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Sample records for abnormally high number

  1. CCNE1 amplification and centrosome number abnormality in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma: further evidence supporting its role as a precursor of ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Elisabetta; Wang, Tian-Li; Doberstein, Kai; Bahadirli-Talbott, Asli; Ayhan, Ayse; Sehdev, Ann Smith; Drapkin, Ronny; Kurman, Robert J; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Aberration in chromosomal structure characterizes almost all cancers and has profound biological significance in tumor development. It can be facilitated by various mechanisms including overexpression of cyclin E1 and centrosome amplification. As ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma has pronounced chromosomal instability, in this study we sought to determine whether increased copy number of CCNE1 which encodes cyclin E1 and centrosome amplification (>2 copies) occurs in its putative precursor, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma. We found CCNE1 copy number gain/amplification in 8 (22%) of 37 serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas and 12 (28%) of 43 high-grade serous carcinomas. There was a correlation in CCNE1 copy number between serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma and high-grade serous carcinoma in the same patients (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of CCNE1 gain/amplification between serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma and high-grade serous carcinoma (P=0.61). Centrosome amplification was recorded in only 5 (14%) of 37 serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas, and in 10 (40%) of 25 high-grade serous carcinomas. The percentage of cells with centrosome amplification was higher in high-grade serous carcinoma than in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (P<0.001). Induced expression of cyclin E1 increased the percentage of fallopian tube epithelial cells showing centrosome amplification. Our findings suggest that gain/amplification of CCNE1 copy number occurs early in tumor progression and precedes centrosome amplification. The more prevalent centrosome amplification in high-grade serous carcinoma than in serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma supports the view that serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma precedes the development of many high-grade serous carcinomas.

  2. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  3. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  4. Molecular profiling of gene copy number abnormalities in key regulatory genes in high-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia: frequency and their association with clinicopathological findings in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Prerana; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2017-05-01

    Genes related to key cellular pathways are frequently altered in B cell ALL and are associated with poor survival especially in high-risk (HR) subgroups. We examined gene copy number abnormalities (CNA) in 101 Indian HR B cell ALL patients and their correlation with clinicopathological features by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, CNA were detected in 59 (59%) cases, with 26, 10 and 23% of cases harboring 1, 2 or +3 CNA. CNA were more prevalent in BCR-ABL1 (60%), pediatric (64%) and high WCC (WBC count) (63%) patients. Frequent genes deletions included CDNK2A/B (26%), IKZF1 (25%), PAX5 (14%), JAK2 (7%), BTG1 (6%), RB1 (5%), EBF1 (4%), ETV6 (4%), while PAR1 region genes were predominantly duplicated (20%). EBF1 deletions selectively associated with adults, IKZF1 deletions occurred frequently in high WCC and BCR-ABL1 cases, while PAR1 region gains significantly associated with MLL-AF4 cases. IKZF1 haploinsufficiency group was predominant, especially in adults (65%), high WCC (60%) patients and BCR-ABL1-negative (78%) patients. Most cases harbored multiple concurrent CNA, with IKZF1 concomitantly occurring with CDNK2A/B, PAX5 and BTG1, while JAK2 occurred with CDNK2A/B and PAX5. Mutually exclusive CNA included ETV6 and IKZF1/RB1, and EBF1 and JAK2. Our results corroborate with global reports, aggregating molecular markers in Indian HR B-ALL cases. Integration of CNA data from rapid methods like MLPA, onto background of existing gold-standard methods detecting significant chromosomal abnormalities, provides a comprehensive genetic profile in B-ALL.

  5. Abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi-Fan; OuYang, Qi; Dai, Can; Lu, Chang-Fu; Lin, Ge; Gong, Fei; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2016-05-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are common in human embryos. Previous studies have suggested links between centrosome number and chromosome abnormalities, but information regarding abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos is limited. We analyzed abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos and embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Following normal fertilization, supernumerary centrosomes were present at rates of 7.3% in two-pronucleus (2PN)-stage zygotes and 6.5% in first-cleavage zygotes. Supernumerary centrosomes were also detected in 24.4% of blastomeres from 60% of embryos derived from 2PN zygotes. Conversely, in mono- (1PN) and tri-pronucleus (3PN) zygotes, the frequency of abnormal centrosome number increased substantially at first cleavage. Rates in blastomeres of Day-3 embryos, however, were about the same between embryos derived from 1PN and 2PN zygotes, whereas abnormalities in centrosome number were higher in those from 3PN zygotes. By comparison, the rate of abnormal centrosome numbers in hESCs was 1.5-11.2%. Thus, abnormalities in centrosome number existed in human zygotes and cleaved embryos-especially those resulting from aberrant fertilization-but the frequency of such abnormalities was lower in hESCs derived from these embryos. These findings identify a source of the chromosomal instability in human embryos and hESCs, and highlight new safety issues for human assisted reproductive technology. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 392-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-27

    wall relation of McKeon et al. (2005), and the results for the smallest sandgrain roughness used by Nikuradse (1933). 3 57xI03 "eI : uhp - 2 8 1 6 8 x l 0...Reynolds Number Turbulent Pipe Flow," ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition, Washington, D.C., November 16-21, 2003... Engineering Sciences, Vol. 365 (1852) pp. 699-714, 2007. 14 ’Pipe flow roughness Allen, J.J., Shockling, M.A. and Smits, A.J. "Effects of a machined rough

  7. High Prevalence of Prothrombotic Abnormalities in Multifocal Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Pilar; Reverter, Joan Carles; Espinosa, Gerard; Martinez-Ferrer, Angeles; Monegal, Ana; Monteagudo, Juan; Tàssies, Dolors; Guañabens, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multifocal or multiple osteonecrosis (ON), defined by the involvement of 3 or more anatomic sites, is unusual, being observed in only 3%–10% of patients diagnosed with ON. We report the clinical characteristics of a cohort of 29 patients with multifocal ON from a single center and evaluate the prevalence of associated prothrombotic abnormalities in 26 of these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with multifocal ON evaluated in our institution during the last 20 years. We recorded clinical manifestations and underlying diagnoses. A wide thrombophilic profile was performed, including antithrombin, protein C, protein S, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, factor V Leiden, mutation G-20210-A of the prothrombin gene, and factor VIII. Coagulation test results were compared with those in a healthy control group and a group of patients with history of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. The mean age of the patients was 49.2 ± 15 years (range, 28–81 yr). The mean number of ON localizations per patient was 5.2 ± 2.3 (range, 3–11). Hips were the most commonly affected joint (82%), followed by knees (58%), shoulders (37%), and ankles (13%). Most patients had an underlying disease process, and 12 of 25 (48%) patients had coagulation test abnormalities. The most common alterations were high factor VIII levels and antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity in 24% and 20% of cases, respectively. These abnormalities were more prevalent in patients with multifocal ON compared with patients in the control groups. Sixty-one percent of patients had a history of corticosteroid treatment. Patients with coagulation abnormalities had a higher number of ON localizations per patient (6.5 ± 2.7 vs. 3.88 ± 0.8; p = 0.002) and a higher prevalence of atypical ON localizations (25% vs. 0%; p = 0.05). In conclusion, in the present cohort of patients with multifocal ON, 48% of the patients had at

  8. High Reynolds number research - 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (Editor); Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required were examined. Potential experiments which maximize the research returns from the use of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) were outlined. Calibration plans were reviewed and the following topics were discussed: fluid dynamics; high lit; configuration aerodynamics; aeroelasticity and unsteady aerodynamics; wind tunnel/flight correlation; space vehicles; and theoretical aerodynamics

  9. A small number of abnormal brain connections predicts adult autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Noriaki; Morimoto, Jun; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Lisi, Giuseppe; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Miho; Yamada, Takashi; Megumi, Fukuda; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Náñez Sr, José E.; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kato, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious lifelong condition, its underlying neural mechanism remains unclear. Recently, neuroimaging-based classifiers for ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals were developed to identify the abnormality of functional connections (FCs). Due to over-fitting and interferential effects of varying measurement conditions and demographic distributions, no classifiers have been strictly validated for independent cohorts. Here we overcome these difficulties by developing a novel machine-learning algorithm that identifies a small number of FCs that separates ASD versus TD. The classifier achieves high accuracy for a Japanese discovery cohort and demonstrates a remarkable degree of generalization for two independent validation cohorts in the USA and Japan. The developed ASD classifier does not distinguish individuals with major depressive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder from their controls but moderately distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from their controls. The results leave open the viable possibility of exploring neuroimaging-based dimensions quantifying the multiple-disorder spectrum. PMID:27075704

  10. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  11. [Biologic mechanisms of mitotic abnormalities and chromosome number changes in malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Katalin

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of this work was to study the effect of Aurora kinase expression on cell ploidy and tumorigenesis. Fifty invasive breast cancer, 50 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and 10 reactive lymph node samples were recruited in the study. Because of the significant correlation with the overall cell proliferation rate, the overexpression of Aurora B could not be stated on the basis of kinase expressing tumor cell fractions alone. The relative expression of Aurora B kinase is better reflected by the AMI index which represents the Aurora B expression in relation to the whole proliferative fraction of the tumor. A higher relative Aurora B expression was associated with higher mitotic activity in B-cell lymphoma. FISH analysis of the AURKB locus did not show any gains or amplifications in the samples analyzed. On the other hand, we have observed the loss of the gene in breast carcinoma and lymphoma samples as well. A strong correlation was shown between AURKB and TP53 copy numbers: AURKB loss was associated with TP53 deletion in all samples. According to our results on breast carcinoma, losses at 17p13.1 and chromosome 17 aneusomy determined by FISH showed a statistically significant correlation. Our study presents the frequent occurrence of chromosome 17 aneusomy in breast carcinoma and B-cell lymphoma samples. Chromosome 17 aneusomy evaluated by FISH correlated with aneuploidy determined by flow cytometry. Direct correlation between kinase expression and ploidy could not be shown. The highest AMI values were seen in B-ALCL samples, and it was associated with high chromosome 17 copy numbers and mitotic activity. The damaged Aurora B kinase function results in regulatory deficiencies in the CPC complex leading to mitotic errors, while p53 deficiency helps malignant cells to survive due to insufficient activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathways. The upregulation of Aurora kinase B function may cause error in an important mitotic checkpoint, thus resulting in

  12. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

  13. Number Theory in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the usefulness of number theory to students on the high school setting in four areas: Fibonacci numbers, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, and algorithms for computing pi. (ASK)

  14. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  15. Association between number and sites of new bone scan abnormalities and presence of skeletal metastases in patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F.; Stomper, P.C.; Jochelson, M.S.; Ascoli, D.M.; Henderson, I.C.; Kaplan, W.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Review of 1,441 bone scans performed on 242 breast cancer patients without known skeletal metastases identified 239 scans with new abnormalities. Findings on 54 of these 239 scans (23%) represented bone metastases. The proportion of scans reflecting metastases, grouped by the number of new abnormalities, was: (1) 20/182 (11%); (2) 9/26 (35%); (3) 4/9 (45%); (4) 1/2 (50%); greater than or equal to 5-20/20 (100%). When metastatic disease presented as a bone scan with 1-4 new abnormalities, the spine was the most common site of involvement (18 of 34 (53%)), followed by the skull (5/34; 15%), extremities and sternum (each 4/34; 12%). Rib lesions were the most common new findings on scans with less than 5 new abnormalities (seen on 76 of 219 scans (35%)) but only infrequently represented metastases (n = 2). Considering as indicative of malignancy only, those bone scans which demonstrated either (a) greater than or equal to 5 new abnormalities, (b) initial radiographic correlation suggestive of metastases, or (c) thoracic spine lesions with normal correlative radiographs, the presence of skeletal metastatic disease could be predicted with a sensitivity of 0.80 and a specificity of 0.94.

  16. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension.

  17. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences: April--June 1995. Volume 18, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence (AO) as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such occurrences to be made to Congress. This report provides a description of those incidents and events that have been determined to be AOs during the period of April 1 through June 30, 1995. This report addresses five AOs at NRC-licensed facilities. One involved a reactor coolant system blowdown at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, one involved a previously unidentified path for the potential release of radioactivity at a PWR nuclear power plant, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved a medical therapeutic radiopharmaceutical misadministration. Four AOs submitted by the Agreement States are included. One involved a medical teletherapy misadministration, two involved medical brachytherapy misadministrations, and one involved the overexposure of personnel at a medical center. The report also contains an update of one AO previously reported by an NRC licensee, and two AOs previously reported by the Agreement States. No ``Other Events of Interest`` items are being reported.

  18. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be...

  19. Chaotic behaviour of high Mach number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.; Ghosh, S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of the super-Alfvenic flow of a two-fluid plasma model with respect to the Mach number and the angle between the flow direction and the magnetic field is investigated. It is found that, in general, a large scale chaotic region develops around the initial equilibrium of the laminar flow when the Mach number exceeds a certain threshold value. After reaching a maximum the size of this region begins shrinking and goes to zero as the Mach number tends to infinity. As a result high Mach number flows in time independent astrophysical plasmas may lead to the formation of 'quasi-shocks' in the presence of little or no dissipation.

  20. High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emens, Jessica M.; Brown, Sarah P.; Frederick Robert A., Jr.; Wood, A. John

    2004-01-01

    This work represents preliminary thermal stability results for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability experiments with Jet A and RP-1 resulted in a quantitative measurement of the thermal stability. Each fuel flowed through a heated capillary tube that held the outlet temperature at 290 C. An optical pyrometer measured the surface temperature of the tube at 12 locations as a function of time. The High Reynolds Number Thermal Stability number was then determined using standards published by the American Society for Testing and Materials. The results for Jet A showed lower thermal stability than similar tests conducted at another facility. The RP-1 results are the first reported using this technique. Because the temperature rise on the capillary tube during testing for the RP-1 fuels was not significant, a new standard for the testing conditions should be developed for these types of fuels.

  1. Bronchogenic cysts with high CT numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Rose, J.S.; Efremidis, S.C.; Kirschner, P.A.; Cohen, B.A.

    1983-03-01

    Four patients with mediastinal masses are described. CT examinations demonstrated masses of high attenuation, and solid masses were suspected. At thoracotomy each patient had a cystic mass containing a brownish, turbid, mucoid material. The pathologic diagnosis in each case was a bronchogenic cyst. The possibility of such a cyst should not be excluded because of a high CT number, which reflects the turbid contents of the cyst.

  2. Noise suppression with high Mach number inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Cherng, J. G.; Tag, I.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results were obtained for two types of high Mach number inlets, one with a translating centerbody and a fixed geometry inlet (collapsing cowl) with no centerbody. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of these inlets was examined. The effects of area ratio, length/diameter ratio, and lip geometry were among several parameters investigated. The translating centerbody type inlet was found to be superior to the collapsing cowl both acoustically and aerodynamically, particularly for area ratios greater than 1.5. Comparison of length/diameter ratio and area ratio effects on performance near choked flow showed the latter to be more significant. Also, greater high frequency noise attenuation was achieved by increasing Mach number from low to high subsonic values.

  3. Generating high Reynolds-number flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Present test facilities are seriously limited regarding investigations involving high Reynolds numbers due to financial considerations. Quasi-steady testing facilities offer a practical immediate solution to the problem of high-Re testing. A familiar example is the blowdown wind tunnel, but even more flexibility and economy may be provided by using shock-tube devices. The Ludwieg tube is the shock-tube device most often proposed as a means of generating high-Re flows. Two-stage nozzles may be used with a Ludwieg tube. Quasi-steady facilities will be useful only if the available test time exceeds that required to establish steady flow.

  4. Abnormalities of follicular helper T-cell number and function in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Rongxin; Li, Wenyan; Zhao, Hongyi; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhou, Lina; Du, Hongqiang; Luo, Guangjin; Wu, Junfeng; Niu, Linlin; An, Yunfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuan; Song, Wenxia; Liu, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is a hematopoietic-specific regulator of actin nucleation. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients show immunodeficiencies, most of which have been attributed to defective T-cell functions. T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are the major CD4+ T-cell subset with specialized B-cell helper capabilities. Aberrant Tfh cells activities are involved in immunopathologies such as autoimmunity, immunodeficiencies, and lymphomas. We found that in WAS patients, the number of circulating Tfh cells was significantly reduced due to reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis, and Tfh cells were Th2 and Th17 polarized. The expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS) in circulating Tfh cells was higher in WAS patients than in controls. BCL6 expression was decreased in total CD4+ T and Tfh cells of WAS patients. Mirroring the results in patients, the frequency of Tfh cells in WAS knockout (KO) mice was decreased, as was the frequency of BCL6+ Tfh cells, but the frequency of ICOS+ Tfh cells was increased. Using WAS chimera mice, we found that the number of ICOS+ Tfh cells was decreased in WAS chimera mice, indicating that the increase in ICOS+ Tfh cells in WAS KO mice was cell extrinsic. The data from in vivo CD4+ naive T-cell adoptive transfer mice as well as in vitro coculture of naive B and Tfh cells showed that the defective function of WASp-deficient Tfh cells was T-cell intrinsic. Consistent findings in both WAS patients and WAS KO mice suggested an essential role for WASp in the development and memory response of Tfh cells and that WASp deficiency causes a deficient differentiation defect in Tfh cells by downregulating the transcription level of BCL6. PMID:27170596

  5. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  6. Multiple model estimator based detection of abnormal cell overheating in a Li-ion battery string with minimum number of temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lystianingrum, Vita; Hredzak, Branislav; Agelidis, Vassilios G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes modeling of abnormal cell overheating caused by internal short circuit in a cell of a Li-ion battery string by augmenting the cell state space model with unknown input disturbance. Furthermore, with minimum number of temperature sensors, in order to identify which of the cells in the string is experiencing the abnormal overheating, a multiple model estimator (MME) is used. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed MME can detect the abnormally overheating cell as well as quickly detect that an abnormal overheating event occurred in the battery string.

  7. High Reynolds number oscillating contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziyuan; Schultz, William W.; Perlin, Marc

    1999-11-01

    Stainless steel, instead of Ting and Perlin's (1995) glass, is used in vertically oscillating plate experiments for a large range of Reynolds numbers. We used the non-wetting stainless steel to minimize the static meniscus that we ignore in our analysis. Except for the different static contact angle serving as an initial condition, the dynamic features in both cases are similar. In low Reynolds number oscillation, a pinned-edge condition can appropriately describe the contact line motion. In high Reynolds number oscillation, contact-line behavior becomes nonlinear and very complicated. The periodic, non-sinusoidal motion exhibits three types of motion: stick (associated with contact angle hysteresis), partial stick, and total slip. Increasing the Reynolds number, reduces the hysteresis phenomenon that still cannot be ignored. An edge condition allowing both the static range and dynamic interface behavior uses a slip coefficient mode that varies with time, stroke amplitude and frequency by introducing additional harmonic modes. Using this edge condition, we calculate the dynamic contact angle and the contact-line position for both stick and slip motion and compare them to our experimental data. Results show that the inviscid, linearized boundary-value problem combined with our slip coefficient model provides an improved prediction of the contact-line behavior.

  8. Turbulent convection at very high Rayleigh numbers

    PubMed

    Niemela; Skrbek; Sreenivasan; Donnelly

    2000-04-20

    Turbulent convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra)--which quantifies the relative magnitude of thermal driving to dissipative forces in the fluid motion--becomes sufficiently high. Although many theoretical and experimental studies of turbulent convection exist, the basic properties of heat transport remain unclear. One important question concerns the existence of an asymptotic regime that is supposed to occur at very high Ra. Theory predicts that in such a state the Nusselt number (Nu), representing the global heat transport, should scale as Nu proportional to Ra(beta) with beta = 1/2. Here we investigate thermal transport over eleven orders of magnitude of the Rayleigh number (10(6) < or = Ra < or = 10(7)), using cryogenic helium gas as the working fluid. Our data, over the entire range of Ra, can be described to the lowest order by a single power-law with scaling exponent beta close to 0.31. In particular, we find no evidence for a transition to the Ra(1/2) regime. We also study the variation of internal temperature fluctuations with Ra, and probe velocity statistics indirectly.

  9. Random Number Generation for High Performance Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...of Distinct Pseudorandom Number Streams Based on Program Context," and "A Statistical Test Method to Quantify Inter-Streams Based on Program Context...regarding the development and implementation of the context aware pseudorandom number generator test program . Provide subject matter expertise (testing

  10. Confined microbubbles at high capillary numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzade, Martin; Cubaud, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow behavior of bubbles in highly viscous silicone oils within various microgeometries. A square focusing section is used to examine the bubble generation process at large capillary numbers. We notably vary the continuous phase viscosity from 1 to 10,000 cS and study the dynamics of interfacial cusps during bubble pinch-off. The resulting segmented flows are then scrutinized in straight microchannels for both dissolving and non-dissolving bubbles. Finally, we examine the motion of bubbles in periodically constricted microchannels over a wide range of flow conditions. Our findings highlight the possibility to control and exploit the interplay between capillary and mass transfer phenomena with highly viscous fluids in microsystems. This work is supported by NSF (CBET-1150389).

  11. Copy number variants and infantile spasms: evidence for abnormalities in ventral forebrain development and pathways of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Paciorkowski, Alex R; Thio, Liu Lin; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Gajecka, Marzena; Gurnett, Christina A; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Chung, Wendy K; Marsh, Eric D; Gentile, Mattia; Reggin, James D; Wheless, James W; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Kumar, Ravinesh; Christian, Susan L; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Maltsev, Natalia; Shaffer, Lisa G; Dobyns, William B

    2011-01-01

    Infantile spasms (ISS) are an epilepsy disorder frequently associated with severe developmental outcome and have diverse genetic etiologies. We ascertained 11 subjects with ISS and novel copy number variants (CNVs) and combined these with a new cohort with deletion 1p36 and ISS, and additional published patients with ISS and other chromosomal abnormalities. Using bioinformatics tools, we analyzed the gene content of these CNVs for enrichment in pathways of pathogenesis. Several important findings emerged. First, the gene content was enriched for the gene regulatory network involved in ventral forebrain development. Second, genes in pathways of synaptic function were overrepresented, significantly those involved in synaptic vesicle transport. Evidence also suggested roles for GABAergic synapses and the postsynaptic density. Third, we confirm the association of ISS with duplication of 14q12 and maternally inherited duplication of 15q11q13, and report the association with duplication of 21q21. We also present a patient with ISS and deletion 7q11.3 not involving MAGI2. Finally, we provide evidence that ISS in deletion 1p36 may be associated with deletion of KLHL17 and expand the epilepsy phenotype in that syndrome to include early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Several of the identified pathways share functional links, and abnormalities of forebrain synaptic growth and function may form a common biologic mechanism underlying both ISS and autism. This study demonstrates a novel approach to the study of gene content in subjects with ISS and copy number variation, and contributes further evidence to support specific pathways of pathogenesis. PMID:21694734

  12. Preston Probe Calibrations at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of the research effort is to study the performance of two Preston probes designed by NASA Langley Research Center across an unprecedented range of Reynolds number (based on friction velocity and probe diameter), and perform an accurate calibration over the same Reynolds number range. Using the Superpipe facility in Princeton, two rounds of experiments were performed. In each round of experiments for each Reynolds number, the pressure gradient, static pressure from the Preston probes and the total pressure from the Preston probes were measured. In the first round, 3 Preston probes having outer diameters of 0.058 inches, 0.083 inches and 0.203 inches were tested over a large range of pipe Reynolds numbers. Two data reduction methods were employed: first, the static pressure measured on the Preston probe was used to calculate P (modified Preston probe configuration), and secondly, the static pressure measured at the reference pressure tap was used to calculate P (un-modified Preston probe configuration). For both methods, the static pressure was adjusted to correspond with the static pressure at the Preston probe tip using the pressure gradient. The measurements for Preston probes with diameters of 0.058 inches, and 0.083 inches respectively were performed in the test pipe before it was polished a second time. Therefore, the measurements at high pipe Reynolds numbers may have been affected by roughness. In the second round of experiments the 0.058 inches and 0.083 inches diameter, un-modified probes were tested after the pipe was polished and prepared to ensure that the surface was smooth. The average velocity was estimated by assuming that the connection between the centerline velocity and the average velocity was known, and by using a Pitot tube to measure the centerline velocity. A preliminary error estimate suggests that it is possible to introduce a 1% to 2% error in estimating the average velocity using this approach. The evidence on the errors

  13. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  14. Mixing in High Schmidt Number Turbulent Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul Lewis

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the passive scalar (species concentration) field in the far-field of round, axisymmetric, high Schmidt number (liquid phase), turbulent jets issuing into a quiescent reservoir, by means of a quantitative laser-induced fluorescence technique. Single -point concentration measurements are made on the jet centerline, at axial locations from 100 to 305 nozzle diameters downstream, and Reynolds numbers of 3,000 to 102,000, yielding data with a resolved temporal dynamic range up to 2.5 times 10^5, and capturing as many as 504 large-scale structure passages. Long-time statistics of the jet concentration are found to converge slowly. Between 100 and 300 large-scale structure passages are required to reduce the uncertainty in the mean to 1%, or so. The behavior of the jet varies with Reynolds number. The centerline concentration pdf's become taller and narrower with increasing Re, and the normalized concentration variances correspondingly decrease with Re. The concentration power spectra also evolve with Re. The behavior of the spectral slopes is examined. No constant -1 (Batchelor) spectral slope range is present. Rather, in the viscous region, the power spectra exhibit log-normal behavior, over a range of scales exceeding a factor of 40, in some cases. The frequency of the beginning of this log-normal range scales like Re^{3/4} (Kolmogorov scaling). Mixing in the far-field is found to be susceptible to initial conditions. Disturbances in the jet plenum fluid and near the nozzle exit strongly influence the scalar variance, with larger disturbances causing larger variances, i.e., less homogeneous mixing. The plenum/nozzle geometry also influences the variance. These effects of initial conditions persist for hundreds of diameters from the nozzle exit, over hundreds of large scales. Mixing in these jets differs from gas-phase, order unity Sc, jet mixing. At low to moderate Re, the higher Sc jet is less well mixed. The difference

  15. High speed optical quantum random number generation.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Martin; Weier, Henning; Nauerth, Sebastian; Marangon, Davide G; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Weinfurter, Harald

    2010-06-07

    We present a fully integrated, ready-for-use quantum random number generator (QRNG) whose stochastic model is based on the randomness of detecting single photons in attenuated light. We show that often annoying deadtime effects associated with photomultiplier tubes (PMT) can be utilized to avoid postprocessing for bias or correlations. The random numbers directly delivered to a PC, generated at a rate of up to 50 Mbit/s, clearly pass all tests relevant for (physical) random number generators.

  16. Abnormally high serum ferritin levels among professional road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, H; Robinson, N; Zorzoli, M; Schattenberg, L; Saugy, M; Mangin, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: An international, longitudinal medical follow up examination of male professional road cyclists revealed excessively elevated serum ferritin levels. Objective: To evaluate the importance of elevated ferritin values among professional cyclists, their relationship with age and nationality, and their evolution over 3 years. Methods: Over 1000 serum ferritin values were collected. Other parameters were included in order to exclude conditions which might have increased ferritin levels without changing body iron stores. Results: In 1999, over 45% of riders displayed ferritin values above 300 ng/ml and one fourth levels over 500 ng/ml. These percentages had decreased to 27% and 9%, respectively, 3 years later, while the overall average, which was above the normal limits in 1999, had decreased by 33% in 3 years. Older cyclists had higher ferritin values than younger cyclists. There was also a relationship between ferritin levels and the nationality of the cyclists. Analysis of 714 riders in 2000 and 2002 showed only a slight and insignificant decrease in the mean ferritin value although those with initially elevated iron stores had a much greater decrease. Conclusion: Professional road cyclists used excessive iron supplementation leading to high serum ferritin levels correlating with increased body iron stores. Although the situation progressively improved over 3 years, it remains worrying as increased body iron stores are related to health complications. Therefore, prevention in addition to the fight against doping should be a main goal of the UCI. Aggressive therapy for athletes with excessive ferritin values should be carried out at or before the end of their careers. PMID:15562163

  17. Viscous thermocapillary convection at high Marangoni number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, S. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid, contained in a quarter plane, undergoes steady motion due to thermocapillary forcing on its upper boundary, a free surface separating the liquid from a passive gas. The rigid vertical sidewall has a strip whose temperature is elevated compared with the liquid at infinity. A boudnary-layer analysis is performed that is valid for large Marangoni numbers M and Prandtl numbers P. It is found that the Nusselt number N for the horizontal heat transport satisfies N proportional to min (M to the 1 2/7/power, M to the 1 1/5/power, M to the 1 1/10/power) Generalizations are discussed.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special issue on High Reynolds Number Experiments Special issue on High Reynolds Number Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    Why do we need high Reynolds number experiments? This is a question I sometimes ask myself. You may have your own answer to this question, but those people who are doing numerical simulation, theorists and experimentalists should each have their own answer. In this special issue, the leading experts present their new ideas or original experiments in response to this question. Personally, I think that high Reynolds number experiments are necessary to seek novel physics in turbulence. For instance, we do not have much information about the Lagrangian quantities. You can understand this point by reading the article 'Why we need experiments at high Reynolds numbers' by Warhaft. High Reynolds number experiments are also indispensable to reveal the universality of turbulence. One famous example is Kolmogorov's similarity hypothesis; another is the logarithmic velocity profile derived by von Kármán. They become clearly satisfied as Reynolds number increases. But there have been many arguments over these problems even in this century, thus we still have to make an effort to reveal the nature of turbulence. Kolmogorov's idea is based on small scale physics; in this sense, Mouri and Hori's paper 'Vortex tubes in turbulence velocity fields at high Reynolds numbers' is a contribution to understanding how eddy size is defined and scaled. In contrast to the universality in the small scale limit, the large scale anisotropy effect is a key factor in considering the local isotropic condition even in grid turbulence. This point is discussed by Kurian and Fransson in 'Grid generated turbulence revisited'. The mean velocity profile over a flat plate in a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer is discussed with the help of a composite profile in 'Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers' by Chauhan et al. Related important physical quantities are computed, and how they are scaled against Reynolds number is discussed, analyzing the vast experimental

  19. Number theory meets high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Feynman amplitudes in perturbative quantum field theory are being expressed in terms of an algebra of functions, extending the familiar logarithms, and associated numbers— periods. The study of these functions (including hyperlogarithms) and numbers (like the multiple zeta values), that dates back to Leibniz and Euler, has attracted anew the interest of algebraic geometers and number theorists during the last decades. The two originally independent developments are recently coming together in an unlikely collaboration between particle physics and what were regarded as the most abstruse branches of mathematics.

  20. Time Orientation in the Positive and Negative Free Phantasies of Mildly Abnormal Versus Normal High School Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychlak, Joseph F.

    1973-01-01

    This study contrasts a group of mildly'' abnormal high school males with matched normals in a two-session free phantasy procedure. Mildly abnormal boys phantasized more negative contents than normal boys. Normal boys projected more positive phantasies into the future than mildly abnormal boys. A logical learning theory'' embracing the…

  1. Dripping dynamics at high Bond numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Rubio, Mariano; Taconet, Paloma; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    When dispensing liquid from a vertically oriented injector under gravity, drops grow at the outlet until the surface tension forces can no longer balance their weight, and the pinch-off occurs. This dripping regime no longer exists above a critical flow rate, at which an abrupt transition to jetting takes place. These phenomena are governed by the liquid properties, the injector size and the injection flow rate, or non-dimensionally, by the Bond, Bo , Weber, We , and Kapitza, Γ, numbers. Detailed accounts of the rich dynamics of the dripping regime and the transition leading to jetting can be found in the literature (e.g. Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 93, 2004, and Phys. Fluids vol. 18, 2006), but only for two different values of Bo . Therefore, we present new experiments on the dripping dynamics and jetting transition for a wide range of both the liquid viscosity and the size of the injector, reaching values of Bo up to one order-of-magnitude larger than those present in the literature. Our results reveal the existence of new dynamics in the dripping regime not observed at small Bond numbers. In addition, we quantify the hysteresis present in the dripping-jetting transition, previously measured only for the inviscid case. Supported by Spanish MINECO under Project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  2. High Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rongrong

    Fully developed turbulent pipe is studied in this thesis. Streamwise and wall-normal turbulence components are measured using a crossed hot-wire probe. In the process, a new calibration method for the crossed hot-wire probe is developed, and the binormal cooling error for hot-wire measurement, which is caused by cooling in the direction normal to the hot-wire measurement plane, is studied and found to be the major error contributor for both mean velocity and turbulence intensity measurements using a crossed-wire probe. The new calibration scheme utilizes the fact that the total stress in a fully developed turbulent pipe flow is defined by the streamwise pressure gradient, so directional sensibility calibration could be done by recording the crossed hot-wire signals against a known shear stress distribution. This information, when combined with mean velocity calibration against a Pitot tube measurement, provide a full calibration for crossed hot-wire probes. The new calibration method is especially convenient for pipe and channel flow measurements. For other measurements, the calibration could be done by using a simple pipe apparatus as the calibration device. Streamwise and wall-normal turbulence components are measured over a Reynolds number range from 1.1 x 105 to 9.8 x 10 6. Similarity arguments are studied for turbulence intensity and spectra. The most relevant physical assumption for the 'similarity' is Townsend's distinction between 'active' and 'inactive' motions. Perry's attached eddy hypothesis, which is based on Townsend's work, offers a more detailed physical model and provides extensive quantitative prediction, is also reviewed and discussed in the context of these new measurements. For the wall-normal turbulence intensity, a constant region in u'rms is found for the region 200 ≤ y+ ≤ 0.1R+ in inner and outer scaling for Reynolds numbers up to 1.0 x 106. An increase in u'rms is observed closer to the wall at about y + ˜ 100, and is suggestive of

  3. The High/Scope Report. Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Charles, Ed.

    This report provides articles on several topics related to the education of young children. In the introduction High/Scope President David P. Weikart suggests that public investment in preschool education is a wise and economically sound social policy. New studies of the long term effects of preschool are demonstrating the staying power of early…

  4. Effects of High Power Lasers, Number 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-31

    the R\\S dynamic structures of the resultant stationary plasmatron . New theoretical results are obtained relating to t-mperaturts and pressures in...the erosion of specimens, depended on their thermal processing history . Thus the high erosion of hardened specimens in comparison to the erosion...Investigations were done using two methods: 1. Optical diagnostics. A single-stage PIM-3 electron-optical converter was used for scanning plasma

  5. Major influencing factors of water flooding in abnormally high-pressure carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingying, Hou; Kaiyuan, Chen; Zifei, Fan; Libing, Fu; Yefei, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The higher pressure coefficient is the major characteristics of the abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoirs, which the pressure coefficient generally exceeds 1.2 and the initial formation pressure is higher than normal sandstone reservoirs. Due to the large pressure difference between initial formation and saturated pressure, oil wells are capable to production with high flow rate by the natural energy at early production stage. When the formation pressure drops to the saturation pressure, the water or gas is usually injected to stabilize the well productivity and sustain the formation pressure. Based on the characteristics of Kenkiak oilfield, a typical abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoir, a well group model is designed to simulate and analyze the influence factors on water flooding. The conclusion is that permeability, interlayer difference and reserve abundance are the main three factors on the water flooding development in these reservoirs.

  6. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates. PMID:27996060

  7. Positive reinforcement training moderates only high levels of abnormal behavior in singly housed rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kate C; Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kimberly; Griffis, Caroline; Maloney, Margaret; Oettinger, Brooke; Schoof, Valerie A M; Martinez, Marni

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline behavioral data on 30 adult males and 33 adult females compared with 3 treatment phases presented in counterbalanced order: 6 min per week of PRT, 20 or 40 min per week of PRT, and 6 min per week of unstructured human interaction (HI). Within-subject parametric tests detected no main or interaction effects involving experimental phase. However, among a subset of subjects with levels of abnormal in the top quartile of the range (n = 15), abnormal behavior was reduced from 35% to 25% of samples with PRT but not with HI. These results suggest that short durations of PRT applied as enrichment for this species and in this context may not in itself be sufficient intervention for abnormal behavior because levels remained high. However, it may be appropriate as an adjunct to other interventions and may be best targeted to the most severely affected individuals.

  8. Positive Reinforcement Training Moderates Only High Levels of Abnormal Behavior in Singly Housed Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate C.; Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kimberly; Griffis, Caroline; Maloney, Margaret; Oettinger, Brooke; Schoof, Valérie A. M.; Martinez, Marni

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline behavioral data on 30 adult males and 33 adult females compared with 3 treatment phases presented in counterbalanced order: 6 min per week of PRT, 20 or 40 min per week of PRT, and 6 min per week of unstructured human interaction (HI). Within-subject parametric tests detected no main or interaction effects involving experimental phase. However, among a subset of subjects with levels of abnormal in the top quartile of the range (n = 15), abnormal behavior was reduced from 35% to 25% of samples with PRT but not with HI. These results suggest that short durations of PRT applied as enrichment for this species and in this context may not in itself be sufficient intervention for abnormal behavior because levels remained high. However, it may be appropriate as an adjunct to other interventions and may be best targeted to the most severely affected individuals. PMID:20183477

  9. High Prandtl number effect on Rayleigh-Bénard convection heat transfer at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Li, Jing; Ji, Shui; Chang, Huajian

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents results of the Rayleigh-Bénard convection heat transfer in silicon oil confined by two horizontal plates, heated from below, and cooled from above. The Prandtl numbers considered as 100-10,000 corresponding to three types of silicon oil. The experiments covered a range of Rayleigh numbers from 2.14·109 to 2.27·1013. The data points that the Nusselt number dependents on the Rayleigh number, which is asymptotic to a 0.248 power. Furthermore, the experiment results can fit the data in low Rayleigh number well.

  10. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2017-01-20

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia.

  11. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2016-01-01

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia. PMID:27773880

  12. Effects of oocyte quality, incubation time and maturation environment on the number of chromosomal abnormalities in IVF-derived early bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastian; Dorado, Jesus; Hidalgo, Manuel; Anter, Jaouad; De Luca, Leonardo; Genero, Enrique; Moreno-Millán, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are one of the major causes of embryo developmental failures in mammals. The occurrence of these types of abnormalities is higher in in vitro-produced (IVP) embryos. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of oocyte morphology and maturation conditions on the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in bovine preimplantational embryos. To this end, 790 early cattle embryos derived from oocytes with different morphologies and matured under different conditions, including maturation period (24 v. 36h) and maturation media (five different serum supplements in TCM-199), were evaluated cytogenetically in three sequential experiments. The rates of normal diploidy and abnormal haploidy, polyploidy and aneuploidy were determined in each embryo. Throughout all the experiments, the rate of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly (P<0.05) affected by oocyte morphology and maturation conditions (maturation time and culture medium). Lower morphological quality was associated with a high rate of chromosome abnormalities (P<0.05). Moreover, polyploidy was associated with increased maturation time (P<0.01), whereas the maturation medium significantly (P<0.05) affected the rates of haploidy and polyploidy. In general, supplementing the maturation medium with oestrous cow serum or fetal calf serum resulted in higher rates of chromosomal aberrations (P<0.05) compared with the other serum supplements tested (bovine steer serum, anoestroues cow serum, bovine amniotic fluid and bovine serum albumin). On the basis of the results of the present study, we conclude that the morphological quality of oocytes and the maturation conditions affect the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in IVP bovine embryos.

  13. Mathematical impairment associated with high-contrast abnormalities in change detection and magnocellular visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2015-10-01

    The cause of developmental dyscalculia, a specific deficit in acquisition of arithmetic skills, particularly of enumeration, has never been investigated with respect to the patency of the visual magnocellular system. Here, the question of dysfunction of the afferent magnocellular cortical input and its dorsal stream projections was tested directly using nonlinear analysis of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and through the psychophysical ability to rapidly detect visual change. A group of young adults with self-reported deficiencies of arithmetical ability, showed marked impairment in magnitude estimation and enumeration performance-though not in lexical decision reaction times when compared with an arithmetically capable group controlled for age and handedness. Multifocal nonlinear VEPs were recorded at low (24 %) and high (96 %) contrast. First- and second-order VEP kernels were comparable between groups at low contrast, but not at high contrast. The mathematically impaired group showed an abnormal lack of contrast saturation in the shortest latency first-order peak (N60) and a delayed P100 positivity in the first slice of the second-order kernel. Both features have previously been argued to be physiological markers of magnocellular function. Mathematically impaired participants also performed worse on a gap paradigm change detection for digit task showing increased reaction times for high-contrast stimuli but not for low-contrast stimuli compared with controls. The VEP results give direct evidence of abnormality in the occipital processing of magnocellular information in those with mathematical impairment. The anomalous high visual contrast physiological and psychophysical performance suggests an abnormality in the inhibitory processes that normally result in saturation of contrast gain in the magnocellular system.

  14. Abnormal high surface heat flow caused by the Emeishan mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qiang; Qiu, Nansheng; Zhu, Chuanqing

    2016-04-01

    It is commonly believed that increase of heat flow caused by a mantle plume is small and transient. Seafloor heat flow data near the Hawaiian hotspot and the Iceland are comparable to that for oceanic lithosphere elsewhere. Numerical modeling of the thermal effect of the Parana large igneous province shows that the added heat flow at the surface caused by the magmatic underplating is less than 5mW/m2. However, the thermal effect of Emeishan mantle plume (EMP) may cause the surface hear-flow abnormally high. The Middle-Late Emeishan mantle plume is located in the western Yangtze Craton. The Sichuan basin, to the northeast of the EMP, is a superimposed basin composed of Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks and Mesozoic-Cenozoic terrestrial clastic rocks. The vitrinite reflectance (Ro) data as a paleogeothermal indicator records an apparent change of thermal regime of the Sichuan basin. The Ro profiles from boreholes and outcrops which are close to the center of the basalt province exhibit a 'dog-leg' style at the unconformity between the Middle and Upper Permian, and they show significantly higher gradients in the lower subsection (pre-Middle Permian) than the Upper subsection (Upper Permian to Mesozoic). Thermal history inversion based on these Ro data shows that the lower subsection experienced a heat flow peak much higher than that of the upper subsection. The abnormal heat flow in the Sichuan basin is consistent with the EMP in temporal and spatial distribution. The high-temperature magmas from deep mantle brought heat to the base of the lithosphere, and then large amount of heat was conducted upwards, resulting in the abnormal high surface heat flow.

  15. Widespread chromosomal abnormalities in high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Comparative genomic hybridization study of pure high-grade DCIS.

    PubMed

    Moore, E; Magee, H; Coyne, J; Gorey, T; Dervan, P A

    1999-03-01

    For a variety of technical reasons it is rarely possible to study cytogenetic abnormalities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) using traditional techniques. However, by combining molecular biology and computerized image analysis it is possible to carry out cytogenetic analyses on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of chromosomal amplifications and deletions in high-grade DCIS and to look specifically for unique or consistent abnormalities in this pre-invasive cancer. Twenty-three cases of asymptomatic, non-palpable, screen-detected, high-grade DCIS were examined using CGH on tumour cells obtained from histology slides. All cases showed chromosomal abnormalities. A wide variety of amplifications and deletions were spread across the genome. The most frequent changes were gains of chromosomes 17 (13 of 23), 16p (13 of 23), and 20q (9 of 23) and amplifications of 11q13 (22 of 23), 12q 24.1-24.2 (12 of 23), 6p21.3 (11 of 23), and 1q31-qter (6 of 23). The most frequent deletions were on 13q 21.3-q33 (7 of 23), 9p21 (4 of 23), and 6q16.1 (4 of 23). These findings indicate that high-grade DCIS is, from a cytogenetic viewpoint, an advanced lesion. There was no absolutely consistent finding in every case, but amplification of 11q13 was found in 22 of the 23 cases. The precise significance of this is unknown at present. This region of chromosome 11q harbours a number of known oncogenes, including cyclin D1 andINT2. It is likely that many of these findings are the result of accumulated chromosomal abnormalities, reflecting an unstable genome in established malignancy.

  16. Detection of abnormally high amygdalin content in food by an enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cho, A-Yeon; Yi, Kye Sook; Rhim, Jung-Hyo; Kim, Kyu-Il; Park, Jae-Young; Keum, Eun-Hee; Chung, Junho; Oh, Sangsuk

    2006-04-30

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glycoside compound which is commonly found in the pits of many fruits and raw nuts. Although amygdalin itself is not toxic, it can release cyanide (CN) after hydrolysis when the pits and nuts are crushed, moistened and incubated, possibly within the gastrointestinal tract. CN reversibly inhibits cellular oxidizing enzymes and cyanide poisoning generates a range of clinical symptoms. As some pits and nuts may contain unusually high levels of amygdalin such that there is a sufficient amount to induce critical CN poisoning in humans, the detection of abnormal content of amygdalin in those pits and nuts can be a life-saving measure. Although there are various methods to detect amygdalin in food extracts, an enzyme immunoassay has not been developed for this purpose. In this study we immunized New Zealand White rabbits with an amygdalin-KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) conjugate and succeeded in raising anti-sera reactive to amygdalin, proving that amygdalin can behave as a hapten in rabbits. Using this polyclonal antibody, we developed a competition enzyme immunoassay for determination of amygdalin concentration in aqueous solutions. This technique was able to effectively detect abnormally high amygdalin content in various seeds and nuts. In conclusion, we proved that enzyme immunoassay can be used to determine the amount of amygdalin in food extracts, which will allow automated analysis with high throughput.

  17. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  18. [A case of megaloblastic anemia with abnormally high urine level of beta-aminoisobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Konjiki, O; Yoneda, Y; Sato, Y; Oosawa, Y; Imamura, T; Takasaki, M

    1993-01-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with anemia and jaundice. Hematological studies revealed hyperchromic macrocytic anemia, and biochemical studies revealed findings of hemolysis. The folic acid level was low and megaloblasts were observed in the bone marrow. From these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency. This patient had been a heavy alcohol drinker in the habit of drinking alcohol without meals. He began to eat regular meals in the hospital, and the anemia and jaundice improved gradually. Since liver cirrhosis was suspected, amino acid analysis of the urine was performed, and abnormal excretion of beta-amino-isobutyric acid (BAIB) was found. According to the amount of BAIB excreted, the Japanese population can be divided into low and high BAIB excretors comprising 65% and 36%, respectively. BAIB is also considered to reflect dissimilation of thymine. The present patient was included in the high excretion group because of the abnormally high urine level of BAIB, which was considered to be caused by ineffective hematopoiesis in the bone marrow as a result of his megaloblastic anemia. For this reason, dissimilation of thymine was considered to have been active in this patient.

  19. White matter alterations related to P300 abnormalities in individuals at high risk for psychosis: an MRI–EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Crossley, Nicolas; Woolley, James; Carletti, Francesco; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Broome, Matthew; Johns, Louise; Tabraham, Paul; Bramon, Elvira; McGuire, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background Psychosis onset is characterized by white matter and electrophysiologic abnormalities. The relation between these factors in the development of illness is almost unknown. We studied the relation between white matter volumes and P300 in prodromal psychosis. Methods We assessed white matter volume (detected using magnetic resonance imaging) and electrophysiologic response during an oddball task (P300) in healthy controls and individuals at high clinical risk for psychosis (with an “at-risk mental state” [ARMS]). Results We included 41 controls and 39 patients with an ARMS in our study. A psychotic disorder developed in 26% of the ARMS group within the follow-up period of 2 years. The P300 amplitude was significantly lower in the ARMS group than in the control group. The ARMS group showed reduced volume of white matter underlying the left superior temporal gyrus and the left superior frontal gyrus and increased volume of white matter underlying the right insula and the right angular gyrus compared with controls. Relative to individuals who did not later become psychotic, the subgroup in whom psychosis subsequently developed had a smaller volume of white matter underlying the left precuneus and the right middle temporal gyrus and increased volume in the white matter underlying the right middle frontal gyrus. We observed a significant interaction in the right middle frontal gyrus: white matter volume was negatively associated with P300 amplitude in the ARMS group and positively associated with P300 amplitude in the control group. Limitations The voxel-based morphometry method alone cannot determine whether abnormal white matter volumes are due to an altered number of axonal connections or decreased myelination. Conclusion P300 abnormalities precede the onset of psychosis and are directly related to white matter alterations, representing a correlate of an increased vulnerability to disease. PMID:21299920

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  1. Impact of high mathematics education on the number sense.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, Julie; Göbel, Silke M

    2012-01-01

    In adult number processing two mechanisms are commonly used: approximate estimation of quantity and exact calculation. While the former relies on the approximate number sense (ANS) which we share with animals and preverbal infants, the latter has been proposed to rely on an exact number system (ENS) which develops later in life following the acquisition of symbolic number knowledge. The current study investigated the influence of high level math education on the ANS and the ENS. Our results showed that the precision of non-symbolic quantity representation was not significantly altered by high level math education. However, performance in a symbolic number comparison task as well as the ability to map accurately between symbolic and non-symbolic quantities was significantly better the higher mathematics achievement. Our findings suggest that high level math education in adults shows little influence on their ANS, but it seems to be associated with a better anchored ENS and better mapping abilities between ENS and ANS.

