Science.gov

Sample records for abnormally high plasma

  1. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  3. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A.; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q.; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  4. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  5. Type 2B von Willebrand Disease: A Matter of Plasma Plus Platelet Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Federici, Augusto B

    2016-07-01

    Type 2B von Willebrand disease (VWD2B) is a rare, autosomal-dominant inherited bleeding disorder, characterized by an enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma and often with variable degree of thrombocytopenia and loss of high-molecular-weight multimers von Willebrand factor (VWF). All these phenomena are caused by a mutant VWF, normally synthesized and assembled by endothelial cells, but with heightened affinity binding to the platelet receptor glycoprotein Ib-α (GpIb-α). When this abnormal VWF is released into the circulation and under specific clinical circumstances, in vivo platelet clumping is observed. Mutations, invariably clustered in exon 28 of the VWF gene encoding for the VWF A1 domain involved in VWF binding to GpIb-α, are responsible for VWD2B phenotype. Clinical and laboratory phenotype appears strongly related to the type of VWF-causative mutations. However, recent evidences suggest that a true platelet defect is also present in this type, with several morphological and functional abnormalities being detected in a subset of VWD2B patients.

  6. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  7. Choroideremia Is a Systemic Disease With Lymphocyte Crystals and Plasma Lipid and RBC Membrane Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Alice Yang; Mysore, Naveen; Vali, Hojatollah; Koenekoop, Jamie; Cao, Sang Ni; Li, Shen; Ren, Huanan; Keser, Vafa; Lopez-Solache, Irma; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Khan, Ayesha; Mui, Jeannie; Sears, Kelly; Dixon, Jim; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Braverman, Nancy; Koenekoop, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor neuronal degenerations are common, incurable causes of human blindness affecting 1 in 2000 patients worldwide. Only half of all patients are associated with known mutations in over 250 disease genes, prompting our research program to identify the remaining new genes. Most retinal degenerations are restricted to the retina, but photoreceptor degenerations can also be found in a wide variety of systemic diseases. We identified an X-linked family from Sri Lanka with a severe choroidal degeneration and postulated a new disease entity. Because of phenotypic overlaps with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy, which was recently found to have systemic features, we hypothesized that a systemic disease may be present in this new disease as well. Methods For phenotyping, we performed detailed eye exams with in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence tomography. For genotyping, we performed whole exome sequencing, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmations and cosegregation. Systemic investigations included electron microscopy studies of peripheral blood cells in patients and in normal controls and detailed fatty acid profiles (both plasma and red blood cell [RBC] membranes). Fatty acid levels were compared to normal controls, and only values two standard deviations above or below normal controls were further evaluated. Results The family segregated a REP1 mutation, suggesting choroideremia (CHM). We then found crystals in peripheral blood lymphocytes and discovered significant plasma fatty acid abnormalities and RBC membrane abnormalities (i.e., elevated plasmalogens). To replicate our discoveries, we expanded the cohort to nine CHM patients, genotyped them for REP1 mutations, and found the same abnormalities (crystals and fatty acid abnormalities) in all patients. Conclusions Previously, CHM was thought to be restricted to the retina. We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that CHM is a systemic condition with prominent crystals in lymphocytes and

  8. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  9. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  10. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  11. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2010-01-01

    The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools. PMID:22219683

  12. Real-time plasma process condition sensing and abnormal process detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2010-01-01

    The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools.

  13. High Prevalence of Prothrombotic Abnormalities in Multifocal Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peris, Pilar; Reverter, Joan Carles; Espinosa, Gerard; Martinez-Ferrer, Angeles; Monegal, Ana; Monteagudo, Juan; Tàssies, Dolors; Guañabens, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multifocal or multiple osteonecrosis (ON), defined by the involvement of 3 or more anatomic sites, is unusual, being observed in only 3%–10% of patients diagnosed with ON. We report the clinical characteristics of a cohort of 29 patients with multifocal ON from a single center and evaluate the prevalence of associated prothrombotic abnormalities in 26 of these patients. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with multifocal ON evaluated in our institution during the last 20 years. We recorded clinical manifestations and underlying diagnoses. A wide thrombophilic profile was performed, including antithrombin, protein C, protein S, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, activated protein C resistance, factor V Leiden, mutation G-20210-A of the prothrombin gene, and factor VIII. Coagulation test results were compared with those in a healthy control group and a group of patients with history of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. The mean age of the patients was 49.2 ± 15 years (range, 28–81 yr). The mean number of ON localizations per patient was 5.2 ± 2.3 (range, 3–11). Hips were the most commonly affected joint (82%), followed by knees (58%), shoulders (37%), and ankles (13%). Most patients had an underlying disease process, and 12 of 25 (48%) patients had coagulation test abnormalities. The most common alterations were high factor VIII levels and antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity in 24% and 20% of cases, respectively. These abnormalities were more prevalent in patients with multifocal ON compared with patients in the control groups. Sixty-one percent of patients had a history of corticosteroid treatment. Patients with coagulation abnormalities had a higher number of ON localizations per patient (6.5 ± 2.7 vs. 3.88 ± 0.8; p = 0.002) and a higher prevalence of atypical ON localizations (25% vs. 0%; p = 0.05). In conclusion, in the present cohort of patients with multifocal ON, 48% of the patients had at

  14. High beta plasma operation in a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John F.

    1978-01-01

    A high beta plasma is produced in a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration by ohmic heating and auxiliary heating. The plasma pressure is continuously monitored and used in a control system to program the current in the poloidal field windings. Throughout the heating process, magnetic flux is conserved inside the plasma and the distortion of the flux surfaces drives a current in the plasma. As a consequence, the total current increases and the poloidal field windings are driven with an equal and opposing increasing current. The spatial distribution of the current in the poloidal field windings is determined by the plasma pressure. Plasma equilibrium is maintained thereby, and high temperature, high beta operation results.

  15. Increased Fetal Plasma Erythropoietin in Monochorionic Twin Pregnancies With Selective Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Abnormal Umbilical Artery Doppler.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Lung; Chao, An-Shine; Peng, Hsiu-Huei; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Su, Sheng-Yuan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Cheng, Po-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Hao

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia is the primary stimulus for the production of erythropoietin (EPO) in both fetal and adult life. Here, we investigated fetal plasma EPO concentrations in monochorionic (MC) twin pregnancies with selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) and abnormal umbilical artery (UA) Doppler. We diagnosed sIUGR in presence of (1) birth-weight discordance >20% and (2) either twin with a birth weight <10th percentile. An abnormal UA Doppler was defined as a persistent absent-reverse end diastolic flow (AREDF). The intertwin EPO ratio was calculated as the plasma EPO level of the smaller (or small-for-gestational-age) twin divided by the EPO concentration of the larger (or appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA)) twin. Thirty-two MC twin pairs were included. Of these, 17 pairs were normal twins (Group 1), seven pairs were twins with sIUGR without UA Doppler abnormalities (Group 2), and eight pairs were twins with sIUGR and UA Doppler abnormalities (Group 3). The highest EPO ratio was identified in Group 3 (p < .001) but no significant differences were observed between Groups 1 and 2. Fetal hemoglobin levels did not differ significantly in the three groups, and fetal EPO concentration did not correlate with gestational age at birth. We conclude that fetal plasma EPO concentrations are selectively increased in MC twin pregnancies with sIUGR and abnormal UA Doppler, possibly as a result of uncompensated hypoxia.

  16. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension.

  17. Elevated Levels of Plasma Phenylalanine in Schizophrenia: A Guanosine Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase-1 Metabolic Pathway Abnormality?

    PubMed Central

    Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Muravitskaja, Olesja; Fuchs, Dietmar; Ashraf, Ayesha; Hinman, Sarah; Giegling, Ina; Hartmann, Annette M.; Konte, Bettina; Friedl, Marion; Schiffman, Jason; Hong, Elliot; Reeves, Gloria; Groer, Maureen; Dantzer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Phenylalanine and tyrosine are precursor amino acids required for the synthesis of dopamine, the main neurotransmitter implicated in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Inflammation, increasingly implicated in schizophrenia, can impair the function of the enzyme Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH; which catalyzes the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine) and thus lead to elevated phenylalanine levels and reduced tyrosine levels. This study aimed to compare phenylalanine, tyrosine, and their ratio (a proxy for PAH function) in a relatively large sample of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Methods We measured non-fasting plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine in 950 schizophrenia patients and 1000 healthy controls. We carried out multivariate analyses to compare log transformed phenylalanine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine:tyrosine ratio between patients and controls. Results Compared to controls, schizophrenia patients had higher phenylalanine (p<0.0001) and phenylalanine: tyrosine ratio (p<0.0001) but tyrosine did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.596). Conclusions Elevated phenylalanine and phenylalanine:tyrosine ratio in the blood of schizophrenia patients have to be replicated in longitudinal studies. The results may relate to an abnormal PAH function in schizophrenia that could become a target for novel preventative and interventional approaches. PMID:24465804

  18. High-power radiating plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the use of radiating plasmas for the optical pumping of lasers are described. Particular consideration is given to the properties of radiating plasmas; radiation selectivity; the dynamics, equilibrium, and stability of radiating plasmas; the radiative Reynolds number; and experimental results on radiating discharges.

  19. Plasmas in High-Density Medium - Supercritical fluid plasma and Cryogenic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of attention to plasmas in high-density medium as novel plasmas from the views points of not only pure sciences but also various technologies. In this talk, two topics, supercritical fluid plasma and cryogenic plasma, will be discussed. First, plasmas generated in supercritical fluids (supercritical fluid plasma) provide a new reaction field that combines the high reactivity of plasmas with the unique characteristics of supercritical fluids, i.e. molecular clustering and density fluctuations near the critical point. An overview of the earliest studies on plasmas generated in supercritical fluids to recent advances in the field, including synthesis of novel nanomaterials such as highly-order diamondoid (diamond molecules), will be given. Second, continuing to thermal plasma (gas temperature Tg higher than a few thousands to millions of K) and low temperature plasma (Tg ranging from a few hundreds to thousands of K), plasma in a third range of gas temperatures (Tg lower than 300 K) is called cryogenic plasma (or cryoplasma) to distinguish it from thermal and low-temperature plasmas. In our group, the gas temperature of the plasma can be continuously controlled below room temperature (RT) down to a cryogenic temperature such as the boiling point of helium (4 K). In addition to the diagnostics, the application of cryogenic plasma to nanoporous material processing (low damage ashing of low-k materials) will be discussed. This work was supported financially in part by Grants-in-Aid.

  20. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  1. Plasma myeloperoxidase is inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation in elderly subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Leonard P; Teerlink, Tom; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Henry, Ronald M A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Heine, Robert J; Scheffer, Peter G

    2010-12-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a biomarker related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide scavenging, has been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Because elevated hydrogen peroxide concentrations in diabetic vessels may enhance MPO activity, we hypothesized that a stronger association of MPO with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) may be found in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. Myeloperoxidase concentrations were measured in EDTA plasma samples from participants of a population-based cohort study, including 230 subjects with normal glucose metabolism and 386 with abnormal glucose metabolism. Vascular function was expressed as FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation of the brachial artery. In subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, MPO was negatively associated with FMD (-20.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -41.7 to -0.2] -μm change in FMD per SD increment of MPO). This association remained significant after adjustment for nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (-31.1 [95% CI, -50.0 to -12.3]) and was not attenuated after further adjustment for established risk factors. In subjects with normal glucose metabolism, MPO was not significantly associated with FMD (2.0 [95% CI, -16.0 to 20.0]). In conclusion, in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, plasma levels of MPO are inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation, possibly reflecting enhancement of MPO activity by vascular oxidative stress.

  2. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  3. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C G; Baldis, H A; Schneider, M B; Hinkel, D E; Langdon, A B; Seka, W; Bahr, R; Depierreaux, S

    2005-08-24

    Laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been studied experimentally in high-temperature, high-energy density plasmas. The studies have been performed using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Rochester, NY. Up to 10 TW of power was incident upon reduced-scale hohlraums, distributed in three laser beam cones. The hot hohlraums fill quickly with plasma. Late in the laser pulse, most of the laser energy is deposited at the laser entrance hole, where most of the LPI takes place. Due to the high electron temperature, the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectrum extends well beyond {omega}{sub 0}/2, due to the Bohm-Gross shift. This high-temperature, high-energy density regime provides a unique opportunity to study LPI beyond inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions.

  4. High-energy laser plasma diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingjun M.; Aye, Tin M.; Fruehauf, Norbert; Savant, Gajendra D.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Smoot, Brayton E.; Loose, Richard W.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-contact diagnosis system for analyzing the plasma density profile, temperature profile, and ionic species of a high energy laser-generated plasma. The system was developed by Physical Optics Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The non- contact diagnostic system consists of three subsystems: an optical fiber-based interferometer, a plasma spectrometer, and a genetic algorithm-based fringe-image processor. In the interferometer subsystem, the transmitter and the receiver are each packaged as a compact module. A narrow notch filter rejects strong plasma light, passing only the laser probing beam, which carries the plasma density information. The plasma spectrum signal is collected by an optical fiber head, which is connected to a compact spectrometer. Real- time genetic algorithm-based data processing/display permits instantaneous analysis of the plasma characteristics. The research effort included design and fabrication of a vacuum chamber, and high-energy laser plasma generation. Compactness, real-time operation, and ease of use make the laser plasma diagnosis system well suited for dual use applications such as diagnosis of electric arc and other industrial plasmas.

  5. High Power Helicon Plasma Source for Plasma Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing a high power helicon plasma source. The high power nature and pulsed neutral gas make this source unique compared to traditional helicon source. These properties produce a plasma flow along the magnetic field lines, and therefore allow the source to be decoupled from the reaction chamber. Neutral gas can be injected downstream, which allows for precision control of the ion-neutral ratio at the surface of the sample. Although operated at high power, the source has demonstrated very low impurity production. This source has applications to nanoparticle productions, surface modification, and ionized physical vapor deposition.

  6. PULSION® HP: Tunable, High Productivity Plasma Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, S. B.; Torregrosa, F.; Etienne, H.; Spiegel, Y.; Roux, L.; Turnbaugh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma doping has been explored for many implant applications for over two decades and is now being used in semiconductor manufacturing for two applications: DRAM polysilicon counter-doping and contact doping. The PULSION HP is a new plasma doping tool developed by Ion Beam Services for high-volume production that enables customer control of the dominant mechanism—deposition, implant, or etch. The key features of this tool are a proprietary, remote RF plasma source that enables a high density plasma with low chamber pressure, resulting in a wide process space, and special chamber and wafer electrode designs that optimize doping uniformity.

  7. Modeling High Energy Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, J. R.; Liberman, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.

    1999-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse lasers are being used to form plasmas at near normal/solid density, heating a target in a time shorter than that on which it can expand. Radiative signatures of the dense plasma conditions are a key diagnostic, and typically require the support of modeling for their design and interpretation. Modeling also often serves to guide the experimental program of work. Here we report on our first attempts to use the INFERNO average-atom atomic model to a construct detailed-configuration-accounting description of the plasma equation-of-state, that is, its distribution of ionization and excitation states, and further, its radiative line, edge, and continuum features.

  8. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging.

    PubMed

    Kong, X; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  9. Antenna development for high field plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2010-10-15

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  10. Antenna development for high field plasma imaginga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) and microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are two microwave nonperturbing plasma visualization techniques that employ millimeter-wave imaging arrays with lens-coupled planar antennas, yielding time-resolved images of temperature (via ECEI) and electron density (via MIR) fluctuations within high temperature magnetic fusion plasmas. A series of new planar antennas have been developed that extend this technology to frequencies as high as 220 GHz for use on high field plasma devices with toroidal fields in excess of 3 T. Antenna designs are presented together with theoretical calculations, simulations, and experimental measurements.

  11. A High-Efficiency Superhydrophobic Plasma Separator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Liao, Shih-Chuan; Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G.; Li, Xuanwen; Wu, Gaoxiang; Ge, Dengteng; Greenberg, Robert M.; Yang, Shu; Bau, Haim H.

    2016-01-01

    To meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules, a relatively large volume of plasma is needed for many blood-based clinical diagnostics. Conventional centrifugation methods for plasma separation are not suitable for on-site testing or bedside diagnostics. Here, we report a simple, yet high-efficiency, clamshell-style, superhydrophobic plasma separator that is capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from several hundred microliters of whole blood (finger-prick blood volume). The plasma separator consists of a superhydrophobic top cover with a separation membrane and a superhydrophobic bottom substrate. Unlike previously reported membrane-based plasma separators, the separation membrane in our device is positioned at the top of the sandwiched whole blood film to increase the membrane separation capacity and plasma yield. In addition, the device’s superhydrophobic characteristics (i) facilitates the formation of well-defined, contracted, thin blood film with a high contact angle; (ii) minimizes biomolecular adhesion to surfaces; (iii) increases blood clotting time; and (iv) reduces blood cell hemolysis. The device demonstrated a “blood in-plasma out” capability, consistently extracting 65±21.5 μL of plasma from 200 μL of whole blood in less than 10 min without electrical power. The device was used to separate plasma from Schistosoma mansoni genomic DNA-spiked whole blood with a recovery efficiency of > 84.5 ± 25.8 %. The S. mansoni genomic DNA in the separated plasma was successfully tested on our custom-made microfluidic chip by using loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. PMID:26732765

  12. A high-efficiency superhydrophobic plasma separator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Liao, Shih-Chuan; Song, Jinzhao; Mauk, Michael G; Li, Xuanwen; Wu, Gaoxiang; Ge, Dengteng; Greenberg, Robert M; Yang, Shu; Bau, Haim H

    2016-02-07

    To meet stringent limit-of-detection specifications for low abundance target molecules, a relatively large volume of plasma is needed for many blood-based clinical diagnostics. Conventional centrifugation methods for plasma separation are not suitable for on-site testing or bedside diagnostics. Here, we report a simple, yet high-efficiency, clamshell-style, superhydrophobic plasma separator that is capable of separating a relatively large volume of plasma from several hundred microliters of whole blood (finger-prick blood volume). The plasma separator consists of a superhydrophobic top cover with a separation membrane and a superhydrophobic bottom substrate. Unlike previously reported membrane-based plasma separators, the separation membrane in our device is positioned at the top of the sandwiched whole blood film to increase the membrane separation capacity and plasma yield. In addition, the device's superhydrophobic characteristics (i) facilitates the formation of well-defined, contracted, thin blood film with a high contact angle; (ii) minimizes biomolecular adhesion to surfaces; (iii) increases blood clotting time; and (iv) reduces blood cell hemolysis. The device demonstrated a "blood in-plasma out" capability, consistently extracting 65 ± 21.5 μL of plasma from 200 μL of whole blood in less than 10 min without electrical power. The device was used to separate plasma from Schistosoma mansoni genomic DNA-spiked whole blood with a recovery efficiency of >84.5 ± 25.8%. The S. mansoni genomic DNA in the separated plasma was successfully tested on our custom-made microfluidic chip by using loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method.

  13. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-01

    Modular high-intensity plasma melter promises improved performance, reduced energy use, and lower emissions. The glass industry has used the same basic equipment for melting glass for the past 100 years.

  14. High power plasma spraying of oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jungklaus, H.; Schwier, G.; Mathesius, H.; Heinrich, P.

    1995-12-31

    New developed high power plasma spray (HPPS) systems offer opportunities for generating both high thermal as well as high kinetic energy transfer to the powder particles. The operation level can be elevated up to 250 kW for continuous processing. PLCs and mass flow controls support high power processing under production conditions. The process is designed for applying large quantities even of high melt materials, such as oxide ceramics. High power plasma processing may result in enhanced coating characteristics. The work in this paper shows first conclusions for processing commercial powders such as alumina, alumina-titania, chromia and a recently developed multicomponent oxide with a HPPS system. Particle velocities were measured after optimizing spraying parameters. Coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy (microstructure and porosity), microhardness and pin-on-disc abrasive wear tests. Powder types and sizes as well as the systems configuration are considered for a general discussion of the capability and limitation in high power plasma spraying.