  2. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Towards a high-speed quantum random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Damien; Burri, Samuel; Charbon, Edoardo; Chunnilall, Christopher; Meneghetti, Alessio; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Randomness is of fundamental importance in various fields, such as cryptography, numerical simulations, or the gaming industry. Quantum physics, which is fundamentally probabilistic, is the best option for a physical random number generator. In this article, we will present the work carried out in various projects in the context of the development of a commercial and certified high speed random number generator.

  4. Identification of copy-number abnormalities and inactivating mutations in two negative regulators of NF-kB signaling pathways in Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Braggio, Esteban; Keats, Jonathan J; Leleu, Xavier; Van Wier, Scott; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Valdez, Riccardo; Schop, Roelandt FJ; Price-Troska, Tammy; Henderson, Kimberly; Sacco, Antonio; Azab, Feda; Greipp, Philip; Gertz, Morie; Hayman, Suzanne; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Carpten, John; Chesi, Marta; Barrett, Michael; Stewart, A Keith; Dogan, Ahmet; Bergsagel, P Leif; Ghobrial, Irene M; Fonseca, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct clinico-biological entity defined as a B-cell neoplasm characterized by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in the bone marrow (BM) and immunoglobulin M paraprotein production. Cytogenetic analyses were historically limited by the difficulty in obtaining tumor metaphases and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly defined. Here we performed a comprehensive analysis in 42 WM patients by using high-resolution, array-based comparative genomic hybridization approach to unravel the genetic mechanisms associated with WM pathogenesis. Overall, 83% of patients have chromosomal abnormalities, with a median of three abnormalities per patient. Gain of 6p was the second most common abnormality (17%) and its presence was always concomitant with 6q loss. A minimal deleted region, including MIRN15A and MIRN16-1, was delineated on 13q14 in 10% of patients. Of interest, we reported biallelic deletions and/or inactivating mutations with uniparental disomy in TRAF3 and TNFAIP3, two negative regulators of the NF-kB signaling pathway. Furthermore, we confirmed the association between TRAF3 inactivation and increased transcriptional activity of NF-kB target genes. Mutational activation of the NF-kB pathway, which is normally activated by ligand-receptor interactions within the BM microenvironment, highlights its biologic importance, and suggests a therapeutic role for inhibitors of NF-kB pathway activation in the treatment of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. PMID:19351844

  5. Microphysics of a multidimensional high beta low Mach number shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukiyo, S.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is generally thought that a high beta shock is weak so that its structre is relatively laminar and stationary. Such low Mach number shocks have not been paid much attention in terms of particle acceleration. However, Voyager spacecraft revealed that the fluxes of not only the non-thermal ions, which are called as the termination shock particles, but also of the non-thermal electrons are enhanced at the crossings of the termination shock. The heliospheric termination shock has a high effective beta due to the presence of pickup ions which are the component having rather high thermal energy. Radio synchrotron emissions from relics of galaxy cluster mergers imply the presence of relativistic electrons accelerated in merger shocks. A plasma beta of such a merger shock is also thought to be rather high so that the merger shocks are usually assumed to have low Mach numbers. These observational facts imply that even a low Mach number shock can be a good accelerator of non-thermal particles. Here, we perform two-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulation to study microstructure of a high beta low Mach number shock and the associated electron acceleration process. Although the effective magnotosonic Mach number is rather low, ~2.6, the structure of the transition region is highly complex. Ion and electron scale structures coexist. Furthermore, some electrons are accelerated to high energy. We will discuss the mechanisms of producing those two-dimensional microstructures and high energy electrons.

  6. Promoting Number Theory in High Schools or Birthday Problem and Number Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    The author introduces the birthday problem in this article. This can amuse willing members of any birthday party. This problem can also be used as the motivational first day lecture in number theory for the gifted students in high schools or in community colleges or in undergraduate classes in colleges.

  7. High-T c superconductor/polymer composites. Modeling of abnormal electrical properties at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlhachemi, A.; Gavarri, J. R.; Musso, J.; Alfred-Duplan, C.; Marfaing, J.

    1994-09-01

    High- Tc 2223-bismuth superconducting pigments have been inserted in a matrix of Fe 3+-doped polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) to obtain new composites with variable properties. The fabrication and the characterization of the various components are briefly described. The electrical resistivity at a low temperature of the composites is reported. In the case of multiphase super-conducting pigments presenting various Tc's and semiconducting fabrication residues inserted in the polymeric matrix, the composites are characterized by abnormal resistivity evolutions between 20 K and 300 K. A new electrical model is proposed to interpret the behavior of such composites in the full 5 K to 300 K temperature range. Percolation features are taken into account through an empirical description of the electrical complex impedances. The computer calculations allow one to characterize fabrication residues and interfaces between insulating, conducting and superconducting areas in the composites.

  8. Abnormally high fluid pressures in the region of the Coalinga earthquake sequence and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, R.F.; Levine, P.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Abnormally high fluid pressures (AHP's) permitted or aided thrusting of buried tectonic wedges of Franciscan assemblage eastward beneath coeval Great Valley sequence onto mafic basement and thus contributed to the 1983 Coalinga earthquake sequence. Much of the southwestern San Joaquin Valley and adjoining parts of the Diablo Range are underlain by rocks with pressure/depth (P/D) ratios near or greater than 0.5 psi/ft (the hydrostatic gradient for oil-field waters is about 0.47 psi/ft). Plots of P/D ratio versus depth for more than 300 wells show an average ratio of about 0.6 psi/ft above 14,000-ft depth, a lower bound of 0.47 psi/ft, and an upper bound greater than 0.9 psi/ft; ratios greater than 0.60 psi/ft are interpreted to be abnormally high. Several likely sources of AHP's are recognized, but their relative contributions cannot be determined. Chief of these sources are diagenetic-metamorphic generation of fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, compaction disequilibrium and aquathermal pressuring in Tertiary strata, and horizontal tectonic compression. Yerkes, Levine, and Wentworth infer the presence of near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks below the Coalinga anticline on the basis of (1) a mapped seismic low-velocity zone; (2) active generation of metamorphic fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, which pond below relatively impermeable layers and thus increase fluid pressure; and (3) apparent southward and westward propagation of the 1983 main-shock rupture, which indicates rupture on a gently southwest dipping surface and implies an inverse relation between depth and crustal strength.

  9. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers at high Mach number and Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Skin friction, heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained in laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers on flat plates at Mach numbers from 7 to 13 at wall-to-free stream stagnation temperature ratios from 0.1 to 0.3. Measurements in laminar flows were in excellent agreement with the theory of Cheng. Correlations of the transition measurements with measurements on flight vehicles and in ballistic ranges show good agreement. Our transition measurements do not correlate well with those of Pate and Schueler. Comparisons have been made between the skin friction and heat transfer measurements and the theories of Van Driest, Eckert and Spalding and Chi. These comparisons reveal in general that at the high end of our Mach number range (10-13) the theory of Van Driest is in best agreement with the data, whereas at lower Mach numbers (6.5-10) the Spalding Chi theory is in better agreement with the measurements.

  10. High frequency of p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway abnormalities in relapsed neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Wilkinson, Jane; O' Toole, Kieran; Wood, Katrina M.; Challen, Christine C.; Baker, Angela G.; Board, Julian R.; Evans, Laura; Cole, Michael; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Boos, Joachim; Köhler, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most neuroblastomas initially respond to therapy but many relapse with chemoresistant disease. p53 mutations are rare in diagnostic neuroblastomas, but we have previously reported inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway in 9/17 (53%) neuroblastoma cell lines established at relapse. Hypothesis: Inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway develops during treatment and contributes to neuroblastoma relapse. Methods: Eighty-four neuroblastomas were studied from 41 patients with relapsed neuroblastoma including 38 paired neuroblastomas at different stages of therapy. p53 mutations were detected by automated sequencing, p14ARF methylation and deletion by methylation-specific PCR and duplex PCR respectively, and MDM2 amplification by fluorescent in-situ hybridisation. Results: Abnormalities in the p53 pathway were identified in 20/41(49%) cases. Downstream defects due to inactivating missense p53 mutations were identified in 6/41 (15%) cases, 5 following chemotherapy and/or at relapse and 1 at diagnosis, post chemotherapy and relapse. The presence of a p53 mutation was independently prognostic for overall survival (hazard ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 9.9; p = 0.02). Upstream defects were present in 35% cases: MDM2 amplification in 3 cases, all at diagnosis & relapse and p14ARF inactivation in 12/41 (29%) cases: 3 had p14ARF methylation, 2 after chemotherapy, and 9 had homozygous deletions, 8 at diagnosis and relapse. Conclusions: These results show that a high proportion of neuroblastomas which relapse have an abnormality in the p53 pathway. The majority have upstream defects suggesting that agents which reactivate wild-type p53 would be beneficial, in contrast to those with downstream defects where p53 independent therapies are indicated. PMID:20145180

  11. Transitional boundary layer in low-Prandtl-number convection at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Joerg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet

    2016-11-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough the boundary layer dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes and an interior region (away from side walls) that is dominated by a shear flow of varying orientation. This interior plate region is compared here to classical wall-bounded shear flows. The working fluid is liquid mercury or liquid gallium at a Prandtl number of Pr = 0 . 021 for a range of Rayleigh numbers of 3 ×105 <= Ra <= 4 ×108 . The momentum transfer response to these system parameters generates a fluid flow in the closed cell with a macroscopic flow Reynolds number that takes values in the range of 1 . 8 ×103 <= Re <= 4 . 6 ×104 . It is shown that particularly the viscous boundary layers for the largest Ra are highly transitional and obey some properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers below 100. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  12. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  13. Network Mechanisms Generating Abnormal and Normal Hippocampal High-Frequency Oscillations: A Computational Analysis1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gliske, Stephen; Catoni, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are an intriguing potential biomarker for epilepsy, typically categorized according to peak frequency as either ripples (100–250 Hz) or fast ripples (>250 Hz). In the hippocampus, fast ripples were originally thought to be more specific to epileptic tissue, but it is still very difficult to distinguish which HFOs are caused by normal versus pathological brain activity. In this study, we use a computational model of hippocampus to investigate possible network mechanisms underpinning normal ripples, pathological ripples, and fast ripples. Our results unify several prior findings regarding HFO mechanisms, and also make several new predictions regarding abnormal HFOs. We show that HFOs are generic, emergent phenomena whose characteristics reflect a wide range of connectivity and network input. Although produced by different mechanisms, both normal and abnormal HFOs generate similar ripple frequencies, underscoring that peak frequency is unable to distinguish the two. Abnormal ripples are generic phenomena that arise when input to pyramidal cells overcomes network inhibition, resulting in high-frequency, uncoordinated firing. In addition, fast ripples transiently and sporadically arise from the precise conditions that produce abnormal ripples. Lastly, we show that such abnormal conditions do not require any specific network structure to produce coherent HFOs, as even completely asynchronous activity is capable of producing abnormal ripples and fast ripples in this manner. These results provide a generic, network-based explanation for the link between pathological ripples and fast ripples, and a unifying description for the entire spectrum from normal ripples to pathological fast ripples. PMID:26146658

  14. Heliospheric shocks: From low- to high-Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, Michael

    Collisionless shocks have been studied for more than five decades. From time to time it seems that most of the questions are answered and the shock physics is essentially understood. Each time this impression is broken due to the progress in observations and numerical simulations, which brings about the necessity to update our views and develop theory. Recent advances posed a number of new questions related to the transition from the low- to high-Mach number regime. These include the deviation of the shock front from planar shape (rippling), non-stationarity, and effects of high energy particles. The three issues are inter-connected and have a potential to change our understanding of how high-Mach number shocks work.

  15. Characterization of Side Populations in HNSCC: Highly Invasive, Chemoresistant and Abnormal Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Chang, Insoon; Chen, Zhuo; Kang, Mo; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Side Population (SP) cells, a subset of Hoechst-low cells, are enriched with stem cells. Originally, SP cells were isolated from bone marrow but recently have been found in various solid tumors and cancer cell lines that are clonogenic in vitro and tumorigenic in vivo. In this study, SP cells from lymph node metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were examined using flow cytometry and Hoechst 3342 efflux assay. We found that highly metastatic HNSCC cell lines M3a2 and M4e contained more SP cells compared to the low metastatic parental HNSCC cell line 686LN. SP cells in HNSCC were highly invasive in vitro and tumorigenic in vivo compared to non-SP cells. Furthermore, SP cells highly expressed ABCG2 and were chemoresistant to Bortezomib and etoposide. Importantly, we found that SP cells in HNSCC had abnormal activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling as compared to non-SP cells. Together, these findings indicate that SP cells might be a major driving force of head and neck tumor formation and metastasis. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be an important target for eliminating cancer stem cells in HNSCC. PMID:20625515

  16. Enthalpy damping for high Mach number Euler solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Anutosh

    1990-01-01

    An improvement on the enthalpy damping procedure currently in use in solving supersonic flow fields is described. A correction based on entropy values is shown to produce a very efficient scheme for simulation of high Mach number three-dimensional flows. Substantial improvements in convergence rates have been achieved by incorporating this enthalpy damping scheme in a finite-volume Runge-Kutta method for solving the Euler equations. Results obtained for blended wing-body geometries at very high Mach numbers are presented.

  17. Probability density distribution of velocity differences at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent understanding of fine-scale turbulence structure in high Reynolds number flows is mostly based on Kolmogorov's original and revised models. The main finding of these models is that intrinsic characteristics of fine-scale fluctuations are universal ones at high Reynolds numbers, i.e., the functional behavior of any small-scale parameter is the same in all flows if the Reynolds number is high enough. The only large-scale quantity that directly affects small-scale fluctuations is the energy flux through a cascade. In dynamical equilibrium between large- and small-scale motions, this flux is equal to the mean rate of energy dissipation epsilon. The pdd of velocity difference is a very important characteristic for both the basic understanding of fully developed turbulence and engineering problems. Hence, it is important to test the findings: (1) the functional behavior of the tails of the probability density distribution (pdd) represented by P(delta(u)) is proportional to exp(-b(r) absolute value of delta(u)/sigma(sub delta(u))) and (2) the logarithmic decrement b(r) scales as b(r) is proportional to r(sup 0.15) when separation r lies in the inertial subrange in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows.

  18. Vorticity isotropy in high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt, Brock; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The isotropy of the smallest turbulent scales is investigated in premixed turbulent combustion by analyzing the vorticity vector in a series of high Karlovitz number premixed flame direct numerical simulations. It is found that increasing the Karlovitz number and the ratio of the integral length scale to the flame thickness both reduce the level of anisotropy. By analyzing the vorticity transport equation, it is determined that the vortex stretching term is primarily responsible for the development of any anisotropy. The local dynamics of the vortex stretching term and vorticity resemble that of homogeneous isotropic turbulence to a greater extent at higher Karlovitz numbers. This results in small scale isotropy at sufficiently high Karlovitz numbers and supports a fundamental similarity of the behavior of the smallest turbulent scales throughout the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. At lower Karlovitz numbers, the vortex stretching term and the vorticity alignment in the strain-rate tensor eigenframe are altered by the flame. The integral length scale has minimal impact on these local dynamics but promotes the effects of the flame to be equal in all directions. The resulting isotropy in vorticity does not reflect a fundamental similarity between the smallest turbulent scales in the flame and in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  19. Abnormal high-energy phosphate molecule metabolism during regional brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, C; Du, F; Ravichandran, C; Goldbach, J R; Thida, T; Lin, P; Dora, B; Gelda, J; O'Connor, L; Sehovic, S; Gruber, S; Ongur, D; Cohen, B M

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests bioenergetic abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). In the brain, phosphocreatine (PCr) acts a reservoir of high-energy phosphate (HEP) bonds, and creatine kinases (CK) catalyze the transfer of HEP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to PCr and from PCr back to ATP, at times of increased need. This study examined the activity of this mechanism in BD by measuring the levels of HEP molecules during a stimulus paradigm that increased local energy demand. Twenty-three patients diagnosed with BD-I and 22 healthy controls (HC) were included. Levels of phosphorus metabolites were measured at baseline and during visual stimulation in the occipital lobe using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4T. Changes in metabolite levels showed different patterns between the groups. During stimulation, HC had significant reductions in PCr but not in ATP, as expected. In contrast, BD patients had significant reductions in ATP but not in PCr. In addition, PCr/ATP ratio was lower at baseline in patients, and there was a higher change in this measure during stimulation. This pattern suggests a disease-related failure to replenish ATP from PCr through CK enzyme catalysis during tissue activation. Further studies measuring the CK flux in BD are required to confirm and extend this finding.

  20. Reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in tree swallows with high levels of PCB contamination

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J. |; Secord, A.; Tillitt, D.

    1995-12-31

    Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding along the Hudson River forage extensively on PCB contaminated insects that emerge from the river. The authors studied the reproductive ecology and behavior of tree swallows breeding at several sites along the Hudson River. These sites vary in the severity of PCB contamination. PCB levels in both eggs and chicks were found to be among the highest ever reported in this species, with concentrations comparable to those found in aquatic organisms in the Hudson River. In 1994 reproductive success at PCB contaminated sites was significantly impaired, relative to other sites in New York. Reduced reproductive success was largely attributed to high levels of nest abandonment during incubation and reduced hatchability of eggs. Growth and development of nestlings was not significantly impaired. Abnormal nest building behavior was also noted in 1994, and this was studied in detail in 1995. Nests from contaminated areas are significantly smaller than those at a nearby reference site and at other sites in New York. The authors suggest that the reduced reproductive outputs at these sites are, in large part, a result of effects on the behavior of incubating females. The population-level implications of these patterns are unknown.

  1. Very high Mach number shocks - Theory. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quest, Kevin B.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and simulation of collisionless perpendicular supercritical shock structure is reviewed, with major emphasis on recent research results. The primary tool of investigation is the hybrid simulation method, in which the Newtonian orbits of a large number of ion macroparticles are followed numerically, and in which the electrons are treated as a charge neutralizing fluid. The principal results include the following: (1) electron resistivity is not required to explain the observed quasi-stationarity of the earth's bow shock, (2) the structure of the perpendicular shock at very high Mach numbers depends sensitively on the upstream value of beta (the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure) and electron resistivity, (3) two-dimensional turbulence will become increasingly important as the Mach number is increased, and (4) nonadiabatic bulk electron heating will result when a thermal electron cannot complete a gyrorbit while transiting the shock.

  2. Abnormally high thromboxane biosynthesis in homozygous homocystinuria. Evidence for platelet involvement and probucol-sensitive mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, G; Davì, G; Margaglione, M; Cirillo, F; Grandone, E; Ciabattoni, G; Catalano, I; Strisciuglio, P; Andria, G; Patrono, C

    1993-01-01

    Homocystinuria due to homozygous cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a high incidence of thrombosis and premature atherosclerosis. We evaluated TXA2 biosynthesis in vivo and several in vitro tests of platelet function in 11 homocystinuric patients and 12 healthy controls. In vitro, patients' platelet aggregation was within control values as were TXB2 formation, fibrinogen binding, and ATP secretion in response to thrombin. In contrast, the urinary excretion of 11-dehydro-TXB2, a major enzymatic derivative of TXA2, was > 2 SD of controls in all patients (1,724 +/- 828 pg/mg creatinine, mean +/- SD, in patients vs. 345 +/- 136 in controls, P < 0.001). The administration to four patients of low-dose aspirin (50 mg/d for 1 wk) reduced metabolite excretion by > 80%. The recovery of 11-dehydro-TXB2 excretion over the 10 d that followed aspirin cessation occurred with a pattern consistent with the entry into the circulation of platelets with intact cyclooxygenase activity. Prolonged partial reduction in the abnormally high excretion of both 11-dehydro-TXB2 and 2,3-dinor-TXB2, was also observed in seven patients who ingested 500 mg daily for 3 wk of the antioxidant drug probucol. These results provide evidence for enhanced thromboxane biosynthesis in homocystinuria and for its partial dependence on probucol-sensitive mechanisms. Furthermore, the elevated TXA2 formation in homocystinuria is likely to reflect, at least in part, in vivo platelet activation. PMID:8376592

  3. High Reynolds Number Transition Experiments in ETW (TELFONA project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, J.; Archambaud, J.-P.; Schrauf, G.; Donelli, R. S.; Hanifi, A.; Quest, J.; Hein, S.; Streit, T.; Fey, U.; Egami, Y.

    A wind-tunnel experiment on laminar-turbulent transition has been performed in ETW (the European Transonic Wind Tunnel in Koln) at high Reynolds number and cryogenic conditions. The studied geometry is a sting mounted full model in swept-wing configuration. The transition location was determined by means of Temperature Sensitive Paint (CryoTSP). The experimental observations were further analysed using different transition prediction tools, based on linear stability theory.

  4. Very High Mach Number Quasi-Perpendicular Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholer, M.; Comisel, H.

    2011-12-01

    A high Mach number quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock is studied with one-dimensional (1-D) full particle simulations. The Alfven Mach number is M_A=22, the shock normal-magnetic field angle is Θ=85 and the ion and electron beta (particle to magnetic pressure) is 0.5. We have used in the simulations a large value for the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the gyrofrequency of ω_pe/Ω_ce=20, and a high value of the ion to electron mass ratio, (m_i/m_e=1500). The shock is highly non-stationary but does not exhibit the reformation pattern seen in previous simulations of lower Mach number perpendicular or quasi-perpendicular shocks. The magnetic field profiles flattens and steepens with a time period of 1.4-1.5 inverse ion gyrofrequencies while the ions are specular reflected from the steepened ramp and finally return downstream just at the subsequent steepening of the ramp. The scale of the ramp varies between ~ 10 to ~ 20 electron inertial lengths corresponding to the changes from a steep to a flat profile. By tracing all trajectories of the reflected ions in the simulation box we have determined the absolute reflection rate as well as an average energy gain related to the non-stationarity of the shock ramp. The reflection rate varies between almost zero percent during flat profiles and ~ 100 percent during steep profiles.

  5. Microinstabilities associated with a high Mach number, perpendicular bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Winske, D.; Tanaka, M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Akimoto, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Zhou, Y. M.; Tsai, S. T.; Rodriguez, P.; Lin, C. S.

    1984-01-01

    Instability analyses incorporating insights gained through ISEE observations and hybrid simulations are used in an examination of the instabilities associated with a high Mach number perpendicular shock akin to the earth's bow shock. In the regions in front of, and at, the shock transition the cross-field instabilities are subdivided into the ion-ion streaming, kinetic cross-field streaming, and drift lower hybrid instability low frequency modes, as well as the electron cyclotron drift, ion sound, and electron whisker instability high frequency modes. Further downstream, ion ring-like and anisotropy-driven instabilities are considered. The implications of these results for wave signatures, plasma heating and acceleration are noted.

  6. Abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon gate during AC stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjun; Joo, Ikhyung; Lee, Changsub; Song, Duheon; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET (HV pMOSFET) under negative AC gate bias stress. In HV pMOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate, the abnormal degradation occurs after the gradual degradation during negative AC stress. The abnormal degradation is suppressed by changing the gate material from n+ poly-Si to p+ poly-Si, and it is caused by hot holes produced by the impact ionization near the surface when electrons move from the gate toward the gate oxide. We suggest a possible mechanism to explain the improvement of degradation by using p+ poly-Si as a gate material.

  7. Numerical Simulation of a High Mach Number Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1993-01-01

    The recent efforts to develop accurate numerical schemes for transition and turbulent flows are motivated, among other factors, by the need for accurate prediction of flow noise. The success of developing high speed civil transport plane (HSCT) is contingent upon our understanding and suppression of the jet exhaust noise. The radiated sound can be directly obtained by solving the full (time-dependent) compressible Navier-Stokes equations. However, this requires computational storage that is beyond currently available machines. This difficulty can be overcome by limiting the solution domain to the near field where the jet is nonlinear and then use acoustic analogy (e.g., Lighthill) to relate the far-field noise to the near-field sources. The later requires obtaining the time-dependent flow field. The other difficulty in aeroacoustics computations is that at high Reynolds numbers the turbulent flow has a large range of scales. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) cannot obtain all the scales of motion at high Reynolds number of technological interest. However, it is believed that the large scale structure is more efficient than the small-scale structure in radiating noise. Thus, one can model the small scales and calculate the acoustically active scales. The large scale structure in the noise-producing initial region of the jet can be viewed as a wavelike nature, the net radiated sound is the net cancellation after integration over space. As such, aeroacoustics computations are highly sensitive to errors in computing the sound sources. It is therefore essential to use a high-order numerical scheme to predict the flow field. The present paper presents the first step in a ongoing effort to predict jet noise. The emphasis here is in accurate prediction of the unsteady flow field. We solve the full time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order finite difference method. Time accurate spatial simulations of both plane and axisymmetric jet are presented. Jet Mach

  8. DSMC Simulation of High Mach Number Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The main focus of this work is to characterise the Taylor-Couette flow of an ideal gas between two coaxial cylinders at Mach number Ma = (U_w /√{ kbT_w / m }) in the range 0.01 < Ma < 10, and Knudsen number Kn = (1 / (√{ 2 } πd2 n_d (r _ 2 - r _ 1))) in the range 0.001 number density of the gas molecules, m and d are the molecular mass and diameter, and kb is the Boltzmann constant. The cylindrical surfaces are specified as being diffusely reflecting with the thermal accommodation coefficient equal to one. In the present analysis of high Mach number compressible Taylor-Couette flow using DSMC method, wall slip in the temperature and the velocities are found to be significant. Slip occurs because the temperature/velocity of the molecules incident on the wall could be very different from that of the wall, even though the temperature/velocity of the reflected molecules is equal to that of the wall. Due to the high surface speed of the inner cylinder, significant heating of the gas is taking place. The gas temperature increases until the heat transfer to the surface equals the work done in moving the surface. The highest temperature is obtained near the moving surface of the inner cylinder at a radius of about (1.26 r_1).

  9. Reynolds Number Effects at High Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Banks, Daniel W.; Hall, Robert M.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Lessons learned from comparisons between ground-based tests and flight measurements for the high-angle-of-attack programs on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), the X-29 forward-swept wing aircraft, and the X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability aircraft are presented. On all three vehicles, Reynolds number effects were evident on the forebodies at high angles of attack. The correlation between flight and wind tunnel forebody pressure distributions for the F-18 HARV were improved by using twin longitudinal grit strips on the forebody of the wind-tunnel model. Pressure distributions obtained on the X-29 wind-tunnel model at flight Reynolds numbers showed excellent correlation with the flight data up to alpha = 50 deg. Above (alpha = 50 deg. the pressure distributions for both flight and wind tunnel became asymmetric and showed poorer agreement, possibly because of the different surface finish of the model and aircraft. The detrimental effect of a very sharp nose apex was demonstrated on the X-31 aircraft. Grit strips on the forebody of the X-31 reduced the randomness but increased the magnitude of the asymmetry. Nose strakes were required to reduce the forebody yawing moment asymmetries and the grit strips on the flight test noseboom improved the aircraft handling qualities.

  10. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  11. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  12. A moving frame algorithm for high Mach number hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trac, Hy; Pen, Ue-Li

    2004-07-01

    We present a new approach to Eulerian computational fluid dynamics that is designed to work at high Mach numbers encountered in astrophysical hydrodynamic simulations. Standard Eulerian schemes that strictly conserve total energy suffer from the high Mach number problem and proposed solutions to additionally solve the entropy or thermal energy still have their limitations. In our approach, the Eulerian conservation equations are solved in an adaptive frame moving with the fluid where Mach numbers are minimized. The moving frame approach uses a velocity decomposition technique to define local kinetic variables while storing the bulk kinetic components in a smoothed background velocity field that is associated with the grid velocity. Gravitationally induced accelerations are added to the grid, thereby minimizing the spurious heating problem encountered in cold gas flows. Separately tracking local and bulk flow components allows thermodynamic variables to be accurately calculated in both subsonic and supersonic regions. A main feature of the algorithm, that is not possible in previous Eulerian implementations, is the ability to resolve shocks and prevent spurious heating where both the pre-shock and post-shock fluid are supersonic. The hybrid algorithm combines the high-resolution shock capturing ability of the second-order accurate Eulerian TVD scheme with a low-diffusion Lagrangian advection scheme. We have implemented a cosmological code where the hydrodynamic evolution of the baryons is captured using the moving frame algorithm while the gravitational evolution of the collisionless dark matter is tracked using a particle-mesh N-body algorithm. Hydrodynamic and cosmological tests are described and results presented. The current code is fast, memory-friendly, and parallelized for shared-memory machines.

  13. High Order Difference Method for Low Mach Number Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A high order finite difference method with improved accuracy and stability properties for computational aeroacoustics (CAA) at low Mach numbers is proposed. The Euler equations are split into a conservative and a symmetric non- conservative portion to allow the derivation of a generalized energy estimate. Since the symmetrization is based on entropy variables, that splitting of the flux derivatives is referred to as entropy splitting. Its discretization by high order central differences was found to need less numerical dissipation than conventional conservative schemes. Owing to the large disparity of acoustic and stagnation quantities in low Mach number aeroacoustics, the split Euler equations are formulated in perturbation form. The unknowns are the small changes of the conservative variables with respect to their large stagnation values. All nonlinearities and the conservation form of the conservative portion of the split flux derivatives can be retained, while cancellation errors are avoided with its discretization opposed to the conventional conservative form. The finite difference method is third-order accurate at the boundary and the conventional central sixth-order accurate stencil in the interior. The difference operator satisfies the summation by parts property analogous to the integration by parts in the continuous energy estimate. Thus, strict stability of the difference method follows automatically. Spurious high frequency oscillations are suppressed by a characteristic-based filter similar to but without limiter. The time derivative is approximated by a 4-stage low-storage second-order explicit Runge-Kutta method. The method has been applied to simulate vortex sound at low Mach numbers. We consider the Kirchhoff vortex, which is an elliptical patch of constant vorticity rotating with constant angular frequency in irrotational flow. The acoustic pressure generated by the Kirchhoff vortex is governed by the 2D Helmholtz equation, which can be solved

  14. Axisymmetric bubble pinch-off at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Sevilla, A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, J; Martínez-Bazán, C

    2005-11-04

    Analytical considerations and potential-flow numerical simulations of the pinch-off of bubbles at high Reynolds numbers reveal that the bubble minimum radius, rn, decreases as tau proportional to r2n sqrt[1lnr2n], where tau is the time to break up, when the local shape of the bubble near the singularity is symmetric. However, if the gas convective terms in the momentum equation become of the order of those of the liquid, the bubble shape is no longer symmetric and the evolution of the neck changes to a rn proportional to tau1/3 power law. These findings are verified experimentally.

  15. Computation of high Reynolds number internal/external flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A general, user oriented computer program, called VNAP2, was developed to calculate high Reynolds number, internal/ external flows. The VNAP2 program solves the two dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either a mixing-length, a one transport equation, or a two transport equation model. Interior grid points are computed using the explicit MacCormack Scheme with special procedures to speed up the calculation in the fine grid. All boundary conditions are calculated using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source terms. Several internal, external, and internal/external flow calculations are presented.

  16. Computation of high Reynolds number internal/external flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A general, user oriented computer program, called VNAF2, developed to calculate high Reynolds number internal/external flows is described. The program solves the two dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled with either a mixing length, a one transport equation, or a two transport equation model. Interior grid points are computed using the explicit MacCormack scheme with special procedures to speed up the calculation in the fine grid. All boundary conditions are calculated using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source terms. Several internal, external, and internal/external flow calculations are presented.

  17. Anisotropic Structure of Rotating Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Squires, Kyle D.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the development of anisotropies and the evolution towards a quasi two-dimensional state in rotating homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds number. The present study demonstrates the existence of two transitions in the development of anisotropy. The first transition marks the onset of anisotropy and occurs when a macro-Rossby number (based on a longitudinal integral lengthscale) has decreased to near unity while the second transition occurs when a micro-Rossby number (defined in this work as the ratio of the rms fluctuating vorticity to background vorticity) has decreased to unity. The anisotropy marked by the first transition corresponds to a reduction in dimensionality while the second transition corresponds to a polarization of the flow, i.e., relative dominance of the velocity components in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Polarization is reflected by emergence of anisotropy measures based on the two-dimensional component of the turbulence. Investigation of the vorticity structure shows that the second transition is also characterized by an increasing tendency for alignment between the fluctuating vorticity vector and the background angular velocity vector with a preference for corrotative vorticity.

  18. High Reynolds number pump facility for cavitation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, K. J.; McBride, M. W.; Billet, M. L.

    1987-09-01

    A High Reynolds Number Pump Facility (HIREP) designed for cavitation studies in the bladetip/endwall region of an axial flow pump is described. The facility consists of a 1.07-m diameter pump state driven by a 1.22-m diameter downstream turbine. An incompressible Reynolds Number of 6,000,000 at the rotor tip is achievable. The two units rotate on a common shaft and operate in the 1.22-m diameter test section of the Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel of the Applied Research Laboratory at Penn State. The facility was designed to accommodate laser velocimeter (LV) measurements in the pump stage, radially traversing five-hole probes in every stage, and a number of transducers in the rotating frame of reference: steady and unsteady pressure transducers force and torque cells, and accelerometers. The latter capability is provided by a slip-ring unit and hollow blade passage ways for conductors from the instrumentation in rotor-tip region. An optical quality window for LV measurements and other windows and ports are available for visual observation and instrumentation access.

  19. Experiments on horizontal convection at high Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaggia, Pierre-Yves; Scotti, Alberto; White, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Horizontal convection is a flow driven by a differential buoyancy forcing across a horizontal surface. It has been considered as a simple model to study the influence of heating, cooling and fresh water fluxes at the ocean surface on the meridional overturning circulation. In order to investigate the flow properties and energetics of horizontal convection at high Prandtl numbers, the flow is driven by the diffusion of salt in water across membranes localized at the surface. The resulting experiments are examined for a Prandtl number Pr 500 and Rayleigh numbers up to Ra 1016 . Time resolved particle image velocimetry is performed together with with planar laser induced fluorescence. To quantify the salt concentration and therefore the density of the fluid, sodium bisulfate is added to the salt water to decrease its pH of and thereby reduce the emission rate of the fluorescein dye. Rhodamine WT, insensitive to pH variations, is also introduced to correct for the spatial nonuniformity of the intensity of the laser sheet, a technique also known as ratiometric PLIF (Coppeta & Rogers, 1998). The local turbulent energetics are finally investigated using the local approach to available potential energy of Scotti & White (2014). The authors acknowledge the support by the National Science Foundation Grant No OCE-1155558.

  20. Vortex shedding from a hydrofoil at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoyne, Dwayne A.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.

    2005-05-01

    High Reynolds number (Re) wall-bounded turbulent flows occur in many hydro- and aerodynamic applications. However, the limited amount of high-Re experimental data has hampered the development and validation of scaling laws and modelling techniques applicable to such flows. This paper presents measurements of the turbulent flow near the trailing edge of a two-dimensional lifting surface at chord-based Reynolds numbers, Re_{C}, typical of heavy-lift aircraft wings and full-scale ship propellers. The experiments were conducted in the William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel at flow speeds from 0.50 to 18.3ms(-1) with a cambered hydrofoil having a 3.05m span and a 2.13m chord that generated 60 metric tons of lift at the highest flow speed, Re_{C}{≈}50{×}10(6) . Flow-field measurements concentrated on the foil's near wake and include results from trailing edges having terminating bevel angles of 44(°) and 56(°) . Although generic turbulent boundary layer and wake characteristics were found at any fixed Re_{C} in the trailing-edge region, the variable strength of near-wake vortex shedding caused the flow-field fluctuations to be Reynolds-number and trailing-edge-geometry dependent. In the current experiments, vortex-shedding strength peaked at Re_{C}{=}4{×}10(6) with the 56(°) bevel-angle trailing edge. A dimensionless scaling for this phenomenon constructed from the free-stream speed, the wake thickness, and an average suction-side shear-layer vorticity at the trailing edge collapses the vortex-shedding strength measurements for 1.4{×}10(6}{≤) Re_{C}{≤}50{×}10(6) from both trailing edges and from prior measurements on two-dimensional struts at Re_{C}{˜}2{×}10(6) with asymmetrical trailing edges.

  1. Abnormal white matter integrity related to head impact exposure in a season of high school varsity football.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Elizabeth M; Whitlow, Christopher T; Urban, Jillian E; Espeland, Mark A; Jung, Youngkyoo; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Gioia, Gerard A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D; Maldjian, Joseph A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cumulative effects of head impacts from a season of high school football produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measureable changes in the brain in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussion. Players from a local high school football team were instrumented with the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS™) during all practices and games. All players received pre- and postseason MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was also conducted. Total impacts and risk-weighted cumulative exposure (RWE), including linear (RWELinear), rotational (RWERotational), and combined components (RWECP), were computed from the sensor data. Fractional, linear, planar, and spherical anisotropies (FA, CL, CP, and CS, respectively), as well as mean diffusivity (MD), were used to determine total number of abnormal white matter voxels defined as 2 standard deviations above or below the group mean. Delta (post-preseason) ImPACT scores for each individual were computed and compared to the DTI measures using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. None of the players analyzed experienced clinical concussion (N=24). Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship between RWECP and FA. Secondary analyses demonstrated additional statistically significant linear associations between RWE (RWECP and RWELinear) and all DTI measures. There was also a strong correlation between DTI measures and change in Verbal Memory subscore of the ImPACT. We demonstrate that a single season of football can produce brain MRI changes in the absence of clinical concussion. Similar brain MRI changes have been previously associated with mild traumatic brain injury.

  2. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model.

    PubMed

    Graham, J Pietarila; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2011-07-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000(3) grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the local mean field follow a Kolmogorov law. We find that the ratio of the eddy turnover time to the Alfvén time increases with wave number, contrary to the so-called critical balance hypothesis. Residual energy and helicity spectra are also considered; the role played by the conservation of magnetic helicity is studied, and scaling laws are found for the magnetic helicity and residual helicity spectra. We put these results in the context of the dynamics of a globally isotropic MHD flow that is locally anisotropic because of the influence of the strong large-scale magnetic field, leading to a partial equilibration between kinetic and magnetic modes for the energy and the helicity.

  3. Two phosphonium ionic liquids with high Li(+) transport number.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vitor L; Sanchez-Ramirez, Nédher; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Torresi, Roberto M

    2015-09-21

    This work presents the physicochemical characterization of two ionic liquids (ILs) with small phosphonium cations, triethylpenthylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P2225][Tf2N]) and (2-methoxyethyl)trimethylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P222(201)][Tf2N]), and their mixtures with Li(+). Properties such as the electrochemical window, density, viscosity and ionic conductivity are presented. The diffusion coefficient was obtained using two different techniques, PGSE-NMR and Li electrodeposition with microelectrodes. In addition, the Li(+) transport number was calculated using the PGSE-NMR technique and an electrochemical approach. The use of these three techniques showed that the PGSE-NMR technique underestimates the diffusion coefficient for charged species. The Li(+) transport number was found to be as high as 0.54. Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were used to evaluate the short-range structure of the liquids. These experiments suggested that the interaction between the Li(+) and the Tf2N(-) anion is similar to that seen with other ILs containing the same anion. However, the MD simulations also showed that the Li(+) ions interact differently with the cation containing an alkyl ether chain. The results found in this work suggest that these Li(+) mixtures have promising potential to be applied as electrolytes in batteries.

  4. Do Subjects at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis Differ from those with a Genetic High Risk? – A Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Brain Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Smieskova, R; Marmy, J; Schmidt, A; Bendfeldt, K; Riecher-Rössler, A; Walter, M; Lang, UE; Borgwardt, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Pre-psychotic and early psychotic characteristics are investigated in the high-risk (HR) populations for psychosis. There are two different approaches based either on hereditary factors (genetic high risk, G-HR) or on the clinically manifested symptoms (clinical high risk, C-HR). Common features are an increased risk for development of psychosis and similar cognitive as well as structural and functional brain abnormalities. Methods: We reviewed the existing literature on longitudinal structural, and on functional imaging studies, which included G-HR and/or C-HR individuals for psychosis, healthy controls (HC) and/or first episode of psychosis (FEP) or schizophrenia patients (SCZ). Results: With respect to structural brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with deficits in frontal, temporal, and cingulate regions in HR, with additional insular and caudate deficits in C-HR population. Furthermore, C-HR had progressive prefrontal deficits related to the transition to psychosis. With respect to functional brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with prefrontal, cingulate and middle temporal abnormalities in HR, with additional parietal, superior temporal, and insular abnormalities in C-HR population. Transition-to-psychosis related differences emphasized prefrontal, hippocampal and striatal components, more often detectable in C-HR population. Multimodal studies directly associated psychotic symptoms displayed in altered prefrontal and hippocampal activations with striatal dopamine and thalamic glutamate functions. Conclusion: There is an evidence for similar structural and functional brain abnormalities within the whole HR population, with more pronounced deficits in the C-HR population. The most consistent evidence for abnormality in the prefrontal cortex reported in structural, functional and multimodal studies of HR population may underlie the complexity of higher cognitive functions that are impaired

  5. Turbomachinery for Low-to-High Mach Number Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Shah, Parthiv N.

    2004-01-01

    The thrust capability of turbojet cycles is reduced at high flight Mach number (3+) by the increase in inlet stagnation temperature. The 'hot section' temperature limit imposed by materials technology sets the maximum heat addition and, hence, sets the maximum flight Mach number of the operating envelope. Compressor pre-cooling, either via a heat exchanger or mass-injection, has been suggested as a means to reduce compressor inlet temperature and increase mass flow capability, thereby increasing thrust. To date, however, no research has looked at compressor cooling (i.e., using a compressor both to perform work on the gas path air and extract heat from it simultaneously). We wish to assess the feasibility of this novel concept for use in low-to-high Mach number flight. The results to-date show that an axial compressor with cooling: (1) relieves choking in rear stages (hence opening up operability), (2) yields higher-pressure ratio and (3) yields higher efficiency for a given corrected speed and mass flow. The performance benefit is driven: (i) at the blade passage level, by a decrease in the total pressure reduction coefficient and an increase in the flow turning; and (ii) by the reduction in temperature that results in less work required for a given pressure ratio. The latter is a thermodynamic effect. As an example, calculations were performed for an eight-stage compressor with an adiabatic design pressure ratio of 5. By defining non-dimensional cooling as the percentage of compressor inlet stagnation enthalpy removed by a heat sink, the model shows that a non-dimensional cooling of percent in each blade row of the first two stages can increase the compressor pressure ratio by as much as 10-20 percent. Maximum corrected mass flow at a given corrected speed may increase by as much as 5 percent. In addition, efficiency may increase by as much as 5 points. A framework for characterizing and generating the performance map for a cooled compressor has been developed

  6. Extension of sonic anemometry to high subsonic Mach number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, R.; Lowe, K. T.; Ng, W. F.

    2017-03-01

    In the literature, the application of sonic anemometry has been limited to low subsonic Mach number, near-incompressible flow conditions. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper represents the first time a sonic anemometry approach has been used to characterize flow velocity beyond Mach 0.3. Using a high speed jet, flow velocity was measured using a modified sonic anemometry technique in flow conditions up to Mach 0.83. A numerical study was conducted to identify the effects of microphone placement on the accuracy of the measured velocity. Based on estimated error strictly due to uncertainty in time-of-acoustic flight, a random error of +/- 4 m s‑1 was identified for the configuration used in this experiment. Comparison with measurements from a Pitot probe indicated a velocity RMS error of +/- 9 m s‑1. The discrepancy in error is attributed to a systematic error which may be calibrated out in future work. Overall, the experimental results from this preliminary study support the use of acoustics for high subsonic flow characterization.

  7. High amplitude surging and plunging motions at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; Williams, David; Caltech Collaboration; IIT Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Aerodynamic forces and flow structures associated with high amplitude oscillations of an airfoil in the streamwise (surging) and transverse (plunging) direction are investigated in two-dimensional simulations at low Reynolds number (Re = 102 ~ 103). While the unsteady aerodynamic forces for low-amplitude motions were mainly affected by the leading-edge vortex (LEV) acting in- or out-of phase with the quasi-component of velocity, large-amplitude motions involve complex vortex interactions of LEVs and trailing-edge vortices (TEVs) with the moving body. For high-amplitude surging, the TEV, instead of the LEV, induces low-pressure regions above the airfoil during the retreating portion of the cycle near the reduced frequency, k = 0.5, and enhances the time-average forces. The time required for the LEV to convect along the chord becomes an intrinsic time scale, and for plunging motions, there is a sudden change of flow structure when the period of the motion is not long enough for the LEV to convect through the whole chord.

  8. A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study of neurohemodynamic abnormalities during emotion processing in subjects at high risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Puthumana, Dawn Thomas K.; Jayakumar, Peruvumba N.; Gangadhar, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Emotion processing abnormalities are considered among the core deficits in schizophrenia. Subjects at high risk (HR) for schizophrenia also show these deficits. Structural neuroimaging studies examining unaffected relatives at high risk for schizophrenia have demonstrated neuroanatomical abnormalities involving neo-cortical and sub-cortical brain regions related to emotion processing. The brain functional correlates of emotion processing in these HR subjects in the context of ecologically valid, real-life dynamic images using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has not been examined previously. Aim: To examine the neurohemodynamic abnormalities during emotion processing in unaffected subjects at high risk for schizophrenia in comparison with age-, sex-, handedness- and education-matched healthy controls, using fMRI. Materials and Methods: HR subjects for schizophrenia (n=17) and matched healthy controls (n=16) were examined. The emotion processing of fearful facial expression was examined using a culturally appropriate and valid tool for Indian subjects. The fMRI was performed in a 1.5-T scanner during an implicit emotion processing paradigm. The fMRI analyses were performed using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 2 (SPM2) software. Results: HR subjects had significantly reduced brain activations in left insula, left medial frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, right precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule. Hypothesis-driven region-of-interest analysis revealed hypoactivation of right amygdala in HR subjects. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that neurohemodynamic abnormalities involving limbic and frontal cortices could be potential indicators for increased vulnerability toward schizophrenia. The clinical utility of these novel findings in predicting the development of psychosis needs to be evaluated. PMID:21267363

  9. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  10. Dynamics of Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2000-01-01

    A series of active flow control experiments were recently conducted at high Reynolds numbers on a generic separated configuration. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert-Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. The main motivation for the experiments is to generate a comprehensive data base for validation of unsteady numerical simulation as a first step in the development of a CFD design tool, without which it would not be possible to effectively utilize the great potential of unsteady flow control. This paper focuses on the dynamics of several key features of the baseline as well as the controlled flow. It was found that the thickness of the upstream boundary layer has a negligible effect on the flow dynamics. It is speculated that separation is caused mainly by the highly convex surface while viscous effects are less important. The two-dimensional separated flow contains unsteady waves centered on a reduced frequency of 0.8, while in the three dimensional separated flow, frequencies around a reduced frequency of 0.3 and 1 are active. Several scenarios of resonant wave interaction take place at the separated shear-layer and in the pressure recovery region. The unstable reduced frequency bands for periodic excitation are centered on 1.5 and 5, but these reduced frequencies are based on the length of the baseline bubble that shortens due to the excitation. The conventional swept wing-scaling works well for the coherent wave features. Reproduction of these dynamic effects by a numerical simulation would provide benchmark validation.

  11. Interaction of two high Reynolds number axisymmetric turbulent wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obligado, M.; Klein, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With the recent discovery of non-equilibrium high Reynolds number scalings in the wake of axisymmetric plates (Nedic et al., PRL, 2013), it has become of importance to develop an experimental technique that permits to easily discriminate between different wake scalings. We propose an experimental setup that tests the presence of non-equilibrium turbulence using the streamwise variation of velocity fluctuations between two bluff bodies facing a flow. We have studied two different sets of plates (one with regular and another with irregular peripheries) with Hot-Wire Anemometry in a wind tunnel. By acquiring streamwise profiles for different plate separations and identifying the wake interaction length for each separation it is possible to estimate the streamwise evolution of the single wake width. From this evolution it is also possible to deduce the turbulence dissipation scalings. This work generalizes previous studies on the interaction of plane wakes (see Gomes-Fernandes et al., JFM, 2012) to include axisymmetric wakes. We find that the wake interaction length proposed in this cited work and a constant anisotropy assumption can be used to collapse the streamwise developments of the first three moments.

  12. Interaction of upstream flow distortions with high Mach number cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Features of the interaction of flow distortions, such as gusts and wakes with blade rows of advance type fans and compressors having high tip Mach numbers are modeled. A typical disturbance was assumed to have harmonic time dependence and was described, at a far upstream location, in three orthogonal spatial coordinates by a double Fourier series. It was convected at supersonic relative to a linear cascade described as an unrolled annulus. Conditions were selected so that the component of this velocity parallel to the axis of the turbomachine was subsonic, permitting interaction between blades through the upstream as well as downstream flow media. A strong, nearly normal shock was considered in the blade passages which was allowed curvature and displacement. The flows before and after the shock were linearized relative to uniform mean velocities in their respective regions. Solution of the descriptive equations was by adaption of the Wiener-Hopf technique, enabling a determination of distortion patterns through and downstream of the cascade as well as pressure distributions on the blade and surfaces. Details of interaction of the disturbance with the in-passage shock were discussed. Infuences of amplitude, wave length, and phase of the disturbance on lifts and moments of cascade configurations are presented. Numerical results are clarified by reference to an especially orderly pattern of upstream vertical motion in relation to the cascade parameters.

  13. Efficient simulation of detached flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Jose M.; Asensio, Victor; Herrero, Raul; Varas, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    A method is presented for the computationally efficient simulation of quasi-periodic detached flows in multi-parameter problems at very large Reynolds numbers, keeping in mind a variety of applications, including helicopter flight simulators, control and certification of unmanned aerial vehicles, control of wind turbines, conceptual design in aeronautics, and civil aerodynamics. In many of these applications, the large scale flows (ignoring the smaller turbulent scales) are at most quasi-periodic, namely the Fourier transform exhibits a finite set of concentrated peaks resulting from the nonlinear passive interaction of periodic wakes. The method consists in an offline preprocess and the online operation. In the preprocess, a standard CFD solver (such as URANS) is used in combination with several ingredients such as an iterative combination proper orthogonal decomposition and fast Fourier transform. The online operation is made with a combination of high order singular value decomposition and interpolation. The performance of the method is tested considering the ow over a fairly complex urban topography, for various free stream intensities and orientations, seeking real time online simulations.

  14. Statistics of High Atwood Number Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The statistical properties of incompressible shear-driven planar mixing layers between two miscible streams of fluids with different densities are investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulations. The simulations begin from a thin interface perturbed by a thin broadband random disturbance, and the mixing layers are allowed to develop to self-similar states. The temporal simulations are performed in unprecedented domain sizes, with grid sizes up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536, which allows turbulent structures to grow and merge naturally. This allows the flow to reach states far-removed from the initial disturbances, thereby enabling high-quality statistics to be obtained for higher moments, pdfs, and other quantities critical to developing closure models. A wide range of Atwood numbers are explored, ranging from nearly constant density to At=0.87. The consequences of increasing the density contrast are investigated for global quantities, such as growth rates, and asymmetries that form in statistical profiles. Additional simulations in smaller domains are performed to study the effects of domain size.

  15. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A tyrosinase with an abnormally high tyrosine hydroxylase/dopa oxidase ratio.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Solano, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum[Salanoubat M, Genin S, Artiguenave F, et al. (2002) Nature 415, 497-502] revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). This soil-borne pathogenic bacterium withers a wide range of plants. We detected the expression of two PPO genes (accession numbers NP_518458 and NP_519622) with high similarity to tyrosinases, both containing the six conserved histidines required to bind the pair of type-3 copper ions at the active site. Generation of null mutants in those genes by homologous recombination mutagenesis and protein purification allowed us to correlate each gene with its enzymatic activity. In contrast with all tyrosinases so far studied, the enzyme NP_518458 shows higher monophenolase than o-diphenolase activity and its initial activity does not depend on the presence of l-dopa cofactor. On the other hand, protein NP_519622 is an enzyme with a clear preference to oxidize o-diphenols and only residual monophenolase activity, behaving as a catechol oxidase. These catalytic characteristics are discussed in relation to two other characteristics apart from the six conserved histidines. One is the putative presence of a seventh histidine which interacts with the carboxy group on the substrate and controls the preference for carboxylated and decarboxylated substrates. The second is the size of the residue isosteric with the aromatic F261 reported in sweet potato catechol oxidase which acts as a gate to control accessibility to CuA at the active site.

  17. Toward Immersed Boundary Simulation of High Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2003-01-01

    of high Reynolds number wall bounded flows is particularly challenging as it requires the consideration of thin turbulent boundary layers, i.e. near wall regions with large gradients of the flow field variables. For such flows, the representation of the wall boundary has a large impact on the accuracy of the computation. It is also critical for the robustness and convergence of the flow solver.

  18. Evaluation of the Generalizability of the Number of Abnormal Scores and the Overall Test Battery Mean as Measures of Performance Validity to a Different Test Battery.

    PubMed

    Silk-Eglit, Graham M; Miele, Andrea S; Stenclik, Jessica H; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Davis, Axelrod, McHugh, Hanks, and Millis (2013) documented that in a battery of 25 tests, producing 15, 10, and 5 abnormal scores at 1, 1.5, and 2 standard deviations below the norm-referenced mean, respectively, and an overall test battery mean (OTBM) of T ≤ 38 accurately identifies performance invalidity. However, generalizability of these findings to other samples and test batteries remains unclear. This study evaluated the use of abnormal scores and the OTBM as performance validity measures in a different sample that was administered a 25-test battery that minimally overlapped with Davis et al.'s test battery. Archival analysis of 48 examinees with mild traumatic brain injury seen for medico-legal purposes was conducted. Producing 18 or more, 7 or more, and 5 or more abnormal scores at 1, 1.5, and 2 standard deviations below the norm-referenced mean, respectively, and an OTBM of T ≤ 40 most accurately classified examinees; however, using Davis et al.'s proposed cutoffs in the current sample maintained specificity at or near acceptable levels. Due to convergence across studies, producing ≥5 abnormal scores at 2 standard deviations below the norm-referenced mean is the most appropriate cutoff for clinical implementation; however, for batteries consisting of a different quantity of tests than 25, an OTBM of T ≤ 38 is more appropriate.

  19. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  20. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B0. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel ["Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes," Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name "helicon" to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B0. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B0 and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B0. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  1. A morphologic study of the airway structure abnormalities in patients with asthma by high-resolution computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Jian; Du, Wen; Zhang, Lan-Lan; He, Li-Xiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Airway structure changes, termed as airway remodeling, are common in asthma patients due to chronic inflammation, which can be assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Considering the controversial conclusions in the correlation of morphologic abnormalities with clinical feature and outcome, we aimed to further specify and evaluate the structural abnormalities of Chinese asthmatics by HRCT. Methods From August 2012 to February 2015, outpatients with asthma were recruited consecutively in the Asthma Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University. Standard HRCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed to collect information of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation, mucus impaction, emphysema, mosaic perfusion, atelectasis, and spirometric parameters. We reported the incidence of each structural abnormality in HRCT and compared it among different asthmatic severities. Results A total of 123 asthmatics were enrolled, among which 84 (68.3%) were female and 39 (31.7%) were male. At least one structural abnormality was detected by HRCT in 85.4% asthmatics, and the incidence of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation, mucus impaction, emphysema, mosaic perfusion, and atelectasis was 57.7%, 51.2%, 22%, 24.4%, 5.7% and 1.6%, respectively. The incidences of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilation and emphysema were significantly increased by asthma severity (P<0.05), while incidences of mucus impaction (26/27, 96.30%), mosaic perfusion (6/7, 85.71%) and atelectasis (2/2, 100%) were mainly found in severe asthma. We found a longer asthma history (28.13±18.55 years, P<0.001, P=0.003), older age (51.30±10.70 years, P=0.022, P=0.006) and lower predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) (41.97±15.19, P<0.001, P<0.001) and ratio of forced expiratory volume to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) (48.01±9.55, P<0.001, P<0.001) in patients with severe bronchial dilation compared with those in

  2. The cryogenic wind tunnel concept for high Reynolds number testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Goodyer, M. J.; Adcock, J. B.; Davenport, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical considerations indicate that cooling the wind-tunnel test gas to cryogenic temperatures will provide a large increase in Reynolds number with no increase in dynamic pressure while reducing the tunnel drive-power requirements. Studies were made to determine the expected variations of Reynolds number and other parameters over wide ranges of Mach number, pressure, and temperature, with due regard to avoiding liquefaction. Practical operational procedures were developed in a low-speed cryogenic tunnel. Aerodynamic experiments in the facility demonstrated the theoretically predicted variations in Reynolds number and drive power. The continuous-flow-fan-driven tunnel is shown to be particularly well suited to take full advantage of operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  3. High Resolution Analysis of Copy Number Mutation in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution...SPONSORING i MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AGENCY REPORT NUMBER U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702...Fellow ofthe Watson School of Biological Sciences and a predoctoral fel- stable copy number and map location, low of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

  4. High Quality Topic Extraction from Business News Explains Abnormal Financial Market Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their “thematic” features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be “abnormally large,” can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no “excess trading,” when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information. PMID:23762258

  5. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  6. Mapping of Genetic Abnormalities of Primary Tumours from Metastatic CRC by High-Resolution SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sayagués, José María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María del Mar; González-González, María; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; del Carmen Chillon, Maria; Garcia, Eva; Bengoechea, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background For years, the genetics of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have been studied using a variety of techniques. However, most of the approaches employed so far have a relatively limited resolution which hampers detailed characterization of the common recurrent chromosomal breakpoints as well as the identification of small regions carrying genetic changes and the genes involved in them. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we applied 500K SNP arrays to map the most common chromosomal lesions present at diagnosis in a series of 23 primary tumours from sporadic CRC patients who had developed liver metastasis. Overall our results confirm that the genetic profile of metastatic CRC is defined by imbalanced gains of chromosomes 7, 8q, 11q, 13q, 20q and X together with losses of the 1p, 8p, 17p and 18q chromosome regions. In addition, SNP-array studies allowed the identification of small (<1.3 Mb) and extensive/large (>1.5 Mb) altered DNA sequences, many of which contain cancer genes known to be involved in CRC and the metastatic process. Detailed characterization of the breakpoint regions for the altered chromosomes showed four recurrent breakpoints at chromosomes 1p12, 8p12, 17p11.2 and 20p12.1; interestingly, the most frequently observed recurrent chromosomal breakpoint was localized at 17p11.2 and systematically targeted the FAM27L gene, whose role in CRC deserves further investigations. Conclusions/Significance In summary, in the present study we provide a detailed map of the genetic abnormalities of primary tumours from metastatic CRC patients, which confirm and extend on previous observations as regards the identification of genes potentially involved in development of CRC and the metastatic process. PMID:21060790

  7. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silano, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of thermal convection are conducted for a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio .5ex1-.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The Prandtl number (Pr) varies from 10^0 to 10^4 and the Rayleigh numbers (Ra) are moderate (10^5 < Ra < 10^9). This study is motivated by the fact that the role of the Prandtl number in convective heat transport is not yet fully understood. The three-dimensional behaviors of the temperature and velocity fields, of the viscous and thermal dissipation fields, and of the diffusive and convective heat fluxes are explored. In the ranges of Pr and Ra considered, we find steady, periodic and chaotic regimes, and large-scale structures which are more complex than the single recirculation cell filling the whole volume. Multiple flow structures are found to be associated with a given set of conditions. The multiple solutions seem to be more probable at higher Pr numbers and could explain the scatter in some data trends. In collaboration with Katepalli Raju Sreenivasan, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics - Trieste, and Roberto Verzicco, DIM, Universitàdegli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata - Roma.

  8. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  9. Maternal high-fat hypercaloric diet during pregnancy results in persistent metabolic and respiratory abnormalities in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Pamela S.; Walton, Cheryl; Samsell, Lennie; Perez, Miriam K.; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have shown in a previous population-based study significant correlation between childhood asthma and early abnormalities of lipid and glucose metabolism. This study's specific aim was to determine whether maternal nutrition in pregnancy affects postnatal metabolic and respiratory outcomes in the offspring. Methods: On gestation day 1, dams were switched from standard chow to either high-fat hypercaloric diet or control diet. Terminal experiments were performed on newborn and weanling offspring of dams fed the study diet during gestation and lactation, and on adult offspring maintained on the same diet as their mother. Results: Pups born from high-fat hypercaloric diet (HFD) dams developed metabolic abnormalities persistent throughout development. Cytokine expression analysis of lung tissues from newborns born to HFD dams revealed a strong proinflammatory pattern. Gene expression of neurotrophic factors and receptors was upregulated in lungs of weanlings born to HFD dams, and this was associated to higher respiratory system resistance and lower compliance at baseline, as well as hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine. Furthermore, HFD dams delivered pups prone to develop more severe disease after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Conclusion: Maternal nutrition in pregnancy is a critical determinant of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in offspring and also increases risk for bronchiolitis independent from prepregnancy nutrition. PMID:26539661

  10. Vorticity spectra in high Reynolds number anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Scott C.; Foss, John F.

    2005-08-01

    Assuming a turbulent flow to be homogeneous and isotropic allows for significant theoretical simplification in the description of its motions. The validity of these assumptions, first put forth by Kolmogorov [A. N. Kolmogorov, "The local structure of turbulence in incompressible viscous fluids for very large Reynolds numbers," C. R. Acad. Sci. URSS 30, 301 (1941)], has been the subject of considerable analytical development and extensive research as they are applied to actual flows. The present investigation describes the one-dimensional vorticity spectra of two flow fields: a single stream shear layer and the near surface region of an atmospheric boundary layer. Both flow fields exhibit a power-law region with a slope of -1 in the one-dimensional spectra of the spanwise component of vorticity in the same wave-number range for which the velocity spectra indicated the isotropic behavior. This is in strong disagreement with the isotropic prediction, which does not exhibit a power-law behavior.

  11. Quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delache, A.; Favier, B.; Godeferd, F. S.; Cambon, C.; Bos, W. J. T.

    2011-12-01

    We analyse the anisotropy of turbulence in an electrically conducting fluid submitted to a uniform magnetic field, for low magnetic Reynolds number, using the quasi-static approximation. In the linear limit, the kinetic energy of velocity components normal to the magnetic field decays faster than the kinetic energy of the component along the magnetic field (Moffatt, 1967). However, numerous numerical studies predict a different behaviour, wherein the final state is characterised by dominant horizontal energy. We investigate the corresponding nonlinear phenomenon using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and spectral closures based on Eddy Damping Quasi-Normal Markovian (EDQNM) models. The initial temporal evolution of the decaying flow indicates that the turbulence is very similar to the so-called "two-and-a-half-dimensional" flow (Montgomery & Turner, 1982) which explains the observations in numerical studies. EDQNM models confirm this statement at higher Reynolds number.

  12. Multiplier less high-speed squaring circuit for binary numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Kabiraj; Panda, Rutuparna

    2015-03-01

    The squaring operation is important in many applications in signal processing, cryptography etc. In general, squaring circuits reported in the literature use fast multipliers. A novel idea of a squaring circuit without using multipliers is proposed in this paper. Ancient Indian method used for squaring decimal numbers is extended here for binary numbers. The key to our success is that no multiplier is used. Instead, one squaring circuit is used. The hardware architecture of the proposed squaring circuit is presented. The design is coded in VHDL and synthesised and simulated in Xilinx ISE Design Suite 10.1 (Xilinx Inc., San Jose, CA, USA). It is implemented in Xilinx Vertex 4vls15sf363-12 device (Xilinx Inc.). The results in terms of time delay and area is compared with both modified Booth's algorithm and squaring circuit using Vedic multipliers. Our proposed squaring circuit seems to have better performance in terms of both speed and area.

  13. Local anisotropy in strained turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.; Speziale, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the hypothesis of local isotropy is implausible in the presence of significant mean rates of strain. In fact, it appears that in uniform shear flow near equilibrium, local isotropy can never constitute a systematic approximation, even in the limit of infinite Reynolds number. An estimate of the level of mean strain rate for which local isotropy is formally a good approximation is provided.

  14. The riddle of high-energy baryon number violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattis, M.P.

    1991-09-01

    The exciting possibility that anomalous baryon and lepton number violation might be observable at the next generation of supercolliders is suggested by an instanton calculation due to Ringwald and Espinosa. In these Lectures, the current controversial status of these claims is discussed, and several new technologies designed to analyze this question are reviewed. These technologies should contribute more generally to our understanding of weakly- coupled field theories in the nonperturbative regime where both energies and multiplicities are very large. 61 refs., 35 figs.

  15. False diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and its complications in Wolfram syndrome--is it the reason for the low number of reported cases of this abnormality?

    PubMed

    Homa, Katarzyna; Stefański, Adam; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Molęda, Piotr; Bryśkiewicz, Marta Ewa; Majkowska, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness), is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome (1/770,000 in the United Kingdom), characterised by juvenile onset of diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy, diabetes insipidus, sensorineural deafness, renal tract and neurological abnormalities, and primary gonadal atrophy. WS is caused mainly by biallelic mutations in the WFS1 gene, which encodes wolframin. Wide tissue distribution of wolframin and many mutations in the wolframin gene resulting in Wolfram syndrome may contribute to different phenotypes and the unusual combinations of clinical features. We describe a female patient with Wolfram syndrome diagnosed at the age of 25, with a previous false diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus and misdiagnosed diabetic complications. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for two novel mutations in exon 8 of WFS1 gene: a 2-bp deletion AT at nt 1539 leading to a frameshift (Y513fs) and a single-base substitution 1174C > T resulting in a stop codon (Q392X). A detailed analysis of the patient's medical history and a review of the literature suggest that many cases of Wolfram syndrome may remain undiagnosed due to misdiagnosis as type 1 diabetes mellitus and incorrect interpretation of clinical symptoms of neurodegenerative abnormalities, especially in their early stages.

  16. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20 number range of 2800 < Reτ < 30000 , targeting areas in the parameter space identified by Jimenez (2004) as being sparsely populated by pre-existing data. Smooth-wall data are also obtained across a similar Reynolds number range to enable comparison of smooth- and rough-wall structural features. Generally, the data indicate similarity in the outer-layer of smooth- and fully-rough wall-bounded flows.

  17. Design of a High-Reynolds Number Recirculating Water Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Libin; Elbing, Brian

    2014-11-01

    An experimental fluid mechanics laboratory focused on turbulent boundary layers, drag reduction techniques, multiphase flows and fluid-structure interactions has recently been established at Oklahoma State University. This laboratory has three primary components; (1) a recirculating water tunnel, (2) a multiphase pipe flow loop, and (3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. The design of the water tunnel is the focus of this talk. The criteria used for the water tunnel design was that it had to produce a momentum-thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104, negligible flow acceleration due to boundary layer growth, maximize optical access for use of the flow visualization system, and minimize inlet flow non-uniformity. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university/commercial water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105) . These objectives were achieved with a 152 mm (6-inch) square test section that is 1 m long and has a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. The flow non-uniformity was mitigated with the use of a tandem honeycomb configuration, a settling chamber and an 8.5:1 contraction. The design process that produced this final design will be presented along with its current status.

  18. Turbulent Boundary Layer in High Rayleigh Number Convection in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra =1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re ≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  19. High-Reynolds Number Taylor-Couette Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two coaxial co- or counter-rotating cylinders, is one of the paradigmatic systems in the physics of fluids. The (dimensionless) control parameters are the Reynolds numbers of the inner and outer cylinders, the ratio of the cylinder radii, and the aspect ratio. One key response of the system is the torque required to retain constant angular velocities, which can be connected to the angular velocity transport through the gap. Whereas the low-Reynolds number regime was well explored in the 1980s and 1990s of the past century, in the fully turbulent regime major research activity developed only in the past decade. In this article, we review this recent progress in our understanding of fully developed Taylor-Couette turbulence from the experimental, numerical, and theoretical points of view. We focus on the parameter dependence of the global torque and on the local flow organization, including velocity profiles and boundary layers. Next, we discuss transitions between different (turbulent) flow states. We also elaborate on the relevance of this system for astrophysical disks (quasi-Keplerian flows). The review ends with a list of challenges for future research on turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

  20. Abnormal strong burn-in degradation of highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal donor-acceptor demixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Perea, José Darío; Kassar, Thaer; Richter, Moses; Heumueller, Thomas; Matt, Gebhard J.; Hou, Yi; Güldal, Nusret S.; Chen, Haiwei; Chen, Shi; Langner, Stefan; Berlinghof, Marvin; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of organic solar cells is determined by the delicate, meticulously optimized bulk-heterojunction microstructure, which consists of finely mixed and relatively separated donor/acceptor regions. Here we demonstrate an abnormal strong burn-in degradation in highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal demixing of the donor and acceptor phases, which dramatically reduces charge generation and can be attributed to the inherently low miscibility of both materials. Even though the microstructure can be kinetically tuned for achieving high-performance, the inherently low miscibility of donor and acceptor leads to spontaneous phase separation in the solid state, even at room temperature and in the dark. A theoretical calculation of the molecular parameters and construction of the spinodal phase diagrams highlight molecular incompatibilities between the donor and acceptor as a dominant mechanism for burn-in degradation, which is to date the major short-time loss reducing the performance and stability of organic solar cells.

  1. Abnormal strong burn-in degradation of highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal donor-acceptor demixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Perea, José Darío; Kassar, Thaer; Richter, Moses; Heumueller, Thomas; Matt, Gebhard J.; Hou, Yi; Güldal, Nusret S.; Chen, Haiwei; Chen, Shi; Langner, Stefan; Berlinghof, Marvin; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of organic solar cells is determined by the delicate, meticulously optimized bulk-heterojunction microstructure, which consists of finely mixed and relatively separated donor/acceptor regions. Here we demonstrate an abnormal strong burn-in degradation in highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal demixing of the donor and acceptor phases, which dramatically reduces charge generation and can be attributed to the inherently low miscibility of both materials. Even though the microstructure can be kinetically tuned for achieving high-performance, the inherently low miscibility of donor and acceptor leads to spontaneous phase separation in the solid state, even at room temperature and in the dark. A theoretical calculation of the molecular parameters and construction of the spinodal phase diagrams highlight molecular incompatibilities between the donor and acceptor as a dominant mechanism for burn-in degradation, which is to date the major short-time loss reducing the performance and stability of organic solar cells. PMID:28224984

  2. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  3. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  4. Binary tree models of high-Reynolds-number turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Dormy, Emmanuel; Frick, Peter

    1997-08-01

    We consider hierarchical models for turbulence, that are simple generalizations of the standard Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell models (E. B. Gledzer, Dokl, Akad. Nauk SSSR 209, 5 (1973) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 18, 216 (1973)]; M. Yamada and K. Ohkitani, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 4210 (1987)). The density of degrees of freedom is constant in wave-number space. Looking only at this behavior and at the quadratic invariants in the inviscid unforced limit, the models can be thought of as systems living naturally in one spatial dimension, but being qualitatively similar to hydrodynamics in two (2D) and three dimensions. We investigated cascade phenomena and intermittency in the different cases. We observed and studied a forward cascade of enstrophy in the 2D case.

  5. Convection in an ideal gas at high Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, A

    2011-08-01

    Numerical simulations of convection in a layer filled with ideal gas are presented. The control parameters are chosen such that there is a significant variation of density of the gas in going from the bottom to the top of the layer. The relations between the Rayleigh, Peclet, and Nusselt numbers depend on the density stratification. It is proposed to use a data reduction which accounts for the variable density by introducing into the scaling laws an effective density. The relevant density is the geometric mean of the maximum and minimum densities in the layer. A good fit to the data is then obtained with power laws with the same exponent as for fluids in the Boussinesq limit. Two relations connect the top and bottom boundary layers: The kinetic energy densities computed from free fall velocities are equal at the top and bottom, and the products of free fall velocities and maximum horizontal velocities are equal for both boundaries.

  6. Numerical simulation of high Reynolds number bubble motion

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of bubble motion. All the results are for single bubbles in unbounded fluids. The liquid phase is quiescent except for the motion created by the bubble, which is axisymmetric. The main focus of the paper is on bubbles that are of order 1 mm in diameter in water. Of particular interest is the effect of surfactant molecules on bubble motion. Results for the {open_quotes}insoluble surfactant{close_quotes} model will be presented. These results extend research by other investigators to finite Reynolds numbers. The results indicate that, by assuming complete coverage of the bubble surface, one obtains good agreement with experimental observations of bubble motion in tap water. The effect of surfactant concentration on the separation angle is discussed.

  7. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  8. High Rayleigh Number 3d Spherical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. H.

    2003-04-01

    features. The convection model was then advanced to a circulation model by driving the upper surface by a plate velocity model for the past 119Myr. At this Rayleigh number the Farallon and Tethys fast seismic anomalies are not as well fit by cold anomalies as they were by lower Rayleigh number calculations of Bunge et al. (Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, 360, 2545-2567, 2002). Other cases with phase changes and increased bottom heating will also be reported. Future work needs to involve temperature dependent viscosity and tracking of composition. The limited results to date give us encouragement to continue pursuing this class of model.

  9. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  10. Laboratory Experiments of High Mach Number Raditaive Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Gardiner, T.; Blackman, E.; Lebedev, S.; Chittenden, J.; Beg, S.; Bland, S.; Ciardi, A.; Ampleford, D.; Hughes, S.; Haines, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    We present astrophysically relevent experiments on the generation of a highly supersonic plasma jet by a convergent plasma flow. The flow is produced by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch). Stagnation of the plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock, which effectively collimates the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Cantó et al 1988 as a possible, purely hydrodynamic mechanism of jet formation in young stellar objects. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a highly supersonic (M 20) and a well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. The interaction of this jet with a plasma target could be used for scaled laboratory astrophysical experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities in decelerated plasma flow.

  11. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  12. High-resolution copy number arrays in cancer and the problem of normal genome copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    High-resolution techniques for analysis of genome copy number (CN) enable the analysis of complex cancer somatic genetics. However, the analysis of these data is difficult, and failure to consider a number of issues in depth may result in false leads or unnecessary rejection of true positives. First, segmental duplications may falsely generate CN breakpoints in aneuploid samples. Second, even when tumor data were each normalized to matching lymphocyte DNA, we still observed copy number polymorphisms masquerading as somatic alterations due to allelic imbalance. We investigated a number of different solutions and determined that evaluating matching normal DNA, or at least using locally derived normal baseline data, were preferable to relying on current online databases because of poor cross-platform compatibility and the likelihood of excluding genuine small somatic alterations.

  13. High Take Off Left Main and Abnormal Origin of Right Coronary Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Negar; Abdi, Seyfollah; Pouraliakba, Hamid Reza; Vakili-Zarch, Anoushiravan

    2013-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are rare congenital disorders with mostly benign course. We report a case of 54-year-old white male who was with stable angina scheduled for coronary angiography. Due to the difficulty of catheterization, patient underwent CT angiography and high take off left main and right coronary arteries were revealed. We conclude that anomalous coronary arteries are important and coronary interventions may be difficult in their presence.

  14. Separation of adult chains of abnormal haemoglobin: Identification by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Paul Angoué; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Ayekoé; Wachman, Henri

    2004-01-01

    Rare abnormal haemoglobin (Hb) often poses a problem in the diagnosis of relative electrophoresis mobility. The rare neutral Hbs interact with the Hb S and thus can increase the severity of sickle cell anaemia. In the present study, we investigated the use of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) as a method for the identification of neutral or unstable Hb, and compared it with the well-known techniques urea-triton electrophoresis (UT) and isoelectrofocusing (IEF). The results of our experiments showed that Bucuresti Hb was separated without ambiguity by RP-HPLC. To date, no other electrophoresis techniques have been able to isolate this Hb. We also examined the Hb Nouakchott, which was the most hydrophobic Hb. Moreover, the adult and foetal chains of globins (especially the Agamma(t) and Agamma(i) chains) were quantified on the same chromatogram.

  15. High fat diet produces brain insulin resistance, synaptodendritic abnormalities and altered behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Steven E; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R; Carlson, Gregory C; Browne, Caroline A; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F; Kim, Sangwon F

    2014-07-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS(616)), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors.

  16. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  17. Red blood cells of sickle cell disease patients exhibit abnormally high abundance of N-methyl D-aspartate receptors mediating excessive calcium uptake.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Pascal; Makhro, Asya; Gassmann, Max; Schmugge, Markus; Goede, Jeroen S; Speer, Oliver; Bogdanova, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Recently we showed that N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed in erythroid precursors (EPCs) and present in the circulating red blood cells (RBCs) of healthy humans, regulating intracellular Ca(2+) in these cells. This study focuses on investigating the possible role of NMDARs in abnormally high Ca(2+) permeability in the RBCs of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Protein levels of the NMDAR subunits in the EPCs of SCD patients did not differ from those in EPCs of healthy humans. However, the number and activity of the NMDARs in circulating SCD-RBCs was substantially up-regulated, being particularly high during haemolytic crises. The number of active NMDARs correlated negatively with haematocrit and haemoglobin levels in the blood of SCD patients. Calcium uptake via these non-selective cation channels was induced by RBC treatment with glycine, glutamate and homocysteine and was facilitated by de-oxygenation of SCD-RBCs. Oxidative stress and RBC dehydration followed receptor stimulation and Ca(2+) uptake. Inhibition of the NMDARs with an antagonist memantine caused re-hydration and largely prevented hypoxia-induced sickling. The EPCs of SCD patients showed higher tolerance to memantine than those of healthy subjects. Consequently, NMDARs in the RBCs of SCD patients appear to be an attractive target for pharmacological intervention.

  18. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  19. Behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities after exposure to low doses of high-energy iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Walter A.; Joseph, James A.; Rabin, Bernard M.

    Exposure of rats to high-energy iron particles (600 MeV/amu) has been found to alter behavior after doses as low as 10 rads. The performance of a task that measures upper body strength was significantly degraded after irradiation. In addition, an impairment in the regulation of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus (a motor center in the brain), lasting at least 6 months, was also found and correlated with the performance deficits. A general indication of behavioral toxicity and an index of nausea and emesis, the conditioned taste aversion, was also evident. The sensitivity to iron particles was 10-600 times greater than to gamma photons. These results suggest that behavioral and neurobiological damage may be a consequence of exposure to low doses of heavy particles and that this possibility should be extensively studied.

  20. Plasmoid instability in high-Lundquist-number magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-15

    Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist (S) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when S exceeds a critical value ∼10{sup 4}, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as S{sup 1/4}. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of S, and the distribution function f(ψ) of plasmoid magnetic flux ψ follows a power law f(ψ)∼ψ{sup −1}. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion for onset is not satisfied. The rich variety of possible reconnection dynamics is organized in the framework of a phase diagram.

  1. Rayleigh Taylor instability of viscoelastic drops at high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. D.; Beavers, G. S.; Funada, T.

    2002-02-01

    Movies of the breakup of viscous and viscoelastic drops in the high-speed airstream behind a shock wave in a shock tube have been reported by Joseph, Belanger & Beavers (1999). They performed a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for the initial breakup of a drop of Newtonian liquid and found that the most unstable Rayleigh Taylor wave fits nearly perfectly with waves measured on enhanced images of drops from the movies, but the effects of viscosity cannot be neglected. Here we construct a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for an Oldroyd-B fluid using measured data for acceleration, density, viscosity and relaxation time [lambda]1. The most unstable wave is a sensitive function of the retardation time [lambda]2 which fits experiments when [lambda]2/[lambda]1 = O(10-3). The growth rates for the most unstable wave are much larger than for the comparable viscous drop, which agrees with the surprising fact that the breakup times for viscoelastic drops are shorter. We construct an approximate analysis of Rayleigh Taylor instability based on viscoelastic potential flow which gives rise to nearly the same dispersion relation as the unapproximated analysis.

  2. Decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors in chronic neutropenia with defective chemotaxis: spontaneous recovery from the neutrophil abnormalities during early childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, K.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyagawa, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Akabane, T.

    1987-05-01

    Childhood chronic neutropenia with decreased numbers of chemotactic factor receptors as well as defective chemotaxis was first demonstrated in an 8-month-old girl. Chemotactic factor receptors on neutrophils were assayed using tritiated N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (/sup 3/H-FMLP). The patient's neutrophils had decreased numbers of the receptors: numbers of the receptors were 20,000 (less than 3 SD) as compared with those of control cells of 52,000 +/- 6000 (mean +/- SD) (n = 10). The neutropenia disappeared spontaneously by 28 months of age parallel with the improvement of chemotaxis and increase in numbers of chemotactic factor receptors. These results demonstrate a transient decrease of neutrophil chemotactic factor receptors as one of the pathophysiological bases of a transient defect of neutrophil chemotaxis in this disorder.

  3. Reversible Brain Abnormalities in People Without Signs of Mountain Sickness During High-Altitude Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cunxiu; Zhao, Yuhua; Yu, Qian; Yin, Wu; Liu, Haipeng; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming; Gesang, Luobu; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of lowlanders ascending to high-altitude (HA) show no signs of mountain sickness. Whether their brains have indeed suffered from HA environment and the persistent sequelae after return to lowland remain unknown. Thirty-one sea-level college students, who had a 30-day teaching on Qinghai-Tibet plateau underwent MRI scans before, during, and two months after HA exposure. Brain volume, cortical structures, and white matter microstructure were measured. Besides, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and neuropsychiatric behaviors were tested. After 30-day HA exposure, the gray and white matter volumes and cortical surface areas significantly increased, with cortical thicknesses and curvatures changed in a wide spread regions; Anisotropy decreased with diffusivities increased in multiple sites of white matter tracts. Two months after HA exposure, cortical measurements returned to basal level. However, increased anisotropy with decreased diffusivities was observed. Behaviors and serum inflammatory factor did not significant changed during three time-point tests. NSE significantly decreased during HA but increased after HA exposure. Results suggest brain swelling occurred in people without neurological signs at HA, but no negative sequelae in cortical structures and neuropsychiatric functions were left after the return to lowlands. Reoxygenation changed white matter microstructure. PMID:27633944

  4. Flow and Noise Control in High Speed and High Reynolds Number Jets Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Kastner, J.; Kim, J.-H.; Utkin, Y.; Adamovich, I.; Brown, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of manipulating flow to change its characteristics is over a century old. Manipulating instabilities of a jet to increase its mixing and to reduce its radiated noise started in the 1970s. While the effort has been successful in low-speed and low Reynolds number jets, available actuators capabilities in terms of their amplitude, bandwidth, and phasing have fallen short in control of high-speed and high Reynolds number jets of practical interest. Localized arc filament plasma actuators have recently been developed and extensively used at Gas Dynamics and Turbulence Laboratory (GDTL) for control of highspeed and high Reynolds number jets. While the technique has been quite successful and is very promising, all the work up to this point had been carried out using small high subsonic and low supersonic jets from a 2.54 cm diameter nozzle exit with a Reynolds number of about a million. The preliminary work reported in this paper is a first attempt to evaluate the scalability of the technique. The power supply/plasma generator was designed and built in-house at GDTL to operate 8 actuators simultaneously over a large frequency range (0 to 200 kHz) with independent control over phase and duty cycle of each actuator. This allowed forcing the small jet at GDTL with azimuthal modes m = 0, 1, 2, 3, plus or minus 1, plus or minus 2, and plus or minus 4 over a large range of frequencies. This power supply was taken to and used, with minor modifications, at the NASA Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). At NATR, 32 actuators were distributed around the 7.5 in. nozzle (a linear increase with nozzle exit diameter would require 60 actuators). With this arrangement only 8 actuators could operate simultaneously, thus limiting the forcing of the jet at NATR to only three azimuthal modes m = plus or minus 1, 4, and 8. Very preliminary results at NATR indicate that the trends observed in the larger NASA facility in terms of the effects of actuation frequency and azimuthal modes are

  5. Influence of abnormally high leptin levels during pregnancy on metabolic phenotypes in progeny mice.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Elena N; Chepeleva, Elena V; Panchenko, Polina E; Bazhan, Nadezhda M

    2013-12-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in offspring, and obesity is accompanied by an increase in blood leptin levels. The "yellow" mutation at the mouse agouti locus (A(y)) increases blood leptin levels in C57BL preobese pregnant mice without affecting other metabolic characteristics. We investigated the influence of the A(y) mutation or leptin injection at the end of pregnancy in C57BL mice on metabolic phenotypes and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in offspring. In both C57BL-A(y) and leptin-treated mice, the maternal effect was more pronounced in male offspring. Compared with males born to control mothers, males born to A(y) mothers displayed equal food intake (FI) but decreased body weight (BW) gain after weaning, equal glucose tolerance, and enhanced FI-to-BW ratios on the standard diet but the same FI and BW on the high-fat diet. Males born to A(y) mothers were less responsive to the anorectic effect of exogenous leptin and less resistant to fasting (were not hyperphagic and gained less weight during refeeding after food deprivation) compared with males born to control mothers. However, all progeny displayed equal hypothalamic expression of Agouti gene-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and equal plasma leptin and glucose levels after food deprivation. Leptin injections in C57BL mice on day 17 of pregnancy decreased BW in both male and female offspring but inhibited FI and DIO only in male offspring. Our results show that hyperleptinemia during pregnancy has sex-specific long-term effects on energy balance regulation in progeny and does not predispose offspring to developing obesity.

  6. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  7. A survey of the three-dimensional high Reynolds number transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.; Sawada, H.; Aoki, T.

    1982-01-01

    The facilities for aerodynamic testing of airplane models at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers are surveyed. The need for high Reynolds number testing is reviewed, using some experimental results. Some approaches to high Reynolds number testing such as the cryogenic wind tunnel, the induction driven wind tunnel, the Ludwieg tube, the Evans clean tunnel and the hydraulic driven wind tunnel are described. The level of development of high Reynolds number testing facilities in Japan is discussed.

  8. High spatial range velocity measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, C. M.; Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Hutchins, N.; Soria, J.; Marusic, I.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we detail and analyse a multi-resolution particle image velocity measurement that resolves the wide range of scales prevalent in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (up to Reτ ≈ 20 000). A unique configuration is utilised, where an array of eight high resolution cameras at two magnification levels are used simultaneously to obtain a large field of view, while still resolving the smaller scales prevalent in the flow. Additionally, a highly magnified field of view targeted at the near wall region is employed to capture the viscous sublayer and logarithmic region, with a spatial resolution of a few viscous length scales. Flow statistics from these measurements show good agreement with prior, well resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements. Analysis shows that the instantaneous wall shear stress can be reliably computed, which is historically known to be challenging in boundary layers. A statistical assessment of the wall shear stress shows good agreement with existing correlations, prior experimental and direct numerical simulation data, extending this view to much higher Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, conditional analysis using multiple magnification levels is detailed, to study near-wall events associated with high skin friction fluctuations and their associated overlaying structures in the log region. Results definitively show that the passage of very large-scale positive (or negative) velocity fluctuations are associated with increased (or reduced) small-scale variance in wall shear stress fluctuations.

  9. High bacterial titers in urine are predictive of abnormal postvoid residual urine in patients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Caron, F; Alexandre, K; Pestel-Caron, M; Chassagne, P; Grise, P; Etienne, M

    2015-09-01

    Urine bacterial titers (BTs) are influenced by bacterial and host factors. The impact of an abnormal postvoid residual (PVR) on BT in urine was investigated. A total of 103 inpatients with a urine growing Enterobacteriacae (≥ 10(2) CFU/mL) and a PVR measure were analyzed, mostly female (62%), elderly (mean age: 72 years), with urinary tract infection (25% of asymptomatic bacteriuria) due to Escherichia coli (85%). Fifty-two subjects (56%) had BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL; 48 (53%) had a PVR ≤ 100 mL, while 26 (25%) had a PVR >250 mL. PVR increased with BT, and a significant (P<0.0001) threshold was reached for 10(6) CFU/mL: 100mL mean PVR for patients with BT ≤ 10(5) CFU/mL versus 248 mL for patients with BT >10(5) CFU/mL. High PVR and BT were associated with complicated infections, concomitant bacteremia, and delayed apyrexia. Screening for patients with BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL is an easy way to identify patients at high risk for acute retention and voiding disorders.

  10. High-resolution genomic copy number profiling of glioblastoma multiforme by single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Ogawa, Seishi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Tunici, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Eoli, Marica; Ruckert, Christian; Huynh, Thien; Liu, Gentao; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Jauch, Anna; Dugas, Martin; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2009-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extremely malignant brain tumor. To identify new genomic alterations in GBM, genomic DNA of tumor tissue/explants from 55 individuals and 6 GBM cell lines were examined using single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray (SNP-Chip). Further gene expression analysis relied on an additional 56 GBM samples. SNP-Chip results were validated using several techniques, including quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), nucleotide sequencing, and a combination of Q-PCR and detection of microsatellite markers for loss of heterozygosity with normal copy number [acquired uniparental disomy (AUPD)]. Whole genomic DNA copy number in each GBM sample was profiled by SNP-Chip. Several signaling pathways were frequently abnormal. Either the p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B)-CDK4/6-pRb or p14(ARF)-MDM2/4-p53 pathways were abnormal in 89% (49 of 55) of cases. Simultaneous abnormalities of both pathways occurred in 84% (46 of 55) samples. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was altered in 71% (39 of 55) GBMs either by deletion of PTEN or amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Deletion of chromosome 6q26-27 often occurred (16 of 55 samples). The minimum common deleted region included PARK2, PACRG, QKI, and PDE10A genes. Further reverse transcription Q-PCR studies showed that PARK2 expression was decreased in another collection of GBMs at a frequency of 61% (34 of 56) of samples. The 1p36.23 region was deleted in 35% (19 of 55) of samples. Notably, three samples had homozygous deletion encompassing this site. Also, a novel internal deletion of a putative tumor suppressor gene, LRP1B, was discovered causing an aberrant protein. AUPDs occurred in 58% (32 of 55) of the GBM samples and five of six GBM cell lines. A common AUPD was found at chromosome 17p13.3-12 (included p53 gene) in 13 of 61 samples and cell lines. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and nucleotide

  11. Milk from dams fed an obesogenic diet combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet induces long-term abnormal mammary gland development in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hue-Beauvais, C; Koch, E; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Galio, L; Chat, S; Letheule, M; Rousseau-Ralliard, D; Jaffrezic, F; Laloë, D; Aujean, E; Révillion, F; Lhotellier, V; Gertler, A; Devinoy, E; Charlier, M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to the metabolic endocrine environment during early life are crucial to mammary gland development. Among these environmental parameters, the initial nutritional event after birth is the consumption of milk, which represents the first maternal support provided to mammalian newborns. Milk is a complex fluid that exerts effects far beyond its immediate nutritional value. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine the effect of the nutritional changes during the neonatal and prepubertal periods on the adult mammary phenotype. Newborn rabbits were suckled by dams fed a high-fat/high-sugar obesogenic (OD) or a control (CON) diet and then subsequently fed either the OD or CON diets from the onset of puberty and throughout early pregnancy. Mammary glands were collected during early pregnancy (Day 8 of pregnancy). Rabbits fed with OD milk and then subjected to an OD diet displayed an abnormal development of the mammary gland: the mammary ducts were markedly enlarged (P < 0.05) and filled with abundant secretory products. Moreover, the alveolar secretory structures were disorganized, with an abnormal aspect characterized by large lumina. Mammary epithelial cells contained numerous large lipid droplets and exhibited fingering of the apical membrane and abnormally enlarged intercellular spaces filled with casein micelles. Leptin has been shown to be involved in modulating several developmental processes. We therefore analyzed its expression in the mammary gland. Mammary leptin mRNA was strongly expressed in rabbits fed with OD milk and subjected to an OD diet by comparison with the CON rabbits. Leptin transcripts and protein were localized in the epithelial cells, indicating that the increase in leptin synthesis occurs in this compartment. Taken together, these findings suggest that early-life nutritional history, in particular through the milking period, can determine subsequent mammary gland development. Moreover, they highlight the potentially important

  12. A high-energy-density, high-Mach number single jet experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J. F.; Dittrich, T. R.; Elliott, J. B.; Glendinning, S. G.; Cotrell, D. L.

    2011-08-15

    A high-energy-density, x-ray-driven, high-Mach number (M{>=} 17) single jet experiment shows constant propagation speeds of the jet and its bowshock into the late time regime. The jet assumes a characteristic mushroom shape with a stalk and a head. The width of the head and the bowshock also grow linearly in time. The width of the stalk decreases exponentially toward an asymptotic value. In late time images, the stalk kinks and develops a filamentary nature, which is similar to experiments with applied magnetic fields. Numerical simulations match the experiment reasonably well, but ''exterior'' details of the laser target must be included to obtain a match at late times.

  13. Birth outcomes of cases with unclassified multiple congenital abnormalities and pregnancy complications in their mothers depending on the number of component defects. Population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E; Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2008-09-01

    Multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA) represent the most severe category of structural birth defects, (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CA]). Unfortunately, most MCA are not recognized and/or identified as MCA syndromes or MCA associations in the clinical practice. The term unclassified MCA (UMCA) is used for this category of MCA. We decided to evaluate the component CA of UMCA cases. The population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (1980-1996) was evaluated. 'False' MCA, such as complex CA, polytopic field defects and sequences were excluded from the category of MCA. In addition, MCA syndromes caused by chromosomal aberrations and major mutant genes with preconceptional origin were excluded from the dataset of the Surveillance. MCA syndromes caused by teratogens and MCA associations with well-defined component CA were also excluded in the study. Thus, only UMCA cases (i) without the recognition of previously delineated MCA syndromes (ii) and/or without the identification of new MCA syndromes or (iii) caused by random combination of CA were included in the study. We compared data from 1349 cases with UMCA, 2405 matched population controls without any CA, and 21 494 malformed controls with isolated CA. There was a higher rate of stillbirth and a moderate male excess in UMCA cases, a somewhat shorter gestational age at delivery and an obvious reduction in birthweight. The intrauterine fetal growth retardation and rate of low-birthweight newborns showed an association with the number of component CA in UMCA cases. A similar association was not found with gestational age and the rate of preterm birth. UMCA represent one of the most severe categories of CA. The degree of intrauterine fetal growth retardation depends on number of component CA in UMCA cases.

  14. Lipid metabolism abnormalities in alcohol-treated rabbits: a morphometric and haematologic study comparing high and low alcohol doses

    PubMed Central

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Zhao, Garida; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteonecrosis remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the morphological changes in bone marrow fat cells and the changes in the serum lipid levels in alcohol-treated rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were randomly assigned into three groups: Four rabbits intragastrically received low-dose alcohol (LDA) (15 ml/kg per day) containing 15% ethanol for 4 weeks, five rabbits received high-dose alcohol (HDA) (30 ml/kg per day) for 4 weeks and six rabbits received physiologic saline for 4 weeks as a control group. Six weeks after the initial alcohol administration, all rabbits were sacrificed. The mean size of the bone marrow fat cells in rabbits treated with HDA was significantly larger than that in the control group (P = 0.0001). Haematologically, the levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the rabbits treated with both low-dose and HDA were significantly higher than those in the control group (P = 0.001 for both comparisons). The results of this study are that there are lipid metabolism abnormalities, both morphologically and haematologically, after alcohol administration. Also these findings were more apparent in rabbits treated with HDA than those treated with LDA. PMID:21645143

  15. Abnormal Mammary Adipose Tissue Environment of Brca1 Mutant Mice Show a Persistent Deposition of Highly Vascularized Multilocular Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laundette P; Buelto, Destiney; Tago, Elaine; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo E

    2011-12-08

    A major challenge to breast cancer research is the identification of alterations in the architecture and composition of the breast that are associated with breast cancer progression. The aim of the present investigation was to characterize the mammary adipose phenotype from Brca1 mutant mice in the expectation that this would shed light on the role of the mammary tissue environment in the early stages of breast tumorigenesis. We observed that histological sections of mammary tissue from adult Brca1 mutant mice abnormally display small, multilocular adipocytes that are reminiscent of brown adipose tissue (BAT) as compared to wildtype mice. Using a marker for BAT, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), we demonstrated that these multilocular adipose regions in Brca1 mutant mice stain positive for UCP1. Transcriptionally, UCP1 mRNA levels in the Brca1 mutant mice were elevated greater than 50-fold compared to age-matched mammary glands from wildtype mice. Indeed, BAT has characteristics that are favorable for tumor growth, including high vascularity. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the multilocular brown adipose phenotype in the mammary fat pad of Brca1 mutant mice displayed regions of increased vascularity as evidenced by a significant increase in the protein expression of CD31, a marker for angiogenesis. This Brca1 mutant mouse model should provide a physiologically relevant context to determine whether brown adipose tissue can play a role in breast cancer development.