  15. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  16. Prophylactic Plasma Transfusion for Surgical Patients With Abnormal Preoperative Coagulation Tests: A Propensity-Adjusted Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qing; Brown, Michael J.; Clifford, Leanne; Wilson, Gregory A.; Truty, Mark J.; Stubbs, James R.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Gajic, Ognjen; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perioperative hemorrhage negatively impacts patient outcomes and results in substantial health care resource consumption. Plasma transfusions are frequently administered to address abnormal preoperative coagulation tests, with the hope of mitigating bleeding complications. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between preoperative plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in patients with elevated international normalized ratios undergoing noncardiac surgery. Methods An observational comparative effectiveness research study evaluating a consecutive sample of adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery (N=14,743) with preoperative international normalized ratios ≥ 1.5 between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Among the patients, 1,234 (8.4%) had an international normalized ratio ≥ 1.5 and were included in this investigation. Exposure of interest was transfusion of preoperative plasma for an elevated international normalized ratio. Primary outcome was World Health Organization grade 3 bleeding in the early perioperative period. Secondary outcomes included blood loss, reoperation for bleeding, and additional patient-important outcomes including death and lengths of stay. Hypotheses were tested with univariate and propensity-matched analyses. Multiple sensitivity analyses were performed to further evaluate the robustness of study findings. Findings Of 1,234 study participants, 139 (11.3%) received a preoperative plasma transfusion. Those who received plasma had a higher rate of perioperative (52.5% vs 32.0%; P < .0001) and intraoperative (40.3% vs 24.5%; P < .0001) red blood cell transfusion, as well as an increased rate of reoperation for bleeding (11.5% vs 4.5%; P = .0005). The increased rate of perioperative red blood cell transfusion stayed in the propensity-matched analyses (OR, 1.75 [95% CI, 1.09–2.81]; P= .0210). Results from multiple sensitivity analyses were qualitatively similar. Interpretation Preoperative plasma

  17. Abnormally high serum ferritin levels among professional road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, H; Robinson, N; Zorzoli, M; Schattenberg, L; Saugy, M; Mangin, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: An international, longitudinal medical follow up examination of male professional road cyclists revealed excessively elevated serum ferritin levels. Objective: To evaluate the importance of elevated ferritin values among professional cyclists, their relationship with age and nationality, and their evolution over 3 years. Methods: Over 1000 serum ferritin values were collected. Other parameters were included in order to exclude conditions which might have increased ferritin levels without changing body iron stores. Results: In 1999, over 45% of riders displayed ferritin values above 300 ng/ml and one fourth levels over 500 ng/ml. These percentages had decreased to 27% and 9%, respectively, 3 years later, while the overall average, which was above the normal limits in 1999, had decreased by 33% in 3 years. Older cyclists had higher ferritin values than younger cyclists. There was also a relationship between ferritin levels and the nationality of the cyclists. Analysis of 714 riders in 2000 and 2002 showed only a slight and insignificant decrease in the mean ferritin value although those with initially elevated iron stores had a much greater decrease. Conclusion: Professional road cyclists used excessive iron supplementation leading to high serum ferritin levels correlating with increased body iron stores. Although the situation progressively improved over 3 years, it remains worrying as increased body iron stores are related to health complications. Therefore, prevention in addition to the fight against doping should be a main goal of the UCI. Aggressive therapy for athletes with excessive ferritin values should be carried out at or before the end of their careers. PMID:15562163

  18. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS PLASMA CONTAINMENT DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.; Hammel, J.E.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presenied for producing neutrons as a result of collisions between ions in high temperature plasmas. The invention resides in the particular arrangement of ihe device whereby ihe magneiic and electric fields are made to cross at substantially right angles in several places along a torus shaped containment vessel. A plasma of deuterium gas is generated in the vessel under the electric fields and is "trapped" in any one of the "crossed field" regions to produce a release of energy.

  19. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  20. High frequency plasma generator for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goede, H.; Divergilio, W. F.; Fosnight, V. V.; Komatsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program to experimentally develop two new types of plasma generators for 30 cm electrostatic argon ion thrusters are presented. The two plasma generating methods selected for this study were by radio frequency induction (RFI), operating at an input power frequency of 1 MHz, and by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) at an operating frequency of 5.0 GHz. Both of these generators utilize multiline cusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement and beam profile optimization. The program goals were to develop a plasma generator possessing the characteristics of high electrical efficiency (low eV/ion) and simplicity of operation while maintaining the reliability and durability of the conventional hollow cathode plasma sources. The RFI plasma generator has achieved minimum discharge losses of 120 eV/ion while the ECH generator has obtained 145 eV/ion, assuming a 90% ion optical transparency of the electrostatic acceleration system. Details of experimental tests with a variety of magnet configurations are presented.

  1. Time Orientation in the Positive and Negative Free Phantasies of Mildly Abnormal Versus Normal High School Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rychlak, Joseph F.

    1973-01-01

    This study contrasts a group of mildly'' abnormal high school males with matched normals in a two-session free phantasy procedure. Mildly abnormal boys phantasized more negative contents than normal boys. Normal boys projected more positive phantasies into the future than mildly abnormal boys. A logical learning theory'' embracing the…

  2. Increased expression of plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase 4b in platelets from hypertensives: a new sign of abnormal thrombopoiesis?

    PubMed

    Dally, Saoussen; Chaabane, Chiraz; Corvazier, Elisabeth; Bredoux, Raymonde; Bobe, Regis; Ftouhi, Bochra; Slimane, Hedia; Raies, Aly; Enouf, Jocelyne

    2007-11-01

    Platelet Ca(2+) homeostasis is controlled by a multi-Ca(2+)ATPase system including two PMCA (plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase) and seven SERCA (sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase) isoforms. Previous studies have shown similar platelet Ca(2+) abnormalities in diabetic and hypertensive patients, including an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)](I), a possible modulation of PMCA activity and increased PMCA tyrosine phosphorylation. Very recently, we found that platelets from diabetic patients also exhibited increased PMCA4b expression. In the present study we looked for further similarities between diabetic and hypertensive patients. We first confirmed a decrease in Ca(2+)ATPase activity (mean 55 + 7%) in mixed platelet membranes isolated from 10 patients with hypertension compared with those from 10 healthy controls. In addition, the decreased Ca(2+)ATPase activity correlated with the DBP of the different patients, as expected for PMCA activity. Second, we performed a pilot study of six hypertensives to examine their expressions of PMCA and SERCA mRNA and proteins. Like the diabetic patients, 100% of hypertensives were found to present a major increase in PMCA4b expression (mean value of 218 +/- 21%). We thus determined that platelets from diabetic and hypertensive patients showed similar increased PMCA4b isoform. Since increased PMCA4b expression was recently found to be associated with a perturbation of megakaryocytopoiesis, these findings may also point to an abnormality in platelet maturation in hypertension.

  3. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  4. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  5. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  6. Macroscopic stability of high β MAST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; Howell, D. F.; Hua, M.-D.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Meyer, H. F.; Michael, C. A.; Pinches, S. D.; Saarelma, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; MAST Team

    2011-07-01

    The high-beta capability of the spherical tokamak, coupled with a suite of world-leading diagnostics on MAST, has facilitated significant improvements in the understanding of performance-limiting core instabilities in high performance plasmas. For instance, the newly installed motional Stark effect diagnostic, with radial resolution <25 mm, has enabled detailed study of saturated long-lived modes in hybrid scenarios. Similarly, the upgraded Thomson scattering system, with radial resolution <10 mm and the possibility of temporal resolution of 1 µs, has allowed detailed analysis of the density and temperature profiles during transient activity in the plasma, such as at a sawtooth crash. High resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy provided measurement of rotation braking induced by both applied magnetic fields and by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, allowing tests of neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory predictions. Finally, MAST is also equipped with internal and external coils that allow non-axisymmetric fields to be applied for active MHD spectroscopy of instabilities near the no-wall beta limit. MAST has been able to operate above the pressure at which the resonant field amplification is observed to strongly increase. In order to access such high pressures, the resistive wall mode must be damped, and so numerical modelling has focused on assessing the kinetic damping of the mode and its nonlinear interaction with other instabilities. The enhanced understanding of the physical mechanisms driving deleterious MHD activity given by these leading-edge capabilities has provided guidance to optimize operating scenarios for improved plasma performance.

  7. Plasma synthesis of high temperature ceramic films

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-11-01

    Thin films of alumina, chromia, mullite, yttria and zirconia have been synthesized using a plasma-based method called metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid)--a highly versatile plasma deposition technique with ion energy control. Monolithic films (a single ceramic component) and multilayer films (individual layers of different ceramic materials) were formed. The films were characterized for their composition and structure in a number of different ways, and the high temperature performance of the films was explored, particularly for their ability to maintain their integrity and adhesion when subjected to repetitive high temperature thermal cycling up 1100 C. We found that the films retain their adhesion and quality without any apparent degradation with time, even after a large number of cycles; (the tests were extended out to a total of 40 cycles each of 24 hours duration). After repetitive high temperature thermal cycling, the film-substrate adhesion was greater than {approx}70 Mpa, the instrumental limit of measurement, and the interface toughness was approximately 0.8 MPa m{sup 1/2}.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Plasmas in high speed aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletzinger, P.; Ganguly, B. N.; Van Wie, D.; Garscadden, A.

    2005-02-01

    A review is presented of the studies in the former Soviet Union and in the USA of the mutual interactions of plasmas and high speed flows and shocks. There are reports from as early as the 1980s of large changes in the standoff distance ahead of a blunt body in ballistic tunnels, significantly reduced drag and modifications of travelling shocks in bounded weakly ionized gases. Energy addition to the flow results in an increase in the local sound speed that leads to expected modifications of the flow and changes to the pressure distribution around a vehicle due to the decrease in local Mach number. The critical question was, did a plasma provide a significant energy multiplier for the system? There have been a large number of experimental studies on the influence of a weakly ionized plasma on relatively low Mach number shocks and inherently also on the influence of the shock on the plasma. This literature is reviewed and illustrated with representative examples. The convergence through more controlled experiments and improved modelling to a physics understanding of the effects being essentially due to heating is outlined. It is demonstrated that the heating in many cases is global; however, tailored experiments with positive columns, dielectric barrier discharges and focused microwave plasmas can produce very localized heating. The latter appears more attractive for energy efficiency in flow control. Tailored localized ionization and thermal effects are also of interest for high speed inlet shock control and for producing reliable ignition for short residence time combustors, and work in these areas is also reviewed.

  9. Major influencing factors of water flooding in abnormally high-pressure carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingying, Hou; Kaiyuan, Chen; Zifei, Fan; Libing, Fu; Yefei, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The higher pressure coefficient is the major characteristics of the abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoirs, which the pressure coefficient generally exceeds 1.2 and the initial formation pressure is higher than normal sandstone reservoirs. Due to the large pressure difference between initial formation and saturated pressure, oil wells are capable to production with high flow rate by the natural energy at early production stage. When the formation pressure drops to the saturation pressure, the water or gas is usually injected to stabilize the well productivity and sustain the formation pressure. Based on the characteristics of Kenkiak oilfield, a typical abnormal high pressure carbonate reservoir, a well group model is designed to simulate and analyze the influence factors on water flooding. The conclusion is that permeability, interlayer difference and reserve abundance are the main three factors on the water flooding development in these reservoirs.

  10. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) operated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon flow rates between 19 - 46 standard cubic centimeter per minute. The HCA was centrally mounted in the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster and was operated in the "spot" and "plume" modes with additional data taken with an applied magnetic field. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orifice of the HCA and to assess the charge state of the near-field plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 electron volt) and plasma potentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operation with an applied-field yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, and increased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with an applied field, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies significantly exceeding the applied discharge voltage. These findings are correlated with high-frequency oscillations associated with each mode.

  11. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  12. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates. PMID:27996060

  13. Positive reinforcement training moderates only high levels of abnormal behavior in singly housed rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kate C; Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kimberly; Griffis, Caroline; Maloney, Margaret; Oettinger, Brooke; Schoof, Valerie A M; Martinez, Marni

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline behavioral data on 30 adult males and 33 adult females compared with 3 treatment phases presented in counterbalanced order: 6 min per week of PRT, 20 or 40 min per week of PRT, and 6 min per week of unstructured human interaction (HI). Within-subject parametric tests detected no main or interaction effects involving experimental phase. However, among a subset of subjects with levels of abnormal in the top quartile of the range (n = 15), abnormal behavior was reduced from 35% to 25% of samples with PRT but not with HI. These results suggest that short durations of PRT applied as enrichment for this species and in this context may not in itself be sufficient intervention for abnormal behavior because levels remained high. However, it may be appropriate as an adjunct to other interventions and may be best targeted to the most severely affected individuals.

  14. Positive Reinforcement Training Moderates Only High Levels of Abnormal Behavior in Singly Housed Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate C.; Bloomsmith, Mollie; Neu, Kimberly; Griffis, Caroline; Maloney, Margaret; Oettinger, Brooke; Schoof, Valérie A. M.; Martinez, Marni

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the application of positive reinforcement training (PRT) as an intervention for abnormal behaviors in singly housed laboratory rhesus macaques at 2 large primate facilities. Training involved basic control behaviors and body-part presentation. The study compared baseline behavioral data on 30 adult males and 33 adult females compared with 3 treatment phases presented in counterbalanced order: 6 min per week of PRT, 20 or 40 min per week of PRT, and 6 min per week of unstructured human interaction (HI). Within-subject parametric tests detected no main or interaction effects involving experimental phase. However, among a subset of subjects with levels of abnormal in the top quartile of the range (n = 15), abnormal behavior was reduced from 35% to 25% of samples with PRT but not with HI. These results suggest that short durations of PRT applied as enrichment for this species and in this context may not in itself be sufficient intervention for abnormal behavior because levels remained high. However, it may be appropriate as an adjunct to other interventions and may be best targeted to the most severely affected individuals. PMID:20183477

  15. In-situ observation of abnormal electron temperure in the F-region valley associated with the prereversal enhancement in the vertical plasma drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Batista, Inez S.; Odriozola, Siomel

    During one of the post sunset rocket launches made on 18-th December 1995 from the equatorial rocket launching station CLA in Alcântara, Brazil a Langmuir probe measured abnormally large electron temperatures below the F-region just before the onset of plasma bubbles but temperatures became normal soon after the onset of bubbles. In-situ measurements made from Brazil recently using rocket-borne swept-bias Langmuir Probes show that the electron temperatures in the valley region between the equatorial E and F regions get modified before the onset of plasma bubbles, probably associated with the prereversal enhancement in the vertical plasma drift. On 2-nd December 2011 a Brazilian VS-30 single stage rocket was launched from the equatorial rocket launching station CLBI in Natal, Brazil carrying a Langmuir probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes to measure both electron temperature and electron density respectively. The ground equipments operated during the rocket launch clearly showed the rapid rise of the F-region base indicating the prereversal enhancement of the F-region vertical drift. At the time of launch the bubble activity was also at its peak. The electron density and temperature height profiles could be estimated from the LP data up to the rocket apogee altitude of 139km. During the rocket upleg and downleg the valley region showed the presence of electron temperatures as high as 2000 ºK while the temperatures expected from the existing models are around 500 ºK. A two stage VS-30/Orion rocket was again launched on 8-th December 2012 soon after sunset carrying a Langmuir Probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes. At the time of launch ground equipments operated at equatorial stations showed rapid rise in the base of the F-layer and creating ionospheric conditions favorable for the generation of plasma bubbles. Electron temperatures as high as 3500ºK were observed in the valley region during the rocket upleg and

  16. High density plasma etching of magnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kee Bum

    Magnetic materials such as NiFe (permalloy) or NiFeCo are widely used in the data storage industry. Techniques for submicron patterning are required to develop next generation magnetic devices. The relative chemical inertness of most magnetic materials means they are hard to etch using conventional RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). Therefore ion milling has generally been used across the industry, but this has limitations for magnetic structures with submicron dimensions. In this dissertation, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) for the etching of magnetic materials (NiFe, NiFeCo, CoFeB, CoSm, CoZr) and other related materials (TaN, CrSi, FeMn), which are employed for magnetic devices like magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), magnetic read/write heads, magnetic sensors and microactuators. This research examined the fundamental etch mechanisms occurring in high density plasma processing of magnetic materials by measuring etch rate, surface morphology and surface stoichiometry. However, one concern with using Cl2-based plasma chemistry is the effect of residual chlorine or chlorinated etch residues remaining on the sidewalls of etched features, leading to a degradation of the magnetic properties. To avoid this problem, we employed two different processing methods. The first one is applying several different cleaning procedures, including de-ionized water rinsing or in-situ exposure to H2, O2 or SF6 plasmas. Very stable magnetic properties were achieved over a period of ˜6 months except O2 plasma treated structures, with no evidence of corrosion, provided chlorinated etch residues were removed by post-etch cleaning. The second method is using non-corrosive gas chemistries such as CO/NH3 or CO2/NH3. There is a small chemical contribution to the etch mechanism (i.e. formation of metal carbonyls) as determined by a comparison with Ar and N2 physical sputtering. The discharge should be NH3

  17. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  18. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro

    2017-01-20

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia.

  19. High-calcium exposure to frog heart: a simple model representing hypercalcemia-induced ECG abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    KAZAMA, Itsuro

    2016-01-01

    By simply adding a high concentration of calcium solution to the surface of the bullfrog heart, we reproduced electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities representing those observed in hypercalcemia, such as Osborn waves and shortening of the QT interval. The rise in extracellular calcium concentration may have activated the outward potassium currents during phase 3 of the action potential, and thus decreased its duration. In addition to the known decrease in the duration of phase 2, such changes in phase 3 were also likely to contribute to the shortening of the QT interval. The dual recordings of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and the ECG waves enabled us to demonstrate the mechanisms of ECG abnormalities induced by hypercalcemia. PMID:27773880

  20. High Current Hollow Cathode Plasma Plume Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert E.; Kamhawi, Hani; Williams, George J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma plume measurements are reported for a hollow cathode assembly (HCA) oper-ated at discharge currents of 50, 70, and 100 A at xenon ow rates between 19 - 46 sccm.The HCA was centrally mounted in the annulus of the NASA-300MS Hall Thruster andwas operated in the spot and plume modes with additional data taken with an appliedmagnetic eld. Langmuir probes, retarding potential analyzers, and optical emission spec-troscopy were employed to measure plasma properties near the orice of the HCA and toassess the charge state of the near-eld plasma. Electron temperatures (2-6 eV) and plasmapotentials are consistent with probe-measured values in previous investigations. Operationwith an applied-eld yields higher discharge voltages, increased Xe III production, andincreased signals from the 833.5 nm C I line. While operating in plume mode and with anapplied eld, ion energy distribution measurements yield ions with energies signicantlyexceeding the applied discharge voltage. These ndings are correlated with high-frequencyoscillations associated with each mode.

  1. Atomic processes in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Y.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final report on the project Atomic Processes in High Temperature Plasmas', which has been completed in June 30, 1991. The original contract started in 1978. The dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients were calculated for ions with the number of electrons N = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, and 12. The result was then used to construct a new and improved rate formula. Other important resonant processes, which are closely related to DR, were also studied to interpret experiments and to test the DR theory. The plasma field and the density effects on the rate coefficients was found to be important, and a consistent correction procedure is being developed. The available data on the DR rates and their accuracy do not yet fully meet the requirement for plasma modeling; there are serious gaps in the available data, and the currently adopted theoretical procedure needs improvements. Critical assessment of the current status of the DR problem is presented, and possible future work needed is summarized.

  2. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  3. Multichannel euv spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.

    1983-11-01

    Spectroscopy of magnetically confined high temperature plasmas in the visible through x-ray spectral ranges deals primarily with the study of impurity line radiation or continuum radiation. Detailed knowledge of absolute intensities, temporal behavior, and spatial distributions of the emitted radiation is desired. As tokamak facilities become more complex, larger, and less accessible, there has been an increased emphasis on developing new instrumentation to provide such information in a minimum number of discharges. The availability of spatially-imaging detectors for use in the vacuum ultraviolet region (especially the intensified photodiode array) has generated the development of a variety of multichannel spectrometers for applications on tokamak facilities.

  4. Plasma cleaning device. [designed for high vacuum environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High vacuum cleaning of contaminated surfaces such as hydrocarbon containment films can be accomplished by a plasma cleaning device which includes a plasma discharge housing to permit generation of a plasma in an environment having a higher pressure than the surface which is to be cleaned. A ground electrode and a radio frequency electrode partially surround a quartz plasma tube, for the introduction of an ionizable gas. These electrodes ionize the gas and help generate the plasma. This plasma flows through a non-constrictive aperture, through the plasma discharge housing and then on to the contaminated surface.

  5. Mathematical impairment associated with high-contrast abnormalities in change detection and magnocellular visual evoked response.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2015-10-01

    The cause of developmental dyscalculia, a specific deficit in acquisition of arithmetic skills, particularly of enumeration, has never been investigated with respect to the patency of the visual magnocellular system. Here, the question of dysfunction of the afferent magnocellular cortical input and its dorsal stream projections was tested directly using nonlinear analysis of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and through the psychophysical ability to rapidly detect visual change. A group of young adults with self-reported deficiencies of arithmetical ability, showed marked impairment in magnitude estimation and enumeration performance-though not in lexical decision reaction times when compared with an arithmetically capable group controlled for age and handedness. Multifocal nonlinear VEPs were recorded at low (24 %) and high (96 %) contrast. First- and second-order VEP kernels were comparable between groups at low contrast, but not at high contrast. The mathematically impaired group showed an abnormal lack of contrast saturation in the shortest latency first-order peak (N60) and a delayed P100 positivity in the first slice of the second-order kernel. Both features have previously been argued to be physiological markers of magnocellular function. Mathematically impaired participants also performed worse on a gap paradigm change detection for digit task showing increased reaction times for high-contrast stimuli but not for low-contrast stimuli compared with controls. The VEP results give direct evidence of abnormality in the occipital processing of magnocellular information in those with mathematical impairment. The anomalous high visual contrast physiological and psychophysical performance suggests an abnormality in the inhibitory processes that normally result in saturation of contrast gain in the magnocellular system.

  6. High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Dynamics Explorer mission are to investigate the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum among the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. At launch, on August 3, 1981, DE-1 was placed into an elliptical polar orbit having an apogee of 23,130 km to allow global auroral imaging and crossings of auroral field lines at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. At the same time DE-2 was placed into a polar orbit, coplanar with that of DE-1 but with a perigee altitude low enough (309 km) for neutral measurements and an apogee altitude of 1012 km. The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) provided data on low and medium energy electrons and ions from August 13, 1981 until December 1, 1981, when a high-voltage failure occured. Analysis of HAPI data for the time period of this contract has produced new results on the source mechanisms for electron conical distributions, particle acceleration phenomena in auroral acceleration regions, Birkeland currents throughout the nightside auroral regions, the source region for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and plasma injection phenomena in the polar cusp.

  7. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  8. Abnormal high surface heat flow caused by the Emeishan mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qiang; Qiu, Nansheng; Zhu, Chuanqing

    2016-04-01

    It is commonly believed that increase of heat flow caused by a mantle plume is small and transient. Seafloor heat flow data near the Hawaiian hotspot and the Iceland are comparable to that for oceanic lithosphere elsewhere. Numerical modeling of the thermal effect of the Parana large igneous province shows that the added heat flow at the surface caused by the magmatic underplating is less than 5mW/m2. However, the thermal effect of Emeishan mantle plume (EMP) may cause the surface hear-flow abnormally high. The Middle-Late Emeishan mantle plume is located in the western Yangtze Craton. The Sichuan basin, to the northeast of the EMP, is a superimposed basin composed of Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks and Mesozoic-Cenozoic terrestrial clastic rocks. The vitrinite reflectance (Ro) data as a paleogeothermal indicator records an apparent change of thermal regime of the Sichuan basin. The Ro profiles from boreholes and outcrops which are close to the center of the basalt province exhibit a 'dog-leg' style at the unconformity between the Middle and Upper Permian, and they show significantly higher gradients in the lower subsection (pre-Middle Permian) than the Upper subsection (Upper Permian to Mesozoic). Thermal history inversion based on these Ro data shows that the lower subsection experienced a heat flow peak much higher than that of the upper subsection. The abnormal heat flow in the Sichuan basin is consistent with the EMP in temporal and spatial distribution. The high-temperature magmas from deep mantle brought heat to the base of the lithosphere, and then large amount of heat was conducted upwards, resulting in the abnormal high surface heat flow.

  9. Detection of abnormally high amygdalin content in food by an enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cho, A-Yeon; Yi, Kye Sook; Rhim, Jung-Hyo; Kim, Kyu-Il; Park, Jae-Young; Keum, Eun-Hee; Chung, Junho; Oh, Sangsuk

    2006-04-30

    Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glycoside compound which is commonly found in the pits of many fruits and raw nuts. Although amygdalin itself is not toxic, it can release cyanide (CN) after hydrolysis when the pits and nuts are crushed, moistened and incubated, possibly within the gastrointestinal tract. CN reversibly inhibits cellular oxidizing enzymes and cyanide poisoning generates a range of clinical symptoms. As some pits and nuts may contain unusually high levels of amygdalin such that there is a sufficient amount to induce critical CN poisoning in humans, the detection of abnormal content of amygdalin in those pits and nuts can be a life-saving measure. Although there are various methods to detect amygdalin in food extracts, an enzyme immunoassay has not been developed for this purpose. In this study we immunized New Zealand White rabbits with an amygdalin-KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin) conjugate and succeeded in raising anti-sera reactive to amygdalin, proving that amygdalin can behave as a hapten in rabbits. Using this polyclonal antibody, we developed a competition enzyme immunoassay for determination of amygdalin concentration in aqueous solutions. This technique was able to effectively detect abnormally high amygdalin content in various seeds and nuts. In conclusion, we proved that enzyme immunoassay can be used to determine the amount of amygdalin in food extracts, which will allow automated analysis with high throughput.

  10. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  11. [A case of megaloblastic anemia with abnormally high urine level of beta-aminoisobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Konjiki, O; Yoneda, Y; Sato, Y; Oosawa, Y; Imamura, T; Takasaki, M

    1993-01-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with anemia and jaundice. Hematological studies revealed hyperchromic macrocytic anemia, and biochemical studies revealed findings of hemolysis. The folic acid level was low and megaloblasts were observed in the bone marrow. From these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency. This patient had been a heavy alcohol drinker in the habit of drinking alcohol without meals. He began to eat regular meals in the hospital, and the anemia and jaundice improved gradually. Since liver cirrhosis was suspected, amino acid analysis of the urine was performed, and abnormal excretion of beta-amino-isobutyric acid (BAIB) was found. According to the amount of BAIB excreted, the Japanese population can be divided into low and high BAIB excretors comprising 65% and 36%, respectively. BAIB is also considered to reflect dissimilation of thymine. The present patient was included in the high excretion group because of the abnormally high urine level of BAIB, which was considered to be caused by ineffective hematopoiesis in the bone marrow as a result of his megaloblastic anemia. For this reason, dissimilation of thymine was considered to have been active in this patient.

  12. Kinetic equilibria of very high- β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Plasma equilibria with many large ion orbits, such as an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration, are neither static (Grad-Shafranov) nor describable as a flowing, multi-fluid. A fully-kinetic treatment of the ions is essential for such high- β plasmas. A kinetic equilibrium is needed to properly support realistic stability and transport analyses, both of which are strongly affected by large-orbit ions. A hybrid equilibrium model has been developed with a fully-kinetic treatment of both thermal ions and a rapidly-rotating ``beam-ion'' component, such as produced by neutral beam injection, relevant to the C-2U experiments at TAE. It employs analytic Vlasov solutions in that the distribution depends only on the two constants of motion, the Hamiltonian (H) and the canonical angular momentum (Pθ) . Electrons are treated as a pressure-bearing fluid. Since realistic forms of f (H ,Pθ) are affected by collisions, f is limited to solutions of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. Importantly, a kinetic end-loss condition applies to unconfined ions, using a particle sink at a rate consistent with Monte-Carlo-like simulations of end loss accounting for a strong end mirror.

  13. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were investigated with particular emphasis on X-ray emission. Topics discussed include: trajectories of high energy electrons; detection of ion trajectories; spatial distribution of neutron emission; space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus; the staged plasma focus as a variation of the hypocloidal pinch; formation of current sheets in a staged plasma focus; and X-ray and neutron emission from a staged plasma focus. The possibility of operating dense plasma-focus type devices in multiple arrays beyond the scaling law for a single gun is discussed.

  14. High latitude electromagnetic plasma wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The principal types of electromagnetic plasma wave emission produced in the high latitude auroral regions are reviewed. Three types of radiation are described: auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, and Z mode radiation. Auroral kilometric radiation is a very intense radio emission generated in the free space R-X mode by electrons associated with the formation of discrete auroral arcs in the local evening. Theories suggest that this radiation is an electron cyclotron resonance instability driven by an enhanced loss cone in the auroral acceleration region at altitudes of about 1 to 2 R sub E. Auroral hiss is a somewhat weaker whistler mode emission generated by low energy (100 eV to 10 keV) auroral electrons. The auroral hiss usually has a V shaped frequency time spectrum caused by a freqency dependent beaming of the whistler mode into a conical beam directed upward or downward along the magnetic field.

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  16. Preliminary validation of an exercise program suitable for pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism: inhibitory effects of Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise on plasma glucose elevation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sachina; Kagawa, Kyoko; Hori, Naohi; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Nomura, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] There is insufficient evidence related to exercise programs that are safe and efficacious for pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism. Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise is an exercise program with validated safety and efficacy in improving physical function in the elderly. In this study, we investigated this program’s inhibitory effects on plasma glucose elevation when it was adapted to a pregnancy model. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve 18- to 19-year-old females without a history of pregnancy were randomly assorted into two groups: an intervention group, for which six subjects were outfitted with mock-pregnancy suits and asked to perform Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise, and a control group who did not perform exercise. The intervention group had a mean Borg Scale score of 11.1 ± 0.9 during the exercise. [Results] No significant intragroup differences were observed in fasting, baseline, or post-intervention/observation plasma glucose levels. On the other hand, the intergroup change in plasma glucose levels after intervention/observation was significant when comparing the intervention and control groups: −1.66 ± 7.0 and 9.42 ± 6.57 mg/dl, respectively. [Conclusion] Tai Chi Yuttari-exercise appears to effectively inhibit plasma glucose elevation at intensity and movement levels that can be safely applied to pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism. PMID:28174463

  17. Plasma structures for quasiphase matched high harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinfux, A. H.; Henis, Z.; Levin, M.; Zigler, A.

    2011-04-04

    A scheme for creation of periodic plasma structures by ablating a lithographic pattern is demonstrated. A proof of principle experiment was conducted, and plasma parameters were measured as a function of time with spatial resolution <10 and 100 {mu}m periodicity. Several possible applications, in particular, quasiphase matching for high harmonic generation in plasma are considered.

  18. Magnetospheric Plasma Studies Using Data from the Dynamics High and Low Altitude Plasma Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-15

    the research reported here was Dy- namics Explorer 1 (DE-1). The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) consists of five electrostatic analyzers...paper (Lin et al, 1983). The High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) on Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE-1) made differential flux measurements of electrons and...N. Eaker, W. C. Gibson, and R. A. Hoffman, High Altitude Plasma Instrument for Dynamics Explorer-A, Space Sci. Instrum., 5, 455, 1981. Burch, J. L

  19. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  20. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  1. Electric and thermal resistivities in dense high-Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Hikaru; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1995-06-01

    Analytic expressions for the electric and thermal resistivities in dense high-Z plasmas have been obtained. The expressions incorporate phase-shift calculations of high-Z ion-sphere-model cross sections as well as existing quantum-mechanical transport calculations for hydrogen plasmas, and are applicable to fluid plasmas with 1<=Z<=26 strong-coupling effects between electrons and ions are particularly clarified. It has been shown that the heat capacity for a dense plasma may have a considerable effect, modifying the rate of thermal conduction. The results are compared with other theoretical predictions for those plasma parameters appropriate to degenerate stars.

  2. Sensitivity to Error Fields in NSTX High Beta Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Buttery, Richard J.; Sabbagh, Steve A.; Bell, Steve E.; LeBlanc, Benoit P.

    2011-11-07

    It was found that error field threshold decreases for high β in NSTX, although the density correlation in conventional threshold scaling implies the threshold would increase since higher β plasmas in our study have higher plasma density. This greater sensitivity to error field in higher β plasmas is due to error field amplification by plasmas. When the effect of amplification is included with ideal plasma response calculations, the conventional density correlation can be restored and threshold scaling becomes more consistent with low β plasmas. However, it was also found that the threshold can be significantly changed depending on plasma rotation. When plasma rotation was reduced by non-resonant magnetic braking, the further increase of sensitivity to error field was observed.

  3. Integrated high-voltage modulator for plasma immersion ion implantation with an RF plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozin, A. I.; Astrelin, V. T.; Richter, E.; Möller, W.

    2003-08-01

    The present investigation focuses on further development of the plasma based high-voltage modulator for plasma immersion ion implantation devices. The modulator produces high-voltage pulses using grid controlled extraction of electrons from the plasma, which is used for the ion implantation. The operation features of the modulator in connection with a radio-frequency plasma are described. The device is applied to nitrogen ion implantations of stainless steel. The results indicate considerable hardness improvement, which confirms the practical utility of the high-voltage modulator.

  4. High Density And High Temperature Plasmas In Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, A.

    2010-07-01

    For the realization of the fusion reactor, it is necessary to confine high density and high temperature plasma for a time, which is well known as the Lawson criterion. To improve the plasma or confinement performance, vigorous experiments have been performed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) in National Institute for Fusion Science, which is the largest superconducting heliotron device with R = 3.9 m r = 0.6 m, Bt = 3 T. Recently a promising confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered. An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 10^20 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB (? = 0.6) is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. The IDB-SDC mode is also favorable from the engineering point of view since one can moderate demands for heating devices and plasma facing components. In order to achieve the IDB-SDC mode, the central fuelling with the pellet injection and the low recycling condition are essential. A repetitive pellet injector was newly developed to continuously feed the particle source to the central region. For the recycling control, the effective divertor system should be employed to control the edge plasma. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature more than 10 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the core region, the heat conductivity is improved to the neoclassical level, while no clear ITB for electron was seen. Another interesting phenomenon called "impurity hole" was observed inside the ITB. During the high ion temperature discharge, the im- purity density in the core region becomes

  5. Magnetospheric Plasma Studies Using Data from the Dynamics High and Low Altitude Plasma Instruments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-15

    High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) [Burch et al, 1981] on DE-1 are shown...Accreeration Regions, J. Geophys. Res. , 84, 5863, 1979. Burch, J. L., J. D. Winningham, V. A. Blevins, N. Eaker, W. C. Gibson, and R. A. Hoffman, High - altitude plasma instrument for... Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) consists of five elec- trostatic analyzers mounted in a fan-shaped angular array at angles of 450, 780, 900, 1020,

  6. Spectroscopic investigation of highly transient pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, K.; Engel, A.; Lebert, R.; Rosmej, O.N.; Rosmej, F.B.; Gavrilescu, C.; Neff, W.

    1997-11-01

    The temporal evolution of neon pinch plasmas, generated in a 2 kJ plasma focus device, has been investigated by x-ray spectroscopic methods for two sets of device parameters. These two sets lead to characteristic differences of the K-shell emission. Stationary models are shown to fail to explain the experimental observations even qualitatively. Transient spectra analysis shows that the characteristic differences observed can be referred to different transient modes of plasma dynamics. The spectra analysis includes beside resonance lines also dielectronic satellites and recombination continua. The results concerning the development of the plasma parameters achieved by the spectra modeling are supported by independent measurements of the time resolved K-shell emission and by optical streak images of the pinch plasma dynamics, which confirms the reliability of the transient spectroscopic analysis presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  8. High-T c superconductor/polymer composites. Modeling of abnormal electrical properties at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlhachemi, A.; Gavarri, J. R.; Musso, J.; Alfred-Duplan, C.; Marfaing, J.

    1994-09-01

    High- Tc 2223-bismuth superconducting pigments have been inserted in a matrix of Fe 3+-doped polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) to obtain new composites with variable properties. The fabrication and the characterization of the various components are briefly described. The electrical resistivity at a low temperature of the composites is reported. In the case of multiphase super-conducting pigments presenting various Tc's and semiconducting fabrication residues inserted in the polymeric matrix, the composites are characterized by abnormal resistivity evolutions between 20 K and 300 K. A new electrical model is proposed to interpret the behavior of such composites in the full 5 K to 300 K temperature range. Percolation features are taken into account through an empirical description of the electrical complex impedances. The computer calculations allow one to characterize fabrication residues and interfaces between insulating, conducting and superconducting areas in the composites.

  9. Abnormally high fluid pressures in the region of the Coalinga earthquake sequence and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, R.F.; Levine, P.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Abnormally high fluid pressures (AHP's) permitted or aided thrusting of buried tectonic wedges of Franciscan assemblage eastward beneath coeval Great Valley sequence onto mafic basement and thus contributed to the 1983 Coalinga earthquake sequence. Much of the southwestern San Joaquin Valley and adjoining parts of the Diablo Range are underlain by rocks with pressure/depth (P/D) ratios near or greater than 0.5 psi/ft (the hydrostatic gradient for oil-field waters is about 0.47 psi/ft). Plots of P/D ratio versus depth for more than 300 wells show an average ratio of about 0.6 psi/ft above 14,000-ft depth, a lower bound of 0.47 psi/ft, and an upper bound greater than 0.9 psi/ft; ratios greater than 0.60 psi/ft are interpreted to be abnormally high. Several likely sources of AHP's are recognized, but their relative contributions cannot be determined. Chief of these sources are diagenetic-metamorphic generation of fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, compaction disequilibrium and aquathermal pressuring in Tertiary strata, and horizontal tectonic compression. Yerkes, Levine, and Wentworth infer the presence of near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks below the Coalinga anticline on the basis of (1) a mapped seismic low-velocity zone; (2) active generation of metamorphic fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, which pond below relatively impermeable layers and thus increase fluid pressure; and (3) apparent southward and westward propagation of the 1983 main-shock rupture, which indicates rupture on a gently southwest dipping surface and implies an inverse relation between depth and crustal strength.

  10. Low plasma adiponectin level, white blood cell count and Helicobacter pylori titre independently predict abnormal pancreatic beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    So, Wing-Yee; Tong, Peter C; Ko, Gary T; Ma, Ronald C; Ozaki, Risa; Kong, Alice P; Yang, Xilin; Ho, Chung-Shun; Lam, Christopher C; Chan, Juliana C

    2009-11-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocytokine with insulin sensitizing effect while chronic inflammation damages pancreatic beta-cells leading to reduced insulin response. We aimed to prove the hypothesis that adiponectin levels and inflammatory markers (white blood cell counts [WCC], Helicobacter pylori [HP] titers, high sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]) may interact to affect risk of diabetes. We studied 288 Chinese men (age-median: 41.0 years, IQR: 35.3-46.0 years) being recruited from the community in Hong Kong. The mean adiponectin level was 5.39+/-2.81 microg/ml and 40.9% (n=107) had low adiponectin level (<4 microg/ml). On multiple regression analysis, adiponectin was negatively associated with diabetes, HOMA insulin resistance top quartile, plasma glucose (PG) and 2h insulin; and positively associated with HOMA insulin sensitivity index. WCC was independently associated with PG and 15' insulin, and negatively associated with HOMA insulin sensitivity top quartile. HP titre was associated with 30' PG level and diabetes. hs-CRP did not enter the multivariable model. In conclusion, adiponectin, WCC and HP titer are independent predictors for hyperglycemia and reduced insulin sensitivity in Chinese men. These findings may explain the high risk for diabetes in Chinese population despite their relatively low adiposity.

  11. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  12. High frequency of p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway abnormalities in relapsed neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Wilkinson, Jane; O' Toole, Kieran; Wood, Katrina M.; Challen, Christine C.; Baker, Angela G.; Board, Julian R.; Evans, Laura; Cole, Michael; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Boos, Joachim; Köhler, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most neuroblastomas initially respond to therapy but many relapse with chemoresistant disease. p53 mutations are rare in diagnostic neuroblastomas, but we have previously reported inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway in 9/17 (53%) neuroblastoma cell lines established at relapse. Hypothesis: Inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway develops during treatment and contributes to neuroblastoma relapse. Methods: Eighty-four neuroblastomas were studied from 41 patients with relapsed neuroblastoma including 38 paired neuroblastomas at different stages of therapy. p53 mutations were detected by automated sequencing, p14ARF methylation and deletion by methylation-specific PCR and duplex PCR respectively, and MDM2 amplification by fluorescent in-situ hybridisation. Results: Abnormalities in the p53 pathway were identified in 20/41(49%) cases. Downstream defects due to inactivating missense p53 mutations were identified in 6/41 (15%) cases, 5 following chemotherapy and/or at relapse and 1 at diagnosis, post chemotherapy and relapse. The presence of a p53 mutation was independently prognostic for overall survival (hazard ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 9.9; p = 0.02). Upstream defects were present in 35% cases: MDM2 amplification in 3 cases, all at diagnosis & relapse and p14ARF inactivation in 12/41 (29%) cases: 3 had p14ARF methylation, 2 after chemotherapy, and 9 had homozygous deletions, 8 at diagnosis and relapse. Conclusions: These results show that a high proportion of neuroblastomas which relapse have an abnormality in the p53 pathway. The majority have upstream defects suggesting that agents which reactivate wild-type p53 would be beneficial, in contrast to those with downstream defects where p53 independent therapies are indicated. PMID:20145180

  13. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  14. Network Mechanisms Generating Abnormal and Normal Hippocampal High-Frequency Oscillations: A Computational Analysis1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gliske, Stephen; Catoni, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are an intriguing potential biomarker for epilepsy, typically categorized according to peak frequency as either ripples (100–250 Hz) or fast ripples (>250 Hz). In the hippocampus, fast ripples were originally thought to be more specific to epileptic tissue, but it is still very difficult to distinguish which HFOs are caused by normal versus pathological brain activity. In this study, we use a computational model of hippocampus to investigate possible network mechanisms underpinning normal ripples, pathological ripples, and fast ripples. Our results unify several prior findings regarding HFO mechanisms, and also make several new predictions regarding abnormal HFOs. We show that HFOs are generic, emergent phenomena whose characteristics reflect a wide range of connectivity and network input. Although produced by different mechanisms, both normal and abnormal HFOs generate similar ripple frequencies, underscoring that peak frequency is unable to distinguish the two. Abnormal ripples are generic phenomena that arise when input to pyramidal cells overcomes network inhibition, resulting in high-frequency, uncoordinated firing. In addition, fast ripples transiently and sporadically arise from the precise conditions that produce abnormal ripples. Lastly, we show that such abnormal conditions do not require any specific network structure to produce coherent HFOs, as even completely asynchronous activity is capable of producing abnormal ripples and fast ripples in this manner. These results provide a generic, network-based explanation for the link between pathological ripples and fast ripples, and a unifying description for the entire spectrum from normal ripples to pathological fast ripples. PMID:26146658

  15. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  16. Characterization of Side Populations in HNSCC: Highly Invasive, Chemoresistant and Abnormal Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Chang, Insoon; Chen, Zhuo; Kang, Mo; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Side Population (SP) cells, a subset of Hoechst-low cells, are enriched with stem cells. Originally, SP cells were isolated from bone marrow but recently have been found in various solid tumors and cancer cell lines that are clonogenic in vitro and tumorigenic in vivo. In this study, SP cells from lymph node metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were examined using flow cytometry and Hoechst 3342 efflux assay. We found that highly metastatic HNSCC cell lines M3a2 and M4e contained more SP cells compared to the low metastatic parental HNSCC cell line 686LN. SP cells in HNSCC were highly invasive in vitro and tumorigenic in vivo compared to non-SP cells. Furthermore, SP cells highly expressed ABCG2 and were chemoresistant to Bortezomib and etoposide. Importantly, we found that SP cells in HNSCC had abnormal activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling as compared to non-SP cells. Together, these findings indicate that SP cells might be a major driving force of head and neck tumor formation and metastasis. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be an important target for eliminating cancer stem cells in HNSCC. PMID:20625515

  17. PULSION registered HP: Tunable, High Productivity Plasma Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, S. B.; Torregrosa, F.; Etienne, H.; Spiegel, Y.; Roux, L.; Turnbaugh, D.