  16. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis in pancreatic cancer using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays

    PubMed Central

    Harada, T; Chelala, C; Bhakta, V; Chaplin, T; Caulee, K; Baril, P; Young, BD; Lemoine, NR

    2008-01-01

    To identify genomic abnormalities characteristic of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in vivo, a panel of 27 microdissected PDAC specimens were analysed using high-density microarrays representing ∼116 000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. We detected frequent gains of 1q, 2, 3, 5, 7p, 8q, 11, 14q and 17q (≥78% of cases), and losses of 1p, 3p, 6, 9p, 13q, 14q, 17p and 18q (≥44%). Although the results were comparable with those from array CGH, regions of those genetic changes were defined more accurately by SNP arrays. Integrating the Ensembl public data, we have generated ‘gene’ copy number indices that facilitate the search for novel candidates involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copy numbers in a subset of the genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. The SKAP2/SCAP2 gene (7p15.2), which belongs to the src family kinases, was most frequently (63%) amplified in our sample set and its recurrent overexpression (67%) was confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization and in situ RNA hybridization analyses for this gene have demonstrated a significant correlation between DNA copy number and mRNA expression level in an independent sample set (P<0.001). These findings indicate that the dysregulation of SKAP2/SCAP2, which is mostly caused by its increased gene copy number, is likely to be associated with the development of PDAC. PMID:17952125

  17. Normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene and abnormal incorporation of fibrillin into the extracellular matrix in Lujan Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhaw, G.A.; Stone, C.; Milewicz, D.

    1994-09-01

    Lujan syndrome is an X-linked condition that includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, poor social integration, normal secondary sexual development with normal testicular size, generalized hypotonia, hypernasal voice and dolichostenomelia. Major cardiac complications and lens dislocation have not been reported although severe myopia may occur. All reported cases have had negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome but establishing this constellation of findings as a distinctive entity has been difficult. We report 4 males in two sibships with clinical findings consistent with Lujan syndrome, normal karyotypes, negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome and a normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene. Dermal fibroblasts explanted from one of the affected males were used to study fibrillin synthesis secretion and extracellular matrix incorporation into microfibrils. Cells from the affected individual showed normal synthesis and secretion of fibrillin when compared to control cells, but the fibrillin was not incorporated into the extracellular matrix. These results suggest the presence of a gene on the X chromosome which may play a role in microfibril assembly and when deficient may disrupt the incorporation of fibrillin into microfibrils. This may be important not only in normal body morphogenesis but also in the development/function of the brain. More affected individuals are needed to investigate these findings further.

  18. Abnormal responses of electronic pocket dosimeters caused by high frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from digital cellular telephones.

    PubMed

    Deji, Shizuhiko; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2005-09-01

    High frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from digital cellular telephones (cell phones) occasionally cause abnormally high and erroneous indicated dose readings on electronic pocket dosimeters (EPDs). Electric field strength distribution around a cell phone transmitting 1.5 GHz band with a maximum power of 0.8 W was analyzed by using an isotropic probe with tri-axial dipole antennas. Five types of EPDs were exposed to the fields for 50 s under configurations relative to the cell phone. The electric field distribution expanded around the phone's antenna and had a maximum electric field strength of 36.5 +/- 0.3 V m(-1). The cell phone gave rise to erroneous indicated dose readings on four out of five EPDs. The maximum value of erroneous indicated dosage for 50 s reached 1,283 microSv, which was about 2.6% of the annual effective dose limit of 50 mSv. The electromagnetic susceptibility of the EPDs was higher in the sections where the semiconductor detectors or electric circuit boards were located. The distance required to prevent electromagnetic interference differed for each EPD and ranged from 2.0 to 21.0 cm from the cell phone. The electric and magnetic field immunity levels of the EPDs varied from 9.2 V m(-1) to greater than 37.6 V m(-1), and from 0.03 A m(-1) to greater than 0.51 A m(-1). The EPDs displayed erroneous dose readings during exposure but recovered their normal performance after the cell phone ceased transmitting. The electromagnetic immunity levels of the EPDs were either equal to or greater than the IEC-standard. The immunity levels should be enhanced greater than the IEC-standard from the standpoint of radiation protection. The simplest and most reliable measure to prevent potential malfunction is to prohibit the radiation workers from carrying cell phones to their workplace.

  19. Nucleophilic addition to olefins. 19. Abnormally high intrinsic barrier in the reaction of piperidine and morpholine with benzylideneacetylacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Bernasconi, C.F.; Kanavarioti, A.

    1986-11-26

    The title reaction leads to the formation of the zwitterionic Michael adduct T/sup +/-/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/NH/sup +/)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/) which is in rapid acid-base equilibrium with its anionic form T/sup -/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/N)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/). Rate (K/sub 1/, k/sub -1/) and equilibrium constants (K/sub 1/) for nucleophilic addition and the pK/sub a/ of the T/sup +/-/-adducts were determined in 50% Me/sub 2/SO-50% water at 20/sup 0/C. From an interpolation of the rate constants to K/sub 1/ = 1 an intrinsic rate constant, log k/sub 0/ = 0.3, was determined. This value deviates negatively by approximately 2.5 log units from a correlation of log k/sub 0/ for amine addition to five olefins of the type PhCH=CXY, with log k/sub 0/ for the deprotonation of the corresponding carbon acids CH/sub 2/XY. Two major factors are believed to contribute to this depressed intrinsic rate constant or enhanced intrinsic barrier: (1) steric inhibition of resonance in T/sup +/-/ with the steric effect developing ahead of C-N bond formation (this conclusion is supported by an X-ray crystallographic study of p-methoxybenzylideneacetylacetone which shows that steric hindrance to optimal ..pi..-overlap in the adduct T/sup+/-/ is already present in the substrate); (2) intramolecular hydrogen bonding in T/sup +/-/, which is inferred from abnormally high pK/sub a/ values and whose development lags behind C-N bond formation. These effects are shown to be manifestations of the Principle of Nonperfect Synchronization.

  20. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  1. Genetic evidence suggests that homosporous ferns with high chromosome numbers are diploid.

    PubMed

    Haufler, C H; Soltis, D E

    1986-06-01

    Homosporous ferns have usually been considered highly polyploid because they have high chromosome numbers (average n = 57.05). In angiosperms, species with chromosome numbers higher than n = 14 generally have more isozymes than those with lower numbers, consistent with their polyploidy. By extrapolation, homosporous ferns would be expected to have many isozymes. However, ongoing surveys indicate that within fern genera, species having the lowest chromosome numbers have the number of isozymes considered typical of diploid seed plants. Only species above these lowest numbers have additional isozymes. Therefore, homosporous ferns either have gone through repeated cycles of polyploidy and gene silencing or were initiated with relatively high chromosome numbers. The latter possibility represents a radical departure from currently advocated hypotheses of fern evolution and suggests that there may be fundamental differences between the genomes of homosporous ferns and those of higher plants. These hypotheses can be tested by genetic, karyological, and molecular techniques.

  2. Abnormal monsoon years and their control on erosion and sediment flux in the high, arid northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-02-01

    The interplay between topography and Indian summer monsoon circulation profoundly controls precipitation distribution, sediment transport, and river discharge along the Southern Himalayan Mountain Front (SHF). The Higher Himalayas form a major orographic barrier that separates humid sectors to the south and arid regions to the north. During the Indian summer monsoon, vortices transport moisture from the Bay of Bengal, swirl along the SHF to the northwest, and cause heavy rainfall when colliding with the mountain front. In the eastern and central parts of the Himalaya, precipitation measurements derived from passive microwave analysis (SSM/I) show a strong gradient, with high values at medium elevations and extensive penetration of moisture along major river valleys into the orogen. The end of the monsoonal conveyer belt is near the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya, where precipitation is lower and rainfall maxima move to lower elevations. This region thus comprises a climatic transition zone that is very sensitive to changes in Indian summer monsoon strength. To constrain magnitude, temporal, and spatial distribution of precipitation, we analyzed high-resolution passive microwave data from the last decade and identified an abnormal monsoon year (AMY) in 2002. During the 2002 AMY, violent rainstorms conquered orographic barriers and penetrated far into otherwise arid regions in the northwest Himalaya at elevations in excess of 3 km asl. While precipitation in these regions was significantly increased and triggered extensive erosional processes (i.e., debris flows) on sparsely vegetated, steep hillslopes, mean rainfall along the low to medium elevations was not significantly greater in magnitude. This shift may thus play an important role in the overall sediment flux toward the Himalayan foreland. Using extended precipitation and sediment flux records for the last century, we show that these events have a decadal recurrence interval during the present-day monsoon

  3. High Rayleigh number heat transfer in a horizontal cylinder with adiabatic wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiroky, G. H.; Rosenberger, F.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an experimentally guided approach to the estimation of Nusselt numbers (Nu) at high Rayleigh numbers (Ra) for a cylinder with an adiabatic side wall. The Rayleigh number dependence of the Nusselt number for a horizontal cylinder with an adiabatic wall is presented in a graph. The obtained data are compared with results reported by Shih (1981). Shih has extended a three-term expansion for velocity and temperature distributions reported by Bejan and Tien (1978).

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation Analysis of Unsteady Separation Over a Pitching Airfoil at High Reynolds Number

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-24

    helicopter rotor blades, wind turbine blades, pitching and flapping airfoils and wings , and rotating turbomachinery blades. For instance, helicopter...of turbulent flow over a pitching airfoil at realistic Reynolds and Mach numbers is performed. Numerical stability at high Reynolds number...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Large-Eddy Simulation Analysis of Unsteady Separation Over a Pitching Airfoil at High Reynolds

  5. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  6. High-order numerical simulations of the flow around wings at moderately high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Negi, Prabal; Hosseini, Seyed M.; Hanifi, Ardeshir; Henningson, Dan S.; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    The results of a DNS of the flow around a wing section represented by a NACA4412 profile, with Rec = 400 , 000 and 5° angle of attack, are presented in this study. The high-order spectral-element code Nek5000 was used for the computations. The Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β ranges from = 0 to 85 on the suction side, and the maximum Reθ and Reτ values are around 2 , 800 and 373, respectively. The adversre pressure gradient (APG) on the suction side of the wing leads to a progressively increasing value of the inner peak in the tangential velocity fluctuations, as well as the development of an outer peak, which is also observed in the other components of the Reynolds-stress tensor. Close to the trailing edge, i.e., at x / c = 0 . 9 , the outer peak in the inner-scaled tangential velocity profile is larger than the inner peak. These effects are connected to the fact that the large-scale motions of the flow become energized due to the APG, as apparent from spanwise-premultiplied power spectral density plots. Preliminary comparisons between DNS and well-resolved LES data, based on a relaxation-term filtering approach, are also presented with the aim of further extending the Reynolds number to Rec = 1 , 000 , 000 . Funded by the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.

  7. A customized high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization to explore copy number variations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; Morello, Giovanna; Gentile, Giulia; D'Agata, Velia; Criscuolo, Chiara; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder, was long believed to be a non-genetic sporadic syndrome. Today, only a small percentage of PD cases with genetic inheritance patterns are known, often complicated by reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. The few well-characterized Mendelian genes, together with a number of risk factors, contribute to the major sporadic forms of the disease, thus delineating an intricate genetic profile at the basis of this debilitating and incurable condition. Along with single nucleotide changes, gene-dosage abnormalities and copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant disease-causing mutations in PD. However, due to their size variability and to the quantitative nature of the assay, CNV genotyping is particularly challenging. For this reason, innovative high-throughput platforms and bioinformatics algorithms are increasingly replacing classical CNV detection methods. Here, we report the design strategy, development, validation and implementation of NeuroArray, a customized exon-centric high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) tailored to detect single/multi-exon deletions and duplications in a large panel of PD-related genes. This targeted design allows for a focused evaluation of structural imbalances in clinically relevant PD genes, combining exon-level resolution with genome-wide coverage. The NeuroArray platform may offer new insights in elucidating inherited potential or de novo structural alterations in PD patients and investigating new candidate genes.

  8. Brain Anatomical Abnormalities in High-Risk Individuals, First-Episode, and Chronic Schizophrenia: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis of Illness Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Di, Xin; McAlonan, Grainne M.; Gong, Qi-yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study reviewed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on high-risk individuals with schizophrenia, patients experiencing their first-episode schizophrenia (FES), and those with chronic schizophrenia. We predicted that gray matter abnormalities would show progressive changes, with most extensive abnormalities in the chronic group relative to FES and least in the high-risk group. Method: Forty-one VBM studies were reviewed. Eight high-risk studies, 14 FES studies, and 19 chronic studies were analyzed using anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis. Results: Less gray matter in the high-risk group relative to controls was observed in anterior cingulate regions, left amygdala, and right insula. Lower gray matter volumes in FES compared with controls were also found in the anterior cingulate and right insula but not the amygdala. Lower gray matter volumes in the chronic group were most extensive, incorporating similar regions to those found in FES and high-risk groups but extending to superior temporal gyri, thalamus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gryus. Subtraction analysis revealed less frontotemporal, striatal, and cerebellar gray matter in FES than the high-risk group; the high-risk group had less gray matter in left subcallosal gyrus, left amygdala, and left inferior frontal gyrus compared with FES. Subtraction analysis confirmed lower gray matter volumes through ventral-dorsal anterior cingulate, right insula, left amygdala and thalamus in chronic schizophrenia relative to FES. Conclusions: Frontotemporal brain structural abnormalities are evident in nonpsychotic individuals at high risk of developing schizophrenia. The present meta-analysis indicates that these gray matter abnormalities become more extensive through first-episode and chronic illness. Thus, schizophrenia appears to be a progressive cortico-striato-thalamic loop disorder. PMID:19633214

  9. Associations between sexually transmitted infections, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and abnormal cervical Pap smear results in OB/GYN outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the meaning and usefulness of sexually transmitted infection (STI) test when caring for patients who have abnormal cervical cytology and/or positive high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test results. Methods Among patients who underwent liquid-based cervical cytology and HPV DNA tests at the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic, 800 patients who showed abnormal cervical cytology were compared with 200 patients in the control group. Both groups were simultaneously tested via multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for seven types of STI-causative microorganisms. Results The positive rate of high-risk HPV infection in total STIs positive group was 1.47 times higher than that of total STIs negative group. The probability of a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) was significantly higher in patients testing positive for total STIs (1.46 times), Chlamydia trachomatis (3.21 times), or Mycoplasma genitalicum (3.58 times) than in those testing negative. The total STIs positive rate was significantly higher for those having a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) when high-risk HPV test result was negative. Conclusion Correlations were present not only between STIs and high-risk HPV infection but also between abnormal cervical cytology and STIs. Therefore, additional evaluation of STIs will be helpful to appropriately diagnose and treat patients with abnormal cervical cytology, positive results on high-risk HPV DNA test, or a cytological diagnosis of ASC-US despite negative high-risk HPV DNA test result. PMID:27329197

  10. Heat-flux measurement in high-Prandtl-number turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Lam, Siu; Zhou, Sheng-Qi

    2002-02-11

    We report Nusselt number measurements from high Prandtl number turbulent thermal convection experiments. The experiments are conducted in four fluids with the Prandtl number Pr varying from 4 to 1350 and the Rayleigh number Ra from 2x10(7) to 3x10(10), all in a single convection cell of unity aspect ratio. We find that the measured Nusselt number decreased about 20% over the range of Pr spanned in the experiment. The measure data are also found in good agreement with the prediction of a recent theory over the extended range of Pr covered in the experiment.

  11. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  12. Patients with MCI and N400 or P600 abnormalities are at very high risk for conversion to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Olichney, J.M.; Taylor, J.R.; Gatherwright, J.; Salmon, D.P.; Bressler, A.J.; Kutas, M.; Iragui-Madoz, V.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought cognitive event-related potential (ERP) biomarkers of disease progression and subsequent conversion to dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Background Two ERP components, the P600 and N400, are sensitive to abnormal episodic/declarative memory and semantic processing. When congruous category-exemplars are repeated, smaller P600s (relative to initial presentation) are normally elicited. Repetitions of semantically incongruous words yield smaller N400 amplitude. In mild Alzheimer disease (AD), abnormalities of both the N400 and P600 repetition effects are present, suggesting a wide-spread failure of synaptic plasticity. Methods Patients with amnestic MCI (n = 32) were longitudinally studied annually with an ERP paradigm in which semantically congruous (50%) and incongruous target words are repeated 10 to 140 seconds after initial presentation. ERP data were analyzed to contrast MCI-to-AD converters (within 3 years) vs nonconverters, using split-plot analyses of variance. Results A statistically significant P600 congruous word repetition effect was found only in the nonconverter group (F = 9.9, p = 0.005 vs MCI converters). This effect correlated with verbal memory measures. Repetition of incongruous words produced a significant N400 amplitude attenuation (across right-hemisphere sites) in nonconverters, but not in converters. Patients with MCI with abnormal/reduced N400 or P600 word repetition effects had an 87 to 88% likelihood of dementia within 3 years while those with normal/spared N400 and P600 repetition effects had only an 11 to 27% likelihood. Conclusions Abnormalities of the P600 or N400 in mild cognitive impairment are associated with an increased risk of subsequent conversion to Alzheimer disease (AD). These event-related potential components may offer useful biomarkers for the detection and staging of very early AD. PMID:18077800

  13. Calculation of the vacuum Green's function valid for high toroidal mode number in tokamaks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Morrell; Turnbull, Alan

    2005-10-01

    The present evaluation of the Green's function used for the magmetic scalar potential in vacuum calculations for axisymmetric geometry in the vacuum segments of gato, pest and other mhd stability codes has been found to be deficient for moderately high toroidal mode numbers. This was due to the loss of numerical precision arising from the upward recursion relation used for generating the functions to high mode numbers. The recursion is initiated from the complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. To ameliorate this, a direct integration of the integral representation of the function was crafted to achieve the necessary high accuracy for moderately high mode numbers. At very high mode numbers the loss of numerical precision due to the oscillatory behavior of the integrand is further avoided by judiciously deforming the integration contour in the complex plane. Machine precision, roughly 14 -- 16 digits, accuracy can be achieved by using a combination of both these techniques.

  14. High EGFR gene copy number predicts poor outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Heae Surng; Jang, Min Hye; Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hee Jin; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, In Ah; Park, So Yeon

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in triple-negative breast cancer and is emerging as a therapeutic target. EGFR gene copy number alteration and mutation are highly variable and scientists have been challenged to define their prognostic significance in triple-negative breast cancer. We examined EGFR protein expression, EGFR gene copy number alteration and mutation of exon 18 to 21 in 151 cases of triple-negative breast cancer and correlated these findings with clinical outcomes. In addition, intratumoral agreement of EGFR protein overexpression and gene copy number alteration was evaluated. EGFR overexpression was found in 97 of 151 cases (64%) and high EGFR gene copy number was detected in 50 cases (33%), including 3 gene amplification (2%) and 47 high polysomy (31%). Five EGFR mutations were detected in 4 of 151 cases (3%) and included G719A in exon 18 (n=1), V786M in exon 20 (n=1), and L858R in exon 21 (n=3). One case had two mutations (G719A and L858R). High EGFR copy number, but not EGFR mutation, correlated with EGFR protein overexpression. Intratumoral heterogeneity of EGFR protein overexpression and EGFR copy number alteration was not significant. In survival analyses, high EGFR copy number was found to be an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-free survival in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Our findings showed that EGFR mutation was a rare event, but high EGFR copy number was relatively frequent and correlated with EGFR overexpression in triple-negative breast cancer. Moreover, high EGFR copy number was associated with poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer, suggesting that evaluation of EGFR copy number may be useful for predicting outcomes in patients with triple-negative breast cancer and for selecting patients for anti-EGFR-targeted therapy.

  15. High Reynolds numbers scaling of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt da Silva, Carlos; Silva, Tiago S.; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) at high Reynolds numbers is assessed using new direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent planar jets (PJET) and shear free turbulence (SFT) with Reynolds numbers ranging from 142 <= Reλ <= 300 . The thickness of the turbulent sublayer (TSL), where the enstrophy production dominates over enstrophy diffusion, is of the order of the Taylor micro-scale, and is roughly one order of magnitude larger than the Kolmogorov micro-scale for these Reynolds numbers, however it clearly scales with the Kolmogorov micro-scale, at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers. It is argued the same scaling should be observed in TNTI from mixing layers, wakes and boundary layers, provided the Reynolds number is sufficiently high.

  16. Viscous dissipation effects on heat transfer from turbulent flow with high Prandtl number fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, B. T. F.; Pang, Y.; Thomas, L. C.

    A comprehensive surface renewal type model, namely, the surface rejuvenation model, is employed to determine the viscous dissipation effect on heat transfer from turbulent flow with high Prandtl number fluids. In this work, the probability distributions for the stochastic variables which include the approach distance, the contact time, the residence time, and the initial temperature profile of the incoming eddies near the wall region are utilized. The Nusselt number, recovery factor, and temperature profile are obtained in integral forms which are then solved numerically. The ratio of Nusselt numbers in the presence of viscous effect to that in the absence of dissipation is presented in terms of Brinkman number, Prandtl number and Reynolds number for both cases of wall heating and cooling. Comparisons of the predicted recovery factor for turbulent pipe flow are also made based on the present model, previous eddy diffusivity models and the elementary surface renewal model for a wide range of Prandtl number.

  17. The Effects of Number Theory Study on High School Students' Metacognition and Mathematics Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miele, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how the study of number theory might affect high school students' metacognitive functioning, mathematical curiosity, and/or attitudes towards mathematics. The study utilized questionnaire and/or interview responses of seven high school students from New York City and 33 high school students from Dalian,…

  18. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Subsonic High-Lift Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L.R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.30 for a configuration without an empennage. A fundamental change in flow-state occurred between Reynolds numbers of 30 to 40 million, which is characterized by significantly earlier inboard leading-edge separation at the high Reynolds numbers. Force and moment levels change but Reynolds number trends are consistent between the two states.

  19. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    NASA/TM—2015–218813 Tests of Full -Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios James C. Biggers and...Information Desk Mail Stop 148 NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA 23681-2199 This page is required and contains approved text that cannot be...changed. NASA/TM—2015–218813 Tests of Full -Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios James C

  20. Beneficiary effect of Tinospora cordifolia against high-fructose diet induced abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Sreenivasa; Ramatholisamma, P; Ramesh, B; Baskar, R; Saralakumari, D

    2009-10-01

    High intake of dietary fructose has been shown to exert a number of adverse metabolic eff ects in humans and experimental animals. The present study was designed to investigate the eff ect of the aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia stem (TCAE) on the adverse eff ects of fructose loading toward carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats. Adult male Wistar rats of body weight around 200 g were divided into four groups, two of which were fed with starch diet and the other two with high fructose (66 %) diet. Plant extract of TC (400 mg/kg/day) was administered orally to each group of the starch fed rats and the highfructose fed rats. At the end of 60 days of experimental period, biochemical parameters related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were assayed. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and elevated levels of hepatic total lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids (p < 0.05) observed in fructose-fed rats were completely prevented with TCAE treatment. Alterations in the activities of enzymes of glucose metabolism (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthetase, lipoprotein lipase, and malic enzyme) as observed in the high fructose-fed rats were prevented with TCAE administration. In conclusion, our fi ndings indicate improvement of glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fructose fed rats by treatment with Tinospora cordifolia, and suggest that the plant can be used as an adjuvant for the prevention and/or management of insulin resistance and disorders related to it.

  1. An investigation of small scales of turbulence in a boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, James M.; Ong, L.; Balint, J.-L.

    1993-01-01

    The assumption that turbulence at large wave-numbers is isotropic and has universal spectral characteristics which are independent of the flow geometry, at least for high Reynolds numbers, has been a cornerstone of closure theories as well as of the most promising recent development in the effort to predict turbulent flows, viz. large eddy simulations. This hypothesis was first advanced by Kolmogorov based on the supposition that turbulent kinetic energy cascades down the scales (up the wave-numbers) of turbulence and that, if the number of these cascade steps is sufficiently large (i.e. the wave-number range is large), then the effects of anisotropies at the large scales are lost in the energy transfer process. Experimental attempts were repeatedly made to verify this fundamental assumption. However, Van Atta has recently suggested that an examination of the scalar and velocity gradient fields is necessary to definitively verify this hypothesis or prove it to be unfounded. Of course, this must be carried out in a flow with a sufficiently high Reynolds number to provide the necessary separation of scales in order unambiguously to provide the possibility of local isotropy at large wave-numbers. An opportunity to use our 12-sensor hot-wire probe to address this issue directly was made available at the 80'x120' wind tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, which is normally used for full-scale aircraft tests. An initial report on this high Reynolds number experiment and progress toward its evaluation is presented.

  2. High Reynolds number and turbulence effects on aerodynamics and heat transfer in a turbine cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Frederick C.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Vanfossen, G. James; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Ameri, Ali

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data on pressure distribution and heat transfer on a turbine airfoil were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.75 to 7.5 x 10 exp 6 and a range of turbulence intensities from 1.8 to about 15 percent. The purpose of this study was to obtain fundamental heat transfer and pressure distribution data over a wide range of high Reynolds numbers and to extend the heat transfer data base to include the range of Reynolds numbers encountered in the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump turbines. Specifically, the study aimed to determine (1) the effect of Reynolds number on heat transfer, (2) the effect of upstream turbulence on heat transfer and pressure distribution, and (3) the relationship between heat transfer at high Reynolds numbers and the current data base. The results of this study indicated that Reynolds number and turbulence intensity have a large effect on both the transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the resulting heat transfer. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for all Reynolds numbers at the leading edge can be correlated with the Frossling number developed for lower Reynolds numbers. For a given turbulence intensity, heat transfer for the airfoil surfaces downstream of the leading edge can be approximately correlated with a dimensionless parameter. Comparison of the experimental results were also made with a numerical solution from a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  3. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range number number Re = (LTUinfrhoinf) /muinf equal to 10 using two-dimensional (2D) direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to understand the flow phenomena of the leading-edge flat plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  4. High incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in acute coronary syndrome patients at a moderate altitude: A sub-Himalayan study

    PubMed Central

    Mokta, Jitender; Kumar, Subash; Ganju, Neeraj; Mokta, Kiran; Panda, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Swatantra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abnormal glucose metabolic status at admission is an important marker of future cardiovascular events and long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), whether or not they are known diabetics. Objective: The aims were to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in ACS patients and to compare the different methods of diagnosing diabetes in ACS patients. Methods: We did a prospective study. About 250 consecutive nondiabetic patients (200 men and 50 women) with ACS admitted to a tertiary care institute of Himachal Pradesh in 1 year were enrolled. Admission plasma glucose, next morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and a standardized 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 72 h after admission were done. Glucose metabolism was categorized as normal glucose metabolism, impaired glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]), and diabetes. Diabetes was arbitrarily classified further as undiagnosed (HBA1c ≥6.5%) or possibly stress diabetes (HBA1c <6.5%). A repeat OGTT after 3 months in objects with IGT and stress hyperglycemia at a time of admission was done. Results: The mean age was 54 ± 12.46 years. The mean plasma glucose at admission was 124 ± 53.96 mg/dL, and the mean FPG was 102 ± 27.07 mg/dL. The mean 2-h postglucose load concentration was 159.5 ± 56.58 mg/dL. At baseline, 95 (38%) had normal glucose metabolism, 95 (38%) had impaired glucose metabolism (IGT and or IGT) and 60 (24%) had diabetes; 48 (19.2%) were undiagnosed diabetes and 12 (4.8%) had stress hyperglycemia. At follow up 58.66% and 55.55% of patients with impaired glucose tolerance and stress hyperglycemia continued to have impaired glucose tolerance respectively. About 75 gm OGTT has highest sensitivity and specificity to diagnose diabetes, whereas A1C most specific to rule out stress hyperglycemia. Conclusions: In this small hilly state of India, abnormal glucose metabolism (previously undiagnosed diabetes and IGT) is

  5. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  6. Performance Limiting Flow Processes in High-State Loading High-Mach Number Compressors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-13

    the Doctoral Thesis Committee of the doctoral student. 3 3.0 Technical Background A strong incentive exists to reduce airfoil count in aircraft engine ...Advanced Turbine Engine ). A basic constraint on blade reduction is seen from the Euler turbine equation, which shows that, although a design can be carried...on the vane to rotor blade ratio of 8:11). Within the MSU Turbo code, specifying a small number of time steps requires more iteration at each time

  7. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  8. pMHC Multiplexing Strategy to Detect High Numbers of T Cell Responses in Parallel.

    PubMed

    Philips, Daisy; van den Braber, Marlous; Schumacher, Ton N; Kvistborg, Pia

    2017-01-01

    The development of peptide loaded major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) conjugated to fluorochromes by Davis and colleagues 20 years ago provided a highly useful tool to identify and characterize antigen-specific T cells. In this chapter we describe a multiplexing strategy that allows detection of high numbers of T cell responses in parallel.

  9. Wind tunnel tests of two airfoils for wind turbines operating at high reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, D.; Tangler, J.

    2000-06-29

    The objectives of this study were to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for Reynolds numbers up to 6 x 106 and to acquire the section characteristics of two airfoils being considered for large, megawatt-size wind turbines. One airfoil, the S825, was designed to achieve a high maximum lift coefficient suitable for variable-speed machines. The other airfoil, the S827, was designed to achieve a low maximum lift coefficient suitable for stall-regulated machines. Both airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) for smooth, fixed-transition, and rough surface conditions at Reynolds numbers of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 x 106. The results show the maximum lift coefficient of both airfoils is substantially underpredicted for Reynolds numbers over 3 x 106 and emphasized the difficulty of designing low-lift airfoils for high Reynolds numbers.

  10. A high-resolution algorithm for wave number estimation using holographic array processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Philippe; Cassereau, Didier; Roux, André

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents an original way to perform wave number inversion from simulated data obtained in a noisy shallow-water environment. In the studied configuration an acoustic source is horizontally towed with respect to a vertical hydrophone array. The inversion is achieved from the combination of three ingredients. First, a modified version of the Prony algorithm is presented and numerical comparison is made to another high-resolution wave number inversion algorithm based on the matrix-pencil technique. Second, knowing that these high-resolution algorithms are classically sensitive to noise, the use of a holographic array processing enables improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio before the inversion is performed. Last, particular care is taken in the representations of the solutions in the wave number space to improve resolution without suffering from aliasing. The dependence of this wave number inversion algorithm on the relevant parameters of the problem is discussed.

  11. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  12. Self-consistent high-Reynolds-number asymptotics for zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Chauhan, Kapil A.; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2007-11-01

    The asymptotic behavior of mean velocity and integral parameters in flat plate turbulent boundary layers under zero pressure gradient are studied for Reynolds numbers approaching infinity. Using the classical two-layer approach of Millikan, Rotta, and Clauser with a logarithmic velocity profile in the overlap region between "inner" and "outer" layers, a fully self-consistent leading-order description of the mean velocity profile and all integral parameters is developed. It is shown that this description fits most high Reynolds number data, and in particular their Reynolds number dependence, exceedingly well; i.e., within experimental errors.

  13. A free-flight experiment of projectiles ranging from high subsonic to high supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, H.; Funabiki, K.; Sato, S.; Hatakeyama, M.

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports a preliminary experiment with a free-flight range which was designed to be able to be driven by means of a sort of fast-acting valve. The notable characteristics pertinent to this type of range is the pliancy of operation and also the wide coverage of flight speed from the high subsonic to the high supersonic range. For both spherical and vehicle models, flight tests were conducted with shadowgraph observations and flight speed measurements in order to examine the capability of this type of facility.

  14. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  15. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    PubMed Central

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier–Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number’. PMID:28167585

  16. High resolution mapping of genetic factors affecting abdominal bristle number in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A.D. |; Mullaney, S.L.; Langley, C.H.; Reid, L.A.; Fry, J.D.; Mackay, T.F.C.

    1995-03-01

    Factors responsible for selection response for abdominal bristle number and correlated responses in sternopleural bristle number were mapped to the X and third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Lines divergent for high and low abdominal bristle number were created by 25 generations of artificial selection from a large base population, with an intensity of 25 individuals of each sex selected from 100 individuals of each sex scored per generation. Isogenic chromosome substitution lines in which the high (H) X or third chromosome were placed in an isogenic low (L) background were derived from the selection lines and from the 93 recombinant isogenic (RI) HL X and 67 RI chromosome 3 lines constructed from them. Highly polymorphic neutral roo transposable elements were hybridized in situ to the polytene chromosomes of the RI lines to create a set of cytogenetic markers. These techniques yielded a dense map with an average spacing of 4 cM between informative markers. Two factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were mapped on the X chromosome and five factors on the third chromosome. One factor with a large effect on sternopleural bristle number was mapped to the X and two were mapped to the third chromosome; all factors with sternopleural effects corresponded to those with effects on abdominal bristle number. Two of the chromosome 3 factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were also associated with reduced viability. Significant sex-specific effects and epistatic interactions between mapped factors of the same order of magnitude as the additive effects were observed. All factors mapped to the approximate positions of likely candidate loci previously characterized by mutations with large effects on bristle number. 55 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. A high order accurate finite element algorithm for high Reynolds number flow prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Galerkin-weighted residuals formulation is employed to establish an implicit finite element solution algorithm for generally nonlinear initial-boundary value problems. Solution accuracy, and convergence rate with discretization refinement, are quantized in several error norms, by a systematic study of numerical solutions to several nonlinear parabolic and a hyperbolic partial differential equation characteristic of the equations governing fluid flows. Solutions are generated using selective linear, quadratic and cubic basis functions. Richardson extrapolation is employed to generate a higher-order accurate solution to facilitate isolation of truncation error in all norms. Extension of the mathematical theory underlying accuracy and convergence concepts for linear elliptic equations is predicted for equations characteristic of laminar and turbulent fluid flows at nonmodest Reynolds number. The nondiagonal initial-value matrix structure introduced by the finite element theory is determined intrinsic to improved solution accuracy and convergence. A factored Jacobian iteration algorithm is derived and evaluated to yield a consequential reduction in both computer storage and execution CPU requirements while retaining solution accuracy.

  18. Dispersive Nature of High Mach Number Collisionless Plasma Shocks: Poynting Flux of Oblique Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Bale, S. D.; Schwartz, S. J.; Soucek, J.; Mozer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  19. Transition Documentation on a Three-Element High-Lift Configuration at High Reynolds Numbers: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild; Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D high-lift system experiment was conducted in August of 1996 in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain transition measurements on a three element high-lift system for CFD code validation studies. A transition database has been created using the data from this experiment. The present report contains the analysis of the surface hot film data in terms of the transition locations on the three elements. It also includes relevant information regarding the pressure loads and distributions and the wakes behind the model to aid in the interpretation of the transition data. For some of the configurations the current pressure data has been compared with previous wind tunnel entries of the same model. The methodology used to determine the regions of transitional flow is outlined and each configuration tested has been analyzed. A discussion of interference effects, repeatability, and three-dimensional effects on the data is included.

  20. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  1. High Reynolds Number Studies in the Wake of a Submarine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Juan; Reynolds, Ryan; Smits, Alexander

    2005-11-01

    Results are presented from submarine wake studies conducted in Princeton University's High Reynolds Number Test Facility (HRTF). Compressed air is used as a working fluid enabling Reynolds numbers based on length of up to 10^8, about 1/5 of full scale. Measurements at Reynolds numbers up to 3 x10^6 have been completed, and show that, for the model condition without fins, the wake mean velocity was self-similar at locations 6 and 9 diameters downstream. Also, PIV at Reynolds numbers near 10^4 showed that when the yaw angle was varied the sail-tip and sail-hull junction vortices increased in magnitude emphasizing the importance of fully understanding the flow characteristics of a maneuvering submarine.

  2. A review of some Reynolds number effects related to bodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    A review of some effects of Reynolds number on selected aerodynamic characteristics of two- and three-dimensional bodies of various cross sections in relation to fuselages at high angles of attack at subsonic and transonic speeds is presented. Emphasis is placed on the Reynolds number ranges above the subcritical and angles of attack where lee side vortex flow or unsteady wake type flows predominate. Lists of references, arranged in subject categories, are presented with emphasis on those which include data over a reasonable Reynolds number range. Selected Reynolds number data representative of various aerodynamic flows around bodies are presented and analyzed and some effects of these flows on fuselage aerodynamic parameters are discussed.

  3. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  4. Altered DNA methylation associated with an abnormal liver phenotype in a cattle model with a high incidence of perinatal pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Hélène; Jouneau, Luc; Campion, Évelyne; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Larcher, Thibaut; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Balzergue, Sandrine; Ledevin, Mireille; Prézelin, Audrey; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Heyman, Yvan; Richard, Christophe; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Renard, Jean-Paul; Jammes, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Cloning enables the generation of both clinically normal and pathological individuals from the same donor cells, and may therefore be a DNA sequence-independent driver of phenotypic variability. We took advantage of cattle clones with identical genotypes but different developmental abilities to investigate the role of epigenetic factors in perinatal mortality, a complex trait with increasing prevalence in dairy cattle. We studied livers from pathological clones dying during the perinatal period, clinically normal adult clones with the same genotypes as perinatal clones and conventional age-matched controls. The livers from deceased perinatal clones displayed histological lesions, modifications to quantitative histomorphometric and metabolic parameters such as glycogen storage and fatty acid composition, and an absence of birth-induced maturation. In a genome-wide epigenetic analysis, we identified DNA methylation patterns underlying these phenotypic alterations and targeting genes relevant to liver metabolism, including the type 2 diabetes gene TCF7L2. The adult clones were devoid of major phenotypic and epigenetic abnormalities in the liver, ruling out the effects of genotype on the phenotype observed. These results thus provide the first demonstration of a genome-wide association between DNA methylation and perinatal mortality in cattle, and highlight epigenetics as a driving force for phenotypic variability in farmed animals. PMID:27958319

  5. Gender, Race, and Diet Affect Platelet Function Tests in Normal Subjects Contributing to a High Rate of Abnormal Results

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Garrett, Katherine; Stein, Sidney F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To assess sources of variability in platelet function tests in normal subjects, 64 healthy young adults were tested on 2–6 occasions at 2 week intervals using 4 methods: platelet aggregation (AGG) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the Bio/Data PAP-4 Aggregometer (BD) and Chrono-Log Lumi-Aggregometer (CL); and AGG in whole blood (WB) in the CL and Multiplate Platelet Function Analyzer (MP), with ATP release (REL) in CL-PRP and CL-WB. Food and medication exposures were recorded prospectively for 2 weeks prior to each blood draw. At least one AGG abnormality was seen in 21% of 81 drug-free specimens with CL-PRP, 15% with CL-WB, 13% with BD-PRP, and 6% with MP-WB, increasing with inclusion of REL to 28% for CL-PRP and 30% for CL-WB. Epinephrine AGG and REL were significantly reduced in males (P<0.0001). Ristocetin AGG and collagen and thrombin REL were significantly reduced in Blacks (P<0.0001). One-third of specimens drawn following flavonoid-rich food exposures had aberrant results, compared to 8.5% of specimens without such exposures (P=0.0035). PRP tests had less intra-individual variation than WB tests. Gender, race, diet, and test system affected results of platelet function testing in healthy subjects, suggesting caution when interpreting the results of platelet function testing in patients. PMID:24617520

  6. Sub-adiabatic perpendicular electron heating across high-Mach number collisionless shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, D. J.; Mozer, F.

    2012-12-01

    Spacecraft observations of a high Mach number quasi-perpendicular bow shock with high plasma beta have revealed electrons that were sub-adiabatic through the shock ramp because they were less heated than expected from conservation of the first adiabatic invariant. This stands out in contrast to existing theories of electron heating at collisionless shocks in which the electrons are adiabatically heated through compression or more-than-adiabatically heated due to additional effects such as anomalous resistivity induced by microinstabilites.

  7. Application of Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems to Ultra-High Reynolds Number Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system development is briefly reviewed. Technical work currently underway at NASA Langley Research Center is detailed, where it relates to the ultra-high Reynolds number application. The application itself is addressed, concluded to be quite feasible, and broad design recommendations given.

  8. Turbulence Model Comparisons and Reynolds Number Effects Over a High-Speed Aircraft at Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives the results of a grid study, a turbulence model study, and a Reynolds number effect study for transonic flows over a high-speed aircraft using the thin-layer, upwind, Navier-Stokes CFL3D code. The four turbulence models evaluated are the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications, the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model, the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, and Menter's two-equation Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests performed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF), are a Mach number of 0.90 and a Reynolds number of 30 million based on chord for a range of angle-of-attacks (1 degree to 10 degrees). For the Reynolds number effect study, Reynolds numbers of 10 and 80 million based on chord were also evaluated. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental data for all four of the turbulence models. The Baldwin-Lomax model with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the one-equation Baldwin-Barth model show the best agreement with experiment overall. The Reynolds number effects are evaluated using the Baldwin-Lomax with the Degani-Schiff modifications and the Baldwin-Barth turbulence models. Five angles-of-attack were evaluated for the Reynolds number effect study at three different Reynolds numbers. More work is needed to determine the ability of CFL3D to accurately predict Reynolds number effects.

  9. Focus on new perspectives in high-Rayleigh-number turbulent convection Focus on new perspectives in high-Rayleigh-number turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-09-01

    Thermal convection in a gravitational field is the source of most large-scale flows on Earth, planets and stars. It is also used to heat houses or to cool passively with metal vanes, as for example in most electronic equipment. The driving force for thermal convection is buoyancy. When a fluid is heated it expands, i.e., it changes its mass density. If the fluid in a gravitational field and heating is applied in such a way that cold, dense fluid is on top of that which is warmer and lighter, the warm fluid will rise when the driving forces of buoyancy overcome viscous drag and thermal diffusion. The experimentally best defined and most studied example is Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where a horizontal fluid layer is heated from below and cooled from above. For an incompressible fluid and Boussinesq conditions, where due to modest temperature gradients only the linear temperature dependence of density governs the physics, two dimensionless parameters describe the physics. One is the Rayleigh number, Ra, which is proportional to the temperature difference across the fluid layer of thickness, d, and to d3, implying that high Ra can be achieved experimentally at modest temperature differences only with a large d. The other parameter is the Prandtl number, Pr, which describes the relative importance of the convective nonlinearities in the momentum and heat equations. The geometry and thermal boundary conditions of the experimental apparatus are other important factors. Experiments usually strive to realize the theoretically most easily studied boundary conditions, i.e. perfectly conducting top and bottom plates and insulating sidewalls. As mentioned above, situations with large Ra require large cell heights. In experiments, typical geometries chosen are mostly cylindrical, with aspect ratios Γ = diameter/height between 1/4 and 2. For RBC, the onset of convection in an infinitely extended layer between no-slip walls is independent of the Prandtl number and occurs

  10. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  11. The 2-micron plasmid as a nonselectable, stable, high copy number yeast vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, D. L.; Bruschi, C. V.

    1991-01-01

    The endogenous 2-microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the construction of yeast cloning and expression plasmids because it is a native yeast plasmid that is able to be maintained stably in cells at high copy number. Almost invariably, these plasmid constructs, containing some or all 2-microns sequences, exhibit copy number levels lower than 2-microns and are maintained stably only under selective conditions. We were interested in determining if there was a means by which 2-microns could be utilized for vector construction, without forfeiting either copy number or nonselective stability. We identified sites in the 2-microns plasmid that could be used for the insertion of genetic sequences without disrupting 2-microns coding elements and then assessed subsequent plasmid constructs for stability and copy number in vivo. We demonstrate the utility of a previously described 2-microns recombination chimera, pBH-2L, for the manipulation and transformation of 2-microns as a pure yeast plasmid vector. We show that the HpaI site near the STB element in the 2-microns plasmid can be utilized to clone yeast DNA of at least 3.9 kb with no loss of plasmid stability. Additionally, the copy number of these constructs is as high as levels reported for the endogenous 2-microns.

  12. Design and installation of a high Reynolds number recirculating water tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Libin

    The High-Reynolds Number Fluid Mechanics Laboratory has recently been established at Oklahoma State University (OSU). The three primary components of the laboratory are 1) a recirculating water tunnel, 2) a multiphase pipe flow facility, and 3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. This thesis focuses on the design and fabrication of the water tunnel, which will be used for high-Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer research. Two main design criteria for the water tunnel were to achieve a momentum thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104 and to have high optical access to the flow surfaces in the test section. This is being achieved with a 1 m. long test section and a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105). The water tunnel is powered by a 150 hp motor and a 4500 gpm capacity centrifugal pump. The water tunnel is designed for a maximum operating pressure of 40 psi. This will make the facility a low cost option to perform high-Reynolds number aerodynamic and hydrodynamic tests. Improved flow imaging capability is a major advantage to liquid based fluid facilities because of the increased density for seeding and reduced field-of-view for equivalent Reynolds number. The laboratory's state-of-the-art flow visualization system can be used for time-resolved and phase averaged stereo- particle-image-velocimetry (sPIV), laser-induced-fluorescence, and high-speed imaging. Design provisions are also made to allow a multi-phase loop to share the pump and motor configuration of this water tunnel facility. The major design decisions that went into the design of the water tunnel facility are discussed. The design considerations that were taken into account for the test section, flow conditioning sections and the entire flow loop are discussed in greater detail. The final configuration and the technical drawings of the water

  13. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  14. Instability of magnetized and differentially rotating stellar radiation zones with high magnetic Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Schultz, M.; Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2016-03-01

    With applications to inner solar-type radiative zones, a linear theory is used to analyse the instability of a toroidal background field of dipolar parity, in the presence of density stratification, differential rotation and realistically small Prandtl numbers. The physical parameters are the Alfvén frequency ΩA, the global rotation rate Ω and the buoyancy frequency N with ΩA < Ω < N. Only the solutions for the wavelengths with the maximal growth rates are considered. If these scales are combined to estimate radial velocities, one finds that it hardly depends on the latitudinal shear and the magnetic Mach number. In the formulation of Schatzman the radial mixing of chemicals can be estimated as Re* = O(100) which indeed is necessary to dissipate the lithium in the solar tachocline with a time-scale of 1 Gyr. The calculated growth rates indicate a destabilization of the system for growing latitudinal shear except for small Mach numbers and antisolar shear. The ratio ε of the magnetic and the kinetic energy of the instability pattern only slightly depends on the shear but a strong dependence on the magnetic Mach number exists with ε ∝ Mm2. The effective magnetic Prandtl number reaches values O(103) so that for the stars with high magnetic Mach number the differential rotation decays much faster than the toroidal background field.

  15. All-optical random number generation using highly nonlinear fibers by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanfen; Liang, Junqiang; Li, Pu; Yang, Lingzhen; Wang, Yuncai

    2014-06-01

    A new scheme of all-optical random number generation based on the nonlinear effects in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLF) is proposed. The scheme is comprised of ultra-wide band chaotic entropy source, all-optical sampler, all-optical comparator and all-optical exclusive-or (XOR), which are mainly realized by four-wave mixing (FWM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) in highly nonlinear fibers. And we achieve 10 Gbit/s random numbers through numerically simulating all the processes. The entire operations are completed in the all-optical domain, which may overcome the bottleneck problem of electronic devices, and apply directly in high-speed all-optical communication network.

  16. Application of PSP to Surface Pressure Measurement in High Knudsen Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideo; Niimi, Tomohide; Hirako, Madoka; Oshima, Yusuke

    2005-05-01

    The pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique has the capability to be applied to high Knudsen number flows, such as low density gas flows, micro-flows, and so on. In this study, to inspect the feasibility of PSP for measurement of pressure on a solid surface in the high Knudsen number flows, fundamental properties of three types of PSP [PdTFPP, PdOEP and PtTFPP bound by poly(TMSP)] are examined especially in the range of pressure below 130 Pa (about 1 Torr). The pressure sensitivity against nitrogen monoxide is also examined for the above PSPs, to develop a technique for the composite measurement of the flow field structure and the surface pressure, using NO-LIF and PSP, respectively. As an application of PSP to low density gas flows, we measure the pressure distribution on a jet-impinging solid surface using PdOEP/poly(TMSP) with very high pressure sensitivity.

  17. Design and Predictions for a High-Altitude (Low-Reynolds-Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Hamory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters of an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 to 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (200,000 to 700,000), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pitot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented. Several predictions of the airfoil performance are also presented. Mark Drela from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology designed the APEX-16 airfoil, using the MSES code. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses were performed by Mahidhar Tatineni and Xiaolin Zhong from the University of California, Los Angeles, and by the authors at NASA Dryden.

  18. Design and Predictions for High-Altitude (Low Reynolds Number) Aerodynamic Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald; Harmory, Phil; Krake, Keith; Drela, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A sailplane being developed at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center will support a high-altitude flight experiment. The experiment will measure the performance parameters or an airfoil at high altitudes (70,000 - 100,000 ft), low Reynolds numbers (2 x 10(exp 5) - 7 x 10(exp 5)), and high subsonic Mach numbers (0.5 and 0.65). The airfoil section lift and drag are determined from pilot and static pressure measurements. The locations of the separation bubble, Tollmien-Schlichting boundary-layer instability frequencies, and vortex shedding are measured from a hot-film strip. The details of the planned flight experiment are presented as well as several predictions of the airfoil performance.