    2011-01-07

    Plasma doping has been explored for many implant applications for over two decades and is now being used in semiconductor manufacturing for two applications: DRAM polysilicon counter-doping and contact doping. The PULSION HP is a new plasma doping tool developed by Ion Beam Services for high-volume production that enables customer control of the dominant mechanism--deposition, implant, or etch. The key features of this tool are a proprietary, remote RF plasma source that enables a high density plasma with low chamber pressure, resulting in a wide process space, and special chamber and wafer electrode designs that optimize doping uniformity.

  18. Plasma detachment study of high density helium plasmas in the Pilot-PSI device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Ješko, K.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Vernimmen, J. W. M.; Morgan, T. W.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshikawa, M.; Masuzaki, S.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated plasma detachment phenomena of high-density helium plasmas in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI, which can realize a relevant ITER SOL/Divertor plasma condition. The experiment clearly indicated plasma detachment features such as drops in the plasma pressure and particle flux along the magnetic field lines that were observed under the condition of high neutral pressure; a feature of flux drop was parameterized using the degree of detachment (DOD) index. Fundamental plasma parameters such as electron temperature (T e) and electron density in the detached recombining plasmas were measured by different methods: reciprocating electrostatic probes, Thomson scattering (TS), and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The T e measured using single and double probes corresponded to the TS measurement. No anomalies in the single probe I-V characteristics, observed in other linear plasma devices [16, 17, 36], appeared under the present condition in the Pilot-PSI device. A possible reason for this difference is discussed by comparing the different linear devices. The OES results are also compared with the simulation results of a collisional radiative (CR) model. Further, we demonstrated more than 90% of parallel particle and heat fluxes were dissipated in a short length of 0.5 m under the high neutral pressure condition in Pilot-PSI.

  19. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  20. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  1. High speed cine film studies of plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, D. H. J.

    1982-12-01

    High speed cine photography is a useful diagnostic aid for studying plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions. Several workers have filmed discharges in tokamaks including ASDEX, DITE, DIVA, ISX, JFT2, TFR and PLT. These films are discussed and examples given of the observed phenomena which include plasma limiter interactions, diverted discharges, disruptions, magnetic islands and moving glowing objects often known as 'UFOs'. Examples of plasma structures in ASDEX and DITE not previously published are also given. The paper also reports experiments in DITE to determine the origin of UFOs.

  2. Optimum plasma conditions for the efficient high-order harmonic generation in platinum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, Rashid A.; Elouga Bom, Luc B.; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2007-06-15

    We studied the optimum plasma conditions that are required for efficient high-order harmonic generation in platinum plume. Harmonics up to the 49th order ({lambda}=16.32 nm) are analyzed under various conditions of laser-plasma interaction. Time-resolved ultraviolet spectra of platinum plasma at both optimum and nonoptimum conditions of harmonic generation are presented. We calculated the ionization states of the plasma, free electron density, and singly charged ion density at different prepulse intensities and compared them with experimental results.

  3. High Current, High Density Arc Plasma as a New Source for WiPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waleffe, Roger; Endrizzi, Doug; Myers, Rachel; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Lab (WiPAL) has installed a new array of nineteen plasma sources (plasma guns) on its 3 m diameter, spherical vacuum vessel. Each gun is a cylindrical, molybdenum, washer-stabilized, arc plasma source. During discharge, the guns are maintained at 1.2 kA across 100 V for 10 ms by the gun power supply establishing a high density plasma. Each plasma source is fired independently allowing for adjustable plasma parameters, with densities varying between 1018 -1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 5-15 eV. Measurements were characterized using a 16 tip Langmuir probe. The plasma source will be used as a background plasma for the magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), and as the plasma source for a magnetic mirror experiment. Temperature, density, and confinement results will be presented. This work is supported by the DoE and the NSF.

  4. High Power Ion Heating in Helium and Hydrogen Plasmas for Advanced Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hagiwara, Tatsuya; Domon, Masakazu; Taguchi, Takahiro

    High power ion cyclotron resonance heating is performed in a fast-flowing plasma operated with hydrogen and helium gases. Ion heating is clearly observed in hydrogen plasma as well as in helium plasma. The resonance region of magnetic field is broader and wave absorption efficiency is higher in hydrogen plasma than those in helium plasma. The thermal energy of the heated ions is converted to the kinetic energy of the exhaust plume by passing through a diverging magnetic nozzle set in a downstream region. In the magnetic nozzle energy conversion occurred as keeping the magnetic moment constant, but some discrepancy was observed in larger gradient of magnetic field. The kinetic energy of the exhaust plume is successfully controlled by an input power of radio-frequency wave, which is one of the key technologies for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) type plasma thruster.

  5. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  6. Observation of abnormal mobility enhancement in multilayer MoS2 transistor by synergy of ultraviolet illumination and ozone plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junjie; Yang, Bingchu; Zheng, Zhouming; Jiang, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Mobility engineering through physical or chemical process is a fruitful approach for the atomically-layered two-dimensional electronic applications. Unfortunately, the usual process with either illumination or oxygen treatment would greatly deteriorate the mobility in two-dimensional MoS2 field-effect transistor (FET). Here, in this work, we report that the mobility can be abnormally enhanced to an order of magnitude by the synergy of ultraviolet illumination (UV) and ozone plasma treatment in multilayer MoS2 FET. This abnormal mobility enhancement is attributed to the trap passivation due to the photo-generated excess carriers during UV/ozone plasma treatment. An energy band model based on Schottky barrier modulation is proposed to understand the underlying mechanism. Raman spectra results indicate that the oxygen ions are incorporated into the surface of MoS2 (some of them are in the form of ultra-thin Mo-oxide) and can further confirm this proposed mechanism. Our results can thus provide a simple approach for mobility engineering in MoS2-based FET and can be easily expanded to other 2D electronic devices, which represents a significant step toward applications of 2D layered materials in advanced cost-effective electronics.

  7. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  8. High Latitude Electromagnetic Plasma Wave Emissions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    1980), and possibly Uranus (Brown, 1976). Auroral hiss emissions have also been detected near the Io plasma torus at Jupi- ter (Gurnett et al., 1979...between 130 kHz and 2,600 kHz, Astrophys. J., 180:359. Brown, L. W., 1976, Possible radio emission from Uranus at 0.5 MHz, Astrophys. J., 207:L202. 28

  9. Mitigation of hot electrons from laser-plasma instabilities in high-Z, highly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, J. R.; Holloway, J. P.; Trantham, M. R.; Keiter, P. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Haberberger, D.; Frank, Y.; Fraenkel, M.; Raicher, E.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.

    2017-03-01

    Hard x-ray measurements are used to infer production of hot electrons in laser-irradiated planar foils of materials ranging from low- to high-Z. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons, fhot , was reduced by a factor of 103 going from low-Z CH to high-Z Au, and hot electron temperatures were reduced from 40 to ˜20 keV. The reduction in fhot correlates with steepening electron density gradient length-scales inferred from plasma refraction measurements. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations predicted electron density profiles in reasonable agreement with those from measurements. Both multi-beam two-plasmon decay (TPD) and multi-beam stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) were predicted to be above threshold with linear threshold parameters that decreased with increasing Z due to steepening length-scales, as well as enhanced laser absorption and increased electron plasma wave collisional and Landau damping. The results add to the evidence that SRS may play a comparable or a greater role relative to TPD in generating hot electrons in multi-beam experiments.

  10. Abnormal high-energy phosphate molecule metabolism during regional brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, C; Du, F; Ravichandran, C; Goldbach, J R; Thida, T; Lin, P; Dora, B; Gelda, J; O'Connor, L; Sehovic, S; Gruber, S; Ongur, D; Cohen, B M

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests bioenergetic abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). In the brain, phosphocreatine (PCr) acts a reservoir of high-energy phosphate (HEP) bonds, and creatine kinases (CK) catalyze the transfer of HEP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to PCr and from PCr back to ATP, at times of increased need. This study examined the activity of this mechanism in BD by measuring the levels of HEP molecules during a stimulus paradigm that increased local energy demand. Twenty-three patients diagnosed with BD-I and 22 healthy controls (HC) were included. Levels of phosphorus metabolites were measured at baseline and during visual stimulation in the occipital lobe using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4T. Changes in metabolite levels showed different patterns between the groups. During stimulation, HC had significant reductions in PCr but not in ATP, as expected. In contrast, BD patients had significant reductions in ATP but not in PCr. In addition, PCr/ATP ratio was lower at baseline in patients, and there was a higher change in this measure during stimulation. This pattern suggests a disease-related failure to replenish ATP from PCr through CK enzyme catalysis during tissue activation. Further studies measuring the CK flux in BD are required to confirm and extend this finding.

  11. Reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in tree swallows with high levels of PCB contamination

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, J. |; Secord, A.; Tillitt, D.

    1995-12-31

    Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding along the Hudson River forage extensively on PCB contaminated insects that emerge from the river. The authors studied the reproductive ecology and behavior of tree swallows breeding at several sites along the Hudson River. These sites vary in the severity of PCB contamination. PCB levels in both eggs and chicks were found to be among the highest ever reported in this species, with concentrations comparable to those found in aquatic organisms in the Hudson River. In 1994 reproductive success at PCB contaminated sites was significantly impaired, relative to other sites in New York. Reduced reproductive success was largely attributed to high levels of nest abandonment during incubation and reduced hatchability of eggs. Growth and development of nestlings was not significantly impaired. Abnormal nest building behavior was also noted in 1994, and this was studied in detail in 1995. Nests from contaminated areas are significantly smaller than those at a nearby reference site and at other sites in New York. The authors suggest that the reduced reproductive outputs at these sites are, in large part, a result of effects on the behavior of incubating females. The population-level implications of these patterns are unknown.

  12. High-pressure ignition plasma torch for aerospace testing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Kulikov, Yu M.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Son, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    The present paper discusses the issues of implementation of high-pressure ignition plasma torch in terms of discharge phenomena in compressed gases, dense nitrogen plasma properties and stable arcing power requirements. Contact ignition has been tested in a pressure range p = 1-25 bar and has proved to be a reliable solution for pilot arc burning.

  13. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  14. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I{sub p} {le} 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P{sub b} {le} 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in {tau}{sub E}. In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas.

  15. Sources of plasma in the high altitude cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Trattner, K. J.

    2012-10-01

    Ambiguities introduced by the inconsistent definitions of the low and high altitude cusp lead to the inconsistency that at low altitudes the region commonly known as the cusp does not include boundary layer plasmas, but at high altitudes it does. Here we examine plasma data from two high altitude cusp intervals where ∼100 keV ionospheric ions were observed. We show that the data are an average over an interval that includes plasma from both boundary layer and newly injected solar wind plasmas. We find that the ∼100 keV ionospheric ions reported in the high altitude cusp are energized by well-known magnetospheric processes bringing energetic ions to the dayside boundary layers. We conclude that there is no need to postulate new processes associated with waves in diamagnetic cavities commonly found in the high altitude cusp to explain the observation of ∼100 keV ionospheric ions found there.

  16. Abnormally high thromboxane biosynthesis in homozygous homocystinuria. Evidence for platelet involvement and probucol-sensitive mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, G; Davì, G; Margaglione, M; Cirillo, F; Grandone, E; Ciabattoni, G; Catalano, I; Strisciuglio, P; Andria, G; Patrono, C

    1993-01-01

    Homocystinuria due to homozygous cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a high incidence of thrombosis and premature atherosclerosis. We evaluated TXA2 biosynthesis in vivo and several in vitro tests of platelet function in 11 homocystinuric patients and 12 healthy controls. In vitro, patients' platelet aggregation was within control values as were TXB2 formation, fibrinogen binding, and ATP secretion in response to thrombin. In contrast, the urinary excretion of 11-dehydro-TXB2, a major enzymatic derivative of TXA2, was > 2 SD of controls in all patients (1,724 +/- 828 pg/mg creatinine, mean +/- SD, in patients vs. 345 +/- 136 in controls, P < 0.001). The administration to four patients of low-dose aspirin (50 mg/d for 1 wk) reduced metabolite excretion by > 80%. The recovery of 11-dehydro-TXB2 excretion over the 10 d that followed aspirin cessation occurred with a pattern consistent with the entry into the circulation of platelets with intact cyclooxygenase activity. Prolonged partial reduction in the abnormally high excretion of both 11-dehydro-TXB2 and 2,3-dinor-TXB2, was also observed in seven patients who ingested 500 mg daily for 3 wk of the antioxidant drug probucol. These results provide evidence for enhanced thromboxane biosynthesis in homocystinuria and for its partial dependence on probucol-sensitive mechanisms. Furthermore, the elevated TXA2 formation in homocystinuria is likely to reflect, at least in part, in vivo platelet activation. PMID:8376592

  17. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-30

    flow. NumerEx used MACH2 to simulate the flow using compressible, inviscid hydrodynamics with the SESAME equations of state . The depth of the...Figure 1 shows the liner state versus the radius of a collapsing 10 cm tall lithium liner driven by an RLC circuit model of Shiva Star. This work...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this

  18. Understanding Plasmas with a High Degree of Correlation Through Modeling: From Rydberg and Fermionic Plasmas to Penning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Ultra cold neutral plasmas have gained attention over the past 15 years as being a unique environment for studying moderately to strongly coupled neutral systems. The first ultra cold neutral plasmas were generated by ionizing a Bose Einstein condensate, generating a plasma with .1K ions and 2-4K electrons. These neutral plasmas have the unique property that the ratio of their potential energy to their kinetic energy, (Γ = PE / KE), can greatly exceed 1, leading to a strongly correlated system. The high degree of correlation means that everything from wave propagation through collision dynamics behaves quite differently from their counterpart in traditional neutral plasmas. Currently, a range of gases and different methods for cooling have been used to generate these plasmas from supersonic expansion, through penning trap configurations (reference Tom, Jake and Ed). These systems have time scales form picoseconds to milliseconds have a particle numbers from 105 to 109. These systems present a unique environment for studying the physics of correlation due to their low particle number and small size. We start by reviewing ultra cold plasmas and the current sate of the art in generating these correlated systems. Then we introduce the methods we will use for exploring these systems through direct simulation of Molecular Dynamics models; Momentum Dependent Potentials, Treecodes and Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh methods. We use these tools to look at two key areas of ultra cold plasmas; development of methods to generate a plasma with a Γ >> 1 and the impact of correlation of collisional relaxation. Our eventual goal is to use what we learn to develop models that can simulate correlation in large plasma systems that are outside of the scope of Molecular Dynamics models. In collaboration with Gautham Dharmuman, Mayur Jain, Michael Murillo and John Verboncoeur. This work it supposed by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. High incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in acute coronary syndrome patients at a moderate altitude: A sub-Himalayan study

    PubMed Central

    Mokta, Jitender; Kumar, Subash; Ganju, Neeraj; Mokta, Kiran; Panda, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Swatantra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abnormal glucose metabolic status at admission is an important marker of future cardiovascular events and long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), whether or not they are known diabetics. Objective: The aims were to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in ACS patients and to compare the different methods of diagnosing diabetes in ACS patients. Methods: We did a prospective study. About 250 consecutive nondiabetic patients (200 men and 50 women) with ACS admitted to a tertiary care institute of Himachal Pradesh in 1 year were enrolled. Admission plasma glucose, next morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and a standardized 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 72 h after admission were done. Glucose metabolism was categorized as normal glucose metabolism, impaired glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]), and diabetes. Diabetes was arbitrarily classified further as undiagnosed (HBA1c ≥6.5%) or possibly stress diabetes (HBA1c <6.5%). A repeat OGTT after 3 months in objects with IGT and stress hyperglycemia at a time of admission was done. Results: The mean age was 54 ± 12.46 years. The mean plasma glucose at admission was 124 ± 53.96 mg/dL, and the mean FPG was 102 ± 27.07 mg/dL. The mean 2-h postglucose load concentration was 159.5 ± 56.58 mg/dL. At baseline, 95 (38%) had normal glucose metabolism, 95 (38%) had impaired glucose metabolism (IGT and or IGT) and 60 (24%) had diabetes; 48 (19.2%) were undiagnosed diabetes and 12 (4.8%) had stress hyperglycemia. At follow up 58.66% and 55.55% of patients with impaired glucose tolerance and stress hyperglycemia continued to have impaired glucose tolerance respectively. About 75 gm OGTT has highest sensitivity and specificity to diagnose diabetes, whereas A1C most specific to rule out stress hyperglycemia. Conclusions: In this small hilly state of India, abnormal glucose metabolism (previously undiagnosed diabetes and IGT) is

  20. Abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon gate during AC stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjun; Joo, Ikhyung; Lee, Changsub; Song, Duheon; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET (HV pMOSFET) under negative AC gate bias stress. In HV pMOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate, the abnormal degradation occurs after the gradual degradation during negative AC stress. The abnormal degradation is suppressed by changing the gate material from n+ poly-Si to p+ poly-Si, and it is caused by hot holes produced by the impact ionization near the surface when electrons move from the gate toward the gate oxide. We suggest a possible mechanism to explain the improvement of degradation by using p+ poly-Si as a gate material.

  1. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard

    2016-07-01

    This grant supported basic experimental, theoretical and computer simulation research into developing a compact, high pulse repetition rate laser accelerator using the direct laser acceleration mechanism in plasma-based slow wave structures.

  2. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  3. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  4. High power, fast, microwave components based on beam generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, W. M.; Fernsler, R. F.; Gitlin, M. S.

    1998-10-01

    It is shown that the agile mirror plasma, under development as a device to simply and cheaply give electronic steering to microwave beams, also has application as a fast, electronically controlled, high power reflector, or phase shifter. In a radar system, this can lead to such applications as pulse to pulse polarization agility and electronic control of antenna gain, as well as to innovative approaches to high power millimeter wave circulators. The basic theory of the enhanced glow plasma is also developed.

  5. Pulse plasma carburizing and high pressure gas quenching -- Industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Preisser, F.; Schnatbaum, F.

    1995-12-31

    Pulse plasma carburizing with high pressure gas quenching up to 20 bar is the newly developed case hardening process now available in production size equipment. The first part of results demonstrates the tremendous potential of high pressure gas quenching for successful hardening of case hardening steels. The second part opens a window to glance at the pulse plasma carburizing of complex shaped parts. Both processes improve economical data and performance of carburizing processes.

  6. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were studied. These devices produce dense high temperature plasmas, which emit X rays of hundreds of KeV energy and one to ten billion neutrons per pulse. The processes in the devices seem related to solar flare phenomena, and would also be of interest for controlled thermonuclear fusion applications. The high intensity, short duration bursts of X rays and neutrons could also possibly be used for pumping nuclear lasers.

  7. Longxuetongluo Capsule Improves Erythrocyte Function against Lipid Peroxidation and Abnormal Hemorheological Parameters in High Fat Diet-Induced ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiao; Liu, Binglin; Lun, Qixing; Yao, Weijuan; Zhao, Yunfang; Xiao, Wei; Huang, Wenzhe; Wang, Yonghua; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Chinese dragon's blood, the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis, one of the renowned traditional medicines, has been used to facilitate blood circulation and disperse blood stasis for thousands of years. Phenolic compounds are considered to be responsible for its main biological activities. In this study, total phenolic compounds of Chinese dragon's blood were made into capsule (Longxuetongluo Capsule, LTC) and their effects on the abnormal hemorheological properties were examined by high fat diet (HFD) induced ApoE−/− mice. Compared to the model group, LTC recovered the abnormal hemorheological parameters in HFD-induced ApoE−/− mice by reducing whole blood viscosity (WBV) at high rate and improving erythrocyte function. In conclusion, LTC could ameliorate erythrocyte deformability and osmotic fragility through the reduction of lipid peroxidation on plasma and erythrocyte membranes in HFD-induced ApoE−/− mice, which supported the traditional uses of Chinese dragon's blood as an effective agent for improving blood microcirculation in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26649134

  8. Progress in Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range and employs an electromagnet to provide the external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to transition from the H-Mode to the Helicon Mode. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will place the plasma in the vacuum chamber for optical and particle probing. With the initial construction phase complete and first plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel DAQ system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, magnetic coils, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported. [4pt] [1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  9. High-current plasmas switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Aleksandr; Grabovskiy, Artiom; Murillo, Oscar; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, the level of development of spatial and earthly nuclear energetic lays down big requirements: total control possibility of current density with a stable work of the instrument in extreme conditions with a big radiation level and temperatures of 1000 K. Among the ways of solving this problem the application of key elements with binary cesium-barium plasmas are available. The results of the investigation on electro-kinetic parameters of plasma Knudsen Cs-Ba key element with big current densities are presented in this work: >The phenomenon of spontaneous current breakage, which has a big influence on the efficiency of the grid extinction, was investigated; >Unique regimes of effective grid extinction, in which the rise of modulated power is realized with a declining of the energetic cost of controlling the current of the key element, were found; >Record energetic parameters for the binary key element were obtained: at an anode potential of 50 V, stable frequencies modulation at 1-10 kHz, the electric power density of 5 kW/cm2 and the efficiency more than 95%.

  10. Atoms and plasmas in a high-magnetic-field trap

    SciTech Connect

    Raithel, G.; Knuffman, B.; Shah, M. H.; Hempel, C.; Paradis, E.; Mhaskar, R.; Zhang, X.; Choi, J.-H.; Povilus, A. P.; Guest, J. R.

    2008-08-08

    We investigate cold rubidium plasmas in a particle trap that has the unique capability to simultaneously laser-cool and trap neutral atoms as well as to confine plasmas in magnetic fields of about three Tesla. The atom trap is a high-field Ioffe-Pritchard laser trap, while the plasma trap is a Ioffe-Penning trap that traps electrons and ions in separate wells. The observed plasma dynamics is characterized by a breathing-mode oscillation of the positive (ionic) plasma component, which feeds back on the behavior of the negative (electron) component of the plasma. At higher densities, the observed oscillations become nonlinear. The electron component has been found to undergo rapid cooling. We further report on the recombination of magnetized plasmas into Rydberg atoms in transient traps and quasi-steady-state traps. In transient traps, large numbers of recombined Rydberg atoms in high-lying states are observed. In quasi-steady-state traps, the measured numbers of recombined atoms are lower and the binding energies higher.

  11. Plasma undulator excited by high-order mode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingwei; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    A laser-created plasma undulator together with a laser-plasma accelerator makes it possible to construct an economical and extremely compact XFEL. However, the spectrum spread of the radiation from the current plasma undulators is too large for XFELs, because of the different values of strength parameters. The phase slippage between the electrons and the wakefield also limits the number of the electron oscillation cycles, thus reduces the performance of XFEL. Here we proposed a phase-locked plasma undulator created by high-order mode lasers. The modulating field is uniform along the transverse direction by choosing appropriate laser intensities of the modes, which enables all the electrons oscillate with the same strength parameter. The plasma density is tapered to lock the phase between the electrons and the wakefield, which signally increases the oscillation cycles. As a result, X-ray radiation with high brightness and narrow bandwidth is generated by injecting a high-energy electron beam into the novel plasma undulator. The beam loading limit indicates that the current of the electron beam could be hundreds of Ampere. These properties imply that such a plasma undulator may have great potential in compact XFELs. This work was supported by the Helmholtz Association (Young Investigator's Group No. VH-NG-1037).

  12. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Golingo, R P; Shumlak, U; Den Hartog, D J

    2010-12-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  13. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2010-12-15

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  14. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  15. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  16. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  17. Topics in high voltage pulsed power plasma devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao

    Pulsed power technology is one of the tools that is used by scientists and engineers nowadays to produce gas plasmas. The transient ultra high power is able to provide a huge pulse of energy which is sometimes greater than the ionization energy of the gas, and therefore separates the ions and electrons to form the plasma. Sometimes, the pulsed power components themselves are plasma devices. For example, the gas type switches can "turn on" the circuit by creating the plasma channel between the switch electrodes. Mini Back Lighted Thyratron, or as we call it, mini-BLT, is one of these gas type plasma switches. The development of the reduced size and weight "mini-BLT" is presented in this dissertation. Based on the operation characteristics testing of the mini-BLT, suggestions of optimizing the design of the switch are proposed. All the factors such as the geometry of the hollow electrodes and switch housing, the gas condition, the optical triggering source, etc. are necessary to consider when we design and operate the mini-BLT. By reducing the diameter of the cylindrical gas path between the electrodes in the BLT, a novel high density plasma source is developed, producing the plasma in the "squeezed" capillary. The pulsed power generator, of course, is inevitably used to provide the ionization energy for hydrogen gas sealed in the capillary. Plasma diagnostics are necessarily analyzed and presented in detail to properly complete and understand the capillary plasma. This high density plasma source (1019 cm-3) has the potential applications in the plasma wakefield accelerator. The resonant oscillation behavior of the particles in plasmas allows for dynamically generated accelerating electric fields that have orders of magnitude larger than those available in the conventional RF accelerators. Finally, the solid state switches are introduced as a comparison to the gas type switch. Pulsed power circuit topologies such as the Marx Bank, magnetic pulse compression and diode

  18. High-order harmonics from laser-irradiated plasma surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.

    2009-04-15

    The investigation of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) of femtosecond laser pulses by means of laser-produced plasmas is surveyed. This kind of harmonic generation is an alternative to the HHG in gases and shows significantly higher conversion efficiency. Furthermore, with plasma targets there is no limitation on applicable laser intensity and thus the generated harmonics can be much more intense. In principle, harmonic light may also be generated at relativistic laser intensity, in which case their harmonic intensities may even exceed that of the focused laser pulse by many orders of magnitude. This phenomenon presents new opportunities for applications such as nonlinear optics in the extreme ultraviolet region, photoelectron spectroscopy, and opacity measurements of high-density matter with high temporal and spatial resolution. On the other hand, HHG is strongly influenced by the laser-plasma interaction itself. In particular, recent results show a strong correlation with high-energy electrons generated during the interaction process. The harmonics are a promising tool for obtaining information not only on plasma parameters such as the local electron density, but also on the presence of large electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, and the (electron) transport inside the target. This paper reviews the theoretical and experimental progress on HHG via laser-plasma interactions and discusses the prospects for applying HHG as a short-wavelength, coherent optical tool.

  19. Nucleation in plasmas at high and low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.S.; Garscadden, A.

    1994-12-31

    The nucleation processes occurring under both high-pressure and low-pressure plasma conditions have been studied and the significance of different processes for particle formation will be presented in detail. Particle nucleation and growth phenomena in plasmas are extremely important to a wide range of processes occurring under laboratory, atmospheric and astrophysical conditions. These include plasma-enhanced processing, cluster-growth mechanisms, synthesis of powders in plasma reactors, aerosol and cloud formation in planetary atmospheres, and formation of interstellar dust grains. Under most circumstances, particle formation occurs as a homogeneous nucleation process. However, at lower pressures in plasma or charged particle environments, the ions can act as condensation nuclei, and ion-induced nucleation becomes highly favored. The nucleation processes occurring under different plasma and laser vaporization conditions may be classified as in Table 1. Laser and arc vaporization processes result in high-pressure vapor sources depending mostly on the energy density striking the surface. Particle nucleation under these conditions occurs from the adiabatic expansion and cooling of the ejected vapor. The very high saturation ratios for materials like carbon and silicon under such conditions makes homogeneous nucleation the dominant mechanism for cluster and particle formations.

  20. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  1. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, James; Graziani, Frank; Marinak, Marty; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  2. Plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Eun H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, J. H.; Nguyen, D. X.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressures for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff were about 120 mTorr less than P(sub opt) less than 450 Torr for He and N2. For Argon 20 mTorr is less than P(sub opt) is less than 5 Torr. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of the inverse pinch switch with the plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. In order to assess the effects of plasma current density on material erosion of electrodes, emissions from both an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) and from a spark gap switch under test were studied with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The color temperature of the argon plasma was approximately 4,000 K which corresponded with the peak continuum emission near 750 nm. There are the strong line emissions of argon in the 650 - 800 nm range and a lack of line emissions of copper and other solid material used in the switch. This indicates that the plasma current density during closing is low and the hot spot or hot filament in the switch is negligible. This result also indicates considerable reduction of line emission with the INPIStron switch over that of a spark-gap switch. However, a strong carbon

  3. Plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Han, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressures for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff were about 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 450 Torr for He and N2. For Argon 120 mTorr less than P(opt) less than 5 Torr for argon. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of the inverse pinch switch with the plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. In order to assess the effects of plasma current density on material erosion of electrodes, emissions from both an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) and from a spark gap switch under test were studied with an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The color temperature of the argon plasma was approximately 4,000 K which corresponded with the peak continuum emission near 750 nm. There are the strong line emissions of argon in the 650 - 800 nm range and a lack of line emissions of copper and other solid material used in the switch. This indicates that the plasma current density during closing is low and the hot spot or hot filament in the switch is negligible. This result also indicates considerable reduction of line emission with the INPIStron switch over that of a spark-gap switch. However, a strong carbon line

  4. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  5. Plasma Interaction with International Space Station High Voltage Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, John W.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is presently being assembled in low-earth orbit (LEO) operating high voltage solar arrays (-160 V max, -140 V typical with respect to the ambient atmosphere). At the station's present altitude, there exists substantial ambient plasma that can interact with the solar arrays. The biasing of an object to an electric potential immersed in plasma creates a plasma "sheath" or non-equilibrium plasma around the object to mask out the electric fields. A positively biased object can collect electrons from the plasma sheath and the sheath will draw a current from the surrounding plasma. This parasitic current can enter the solar cells and effectively "short out" the potential across the cells, reducing the power that can be generated by the panels. Predictions of collected current based on previous high voltage experiments (SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment), PASP+ (Photovoltaic Array Space Power) were on the order of amperes of current. However, present measurements of parasitic current are on the order of several milliamperes, and the current collection mainly occurs during an "eclipse exit" event, i.e., when the space station comes out of darkness. This collection also has a time scale, t approx. 1000 s, that is much slower than any known plasma interaction time scales. The reason for the discrepancy between predictions and present electron collection is not understood and is under investigation by the PCU (Plasma Contactor Unit) "Tiger" team. This paper will examine the potential structure within and around the solar arrays, and the possible causes and reasons for the electron collection of the array.

  6. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  7. Numerical Studies of High-Z Plasma in the HyperV Plasma Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linchun; Messer, Sarah; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Phillips, Mike; Bogatu, I. Nick; Galkin, Sergei; Macfarlane, Joe; Golovkin, Igor

    2010-11-01

    Numerical studies of railguns and coaxial guns at HyperV Technologies Corp. include simulations of hypervelocity plasma transport in the gun, plasma expansion out of the nozzle, and two or more jets merging in vacuum. Plasma detachment, merging jets temperature and charge state evolution are examined in these processes. High-Z materials, such as argon and xenon, are used throughout these simulations. The plasma moves with an initial velocity of 0-10 km/s (80-100 km/s for jet merging), the initial number density ranges from 10^15cm-3 to 10^18cm-3, and the merging jets are several centimeters in radius. The LSP code is used to perform the simulations using improved fluid algorithms and equation-of-state models from Voss and atomic data from Prism.

  8. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Yu, He; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-06-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high ne peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, ne increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped ne and Te data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (Vp) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower Te and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  9. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Crilly, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. With the initial construction phase complete and repeatable plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  10. Experimental studies of linear high-beta heliac plasma configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, C.M.; Koepke, M.E.; Ribe, F.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The formation and quasi-equilibrium of a high-beta heliac plasma are investigated in the High-Beta Q Machine (Phys. Fluids {bold 30}, 2885 (1987)), a linear high-beta {ital l}=1 stellarator with an internal current carrying conductor (hardcore). The hardcore current rise time is varied from 9 {mu}sec to smaller values comparable with that of the main compression field (450 nsec). Flux contours and plasma pressure calculated from internal magnetic-probe measurements are used to distinguish between nearly axisymmetric plasma confined near the hardcore and the heliac plasma confined near the magnetic axis. For the shorter hardcore rise times, the axisymmetric plasma pressure becomes small compared to that of the heliac. Further analysis of the data allows calculation of the currents flowing in the plasma, the rotational transform, and the magnetic well depth. Appreciable axial current is observed, consistent with induction by the changing magnetic fields during the heliac formation. The observed relationship between the axial current and rotational transform is confirmed by computer modeling using the HASE magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium code (Nucl. Fusion {bold 23}, 1061 (1983)).

  11. Influence of abnormally high leptin levels during pregnancy on metabolic phenotypes in progeny mice.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Elena N; Chepeleva, Elena V; Panchenko, Polina E; Bazhan, Nadezhda M

    2013-12-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in offspring, and obesity is accompanied by an increase in blood leptin levels. The "yellow" mutation at the mouse agouti locus (A(y)) increases blood leptin levels in C57BL preobese pregnant mice without affecting other metabolic characteristics. We investigated the influence of the A(y) mutation or leptin injection at the end of pregnancy in C57BL mice on metabolic phenotypes and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in offspring. In both C57BL-A(y) and leptin-treated mice, the maternal effect was more pronounced in male offspring. Compared with males born to control mothers, males born to A(y) mothers displayed equal food intake (FI) but decreased body weight (BW) gain after weaning, equal glucose tolerance, and enhanced FI-to-BW ratios on the standard diet but the same FI and BW on the high-fat diet. Males born to A(y) mothers were less responsive to the anorectic effect of exogenous leptin and less resistant to fasting (were not hyperphagic and gained less weight during refeeding after food deprivation) compared with males born to control mothers. However, all progeny displayed equal hypothalamic expression of Agouti gene-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and equal plasma leptin and glucose levels after food deprivation. Leptin injections in C57BL mice on day 17 of pregnancy decreased BW in both male and female offspring but inhibited FI and DIO only in male offspring. Our results show that hyperleptinemia during pregnancy has sex-specific long-term effects on energy balance regulation in progeny and does not predispose offspring to developing obesity.

  12. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Green, David L; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, Lee A; Chen, Guangye; Ryan, Philip Michael; Canik, John

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  13. Plasma formation in water vapour layers in high conductivity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, C. P.; Schaper, L.; Stalder, K. R.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-10-01

    The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current-voltage characteristics) they can be correlated with the spectra features. Initial measurements reveal two apparently different plasma formations. Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line indicate electron densities of 3 to 5 ×1020 m-3 for plasmas produced early in the voltage pulse and an order of magnitude less for the later plasmas. The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current

  14. Do Subjects at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis Differ from those with a Genetic High Risk? – A Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Brain Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Smieskova, R; Marmy, J; Schmidt, A; Bendfeldt, K; Riecher-Rössler, A; Walter, M; Lang, UE; Borgwardt, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Pre-psychotic and early psychotic characteristics are investigated in the high-risk (HR) populations for psychosis. There are two different approaches based either on hereditary factors (genetic high risk, G-HR) or on the clinically manifested symptoms (clinical high risk, C-HR). Common features are an increased risk for development of psychosis and similar cognitive as well as structural and functional brain abnormalities. Methods: We reviewed the existing literature on longitudinal structural, and on functional imaging studies, which included G-HR and/or C-HR individuals for psychosis, healthy controls (HC) and/or first episode of psychosis (FEP) or schizophrenia patients (SCZ). Results: With respect to structural brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with deficits in frontal, temporal, and cingulate regions in HR, with additional insular and caudate deficits in C-HR population. Furthermore, C-HR had progressive prefrontal deficits related to the transition to psychosis. With respect to functional brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with prefrontal, cingulate and middle temporal abnormalities in HR, with additional parietal, superior temporal, and insular abnormalities in C-HR population. Transition-to-psychosis related differences emphasized prefrontal, hippocampal and striatal components, more often detectable in C-HR population. Multimodal studies directly associated psychotic symptoms displayed in altered prefrontal and hippocampal activations with striatal dopamine and thalamic glutamate functions. Conclusion: There is an evidence for similar structural and functional brain abnormalities within the whole HR population, with more pronounced deficits in the C-HR population. The most consistent evidence for abnormality in the prefrontal cortex reported in structural, functional and multimodal studies of HR population may underlie the complexity of higher cognitive functions that are impaired

  15. High-Energy Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A high-energy (28 kJ per pulse) two-stage pulsed plasma thruster (MSFC PPT-1) has been constructed and tested. The motivation of this project is to develop a high power (approximately 500 kW), high specific impulse (approximately 10000 s), highly efficient (greater than 50%) thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high power nuclear electric propulsion system. PPT-1 was designed to overcome four negative characteristics which have detracted from the utility of pulsed plasma thrusters: poor electrical efficiency, poor propellant utilization efficiency, electrode erosion, and reliability issues associated with the use of high speed gas valves and high current switches. Traditional PPTs have been plagued with poor efficiency because they have not been operated in a plasma regime that fully exploits the potential benefits of pulsed plasma acceleration by electromagnetic forces. PPTs have generally been used to accelerate low-density plasmas with long current pulses. Operation of thrusters in this plasma regime allows for the development of certain undesirable particle-kinetic effects, such as Hall effect-induced current sheet canting. PPT-1 was designed to propel a highly collisional, dense plasma that has more fluid-like properties and, hence, is more effectively pushed by a magnetic field. The high-density plasma loading into the second stage of the accelerator is achieved through the use of a dense plasma injector (first stage). The injector produces a thermal plasma, derived from a molten lithium propellant feed system, which is subsequently accelerated by the second stage using mega-amp level currents, which eject the plasma at a speed on the order of 100 kilometers per second. Traditional PPTs also suffer from dynamic efficiency losses associated with snowplow loading of distributed neutral propellant. The twostage scheme used in PPT-I allows the propellant to be loaded in a manner which more closely approximates the optimal slug loading. Lithium propellant

  16. Dust Accelerators And Their Applications In High-Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang Zhehui

    2011-06-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Although much effort has been devoted to getting rid of the dust nuisance, there are instances where a controlled use of dust can be beneficial. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  17. Dust accelerators and their applications in high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Ticos, Catakin M

    2010-01-01

    The perennial presence of dust in high-temperature plasma and fusion devices has been firmly established. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular in the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and potentially interfere with fusion energy production. Much effort has been devoted to gening rid of the dust nuisance. We have recognized a number of dust-accelerators applications in magnetic fusion, including in plasma diagnostics, in studying dust-plasma interactions, and more recently in edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. With the applications in mind, we will compare various acceleration methods, including electrostatic, gas-drag, and plasma-drag acceleration. We will also describe laboratory experiments and results on dust acceleration.

  18. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Green, D L; Berry, L A; Chen, G; Ryan, P M; Canik, J M; Jaeger, E F

    2011-09-30

    Observations of improved radio frequency (rf) heating efficiency in ITER relevant high-confinement (H-)mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. The steady-state rf electric field is calculated for various antenna spectra and the results examined for characteristics that correlate with observations of improved or reduced rf heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave numbers that give fast-wave propagation in the scrape-off plasma excites large amplitude (∼kV m(-1)) coaxial standing modes between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggests that these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency.

  19. The behavior of the electron plasma boundary in ultraintense laser–highly overdense plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Sanz, J.; Debayle, A.; Lehmann, G.

    2014-12-15

    The structural stability of the laser/plasma interaction is discussed, for the case of a linearly polarized laser beam interacting with a solid at normal incidence. Using a semi-analytical cold fluid model, the dynamics of the electron plasma boundary (EPB), usually related to the high-order harmonic generation and laser absorption, are presented. While the well-known J × B plasma oscillations at two times the laser frequency are recovered by the model, several other periodic in time stable solutions exist for exactly the same value of the physical parameters. This novel behavior highlights the importance of the laser pulse history among other factors. Some important features, such as the synchronization between the incident laser and the EPB oscillation, depend on the solution under consideration. A description of the possible types of stable oscillations in a parametric plane involving plasma density and laser amplitude is presented. The semi-analytical model is compared with particle-in-cell and semi-Lagrangian Vlasov simulations. They show that, among all the stable solutions, the plasma preferentially evolves to a state with the EPB oscillating twice faster than the laser. The effect of the plasma temperature and the existence of a ramp in the ion density profile are also discussed.

  20. High repetition rate plasma mirror device for attosecond science

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, A.; Douillet, D.; Iaquaniello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.-P.

    2014-01-15

    This report describes an active solid target positioning device for driving plasma mirrors with high repetition rate ultra-high intensity lasers. The position of the solid target surface with respect to the laser focus is optically monitored and mechanically controlled on the nm scale to ensure reproducible interaction conditions for each shot at arbitrary repetition rate. We demonstrate the target capabilities by driving high-order harmonic generation from plasma mirrors produced on glass targets with a near-relativistic intensity few-cycle pulse laser system operating at 1 kHz. During experiments, residual target surface motion can be actively stabilized down to 47 nm (root mean square), which ensures sub-300-as relative temporal stability of the plasma mirror as a secondary source of coherent attosecond extreme ultraviolet radiation in pump-probe experiments.