  19. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  20. Electron runaway across a magnetic field in a collisional high-atomic-number plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Welch, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Nonthermal x-ray spectra observed in high-atomic-number z-pinch plasmas indicate that electrons with energies greatly in excess of the plasma temperature are present. A favorite mechanism for the production of these nonthermal electrons is acceleration in inductive electric fields produced by localized collapse of plasma into pinch spots. One problem with this acceleration mechanism is the presence of intense azimuthal magnetic fields embedded in the plasma which impede the runaway of electrons along the electric field. In this work, a fluid model for nonthermal electron flow in dense, high-atomic-number plasmas is employed to determine how collisions affect their energy gain in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The simple scaling laws derived from this model are compared with IPRPO particle-in-cell simulations of the same plasma environment. Large cross-field energy gains are calculated by both models for high-atomic number plasmas where the electron scattering (momentum-transfer) frequency v{sub s} is of order Zv{sub e}, where v{sub e} is the rate associated with collisional energy loss and Z is the plasma ionization level. Once a threshold electric field is exceeded, a large number of scattering collisions across the magnetic field and along the electric field can occur in an energy-loss time and much larger energy gains are possible than in hydrogenic plasmas.

  1. Magnus effects at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Ringel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Magnus force and moment experienced by a yawed, spinning cylinder were studied experimentally in low speed and subsonic flows at high angles of attack and critical Reynolds numbers. Flow-field visualization aided in describing a flow model that divides the Magnus phenomenon into a subcritical region, where reverse Magnus loads are experienced, and a supercritical region where these loads are not encountered. The roles of the spin rate, angle of attack, and crossflow Reynolds number in determining the boundaries of the subcritical region and the variations of the Magnus loads were studied.

  2. Numerical simulations of high Knudsen number gas flows and microchannel electrokinetic liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang

    Low pressure and microchannel gas flows are characterized by high Knudsen numbers. Liquid flows in microchannels are characterized by non-conventional driving potentials like electrokinetic forces. The main thrust of the dissertation is to investigate these two different kinds of flows in gases and liquids respectively. High Knudsen number (Kn) gas flows were characterized by 'rarified' or 'microscale' behavior. Because of significant non-continuum effect, traditional CFD techniques are often inaccurate for analyzing high Kn number gas flows. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method offers an alternative to traditional CFD which retains its validity in slip and transition flow regimes. To validate the DSMC code, comparisons of simulation results with theoretical analysis and experimental data are made. The DSMC method was first applied to compute low pressure, high Kn flow fields in partially heated two dimensional channels. The effects of varying pressure, inlet flow and gas transport properties (Kn, Reynolds number, Re and the Prandtl number, Pr respectively) on the wall heat transfer (Nusselt number, Nu) were examined. The DSMC method was employed to explore mixing gas flows in two dimensional microchannels. Mixing of two gas streams (H2 and O2) was considered within a microchannel. The effect of the inlet-outlet pressure difference, the pressure ratio of the incoming streams and the accommodation coefficient of the solid wall on mixing length were all examined. Parallelization of a three-dimensional DSMC code was implemented using OpenMP procedure on a shared memory multi-processor computer. The parallel code was used to simulate 3D high Kn number Couette flow and the flow characteristics are found to be very different from their continuum counterparts. A mathematical model describing electrokinetically driven mass transport phenomena in microfabricated chip devices will also be presented. The model accounts for the principal physical phenomena affecting

  3. Longxuetongluo Capsule Improves Erythrocyte Function against Lipid Peroxidation and Abnormal Hemorheological Parameters in High Fat Diet-Induced ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiao; Liu, Binglin; Lun, Qixing; Yao, Weijuan; Zhao, Yunfang; Xiao, Wei; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Yonghua; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese dragon's blood, the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis, one of the renowned traditional medicines, has been used to facilitate blood circulation and disperse blood stasis for thousands of years. Phenolic compounds are considered to be responsible for its main biological activities. In this study, total phenolic compounds of Chinese dragon's blood were made into capsule (Longxuetongluo Capsule, LTC) and their effects on the abnormal hemorheological properties were examined by high fat diet (HFD) induced ApoE−/− mice. Compared to the model group, LTC recovered the abnormal hemorheological parameters in HFD-induced ApoE−/− mice by reducing whole blood viscosity (WBV) at high rate and improving erythrocyte function. In conclusion, LTC could ameliorate erythrocyte deformability and osmotic fragility through the reduction of lipid peroxidation on plasma and erythrocyte membranes in HFD-induced ApoE−/− mice, which supported the traditional uses of Chinese dragon's blood as an effective agent for improving blood microcirculation in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26649134

  4. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Taro; SUGANUMA, Narufumi; HERING, Kurt G.; VEHMAS, Tapio; ITOH, Harumi; AKIRA, Masanori; TAKASHIMA, Yoshihiro; HIRANO, Harukazu; KUSAKA, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects’ occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades. PMID:25810443

  5. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  6. A robust approach to the generation of high-quality random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisadi, Zahra; Fontana, Giorgio; Moser, Enrico; Pucker, Georg; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    A random number generation approach comprising a silicon nanocrystals LED (Si-NCs LED), silicon single photon avalanche photodiode (Si SPAD) and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is introduced. The Si-NCs LED is the source of entropy with photon emission in the visible range detectable by silicon detectors allowing the fabrication of an all-silicon-based device. The proposed quantum random number generator (QRNG) is robust against variations of the internal and external parameters such as aging of the components, changing temperature, the ambient interferences and the silicon detector artifacts. The raw data show high quality of randomness and passed all the statistical tests in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) tests suite without the application of a post-processing algorithm. The efficiency of random number generation is 4-bits per detected photon.

  7. A distortion of very-high-redshift galaxy number counts by gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Yan, Haojing; Windhorst, Rogier A; Mao, Shude

    2011-01-13

    The observed number counts of high-redshift galaxy candidates have been used to build up a statistical description of star-forming activity at redshift z ≳ 7, when galaxies reionized the Universe. Standard models predict that a high incidence of gravitational lensing will probably distort measurements of flux and number of these earliest galaxies. The raw probability of this happening has been estimated to be ∼0.5 per cent (refs 11, 12), but can be larger owing to observational biases. Here we report that gravitational lensing is likely to dominate the observed properties of galaxies with redshifts of z ≳ 12, when the instrumental limiting magnitude is expected to be brighter than the characteristic magnitude of the galaxy sample. The number counts could be modified by an order of magnitude, with most galaxies being part of multiply imaged systems, located less than 1 arcsec from brighter foreground galaxies at z ≈ 2. This lens-induced association of high-redshift and foreground galaxies has perhaps already been observed among a sample of galaxy candidates identified at z ≈ 10.6. Future surveys will need to be designed to account for a significant gravitational lensing bias in high-redshift galaxy samples.

  8. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  9. Regularized characteristic boundary conditions for the Lattice-Boltzmann methods at high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissocq, Gauthier; Gourdain, Nicolas; Malaspinas, Orestis; Eyssartier, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports the investigations done to adapt the Characteristic Boundary Conditions (CBC) to the Lattice-Boltzmann formalism for high Reynolds number applications. Three CBC formalisms are implemented and tested in an open source LBM code: the baseline local one-dimension inviscid (BL-LODI) approach, its extension including the effects of the transverse terms (CBC-2D) and a local streamline approach in which the problem is reformulated in the incident wave framework (LS-LODI). Then all implementations of the CBC methods are tested for a variety of test cases, ranging from canonical problems (such as 2D plane and spherical waves and 2D vortices) to a 2D NACA profile at high Reynolds number (Re =105), representative of aeronautic applications. The LS-LODI approach provides the best results for pure acoustics waves (plane and spherical waves). However, it is not well suited to the outflow of a convected vortex for which the CBC-2D associated with a relaxation on density and transverse waves provides the best results. As regards numerical stability, a regularized adaptation is necessary to simulate high Reynolds number flows. The so-called regularized FD (Finite Difference) adaptation, a modified regularized approach where the off-equilibrium part of the stress tensor is computed thanks to a finite difference scheme, is the only tested adaptation that can handle the high Reynolds computation.

  10. The Dynamics of Very High Alfvén Mach Number Shocks in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Burgess, David; Scholer, Manfred; Masters, Adam; Sulaiman, Ali H.

    2017-02-01

    Astrophysical shocks, such as planetary bow shocks or supernova remnant shocks, are often in the high or very-high Mach number regime, and the structure of such shocks is crucial for understanding particle acceleration and plasma heating, as well inherently interesting. Recent magnetic field observations at Saturn’s bow shock, for Alfvén Mach numbers greater than about 25, have provided evidence for periodic non-stationarity, although the details of the ion- and electron-scale processes remain unclear due to limited plasma data. High-resolution, multi-spacecraft data are available for the terrestrial bow shock, but here the very high Mach number regime is only attained on extremely rare occasions. Here we present magnetic field and particle data from three such quasi-perpendicular shock crossings observed by the four-spacecraft Cluster mission. Although both ion reflection and the shock profile are modulated at the upstream ion gyroperiod timescale, the dominant wave growth in the foot takes place at sub-proton length scales and is consistent with being driven by the ion Weibel instability. The observed large-scale behavior depends strongly on cross-scale coupling between ion and electron processes, with ion reflection never fully suppressed, and this suggests a model of the shock dynamics that is in conflict with previous models of non-stationarity. Thus, the observations offer insight into the conditions prevalent in many inaccessible astrophysical environments, and provide important constraints for acceleration processes at such shocks.

  11. Prevalence of High-Risk HPV Types and Abnormal Cervical Cytology in American Indian/Alaska Native Women, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Grace A.; Datta, S. Deblina; Mickiewicz, Theresa; Koutsky, Laura A.; Ghanem, Khalil; Hagensee, Michael; Kerndt, Peter; Hsu, Katherine; Weinstock, Hillard; Shlay, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We described prevalence estimates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), HPV types 16 and 18, and abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women compared with women of other races/ethnicities. Methods A total of 9,706 women presenting for cervical screening in a sentinel network of 26 clinics (sexually transmitted disease, family planning, and primary care) received Pap smears and HR-HPV type-specific testing. We compared characteristics of 291 women self-identified as AI/AN with other racial/ethnic minority groups. Results In our population, AI/AN and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women had similar age- and clinic-adjusted prevalences of HR-HPV (29.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 23.9, 34.3 for AI/AN women vs. 25.8%, 95% CI 24.4, 27.2 for NHW women), HPV 16 and 18 (6.7%, 95% CI 3.9, 9.6 for AI/AN women vs. 8.8%, 95% CI 7.9, 9.7 for NHW women), and abnormal Pap smear test results (16%, 95% CI 11.7, 20.3 for AI/AN women vs. 14.9%, 95% CI 13.7, 16.0 for NHW women). AI/AN women had a higher prevalence of HR-HPV than Hispanic women, and a similar prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 as compared with Hispanic and African American women. Conclusions We could not demonstrate differences in the prevalence of HR-HPV, HPV 16 and 18, or abnormal Pap smear test results between AI/AN and NHW women. This finding should improve confidence in the benefit of HPV vaccine and Pap smear screening in the AI/AN population as an effective strategy to reduce rates of cervical cancer. PMID:21553660

  12. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  13. NASA High-Reynolds Number Circulation Control Research - Overview of CFD and Planned Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, W. E., II; Jones, Greg S.; Cagle, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    A new capability to test active flow control concepts and propulsion simulations at high Reynolds numbers in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is being developed. This technique is focused on the use of semi-span models due to their increased model size and relative ease of routing high-pressure air to the model. A new dual flow-path high-pressure air delivery station has been designed, along with a new high performance transonic sem -si pan wing model. The modular wind tunnel model is designed for testing circulation control concepts at both transonic cruise and low-speed high-lift conditions. The ability of the model to test other active flow control techniques will be highlighted. In addition, a new higher capacity semi-span force and moment wind tunnel balance has been completed and calibrated to enable testing at transonic conditions.

  14. PUFKEY: a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator for sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongfang; Lu, Zhaojun; Zou, Xuecheng; Liu, Zhenglin

    2015-10-16

    Random number generators (RNG) play an important role in many sensor network systems and applications, such as those requiring secure and robust communications. In this paper, we develop a high-security and high-throughput hardware true random number generator, called PUFKEY, which consists of two kinds of physical unclonable function (PUF) elements. Combined with a conditioning algorithm, true random seeds are extracted from the noise on the start-up pattern of SRAM memories. These true random seeds contain full entropy. Then, the true random seeds are used as the input for a non-deterministic hardware RNG to generate a stream of true random bits with a throughput as high as 803 Mbps. The experimental results show that the bitstream generated by the proposed PUFKEY can pass all standard national institute of standards and technology (NIST) randomness tests and is resilient to a wide range of security attacks.

  15. On the high Mach number shock structure singularity caused by overreach of Maxwellian molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Myong, R. S.

    2014-05-15

    The high Mach number shock structure singularity arising in moment equations of the Boltzmann equation was investigated. The source of the singularity is shown to be the unbalanced treatment between two high order kinematic and dissipation terms caused by the overreach of Maxwellian molecule assumption. In compressive gaseous flow, the high order stress-strain coupling term of quadratic nature will grow far faster than the strain term, resulting in an imbalance with the linear dissipation term and eventually a blow-up singularity in high thermal nonequilibrium. On the other hand, the singularity arising from unbalanced treatment does not occur in the case of velocity shear and expansion flows, since the high order effects are cancelled under the constraint of the free-molecular asymptotic behavior. As an alternative method to achieve the balanced treatment, Eu's generalized hydrodynamics, consistent with the second law of thermodynamics, was revisited. After introducing the canonical distribution function in exponential form and applying the cumulant expansion to the explicit calculation of the dissipation term, a natural platform suitable for the balanced treatment was derived. The resulting constitutive equation with the nonlinear factor was then shown to be well-posed for all regimes, effectively removing the high Mach number shock structure singularity.

  16. Field synergy analysis of six starts spiral corrugated tube under high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jin-yuan; Liu, Bu-zhan; Chen, Fu-qiang; Gao, Xiao-fei; Jin, Zhi-jiang

    2016-09-01

    Coaxial heat exchanger is widely used in air conditioning, refrigeration etc., due to its highly efficient heat transfer performance. Spiral corrugated tube plays an important role in coaxial heat exchanger. In this paper, the numerical model of a six starts spiral corrugated tube and a smooth tube with the same size are developed. The temperature field and the velocity field of their streamline and longitudinal vortex are investigated respectively. Then, their heat transfer and pressure drop performance inside the spiral corrugated tube under different high Reynolds number is investigated by compared their Nusselt number and friction coefficient. Meanwhile, their field synergy performances with their field synergy angles are presented. The result shows that the Nusselt number and friction coefficient of spiral corrugated tube are always larger than the smooth tube, and with the increasing of Reynolds number, the heat transfer performance of SCT becomes better than smooth tube, however, the friction coefficient ratio also increases synchronously. And in spiral corrugated tube, the field synergy angel is smaller than in the smooth tube. This work can be referred by some who are also dealing with spiral corrugated tube and its heat performance research.

  17. Nonlocal interactions in hydrodynamic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers: the slow emergence of scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Mininni, P D; Alexakis, A; Pouquet, A

    2008-03-01

    We analyze the data stemming from a forced incompressible hydrodynamic simulation on a grid of 2048(3) regularly spaced points, with a Taylor Reynolds number of R(lambda) ~ 1300. The forcing is given by the Taylor-Green vortex, which shares similarities with the von Kàrmàn flow used in several laboratory experiments; the computation is run for ten turnover times in the turbulent steady state. At this Reynolds number the anisotropic large scale flow pattern, the inertial range, the bottleneck, and the dissipative range are clearly visible, thus providing a good test case for the study of turbulence as it appears in nature. Triadic interactions, the locality of energy fluxes, and longitudinal structure functions of the velocity increments are computed. A comparison with runs at lower Reynolds numbers is performed and shows the emergence of scaling laws for the relative amplitude of local and nonlocal interactions in spectral space. Furthermore, the scaling of the Kolmogorov constant, and of skewness and flatness of velocity increments is consistent with previous experimental results. The accumulation of energy in the small scales associated with the bottleneck seems to occur on a span of wave numbers that is independent of the Reynolds number, possibly ruling out an inertial range explanation for it. Finally, intermittency exponents seem to depart from standard models at high R(lambda), leaving the interpretation of intermittency an open problem.

  18. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  20. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  2. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  3. High-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, Mehmet A.; Pieprzyk, Josef; Li, Jing; Luo, Mingxing; Xiao, Jinghua; Xiao, Fuyuan

    2016-11-01

    We propose an approach that achieves high-capacity quantum key distribution using Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers coding. In particular, we encode a key with the Chebyshev-map values corresponding to Lucas numbers and then use k-Chebyshev maps to achieve consecutive and flexible key expansion and apply the pre-shared classical information between Alice and Bob and fountain codes for privacy amplification to solve the security of the exchange of classical information via the classical channel. Consequently, our high-capacity protocol does not have the limitations imposed by orbital angular momentum and down-conversion bandwidths, and it meets the requirements for longer distances and lower error rates simultaneously.

  4. Detached eddy simulation of high-Reynolds-number turbulent flows using the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio; Orlandi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Detached Eddy Simulation based on the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is applied in conjunction with the immersed boundary method to simulate high-Reynolds number turbulent flows in complex geometries. A fourth-order, finite-difference solver capable of discretely preserving the kinetic energy in the limit of inviscid flow is adopted to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations and model-consistent, adaptive wall functions are employed to provide the proper numerical boundary conditions at the fluid/solid interface. Numerical tests, performed for several configurations involving massively separated flows, demonstrate that computations at high-Reynolds number, as typically occurring in flows of industrial relevance, can be successfully carried out using the immersed boundary strategy, providing predictions whose accuracy is comparable to that of standard, body-fitted, structured or unstructured flow solvers.

  5. Note: A high Mach number arc-driven shock tube for turbulence studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Johnson, J. A.

    2013-04-01

    A high Mach arc-driven shock tube has been built at the Center for Plasma Science and Technology of Florida A&M University to study shock waves. A larger apparatus with higher voltage was built to study more stable shock waves and subsequent plasmas. Initial measurements of the apparatus conclude that the desired Mach numbers can be reached using only two-thirds the maximum possible energy that the circuit can provide.

  6. Simulation of transient flow in a shock tunnel and a high Mach number nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite volume Navier-Stokes code was used to simulate the shock reflection and nozzle starting processes in an axisymmetric shock tube and a high Mach number nozzle. The simulated nozzle starting processes were found to match the classical quasi-1-D theory and some features of the experimental measurements. The shock reflection simulation illustrated a new mechanism for the driver gas contamination of the stagnated test gas.

  7. Turbulent convective flows in a cubic cavity at high Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Sukhanovskii, A.; Frick, P.

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of turbulent convective flows in a cubic cell is studied experimentally for high values of Prandtl number. The first set was carriied out with propylene glycol (Pr = 64 and the second one with 25% water solution of propylene glycol (Pr = 24). It was found that increasing of Pr from 6.1 to 24 leads only to the slight change of intensity of the flow but during the next increasing of Pr from 24 to 64 the flow changes its structure.

  8. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  9. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 < Pr < 800 was derived from the data: {Nu}t = 0.0085 \\cdot Re^{0.2} \\cdot {Pr^{0.65}} The correlation has been compared to literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  10. A Computer Study of High Magnetic Reynolds Number MHD Channel Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    AD-AGOG 215 STD RESEARCH CORP ARCADIA CALIF FIG 9043 cOWPUTER STUDY OF HIGH1 MAGNETIC REYNOLDS NUMBER MH CHANNEL F--E,C (U) .OV G0 D A OLIVER. T F... STD RESEARCH.CORPORATION POST OFFICE BOX ’C’, ARCADIA, CALIFORNIA 91006 TELEPHONE: (213)_357-2311 / - STDR-80-41 A COMPUTER STUDY OF HIGH MAGNETIC...AAa____________ Ia. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK STD Research Corporation L/ AREA 46 WORK UNT NUuegs P. 0 BOX"C"NR 099-415 1 U. S. Dept. of Navy

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  12. Unstructured and adaptive mesh generation for high Reynolds number viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for generating and adaptively refining a highly stretched unstructured mesh suitable for the computation of high-Reynolds-number viscous flows about arbitrary two-dimensional geometries was developed. The method is based on the Delaunay triangulation of a predetermined set of points and employs a local mapping in order to achieve the high stretching rates required in the boundary-layer and wake regions. The initial mesh-point distribution is determined in a geometry-adaptive manner which clusters points in regions of high curvature and sharp corners. Adaptive mesh refinement is achieved by adding new points in regions of large flow gradients, and locally retriangulating; thus, obviating the need for global mesh regeneration. Initial and adapted meshes about complex multi-element airfoil geometries are shown and compressible flow solutions are computed on these meshes.

  13. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Assess Brain Structural Abnormalities in the Murine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII Model

    PubMed Central

    Poptani, Harish; Kumar, Manoj; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Kim, Sungheon; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Li, Joel; Parente, Michael K; Wolfe, John H.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed to characterize brain structural abnormalities in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). μMRI demonstrated a decrease in the volume of anterior commissure and corpus callosum and a slight increase in the volume of the hippocampus in MPS VII vs. wild-type mice. DTI indices were analyzed in gray and white matter. In vivo and ex vivo DTI demonstrated significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, external capsule and hippocampus in MPS VII vs. control brains. Significantly increased mean diffusivity was also found in the anterior commissure and corpus callosum from ex-vivo DTI. Significantly reduced linear anisotropy was observed from the hippocampus from in-vivo DTI, whereas significantly decreased planar anisotropy and spherical anisotropy were observed in the external capsule from only ex-vivo DTI. There were corresponding morphological differences in the brains of MPS VII mice by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Luxol fast blue staining demonstrated less intense staining of the corpus callosum and external capsule; myelin abnormalities in the corpus callosum were also demonstrated quantitatively in toluidine blue-stained sections and confirmed by electron microscopy. These results demonstrate the potential for μMRI and DTI for quantitative assessment of brain pathology in murine models of brain diseases. PMID:24335527

  14. A study of high-lift airfoils at high Reynolds numbers in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.; Ferris, James C.; Mcghee, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to determine the effects of Reynolds number and Mach number on the two-dimensional aerodynamic performance of two supercritical type airfoils, one equipped with a conventional flap system and the other with an advanced high lift flap system. The conventional flap system consisted of a leading edge slat and a double slotted, trailing edge flap with a small chord vane and a large chord aft flap. The advanced flap system consisted of a leading edge slat and a double slotted, trailing edge flap with a large chord vane and a small chord aft flap. Both models were tested with all elements nested to form the cruise airfoil and with the leading edge slat and with a single or double slotted, trailing edge flap deflected to form the high lift airfoils. The experimental tests were conducted through a Reynolds number range from 2.8 to 20.9 x 1,000,000 and a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.35. Lift and pitching moment data were obtained. Summaries of the test results obtained are presented and comparisons are made between the observed aerodynamic performance trends for both models. The results showing the effect of leading edge frost and glaze ice formation is given.

  15. High-Reynolds Number Circulation Control Testing in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Chan, David T.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    A new capability to test active flow control concepts and propulsion simulations at high Reynolds numbers in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center is being developed. The first active flow control experiment was completed using the new FAST-MAC semi-span model to study Reynolds number scaling effects for several circulation control concepts. Testing was conducted over a wide range of Mach numbers, up to chord Reynolds numbers of 30 million. The model was equipped with four onboard flow control valves allowing independent control of the circulation control plenums, which were directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. Preliminary analysis of the uncorrected lift data showed that the circulation control increased the low-speed maximum lift coefficient by 33%. At transonic speeds, the circulation control was capable of positively altering the shockwave pattern on the upper wing surface and reducing flow separation. Furthermore, application of the technique to only the outboard portion of the wing demonstrated the feasibility of a pneumatic based roll control capability.

  16. Reduced numbers of switched memory B cells with high terminal differentiation potential in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carsetti, Rita; Valentini, Diletta; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Marasco, Emiliano; Giustini, Ferruccio; Bartuli, Andrea; Villani, Alberto; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2015-03-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have increased susceptibility to infections and a high frequency of leukemia and autoimmune disorders, suggesting that immunodeficiency and immune dysfunction are integral parts of the syndrome. A reduction in B-cell numbers has been reported, associated with moderate immunodeficiency and normal immunoglobulin levels. Here, we compared B-cell populations of 19 children with DS with those in healthy age-matched controls. We found that all steps of peripheral B-cell development are altered in DS, with a more severe defect during the later stages of B-cell development. Transitional and mature-naïve B-cell numbers are reduced by 50% whereas switched memory B cells represent 10-15% of the numbers in age-matched controls. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced, but all other immunoglobulin isotypes were in the normal range. The frequency of switched memory B cells specific for vaccine antigens was significantly lower in affected children than in their equivalently vaccinated siblings. In vitro switched memory B cells of patients with DS have an increased ability to differentiate into antibody-forming cells in response to TLR9 signals. Tailored vaccination schedules increasing the number of switched memory B cells may improve protection and reduce the risk of death from infection in DS.

  17. Fast response temperature and humidity sensors for measurements in high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Arwatz, Gilad; Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Conventional hot/cold wires have been widely used in measuring velocity and temperature in turbulent flows due to their fine resolutions and fast response. However, for very high Reynolds number flows, limitations on the resolution appear. A very high Reynolds number flow is the atmospheric boundary layer. In order to accurately predict the energy balance at the Earth's surface, one needs information about the different turbulent scalar fields, mainly temperature and humidity, which together with velocity, contribute to the turbulent fluxes away from the surface. The nano-scaled thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) was previously developed at Princeton and has proven to have much higher spatial and temporal resolution than the regular hot wires. Here we introduce new fast-response temperature and humidity sensors that have been developed and tested. These sensors are made in-house using standard MEMS manufacturing techniques, leaving high flexibility in the process for optimization to different conditions. The small dimensions of these novel sensors enable very high spatial resolution while the small thermal mass allows significant improvements in the frequency response. These sensors have shown promising results in acquiring un-biased data of turbulent scalar and vector fields. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  18. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  19. The influence of electron temperature on cosmic ray injection in high Mach number magnetosonic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2001-08-01

    Electron pre-acceleration from thermal to mildly relativistic energies in high Mach number shocks (the injection problem) is an outstanding issue in understanding synchrotron radiation from supernova remnants. At high Alfv´enic Mach numbers, collisionless perpendicular shocks reflect a fraction of the upstream ions. This gives rise to two-stream instabilities which in turn can accelerate ions, see eg (M. E. Dieckmann et al., Astron. Astrophys. 356, 377 (2000)). However in astrophysical plasmas the value of β - the ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure - is not well known. We have used a particle in cell simulation code to investigate the influence of β on the shock structure and on the electron acceleration. Previous simulations at low values of β (N. Shimada and M. Hoshino, Astrophys. J. 543, L67 (2000)) showed that the phase space distributions of electrons and ions became highly structured: characteristic holes appear in the electron phase space and the shock dynamics exhibit reformation processes. However, we find that all these features disappear at higher β due to the high initial thermal velocity of the electrons. It follows that the electron cosmic ray injection mechanism depends strongly on β, that is, the electron temperature and magnetic field strength upstream.

  20. Action plan for responses to abnormal conditions in Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks with high organic content. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-07-01

    This action plan describes the criteria and the organizational responsibilities required for ensuring that waste storage tanks with high organic contents are maintained in a safe condition at the Hanford Site. In addition, response actions are outlined for (1) prevention or mitigation of excessive temperatures; or (2) a material release from any waste tank with high organic content. Other response actions may be defined by Westinghouse Hanford Company Systems Engineering if a waste tank parameter goes out of specification. Trend analysis indicates the waste tank parameters have seasonal variations, but are otherwise stable.

  1. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  2. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  3. On Pair Diffusion and Preferential Concentration of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we derived the Fokker-Planck equation governing the PDF of pair separation and relative velocity vectors of high St particles. The PDF equation contains a particle-pair diffusion coefficient in relative velocity space. We developed an analytical theory to predict this relative velocity-space pair diffusion coefficient in the limit of high St . Using the diffusion coefficient, Langevin-equation-based stochastic simulations were performed to evolve pair separation and velocity vectors in isotropic turbulence for particle Stokes numbers, St = 1 , 2 , 4 , 10 ,and, 20 and a Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number, Reλ = 75 . The most significant finding from the Langevin simulations is that our pair diffusivity theory successfully captures the transition of relative velocity PDF from a Gaussian PDF at separations of the order of integral length scale to a non-Gaussian PDF at smaller separations. The pair radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed using our theory show that as the Stokes number increased, particles preferentially accumulate even at integral length scale separations. Another significant finding of our approach is that the slope of RDF at Kolmogorov length scale separations for higher St particles is not zero.

  4. Human papillomavirus genotypes in women with cervical cytological abnormalities from an area with high incidence of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Deluca, Gerardo Daniel; Lucero, Raúl Horacio; Martin de Civetta, María T; Vicente, Lilian; de Gorodner, Ofelia L Z; Schelover, Eduardo; Alonso, José Mario

    2004-01-01

    It has been well demonstrated the relationship between the infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPVs) genotypes and cervical cancer. In Northeastern Argentina a high incidence of this pathology has been described and therefore a high prevalence of HPV infection is expected. In order to identify HPV genotypes associated with malignant and pre-malignant cervical lesions present in the area, 53 ecto-endo cervical cell specimens obtained from women with cytohistological alterations were studied by a PCR-RFLP technique. Out of 53 patients, 34 (64.2%) were positive for HPV infection, being HPV-16 (32.3%) the most frequently found genotype, followed by HPV-58 (14.7%), -6, -18 and -45 (5.9%), -33, -52, -53, -54, -56, -66, -MM4 and -LVX100 (2.9%). Also 5 cases of infection caused by multiple genotypes were found, which corresponded to 14.7% of the positive cases. Results indicate that besides HPV-16 and -18, the most prevalent high-risk HPV genotypes worldwide, others like -45 and -58 as well as co-infection cases are frequent between women of Northeastern Argentina, and a particular attention should be paid to this circumstance because it could be an epidemiological feature of regional importance and a useful information for a future vaccination program.

  5. Abnormal Functional Specialization within Medial Prefrontal Cortex in High-Functioning Autism: A Multi-Voxel Similarity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Meuwese, Julia D. I.; Towgood, Karren J.; Frith, Christopher D.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-voxel pattern analyses have proved successful in "decoding" mental states from fMRI data, but have not been used to examine brain differences associated with atypical populations. We investigated a group of 16 (14 males) high-functioning participants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 16 non-autistic control participants (12 males)…

  6. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Anatomy of a laminar starting thermal plume at high Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, Anne; Limare, Angela; Touitou, Floriane; Kumagai, Ichiro; Vatteville, Judith

    2011-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the dynamics of a plume generated from a small heat source in a high Prandtl number fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The velocity field was determined with particle image velocimetry, while the temperature field was measured using differential interferometry and thermochromic liquid crystals. The combination of these different techniques run simultaneously allows us to identify the different stages of plume development, and to compare the positions of key-features of the velocity field (centers of rotation, maximum vorticity locations, stagnation points) respective to the plume thermal anomaly, for Prandtl numbers greater than 103. We further show that the thermal structure of the plume stem is well predicted by the constant viscosity model of Batchelor (Q J R Met Soc 80: 339-358, 1954) for viscosity ratios up to 50.

  8. Experimental investigation of late time Rayleigh-Taylor mixing at high Atwood number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchandra, Prasoon; Mikhaeil, Mark; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of late time, high Reynolds number (Re >20000) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is studied using statistically steady experiments performed in a multi-layer gas tunnel. The density ratio of air and air-Helium mixture used in the present experiment results in an Atwood number 0.73. Three types of diagnostics - back-lit visualization, hot-wire anemometry and stereo particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) - are employed to obtain mixing width, velocity and density fields, with S-PIV employed for the first time for such experimental conditions. Velocity and density statistics, and their correlations (u', v', w',ρ' ,ρ'v') are presented. Calculations of probability density functions (p.d.f.s) and energy spectra are made to provide further insight into the flow physics. Energy budget of the flow is also discussed.

  9. High-speed quantum-random number generation by continuous measurement of arrival time of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Hua, Zhang; Liao, Qinghong; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel high speed and multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring arrival time of photons with a common starting point. To obtain the unbiased and post-processing free random bits, the measured photon arrival time is converted into the sum of integral multiple of a fixed period and a phase time. Theoretical and experimental results show that the phase time is an independent and uniform random variable. A random bit extraction method by encoding the phase time is proposed. An experimental setup has been built and the unbiased random bit generation rate could reach 128 Mb/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 8 bits per detected photon. The random numbers passed all tests in the statistical test suite.

  10. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for high Reynolds number incompressible turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1980-05-01

    The full Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible turbulent flow must be solved to accurately represent all flow phenomena which occur in a high Reynolds number incompressible flow. A two layer algebraic eddy viscosity turbulence model is used to represent the Reynolds stress in the primitive variable formulation. The development of the boundary-fitted coordinate systems makes the numerical solution of these equations feasible for arbitrarily shaped bodies. The nondimensional time averaged Navier-Stokes equations, including the turbulence mode, are represented by finite difference approximations in the transformed plane. The resulting coupled system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved using a point successive over relaxation iteration. The test case considered was a NACA 64A010 airfoil section at an angle of attack of two degrees and a Reynolds number of 2,000,000.

  11. High Frontier: The Journal for Space & Missile Professionals. Volume 2, Number 4, August 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER( S ) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release ; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY...Professionals. Volume 2, Number 4, August 2006 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Space Command (AFSPC/PAI),150 Vandenberg St Ste 1105

  12. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  13. A longitudinal follow-up using the high trans-scrotal approach for inguinal and scrotal abnormalities in boys.

    PubMed

    Gökçora, I H; Yagmurlu, A

    2003-12-01

    The popular incision for surgical approach to pediatric inguinal pathologies has been the suprapubic transverse inguinal incision. Yet alternative incisions may be considered. A prospectively randomized study of a consecutive series of 256 male infants and children with various inguinal pathologies (mainly indirect inguinal hernias) were treated surgically using the "high trans-scrotal skin-crease incision," over a period of 84 months (7 years) and were compared and found to be clinically better than age- and sex-matched 278 controls with suprapubic transverse inguinal incisions for wound healing/infection, edema, seroma, hematoma, malpositioning or atrophy of testes and recurrence of the primary pathology. The results in the study group were cosmetically and clinically more favorable, and better than the control group. Nosocomial infections, complications of incarceration, and emergency surgery have resulted in an acceptable morbidity rate of approximately 5%. Popularized use of the high trans-scrotal incision and further clinical experience is recommended to facilitate even better results.

  14. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) Genotypes and Multiple Infections in Cervical Abnormalities from Northern Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jingyun; Jiang, Jianjun; Jia, Xuesong; Chen, Chuangfu; Wang, Yuanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes often coexist within the cervical epithelia and are frequently detected together in various grades of the cervical neoplasia. To date, only a few reports exist on multiple HPV infections of HPV in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR). In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of High-Risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotypes and multiple infections. Cervical cytology samples were collected from 428 women who presented cervical abnormalities. Genotyping of HPV was performed by polymerase chain reaction–sequencing based typing (PCR-SBT) using consensus primers and specific primers. Of them, 166 samples were positive for HPV according to PCR results using the consensus primers. These samples contained cervical abnormalities enriched with inflammation (n = 107), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I (n = 19), CINII-III (n = 9) and cervical cancer (n = 31). Of the 166 HPV positive samples as determined by PCR analysis, 151 were further typed by PCR-SBT using 19 pairs of genotype-specific primers. Using this method, 17 different HR-HPV genotypes were identified. The most frequently observed HPV genotypes were HPV16 (44.0%, 73/166), 53 (28.9%, 48/166), 52 (25.3%, 42/166), 58 (22.3%, 37/166) and 35 (17.5%, 29/166). The proportions of single and multiple infections in the HPV-positive specimens were 34.9% and 65.1%, respectively. Multiple HPV types were most prevalent in the inflammatory state (63.0%), followed by cervical cancer (24.1%), CINI (11.1%), and CINII-III (1.9%). The results of our data analyses suggested that i) multiple HPV infection is not necessarily correlated with the severity of cervical abnormalities; and ii) among the multiple HPV infections, double infections combined with HPV16 is the most common. In addition, L1 full-length sequences of the top five high-risk HPV genotypes were amplified and sequenced. According to the L1 sequence of the epidemic genotypes that were amplified, we found that these

  15. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) Genotypes and Multiple Infections in Cervical Abnormalities from Northern Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Pengyan; Ren, Yan; Du, Jingyun; Jiang, Jianjun; Jia, Xuesong; Chen, Chuangfu; Wang, Yuanzhi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes often coexist within the cervical epithelia and are frequently detected together in various grades of the cervical neoplasia. To date, only a few reports exist on multiple HPV infections of HPV in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (XUAR). In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of High-Risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotypes and multiple infections. Cervical cytology samples were collected from 428 women who presented cervical abnormalities. Genotyping of HPV was performed by polymerase chain reaction-sequencing based typing (PCR-SBT) using consensus primers and specific primers. Of them, 166 samples were positive for HPV according to PCR results using the consensus primers. These samples contained cervical abnormalities enriched with inflammation (n = 107), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I (n = 19), CINII-III (n = 9) and cervical cancer (n = 31). Of the 166 HPV positive samples as determined by PCR analysis, 151 were further typed by PCR-SBT using 19 pairs of genotype-specific primers. Using this method, 17 different HR-HPV genotypes were identified. The most frequently observed HPV genotypes were HPV16 (44.0%, 73/166), 53 (28.9%, 48/166), 52 (25.3%, 42/166), 58 (22.3%, 37/166) and 35 (17.5%, 29/166). The proportions of single and multiple infections in the HPV-positive specimens were 34.9% and 65.1%, respectively. Multiple HPV types were most prevalent in the inflammatory state (63.0%), followed by cervical cancer (24.1%), CINI (11.1%), and CINII-III (1.9%). The results of our data analyses suggested that i) multiple HPV infection is not necessarily correlated with the severity of cervical abnormalities; and ii) among the multiple HPV infections, double infections combined with HPV16 is the most common. In addition, L1 full-length sequences of the top five high-risk HPV genotypes were amplified and sequenced. According to the L1 sequence of the epidemic genotypes that were amplified, we found that these

  16. Brain abnormality segmentation based on l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Erus, Guray; Tanwar, Manoj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-03-01

    We present a method that uses sparse representations to model the inter-individual variability of healthy anatomy from a limited number of normal medical images. Abnormalities in MR images are then defined as deviations from the normal variation. More precisely, we model an abnormal (pathological) signal y as the superposition of a normal part ~y that can be sparsely represented under an example-based dictionary, and an abnormal part r. Motivated by a dense error correction scheme recently proposed for sparse signal recovery, we use l1- norm minimization to separate ~y and r. We extend the existing framework, which was mainly used on robust face recognition in a discriminative setting, to address challenges of brain image analysis, particularly the high dimensionality and low sample size problem. The dictionary is constructed from local image patches extracted from training images aligned using smooth transformations, together with minor perturbations of those patches. A multi-scale sliding-window scheme is applied to capture anatomical variations ranging from fine and localized to coarser and more global. The statistical significance of the abnormality term r is obtained by comparison to its empirical distribution through cross-validation, and is used to assign an abnormality score to each voxel. In our validation experiments the method is applied for segmenting abnormalities on 2-D slices of FLAIR images, and we obtain segmentation results consistent with the expert-defined masks.

  17. Time resolved, near wall PIV measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, C.; Soria, J.; Stanislas, M.; Amili, O.; Bellani, G.; Cuvier, C.; Eisfelder, M.; Fiorini, T.; Graf, N.; Klinner, J.

    2016-11-01

    We report on near wall measurements of a turbulent pipe flow at shear Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 40000 acquired in the CICLoPE facility near Bologna, Italy. With 900 mm diameter and 110 m length the facility offers a well-established turbulent flow with viscous length scales ranging from y+ = 85 μ m at Reτ = 5000 to y+ = 11 μ m at Reτ = 40000 . These length scales can be resolved with a high-speed PIV camera at image magnification near unity. For the measurement the light of a high-speed, double-pulse laser is focused into a 300 μ m thin light sheet that is introduced radially into the pipe. The light scattered by 1 μ m water-glycerol droplet seeding is observed from the side by the camera via a thin high-aspect ratio mirror with a field of view covering 20mm in wall-normal and 5mm in stream-wise direction. Statistically converged velocity profiles could be achieved using 70000 samples per sequence acquired at low laser repetition rates (100Hz). Higher sampling rates of 10 kHz provide temporally coherent data from which frequency spectra can be derived. Preliminary analysis of the data shows a well resolved inner peak that grows with increasing Reynolds number. (Project funding through EuHIT - www.euhit.org)

  18. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  19. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  20. High prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and abnormal glucose tolerance in the Iranian urban population: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Hadaegh, Farzad; Bozorgmanesh, Mohammad Reza; Ghasemi, Asghar; Harati, Hadi; Saadat, Navid; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2008-01-01

    Background To estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and combined IFG/IGT in a large urban Iranian population aged ≥ 20 years. Methods The study population included 9,489 participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study with full relevant clinical data. Age-standardized prevalence of diabetes and glucose intolerance categories were reported according to the 2003 American Diabetes Association definitions. Age-adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the numbers needed to screen (NNTS) to find one person with undiagnosed diabetes. Results The prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, isolated IFG, isolated IGT, and combined IFG/IGT were 8.1%, 5.1%, 8.7%, 5.4% and 4.0% in men and 10%, 4.7%, 6.3%, 7.6%, and 4.5% in women respectively. Participants with undiagnosed diabetes had higher age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, triglycerides (all p values <0.001) and lower HDL-cholesterol (only in women, p < 0.01) compared to normoglycemic subjects. Undiagnosed diabetes was associated with family history of diabetes, increased BMI (≥ 25 kg/m2), abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension and low HDL-cholesterol levels. Among men, a combination of increased BMI, hypertension, and family history of diabetes led to a NNTS of 1.6 (95% CI: 1.57–1.71) and among women a combination of family history of diabetes and abdominal obesity, yielded a NNTS of 2.2 (95% CI: 2.1–2.4). Conclusion In conclusion, about one third of Tehranian adults had disturbed glucose tolerance or diabetes. One- third of total cases with diabetes were undiagnosed. Screening individuals with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (men), hypertension (men), abdominal obesity (women) and family history of diabetes may be more efficient. PMID:18501007

  1. Turbulent Flow Physics and Noise in High Reynolds Number Compressible Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    In this talk I will present a snapshot of our ongoing research in high Reynolds number turbulent compressible jets. The high speed axisymmetric jet work (Mach 0.6 - 1.1) has been jointly performed with Spectral Energies LLC through AFRL support and involves 10 kHz and large window PIV data extracted from the near field jet plume, simultaneously sampled with near field pressure and far field noise. We have learned from the simultaneously sampled 10 kHz PIV near field plume and far field noise data, using POD/OID and Wavelet filtering, that there are certain "loud" velocity modes that have low averaged turbulent kinetic energy content but strongly correlate with the far field noise. From the large window PIV data obtained at Mach 1.0 and 1.1, specific POD modes were found to contain important physics of the problem. For example, the large-scale structure of the jet, shock-related fluctuations, and turbulent mixing regions of the flow were isolated through POD. By computing cross correlations, particular POD modes were found to be related to particular noise spectra. I will conclude with a description of our complex nozzle work which uses the multi-stream supersonic single expansion rectangular nozzle (SERN) recently installed in our large anechoic chamber at SU. This work is funded from both AFOSR (joint with OSU with a primary focus on flow physics) and Spectral Energies LLC (via AFRL funds with a focus on noise). Particular emphasis will be on insight gained into this complex 3D flow field (and its relationship to the far field noise) from applications of POD, Wavelet filtering and DMD to various numerical (LES) and experimental (PIV, high speed schlieren, near and far field pressure) data sets, at a core nozzle Mach number of 1.6 and a second stream Mach number of 1.0.

  2. Rayleigh-Bénard convection at high Prandtl numbers in circular and square geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephen R.; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    Experiments using water and simulations have shown that flow structures and turbulent fluctuations in Rayleigh-Bénard convection are affected by the shape of the container. We study the effect of the geometry in both square and cylindrical test cells of aspect ratio of order unity in high Prandtl fluids (up to 104). Flow visualization using a photochromic dye seeded throughout the fluid allows us to uninvasively study the evolution of the large scale structures. We discuss the observations in the two geometries and compare them with previous observations at low Prandtl numbers.

  3. Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    of Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014014. Fig. 4 Turbulent transport as a fraction of total transport plotted versus Re for each of four...Diffusion in Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014062. [9] George, E., Glimm, J., Grove, J. W., Li, X.-L., Liu, Y.-J., Xu, Z.-L., and Zhao, N., 2003...ABSTRACT Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context Report Title Mix is a critical input to hydro

  4. Computation of high Reynolds number internal/external flows. [VNAP2 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.; Wilmoth, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A general, user oriented computer program, called VNAP2, has been developed to calculate high Reynolds number, internal/external flows. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either a mixing-length, a one transport equation, or a two transport equation model. Interior grid points are computed using the explicit MacCormack scheme with special procedures to speed up the calculation in the fine grid. All boundary conditions are calculated using a reference plane characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source terms. Several internal, external, and internal/external flow calculations are presented.

  5. Neuroanatomic and Cognitive Abnormalities in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in the Era of “High Definition” Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Argelinda; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing release of the Human Connectome Project (HCP) data is a watershed event in clinical neuroscience. By attaining a quantum leap in spatial and temporal resolution within the framework of a twin/sibling design, this open science resource provides the basis for delineating brain-behavior relationships across the neuropsychiatric landscape. Here we focus on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is at least partly continuous across the population, highlighting constructs that have been proposed for ADHD and which are included in the HCP phenotypic battery. We review constructs implicated in ADHD (reward-related processing, inhibition, vigilant attention, reaction time variability, timing and emotional lability) which can be examined in the HCP data and in future “high definition” clinical datasets. PMID:25212469

  6. Neuroanatomic and cognitive abnormalities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the era of 'high definition' neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Argelinda; Castellanos, F Xavier

    2015-02-01

    The ongoing release of the Human Connectome Project (HCP) data is a watershed event in clinical neuroscience. By attaining a quantum leap in spatial and temporal resolution within the framework of a twin/sibling design, this open science resource provides the basis for delineating brain-behavior relationships across the neuropsychiatric landscape. Here we focus on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is at least partly continuous across the population, highlighting constructs that have been proposed for ADHD and which are included in the HCP phenotypic battery. We review constructs implicated in ADHD (reward-related processing, inhibition, vigilant attention, reaction time variability, timing and emotional lability) which can be examined in the HCP data and in future 'high definition' clinical datasets.

  7. Instability of thermocapillary convection in long liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Koichi; Yano, Taishi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Ueno, Ichiro; Ermakov, Michael K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the instability of thermocapillary convection in long half-zone liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids (Pr=67, 112 and 207 for 5, 10 and 20 cSt silicone oils, respectively). The experiments were carried out in microgravity on the International Space Station, which allowed sufficiently long waiting period for the development of instability. Critical temperature differences were measured for liquid bridges of 30 and 50 mm diameters and up to 62.5 mm length. The resultant critical Marangoni numbers (Mac) were obtained for a wide range of aspect ratio (=height/diameter), AR, up to AR=2.0. Linear stability analyses for Pr=67 were also carried out to obtain numerical data for comparison. The present experimental results for Pr=67 indicate 5.0×1031.25) and they are in good agreement with the present linear stability analysis result. In contrast, the present results are considerably smaller than the previous data (Pr=74) taken in the Space Shuttle experiments. It is shown that this difference is due to the effect of heating rate of the liquid bridge. The data for oscillation frequency and azimuthal mode number are also presented. The non-dimensional oscillation frequencies as well as Mac for Pr=67 have shown a sudden decrease at around AR=1.25, suggesting the bifurcation of neutral stability curves.

  8. DNS/LES Simulations of Separated Flows at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) simulations of flow through a periodic channel with a constriction are performed using the dynamic Smagorinsky model at two Reynolds numbers of 2800 and 10595. The LES equations are solved using higher order compact schemes. DNS are performed for the lower Reynolds number case using a fine grid and the data are used to validate the LES results obtained with a coarse and a medium size grid. LES simulations are also performed for the higher Reynolds number case using a coarse and a medium size grid. The results are compared with an existing reference data set. The DNS and LES results agreed well with the reference data. Reynolds stresses, sub-grid eddy viscosity, and the budgets for the turbulent kinetic energy are also presented. It is found that the turbulent fluctuations in the normal and spanwise directions have the same magnitude. The turbulent kinetic energy budget shows that the production peaks near the separation point region and the production to dissipation ratio is very high on the order of five in this region. It is also observed that the production is balanced by the advection, diffusion, and dissipation in the shear layer region. The dominant term is the turbulent diffusion that is about two times the molecular dissipation.