  1. A functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study of neurohemodynamic abnormalities during emotion processing in subjects at high risk for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Puthumana, Dawn Thomas K.; Jayakumar, Peruvumba N.; Gangadhar, B. N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Emotion processing abnormalities are considered among the core deficits in schizophrenia. Subjects at high risk (HR) for schizophrenia also show these deficits. Structural neuroimaging studies examining unaffected relatives at high risk for schizophrenia have demonstrated neuroanatomical abnormalities involving neo-cortical and sub-cortical brain regions related to emotion processing. The brain functional correlates of emotion processing in these HR subjects in the context of ecologically valid, real-life dynamic images using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has not been examined previously. Aim: To examine the neurohemodynamic abnormalities during emotion processing in unaffected subjects at high risk for schizophrenia in comparison with age-, sex-, handedness- and education-matched healthy controls, using fMRI. Materials and Methods: HR subjects for schizophrenia (n=17) and matched healthy controls (n=16) were examined. The emotion processing of fearful facial expression was examined using a culturally appropriate and valid tool for Indian subjects. The fMRI was performed in a 1.5-T scanner during an implicit emotion processing paradigm. The fMRI analyses were performed using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 2 (SPM2) software. Results: HR subjects had significantly reduced brain activations in left insula, left medial frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, right cingulate gyrus, right precentral gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule. Hypothesis-driven region-of-interest analysis revealed hypoactivation of right amygdala in HR subjects. Conclusions: Study findings suggest that neurohemodynamic abnormalities involving limbic and frontal cortices could be potential indicators for increased vulnerability toward schizophrenia. The clinical utility of these novel findings in predicting the development of psychosis needs to be evaluated. PMID:21267363

  2. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  3. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  4. Magnetospheric plasma studies using data from the dynamics explorer high and low altitude plasma instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, J. N.

    1986-02-01

    The reported research focused primarily upon plasma processes in and near the plasma cusp. The following areas were studied: plasma injection and transport in the mid-altitude polar cusp; observations of counterstreaming electrons at high altitudes; observations of upward electron beams and their relationship to region 1 Birkeland currents; observations of the electron population responsible for the 6300A SAR arc emission, polar rain observations; polar wind observations; and observations of ion and electron acceleration events produced by parallel electric fields. The primary observing platform for the research reported here was Dynamic Explorer 1 (DE-1). The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) consists of five electrostatic analyzers mounted in a fan-shaped angular array at angles of 45, 78, 90, 102, and 135 deg. with respect to the spacecraft spin axis. Each analyzer makes differential measurements of electrons and positive ions over an energy/charge range of 5 eV/e to 32 keV/e. Energy stepping proceeds at commandable rates of up to 64 sec, providing three-dimensional plasma distribution functions at the six second spin rate or DE-1.

  5. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Frank, John; Karama, Jackson; Hopson, Jordan; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas (~ 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  6. Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (10 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX is completing construction of triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and is designing a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  7. Updates to the Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phil; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Emami, Tooran; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas ( 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations are being developed and tested. Progress on the construction of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, and magnetic coils, along with observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  8. Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet emission from high-Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Higashiguchi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Suzuki, C.; Tomita, K.; Nishikino, M.; Fujioka, S.; Endo, A.; Li, B.; Otsuka, T.; Dunne, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray sources in the 2 to 7 nm spectral region related to the beyond EUV (BEUV) question at 6.x nm and the water window source based on laser-produced high-Z plasmas. Resonance emission from multiply charged ions merges to produce intense unresolved transition arrays (UTAs), extending below the carbon K edge (4.37 nm). An outline of a microscope design for single-shot live cell imaging is proposed based on high-Z plasma UTA source, coupled to multilayer mirror optics.

  9. Alternative Coordinate Systems for High Latitude Ionospheric Plasma Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    altitude nuclear tests were conducted at magnetic L-shells of ahout two or less, mid latitudes because of the location of CrOIls). The scope of current...AL-AIS 851 ALTERNATIVE COORDINATE SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LATITUDE IONOSPHERIC PLASMA STUDI.. U| MISSION RESEARCH CORP SANTA MARBARA CA D J MALOOF ET AL. IS...5 𔄁 r1 AD-A156 851 r DNA-TR-84-56 ALTERNATIVE COORDINATE SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LATITUDE IONOSPHERIC PLASMA STUDIES D.J. Maloof W.W. White Mission

  10. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  11. Using Plasma Physics to Enhance the High School Physics Curriculu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J.; Buck, M.; Gekelman, W.; Buck, R.; Spahn, C.; Walker, C.; Layton, W.

    2001-10-01

    Faculty and student members of the Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) have constructed a plasma machine on the ULCA. Dr. Gekelman, the faculty advisor, provides information and materials on plasma physics via the Web and lectures to high school faculty and students. Faculty members then transfer the information to students at their respective schools and schedule time for experiments on the machine. A lab manual and curricular materials suitable for high school students is being developed using a lab based, discovery approach. The manual is available as a pdf document on the LAPTAG website (http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag/plasma_exp.dir/laptag_plasma.htm). Introducing plasma physics into the high school curriculum provides a 20th century application of classical physics concepts that support and motivate student interest in physics. Students from LAPTAG schools use state-of-the-art computers, software, and equipment to perform developed labs and to design experiments of their own. Collaboration exists between students and faculty from different schools and the university. Learning physics concepts takes place in the context of a "science community" that realistically demonstrates the scientific process to students.

  12. Self-sustained focusing of high-density streaming plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A.; Dobrovolskiy, A.; Goncharov, A.; Gushenets, V.; Litovko, I.; Naiko, I.; Oks, E.

    2017-01-01

    We describe our observations of the transport through an electrostatic plasma lens of a wide-aperture, high-current, low energy, metal-ion plasma flow produced by a cathodic arc discharge. The lens input aperture was 80 mm, the length of the lens was 140 mm, and there were three electrostatic ring electrodes located in a magnetic field formed by permanent magnets. The lens outer electrodes were grounded and the central electrode was biased up to -3 kV. The plasma was a copper plasma with directed (streaming) ion energy 20-40 eV, and the equivalent ion current was up to several amperes depending on the potential applied to the central lens electrode. We find that when the central lens electrode is electrically floating, the current density of the plasma flow at the lens focus increases by up to 40%-50%, a result that is in good agreement with a theoretical treatment based on plasma-optical principles of magnetic insulation of electrons and equipotentialization along magnetic field lines. When the central lens electrode is biased negatively, an on-axis stream of energetic electrons is formed, which can also provide a mechanism for focusing of the plasma flow. Optical emission spectra under these conditions show an increase in intensity of lines corresponding to both copper atoms and singly charged copper ions, indicating the presence of fast electrons within the lens volume. These energetic electrons, as well as accumulating on-axis and providing ion focusing, can also assist in reducing the microdroplet component in the dense, low-temperature, metal plasma.

  13. High-density operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Parish, C. M.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Donovan, D.; Piotrowicz, P. A.; Martin, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity RF plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with ion and electron heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration with the goal of delivering a plasma heat flux of 10 MW/m2 at a target. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz RF power at levels of >100 kW. A 30 kW ion cyclotron antenna has recently been installed, and microwaves at 28 GHz ( 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). High plasma densities near the target have been produced in D ( 5 x1019/m3) , and electron temperatures range from 3 to >10 eV, depending on the source parameters. IR camera images of the target plate indicate plasma heat depositions >10 MW/m2 for some operating conditions. Details of the experimental results of the operational domain with respect to Te and ne as well as results from initial plasma material interaction tests will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  14. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  15. Plasma-based polarization modulator for high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Manipulation of laser pulses at high intensities is an important yet challenging issue. New types of plasma-based optical devices are promising alternatives to achieve this goal. Here we propose to modulate the polarization state of intense lasers based on oblique reflection from solid-plasma surfaces. A new analytical description is presented considering the plasma as an uniaxial medium that causes birefringence effect. Particle-in-cell simulation results numerically demonstrate that such a scheme can provide a tunable polarization control of the laser pulses even in the relativistic regime. The results are thus relevant for the design of compact, easy to use, and versatile polarization modulators for high-intensity laser pulses.

  16. A high temperature, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.; Britten, J.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Scrivener, M.S.; Unites, W.G.; Campbell, J.H. ); Johnson, W.L. )

    1990-02-01

    We have designed and built a high-temperature, plasma-assisted, chemical vapor deposition system to deposit multilayer optical coatings of SiO{sub 2} and doped-SiO{sub 2} flat substrates. The coater concept and design is an outgrowth of our recent work with Schott Glasswerke demonstrating the use of plasma assisted CVD to prepare very high damage threshold optical coatings. The coater is designed to deposit up to several thousand alternating quarterwave layers of SiO{sub 2} and doped SiO{sub 2} substrate at deposition rates up to several microns per minute. The substrate is resistively heated to about 1000{degree}C during the deposition phase of the process. The plasma is driven by a 13.56 MHz RF unit capable of producing power densities of up to 140 W cm{sup {minus}3} in the reaction zone. The coater is designed to be adaptable to microwave generated plasmas, as well as RF. Reactant gas flow rates of up to 10 slm can be achieved at a 10 tar operating pressure. Reactants consist of O{sub 2}, SiCl{sub 4} and a volatile halogenated dopant. These gases react in the plasma volume producing SiO{sub 2} with dopant concentrations of up to a few percent. A variable dopant concentration is used to produce index differences between adjacent optical layers.

  17. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  18. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  20. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  1. On impurity handling in high performance stellarator/heliotron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhenn, R.; Feng, Y.; Ida, K.; Maassberg, H.; McCarthy, K. J.; Kalinina, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Nozato, H.; Okamura, S.; Sudo, S.; Suzuki, C.; Tamura, N.; Weller, A.; Yoshinuma, M.; Zurro, B.

    2009-06-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X, under construction) are experiments specially designed to demonstrate long-pulse (quasi steady state) operation, which is an intrinsic property of stellarators and heliotrons. Significant progress has been made in establishing high performance plasmas. A crucial point is the increasing impurity confinement at high density observed at several machines (TJ-II, W7-AS, LHD) which can lead to impurity accumulation and early pulse termination by radiation collapse. In addition, theoretical predictions for non-axisymmetric configurations predict the absence of impurity screening by ion temperature gradients in standard ion-root plasmas. Nevertheless, scenarios were found where impurity accumulation was successfully avoided in LHD and W7-AS due to the onset of friction forces in the (high density and low temperature) scrape-off-layer (SOL), the generation of magnetic islands at the plasma boundary and to a certain degree also by edge localized modes, flushing out impurities and reducing the net impurity influx into the core. In both the W7-AS high density H-mode regime and in the case of application of sufficient electron cyclotron radiation heating power a reduction in impurity core confinement was observed. The exploration of such purification mechanisms is a demanding task for successful steady-state operation. Impurity transport at the plasma edge/SOL was identified to play a major role for the global impurity behaviour in addition to the core confinement.

  2. High-Altitude Plasma Instrument for Dynamics Explorer-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Blevins, V. A.; Eaker, N.; Gibson, W. C.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1981-12-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A High-Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) will make differential measurements of the velocity-space distributions of electrons and positive ions over the energy/charge range of 5 eV to 32 keV. Five identical analyzers, each making simultaneous measurements of electrons and positive ions at 64 possible energy levels, will have viewing angles of 45, 78, 90, 102, and 135 deg relative to the spacecraft spin axis. The HAPI data will contribute to the overall Dynamics Explorer science objectives, particularly by providing information on the hot-plasma effects of the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum within the earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

  3. High-Altitude Plasma Instrument for Dynamics Explorer-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Blevins, V. A.; Eaker, N.; Gibson, W. C.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A High-Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) will make differential measurements of the velocity-space distributions of electrons and positive ions over the energy/charge range of 5 eV to 32 keV. Five identical analyzers, each making simultaneous measurements of electrons and positive ions at 64 possible energy levels, will have viewing angles of 45, 78, 90, 102, and 135 deg relative to the spacecraft spin axis. The HAPI data will contribute to the overall Dynamics Explorer science objectives, particularly by providing information on the hot-plasma effects of the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum within the earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

  4. High frequency plasma generators for ion thruster applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Komatsu, G. K.; Christensen, T.

    1981-01-01

    Two concepts for high frequency discharge ion thrusters are described. Both sources are designed for use with 30 cm grid sets and argon propellant and utilize multi-cusp permanent magnet geometries for plasma confinement. The RF induction source is a conventional design representing a synthesis of the RIT and multi-cusp concepts. The preliminary data (without system optimization) indicate a discharge efficiency comparable to that obtained in 30 cm hollow cathode multi-cusp argon thrusters. The electron cyclotron heating source is electrodeless and exhibits plasma characteristics which should lead to greatly reduced discharge chamber and screen sputter rates with the optimization of the magnetic fields, microwave frequency, and feed configuration.

  5. Internal Kink Mode Dynamics in High-{beta} NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Menard; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; S.S. Medley; W. Park; S.A. Sabbagh; A. Sontag; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; W. Zhu; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-12-22

    Saturated internal kink modes have been observed in many of the highest toroidal beta discharges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These modes often cause rotation flattening in the plasma core, can degrade energy confinement, and in some cases contribute to the complete loss of plasma angular momentum and stored energy. Characteristics of the modes are measured using soft X-ray, kinetic profile, and magnetic diagnostics. Toroidal flows approaching Alfvenic speeds, island pressure peaking, and enhanced viscous and diamagnetic effects associated with high-beta may contribute to mode nonlinear stabilization. These saturation mechanisms are investigated for NSTX parameters and compared to experimental data.

  6. Internal Kink Mode Dynamics in High-beta NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Menard; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; S.S. Medley; W. Park; S.A. Sabbagh; A. Sontag; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; W. Zhu; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-12-22

    Saturated internal kink modes have been observed in many of the highest toroidal {beta} discharges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These modes often cause rotation flattening in the plasma core, can degrade energy confinement, and in some cases contribute to the complete loss of plasma angular momentum and stored energy. Characteristics of the modes are measured using soft X-ray, kinetic profile, and magnetic diagnostics. Toroidal flows approaching Alfvenic speeds, island pressure peaking, and enhanced viscous and diamagnetic effects associated with high-{beta} may contribute to mode nonlinear stabilization. These saturation mechanisms are investigated for NSTX parameters and compared to experimental data.

  7. A HIGH REPETITION PLASMA MIRROR FOR STAGED ELECTRON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Osterhoff, Jens; Evans, Eugene; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-22

    In order to build a compact, staged laser plasma accelerator the in-coupling of the laser beam to the different stages represents one of the key issues. To limit the spatial foot print and thus to realize a high overall acceleration gradient, a concept has to be found which realizes this in-coupling within a few centimeters. We present experiments on a tape-drive based plasma mirror which could be used to reflect the focused laser beam into the acceleration stage.

  8. A morphologic study of the airway structure abnormalities in patients with asthma by high-resolution computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Jian; Du, Wen; Zhang, Lan-Lan; He, Li-Xiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Airway structure changes, termed as airway remodeling, are common in asthma patients due to chronic inflammation, which can be assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Considering the controversial conclusions in the correlation of morphologic abnormalities with clinical feature and outcome, we aimed to further specify and evaluate the structural abnormalities of Chinese asthmatics by HRCT. Methods From August 2012 to February 2015, outpatients with asthma were recruited consecutively in the Asthma Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University. Standard HRCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) were performed to collect information of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation, mucus impaction, emphysema, mosaic perfusion, atelectasis, and spirometric parameters. We reported the incidence of each structural abnormality in HRCT and compared it among different asthmatic severities. Results A total of 123 asthmatics were enrolled, among which 84 (68.3%) were female and 39 (31.7%) were male. At least one structural abnormality was detected by HRCT in 85.4% asthmatics, and the incidence of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation, mucus impaction, emphysema, mosaic perfusion, and atelectasis was 57.7%, 51.2%, 22%, 24.4%, 5.7% and 1.6%, respectively. The incidences of bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilation and emphysema were significantly increased by asthma severity (P<0.05), while incidences of mucus impaction (26/27, 96.30%), mosaic perfusion (6/7, 85.71%) and atelectasis (2/2, 100%) were mainly found in severe asthma. We found a longer asthma history (28.13±18.55 years, P<0.001, P=0.003), older age (51.30±10.70 years, P=0.022, P=0.006) and lower predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%) (41.97±15.19, P<0.001, P<0.001) and ratio of forced expiratory volume to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) (48.01±9.55, P<0.001, P<0.001) in patients with severe bronchial dilation compared with those in

  9. Ideal Laser Beam Propagation through high temperature ignition hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N; Dixit, S; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-09-20

    We demonstrate that a blue (3{omega}, 351 nm) laser beam with an intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W-cm{sup -2} propagates within the original beam cone through a 2-mm long, T{sub e}=3.5 keV high density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) plasma. The beam produced less than 1% total backscatter; the resulting transmission is greater than 90%. Scaling of the electron temperature in the plasma shows that the plasma becomes transparent for uniform electron temperatures above 3 keV. These results are consistent with linear theory thresholds for both filamentation and backscatter instabilities inferred from detailed hydrodynamic simulations. This provides a strong justification for current inertial confinement fusion designs to remain below these thresholds.

  10. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  11. Plasma-polymerized methyl methacrylate via intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure micro-plasma for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Sang; Ballato, John; Kim, Sung-O.; Clemson University Team

    2013-09-01

    Poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA, has been widely used as a biocompatible material in bone cement, dental fillings, and many other bio-related applications. Vacuum plasmas and radio frequency (RF) atmospheric plasmas are the most common methods for depositing plasma-derived thin films and nanoparticles. However, the necessary equipment is difficult to operate and maintain as well as being large and expensive. Here, we report the use of a novel intense and highly energetic atmospheric pressure plasma jet array using direct plasma jet-to-jet coupling effects to deposit high quality plasma-polymerized MMA (PPMMA) for bio-medical applications. The newly proposed atmospheric pressure micro-plasma jet array device can generate the intense plasma mode with a strong plasma emission and high plasma particle energy. PPMMA was successfully deposited on a variety of substrates and characterized by SEM, AFM, and FT-IR. The micro-plasma jet is obtained at a sinusoidal voltage with a peak value of 30 kV and frequency of 35 kHz. Argon gas was employed as the discharge gas for plasma generation and its flow rate was in the range of 2230 sccm, Methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer was vaporized by means of a glass bubbler which was supplied by argon gas with flow rates in the range of 268 sccm from room temperature to 400°C. The deposited PPMMA thin films were flexible, transparent, thin, and strong on metal substrates.

  12. Great apes show highly selective plasma carotenoids and have physiologically high plasma retinyl esters compared to humans.

    PubMed

    García, Ada L; Raila, Jens; Koebnick, Corinna; Eulenberger, Klaus; Schweigert, Florian J

    2006-10-01

    Great apes are the closest living relatives of humans. Physiological similarities between great apes and humans provide clues to identify which biological features in humans are primitive or derived from great apes. Vitamin A (VA) and carotenoid metabolism have been only partially studied in great apes, and comparisons between great apes and humans are not available. We aimed to investigate VA and carotenoid intake and plasma concentrations in great apes living in captivity, and to compare them to healthy humans. Dietary intakes of humans (n = 20) and, among the great apes, chimpanzees (n = 15) and orangutans (n = 5) were calculated. Plasma retinol (ROH), retinol-binding protein (RBP), retinyl esters, and major carotenoids were analyzed. The great ape diet was higher in VA than in humans, due to high intake of provitamin A carotenoids. Plasma ROH concentrations in great apes were similar to those in humans, but retinyl esters were higher in great apes than in humans. Differences in plasma carotenoid concentrations were observed between great apes and humans. Lutein was the main carotenoid in great apes, while beta-carotene was the main carotenoid for humans. RBP concentrations did not differ between great apes and humans. The molar ratio of ROH to RBP was close to 1.0 in both great apes and humans. In conclusion, great apes show homeostatic ROH regulation, with high but physiological retinyl esters circulating in plasma. Furthermore, great apes show great selectivity in their plasmatic carotenoid concentration, which is not explained by dietary intake.

  13. Transport studies in high-performance field reversed configuration plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Barnes, D. C.; Dettrick, S. A.; Trask, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Hubbard, K.; Korepanov, S.; Thompson, M. C.; Zhai, K.; Tajima, T.

    2016-05-01

    A significant improvement of field reversed configuration (FRC) lifetime and plasma confinement times in the C-2 plasma, called High Performance FRC regime, has been observed with neutral beam injection (NBI), improved edge stability, and better wall conditioning [Binderbauer et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 056110 (2015)]. A Quasi-1D (Q1D) fluid transport code has been developed and employed to carry out transport analysis of such C-2 plasma conditions. The Q1D code is coupled to a Monte-Carlo code to incorporate the effect of fast ions, due to NBI, on the background FRC plasma. Numerically, the Q1D transport behavior with enhanced transport coefficients (but with otherwise classical parametric dependencies) such as 5 times classical resistive diffusion, classical thermal ion conductivity, 20 times classical electron thermal conductivity, and classical fast ion behavior fit with the experimentally measured time evolution of the excluded flux radius, line-integrated density, and electron/ion temperature. The numerical study shows near sustainment of poloidal flux for nearly 1 ms in the presence of NBI.