  9. Abnormally High Content of Free Glucosamine Residues Identified in a Preparation of Commercially Available Porcine Intestinal Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) polysaccharides are ubiquitous in animal tissues as components of proteoglycans, and they participate in many important biological processes. HS carbohydrate chains are complex and can contain rare structural components such as N-unsubstituted glucosamine (GlcN). Commercially available HS preparations have been invaluable in many types of research activities. In the course of preparing microarrays to include probes derived from HS oligosaccharides, we found an unusually high content of GlcN residue in a recently purchased batch of porcine intestinal mucosal HS. Composition and sequence analysis by mass spectrometry of the oligosaccharides obtained after heparin lyase III digestion of the polysaccharide indicated two and three GlcN in the tetrasaccharide and hexasaccharide fractions, respectively. 1H NMR of the intact polysaccharide showed that this unusual batch differed strikingly from other HS preparations obtained from bovine kidney and porcine intestine. The very high content of GlcN (30%) and low content of GlcNAc (4.2%) determined by disaccharide composition analysis indicated that N-deacetylation and/or N-desulfation may have taken place. HS is widely used by the scientific community to investigate HS structures and activities. Great care has to be taken in drawing conclusions from investigations of structural features of HS and specificities of HS interaction with proteins when commercial HS is used without further analysis. Pending the availability of a validated commercial HS reference preparation, our data may be useful to members of the scientific community who have used the present preparation in their studies. PMID:27295282

  10. On large-scale dynamo action at high magnetic Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic activity—dynamo waves—in the astrophysical limit of very large magnetic Reynolds number. We consider kinematic dynamo action for a system consisting of helical flow and large-scale shear. We demonstrate that large-scale dynamo waves persist at high Rm if the helical flow is characterized by a narrow band of spatial scales and the shear is large enough. However, for a wide band of scales the dynamo becomes small scale with a further increase of Rm, with dynamo waves re-emerging only if the shear is then increased. We show that at high Rm, the key effect of the shear is to suppress small-scale dynamo action, allowing large-scale dynamo action to be observed. We conjecture that this supports a general 'suppression principle'—large-scale dynamo action can only be observed if there is a mechanism that suppresses the small-scale fluctuations.

  11. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 2; Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the aerodynamic design of an experimental hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) wing panel intended for use on a Boeing 757 airplane to provide a facility for flight research on high Reynolds number HLFC and to demonstrate practical HLFC operation on a full-scale commercial transport airplane. The design consists of revised wing leading edge contour designed to produce a pressure distribution favorable to laminar flow, definition of suction flow requirements to laminarize the boundary layer, provisions at the inboard end of the test panel to prevent attachment-line boundary layer transition, and a Krueger leading edge flap that serves both as a high lift device and as a shield to prevent insect accretion on the leading edge when the airplane is taking off or landing.

  12. A spectral multidomain penalty method model for high Reynolds number incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Vargas, Jorge; Diamessis, Peter

    2010-11-01

    We present the latest results of a spectral multidomain penalty method-based incompressible Navier Stokes solver for high Reynolds number stratified turbulent flows in doubly non-periodic domains that is currently under development. Time is discretized with a high-order stiffly stable scheme, whereas space is discretized with a Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre collocation approach in discontinuous quadrilateral subdomains. Numerical stability is guaranteed through a penalty scheme, spectral filtering and dealiasing techniques. The Poisson system of equations that arises from the temporal discretization is analyzed in detail as well as different preconditioning strategies to solve it efficiently, such as Kronecker product, deflation, multigrid, Jacobi, and finite difference based techniques. The efficiency and accuracy of the Navier Stokes solver are assessed through the solution of the driven cavity flow, Taylor vortex, and Couette flow.

  13. The mean coefficients of heat transfer from gas to turbine nozzle blade at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariev, D. I.; Lelchuk, V. L.; Balashov, Iu. A.

    1982-10-01

    The mean heat transfer in the flow section of a high-temperature gas turbine at high Reynolds number between six and seven million was examined. The experimental nozzle cascade is described and experimental velocity curves for assessing the aerodynamic efficiency of the blade profile are shown. The heat-transfer investigation involved calorimetric measurement with forward and reverse directions of the heat flux. The flow rate and temperature difference of water passing through the blade were measured, and the mean coefficients of heat transfer over the profile surface were calculated in the form of the ratio of heat flux density to the difference between the mean temperature of the surface and the inlet cascade flow temperature. The experimental results were used to derive a relation which is analyzed.

  14. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  15. Stark broadening of high-principal-quantum-number n-alpha lines of hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasalle, T. R.; Nee, T.-J.; Griem, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    High n-alpha lines (transitions n + 1 to n) with quantum numbers n between 50 and 250 have been observed emanating from galactic H II regions where the electron density and temperature are about 1000/cu cm and 1 eV, respectively. High n-alpha lines have not previously been seen in the laboratory where fairly homogeneous plasmas may be produced and relatively precise measurements of electron densities and temperatures can be made. The present work describes experiments where the first members of the hydrogen line series with lower states n = 10, 11, 12, and 13 have been detected in a laboratory plasma. The width of the 12-alpha line at 88.7 microns could be measured and was consistent with calculated broadening from elastic electron collisions and quasi-static ion effects.

  16. Simulation study of magnetic reconnection in high magnetic Reynolds number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabo, T.; Kusano, K.; Miyoshi, T.; Vekstein, G.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process for dynamics in space and laboratory plasmas. Magnetic reconnection is basically dominated by magnetic diffusion at thin current sheet as proposed by Sweet (1958) and Parker (1963). According to their theory, the reconnection rate must be inversely proportional to the square root of the magnetic Reynolds number (S). In magnetosphere and the solar corona, however, in spite of high magnetic Reynolds number (>10^12), reconnection rate is measured to be about 10^-2 that is much higher than the Sweet and Parker's prediction. Although Petschek proposed that the slow mode shock may accelerate reconnection, numerical simulations suggested that the Petschek's type reconnection cannot be sustained with uniform resistivity. On the other hand, it is pointed out that in high magnetic Reynolds number, the thin current sheet becomes unstable to the so-called secondary tearing instability, which generates many plasmoids and drives a sort of fast reconnection. Although Baty (2012) recently investigated the possibility of Petschek-like structure in relatively high-S (~10^4) regime, it is still unclear whether and how the magnetic reconnection is able to be accelerated in higher-S regime (S>10^5). In this paper, we developed the high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of magnetic reconnection for very high-S (S~10^4-10^6) aiming at revealing the acceleration mechanism of magnetic reconnection. We applied the HLLD Riemann solver, which was developed by Miyoshi and Kusano (2005), to the high resolution two-dimensional MHD simulation of current sheet dynamics. In our model, the initial state is given by the Harris sheet equilibrium plus perturbation. As a result, in the case for S=10^5, multiple X-line reconnection appears as a result of the secondary tearing instability and magnetic reconnection is accelerated through the formation of multiple magnetic islands as pointed out by the previous studies. Furthermore, we found that

  17. Magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in high Mach number shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-11-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields is a central ingredient in understanding particle acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. I will present results from multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of shock formation and particle acceleration for different magnetization levels. These first principles simulations, for unprecedented temporal and spatial scales, help bridge the gap between fully kinetic and hybrid modeling. The results show that depending on the magnetization the turbulence responsible for particle injection and acceleration is determined by different processes, which include Weibel and Bell-type instabilities, but also magnetic reconnection. At high Mach numbers both electrons and ions are shown to be efficiently injected and accelerated. I will discuss the importance of these results for current astrophysical models and the possibility of studying these magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration processes in near future high energy density laboratory experiments.

  18. Stability of High Rayleigh-Number Equilibrium Solutions of the Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole; Corson, Lindsey; Chini, Gregory

    2013-11-01

    There has been significant renewed interest in dissolution-driven convection in porous layers owing to the potential impact of this process on carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers. In this talk, we present some numerically-exact equilibrium solutions to the porous medium convection problem in small laterally-periodic domains at high Rayleigh number Ra . The ``uni-cellular'' equilibrium solutions first found by Corson and Chini (2011) by solving the steady Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations are recovered and, in the interior (i.e. away from upper and lower boundary layers), are shown to have the same horizontal-mean structure as the ``heat-exchanger'' solutions identified by Hewitt et al. (2012). Secondary stability analysis of the steady solutions is performed, and implications for high-Ra porous medium convection are discussed. Funding from NSF Award 0928098 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Brain abnormalities in high-risk violent offenders and their association with psychopathic traits and criminal recidivism.

    PubMed

    Leutgeb, V; Leitner, M; Wabnegger, A; Klug, D; Scharmüller, W; Zussner, T; Schienle, A

    2015-11-12

    Measures of psychopathy have been proved to be valuable for risk assessment in violent criminals. However, the neuronal basis of psychopathy and its contribution to the prediction of criminal recidivism is still poorly understood. We compared structural imaging data from 40 male high-risk violent offenders and 37 non-delinquent healthy controls via voxel-based morphometry. Psychopathic traits and risk of violence recidivism were correlated with gray matter volume (GMV) of regions of interest previously shown relevant for criminal behavior. Relative to controls, criminals showed less GMV in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and more GMV in cerebellar regions and basal ganglia structures. Within criminals, we found a negative correlation between prefrontal GMV and psychopathy. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar GMV and psychopathy as well as risk of recidivism for violence. Moreover, GMVs of the basal ganglia and supplementary motor area (SMA) were positively correlated with anti-sociality. GMV of the amygdala was negatively correlated with dynamic risk for violence recidivism. In contrast, GMV of (para)limbic areas (orbitofrontal cortex, insula) was positively correlated with anti-sociality and risk of violence recidivism. The current investigation revealed that in violent offenders deviations in GMV of the PFC as well as areas involved in the motor component of impulse control (cerebellum, basal ganglia, SMA) are differentially related to psychopathic traits and the risk of violence recidivism. The results might be valuable for improving existing risk assessment tools.

  20. High Frequency Tympanometry (1,000 Hz) for Neonates with Normal and Abnormal Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Nahrani, Morteza Hamidi; Bolandi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper aimed at evaluating the characteristics of high-frequency (1,000 Hz) acoustic admittance (ya) for the neonates with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) as either pass or refer group. Subjects and Methods Using a 1,000 Hz probe tone, 297neonates (152 male, 145 female aged 0–104 days old) were evaluated. Tympanometric parameters admittance value at +200 dapa, middle ear admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure were calculated for each tympanogram. Results The mean of ya was 0.9678 mmho in the TEOAE for the pass group and 0.7229 mmho in the refer group. The mean of acoustic admittance at +200 (y200) was 2.0657 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 1.7191 for the refer group. The mean of Tpp was 23/8591 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 59/7619 for the refer group. Conclusions There were significant differences in the distribution of different types of tympanograms, the mean of ya, tympanic peak pressure, and y200 between the TEOAEs for the pass and the refer groups. PMID:27942601

  1. A study of neurosonogram abnormalities, clinical correlation with neurosonogram findings, and immediate outcome of high-risk neonates in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Niranjan; Berwal, Pramod Kumar; Srinivas, Anusha; Sehra, Ramnarayan; Swami, Sarika; Jeevaji, Prathyusha; Swami, Gotam; Choudary, Lokesh; Berwal, Ayush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sonography of the brain is now an essential part of newborn care, particularly in high risk and unstable premature infants. Cranial ultrasound is the most available and easily repeatable imaging technique for the neonatal brain showing brain development and the most frequently occurring forms of cerebral injury in the preterm and terms. This study aims to assess the importance of cranial ultrasound as an investigatory modality for high-risk neonates and to find out the morphology of various cerebral lesions and correlate clinically. Methodology: An observational correlation clinical study was conducted at Sardar Patel Medical College, Bikaner involving 100 high-risk neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) who was subjected to neurosonography on selected days as per protocol. Perinatal details were recorded, and clinical examination with appropriate investigations was done. The cranial ultrasound was done, and morphology of various findings was studied and recorded. Clinical correlation with cranial ultrasound findings and follow-up was done. Results: On cranial ultrasound, 38% of neonates had abnormal findings. Twelve percent of these had evidence of intracranial bleed, 13% periventricular echogenicity, 7% had ventriculomegaly, 2% had cerebral edema, and 1% had leukomalacia. Three neonates had findings suggestive of simple cyst in middle cranial fossa, agenesis of corpus callosum, and choroid plexus cyst. Conclusions: Cranial ultrasonography is the best point of care neuroimaging method available for high-risk neonates. It is critical as an investigatory modality in NICU and effectively documents morphology of cerebral damage. PMID:27857787

  2. Mean rate of energy transfer in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage; Klewicki, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    Recently Wyngaard(Phys. Fluids, 14, 2002) derived a physical space representation of the mean rate of energy transfer from resolvable scales to sub-filter scales in a turbulent flow field as Π = \\overlineu_i^ru_j^rs_ij^s - \\overlineu_i^su_j^ss_ij^r . Here, u_i^r , and u_i^r are the resolvable scale and sub-filter scale velocities and s_ij^r and s_ij^r are the respective strain rates. He also derived that the joint transport of turbulent kinetic energy(TKE) as -\\overlinefracpartialu_i^ru_i^su_jpartialx_j. In this research, some of the terms in the above expressions are explored using high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer data. The data were acquired under near-neutral conditions in the atmospheric surface layer that flows over the salt playa of western Utah. The momentum deficit thickness Reynolds number of the flow was approximately 5 × 10^6. Hot wire anemometry was used with custom designed six-wire probes. The spatial resolution of sensors, about 10 viscous units, was very good. Top-hat high-pass and low-pass temporal filtering is used to segregate the experimental time series into resolved and sub-filter scales. Contributions to the energy budget are computed for both scales and compared. In addition, results of the contributions to the mean energy transfer rate will be presented as a function of varying cut-off frequency.

  3. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Nudds, Robert L; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-10-16

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion.

  4. Three-dimensional effects on airfoil measurements at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark; Hultmark, Marcus; Hansen, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum codes (BEM) are widely used in the wind turbine industry to determine a turbine's operational range and its limits. Empirical two-dimensional airfoil data serve as the primary and fundamental input to the BEM code. Consequently, the results of BEM simulations are strongly dependent on the accuracy of these data. In this presentation, an experimental study is described in which airfoils of different aspect ratios were tested at identical Reynolds numbers. A high-pressure wind tunnel facility is used to achieve large Reynolds numbers of Rec = 3 ×106 , even with small chord lengths. This methodology enables testing of very high aspect ratio airfoils to characterize 3-D effects on the lift and drag data. The tests were performed over a large range of angles of attack, which is especially important for wind turbines. The effect of varying aspect ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil is discussed with emphasis on the outcome of a BEM simulation. The project was partially funded by NSF CBET-1435254 (program manager Dr. Gregory Rorrer).

  5. The effect of high frequency sound on Culicoides numbers collected with suction light traps.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2012-11-07

    Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), are involved in the transmission of various pathogens that cause important diseases of livestock worldwide. The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of these insects on livestock could play an important role as part of an integrated control programme against diseases transmitted by these midges. The objective of this study was to determine whether high frequency sound has any repellent effect on Culicoides midges. The number of midges collected with 220 V Onderstepoort white light traps fitted with electronic mosquito repellents (EMRs), emitting 5-20 KHz multi-frequency sound waves, was compared with that of two untreated traps. Treatments were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although fewer midges were collected in the two traps fitted with EMRs, the average number collected over eight consecutive nights was not significantly different. The EMRs also had no influence on any of the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer or the species composition of the Culicoides population as determined with light traps. The results indicate that high frequency sound has no repellent effect on Culicoides midges. There is therefore no evidence to support their promotion or use in the protection of animals against pathogens transmitted by Culicoides midges.

  6. Flying and swimming animals cruise at a Strouhal number tuned for high power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Graham K.; Nudds, Robert L.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.

    2003-10-01

    Dimensionless numbers are important in biomechanics because their constancy can imply dynamic similarity between systems, despite possible differences in medium or scale. A dimensionless parameter that describes the tail or wing kinematics of swimming and flying animals is the Strouhal number, St = fA/U, which divides stroke frequency (f) and amplitude (A) by forward speed (U). St is known to govern a well-defined series of vortex growth and shedding regimes for airfoils undergoing pitching and heaving motions. Propulsive efficiency is high over a narrow range of St and usually peaks within the interval 0.2 < St < 0.4 (refs 3-8). Because natural selection is likely to tune animals for high propulsive efficiency, we expect it to constrain the range of St that animals use. This seems to be true for dolphins, sharks and bony fish, which swim at 0.2 < St < 0.4. Here we show that birds, bats and insects also converge on the same narrow range of St, but only when cruising. Tuning cruise kinematics to optimize St therefore seems to be a general principle of oscillatory lift-based propulsion.

  7. Development of small high-copy-number plasmid vectors for gene expression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Umelo-Njaka, E; Nomellini, J F; Yim, H; Smit, J

    2001-07-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is a bacterium with a distinctive life cycle and so it is studied as a cell development model. In addition, we have adapted this bacterium for recombinant protein production and display based on the crystalline surface protein (S)-layer and its C-terminal secretion signal. We report here the development of small, high-copy-number plasmid vectors and methods for producing an obligate expression host. The vectors are based on a narrow-host-range colE1-replicon-based plasmid commonly used in Escherichia coli, to which was added the replication origin of the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. C. crescentus strains were modified to enable plasmid replication by introduction of the RSF1010 repBAC genes at the recA locus. The small (4.0-4.5 kb) plasmids were in high copy numbers in both C. crescentus and E. coli and amenable to rapid methods for plasmid isolation and DNA sequencing. The method for introducing repBAC is suitable for other C. crescentus strains or any bacterium with an adequately homologous recA gene. Application of the vector for protein expression, based on the type I secretion system of the S-layer protein, when compared to constructs in broad-host-range plasmids, resulted in reduced time and steps required from clone construction to recombinant protein recovery and increased protein yield.

  8. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  9. High prevalence of androgen deficiency and abnormal lipid profile in infertile men with non-obstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Bobjer, J; Naumovska, M; Giwercman, Y L; Giwercman, A

    2012-10-01

    In men with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), the risk of hypogonadism is often overlooked. Testicular sperm extraction (TESE) may increase this risk. The objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of hypogonadism in NOA-patients, the impact of TESE on hormone balance and the association between testosterone deficiency and dyslipidaemia. Men with NOA who had undergone TESE during the period 2004-2009 were eligible. Hypogonadism was defined as total testosterone <10 nmol/L and/or LH >10 IU/L and/or ongoing androgen replacement therapy. Sixty-five consecutive men who had undergone TESE owing to NOA and from whom post-TESE serum testosterone levels measured before 1100 h were available. Furthermore, 141 fertile men served as controls. Serum concentrations of testosterone, LH and lipids were assessed. Odds ratios (OR) for biochemical hypogonadism were calculated. Pre- and post-TESE hormone levels were compared. Lipid profile was related to testosterone levels. Hypogonadism was found in 47% (95% CI, 0.36, 0.59) of the NOA-men. As compared with fertile controls, the OR for hypogonadism post-TESE was 17 (95% CI 6.6-45). Serum LH (p = 0.03), but not testosterone (p = 0.43), differed significantly pre- and post-TESE. Compared with eugonadal NOA-men, the OR for having deviations in lipid profile was 3.3 (95% CI 1.3-8.8) for the hypogonadal NOA-men. NOA-men are at very high risk of androgen deficiency, which even in young subjects is associated with dyslipidaemia. Medical management of these men should therefore include endocrinological evaluation and follow-up after completion of infertility treatment.

  10. Voluntary exercise contributed to an amelioration of abnormal feeding behavior, locomotor activity and ghrelin production concomitantly with a weight reduction in high fat diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Mifune, Hiroharu; Tajiri, Yuji; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Kento; Iwata, Shimpei; Tokubuchi, Ichiro; Mitsuzono, Ryouichi; Yamada, Kentaro; Kojima, Masayasu

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, effects of voluntary exercise in an obese animal model were investigated in relation to the rhythm of daily activity and ghrelin production. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a high fat diet (HFD) or a chow diet (CD) from four to 16 weeks old. They were further subdivided into either an exercise group (HFD-Ex, CD-Ex) with a running wheel for three days of every other week or sedentary group (HFD-Se, CD-Se). At 16 weeks old, marked increases in body weight and visceral fat were observed in the HFD-Se group, together with disrupted rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity. The induction of voluntary exercise brought about an effective reduction of weight and fat, and ameliorated abnormal rhythms of activity and feeding in the HFD-Ex rats. Wheel counts as voluntary exercise was greater in HFD-Ex rats than those in CD-Ex rats. The HFD-obese had exhibited a deterioration of ghrelin production, which was restored by the induction of voluntary exercise. These findings demonstrated that abnormal rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity in HFD-obese rats were restored by infrequent voluntary exercise with a concomitant amelioration of the ghrelin production and weight reduction. Because ghrelin is related to food anticipatory activity, it is plausible that ghrelin participates in the circadian rhythm of daily activity including eating behavior. A beneficial effect of voluntary exercise has now been confirmed in terms of the amelioration of the daily rhythms in eating behavior and physical activity in an animal model of obesity.

  11. Time-averaged flow over a hydrofoil at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoyne, Dwayne A.; Hamel, Joshua M.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Dowling, David R.

    2003-12-01

    At high Reynolds number, the flow of an incompressible viscous fluid over a lifting surface is a rich blend of fluid dynamic phenomena. Here, boundary layers formed at the leading edge develop over both the suction and pressure sides of the lifting surface, transition to turbulence, separate near the foil's trailing edge, combine in the near wake, and eventually form a turbulent far-field wake. The individual elements of this process have been the subject of much prior work. However, controlled experimental investigations of these flow phenomena and their interaction on a lifting surface at Reynolds numbers typical of heavy-lift aircraft wings or full-size ship propellers (chord-based Reynolds numbers, Re_C {˜} 10(7{-}10^8) ) are largely unavilable. This paper presents results from an experimental effort to identify and measure the dominant features of the flow over a two-dimensional hydrofoil at nominal Re_C values from near one million to more than 50 million. The experiments were conducted in the US Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel with a solid-bronze hydrofoil (2.1 m chord, 3.0 m span, 17 cm maximum thickness) at flow speeds from 0.25 to 18.3 m s(-1) . The foil section, a modified NACA 16 with a pressure side that is nearly flat and a suction side that terminates in a blunt trailing-edge bevel, approximates the cross-section of a generic naval propeller blade. Time-averaged flow-field measurements drawn from laser-Doppler velocimetry, particle-imaging velocimetry, and static pressure taps were made for two trailing-edge bevel angles (44 (°) and 56 (°) ). These velocity and pressure measurements were concentrated in the trailing-edge and near-wake regions, but also include flow conditions upstream and far downstream of the foil, as well as static pressure distributions on the foil surface and test section walls. Observed Reynolds-number variations in the time-averaged flow over the foil are traced to changes in suction-side boundary

  12. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change.

  13. [Adaptation of the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus Schreber) to conditions of biogeochemical province with abnormally high content of nickel, cobalt and chromium].

    PubMed

    Mikheeva, E V; Zhigal'skiĭ, O A; Mamina, V P; Baĭtimirova, E A

    2006-01-01

    Morphophysiological characteristics and peculiarities of adrenal gland of bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) were studied in the area of natural biogeochemical province with abnormally high content of nickel, cobalt and chromium. The control population inhabited area with usual content of these elements. We used 4-factor analysis of variance to estimate the influence of geochemical conditions, phase of population cycle, sex and reproductive state on the morphophysiological characteristics of animals and functional activity of adrenal gland. Animals from area with high concentration of Ni, Co and Cr show an increase in relative mass of adrenal glands, fascicular zone of adrenal cortex, size of cells and their nuclei. All these changes can be considered as an evidence of increased secretion of glucocorticoids. It is shown that phase of population cycle influences fatness of animals, size of nuclei, cells and adrenal cortex. Females in comparison with males are characterized with higher indexes of liver and adrenal gland, as well as morphometric indexes of adrenal cortex. The maturation of animals is accompanied with increase in body mass, fatness and relative mass of adrenal glands, the size of cortex zone, nuclei and cells themselves. It is supposed that the effect of "geochemical factor" results in intensification of glucocorticoid secretion of adrenal costex, thus increasing non-specific resistance of animals inhabiting area with high concentration of heavy metals. Such factors as "phase of population cycle", "sex" and "reproductive state", influence mineralocorticoid activity, glucocorticoid and androgenic functions of adrenal cortex. Some factors show synergetic effect.

  14. A study on high subsonic airfoil flows in relatively high Reynolds number by using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Shinichiro; Kashitani, Masashi; Miyaguni, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, numerical calculations of the flow-field around the airfoil model are performed by using the OpenFOAM in high subsonic flows. The airfoil model is NACA 64A010. The maximum thickness is 10 % of the chord length. The SonicFOAM and the RhoCentralFOAM are selected as the solver in high subsonic flows. The grid point is 158,000 and the Mach numbers are 0.277 and 0.569 respectively. The CFD data are compared with the experimental data performed by the cryogenic wind tunnel in the past. The results are as follows. The numerical results of the pressure coefficient distribution on the model surface calculated by the SonicFOAM solver showed good agreement with the experimental data measured by the cryogenic wind tunnel. And the data calculated by the SonicFOAM have the capability for the quantitative comparison of the experimental data at low angle of attack.

  15. High-resolution analysis of copy number alterations and associated expression changes in ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    Haverty, Peter M; Hon, Lawrence S; Kaminker, Joshua S; Chant, John; Zhang, Zemin

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA copy number alterations are frequently observed in ovarian cancer, but it remains a challenge to identify the most relevant alterations and the specific causal genes in those regions. Methods We obtained high-resolution 500K SNP array data for 52 ovarian tumors and identified the most statistically significant minimal genomic regions with the most prevalent and highest-level copy number alterations (recurrent CNAs). Within a region of recurrent CNA, comparison of expression levels in tumors with a given CNA to tumors lacking that CNA and to whole normal ovary samples was used to select genes with CNA-specific expression patterns. A public expression array data set of laser capture micro-dissected (LCM) non-malignant fallopian tube epithelia and LCM ovarian serous adenocarcinoma was used to evaluate the effect of cell-type mixture biases. Results Fourteen recurrent deletions were detected on chromosomes 4, 6, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 22 and most prevalently on X and 8. Copy number and expression data suggest several apoptosis mediators as candidate drivers of the 8p deletions. Sixteen recurrent gains were identified on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 17, 19, and 20, with the most prevalent gains localized to 8q and 3q. Within the 8q amplicon, PVT1, but not MYC, was strongly over-expressed relative to tumors lacking this CNA and showed over-expression relative to normal ovary. Likewise, the cell polarity regulators PRKCI and ECT2 were identified as putative drivers of two distinct amplicons on 3q. Co-occurrence analyses suggested potential synergistic or antagonistic relationships between recurrent CNAs. Genes within regions of recurrent CNA showed an enrichment of Cancer Census genes, particularly when filtered for CNA-specific expression. Conclusion These analyses provide detailed views of ovarian cancer genomic changes and highlight the benefits of using multiple reference sample types for the evaluation of CNA-specific expression changes

  16. Electron Acceleration in a Nonrelativistic Shock with Very High Alfvén Mach Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.

    2013-11-01

    Electron acceleration associated with various plasma kinetic instabilities in a nonrelativistic shock with very high Alfvén Mach number (MA˜45) is revealed by means of a two-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. Electromagnetic (ion Weibel) and electrostatic (ion-acoustic and Buneman) instabilities are strongly activated at the same time in different regions of the two-dimensional shock structure. Relativistic electrons are quickly produced predominantly by the shock surfing mechanism with the Buneman instability at the leading edge of the foot. The energy spectrum has a high-energy tail exceeding the upstream ion kinetic energy accompanying the main thermal population. This gives a favorable condition for the ion-acoustic instability at the shock front, which in turn results in additional energization. The large-amplitude ion Weibel instability generates current sheets in the foot, implying another dissipation mechanism via magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional shock structure in the very-high-MA regime.

  17. Fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces in high Reynolds number laboratory shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praskovsky, Alexander A.; Foss, John F.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Karyakin, Mikhail Yu.

    1993-08-01

    The fractal properties of isovelocity surfaces are studied in three high Reynolds number (Rλ≊2.0×102-3.2×103) laboratory shear flows using the standard box-counting method. The fractal dimension D=-d(log Nr)/d(log r) was estimated within the range of box sizes r from several Kolmogorov scales up to several integral scales (Nr is the number of boxes with size r required to cover the line intersection of an isovelocity surface). The inertial subrange was of particular interest in this investigation. Measurements were carried out for external intermittency factors γ≊0.6-1.0. The data were processed using threshold levels U±2.5u' (U and u' denote mean and rms values of longitudinal velocity). Over the parameters studied, no wide range of constant fractal dimension was found. On the other hand, the accuracy of constant fractal dimension approximation with D≊0.4 over the inertial subranges was shown to be similar to that of the Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 301 (1941)] ``two-thirds law.''

  18. A Stochastic Model for the Relative Motion of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2014-11-01

    In the current study, a novel analytical closure for the diffusion current in the PDF equation is presented that is applicable to high-inertia particle pairs with Stokes numbers Str >> 1 . Here Str is a Stokes number based on the time-scale τr of eddies whose size scales with pair separation r. Using this closure, Langevin equations were solved to evolve particle-pair relative velocities and separations in stationary isotropic turbulence. The Langevin equation approach enables the simulation of the full PDF of pair relative motion, instead of only the first few moments of the PDF as is the case in a moments-based approach. Accordingly, PDFs Ω (U | r) and Ω (Ur | r) are computed for various separations r, where the former is the PDF of relative velocity U and the latter is the PDF of the radial component of relative velocity Ur, both conditioned upon the separation r. Consistent with the DNS study of Sundaram & Collins, the Langevin simulations capture the transition of Ω (U | r) from being Gaussian at integral-scale separations to an exponential PDF at Kolmogorov-scale separations. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed from these simulations also show reasonable quantitative agreement with those from the DNS of Fevrier et al.

  19. Nonthermal Electrons at High Mach Number Shocks: Electron Shock Surfing Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, M.; Shimada, N.

    2002-06-01

    We study the suprathermal electron acceleration mechanism in a perpendicular magnetosonic shock wave in a high Mach number regime by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We find that shock surfing/surfatron acceleration producing suprathermal electrons occurs in the shock transition region, where a series of large-amplitude electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) are excited by Buneman instability under the interaction between the reflected ions and the incoming electrons. It is shown that the electrons are likely to be trapped by ESWs, and during the trapping phase they can be effectively accelerated by the shock motional/convection electric field. We discuss that suprathermal electrons can be accelerated up to mic2(v0/c), where mic2 is the ion rest mass energy and v0 is the shock upstream flow velocity. Furthermore, some of these suprathermal electrons may be effectively trapped for an infinitely long time when the Alfvén Mach number MA exceeds several tens, and they are accelerated up to the shock potential energy determined by the global shock size.

  20. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  1. Heat transfer predictions for two turbine nozzle geometries at high Reynolds and Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Jackson, R.

    1995-01-01

    Predictions of turbine vane and endwall heat transfer and pressure distributions are compared with experimental measurements for two vane geometries. The differences in geometries were due to differences in the hub profile, and both geometries were derived from the design of a high rim speed turbine (HRST). The experiments were conducted in the Isentropic Light Piston Facility (ILPF) at Pyestock at a Reynolds number of 5.3 x 10(exp 6), a Mach number of 1.2, and a wall-to-gas temperature ratio of 0.66. Predictions are given for two different steady-state three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational analyses. C-type meshes were used, and algebraic models were employed to calculate the turbulent eddy viscosity. The effects of different turbulence modeling assumptions on the predicted results are examined. Comparisons are also given between predicted and measured total pressure distributions behind the vane. The combination of realistic engine geometries and flow conditions proved to be quite demanding in terms of the convergence of the CFD solutions. An appropriate method of grid generation, which resulted in consistently converged CFD solutions, was identified.

  2. f Number Increase of a High-Intensity Green Laser Beam in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobble, J. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Mason, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    Earlier(J. A. Cobble, R. P. Johnson, R. J. Mason, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3006 (1997).), we studied the increase in f number of a high-intensity, 1054-nm laser beam passing through a low density, preformed plasma, i. e., an exploding foil. We have extended this work to 527-nm light. Again we find an increase in the f number of the probe beam. Near field imaging of the transmitted green beam shows a factor of four reduction in beam divergence at 8 percent of the critical density. The change is less for lower densities, and the beam compression corresponds to the critical power dropping below the laser power (0.6 TW) as the density increases. The density is estimated from the spectra of stimulated Raman back scatter and from modeling of the target plasma with LASNEX. A CCD camera and a spectrometer with a 200-nm bandwidth were used to record the backscattered spectra. *Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  3. Optimizing sparse sequencing of single cells for highly multiplex copy number profiling

    PubMed Central

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Ward, Brian; Cox, Hilary; Leotta, Anthony; Rodgers, Linda; Riggs, Michael; D'Italia, Sean; Sun, Guoli; Yong, Mao; Miskimen, Kristy; Gilmore, Hannah; Saborowski, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Krasnitz, Alexander; Harris, Lyndsay; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis at the level of single cells has recently emerged as a powerful tool to dissect genome heterogeneity in cancer, neurobiology, and development. To be truly transformative, single-cell approaches must affordably accommodate large numbers of single cells. This is feasible in the case of copy number variation (CNV), because CNV determination requires only sparse sequence coverage. We have used a combination of bioinformatic and molecular approaches to optimize single-cell DNA amplification and library preparation for highly multiplexed sequencing, yielding a method that can produce genome-wide CNV profiles of up to a hundred individual cells on a single lane of an Illumina HiSeq instrument. We apply the method to human cancer cell lines and biopsied cancer tissue, thereby illustrating its efficiency, reproducibility, and power to reveal underlying genetic heterogeneity and clonal phylogeny. The capacity of the method to facilitate the rapid profiling of hundreds to thousands of single-cell genomes represents a key step in making single-cell profiling an easily accessible tool for studying cell lineage. PMID:25858951

  4. Assessment of an Euler-Interacting Boundary Layer Method Using High Reynolds Number Transonic Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Maddalon, Dal V.

    1998-01-01

    Flight-measured high Reynolds number turbulent-flow pressure distributions on a transport wing in transonic flow are compared to unstructured-grid calculations to assess the predictive ability of a three-dimensional Euler code (USM3D) coupled to an interacting boundary layer module. The two experimental pressure distributions selected for comparative analysis with the calculations are complex and turbulent but typical of an advanced technology laminar flow wing. An advancing front method (VGRID) was used to generate several tetrahedral grids for each test case. Initial calculations left considerable room for improvement in accuracy. Studies were then made of experimental errors, transition location, viscous effects, nacelle flow modeling, number and placement of spanwise boundary layer stations, and grid resolution. The most significant improvements in the accuracy of the calculations were gained by improvement of the nacelle flow model and by refinement of the computational grid. Final calculations yield results in close agreement with the experiment. Indications are that further grid refinement would produce additional improvement but would require more computer memory than is available. The appendix data compare the experimental attachment line location with calculations for different grid sizes. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and calculated attachment line locations.

  5. Neutrino properties deduced from the study of lepton number violating processes at low and high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Sabin

    2012-11-20

    There is nowadays a significant progress in understanding the neutrino properties. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments have convincingly showed that neutrinos have mass and oscillate, in contradiction with the Standard Model (SM) assumptions, and these are the first evidences of beyond SM physics. However, fundamental properties of the neutrinos like their absolute mass, their character (are they Dirac or Majorana particles?), their mass hierarchy, the number of neutrino flavors, etc., still remain unknown. In this context there is an increased interest in the study of the lepton number violating (LNV) processes, since they could complete our understanding on the neutrino properties. Since recently, the neutrinoless double beta decay was considered the only process able to distinguish between Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and to give a hint on the absolute mass of the electron neutrino. At present, the increased luminosity of the LHC experiments makes feasible the search of LNV processes at high energy as well. In this lecture I will make a brief review on our present knowledge of the neutrino properties, on the present status of the double-beta decay studies and on the first attempts to search LNV processes at LHC.

  6. Impact of copy number variations burden on coding genome in humans using integrated high resolution arrays.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Vishweswaraiah, Sangeetha; Murthy, Megha N; Suresh, Raviraj V; Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-12-16

    Copy number variations (CNVs) alter the transcriptional and translational levels of genes by disrupting the coding structure and this burden of CNVs seems to be a significant contributor to phenotypic variations. Therefore it was necessary to assess the complexities of CNV burden on the coding genome. A total of 1715 individuals from 12 populations were used for CNV analysis in the present investigation. Analysis was performed using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6·0 chip and CytoScan High-Density arrays. CNVs were more frequently observed in the coding region than in the non-coding region. CNVs were observed vastly more frequently in the coding region than the non-coding region. CNVs were found to be enriched in the regions containing functional genes (83-96%) compared with the regions containing pseudogenes (4-17%). CNVs across the genome of an individual showed multiple hits across many genes, whose proteins interact physically and function under the same pathway. We identified varying numbers of proteins and degrees of interactions within protein complexes of single individual genomes. This study represents the first draft of a population-specific CNV genes map as well as a cross-populational map. The complex relationship of CNVs on genes and their physically interacting partners unravels many complexities involved in phenotype expression. This study identifies four mechanisms contributing to the complexities caused by the presence of multiple CNVs across many genes in the coding part of the genome.

  7. Jet Velocity Profile Effects on Spray Characteristics of Impinging Jets at High Reynolds and Weber Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.; Kulkarni, Varun; Sojka, Paul E.

    2014-11-01

    While like-on-like doublet impinging jet atomization has been extensively studied in the literature, there is poor agreement between experimentally observed spray characteristics and theoretical predictions (Ryan et al. 1995, Anderson et al. 2006). Recent works (Bremond and Villermaux 2006, Choo and Kang 2007) have introduced a non-uniform jet velocity profile, which lead to a deviation from the standard assumptions for the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter. These works have assumed a parabolic profile to serve as another limit to the traditional uniform jet velocity profile assumption. Incorporating a non-uniform jet velocity profile results in the sheet velocity and the sheet thickness parameter depending on the sheet azimuthal angle. In this work, the 1/7th power-law turbulent velocity profile is assumed to provide a closer match to the flow behavior of jets at high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which correspond to the impact wave regime. Predictions for the maximum wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop diameter are compared with experimental observations. The results demonstrate better agreement between experimentally measured values and predictions, compared to previous models. U.S. Army Research Office under the Multi-University Research Initiative Grant Number W911NF-08-1-0171.

  8. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at anmore » altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).« less

  9. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).

  10. Apparatus for measuring pressure-driven transport through channels at high Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakitsiou, S.; Holst, B.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The pressure-driven gas flow through micro- and nano-porous structures is particularly interesting for innovative technologies such as microelectromechanical and nano-mechanical-electrical systems. The classical continuum assumption breaks down for rarefied flow through channels with a characteristic dimension comparable to the mean free path of the gas. Theories based on molecular interactions have been formulated to predict the flow at high Knudsen numbers. Measuring rarefied gas flow experimentally is a challenge since only a few studies have been able to determine flowrates in the molecular flow regime. Here we present the design of an experimental apparatus, which can be used to measure the flow of gases through nano- and microscale channels in the flow regimes where molecular effects are critical. The equations used to design the apparatus are given, focusing on the slip and transition flow regimes (together sometimes called "Intermediate flow regime"). A channel with a diameter of 325 μm ± 5μm and a length of 2 mm was tested experimentally with the apparatus for a wide range of Knudsen numbers (10-2 < Kn < 1 × 105) demonstrating its suitability through the slip and transition regime (2.23 × 10-2 < Kn < 2.26).

  11. Optimizing sparse sequencing of single cells for highly multiplex copy number profiling.

    PubMed

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Ward, Brian; Cox, Hilary; Leotta, Anthony; Rodgers, Linda; Riggs, Michael; D'Italia, Sean; Sun, Guoli; Yong, Mao; Miskimen, Kristy; Gilmore, Hannah; Saborowski, Michael; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Krasnitz, Alexander; Harris, Lyndsay; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide analysis at the level of single cells has recently emerged as a powerful tool to dissect genome heterogeneity in cancer, neurobiology, and development. To be truly transformative, single-cell approaches must affordably accommodate large numbers of single cells. This is feasible in the case of copy number variation (CNV), because CNV determination requires only sparse sequence coverage. We have used a combination of bioinformatic and molecular approaches to optimize single-cell DNA amplification and library preparation for highly multiplexed sequencing, yielding a method that can produce genome-wide CNV profiles of up to a hundred individual cells on a single lane of an Illumina HiSeq instrument. We apply the method to human cancer cell lines and biopsied cancer tissue, thereby illustrating its efficiency, reproducibility, and power to reveal underlying genetic heterogeneity and clonal phylogeny. The capacity of the method to facilitate the rapid profiling of hundreds to thousands of single-cell genomes represents a key step in making single-cell profiling an easily accessible tool for studying cell lineage.

  12. Implications of turbulence interactions: A path toward addressing very high Reynolds number flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y

    2006-05-15

    The classical 'turbulence problem' is narrowed down and redefined for scientific and engineering applications. From an application perspective, accurate computation of large-scale transport of the turbulent flows is needed. In this paper, a scaling analysis that allows for the large-scales of very high Reynolds number turbulent flows - to be handled by the available supercomputers is proposed. Current understanding of turbulence interactions of incompressible turbulence, which forms the foundation of our argument, is reviewed. Furthermore, the data redundancy in the inertial range is demonstrated. Two distinctive interactions, namely, the distance and near-grid interactions, are inspected for large-scale simulations. The distant interactions in the subgrid scales in an inertial range can be effectively modelled by an eddy damping. The near-grid interactions must be carefully incorporated.

  13. Preliminary engineering study: Quick opening valve MSFC high Reynolds number wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    FluiDyne Engineering Corporation has conducted a preliminary engineering study of a quick-opening valve for the MSFC High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel under NASA Contract NAS8-35056. The subject valve is intended to replace the Mylar diaphragm system as the flow initiation device for the tunnel. Only valves capable of opening within 0.05 sec. and providing a minimum of 11.4 square feet of flow area were considered. Also, the study focused on valves which combined the quick-opening and tight shutoff features in a single unit. A ring sleeve valve concept was chosen for refinement and pricing. Sealing for tight shutoff, ring sleeve closure release and sleeve actuation were considered. The resulting cost estimate includes the valve and requisite modifications to the facility to accommodate the valve as well as the associated design and development work.

  14. Dissipative particle dynamics of diffusion-NMR requires high Schmidt-numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Mueed; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G.; Kauzlarić, David

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient mesoscale model to simulate the diffusion measurement with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the level of mesoscopic thermal motion of fluid particles, we couple the Bloch equations with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Thereby we establish a physically consistent scaling relation between the diffusion constant measured for DPD-particles and the diffusion constant of a real fluid. The latter is based on a splitting into a centre-of-mass contribution represented by DPD, and an internal contribution which is not resolved in the DPD-level of description. As a consequence, simulating the centre-of-mass contribution with DPD requires high Schmidt numbers. After a verification for fundamental pulse sequences, we apply the NMR-DPD method to NMR diffusion measurements of anisotropic fluids, and of fluids restricted by walls of microfluidic channels. For the latter, the free diffusion and the localisation regime are considered.

  15. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  16. Evaluation of methods for characterizing surface topography of models for high Reynolds number wind-tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, E. C.; Vorburger, T. V.; Scire, F. E.; Baker, S. M.; Jensen, S. W.; Gloss, B. B.; Trahan, C.

    1982-01-01

    Current work by the National Bureau of Standards at the NASA National Transonic Facility (NTF) to evaluate the performance of stylus instruments for determining the topography of models under investigation is described along with instrumentation for characterization of the surface microtopography. Potential areas of surface effects are reviewed, and the need for finer surfaced models for the NTF high Reynolds number flows is stressed. Current stylus instruments have a radii as large as 25 microns, and three models with surface finishes of 4-6, 8-10, and 12-15 micro-in. rms surface finishes were fabricated for tests with a stylus with a tip radius of 1 micron and a 50 mg force. Work involving three-dimensional stylus profilometry is discussed in terms of stylus displacement being converted to digital signals, and the design of a light scattering instrument capable of measuring the surface finish on curved objects is presented.

  17. A Quadrilateral Spectral Multidomain Penalty Method Model For High Reynolds Number Incompressible Stratified Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Vargas, Jorge; Diamessis, Peter

    2011-11-01

    We present a spectral multidomain penalty method-based incompressible Navier Stokes solver for high Reynolds number stratified turbulent flows in doubly non-periodic domains. Within the solver, time is discretized with a fractional-step method, and, in space, a Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre collocation approach is used in discontinuous quadrilateral subdomains. Stability of the numerical scheme is guaranteed through a penalty scheme and spectral filtering, further buttressed by a overintegration-based dealiasing technique. The efficient iterative solution of the associated discrete pressure Poisson equation is ensured through a Kronecker product based computation of the null vector associated with the global matrix, plus a two-level preconditioner within a GMRES solver. Efficiency and accuracy of the Navier Stokes solver are assessed through the solution of the lid-driven cavity flow, Taylor vortex and double shear layer. The canonical lock exchange problem is also presented to assess the potential of the solver for the study of environmental stratified flows.

  18. An Immersed-Boundary method for deformable bodies at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marinis, Dario; Krishnan, Sreenath; de Tullio, Marco Donato; Napolitano, Michele; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    With the aim of accurately simulate the flow-field through gas turbine blades a numerical approach is presented, that couples a massively parallel, finite volume Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations solver with an efficient structural solver describing the dynamics of deformable bodies, using an iterative coupled approach. The numerical strategy is based on a suitable version of the immersed boundary (IB) technique, which is able to handle rigid and deformable complex geometries in turbulent flows. The structures are discretized by a surface mesh of three-node triangular elements and modeled by means of a finite element method. The solution of the fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) problem produces detailed information of the flow patterns through realistic geometries subject to small deformations at high Reynolds and Mach numbers. Via Orabona 4 - 70125 - Bari, Italy.

  19. Local isotropy in distorted turbulent boundary layers at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.

    1993-01-01

    This is a report on the continuation of our experimental investigations of the hypothesis of local isotropy in shear flows. This hypothesis, which states that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the small-scale structures of turbulent motions are independent of large-scale structures and mean deformations, has been used in theoretical studies of turbulence and computational methods such as large-eddy simulation. Since Kolmogorov proposed his theory, there have been many experiments, conducted in wakes, jets, mixing layers, a tidal channel, and atmospheric and laboratory boundary layers, in which attempts have been made to verify - or refute - the local-isotropy hypothesis. However, a review of the literature over the last five decades indicated that, despite all these experiments in shear flows, there was no consensus in the scientific community regarding this hypothesis, and, therefore, it seemed worthwhile to undertake a fresh experimental investigation into this question.

  20. Dissipative Effects on Inertial-Range Statistics at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bewley, Gregory; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-11-01

    Using the unique capabilities of the Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, we were able to measure extremely long time series of up to 1010 samples of the turbulent fluctuating velocity in a well-controlled environment at a wide range of high Reynolds numbers up to Rλ = 1600 . These classical grid measurements were conducted using both classical hot-wire probes as well as NSTAP probes developed at Princeton University. With these long datasets, we were able to uncover fine details of the structure functions and their scaling behavior. We find that deviations from ideal scaling is anchored to the small scales and that dissipation influences the inertial-range statistics even up to r / η = 1000 .

  1. THE SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE OF STELLAR CONVECTION AND ITS SCALING IN THE HIGH-RAYLEIGH-NUMBER REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-10

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  2. Observations of high droplet number concentrations in Southern Ocean boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, T.; Huang, Y.; Jensen, J.; Campos, T.; Siems, S.; Manton, M.

    2015-09-01

    Data from the standard cloud physics payload during the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns provide a snapshot of unusual wintertime microphysical conditions in the boundary layer over the Southern Ocean. On 29 June 2011, the HIAPER sampled the boundary layer in a region of pre-frontal warm air advection between 58 and 48° S to the south of Tasmania. Cloud droplet number concentrations were consistent with climatological values in the northernmost profiles but were exceptionally high for wintertime in the Southern Ocean at 100-200 cm-3 in the southernmost profiles. Sub-micron (0.0625 m s-1) were most likely responsible for production of sea spray aerosol which influenced the microphysical properties of the boundary layer clouds. The smaller size and higher number concentration of cloud droplets is inferred to increase the albedo of these clouds, and these conditions occur regularly, and are expected to increase in frequency, over windy parts of the Southern Ocean.