  14. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Spectroscopy Measurements on Ablation Testing in High Enthalpy Plasma Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    stagnation point, are located on the ablative material sample. 3.5 InfraRed THERMOGRAPHY Surface temperature measurement is a topic of great concern...high temperature material at two different narrow wavelengths. The temperature is calculated by building the ratio of the radiation intensities. The...this work is to develop the capability of testing and characterization of ablative materials exposed to high enthalpy plasma flows including both

  17. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  18. One method of producing a high-temperature dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternovoi, V. Ya.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.

    2009-05-01

    This paper considers the interaction between an absolutely rigid wall or a steel plate and the rarefaction wave arising in solid deuterium when a 30-150 GPa shock wave arrives at the free surface. It is shown that, in the entropy trace near the wall or interface with the plate, a high-temperature plasma arises, in which a thermonuclear fusion is possible, at least, for shock-wave pressures above 70 GPa. The dimension of the plasma region and the time of its establishment are proportional to the distance between the free surface and the wall. Estimates of the proportionality coefficients are given. It is noted that, in this case, unlike in other methods of high-temperature plasma generation, the time of existence of the plasma may not depend on the sound velocity in it. It is shown that, by using a conical solid-state target wit an exit hole, the shock-wave pressure in solid deuterium can be increased from 10 to 100 GPa.

  19. The Challenges of High-Power Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2004-11-01

    Our future space explorers face many challenges but three loom high above the rest: physiological debilitation, radiation and psychological stress. Counter-measures are presently being considered to ameliorate these difficulties; however, two new developments are required: abundant space power and advanced propulsion. Also, electric propulsion, long relegated to low-power thrusters, has been reinvigorated by interest in multi-megawatt plasma propulsion. One rapidly evolving concept, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR,) borrows heavily from magnetic fusion research, particularly on RF plasma generation and heating in mirror-like geometries. Axial momentum is obtained by expansion of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle. The configuration could enable thrust and specific impulse variation, at constant power, allowing in-flight mission performance optimization. VASIMR technology, and similar others, could be validated, in the near term, on the International Space Station, where they can benefit from a container-less environment and virtually infinite vacuum. The experiments could also help re-boost the orbital facility. This paper describes the advantages and operational motivation for high-power plasma rockets, illustrated through the VASIMR research effort.

  20. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  1. High temperature plasma in beta Lyrae, observed from Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Hack, M.; Hutchings, J. B.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Plavec, M.; Polidan, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution UV spectrophotometry of the complex close binary system beta Lyrae was performed with a telescope spectrometer on board Copernicus. Observations were made at phases 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 with resolutions of 0.2 A (far-UV) and 0.4 A (mid-UV). The far-UV spectrum is completely dominated by emission lines indicating the existence of a high-temperature plasma in this binary. The spectrum of this object is unlike that of any other object observed from Copernicus. It is believed that this high-temperature plasma results from dynamic mass transfer taking place in the binary. The current results are compared with OAO-2 observations and other observational results. The possibility that the secondary component is a collapsed object is also discussed; the Copernicus observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the spectroscopically invisible secondary component is a black hole.

  2. Relatively high plasma density in low pressure inductive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured in a low pressure argon inductive discharge. As radio frequency (RF) power increases, discharge mode is changed from E-mode (capacitively coupled) to H-mode (inductively coupled) and the EEPFs evolve from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Maxwellian distribution. It is found that the plasma densities at low RF powers (<30 W) are much higher than the density predicted from the slope of the densities at high powers. Because high portion of high energy electrons of the bi-Maxwellian distribution lowers the collisional energy loss and low electron temperature of low energy electrons reduces particle loss rate at low powers. Therefore, the energy loss of plasma decreases and electron densities become higher at low powers.

  3. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  4. Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency plasma in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, T.; Mukasa, S.; Takemori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kurokawa, K.; Toyota, H.; Nomura, S.; Kawashima, A.; Iwamae, A.

    2009-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of high frequency (hf) plasma were performed under high pressure conditions (5 and 7 MPa) and supercritical (sc) CO{sub 2} conditions (8-20 MPa). Temperature evaluated from C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) increased from 3600 to 4600 K with an increase in pressure. The first observation of broadening and shifting of the O I line profile (3p {sup 5} P{sub 3,2,1}{yields}3s {sup 5} S{sub 2}{sup 0}) of hf plasma under sc CO{sub 2} conditions was carried out. However, the origin of broadening and the shifting cannot be understood because the present theory explaining them is not valid for such high pressure conditions.

  5. High-voltage plasma interactions calculations using NASCAP/LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews four previous simulations (two laboratory and two space-flight) of interactions of a high-voltage spacecraft with a plasma under low-earth orbit conditions, performed using a three-dimensional computer code NASCAP/LEO. Results show that NASCAP/LEO can perform meaningful simulations of high-voltage plasma interactions taking into account three-dimensional effects of geometry, spacecraft motion, and magnetic field. Two new calculations are presented: (1) for current collection by 1-mm pinholes in wires (showing that a pinhole in a wire can collect far more current than a similar pinhole in a flat plate); and (2) current collection by Charge-2 mother vehicle launched in December 1985. It is shown that the Charge-2 calculations predicted successfully ion collection at negative bias, the floating potential of a probe outside or inside the sheath under negative bias conditions, and magnetically limited electron collection under electron beam operation at high altitude.

  6. High Performance Plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Darrow; P. Efthimion; J. Ferron; E. Fredrickson; L. Grisham; J. Hosea; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; S. Kaye; S. Kubota; H. Kugel; B. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; J. Manickam; T.K. Mau; R.J. Maqueda; E. Mazzucato; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B. Nelson; N. Nishino; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; Y-K.M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Raman; P. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; C.H. Skinner; D. Stutman; D. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson; W. Zhu; S. Zweben; A. Bers; M. Carter; B. Deng; C. Domier; E. Doyle; M. Finkenthal; K. Hill; T. Jarboe; S. Jardin; H. Ji; L. Lao; K.C. Lee; N. Luhmann; R. Majeski; H. Park; T. Peebles; R.I. Pinsker; G. Porter; A. Ram; M. Rensink; T. Rognlien; D. Stotler; B. Stratton; G. Taylor; W. Wampler; G.A. Wurden; X.Q. Xu; L. Zeng; and the NSTX Team

    2001-07-10

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced toroidal plasmas at low aspect ratio (A = R/a = 0.86 m/0.68 m approximately equal to 1.3, where R is the major radius and a is the minor radius of the torus) with plasma currents of 1.4 MA. The rapid development of the machine has led to very exciting physics results during the first full year of physics operation. Pulse lengths in excess of 0.5 sec have been obtained with inductive current drive. Up to 4 MW of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating power has been applied with 6 MW planned. Using only 2 MW of HHFW heating power clear evidence of electron heating is seen with HHFW, as observed by the multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. A noninductive current drive concept known as Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has driven 260 kA of toroidal current. Neutral-beam heating power of 5 MW has been injected. Plasmas with beta toroidal (= 2 mu(subscript ''0'')

    /B(superscript ''2'') = a measure of magnetic confinement efficiency ) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code. Beta-limiting phenomena have been observed, and the maximum beta toroidal scales with I(subscript ''p'')/aB(subscript ''t''). High frequency (>MHz) magnetic fluctuations have been observed. High-confinement mode plasmas are observed with confinement times of >100 msec. Beam-heated plasmas show energy confinement times in excess of those predicted by empirical scaling expressions. Ion temperatures in excess of 2.0 keV have been measured, and power balance suggests that the power loss from the ions to the electrons may exceed the calculated classical input power to the ions.

  7. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  8. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  9. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B0. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel ["Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes," Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name "helicon" to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B0. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B0 and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B0. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  10. High Quality Topic Extraction from Business News Explains Abnormal Financial Market Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their “thematic” features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be “abnormally large,” can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no “excess trading,” when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information. PMID:23762258

  11. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  12. Mapping of Genetic Abnormalities of Primary Tumours from Metastatic CRC by High-Resolution SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sayagués, José María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María del Mar; González-González, María; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; del Carmen Chillon, Maria; Garcia, Eva; Bengoechea, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background For years, the genetics of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have been studied using a variety of techniques. However, most of the approaches employed so far have a relatively limited resolution which hampers detailed characterization of the common recurrent chromosomal breakpoints as well as the identification of small regions carrying genetic changes and the genes involved in them. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we applied 500K SNP arrays to map the most common chromosomal lesions present at diagnosis in a series of 23 primary tumours from sporadic CRC patients who had developed liver metastasis. Overall our results confirm that the genetic profile of metastatic CRC is defined by imbalanced gains of chromosomes 7, 8q, 11q, 13q, 20q and X together with losses of the 1p, 8p, 17p and 18q chromosome regions. In addition, SNP-array studies allowed the identification of small (<1.3 Mb) and extensive/large (>1.5 Mb) altered DNA sequences, many of which contain cancer genes known to be involved in CRC and the metastatic process. Detailed characterization of the breakpoint regions for the altered chromosomes showed four recurrent breakpoints at chromosomes 1p12, 8p12, 17p11.2 and 20p12.1; interestingly, the most frequently observed recurrent chromosomal breakpoint was localized at 17p11.2 and systematically targeted the FAM27L gene, whose role in CRC deserves further investigations. Conclusions/Significance In summary, in the present study we provide a detailed map of the genetic abnormalities of primary tumours from metastatic CRC patients, which confirm and extend on previous observations as regards the identification of genes potentially involved in development of CRC and the metastatic process. PMID:21060790

  13. Gender, Race, and Diet Affect Platelet Function Tests in Normal Subjects Contributing to a High Rate of Abnormal Results

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Garrett, Katherine; Stein, Sidney F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To assess sources of variability in platelet function tests in normal subjects, 64 healthy young adults were tested on 2–6 occasions at 2 week intervals using 4 methods: platelet aggregation (AGG) in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in the Bio/Data PAP-4 Aggregometer (BD) and Chrono-Log Lumi-Aggregometer (CL); and AGG in whole blood (WB) in the CL and Multiplate Platelet Function Analyzer (MP), with ATP release (REL) in CL-PRP and CL-WB. Food and medication exposures were recorded prospectively for 2 weeks prior to each blood draw. At least one AGG abnormality was seen in 21% of 81 drug-free specimens with CL-PRP, 15% with CL-WB, 13% with BD-PRP, and 6% with MP-WB, increasing with inclusion of REL to 28% for CL-PRP and 30% for CL-WB. Epinephrine AGG and REL were significantly reduced in males (P<0.0001). Ristocetin AGG and collagen and thrombin REL were significantly reduced in Blacks (P<0.0001). One-third of specimens drawn following flavonoid-rich food exposures had aberrant results, compared to 8.5% of specimens without such exposures (P=0.0035). PRP tests had less intra-individual variation than WB tests. Gender, race, diet, and test system affected results of platelet function testing in healthy subjects, suggesting caution when interpreting the results of platelet function testing in patients. PMID:24617520

  14. High-Density Plasma Reactors: Simulations for Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The development of improved and more efficient plasma reactors is a costly process for the semiconductor industry. Until five years ago, the Industry made most of its advancements through a trial and error approach. More recently, the role of computational modeling in the design process has increased. Both conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques like Navier-Stokes solvers as well as particle simulation methods are used to model plasma reactor flowfields. However, since high-density plasma reactors generally operate at low gas pressures on the order of 1 to 10 mTorr, a particle simulation may be necessary because of the failure of CFD techniques to model rarefaction effects. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is the most widely accepted and employed particle simulation tool and has previously been used to investigate plasma reactor flowfields. A plasma DSMC code is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center with its foundation as the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO. The present investigation is a follow up of a neutral flow investigation of the effects of process parameters as well as reactor design on etch rate and etch rate uniformity. The previous work concentrated on silicon etch of a chlorine flow in a configuration typical of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) or helical resonator type reactors. The effects of the plasma on the dissociation chemistry were modeled by making assumptions about the electron temperature and number density. The electrons or ions themselves were not simulated.The present work extends these results by simulating the charged species.The electromagnetic fields are calculated such that power deposition is modeled self-consistently. Electron impact reactions are modeled along with mechanisms for charge exchange. An bipolar diffusion assumption is made whereby electrons remain tied to the ions. However, the velocities of tile electrons are allowed to be modified during collisions

  15. Maternal high-fat hypercaloric diet during pregnancy results in persistent metabolic and respiratory abnormalities in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Pamela S.; Walton, Cheryl; Samsell, Lennie; Perez, Miriam K.; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have shown in a previous population-based study significant correlation between childhood asthma and early abnormalities of lipid and glucose metabolism. This study's specific aim was to determine whether maternal nutrition in pregnancy affects postnatal metabolic and respiratory outcomes in the offspring. Methods: On gestation day 1, dams were switched from standard chow to either high-fat hypercaloric diet or control diet. Terminal experiments were performed on newborn and weanling offspring of dams fed the study diet during gestation and lactation, and on adult offspring maintained on the same diet as their mother. Results: Pups born from high-fat hypercaloric diet (HFD) dams developed metabolic abnormalities persistent throughout development. Cytokine expression analysis of lung tissues from newborns born to HFD dams revealed a strong proinflammatory pattern. Gene expression of neurotrophic factors and receptors was upregulated in lungs of weanlings born to HFD dams, and this was associated to higher respiratory system resistance and lower compliance at baseline, as well as hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine. Furthermore, HFD dams delivered pups prone to develop more severe disease after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Conclusion: Maternal nutrition in pregnancy is a critical determinant of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in offspring and also increases risk for bronchiolitis independent from prepregnancy nutrition. PMID:26539661

  16. Collisional and Radiative Processes in High-Pressure Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt

    2001-10-01

    High-pressure discharge plasmas (HPDPs) with operating pressures up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure have gained prominence in many areas of application such as EM absorbers and reflectors, remediation of waste streams, deposition and surface modification, surface cleaning and sterilization, and light source development. In particular, HPDPs are widely used as sources for the generation of non-coherent UV and VUV light such as excimer emissions in the spectral range from 50 nm to 300 nm using rare gases or rare gas admixed with other gases as the operating medium. In this talk we will discuss several common types of HPDPs (e.g. microhollow cathode discharge plasmas, dielectric barrier discharge plasmas, capillary dielectrode discharge plasmas) that are commonly used for the generation of non-coherent excimer emissions. The main focus of this talk will be on the elucidation of the underlying microscopic collisional and radiative processes in these plasmas that lead to the photon emission and that determine the efficiency and spectral characteristics of various sources. Processes of particular interest are the generation of intense, monochromatic atomic line emissions in the 90 - 130 nm range, in particular the H Lyman-alpha emission at 121.6 nm, from HPDPs in gas mixtures containing high-pressure He, Ne, or Ar with trace amounts (1which may have great potential in photolithography and related applications. The mechanism for the emission of these intense atomic VUV lines are near-resonant energy transfer processes from the excimer molecule to the diatomic gas (H2, O2, N2). This work was supported by the NSF and by DARPA/ARO and carried out in collaboration with P. Kurunczi, K.H. Schoenbach, M. Laroussi, M. Gupta, and N. Masoud. Helpful discussions with U. Kogelschatz and E. Kunhardt are gratefully acknowledged.

  17. White matter alterations related to P300 abnormalities in individuals at high risk for psychosis: an MRI–EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Crossley, Nicolas; Woolley, James; Carletti, Francesco; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Broome, Matthew; Johns, Louise; Tabraham, Paul; Bramon, Elvira; McGuire, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background Psychosis onset is characterized by white matter and electrophysiologic abnormalities. The relation between these factors in the development of illness is almost unknown. We studied the relation between white matter volumes and P300 in prodromal psychosis. Methods We assessed white matter volume (detected using magnetic resonance imaging) and electrophysiologic response during an oddball task (P300) in healthy controls and individuals at high clinical risk for psychosis (with an “at-risk mental state” [ARMS]). Results We included 41 controls and 39 patients with an ARMS in our study. A psychotic disorder developed in 26% of the ARMS group within the follow-up period of 2 years. The P300 amplitude was significantly lower in the ARMS group than in the control group. The ARMS group showed reduced volume of white matter underlying the left superior temporal gyrus and the left superior frontal gyrus and increased volume of white matter underlying the right insula and the right angular gyrus compared with controls. Relative to individuals who did not later become psychotic, the subgroup in whom psychosis subsequently developed had a smaller volume of white matter underlying the left precuneus and the right middle temporal gyrus and increased volume in the white matter underlying the right middle frontal gyrus. We observed a significant interaction in the right middle frontal gyrus: white matter volume was negatively associated with P300 amplitude in the ARMS group and positively associated with P300 amplitude in the control group. Limitations The voxel-based morphometry method alone cannot determine whether abnormal white matter volumes are due to an altered number of axonal connections or decreased myelination. Conclusion P300 abnormalities precede the onset of psychosis and are directly related to white matter alterations, representing a correlate of an increased vulnerability to disease. PMID:21299920

  18. High power microwave source for a plasma wakefield experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Shlapakovski, A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Bliokh, Yu.; Leopold, J. G.; Gleizer, S.; Gad, R.; Rostov, V. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the generation of a high-power microwave (˜550 MW, 0.5 ns, ˜9.6 GHz) beam and feasibility of wakefield-excitation with this beam in under-dense plasma are presented. The microwave beam is generated by a backward wave oscillator (BWO) operating in the superradiance regime. The BWO is driven by a high-current electron beam (˜250 keV, ˜1.5 kA, ˜5 ns) propagating through a slow-wave structure in a guiding magnetic field of 2.5 T. The microwave beam is focused at the desired location by a dielectric lens. Experimentally obtained parameters of the microwave beam at its waist are used for numerical simulations, the results of which demonstrate the formation of a bubble in the plasma that has almost 100% electron density modulation and longitudinal and transverse electric fields of several kV/cm.

  19. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bremsstrahlung X-rays from a plasma focus device were investigated with emphasis on the emission versus position, time, energy, and angle of emission. It is shown that low energy X-rays come from the plasma focus region, but that the higher energy components come from the anode. The emission is anisotropic, the low energy polar diagram resembling a cardioid, while the high energy emission is a lobe into the anode. The plasma parameters were considered indicating that even in the dense focus, the plasma is collisionless near the axis. By considering the radiation patterns of relativistic electrons a qualitative picture is obtained, which explains the measured polar diagrams, assuming the electrons that produce the X-rays have velocity vectors lying roughly in a cone between the point of focus and the anode. The average electron energy is about 3keV at the focus and about 10 keV on the anode surface. Results are consistent with the converging beam model of neutron production.

  20. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and subsequent chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this “divide-and-conquer” strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 different proteins with 1494 proteins identified by multiple peptides. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 “classic” cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:16684767

  1. Assessment of plasma gasification of high caloric waste streams.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Bert; Elslander, Helmut; Vanderreydt, Ive; Peys, Kurt; Diels, Ludo; Oosterlinck, Michel; Joos, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Plasma gasification is an innovative technology for transforming high calorific waste streams into a valuable synthesis gas and a vitrified slag by means of a thermal plasma. A test program has been set up to evaluate the feasibility of plasma gasification and the impact of this process on the environment. RDF (refuse derived fuel) from carpet and textile waste was selected as feed material for semi-pilot gasification tests. The aim of the tests was: (1) to evaluate the technical feasibility of making a stable synthesis gas; (2) to characterize the composition of this synthesis gas; (3) to define a suitable after-treatment configuration for purification of the syngas and (4) to characterize the stability of the slag, i.e., its resistance to leaching for use as a secondary building material. The tests illustrate that plasma gasification can result in a suitable syngas quality and a slag, characterized by an acceptable leachability. Based on the test results, a further scale-up of this technology will be prepared and validation tests run.

  2. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-06-08

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this ''divide-and-conquer'' strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 nonredundant proteins. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 ''classic'' cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses.

  3. Characterization of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in High Power, High Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Kenney, Jason; Agarwal, Ankur; Nichols, Michael; Rogers, James; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used in the microelectronic industry for thin film etching. ICPs have typically been operated at low gas pressures (<50 mTorr) and they have been well-characterized in this regime. Several applications requiring high etch rates (e.g., vertical NAND etch) have recently extended the use of ICPs to the high power (>4000 W) and high pressure (>100 mTorr) regime. ICP operation in this high-power, high-pressure regime imposes a tremendous challenge of achieving good plasma uniformity over large substrates. This necessitates a good theoretical understanding of the underlying physics, thorough experimental characterization, and more accurate numerical models for hardware design guidance. In this study, we will focus on the characterization of ICP in the high-power, high-pressure regime. Computational modeling is done using CRTRS, our in-house 2D/3D plasma model. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a circuit model to self-consistently account for the capacitive coupling from the coils that is expected to dominate in this operating regime. Properties of Ar plasma will be discussed and compared with experiments. The impact of critical operating parameters such as ICP power, pressure, flow rate, and current ratio (in multi-coil antenna structures) on plasma characteristics will be examined. Results in relevant processing gases will also be discussed.

  4. Superfluorescence from dense electron hole plasmas under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jho, Y. D.; Wang, X.; Kono, J.; Reitze, D. H.; Wei, X.; Belyanin, A. A.; Kocharovsky, V. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.; Solomon, G. S.