  3. Flow over a hydrofoil with trailing edge vortex shedding at high-Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoyne, Dwayne Anthony

    At high Reynolds number, the flow of an incompressible fluid over a lifting surface is a rich blend of fluid dynamic phenomena, and the individual elements of this process have been the subject of much prior work. However, controlled experimental investigations of lifting surfaces at Reynolds numbers typical of heavy-lift aircraft wings or full-size ship propellers (chord-based Reynolds numbers, ReC ˜ 107--10 8) are largely unavailable. This paper presents experimental results from the flow over a two-dimensional hydrofoil at nominal ReC values from near one million (1M) to more than 50 million (50M). The tests were conducted in the U.S. Navy's William B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel with a solid-bronze hydrofoil (2.1 m chord, 3.0 m span, 17 cm maximum thickness) at flow speeds from 0.25 to 18.3 m/s. The foil section, a modified NACA 0016 with a rounded trailing-edge bevel, approximates the cross section of a generic naval propeller blade. Trailing-edge geometries with bevel angles of 44° and 56° are investigated. Flow field velocities are measured with laser Doppler velocimetry and planar particle imaging velocimetry. Pressure measurements are made with static pressure taps along the foil chord and test section walls and with unsteady pressure sensors near the trailing edge. Results are presented from the time-averaged flow (part I), as well as turbulence statistics, pressure and velocity spectra, and instantaneous velocity fields (part II). Geometry and Reynolds-number dependencies in the mean flow are linked to similar dependencies in the dynamic flow. A correlation is shown between the suction side time-average shear rate near the trailing edge and the strength of the near-wake vortex shedding. Peaks in spectra of vertical velocity fluctuations associated with vortex shedding near the trailing edge are strongest when the suction side shear layer, which separates upstream of the trailing edge, most effectively induces roll-up of the pressure side shear

  4. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Abnormal relationships between the neural response to high- and low-calorie foods and endogenous acylated ghrelin in women with active and weight-recovered anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Holsen, Laura M.; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Christensen, Kara; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence contributing to the understanding of neurobiological mechanisms underlying appetite dysregulation in anorexia nervosa draws heavily on separate lines of research into neuroendocrine and neural circuitry functioning. In particular, studies consistently cite elevated ghrelin and abnormal activation patterns in homeostatic (hypothalamus) and hedonic (striatum, amygdala, insula) regions governing appetite. The current preliminary study examined the interaction of these systems, based on research demonstrating associations between circulating ghrelin levels and activity in these regions in healthy individuals. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 13 women with active anorexia nervosa (AN), 9 women weight-recovered from AN (AN-WR), and 12 healthy-weight control women using a food cue functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm, with assessment of fasting levels of acylated ghrelin. Healthy-weight control women exhibited significant positive associations between fasting acylated ghrelin and activity in the right amygdala, hippocampus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex in response to high-calorie foods, associations which were absent in the AN and AN-WR groups. Women with AN-WR demonstrated a negative relationship between ghrelin and activity in the left hippocampus in response to high-calorie foods, while women with AN showed a positive association between ghrelin and activity in the right orbitofrontal cortex in response to low-calorie foods. Findings suggest a breakdown in the interaction between ghrelin signaling and neural activity in relation to reward responsivity in AN, a phenomenon that may be further characterized using pharmacogenetic studies. PMID:24862390

  6. High Reynolds number flows about bodies of revolution with application to submarines and torpedoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Juan M.

    x 106, which seem to have collapsed. The sail wake experiments demonstrated the significance of the sail tip vortex when the submarine is at a nonzero yaw angle. As the yaw angle is increased the circulation of the sail tip vortex increases. As the yaw angle is further increased the boundary layer separates from the sail with an overall drop in circulation. A similar phenomenon is observed for the junction vortex with the exception that when the yaw angle is further increased to 17 degrees the circulation continues to increase at a slower rate. Also, the circulation values for the sail tip vortex are about an order of magnitude larger than those of the junction vortex. The effects of the support on the wake development are similar to the effects introduced by the sail on a submarine wake (except for the absence of the tip flow). The presence of the support affects the flow differently for different Reynolds numbers emphasizing the importance of high Reynolds number studies to better understand submarine flows.

  7. Analysis of the high Reynolds number 2D tests on a wind turbine airfoil performed at two different wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Madsen, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    2D wind tunnel tests at high Reynolds numbers have been done within the EU FP7 AVATAR project (Advanced Aerodynamic Tools of lArge Rotors) on the DU00-W-212 airfoil and at two different test facilities: the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG) and the LM Wind Power in-house wind tunnel. Two conditions of Reynolds numbers have been performed in both tests: 3 and 6 million. The Mach number and turbulence intensity values are similar in both wind tunnels at the 3 million Reynolds number test, while they are significantly different at 6 million Reynolds number. The paper presents a comparison of the data obtained from the two wind tunnels, showing good repeatability at 3 million Reynolds number and differences at 6 million Reynolds number that are consistent with the different Mach number and turbulence intensity values.

  8. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  9. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  10. Radiative Properties of High Wire Number Tungsten Arrays with Implosion Times up to 250 ns

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, F.N.; Coverdale, C.A.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Haines, M.G.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruiz-Camacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.

    1999-02-02

    High wire number, 25-mm diameter tungsten wire arrays have been imploded on the 8-MA Saturn generator, operating in a long-pulse mode. By varying the mass load from 710 to 6140 ps/cm, implosion times of 130 to 250 ns have been obtained with implosion velocities of 50 to 25 cn-dys, respectively. These z-pinch implosions produced plasmas with millimeter diameters that radiated 600 to 800 kJ of x-rays, with powers of 20 to 49 TW; the corresponding pulse widths were 19 to 7.5 ns, with risetimes ranging from 6.5 to 4.0 ns. These powers and pulse widths are similar to those achieved with 50 ns implosion times on Saturn. Two-dimensional, radiation- magnetohydrodynamic calculations indicate that the imploding shells in these long implosion time experiments are comparable in width to those in the short pulse cases. This can only be due to lower initial perturbations. A heuristic wire array model suggests that the reduced perturbations, in the long pulse cases, may be due to the individual wire merger occurring well before the acceleration of the shell. The experiments and modeling suggest that 150 to 200 ns implosion time z-pinches could be employed for high-power, x-ray source applications.

  11. Increased number of orexin/hypocretin neurons with high and prolonged external stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Jalewa, Jaishree; Wong-Lin, KongFatt; McGinnity, T Martin; Prasad, Girijesh; Hölscher, Christian

    2014-10-01

    It has been found that dysregulation in the orexin/hypocretin (Ox/HCRT) neuropeptide system in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) is known to affect sleep disorder, depression and motor activities. However, to date there is no common agreement regarding the resulting specific changes induced in the Ox system. In this study, we inject corticosterone to produce stress-induced depressed mice and investigate the Ox neuronal and corresponding behavioural changes. Different doses (10, 20, 50mg/kgbw) of corticosterone were injected in adult mice, and then were tested in the open field test, forced swim test, tail suspension test, elevated plus maze test and motor activity measurements to validate the depressed animal model. Significant dose-dependent behavioural changes were observed in correlation with the doses of corticosterone. The effect is most significant and robust in the high 50mg/kgbw dose group five weeks after injection. Interestingly, we found on average a reduction in motor activity during the 12-hour dark phase (awake) of the depressed mice and no significant change during the light phase (asleep). Finally, using confocal microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF) analysis shows a significant increase (∼20%) in the number of Ox neurons in the LHA of the depressed mice as compared to the age-matched controls. This study suggests that an increase in Ox neuronal signaling may be functionally linked to high and prolonged external stress-induced depression.

  12. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  13. Extending the restricted nonlinear model for wall-turbulence to high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretheim, Joel; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice

    2016-11-01

    The restricted nonlinear (RNL) model for wall-turbulence is motivated by the long-observed streamwise-coherent structures that play an important role in these flows. The RNL equations, derived by restricting the convective term in the Navier-Stokes equations, provide a computationally efficient approach due to fewer degrees of freedom in the underlying dynamics. Recent simulations of the RNL system have been conducted for turbulent channel flows at low Reynolds numbers (Re), yielding insights into the dynamical mechanisms and statistics of wall-turbulence. Despite the computational advantages of the RNL system, simulations at high Re remain out-of-reach. We present a new Large Eddy Simulation (LES) framework for the RNL system, enabling its use in engineering applications at high Re such as turbulent flows through wind farms. Initial results demonstrate that, as observed at moderate Re, restricting the range of streamwise varying structures present in the simulation (i.e., limiting the band of x Fourier components or kx modes) significantly affects the accuracy of the statistics. Our results show that only a few well-chosen kx modes lead to RNL turbulence with accurate statistics, including the mean profile and the well-known inner and outer peaks in energy spectra. This work is supported by NSF (WindInspire OISE-1243482).

  14. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species.

  15. A Study of the Unstable Modes in High Mach Number Gaseous Jets and Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Gene Marcel

    1993-01-01

    Instabilities affecting the propagation of supersonic gaseous jets have been studied using high resolution computer simulations with the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM). These results are discussed in relation to jets from galactic nuclei. These studies involve a detailed treatment of a single section of a very long jet, approximating the dynamics by using periodic boundary conditions. Shear layer simulations have explored the effects of shear layers on the growth of nonlinear instabilities. Convergence of the numerical approximations has been tested by comparing jet simulations with different grid resolutions. The effects of initial conditions and geometry on the dominant disruptive instabilities have also been explored. Simulations of shear layers with a variety of thicknesses, Mach numbers and densities perturbed by incident sound waves imply that the time for the excited kink modes to grow large in amplitude and disrupt the shear layer is taug = (546 +/- 24) (M/4)^{1.7 } (Apert/0.02) ^{-0.4} delta/c, where M is the jet Mach number, delta is the half-width of the shear layer, and A_ {pert} is the perturbation amplitude. For simulations of periodic jets, the initial velocity perturbations set up zig-zag shock patterns inside the jet. In each case a single zig-zag shock pattern (an odd mode) or a double zig-zag shock pattern (an even mode) grows to dominate the flow. The dominant kink instability responsible for these shock patterns moves approximately at the linear resonance velocity, nu_ {mode} = cextnu_ {relative}/(cjet + c_ {ext}). For high resolution simulations (those with 150 or more computational zones across the jet width), the even mode dominates if the even penetration is higher in amplitude initially than the odd perturbation. For low resolution simulations, the odd mode dominates even for a stronger even mode perturbation. In high resolution simulations the jet boundary rolls up and large amounts of external gas are entrained into the jet. In low

  16. High-resolution copy number analysis of paired normal-tumor samples from diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Elena; Alcoceba, Miguel; Martín-García, David; Blanco, Óscar; Sanchez-Barba, Mercedes; Balanzategui, Ana; Marín, Luis; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; González-Barca, Eva; Pardal, Emilia; Jiménez, Cristina; García-Álvarez, María; Clot, Guillem; Carracedo, Ángel; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Sarasquete, M Eugenia; Chillón, Carmen; Corral, Rocío; Prieto-Conde, M Isabel; Caballero, M Dolores; Salaverria, Itziar; García-Sanz, Ramón; González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Copy number analysis can be useful for assessing prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We analyzed copy number data from tumor samples of 60 patients diagnosed with DLBCL de novo and their matched normal samples. We detected 63 recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs), including 33 gains, 30 losses, and nine recurrent acquired copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH). Interestingly, 20 % of cases acquired CNN-LOH of 6p21 locus, which involves the HLA region. In normal cells, there were no CNAs but we observed CNN-LOH involving some key lymphoma regions such as 6p21 and 9p24.1 (5 %) and 17p13.1 (2.5 %) in DLBCL patients. Furthermore, a model with some specific CNA was able to predict the subtype of DLBCL, 1p36.32 and 10q23.31 losses being restricted to germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL. In contrast, 8p23.3 losses and 11q24.3 gains were strongly associated with the non-GCB subtype. A poor prognosis was associated with biallelic inactivation of TP53 or 18p11.32 losses, while prognosis was better in cases carrying 11q24.3 gains. In summary, CNA abnormalities identify specific DLBCL groups, and we describe CNN-LOH in germline cells from DLBCL patients that are associated with genes that probably play a key role in DLBCL development.

  17. N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    N-231 High Reynolds Number Channel Facility (An example of a Versatile Wind Tunnel) Tunnel 1 I is a blowdown Facility that utilizes interchangeable test sections and nozzles. The facility provides experimental support for the fluid mechanics research, including experimental verification of aerodynamic computer codes and boundary-layer and airfoil studies that require high Reynolds number simulation. (Tunnel 1)

  18. High-resolution copy number variation analysis of schizophrenia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kushima, I; Aleksic, B; Nakatochi, M; Shimamura, T; Shiino, T; Yoshimi, A; Kimura, H; Takasaki, Y; Wang, C; Xing, J; Ishizuka, K; Oya-Ito, T; Nakamura, Y; Arioka, Y; Maeda, T; Yamamoto, M; Yoshida, M; Noma, H; Hamada, S; Morikawa, M; Uno, Y; Okada, T; Iidaka, T; Iritani, S; Yamamoto, T; Miyashita, M; Kobori, A; Arai, M; Itokawa, M; Cheng, M-C; Chuang, Y-A; Chen, C-H; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, T; Hashimoto, R; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Watanabe, Y; Nunokawa, A; Someya, T; Ikeda, M; Toyota, T; Yoshikawa, T; Numata, S; Ohmori, T; Kunimoto, S; Mori, D; Iwata, N; Ozaki, N

    2017-03-01

    Recent schizophrenia (SCZ) studies have reported an increased burden of de novo copy number variants (CNVs) and identified specific high-risk CNVs, although with variable phenotype expressivity. However, the pathogenesis of SCZ has not been fully elucidated. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we performed a high-resolution genome-wide CNV analysis on a mainly (92%) Japanese population (1699 SCZ cases and 824 controls) and identified 7066 rare CNVs, 70.0% of which were small (<100 kb). Clinically significant CNVs were significantly more frequent in cases than in controls (odds ratio=3.04, P=9.3 × 10(-9), 9.0% of cases). We confirmed a significant association of X-chromosome aneuploidies with SCZ and identified 11 de novo CNVs (e.g., MBD5 deletion) in cases. In patients with clinically significant CNVs, 41.7% had a history of congenital/developmental phenotypes, and the rate of treatment resistance was significantly higher (odds ratio=2.79, P=0.0036). We found more severe clinical manifestations in patients with two clinically significant CNVs. Gene set analysis replicated previous findings (e.g., synapse, calcium signaling) and identified novel biological pathways including oxidative stress response, genomic integrity, kinase and small GTPase signaling. Furthermore, involvement of multiple SCZ candidate genes and biological pathways in the pathogenesis of SCZ was suggested in established SCZ-associated CNV loci. Our study shows the high genetic heterogeneity of SCZ and its clinical features and raises the possibility that genomic instability is involved in its pathogenesis, which may be related to the increased burden of de novo CNVs and variable expressivity of CNVs.

  19. High-Schmidt-number mass transport mechanisms from a turbulent flow to absorbing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer from a turbulent flow to an underlying organic sediment bed populated with DO-absorbing bacteria. Our numerical study relies on a previously developed and tested computational tool that couples a bio-geochemical model for the sediment layer and large-eddy simulation for transport on the water side. Simulations have been carried out in an open channel configuration for different Reynolds numbers (Reτ = 180-1000), Schmidt numbers (Sc = 400-1000), and bacterial populations (χ* = 100-700 mg l-1). We show that the average oxygen flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) changes with Reτ and Sc, in good agreement with classic heat-and-mass-transfer parametrizations. Time correlations at the SWI show that intermittent peaks in the wall-shear stress initiate the mass transfer and modulate its distribution in space and time. The diffusive sublayer acts as a de-noising filter with respect to the overlying turbulence; the instantaneous mass flux is not affected by low-amplitude background fluctuations in the wall-shear stress but, on the other hand, it is receptive to energetic and coherent near-wall transport events, in agreement with the surface renewal theory. The three transport processes involved in DO depletion (turbulent transport, molecular transport across the diffusive sublayer, and absorption in the organic sediment layer) exhibit distinct temporal and spatial scales. The rapidly evolving near-wall high-speed streaks transport patches of fluid to the edge of the diffusive sublayer, leaving slowly regenerating elongated patches of positive DO concentration fluctuations and mass flux at the SWI. The sediment surface retains the signature of the overlying turbulent transport over long time scales, allowed by the slow bacterial absorption.

  20. Review of Skin Friction Measurements Including Recent High-Reynolds Number Results from NASA Langley NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Hall, Robert M.; Anders, John B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews flat plate skin friction data from early correlations of drag on plates in water to measurements in the cryogenic environment of The NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) in late 1996. The flat plate (zero pressure gradient with negligible surface curvature) incompressible skin friction at high Reynolds numbers is emphasized in this paper, due to its importance in assessing the accuracy of measurements, and as being important to the aerodynamics of large scale vehicles. A correlation of zero pressure gradient skin friction data minimizing extraneous effects between tests is often used as the first step in the calculation of skin friction in complex flows. Early data compiled by Schoenherr for a range of momentum thickness Reynolds numbers, R(sub Theta) from 860 to 370,000 contained large scatter, but has proved surprisingly accurate in its correlated form. Subsequent measurements in wind tunnels under more carefully controlled conditions have provided inputs to this database, usually to a maximum R(sub Theta) of about 40,000. Data on a large axisymmetric model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility extends the upper limit in incompressible R(sub Theta) to 619,800 using the van Driest transformation. Previous data, test techniques, and error sources ar discussed, and the NTF data will be discussed in detail. The NTF Preston tube and Clauser inferred data accuracy is estimated to be within -2 percent of a power-law curve fit, and falls above the Spalding theory by 1 percent at R(sub Theta) of about 600,000.

  1. Active Control of High Reynolds Number Supersonic Jets Using Plasma Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    LAFPAs) is conducted over a wide range of the fully expanded jet Mach numbers (MJ or simply jet Mach number ). The jet Mach numbers covered in the...present research are 0.9 (with a converging nozzle), 1.2 (overexpanded), 1.3 (perfectly expanded), and 1.4 (underexpanded) with a design Mach number 1.3... number does not change significantly under varying conditions. In a comparison of Mach 0.3 and Mach 0.8 jets, it was concluded that the higher Mach

  2. Lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu.

    PubMed

    Salsano, Ettore; Fancellu, Roberto; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Ciano, Claudia; Scaioli, Vidmer; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Mariotti, Caterina; Pareyson, Davide

    2011-03-15

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu (GSS102) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited prion disease due to a substitution of proline for leucine at codon 102 in the Prion Protein gene, and characterized by early walking difficulties and much later occurring dementia. We report clinical, electrophysiological and neuroradiological features of seven novel Italian cases of GSS102. The findings in our series support the thesis that early signs of GSS102 (including areflexia, ataxia, lower limb weakness, and painful dysesthesias) are likely due to a caudal myelopathic process, and suggest that GSS102 should be included among the causes of ataxia with areflexia. Moreover, our observations show that in patients with GSS102, as opposed to Friedreich's ataxia and other forms of ataxia with areflexia, nerve conduction studies and somato-sensory evoked potentials are normal, despite the presence of lower limb areflexia. Hence, in subjects with walking difficulties, the presence of lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive or possibly pathognomonic of GSS102, and can easily guide the clinicians to make the diagnosis of this rare neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Development and validation of an high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector method for the simultaneous determination of six phenolic compounds in abnormal savda munziq decoction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuge; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Xuejia; Upur, Halmuart

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Given the high-effectiveness and low-toxicity of abnormal savda munziq (ASMQ), its herbal formulation has long been used in traditional Uyghur medicine to treat complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Settings and Design: ASMQ decoction by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array detector was successfully developed for the simultaneous quality assessment of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, rosmarinic acid, and luteolin. The six phenolic compounds were separated on an Agilent TC-C18 reversed-phase analytical column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm) by gradient elution using 0.3% aqueous formic acid (v/v) and 0.3% methanol formic acid (v/v) at 1.0 mL/min. Materials and Methods: The plant material was separately ground and mixed at the following ratios (10): Cordia dichotoma (10.6), Anchusa italic (10.6), Euphorbia humifusa (4.9), Adiantum capillus-veneris (4.9), Ziziphus jujube (4.9), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (7.1), Foeniculum vulgare (4.9), Lavandula angustifolia (4.9), Dracocephalum moldavica L. (4.9), and Alhagi pseudoalhagi (42.3). Statistical Analysis Used: The precisions of all six compounds were <0.60%, and the average recoveries ranged from 99.39% to 104.85%. Highly significant linear correlations were found between component concentrations and specific chromatographic peak areas (R2 > 0.999). Results: The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the levels of six active components in ASMQ. Conclusions: Given the simplicity, precision, specificity, and sensitivity of the method, it can be utilized as a quality control approach to simultaneously determining the six phenolic compounds in AMSQ. PMID:25709227

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with ultrasonographically detected neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Kanit, Hakan; Özkan, Azra Arici; Öner, Soner Recai; Ispahi, Ciğdem; Endrikat, Jan Siegfried; Ertan, Kubilay

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed the karyotype of fetuses with ultrasonographically detected neural tube defects (NTDs). In our study, we included a total of 194 fetuses with NTDs. We analyzed the type of NTD, the karyotype, maternal age, fetal gestational age at diagnosis, and fetal sex. Of the 194 fetuses with NTDs, 87 were anencephalic and 107 had other, nonanencephalic, NTDs. A total of 12 fetuses were shown to have chromosomal abnormalities. Three of 87 anencephalic fetuses (3.45%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The sex ratio for anencephalic fetuses was 65.5% : 34.5% for female and male fetuses. Nine of 107 fetuses with other NTDs (8.41%) had chromosomal abnormalities. Seven fetuses had isolated NTDs and a further seven fetuses had additional ultrasonographic anomalies. Two of the latter had abnormal karyotypes. The sex ratio of all other NTD cases was 67.3% : 32.7% for female and male fetuses. The high number of chromosomal abnormalities justifies prenatal karyotyping in all fetuses with ultrasonographically diagnosed NTDs.

  5. Linear drag law for high-Reynolds-number flow past an oscillating body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agre, Natalie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-07-01

    An object immersed in a fast flow typically experiences fluid forces that increase with the square of speed. Here we explore how this high-Reynolds-number force-speed relationship is affected by unsteady motions of a body. Experiments on disks that are driven to oscillate while progressing through air reveal two distinct regimes: a conventional quadratic relationship for slow oscillations and an anomalous scaling for fast flapping in which the time-averaged drag increases linearly with flow speed. In the linear regime, flow visualization shows that a pair of counterrotating vortices is shed with each oscillation and a model that views a train of such dipoles as a momentum jet reproduces the linearity. We also show that appropriate scaling variables collapse the experimental data from both regimes and for different oscillatory motions into a single drag-speed relationship. These results could provide insight into the aerodynamic resistance incurred by oscillating wings in flight and they suggest that vibrations can be an effective means to actively control the drag on an object.

  6. Magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, G. W. Gonçalves, F. J. T.; McFadzean, S.; Stamps, R. L.; O'Reilly, S.; Bowman, R.

    2015-11-28

    We report the static and dynamic magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer test structure with potential applications in broadband absorber and filter devices. To allow fine control over the absorption linewidths and to understand the mechanisms governing the resonances in a tailored structure similar to that expected to be used in real world applications, the multilayer was intentionally designed to have layer thickness and interface roughness variations. Magnetometry measurements show that the sample has complex hysteresis loops with features consistent with single ferromagnetic film reversals. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy allows us to correlate the magnetic properties with structural features, including the film widths and interface roughnesses. Analysis of resonance frequencies from broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of field magnitude and orientation provide values of the local exchange bias, rotatable anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy fields for specific layers in the stack and explain the observed mode softening. The linewidths of the multilayer are adjustable around the bias field, approaching twice that seen at larger fields, allowing control over the bandwidth of devices formed from the structure.

  7. Magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, G. W.; Gonçalves, F. J. T.; McFadzean, S.; O'Reilly, S.; Bowman, R.; Stamps, R. L.

    2015-11-01

    We report the static and dynamic magnetic characteristics of a high-layer-number NiFe/FeMn multilayer test structure with potential applications in broadband absorber and filter devices. To allow fine control over the absorption linewidths and to understand the mechanisms governing the resonances in a tailored structure similar to that expected to be used in real world applications, the multilayer was intentionally designed to have layer thickness and interface roughness variations. Magnetometry measurements show that the sample has complex hysteresis loops with features consistent with single ferromagnetic film reversals. Characterisation by transmission electron microscopy allows us to correlate the magnetic properties with structural features, including the film widths and interface roughnesses. Analysis of resonance frequencies from broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements as a function of field magnitude and orientation provide values of the local exchange bias, rotatable anisotropy, and uniaxial anisotropy fields for specific layers in the stack and explain the observed mode softening. The linewidths of the multilayer are adjustable around the bias field, approaching twice that seen at larger fields, allowing control over the bandwidth of devices formed from the structure.

  8. The effect of tip speed ratio on a vertical axis wind turbine at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Colin M.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-05-01

    This work visualizes the flow surrounding a scaled model vertical axis wind turbine at realistic operating conditions. The model closely matches geometric and dynamic properties—tip speed ratio and Reynolds number—of a full-size turbine. The flow is visualized using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) in the midplane upstream, around, and after (up to 4 turbine diameters downstream) the turbine, as well as a vertical plane behind the turbine. Time-averaged results show an asymmetric wake behind the turbine, regardless of tip speed ratio, with a larger velocity deficit for a higher tip speed ratio. For the higher tip speed ratio, an area of averaged flow reversal is present with a maximum reverse flow of -0.04U_∞. Phase-averaged vorticity fields—achieved by syncing the PIV system with the rotation of the turbine—show distinct structures form from each turbine blade. There were distinct differences in results by tip speed ratios of 0.9, 1.3, and 2.2 of when in the cycle structures are shed into the wake—switching from two pairs to a single pair of vortices being shed—and how they convect into the wake—the middle tip speed ratio vortices convect downstream inside the wake, while the high tip speed ratio pair is shed into the shear layer of the wake. Finally, results show that the wake structure is much more sensitive to changes in tip speed ratio than to changes in Reynolds number.

  9. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  10. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA-DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA-DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place.

  11. Self-similar decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds-number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e., the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder (Re i=2 ×106 , the outer cylinder is at rest) is stopped within 12 s, thus fully removing the energy input to the system. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Second, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way by taking the effects of additional friction at the walls into account.

  12. Large ν - \\overline{ν} oscillations from high-dimensional lepton number violating operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da

    2017-03-01

    It is usually believed that the observation of the neutrino-antineutrino ( ν - \\overline{ν} ) oscillations is almost impossible since the oscillation probabilities are expected to be greatly suppressed by the square of tiny ratio of neutrino masses to energies. Such an argument is applicable to most models for neutrino mass generation based on the Weinberg operator, including the seesaw models. However, in the present paper, we shall give a counterexample to this argument, and show that large ν - \\overline{ν} oscillation probabilities can be obtained in a class of models in which both neutrino masses and neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decays are induced by the high-dimensional lepton number violating operator O}_7={\\overline{u}}_R{l}_R^c{\\overline{L}}_L{H}^{\\ast }{d}_R+H.c. with u and d representing the first two generations of quarks. In particular, we find that the predicted 0 νββ decay rates have already placed interesting constraints on the {ν}_e\\leftrightarrow {\\overline{ν}}_e oscillation. Moreover, we provide an UV-complete model to realize this scenario, in which a dark matter candidate naturally appears due to the new U(1) d symmetry.

  13. Laboratory Study of Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenak, Zachary; Dou, Zhongwang; Yang, Fan; Cao, Lujie; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    To study particle dynamics modified by isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and provide experimental data for DNS validation, we have developed a soccer-ball-shaped truncated icosahedron turbulence chamber with 20 adjoining hexagon surfaces, 12 pentagon surfaces and twenty symettrically displaced fans, which form an enclosed chamber of 1m diameter. We use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique to characterize the base turbulent flow, using different PIV set ups to capture various characteristic scales of turbulence. Results show that the stationary isotropic turbulence field is a spherical domain with diameter of 40 mm with quasi-zero mean velocities. The maximum rms velocity is ~1.5 m/s, corresponding to a Taylor microscale Re of 450. We extract from the PIV velocity field the whole set of turbulent flow parameters including: turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity, kinetic energy dissipation rate, large eddy length and time scales, the Kolmogorov length, time and velocity scales, Taylor microscale and Re, which are critical to the study of inter-particle statistics modified by turbulence. This research is funded by an NSF grant CBET-0967407.

  14. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = <(ui(x +r)-ui(x))(uj(x +r)-uj(x))> (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  15. Velocity measurements in a high-Reynolds-number, momentum-conserving, axisymmetric, turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, H.J.; Capp, S.P.; George, W.K.

    1994-01-01

    The turbulent flow resulting from a top-hat jet exhausting into a large room was investigated. The Reynolds number based on exit conditions was approximately 10(exp 5). Velocity moments to third order were obtained using flying and stationary hot-wire and burst-mode laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) techniques. The entire room was fully seeded for the LDA measurements. The measurements are shown to satisfy the differential and integral momentum equations for a round jet in an infinite environment. The results differ substantially from those reported by some earlier investigators, both in the level and shape of the profiles. These differences are attributed to the smaller enclosures used in the earlier works and the recirculation within them. Also, the flying hot-wire and burst-mode LDA measurements made here differ from the stationary wire measurements, especially the higher moments and away from the flow centreline. These differences are attributed to the cross-flow and rectification errors on the latter at the high turbulence intensities present in this flow (30% minimum at centreline). The measurements are used, together with recent dissipation measurements, to compute the energy balance for the jet, and an attempt is made to estimate the pressure-velocity and pressure-strain rate correlations.

  16. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background.

  17. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments to Design Sweeping Jets for High Reynolds Number Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Fell, Jared S.; Webb, Sandy R.; Cagle, C. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The application of a sweeping jet actuator to a circulation control system was initiated by a risk reduction series of experiments to optimize the authority of a single sweeping jet actuator. The sweeping jet design was integrated into the existing Fundamental Aerodynamic Subsonic Transonic- Modular Active Control (FAST-MAC) model by replacing the steady blowing system with an array of thirty-nine sweeping jet cartridges. A constant slot height to wing chord ratio was similar to the steady blowing configuration resulting in each actuator having a unique in size for the sweeping jet configuration. While this paper will describe the scaling and optimization of the actuators for future high Reynolds number applications, the major focus of this effort was to target the transonic flight regime by increasing the amplitude authority of the actuator. This was accomplished by modifying the diffuser of the sweeping jet actuator, and this paper highlights twelve different diffuser designs. The experimental portion of this work was completed in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility.

  18. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  19. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  20. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  1. Application of a Planar Doppler Velocimetry System to a High Reynolds Number Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    A Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been constructed and used to investigate the instantaneous turbulent velocity structure of a round high-speed compressible air jet with a low-speed co-flow. The exit condition was Mach=0.85 at ambient pressure, yielding a Reynolds number of about 650,000 on diameter. The PDV system was installed at NASA Langley Research Center in the Small Anechoic Jet Facility (SAJF), a chamber in which both the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of jets can be studied. For this test, the goal was to gather data which can be used to relate the turbulence structure of the jet to the levels and character of the acoustic noise produced by the jet. The current PDV system can acquire single-velocity-component, single-shot, planar images (15ns exposures) at 30 Hz. For this paper, the primary data set consists of 240 frames of velocity data acquired with both the jet and the low-speed co-flow seeded with light-scattering articles. Thus, velocities could be measured everywhere in the jet shear layer, both in the jet fluid and in the entrained co-flow. Some data were also taken with only the jet flow seeded. These provided mixing concentration images along with the reduced velocity fields. Other images were taken with only the co-flow seeded. These produced unique quantitative images of high speed entrainment. Optical "laser speckle" noise is the largest source of random noise in pulsed PDV systems. Components for the PDV imaging system were specifically selected to minimize speckle noise. To reduce systematic velocity errors due to laser drift, a frequency monitoring reference leg with a temperature-tuned reference iodine cell, was employed. In the course of this study, a novel flow seeder was developed. It enabled continuously variable seeding of the flow with particles of Sheared Pyrogenic Amorphous Hydrophobic Silica (SPAHS). The seeder comprised a dry fluidized bed hopper and a supersonic nozzle "pickup." Shearing action in the pickup

  2. Design and Calibration of the ARL Mach 3 High Reynolds Number Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    polytropically during the depressurization process (a function of mass flow, run time and tank volume), and by the cooling (Joule- Thomson effect ) associated...Reynolds numbers, where the mass flows are largest. Joule- Thomson effects will be more pronounced at the lower Reynolds numbers, due to the greater

  3. The Concept of Irrational Numbers in High-School Students and Prospective Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Efraim; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigation of the presence and effect of intuitive obstacles to the concept of irrational number in (n=30) ninth-grade, (n=32) tenth-grade, and (n=29) college students found that only some students manifest genuine intuitive biases. Most students were unable to classify numbers as rational, irrational, and/or real. (Author/MKR)

  4. Pressure recovery performance of conical diffusers at high subsonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, F. X.; Runstadler, P. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure recovery performance of conical diffusers has been measured for a wide range of geometries and inlet flow conditions. The approximate level and location (in terms of diffuser geometry of optimum performance were determined. Throat Mach numbers from low subsonic (m sub t equals 0.2) through choking (m sub t equals 1.0) were investigated in combination with throat blockage from 0.03 to 0.12. For fixed Mach number, performance was measured over a fourfold range of inlet Reynolds number. Maps of pressure recovery are presented as a function of diffuser geometry for fixed sets of inlet conditions. The influence of inlet blockage, throat Mach number, and inlet Reynolds number is discussed.

  5. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input.

  6. The Effect of Number and Presentation Order of High-Constraint Sentences on Second Language Word Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tengfei; Chen, Ran; Dunlap, Susan; Chen, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment that investigated the effects of number and presentation order of high-constraint sentences on semantic processing of unknown second language (L2) words (pseudowords) through reading. All participants were Chinese native speakers who learned English as a foreign language. In the experiment, sentence constraint and order of different constraint sentences were manipulated in English sentences, as well as L2 proficiency level of participants. We found that the number of high-constraint sentences was supportive for L2 word learning except in the condition in which high-constraint exposure was presented first. Moreover, when the number of high-constraint sentences was the same, learning was significantly better when the first exposure was a high-constraint exposure. And no proficiency level effects were found. Our results provided direct evidence that L2 word learning benefited from high quality language input and first presentations of high quality language input. PMID:27695432

  7. On the Formation Mechanisms of Artificially Generated High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of an artificially thick turbulent boundary layer generated by two families of small obstacles (divided into uniform and non-uniform wall normal distributions of blockage). One- and two-point velocity measurements using constant temperature anemometry show that the canonical behaviour of a boundary layer is recovered after an adaptation region downstream of the trips presenting 150~% higher momentum thickness (or equivalently, Reynolds number) than the natural case for the same downstream distance (x≈ 3 m). The effect of the degree of immersion of the trips for h/δ ≳ 1 is shown to play a secondary role. The one-point diagnostic quantities used to assess the degree of recovery of the canonical properties are the friction coefficient (representative of the inner motions), the shape factor and wake parameter (representative of the wake regions); they provide a severe test to be applied to artificially generated boundary layers. Simultaneous two-point velocity measurements of both spanwise and wall-normal correlations and the modulation of inner velocity by the outer structures show that there are two different formation mechanisms for the boundary layer. The trips with high aspect ratio and uniform distributed blockage leave the inner motions of the boundary layer relatively undisturbed, which subsequently drive the mixing of the obstacles' wake with the wall-bounded flow (wall-driven). In contrast, the low aspect-ratio trips with non-uniform blockage destroy the inner structures, which are then re-formed further downstream under the influence of the wake of the trips (wake-driven).

  8. The Very High Alfvén Mach Number Bow Shock of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves are ubiquitous in the universe and fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. The interplay between particles (ions and electrons) and fields (electromagnetic) introduces a variety of both physical and geometrical parameters such as Mach numbers (e.g. MA, Mf), β, and θbn. These vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics of shocks. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. It is not clear what happens in the higher MA regime. Here we show the parameter space of MA for all bow shock crossings from 2004-2012 as measured by the Cassini spacecraft. We found that the Saturnian bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we estimated the θbn­ of each crossing and were able to further constrain the sample into categories of similar features. Our results demonstrate how MA plays a central role in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly instabilities, non-time stationarity and electron acceleration. We anticipate our comprehensive assessment to give deeper insight to high MA collisionless shocks and provide a broader scope for understanding the structures and mechanisms of collisionless shocks. This can potentially bridge the gap between more modest MA observed in near-Earth space and more exotic astrophysical regimes where shock

  9. Spatial patterning of the neonatal EEG suggests a need for a high number of electrodes.

    PubMed

    Odabaee, Maryam; Freeman, Walter J; Colditz, Paul B; Ramon, Ceon; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for source analysis of neonatal EEG, but currently there is inadequate knowledge about i) the spatial patterning of neonatal scalp EEG and hence ii) the number of electrodes needed to capture neonatal EEG in full spatial detail. This study addresses these issues by using a very high density (2.5mm interelectrode spacing) linear electrode array to assess the spatial power spectrum, by using a high density (64 electrodes) EEG cap to assess the spatial extent of the common oscillatory bouts in the neonatal EEG and by using a neonatal size spherical head model to assess the effects of source depth and skull conductivities on the spatial frequency spectrum. The linear array recordings show that the spatial power spectrum decays rapidly until about 0.5-0.8 cycles per centimeter. The dense array EEG recordings show that the amplitude of oscillatory events decays within 4-6 cm to the level of global background activity, and that the higher frequencies (12-20 Hz) show the most rapid spatial decline in amplitude. Simulation with spherical head model showed that realistic variation in skull conductivity and source depths can both introduce orders of magnitude difference in the spatial frequency of the scalp EEG. Calculation of spatial Nyquist frequencies from the spatial power spectra suggests that an interelectrode distance of about 6-10mm would suffice to capture the full spatial texture of the raw EEG signal at the neonatal scalp without spatial aliasing or under-sampling. The spatial decay of oscillatory events suggests that a full representation of their spatial characteristics requires an interelectrode distance of 10-20mm. The findings show that the conventional way of recording neonatal EEG with about 10 electrodes ignores most spatial EEG content, that increasing the electrode density is necessary to improve neonatal EEG source localization and information extraction, and that prospective source models will need to carefully consider the

  10. Ultimate regime of high Rayleigh number convection in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Duncan R; Neufeld, Jerome A; Lister, John R

    2012-06-01

    Well-resolved direct numerical simulations of 2D Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a porous medium are presented for Rayleigh numbers Ra≤4×10(4) which reveal that, contrary to previous indications, the linear classical scaling for the Nusselt number, Nu~Ra, is attained asymptotically. The flow dynamics are analyzed, and the interior of the vigorously convecting system is shown to be increasingly well described as Ra→∞ by a simple columnar "heat-exchanger" model with a single horizontal wave number k and a linear background temperature field. The numerical results are approximately fitted by k~Ra(0.4).

  11. Greater default-mode network abnormalities compared to high order visual processing systems in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: an integrated multi-modal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M; Rami, Lorena; Bargalló, Núria; Junqué, Carme; Molinuevo, José-Luis; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an integrated multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study based on functional MRI (fMRI) data during a complex but cognitively preserved visual task in 15 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI) patients and 15 Healthy Elders (HE). Independent Component Analysis of fMRI data identified a functional network containing an Activation Task Related Pattern (ATRP), including regions of the dorsal and ventral visual stream, and a Deactivation Task Related Pattern network (DTRP), with high spatial correspondence with the default-mode network (DMN). Gray matter (GM) volumes of the underlying ATRP and DTRP cortical areas were measured, and probabilistic tractography (based on diffusion MRI) identified fiber pathways within each functional network. For the ATRP network, a-MCI patients exhibited increased fMRI responses in inferior-ventral visual areas, possibly reflecting compensatory activations for more compromised dorsal regions. However, no significant GM or white matter group differences were observed within the ATRP network. For the DTRP/DMN, a-MCI showed deactivation deficits and reduced GM volumes in the posterior cingulate/precuneus, excessive deactivations in the inferior parietal lobe, and less fiber tract integrity in the cingulate bundles. Task performance correlated with DTRP-functionality in the HE group. Besides allowing the identification of functional reorganizations in the cortical network directly processing the task-stimuli, these findings highlight the importance of conducting integrated multi-modal MRI studies in MCI based on spared cognitive domains in order to identify functional abnormalities in critical areas of the DMN and their precise anatomical substrates. These latter findings may reflect early neuroimaging biomarkers in dementia.

  12. Wall Cooling Effects on Hypersonic Transitional/Turbulent Boundary Layers at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.

    1975-01-01

    A 4 degree wedge was used to produce a thick turbulent boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 11. By using a two-dimensional model, the boundary layer was nearly free from upstream history effects associated with nozzle wall turbulent boundary layers. Heat-transfer distributions were used to define regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow at several values of T(sub w)/T(sub t) for an edge unit Reynolds number of 0.47 x lot per cm. Pitot and total temperature profiles and skin-friction measurements were obtained at selected stations along the model. Turbulence parameters (mixing length/sigma and epsilon) were derived from the fully turbulent profiles and used to more completely define the "low Reynolds number" effect. Turbulent Prandtl number distributions are also presented.

  13. Excitable dynamics in high-Lewis number premixed gas combustion at normal and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard

    1995-01-01

    Freely-propagating, premixed gas flames in high-Lewis (Le) number, quiescent mixtures are studied experimentally in tubes of various diameter at normal (lg) and microgravity (mu g). A premixture of lean butane and oxygen diluted with helium, argon, neon, nitrogen or a mixture of multiple diluents is examined such that the thermal diffusivity of the mixture (and to a lesser extent, the mass diffusivity of the rate-limiting component) is systematically varied. In effect, different diluents allow variation of the Le without changing the chemistry. The flames are recorded with high speed cinematography and their stability is visually assessed. Different modes of propagation were observed depending on the diameter of the tubes (different conductive heat loss), the composition of the mixture and the g-level. At 1g, four modes of propagation were observed in small and intermediate diameter tubes (large conductive heat loss): (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, (3) 'wavering' flames, and (4) rotating spiral flames. As the diameter of the tube increases, the radial modes become more pronounced while the longitudinal modes systematically disappear. Also, multiple, simultaneous, spatially-separated 'pacemaker' sites are observed in intermediate and large diameter tubes. Each site starts as a small region of high luminosity and develops into a flamelet which assumes the form of one of the fore mentioned modes. These flamelets eventually interact, annihilate each other in their regions of intersection and merge at their newly created free-ends. For very large tubes, radially-propagating wave-trains (believed to be 'trigger waves') are observed. These are analogous to the radial pulsations observed in the smaller diameter tubes. At mu g, three modes of propagation have been observed: (1) steadily propagating flames, (2) radial and longitudinal pulsating flames, and (3) multi-armed, rotating flames. Since the pulsating mode exists at mu

  14. Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

  15. An autostereoscopic display with high resolution and large number of view zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wu-Li; Hsu, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Chao-Hsu; Wang, Chy-Lin; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Cheng, Shu-Chuan

    2008-02-01

    For a spatial-multiplexed 3D display, trade-off between resolution and number of view-zones are usually unavoidable due to the limited number of pixels on the screen. In this paper, we present a new autostereoscopic system, named as "integrated-screen system," to substantially increase the total number of pixels on the screen, which in turn increase both the resolution and number of view-zones. In the integrated-screen system, a large number of mini-projectors are arrayed and the images are tiled together without seams in between. For displaying 3D images, the lenticular screen with predesigned tilted angle is used for distributing different viewing zones. In order to achieve good performance, we design a brand-new projector with special lens set to meet the low-distortion requirement because the distortion of the image will induce serious crosstalk between view-zones. The proposed system has two advantages. One is the extensibility of the screen size. The size of the display can be chosen based on the applications we deal with, including the size of the projected pixel and the number of viewing zones. The other advantage is that the integrated-screen system provides projected pixels in great density to solve the major problem of the poor resolution that a lenticular-type 3D display has.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  17. Differences in Factors Affecting Various Crash Types with High Numbers of Fatalities and Injuries in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; He, Jie; Ding, Jianxun; Shi, Qin; Wang, Changjun; Li, Pingfan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Road traffic crashes that involve very high numbers of fatalities and injuries arouse public concern wherever they occur. In China, there are two categories of such crashes: a crash that results in 10–30 fatalities, 50–100 serious injuries or a total cost of 50–100 million RMB ($US8-16m) is a “serious road traffic crash” (SRTC), while a crash that is even more severe or costly is a “particularly serious road traffic crash” (PSRTC). The aim of this study is to identify the main factors affecting different types of these crashes (single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact) with the ultimate goal of informing prevention activities and policies. Methods Detailed descriptions of the SRTCs and PSRTCs that occurred from 2007 to 2014 were collected from the database “In-depth Investigation and Analysis System for Major Road Traffic Crashes” (IIASMRTC), which is maintained by the Traffic Management Research Institute of the Ministry of Public Security of China (TMRI). 18 main risk factors, which were categorized into four areas (participant, vehicle, road and environment-related) were chosen as potential independent variables for the multinomial logistic regression analysis. Comparisons were made among the single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact crashes in terms of factors affecting crash occurrence. Findings Five risk factors were significant for the six multinomial logistic regression models, which were location, vertical alignment, roadside safety rating, driver distraction and overloading of cargo. It was indicated that intersections were more likely to have side impact SRTCs and PSRTCs, especially with poor visibility at night. Overloaded freight vehicles were more likely to be involved in a rear-end crash than other freight vehicles. Driver distraction is an important risk factor for head-on crashes, while vertical alignment and roadside safety rating are positively associated with single-vehicle crashes. Conclusion Based

  18. a Novel Approach for Analyzing Supersonic High Reynolds Number Flows with Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Gregory Dan

    A phenomenon which can have a significant impact on the performance of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems is the strong interaction which occurs between the viscous and inviscid regions of high Reynolds number, laminar flows. Strong interaction is characterized by the presence of "upstream influence" and often results in flow separation. Since strong viscous/inviscid interaction can significantly alter the flow field and degrade the performance of airframe and propulsion systems, accurately predicting these flows is essential to the aerodynamic design process. The goal of the present study is to develop a physically based computational technique to solve the steady Navier-Stokes equations for the above class of problems. This goal is accomplished by tailoring the analysis to reflect the dominant mechanism of strong viscous/inviscid interaction as determined from experimental observations and mathematical theories. A reduced set of composite equations, derived from the full Navier-Stokes equations, is solved in a globally -iterated, space-marching manner where upstream influence is modelled through the introduction of the stream function along a single line oriented in the streamwise direction and located within the viscous region. This novel technique for solving the composite equations represents an extension of established two-layer interacting viscous-layer approaches and should be applicable to a broader range of flow conditions than the two-layer methods while providing a comparable level of efficiency and thus could provide an effective alternative to time-marching algorithms. Computational results are presented for the cases of normal slot injection into a supersonic stream and shock/boundary -layer interaction with and without separation. These results compare favorably with results computed using an asymptotic analysis, results computed using a time-marching Navier -Stokes procedure, and available experimental data. In addition

  19. Inferring Haplotypes of Copy Number Variations From High-Throughput Data With Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Yoon, Seungtai; Hosono, Naoya; Leotta, Anthony; Sebat, Jonathan; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Zhang, Michael Q.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate information on haplotypes and diplotypes (haplotype pairs) is required for population-genetic analyses; however, microarrays do not provide data on a haplotype or diplotype at a copy number variation (CNV) locus; they only provide data on the total number of copies over a diplotype or an unphased sequence genotype (e.g., AAB, unlike AB of single nucleotide polymorphism). Moreover, such copy numbers or genotypes are often incorrectly determined when microarray signal intensities derived from different copy numbers or genotypes are not clearly separated due to noise. Here we report an algorithm to infer CNV haplotypes and individuals’ diplotypes at multiple loci from noisy microarray data, utilizing the probability that a signal intensity may be derived from different underlying copy numbers or genotypes. Performing simulation studies based on known diplotypes and an error model obtained from real microarray data, we demonstrate that this probabilistic approach succeeds in accurate inference (error rate: 1–2%) from noisy data, whereas previous deterministic approaches failed (error rate: 12–18%). Applying this algorithm to real microarray data, we estimated haplotype frequencies and diplotypes in 1486 CNV regions for 100 individuals. Our algorithm will facilitate accurate population-genetic analyses and powerful disease association studies of CNVs. PMID:22384316

  20. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  1. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  2. The diagonal and off-diagonal quark number susceptibility of high temperature and finite density QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietanen, A.; Rummukainen, K.

    2008-04-01

    We study the quark number susceptibility of the hot quark-gluon plasma at zero and non-zero quark number density, using lattice Monte Carlo simulations of an effective theory of QCD, electrostatic QCD (EQCD). Analytic continuation is used to obtain results at non-zero quark chemical potential μ. We measure both flavor singlet (diagonal) and non-singlet (off-diagonal) quark number susceptibilities. The diagonal susceptibility approaches the perturbative result above ~ 20Tc, but below that temperature we observe significant deviations. The results agree well with 4d lattice data down to temperatures ~ 2Tc. The off-diagonal susceptibility is more prone to statistical and systematic errors, but the results are consistent with perturbation theory already at 10Tc.

  3. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  4. Airfoil stall penetration at constant pitch rate and high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorber, Peter F.; Carta, Franklin O.

    1989-01-01

    The model wing consists of a set of fiberglass panels mounted on a steel spar that spans the 8 ft test section of the UTRC Large Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The first use of this system was to measure surface pressures and flow conditions for a series of constant pitch rate ramps and sinusoidal oscillations a Mach number range, a Reynolds number range, and a pitch angle range. It is concluded that an increased pitch rate causes stall events to be delayed, strengthening of the stall vortex, increase in vortex propagation, and increase in unsteady airloads. The Mach number range causes a supersonic zone near the leading edge, stall vortex to be weaker, and a reduction of unsteady airloads.

  5. A High-Level Formalization of Floating-Point Number in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldo, Sylvie; Munoz, Cesar

    2006-01-01

    We develop a formalization of floating-point numbers in PVS based on a well-known formalization in Coq. We first describe the definitions of all the needed notions, e.g., floating-point number, format, rounding modes, etc.; then, we present an application to polynomial evaluation for elementary function evaluation. The application already existed in Coq, but our formalization shows a clear improvement in the quality of the result due to the automation provided by PVS. We finally integrate our formalization into a PVS hardware-level formalization of the IEEE-854 standard previously developed at NASA.

  6. Hill number as a bacterial diversity measure framework with high-throughput sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sanghoon; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.; Ng, Justin P.; Gentry, Terry J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial diversity is an important parameter for measuring bacterial contributions to the global ecosystem. However, even the task of describing bacterial diversity is challenging due to biological and technological difficulties. One of the challenges in bacterial diversity estimation is the appropriate measure of rare taxa, but the uncertainty of the size of rare biosphere is yet to be experimentally determined. One approach is using the generalized diversity, Hill number (Na), to control the variability associated with rare taxa by differentially weighing them. Here, we investigated Hill number as a framework for microbial diversity measure using a taxa-accmulation curve (TAC) with soil bacterial community data from two distinct studies by 454 pyrosequencing. The reliable biodiversity estimation was obtained when an increase in Hill number arose as the coverage became stable in TACs for a ≥ 1. In silico analysis also indicated that a certain level of sampling depth was desirable for reliable biodiversity estimation. Thus, in order to attain bacterial diversity from second generation sequencing, Hill number can be a good diversity framework with given sequencing depth, that is, until technology is further advanced and able to overcome the under- and random-sampling issues of the current sequencing approaches. PMID:27901123

  7. Status and future prospects of using numerical methods to study complex flows at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The calculation of flow fields past aircraft configuration at flight Reynolds numbers is considered. Progress in devising accurate and efficient numerical methods, in understanding and modeling the physics of turbulence, and in developing reliable and powerful computer hardware is discussed. Emphasis is placed on efficient solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations.

  8. Efficient isolation of polymorphic microsatellites from high-throughput sequence data based on number of repeats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sara D; Gonçalves, David; Robalo, Joana I; Almada, Vitor C; Canário, Adelino V M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-09-01

    Transcriptome data are a good resource to develop microsatellites due to their potential in targeting candidate genes. However, developing microsatellites can be a time-consuming enterprise due to the numerous primer pairs to be tested. Therefore, the use of methodologies that make it efficient to identify polymorphic microsatellites is desirable. Here we used a 62,038 contigs transcriptome assembly, obtained from pyrosequencing a peacock blenny (Salaria pavo) multi-tissue cDNA library, to mine for microsatellites and in silico evaluation of their polymorphism. A total of 4190 microsatellites were identified in 3670 unique unigenes, and from these microsatellites, in silico polymorphism was detected in 733. We selected microsatellites based either on their in silico polymorphism and annotation results or based only on their number of repeats. Using these two approaches, 28 microsatellites were successfully amplified in twenty-six individuals, and all but 2 were found to be polymorphic, being the first genetic markers for this species. Our results showed that the strategy of selection based on number of repeats is more efficient in obtaining polymorphic microsatellites than the strategy of in silico polymorphism (allelic richness was 8.2±3.85 and 4.56±2.45 respectively). This study demonstrates that combining the knowledge of number of repeats with other predictors of variability, for example in silico microsatellite polymorphism, improves the rates of polymorphism, yielding microsatellites with higher allelic richness, and decreases the number of monomorphic microsatellites obtained.

  9. Enumeration of High Numbers of Bacteria Using Hydrophobic Grid-Membrane Filters

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Anthony N.; Michaud, Gregory L.

    1975-01-01

    Printing a wax grid on a conventional membrane filter yields a device functioning as a most probable number apparatus (MPN), used at a single dilution but with a very large number of growth compartments (e.g., 3,650). By restraining the lateral spread and confluence of colonies, the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter (HGMF) allows growth- or colony-forming units (GU) to be resolved at levels far above those which produce an uncountable lawn on a conventional membrane filter. It also eliminates the size variation of normal bacterial colonies. As a result, the HGMF can give more accurate estimates of the concentration of GU. The method by which grid-cell count observations can be used to obtain MPN estimates of the number of GUs is described, and estimates obtained using the MPN method on the HGMF are compared with those resulting from conventional colony count procedures on membrane filters. A linear relation was observed between MPNGU and the number of GUs, at levels up to 30,000 GUs, for pure cultures of bacteria and for samples of natural waters. The HGMF has great potential for reducing the labor required in quantitative microbiology, since it allows, with one filter, enumeration of microorganisms over a very large concentration range and therefore reduces the need to make dilutions. PMID:1103728

  10. Enumeration of high numbers of bacteria using hydrophobic grid-membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, A N; Michaud, G L

    1975-10-01

    Printing a wax grid on a conventional membrane filter yields a device functioning as a most probable number apparatus (MPN), used at a single dilution but with a very large number of growth compartments (e.g., 3,650). By restraining the lateral spread and confluence of colonies, the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter (HGMF) allows growth- or colony-forming units (GU) to be resolved at levels far above those which produce an uncountable lawn on a conventional membrane filter. It also eliminates the size variation of normal bacterial colonies. As a result, the HGMF can give more accurate estimates of the concentration of GU. The method by which grid-cell count observations can be used to obtain MPN estimates of the number of GUs is described, and estimates obtained using the MPN method on the HGMF are compared with those resulting from conventional colony count procedures on membrane filters. A linear relation was observed between MPNGU and the number of GUs, at levels up to 30,000 GUs, for pure cultures of bacteria and for samples of natural waters. The HGMF has great potential for reducing the labor required in quantitative microbiology, since it allows, with one filter, enumeration of microorganisms over a very large concentration range and therefore reduces the need to make dilutions.

  11. A two-dimensional, TVD numerical scheme for inviscid, high Mach number flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, S.; Palmer, G.

    1986-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed for hypervelocity flows in chemical equilibrium. Solutions have been achieved for Mach numbers up to 15 with no adverse effect on convergence. Two methods of coupling an equilibrium chemistry package have been tested, with the simpler method proving to be more robust. Improvements in boundary conditions are still required for a production-quality code.

  12. Entrainment Across a Sheared Density Interface in High Richardson Number Cavity Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nicholas; Kirkpartick, Michael; Armfield, Steve

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent entrainment of fluid across a sharp density interface has been examined experimentally in a purging cavity flow. In the experiments, a long straight cavity with sloped entry and exit boundaries is located in the base of a straight open channel. Saline fluid is entrained from the cavity into the overflow. The cavity geometry has been designed to ensure there is no separation of the overflow in the cavity region with the goal of obtaining a single mode of entrainment, related only to the interface properties rather than to cavity specific mechanisms. The bulk entrainment rate has been measured and correlated with bulk Richardson number over Ri = 1 . 0 - 20 at Reynolds number Re = 7100 - 15100 . The entrainment rate is shown to scale with the local bulk Richardson number E ~= CRi - 1 . 38 , very close to the established result for entrainment across a sharp two layer density interface in a recirculating water channel (Strang and Fernando, J Fluid Mech., 428, 2001) but with an order of magnitude lower coefficient C. Experiments instrumented with PIV/LIF were used to relate the bulk Ri to the local gradient Richardson number of the interface. In the cavity setting the interface appears to remain sharper, resulting in larger Rig and reduced entrainment.

  13. Fine mapping of copy number variations on two cattle genome assemblies using high density SNP array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Btau_4.0 and UMD3.1 are two distinct cattle reference genome assemblies. In our previous study using the low density BovineSNP50 array, we reported a copy number variation (CNV) analysis on Btau_4.0 with 521 animals of 21 cattle breeds, yielding 682 CNV regions with a total length of 139.8 megabases...

  14. Clinical abnormalities in working donkeys and their associations with behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Regan (nee Ashley), F. H.; Hockenhull, J.; Pritchard, J. C.; Waterman-Pearson, A. E.; Whay, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Introductions Working donkeys are at risk of developing multiple, acute and chronic health problems. The ability to recognise and assess pain in donkeys associated with these health problems is important for people responsible for their care and treatment, including owners and veterinary or animal health workers. Aims and objectives The aims of this study were firstly to quantify the prevalence of a range of clinical abnormalities within a sample of working donkeys; and secondly to find out whether these abnormalities were associated with potential behavioural indicators of pain. Materials and methods One hundred and thirty-three entire male adult working donkeys were observed for ten minutes before and after a one-hour rest period. Using an ethogram developed and refined in associated studies, posture and event behaviours were recorded by a single observer. The health of each donkey was then assessed by a veterinarian for specific clinical abnormalities. Results Working donkeys have a high prevalence of clinical abnormalities and a number of behaviours are associated with these. Significant associations were found between observed behaviours and systemic, ocular and limb-related clinical abnormalities. Cumulative clinical scores for limb-related problems were associated with a higher frequency of leg trembling, knuckling of the forelimb, leg-lifting and weight-shifting behaviours (all R≥0.4; P<0.001) and with a lower frequency of weight-bearing evenly on all four feet (R=-0.458; P<0.001). Conclusions The specific behaviour changes associated with clinical abnormalities identified in this study, together with general changes in demeanour identified in related studies, may be useful in assessing the presence and severity of pain in working donkeys and their response to medical and palliative interventions. PMID:26392903

  15. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  16. Use of a Novel High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Neurography Protocol to Detect Abnormal Dorsal Root Ganglia in Sjögren Patients With Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Julius; Duncan, Trisha; Owoyemi, Kristie; Wang, Kenneth C.; Carrino, John; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis and treatment of patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS) with neuropathic pain pose several challenges. Patients with SS may experience unorthodox patterns of burning pain not conforming to a traditional “stocking-and-glove” distribution, which can affect the face, torso, and proximal extremities. This distribution of neuropathic pain may reflect mechanisms targeting the proximal-most element of the peripheral nervous system—the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Skin biopsy can diagnose such a small-fiber neuropathy and is a surrogate marker of DRG neuronal cell loss. However, SS patients have been reported who have similar patterns of proximal neuropathic pain, despite having normal skin biopsy studies. In such cases, DRGs may be targeted by mechanisms not associated with neuronal cell loss. Therefore, alternative approaches are warranted to help characterize abnormal DRGs in SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain. We performed a systematic review of the literature to define the frequency and spectrum of SS peripheral neuropathies, and to better understand the attribution of SS neuropathic pain to peripheral neuropathies. We found that the frequency of SS neuropathic pain exceeded the prevalence of peripheral neuropathies, and that painful peripheral neuropathies occurred less frequently than neuropathies not always associated with pain. We developed a novel magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) protocol to evaluate DRG abnormalities. Ten SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain were evaluated by this MRN protocol, as well as by punch skin biopsies evaluating for intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of unmyelinated nerves. Five patients had radiographic evidence of DRG abnormalities. Patients with MRN DRG abnormalities had increased IENFD of unmyelinated nerves compared to patients without MRN DRG abnormalities (30.2 [interquartile range, 4.4] fibers/mm vs. 11.0 [4.1] fibers/mm, respectively; p = 0.03). Two of these 5 SS patients

  17. Abnormal myocardial perfusion and risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Utrera-Lagunas, Marcelo; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Espinoza-Rosas, Sarahi; Sánchez-Ortíz, Néstor Alonso; Olvera-Mayorga, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart failure (HF), although the pathophysiological processes have not been clarified. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of HF and of abnormal myocardial perfusion in diabetic patients evaluated using technetium (99m) sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography. METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted that included patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent echocardiography to diagnose HF and a pharmacological stress test with intravenous dipyridamole to examine cardiac scintigraphic perfusion abnormalities. Clinical and biochemical data were also collected. RESULTS: Of the 160 diabetic patients included, 92 (57.6%) were in HF and 68 (42.5%) were not. When patients were stratified according to the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion, those with abnormal perfusion had a higher prevalence of HF (93%) than those with normal perfusion (44.4%) (P<0.0001). Patients with HF weighed more (P=0.03), used insulin less frequently (P=0.01), had lower total cholesterol (P=0.05) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P=0.002), and a greater number of their myocardial segments showed abnormal perfusion (P≤0.001). More HF patients had a history of myocardial infarction (P<0.001) compared with those without HF. In a logistic regression analysis, the number of segments exhibiting abnormal myocardial perfusion was an independent risk factor for HF. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HF in diabetic patients was high and HF predominantly occured in association with myocardial ischemia. PMID:24294048

  18. Performance of High-pressure-ratio Axial-flow Compressor Using Highly Cambered NACA 65-series Blower Blades at High Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, Charles H; Guentert, Donald C; Dugan, James F

    1950-01-01

    A complete stage of an axial-flow compressor was designed and built to investigate the possibility of obtaining a high pressure ratio with an acceptable efficiency through the use of the optimum combination of high blade loading and high relative inlet Mach number. Over-all stage performance was investigated over a range of flows at equivalent tip speeds of 418 to 836 feet per second. At design speed (836 ft/sec), a peak total-pressure ration of 1.445 was obtained with an adiabatic efficiency of 0.89. For design angle of attack at the mean radius, a total-pressure ratio of 1.392 was obtained.

  19. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in v

  20. Red-Backed Vole Brain Promotes Highly Efficient In Vitro Amplification of Abnormal Prion Protein from Macaque and Human Brains Infected with Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in vCJD-infected human

  1. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  2. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  3. Application of shock tubes to transonic airfoil testing at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Chaney, M. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    Performance analysis of a gas-driven shock tube shows that transonic airfoil flows with chord Reynolds numbers of the order of 100 million can be produced, with limitations being imposed by the structural integrity of the facility or the model. A study of flow development over a simple circular arc airfoil at zero angle of attack was carried out in a shock tube at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers to assess the testing technique. Results obtained from schlieren photography and airfoil pressure measurements show that steady transonic flows similar to those produced for the same airfoil in a wind tunnel can be generated within the available testing time in a shock tube with properly contoured test section walls.

  4. Skin Friction at Very High Reynolds Numbers in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Anders, John B.; Hall, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Skin friction coefficients were derived from measurements using standard measurement technologies on an axisymmetric cylinder in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.85. The pressure gradient was nominally zero, the wall temperature was nominally adiabatic, and the ratio of boundary layer thickness to model diameter within the measurement region was 0.10 to 0.14, varying with distance along the model. Reynolds numbers based on momentum thicknesses ranged from 37,000 to 605,000. The measurements approximately doubled the range of available data for flat plate skin friction coefficients. Three different techniques were used to measure surface shear. The maximum error of Preston tube measurements was estimated to be 2.5 percent, while that of Clauser derived measurements was estimated to be approximately 5 percent. Direct measurements by skin friction balance proved to be subject to large errors and were not considered reliable.

  5. The cryogenic wind tunnel for high Reynolds number testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments performed at the NASA Langley Research Center in a cryogenic low-speed continuous-flow tunnel and in a cryogenic transonic continuous-flow pressure tunnel have demonstrated the predicted changes in Reynolds number, drive power, and fan speed with temperature, while operating with nitrogen as the test gas. The experiments have also demonstrated that cooling to cryogenic temperatures by spraying liquid nitrogen directly into the tunnel circuit is practical and that tunnel temperature can be controlled within very close limits. Whereas most types of wind tunnel could operate with advantage at cryogenic temperatures, the continuous-flow fan-driven tunnel is particularly well suited to take full advantage of operating at these temperatures. A continuous-flow fan-driven cryogenic tunnel to satisfy current requirements for test Reynolds number can be constructed and operated using existing techniques. Both capital and operating costs appear acceptable.

  6. Characteristics of a hyperboloid-flare configuration at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvegintsev, V. I.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chirkashenko, V. F.; Chibisov, S. V.; Fletcher, D.; Paris, S.

    2006-12-01

    Results on a hyperboloid-flare model tested in a new hypersonic wind tunnel with adiabatic compression AT-303 based at ITAM SB RAS at M∞ = 10 and 15 and in a wide range of Reynolds numbers are presented. Pressure and heat-flux distributions along the model are compared with data obtained previously in various European hypersonic wind tunnels (Longshot — Belgium, HEG — Germany) and with results of numerical computations. Pressure and heat-flux coefficients measured in the attached flow region are demonstrated to be in good qualitative agreement. Reasons for the differences in results measured in regions of flow separation and reattachment are discussed. Significant viscous effects on characteristics of the flow around the model are demonstrated; a particularly strong effect is exerted on the heat-flux distribution. This fact confirms that it is important to model real Reynolds numbers in wind-tunnel testing of aerospace plane models.

  7. Determination of the Profile Drag of an Airplane Wing in Flight at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicknell, Joseph

    1939-01-01

    Flight tests were made to determine the profile-drag coefficients of a portion of the original wing surface of an all-metal airplane and of a portion of the wing made aerodynamically smooth and more nearly fair than the original section. The wing section was approximately the NACA 2414.5. The tests were carried out over a range of airplane speeds giving a maximum Reynolds number of 15,000,000. Tests were also carried out to locate the point of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer and to determine the velocity distribution along the upper surface of the wing. The profile-drag coefficients of the original and of the smooth wing portions at a Reynolds number of 15,000,000 were 0.0102 and 0.0068, respectively; i.e., the surface irregularities on the original wing increased the profile-drag coefficient 50 percent above that of the smooth wing.

  8. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  9. Temperature variance profiles of turbulent thermal convection at high Rayleigh numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaozhou; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-11-01

    We present measurements of the Nusselt number Nu , and of the temperature variance σ2 as a function of vertical position z, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection of two cylindrical samples with aspect ratios (diameter D/height L) Γ = 0 . 50 and 0 . 33 . Both samples had D = 1 . 12 m but different L. We used compressed SF6 gas at pressures up to 19 bars as the fluid. The measurements covered the Rayleigh-number range 1013 < Ra < 5 ×1015 at a Prandtl number Pr = 0 . 80 . Near the side wall we found that σ2 is independent of Ra when plotted as a function of z / λ where λ ≡ L / (2 Nu) is a thermal boundary-layer thickness. The profiles σ2 (z / λ) for the two Γ values overlapped and followed a logarithmic function for 20 z / λ 120 . With the observed "-1"-scaling of the temperature power spectra and on the basis of the Perry-Townsend similarity hypothesis, we derived a fitting function σ2 =p1 ln (z / λ) +p2 +p3(z / λ) - 0 . 5 which describes the σ2 data up to z / λ = 1500 . Supported by the Max Planck Society, the Volkswagenstiftung, the DFD Sonderforschungsbereich SFB963, and NSF Grant DMR11-58514.

  10. Analysis of the thermomechanical inconsistency of some extended hydrodynamic models at high Knudsen number.

    PubMed

    Dadzie, S Kokou; Reese, Jason M

    2012-04-01

    There are some hydrodynamic equations that, while their parent kinetic equation satisfies fundamental mechanical properties, appear themselves to violate mechanical or thermodynamic properties. This paper aims to shed some light on the source of this problem. Starting with diffusive volume hydrodynamic models, the microscopic temporal and spatial scales are first separated at the kinetic level from the macroscopic scales at the hydrodynamic level. Then, we consider Klimontovich's spatial stochastic version of the Boltzmann kinetic equation and show that, for small local Knudsen numbers, the stochastic term vanishes and the kinetic equation becomes the Boltzmann equation. The collision integral dominates in the small local Knudsen number regime, which is associated with the exact traditional continuum limit. We find a subdomain of the continuum range, which the conventional Knudsen number classification does not account for appropriately. In this subdomain, it is possible to obtain a fully mechanically consistent volume (or mass) diffusion model that satisfies the second law of thermodynamics on the grounds of extended non-local-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  11. Large-eddy simulations of impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Piomelli, Ugo

    2013-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of an impinging jet with embedded azimuthal vortices. We used a hybrid approach in which the near-wall layer is modelled using the RANS equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model, while away from the wall Lagrangian-averaged dynamic eddy-viscosity modelled LES is used. This method allowed us to reach Reynolds numbers that would be prohibitively expensive for wall-resolving LES. First, we compared the results of the hybrid calculation with a wall-resolved one at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 66 , 000 (based on jet diameter and velocity). The mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were in good agreement between the simulations, and, in particular, the generation of secondary vorticity at the wall and its liftup were captured well. The simulation cost was reduced by 86%. We then carried out simulations at Re = 266 , 000 and 1.3 million. The effect of Reynolds number on vortex development will be discussed. Canada Research Chair in Computational Turbulence, HPCVL-Sun Microsystems Chair in Computational Science and Engineering.

  12. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  13. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  14. Natural convection in a vertical plane channel: DNS results for high Grashof numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiš, P.; Herwig, H.

    2014-07-01

    The turbulent natural convection of a gas ( Pr = 0.71) between two vertical infinite walls at different but constant temperatures is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation for a wide range of Grashof numbers (6.0 × 106 > Gr > 1.0 × 103). The maximum Grashof number is almost one order of magnitude higher than those of computations reported in the literature so far. Results for the turbulent transport equations are presented and compared to previous studies with special attention to the study of Verteegh and Nieuwstadt (Int J Heat Fluid Flow 19:135-149, 1998). All turbulence statistics are available on the TUHH homepage (http://www.tu-harburg.de/tt/dnsdatabase/dbindex.en.html). Accuracy considerations are based on the time averaged balance equations for kinetic and thermal energy. With the second law of thermodynamics Nusselt numbers can be determined by evaluating time averaged wall temperature gradients as well as by a volumetric time averaged integration. Comparing the results of both approaches leads to a direct measure of the physical consistency.

  15. Experimental study of the effects of Reynolds number on high angle of attack aerodynamic characteristics of forebodies during rotary motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, H.; Ralston, J.; Dickes, E.

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Defense Research Agency (United Kingdom) have ongoing experimental research programs in rotary-flow aerodynamics. A cooperative effort between the two agencies is currently underway to collect an extensive database for the development of high angle of attack computational methods to predict the effects of Reynolds number on the forebody flowfield at dynamic conditions, as well as to study the use of low Reynolds number data for the evaluation of high Reynolds number characteristics. Rotary balance experiments, including force and moment and surface pressure measurements, were conducted on circular and rectangular aftbodies with hemispherical and ogive noses at the Bedford and Farnborough wind tunnel facilities in the United Kingdom. The bodies were tested at 60 and 90 deg angle of attack for a wide range of Reynolds numbers in order to observe the effects of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow separation on the forebody characteristics when rolling about the velocity vector.

  16. Computational study on the influence of number of threads on the performance of single screw pump at high angular velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Jaison; Suryan, Abhilash; Sanand, T. V.; Unnikrishnan Nair, P.; Sivakumar, S.

    2017-02-01

    Fluid flow in a screw pump which rotates at very high angular velocity is numerically analyzed. In the present study, fluid flow in screw pumps under high Reynolds number, of the order of 105, is considered. Screw pump has two major elements, a plain shroud which is a stationary element and a rotating hub with helical grooves contained within the shroud. In this paper, three variants of hubs with different number of thread starts numbering six, eight and twelve in combination with a plain shroud is studied. Each of the three possible combinations are analyzed on the basis of pressure rise developed, efficiency and shaft power. It was seen that pressure rise, efficiency and shaft power increases as the number of threads increases in the range of mass flow rates studied.

  17. Number Sense-Based Strategies Used by High-Achieving Sixth Grade Students Who Experienced Reform Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsawaie, Othman N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore strategies used by high-achieving 6th grade students in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to solve basic arithmetic problems involving number sense. The sample for the study consisted of 15 high-achieving boys and 15 high-achieving girls in grade 6 from 2 schools in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE. Data for the…

  18. High School Redesign. Diplomas Count, 2016. Education Week. Volume 35, Number 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This year's report focuses on efforts to redesign high schools. Those include incorporating student voice, implementing a rigorous and relevant curriculum, embracing career exploration, and more. The report also includes the latest statistics on the nation's overall, on-time high school graduation rate. Articles include: (1) To Build a Better High…

  19. Summer Mathematics Remediation for Incoming Pupils; 1975 High School Umbrella Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegelman, Marvin

    Funded under Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, the Summer Remediation for Incoming Pupils 1975 High School Umbrella #2 program (RIP) was designed to provide remedial instruction in mathematics to incoming ninth and tenth grade pupils who had attended Title I junior high or intermediate schools. The program was designed to bridge the gap…

  20. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  1. Analysis of high Reynolds numbers effects on a wind turbine airfoil using 2D wind tunnel test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, O.; Munduate, X.; Ceyhan, O.; Jacobs, M.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a wind turbine airfoil has been measured in a dedicated 2D wind tunnel test at the DNW High Pressure Wind Tunnel in Gottingen (HDG), Germany. The tests have been performed on the DU00W212 airfoil at different Reynolds numbers: 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 million, and at low Mach numbers (below 0.1). Both clean and tripped conditions of the airfoil have been measured. An analysis of the impact of a wide Reynolds number variation over the aerodynamic characteristics of this airfoil has been performed.

  2. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  3. Design of high-Reynolds-number flat-plate experiments in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1988-01-01

    The design of an experiment to measure skin friction and turbulent boundary layer characteristics at Reynolds numbers exceeding 1 x 10 to the 9th is described. The experiment will be conducted in a zero-pressure-gradient flow on a flat plate in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The development of computational codes to analyze the aerodynamic loads and the blockage is documented. Novel instrumentation techniques and models, designed to operate in cryogenic environments, are presented. Special problems associated with aerodynamic loads, surface finish, and hot-wire anemometers are discussed.

  4. Electron Accelerations at High Mach Number Shocks: Two-dimensional Particle-in-cell Simulations in Various Parameter Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collisionless shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various Alfvén Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron β e (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We find electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (MA ~ 30) with a mass ratio of M/m = 100 and β e = 0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with a large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low.

  5. Electron Accelerations at High Mach Number Shocks: Two-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulations in Various Parameter Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.

    2012-12-01

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collision-less shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations with various Alfven Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron βe (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We found electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (MA ~ 30) with a mass ratio of M/m=100 and βe=0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with the large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely-high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low. Matsumoto et al., Astrophys. J., 755, 109, 2012.

  6. ELECTRON ACCELERATIONS AT HIGH MACH NUMBER SHOCKS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS IN VARIOUS PARAMETER REGIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2012-08-20

    Electron accelerations at high Mach number collisionless shocks are investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various Alfven Mach numbers, ion-to-electron mass ratios, and the upstream electron {beta}{sub e} (the ratio of the thermal pressure to the magnetic pressure). We find electrons are effectively accelerated at a super-high Mach number shock (M{sub A} {approx} 30) with a mass ratio of M/m = 100 and {beta}{sub e} = 0.5. The electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for accelerating the particles toward the relativistic regime even in two dimensions with a large mass ratio. Buneman instability excited at the leading edge of the foot in the super-high Mach number shock results in a coherent electrostatic potential structure. While multi-dimensionality allows the electrons to escape from the trapping region, they can interact with the strong electrostatic field several times. Simulation runs in various parameter regimes indicate that the electron shock surfing acceleration is an effective mechanism for producing relativistic particles in extremely high Mach number shocks in supernova remnants, provided that the upstream electron temperature is reasonably low.

  7. Validating kinetic models in a fluid code using data from high-Knudsen-number capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N.; Molvig, K.; Dodd, E.; Albright, B.; Simakov, A.; Zimmerman, G.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Sinenian, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Sangster, C.

    2013-10-01

    We validate models of (a) ion diffusion and (b) fusion reactivity decrease from modified ion-distribution tails, implemented in a rad-hydro code, using data for five quantities (DD-n yield, D3He-p yield, DD burn temperature, bang time, and absorbed energy) from recent thin-shell D3He-filled capsules at OMEGA. Four inputs (laser source fraction, electron thermal flux limiter, Knudsen number multiplier, and ion flux multiplier) are varied to find the best fit to the ten observables from two implosions (8-atm fill and 23-atm fill). The calibrated input values can explain the data from a set of other D3He implosions with fill pressures from 1 atm to 17 atm (Knudsen numbers from 0.5 to ~6). Using a new transport model for ion loss, we will develop a model of wide validity for OMEGA direct-drive implosions. Funded by USDOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  8. Curling dynamics of naturally curved ribbons from high to low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran Arriagada, Octavio; Massiera, Gladys; Abkarian, Manouk

    2012-11-01

    Curling deformation of thin elastic sheets appears in numerous structures in nature, such as membranes of red blood cells, epithelial tissues or green algae colonies to cite just a few examples. However, despite its ubiquity, the dynamics of curling propagation in a naturally curved material remains still poorly investigated. Here, we present a coupled experimental and theoretical study of the dynamical curling deformation of naturally curved ribbons. Using thermoplastic and metallic ribbons molded on cylinders of different radii, we tune separately the natural curvature and the geometry to study curling dynamics in air, water and in viscous oils, thus spanning a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Our theoretical and experimental approaches separate the role of elasticity, gravity and hydrodynamic dissipation from inertia and emphasize the fundamental differences between the curling of a naturally curved ribbon and a rod described by the classical Elastica. Our work shows evidence for the propagation of a single instability front, selected by a local buckling condition. We show that depending on gravity, and both the Reynolds and the Cauchy numbers, the curling speed and shape are modified by the large scale drag and the local lubrication forces. This work was supported by the French Ministry of Research, the CNRS Physics-Chemistry-Biology Interdisciplinary Pro- gram, the University Montpellier 2 Interdisciplinary Program and the Region Languedoc-Roussillon.

  9. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the surface detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ±0.04 ±0.48 (sys))×107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. The logarithmic gain d ln Nμ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 ×1018 eV and 5 ×1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ±0.024 ±0.030 (sys)) .

  10. Blattabacteria, the endosymbionts of cockroaches, have small genome sizes and high genome copy numbers.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, María José; Neef, Alexander; Patiño-Navarrete, Rafael; Navarro, Lara; Jiménez, Ricardo; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2008-12-01

    Blattabacteria are intracellular endosymbionts of cockroaches and primitive termites that belong to the class Flavobacteria and live only in specialized cells in the abdominal fat body of their hosts. In the present study we determined genome sizes as well as genome copy numbers for the endosymbionts of three cockroach species, Blattella germanica, Periplaneta americana and Blatta orientalis. The sole presence of blattabacteria in the fat body was demonstrated by rRNA-targeting techniques. The genome sizes of the three blattabacteria were determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. The resulting total genome sizes for the three symbionts were all approximately 650 +/- 15 kb. Comparison of the genome sizes with those of free-living Bacteroidetes shows extended reduction, as occurs in other obligatory insect endosymbionts. Genome copy numbers were determined based on cell counts and determination of DNA amounts via quantitative PCR. Values between 10.2 and 18.3 and between 323 and 353 were found for the symbionts of P. americana and B. orientalis respectively. Polyploidy in intracellular bacteria may play a significant role in the genome reduction process.

  11. Entropy Splitting for High Order Numerical Simulation of Vortex Sound at Low Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A method of minimizing numerical errors, and improving nonlinear stability and accuracy associated with low Mach number computational aeroacoustics (CAA) is proposed. The method consists of two levels. From the governing equation level, we condition the Euler equations in two steps. The first step is to split the inviscid flux derivatives into a conservative and a non-conservative portion that satisfies a so called generalized energy estimate. This involves the symmetrization of the Euler equations via a transformation of variables that are functions of the physical entropy. Owing to the large disparity of acoustic and stagnation quantities in low Mach number aeroacoustics, the second step is to reformulate the split Euler equations in perturbation form with the new unknowns as the small changes of the conservative variables with respect to their large stagnation values. From the numerical scheme level, a stable sixth-order central interior scheme with a third-order boundary schemes that satisfies the discrete analogue of the integration-by-parts procedure used in the continuous energy estimate (summation-by-parts property) is employed.

  12. Revisiting Turbulence Model Validation for High-Mach Number Axisymmetric Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Huang, George P.

    2015-01-01

    Two axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) cases are used to benchmark one- and two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models. This validation exercise was executed in the philosophy of the NASA Turbulence Modeling Resource and the AIAA Turbulence Model Benchmarking Working Group. Both SWBLI cases are from the experiments of Kussoy and Horstman for axisymmetric compression corner geometries with SWBLI inducing flares of 20 and 30 degrees, respectively. The freestream Mach number was approximately 7. The RANS closures examined are the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model and the Menter family of kappa - omega two equation models including the Baseline and Shear Stress Transport formulations. The Wind-US and CFL3D RANS solvers are employed to simulate the SWBLI cases. Comparisons of RANS solutions to experimental data are made for a boundary layer survey plane just upstream of the SWBLI region. In the SWBLI region, comparisons of surface pressure and heat transfer are made. The effects of inflow modeling strategy, grid resolution, grid orthogonality, turbulent Prandtl number, and code-to-code variations are also addressed.

  13. Mean profile of a high-Reynolds-number smooth-flat-plate turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Oweis, Ghanem F.; Winkel, Eric S.; Cutbirth, James M.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc

    2010-11-01

    Although smooth-flat-plate turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) have been studied for nearly a century, measurements at Reynolds numbers typical of marine & aerospace transportation systems are scarce. Experimental results at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers (Re) up to 150,000 from the US Navy W.B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel using a polished 12.9-m-long flat-plate test model at water flow speeds up to 20 m/s are presented. Mean velocity profiles were measured 10.7 m from the leading edge of the model over a wall-normal range from less than one wall unit to more than twice the nominal boundary layer thickness using particle-tracking and laser-Doppler velocimetry. Static pressure and average skin-friction were measured independently. A mild favorable pressure gradient led to a flow speed increase of 2.5% over the test surface. The measurements span a factor of three in Re and were fitted to within experimental uncertainty using one set of constants and modern empirical inner- and outer-profile forms based on traditional TBL asymptotics. The fitted profiles satisfy the von-Karman momentum integral to within 1%, and show distinct differences from equivalent zero pressure gradient results. [Supported by DARPA & ONR

  14. Filtered chemical source term modeling for LES of high Karlovitz number premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapointe, Simon; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    Tabulated chemistry with the transport of a single progress variable is a popular technique for large eddy simulations of premixed turbulent flames. Since the reaction zone thickness is usually smaller than the LES grid size, modeling of the filtered progress variable reaction rate is required. Most models assume that the filtered progress variable reaction rate is a function of the filtered progress variable and its variance where the dependence can be obtained through the probability density function (PDF) of the progress variable. Among the most common approaches, the PDF can be presumed (usually as a β-PDF) or computed using spatially filtered one dimensional laminar flames (FLF). Models for the filtered source term are studied a priori using results from DNS of turbulent n-heptane/air premixed flames at varying Karlovitz numbers. Predictions from the optimal estimator and models based on laminar flames using a β-PDF or a FLF-PDF are compared to the exact filtered source term. For all filter widths and Karlovitz numbers, the optimal estimator yields small errors while β-PDF and FLF-PDF approaches present larger errors. Sources of differences are discussed.

  15. Transition of effective hydraulic properties from low to high Reynolds number flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanesapillai, R.; Steeb, H.; Hartmaier, A.

    2014-07-01

    We numerically analyze fluid flow through porous media up to a limiting Reynolds number of O(103). Due to inertial effects, such processes exhibit a gradual transition from laminar to turbulent flow for increasing magnitudes of Re. On the macroscopic scale, inertial transition implies nonlinearities in the relationship between the effective macroscopic pressure gradient and the filter velocity, typically accounted for in terms of the quadratic Forchheimer equation. However, various inertia-based extensions to the linear Darcy equation have been discussed in the literature; most prominently cubic polynomials in velocity. The numerical results presented in this contribution indicate that inertial transition, as observed in the apparent permeability, hydraulic tortuosity, and interfacial drag, is inherently of sigmoidal shape. Based on this observation, we derive a novel filtration law which is consistent with Darcy's law at small Re, reproduces Forchheimer's law at large Re, and exhibits higher-order leading terms in the weak inertia regime.

  16. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  17. Magnetic reconnection and stochastic plasmoid chains in high-Lundquist-number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, N. F.; Samtaney, R.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Uzdensky, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    A numerical study of magnetic reconnection in the large-Lundquist-number (S), plasmoid-dominated regime is carried out for S up to 107. The theoretical model of Uzdensky et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 235002 (2010)] is confirmed and partially amended. The normalized reconnection rate is E~eff~0.02 independently of S for S>>104. The plasmoid flux (Ψ) and half-width (wx) distribution functions scale as f(Ψ)~Ψ-2 and f(wx)~wx-2. The joint distribution of Ψ and wx shows that plasmoids populate a triangular region wx>~Ψ/B0, where B0 is the reconnecting field. It is argued that this feature is due to plasmoid coalescence. Macroscopic ``monster'' plasmoids with wx~10% of the system size are shown to emerge in just a few Alfvén times, independently of S, suggesting that large disruptive events are an inevitable feature of large-S reconnection.

  18. Theory of viscous transonic flow over airfoils at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Chow, R.; Mead, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers viscous flows with unseparated turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional airfoils at transonic speeds. Conventional theoretical methods are based on boundary layer formulations which do not account for the effect of the curved wake and static pressure variations across the boundary layer in the trailing edge region. In this investigation an extended viscous theory is developed that accounts for both effects. The theory is based on a rational analysis of the strong turbulent interaction at airfoil trailing edges. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is employed to develop formal series solutions of the full Reynolds equations in the limit of Reynolds numbers tending to infinity. Procedures are developed for combining the local trailing edge solution with numerical methods for solving the full potential flow and boundary layer equations. Theoretical results indicate that conventional boundary layer methods account for only about 50% of the viscous effect on lift, the remaining contribution arising from wake curvature and normal pressure gradient effects.

  19. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  20. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  1. High Frontier - The Journal for Space and Cyberspace Professionals. Volume 6, Number 3, May 2010.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    have wiped out entire classes of organisms including the dinosaurs . Through these earthshak- ing periods, the survival and resiliency of simple...that today’s space architectures have “evolved” to a position analogous with the dinosaurs —highly optimized sys- tems perfectly suited for the

  2. Highly Mobile Students: Educational Problems and Possible Solutions. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, New York, NY.

    The following two types of student mobility stand out as causing educational problems: (1) inner-city mobility, which is prompted largely by fluctuations in the job market; and (2) intra-city mobility, which is caused by upward mobility or by poverty and homelessness. Most research indicates that high mobility negatively affects student…

  3. The Danish Folk High Schools. Bulletin, 1914, No. 22. Whole Number 595

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foght, H. W.

    1914-01-01

    This bulletin contains the third section of Harold W. Foght's report on the rural schools of Denmark. This section of the report pertains almost wholly to the folk high schools, which have by common consent been the most important factor in the transformation in the rural life of Denmark and in the phenomenal economic and social development of…

  4. Achievement Motivation Training for Potential High School Dropouts. Achievement Motivation Development Project Working Paper Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.

    This pilot project sought to determine if instruction in achievement motivation would help potential dropouts to complete their schooling. Subjects were tenth grade students in a suburban Boston high school. A one-week residential course during winter and spring vacations was taken by one group of six boys and a second group of four. Equated…

  5. Collaborating with High Schools. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Janet E., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Designed to encompass multiple perspectives and orientations on community college-high school cooperation, this collection of essays provides a theoretical and historical background to joint programs between colleges and schools and describes a sample of current approaches. The volume includes: (1) "Reconnecting Youth: The New Wave of Reform," by…

  6. High Frontier, The Journal for Space & Missile Professionals. Volume 3, Number 4, August 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Government , the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Air Force. Editorial content is edited, prepared, and provided by the Public Affairs...reflect those of the United States Department of Defense, the United States Air Force, or any other government agency. Headquarters Air Force Space...and government agencies to High Frontier learn what

  7. Teacher-made Test Items in American History: Emphasis Junior High School. Bulletin Number 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana

    Designed originally for use in junior-high-school classes, this bulletin provides an extensive file of 420 multiple-choice test questions in American history. The test items are intended to measure substantive understandings as well as such abilities as interpretation, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and application. The initial questions were…

  8. Are Credit Card Rates Too High? At Home with Consumers. Volume 8, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    At Home with Consumers, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The four articles in this journal issue examine the pros and cons of the proposition that credit card rates are too high. In "How Congress and Consumers Will Crack the Credit Card Market," Congressman Charles E. Schumer argues that banks can get away with their excessive rates because of consumer misinformation and the unfair competitive edge held…

  9. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  10. Experimental Design: Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Growth to High Froude Number in the Non-Linear Regime at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgin, Laura; Malamud, G.; Huntington, C. M.; Handy, T.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2016-10-01

    Potential flow models predict that a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable system will reach a terminal velocity (and constant Froude number) at low Atwood numbers. Numerical simulations by Ramaprabhu et al. predict a reacceleration phase of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) and higher Froude number at late times. We are planning a series of experiments at OMEGA 60 to measure RTI growth at low and high Atwood numbers and late times in order to observe this effect. The evolution of this system will be diagnosed with dual, x-ray radiography. Experimental design and diagnostic challenges are discussed here. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, through NNSA Grants DE-NA0002956 (SSAA) and DE-NA0002719 (NLUF), by the LLE under DE-NA0001944, and by the LLNL under subcontract B614207 to DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. GPU Implementation of Two-Dimensional Rayleigh-Benard Code with High Resolution and Extremely High Rayleigh Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    As computational modeling became prolific throughout the physical sciences community, newer and more efficient ways of processing large amounts of data needed to be devised. One particular method for processing such large amounts of data arose in the form of using a graphics processing unit (GPU) for calculations. Computational scientists were attracted to the GPU as a computational tool as the performance, growth, and availability of GPUs over the past decade increased. Scientists began to utilize the GPU as the sole workhorse for their brute force calculations and modeling. The GPUs, however, were not originally designed for this style of use. As a result, difficulty arose when trying to find a use for the GPU from a scientific standpoint. A lack of parallel programming routines was the main culprit behind the difficulty in programming with a GPU, but with time and a rise in popularity, NVIDIA released a proprietary architecture named Fermi. The Fermi architecture, when used in conjunction with development tools such as CUDA, allowed the programmer easier access to routines that made parallel programming with the NVIDIA GPUs an ease. This new architecture enabled the programmer full access to faster memory, double-precision support, and large amounts of global memory at their fingertips. Our model was based on using a second-order, spatially correct finite difference method and a third order Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme for studying the 2D Rayleigh-Benard code. The code extensively used the CUBLAS routines to do the heavy linear algebra calculations. The calculations themselves were completed using a single GPU, the NVDIA C2070 Fermi, which boasts 6 GB of global memory. The overall scientific goal of our work was to apply the Tesla C2070's computing potential to achieve an onset of flow reversals as a function of increasing large Rayleigh numbers. Previous investigations were successful using a smaller grid size of 1000x1999 and a Rayleigh number of 10^9. The

  12. New highly linear tunable transconductor circuits with low number of MOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Firat; Yuce, Erkan

    2016-08-01

    In this article, two new highly linear tunable transconductor circuits are proposed. The transconductors employ only six MOS transistors operated in saturation region. The second transconductor is derived from the first one with a slight modification. Transconductance of both transconductors can be tuned by a control voltage. Both of the transconductors do not need any additional bias voltages and currents. Another important feature of the transconductors is their high input and output impedances for cascadability with other circuits. Besides, total harmonic distortions are less than 1.5% for both transconductors. A positive lossless grounded inductor simulator with a grounded capacitor is given as an application example of the transconductors. Simulation and experimental test results are included to show effectiveness of the proposed circuits.

  13. Structures with high number density of carbon nanotubes and 3-dimensional distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zheng (Inventor); Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A composite is described having a three dimensional distribution of carbon nanotubes. The critical aspect of such composites is a nonwoven network of randomly oriented fibers connected at their junctions to afford macropores in the spaces between the fibers. A variety of fibers may be employed, including metallic fibers, and especially nickel fibers. The composite has quite desirable properties for cold field electron emission applications, such as a relatively low turn-on electric field, high electric field enhancement factors, and high current densities. The composites of this invention also show favorable properties for other an electrode applications. Several methods, which also have general application in carbon nanotube production, of preparing these composites are described and employ a liquid feedstock of oxyhydrocarbons as carbon nanotube precursors.

  14. High Frontier: The Journal for Space and Cyberspace Professionals. Volume 6, Number 4, August 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    primarily from the aeronautics field. They understood little of rocket propulsion , orbital mechanics, or proximity operations. Yet, in response to...and stabilize areas where anti-access strategies are being executed or contemplated. For ex- ample, satellites in low Earth orbit routinely travel...17 Lockheed Martin, low Earth orbit , fact site, http://www.thetech.org/ exhibits/online/satellite/4/4a/4a.1.html. 18 Lutton, “Defending the High

  15. Nonlinear effects on sound propagation through high subsonic Mach number flows in variable area ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callegari, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    A nonlinear theory for sound propagation in variable area ducts carrying a nearly sonic flow is presented. Linear acoustic theory is shown to be singular and the detailed nature of the singularity is used to develop the correct nonlinear theory. The theory is based on a quasi-one dimensional model. It is derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. In a nearly chocked flow, the theory indicates the following processes to be acting: a transonic trapping of upstream propagating sound causing an intensification of this sound in the throat region of the duct; generation of superharmonics and an acoustic streaming effect; development of shocks in the acoustic quantities near the throat. Several specific problems are solved analytically and numerical parameter studies are carried out. Results indicate that appreciable acoustic power is shifted to higher harmonics as shocked conditions are approached. The effect of the throat Mach number on the attenuation of upstream propagating sound excited by a fixed source is also determined.

  16. Base pressure associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A model is suggested to study the viscid-inviscid interaction associated with steady incompressible flow past wedges of arbitrary angles. It is shown from this analysis that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem and this pressure can only be determined from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which should adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as boundary-layer buildup along the wedge surface, jet mixing, recompression, and reattachment which occurs along the region attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary-layer concept, serve to determine the aforementioned parameters needed for the establishment of the inviscid flow. It is found that the point of reattachment behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the viscous recompression process. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge surface, and the wake geometry as well as the influence of the characteristic Reynolds number are obtained. Discussion of these results and their comparison with the experimental data are reported.

  17. High numbers of Staphylococcus aureus at three bathing beaches in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Esiobu, Nwadiuto; Green, Melissa; Echeverry, Andrea; Bonilla, Tonya D; Stinson, Corine Melanie; Hartz, Aaron; Rogerson, Andrew; McCorquodale, Donald S

    2013-01-01

    While the value of Staphylococcus aureus as an indicator for non-enteric diseases is unclear, understanding its prevalence in recreational beaches would prove useful, given its pathogenic potential. Staphylococcus aureus levels were evaluated in sand and seawater at three beaches during one year. To elucidate possible S. aureus sources or colonization trends, distribution in sand was analyzed at Hollywood Beach. Staphylococcus aureus levels fluctuated throughout the study with highest average densities detected in dry sand (3.46 × 10⁵ CFU/g, Hobie Beach), particularly at beaches with high human density. Patchy distribution marked hotspots of human use and/or possible bacterial re-growth. Data from a brief epidemiological survey indicated a very slight association between beach usage and skin conditions; suggesting high S. aureus levels in sand may not necessarily constitute major health risks. Because the possibility of disease transmission exists, particularly to children and immuno-compromised beach-goers, periodic surveying of highly frequented beaches seems warranted.

  18. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  19. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  20. Organotin-catalyzed highly regioselective thiocarbonylation of nonprotected carbohydrates and synthesis of deoxy carbohydrates in a minimum number of steps.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Wataru; Tanigawa, Satoko; Takemoto, Yuki; Yoshimatsu, Hirofumi; Onomura, Osamu

    2012-04-16

    Nonprotected carbohydrates: The catalytic regioselective thiocarbonylation of carbohydrates by using organotin dichloride under mild conditions was demonstrated. The reaction afforded various deoxy saccharides in high yields and excellent regioselectivity in a minimum number of steps. The regioselectivity of the thiocarbonylation is attributed to the intrinsic character of the carbohydrates based on the stereorelationship of their hydroxy groups (see scheme).