    Ultrafast optical excitation of a dense electron hole plasma in InxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells in high magnetic fields (>20T) produces cooperative radiative recombination between conduction and valence band Landau levels (LL). Above a critical threshold, the emission is characterized by very narrow LL line widths, superlinear increase with increasing field and laser excitation fluence, and stochastic directionality from shot to shot. Here, we investigate the effects of temperature and excitation geometry on the emission properties.

  5. Analysis of Electron Trajectories in Magnetized High Power Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Dennis; Gallian, Sara; Trieschmann, Jan; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is an important example of magnetized technological plasmas. With HiPIMS the focus lies on the generation of a high density plasma with a remarkably high degree of ionization. It can be used for the deposition of thin films with superior density and quality. Theoretical approaches to the regime of magnetized low temperature plasmas encounter some fundamental difficulties, for example concerning the details of the magnetic field configuration, the strongly varying degree of magnetization, and the frequent wall interactions. A kinetic single particle model is used for the investigations. Single electron trajectories are analyzed with the widely used Boris algorithm within the magnetized zone above the target (racetrack). We further examine a configuration where symmetry breaking occurs due to a potential bump, which is rotating azimuthally around the racetrack (spoke). Observing the effects of this structure on the single electron motion may allow us to obtain further insight into this phenomenon. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  6. Collisional and radiative processes in high-pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Kurt H.; Kurunczi, Peter F.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2002-05-01

    Discharge plasmas at high pressures (up to and exceeding atmospheric pressure), where single collision conditions no longer prevail, provide a fertile environment for the experimental study of collisions and radiative processes dominated by (i) step-wise processes, i.e., the excitation of an already excited atomic/molecular state and by (ii) three-body collisions leading, for instance, to the formation of excimers. The dominance of collisional and radiative processes beyond binary collisions involving ground-state atoms and molecules in such environments allows for many interesting applications of high-pressure plasmas such as high power lasers, opening switches, novel plasma processing applications and sputtering, absorbers and reflectors for electromagnetic waves, remediation of pollutants and waste streams, and excimer lamps and other noncoherent vacuum-ultraviolet light sources. Here recent progress is summarized in the use of hollow cathode discharge devices with hole dimensions in the range 0.1-0.5 mm for the generation of vacuum-ultraviolet light.

  7. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  8. Abnormal strong burn-in degradation of highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal donor-acceptor demixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Perea, José Darío; Kassar, Thaer; Richter, Moses; Heumueller, Thomas; Matt, Gebhard J.; Hou, Yi; Güldal, Nusret S.; Chen, Haiwei; Chen, Shi; Langner, Stefan; Berlinghof, Marvin; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of organic solar cells is determined by the delicate, meticulously optimized bulk-heterojunction microstructure, which consists of finely mixed and relatively separated donor/acceptor regions. Here we demonstrate an abnormal strong burn-in degradation in highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal demixing of the donor and acceptor phases, which dramatically reduces charge generation and can be attributed to the inherently low miscibility of both materials. Even though the microstructure can be kinetically tuned for achieving high-performance, the inherently low miscibility of donor and acceptor leads to spontaneous phase separation in the solid state, even at room temperature and in the dark. A theoretical calculation of the molecular parameters and construction of the spinodal phase diagrams highlight molecular incompatibilities between the donor and acceptor as a dominant mechanism for burn-in degradation, which is to date the major short-time loss reducing the performance and stability of organic solar cells.

  9. Abnormal strong burn-in degradation of highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal donor-acceptor demixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Perea, José Darío; Kassar, Thaer; Richter, Moses; Heumueller, Thomas; Matt, Gebhard J.; Hou, Yi; Güldal, Nusret S.; Chen, Haiwei; Chen, Shi; Langner, Stefan; Berlinghof, Marvin; Unruh, Tobias; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of organic solar cells is determined by the delicate, meticulously optimized bulk-heterojunction microstructure, which consists of finely mixed and relatively separated donor/acceptor regions. Here we demonstrate an abnormal strong burn-in degradation in highly efficient polymer solar cells caused by spinodal demixing of the donor and acceptor phases, which dramatically reduces charge generation and can be attributed to the inherently low miscibility of both materials. Even though the microstructure can be kinetically tuned for achieving high-performance, the inherently low miscibility of donor and acceptor leads to spontaneous phase separation in the solid state, even at room temperature and in the dark. A theoretical calculation of the molecular parameters and construction of the spinodal phase diagrams highlight molecular incompatibilities between the donor and acceptor as a dominant mechanism for burn-in degradation, which is to date the major short-time loss reducing the performance and stability of organic solar cells. PMID:28224984

  10. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  11. 'Abnormal' angle response curves of TW/Rs for near zero tilt and high tilt channeling implants

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Baonian; Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Toh, Terry; Colombeau, Benjamin; Todorov, Stan; Sinclair, Frank; Shim, Kyu-Ha; Henry, Todd

    2012-11-06

    Angle control has been widely accepted as the key requirement for ion implantation in semiconductor device processing. From an ion implanter point of view, the incident ion direction should be measured and corrected by suitable techniques, such as XP-VPS for the VIISta implanter platform, to ensure precision ion placement in device structures. So called V-curves have been adopted to generate the wafer-based calibration using channeling effects as the Si lattice steer ions into a channeling direction. Thermal Wave (TW) or sheet resistance (Rs) can be used to determine the minimum of the angle response curve. Normally it is expected that the TW and Rs have their respective minima at identical angles. However, the TW and Rs response to the angle variations does depend on factors such as implant species, dose, and wafer temperature. Implant damage accumulation effects have to be considered for data interpretation especially for some 'abnormal' V-curve data. In this paper we will discuss some observed 'abnormal' angle responses, such as a) TW/Rs reverse trend for Arsenic beam, 2) 'W' shape of Rs Boron, and 3) apparent TW/Rs minimum difference for high tilt characterization, along with experimental data and TCAD simulations.

  12. Long-lived Ar-Hg plasma in the afterglow of a high-current pulsed discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Lukina, N. A.; Fesenko, A. A.

    2013-02-15

    High-density (n > 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}) argon-mercury plasma produced by a short (t {approx} 20 {mu}s) high-power pulsed discharge in argon with an admixture of mercury vapor at a discharge current of {approx}50 A, an argon pressure of {approx}4 mm Hg, and a mercury vapor pressure of {approx}10{sup -3} mm Hg was studied using optical spectroscopy and radio physics methods. It is found that the lifetime of this plasma after the end of the discharge pulse is up to 10{sup -2} s. It is shown that such an abnormally long lifetime of such an afterglow plasma, as compared to the plasma of an argon discharge without an admixture of mercury vapor, is related to the long residence time of atoms and ions of both argon and mercury in highly excited states due to chemi-ionization processes involving long-lived metastable argon ions. It is suggested that dissociative recombination of highly excited molecular ions of argon play an important role in the transfer of excitation to argon atoms and ions that are close to autoionization states.

  13. Widespread chromosomal abnormalities in high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. Comparative genomic hybridization study of pure high-grade DCIS.

    PubMed

    Moore, E; Magee, H; Coyne, J; Gorey, T; Dervan, P A

    1999-03-01

    For a variety of technical reasons it is rarely possible to study cytogenetic abnormalities in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) using traditional techniques. However, by combining molecular biology and computerized image analysis it is possible to carry out cytogenetic analyses on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of chromosomal amplifications and deletions in high-grade DCIS and to look specifically for unique or consistent abnormalities in this pre-invasive cancer. Twenty-three cases of asymptomatic, non-palpable, screen-detected, high-grade DCIS were examined using CGH on tumour cells obtained from histology slides. All cases showed chromosomal abnormalities. A wide variety of amplifications and deletions were spread across the genome. The most frequent changes were gains of chromosomes 17 (13 of 23), 16p (13 of 23), and 20q (9 of 23) and amplifications of 11q13 (22 of 23), 12q 24.1-24.2 (12 of 23), 6p21.3 (11 of 23), and 1q31-qter (6 of 23). The most frequent deletions were on 13q 21.3-q33 (7 of 23), 9p21 (4 of 23), and 6q16.1 (4 of 23). These findings indicate that high-grade DCIS is, from a cytogenetic viewpoint, an advanced lesion. There was no absolutely consistent finding in every case, but amplification of 11q13 was found in 22 of the 23 cases. The precise significance of this is unknown at present. This region of chromosome 11q harbours a number of known oncogenes, including cyclin D1 andINT2. It is likely that many of these findings are the result of accumulated chromosomal abnormalities, reflecting an unstable genome in established malignancy.

  14. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  15. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples. PMID:26459926

  16. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  17. Nearly axisymmetric hot plasmas in a highly rippled tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2002-11-01

    Tokamak ohmic heating current flowing along toroidally rippled flux surfaces results in a poloidal torque. Since pressure gradients cannot offset torques, the torque drives plasma flows which convect plasma toroidally from ripple necks (high B_pol^2) to ripple bulges (low B_pol^2). Stagnation of the oppositely directed toroidal flows at the ripple bulges thermalizes the directed flow velocity ˜ B_pol/μ_0ρ , giving β _pol ˜1. These flows also convect frozen-in poloidal field lines which accumulate at the bulges enhancing the pinch force there and so reducing the bulge. Thus, a nearly axisymmetric β_pol ˜1 equilibrium is achieved using only a few TF coils. Particles bouncing in step between approaching flows will be Fermi accelerated to form a high energy tail. The ST tokamak magnetic mountain experiment [1] showed that, compared to a 1.8% ripple configuration, a 28% ripple configuration had four times the neutron production, and only a modest degradation of overall confinement; the former is consistent with the notion of Fermi acceleration of particles bouncing between colliding toroidal flows and the latter is consistent with ripple reduction due to toroidal convection of poloidal field lines. [1] W. Stodiek et al, Proc. 4th Intl. Conf. Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nuc. Fusion Res., (Madison, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 465

  18. High-order Harmonic Generation in Ultra Thin Plasma Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Bin; Shen, Baifei; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    Via l-D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations, we investigated the high-order harmonic emission from flim plasma foils irradiated by two circular- polarized, counter-propagating laser pulses with their electrical vectors rotating in different directions. More than 200 harmonics can be generated with a laser intensity of 1021 W/cm2. When the duration of laser gets shorter, the frequencies of harmonics were severely modulated due to the Doppler shift caused by the movement of the plasma boundary when the foil is being compressed. The Doppler shift can be estimated by the simulation results, and this effect can also be reduced or modified by introducing frequency chirping to the pump pulse.

  19. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  20. Measuring Ionization in Highly Compressed, Near-Degenerate Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Kraus, D.; Neumayer, P.; Bachmann, B.; Collins, G. W.; Divol, L.; Kritcher, A.; Landen, O. L.; Pak, A.; Weber, C.; Fletcher, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Falcone, R. W.; Saunders, A.; Chapman, D.; Baggott, R.; Gericke, D. O.; Yi, A.

    2016-10-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is required to accurately model compressibility and heat capacity of materials at extreme conditions. We use x-ray Thomson scattering to characterize the plasma conditions in plastic and beryllium capsules near stagnation in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We expect the capsules to be compressed to more than 20x and electron densities approaching 1025 cm-3, corresponding to a Fermi energy of 170 eV. Zinc Heα x-rays (9 keV) scattering at 120° off the plasma yields high sensitivity to K-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. We will discuss recent results in the context of ionization potential depression at these extreme conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  2. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  3. Nonlinear waves in dense dusty plasmas with high fugacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. N.; Shukla, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation of small, but finite, amplitude electrostatic dust waves has been investigated in the low as well as high fugacity regimes by deriving the corresponding Boussinesq equation which, for unidirectional propagation, reduces to the Korteweg-de Vries equation. The dust-acoustic wave (DAW) solitons are shown to correspond to the tenuous (low fugacity) dusty plasmas, while in the dense (high fugacity) regime the solitons are associated with the dust-Coulomb waves (DCWs). Unlike the DAW solitons which are (dust) density compressional and supersonic, the DCW solitons are (dust) density rarefactive and propagate with super-Coulombic speeds.

  4. High-temperature plasmas in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Naoki; Kohyama, Yasuharu; Nozawa, Satoshi

    1998-12-01

    Recent developments in the study of high-temperature plasmas in clusters of galaxies are reviewed. The Compton scattering of the permeating 2.7 K cosmic microwave background photons by high-temperature electrons of energy 0953-8984/10/49/016/img5 produces a distortion in the Planck distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background photons. This effect, which has been termed the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, has been studied extensively in recent years both theoretically and observationally. We will give a review of the study on this subject.

  5. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  6. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  7. Ion drag force on an absorbing grain in highly collisional plasma in the presence of plasma production and loss processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Manis; Khrapak, Sergei A.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force acting on a small absorbing spherical grain has been calculated analytically in highly collisional plasma with slowly drifting ions taking into account plasma production and loss mechanisms in the vicinity of the grain. It is shown that both the magnitude and direction of the ion drag force are strongly influenced by the plasma production and loss mechanisms. The parameter regimes for the 'positive' and 'negative' ion drag forces acting on an absorbing grain have been identified.

  8. High Take Off Left Main and Abnormal Origin of Right Coronary Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Negar; Abdi, Seyfollah; Pouraliakba, Hamid Reza; Vakili-Zarch, Anoushiravan

    2013-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are rare congenital disorders with mostly benign course. We report a case of 54-year-old white male who was with stable angina scheduled for coronary angiography. Due to the difficulty of catheterization, patient underwent CT angiography and high take off left main and right coronary arteries were revealed. We conclude that anomalous coronary arteries are important and coronary interventions may be difficult in their presence.

  9. Separation of adult chains of abnormal haemoglobin: Identification by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Paul Angoué; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Ayekoé; Wachman, Henri

    2004-01-01

    Rare abnormal haemoglobin (Hb) often poses a problem in the diagnosis of relative electrophoresis mobility. The rare neutral Hbs interact with the Hb S and thus can increase the severity of sickle cell anaemia. In the present study, we investigated the use of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) as a method for the identification of neutral or unstable Hb, and compared it with the well-known techniques urea-triton electrophoresis (UT) and isoelectrofocusing (IEF). The results of our experiments showed that Bucuresti Hb was separated without ambiguity by RP-HPLC. To date, no other electrophoresis techniques have been able to isolate this Hb. We also examined the Hb Nouakchott, which was the most hydrophobic Hb. Moreover, the adult and foetal chains of globins (especially the Agamma(t) and Agamma(i) chains) were quantified on the same chromatogram.

  10. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  11. High fat diet produces brain insulin resistance, synaptodendritic abnormalities and altered behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Steven E; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R; Carlson, Gregory C; Browne, Caroline A; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F; Kim, Sangwon F

    2014-07-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS(616)), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors.

  12. High Fat Diet Produces Brain Insulin Resistance, Synaptodendritic Abnormalities and Altered Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Steven E.; Lucki, Irwin; Brookshire, Bethany R.; Carlson, Gregory C.; Browne, Carolyn A.; Kazi, Hala; Bang, Sookhee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Chen, Yong; McMullen, Mary F.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome are increasingly recognized for their effects on cognitive health. To ascertain mechanisms by which this occurs, we fed mice a very high fat diet (60% kcal by fat) for 17 days or a moderate high fat diet (HFD, 45% kcal by fat) for 8 weeks and examined changes in brain insulin signaling responses, hippocampal synaptodendritic protein expression, and spatial working memory. Compared to normal control diet mice, cerebral cortex tissues of HFD mice were insulin-resistant as evidenced by failed activation of Akt, S6 and GSK3β with ex-vivo insulin stimulation. Importantly, we found that expression of brain IPMK, which is necessary for mTOR/Akt signaling, remained decreased in HFD mice upon activation of AMPK. HFD mouse hippocampus exhibited increased expression of serine-phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1-pS616), a marker of insulin resistance, as well as decreased expression of PSD-95, a scaffolding protein enriched in post-synaptic densities, and synaptopodin, an actin-associated protein enriched in spine apparatuses. Spatial working memory was impaired as assessed by decreased spontaneous alternation in a T-maze. These findings indicate that HFD is associated with telencephalic insulin resistance and deleterious effects on synaptic integrity and cognitive behaviors. PMID:24686304

  13. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  14. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities after exposure to low doses of high-energy iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Walter A.; Joseph, James A.; Rabin, Bernard M.

    Exposure of rats to high-energy iron particles (600 MeV/amu) has been found to alter behavior after doses as low as 10 rads. The performance of a task that measures upper body strength was significantly degraded after irradiation. In addition, an impairment in the regulation of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus (a motor center in the brain), lasting at least 6 months, was also found and correlated with the performance deficits. A general indication of behavioral toxicity and an index of nausea and emesis, the conditioned taste aversion, was also evident. The sensitivity to iron particles was 10-600 times greater than to gamma photons. These results suggest that behavioral and neurobiological damage may be a consequence of exposure to low doses of heavy particles and that this possibility should be extensively studied.

  16. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  17. High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

    2006-10-27

    frits. Exploratory melts of non-glassy materials, such as wollastonite, zirconium silicate, and alumino-silicate melts were successfully done indicating that plasma melting has potential application beyond glass. Experimental results were generated that show the high quality of plasma-melted fiberglass compositions, such as E-glass, can result in good fiberizing performance. Fiberizing performance and tensile strength data were achieved during the project to support this conclusion. High seed counts are a feature of the current lab scale melter and must be dealt with via other means, since fining work was outside the scope of this project.

  18. High-Q plasmas in the TFTR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Barnes, C. W.; Bell, M. G.; Bitter, M.; Boivin, R.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R. V.; Bush, C. E.; Dylla, H. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A. C.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kieras-Phillips, C.; Kilpatrick, S. J.; LaMarche, P. H.; LeBlanc, B.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H. K.; Paul, S. F.; Pitcher, S.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Scott, S. D.; Snipes, J.; Stevens, J.; Strachan, J. D.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J. L.; Timberlake, J. R.; Towner, H. H.; Ulrickson, M.; von Goeler, S.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K.-L.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1991-08-01

    In the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)], the highest neutron source strength Sn and D-D fusion power gain QDD are realized in the neutral-beam-fueled and heated ``supershot'' regime that occurs after extensive wall conditioning to minimize recycling. For the best supershots, Sn increases approximately as P1.8b. The highest-Q shots are characterized by high Te (up to 12 keV), Ti (up to 34 keV), and stored energy (up to 4.7 MJ), highly peaked density profiles, broad Te profiles, and lower Zeff. Replacement of critical areas of the graphite limiter tiles with carbon-fiber composite tiles and improved alignment with the plasma have mitigated the ``carbon bloom.'' Wall conditioning by lithium pellet injection prior to the beam pulse reduces carbon influx and particle recycling. Empirically, QDD increases with decreasing pre-injection carbon radiation, and increases strongly with density peakedness [ne(0)/] during the beam pulse. To date, the best fusion results are Sn=5×1016 n/sec, QDD=1.85×10-3, and neutron yield=4.0×1016 n/pulse, obtained at Ip=1.6-1.9 MA and beam energy Eb=95-103 keV, with nearly balanced co- and counter-injected beam power. Computer simulations of supershot plasmas show that typically 50%-60% of Sn arises from beam-target reactions, with the remainder divided between beam-beam and thermonuclear reactions, the thermonuclear fraction increasing with Pb. The simulations predict that QDT=0.3-0.4 would be obtained for the best present plasma conditions, if half the deuterium neutral beams were to be replaced by tritium beams. Somewhat higher values are calculated if D beams are injected into a predominantly tritium target plasma. The projected central beta of fusion alphas is 0.4%-0.6%, a level sufficient for the study of alpha-induced collective effects.

  19. Development of High-Density Plasma Photonic Crystals Using High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon Quinones, Roberto; Wang, Benjamin; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    A plasma photonic crystal (PPC) is an array of plasma structures that interacts with electromagnetic (EM) waves in ways not possible with natural materials. 2D PPCs can be used for generating a band gap, which is a range of wave frequencies in which no waves are transmitted through the structure. Such gap forms when an EM wave travels through a 2D PPC with spacing equal to half the wavelength of the wave and plasma frequency (ωp) on the order of the frequency of the wave. Until recently, research on PPCs has been limited to ωp < 30 GHz, which is equivalent to a plasma density of ne <1013 cm-3 . Over the last year, PPCs of ne >1015 cm-3 have been generated at Stanford through the use of high-power lasers. The PPCs are generated by expanding the laser beam from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through a Galilean beam expander and subsequently focusing the beam through an optical micro-lens array. The intense photoionization of air that occurs at the focus of the individual lenses leads to the formation of a 2D array of very dense plasma spots. Photomultiplier measurements show a plasma lifetime of ~150 ns during which the plasma array functions as a PPC, representing a first step towards advancing the field forward into the low THz regime. Sponsored by the AFOSR MURI and DoD NDSEG.

  20. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    , et al.). Combustion Synthesis in the Ti-C-Ni-Al System (S. Dunmead, et al.). Combustion Synthesis Dynamics Modeling (T. Kottke, et al.). Elementary Processes in SiO2-Al Thermite-Type Reactions Activated or Induced by Mechanochemical Treatment (G. Hida & I. Lin). Combustion Synthesis of Ceramic Preforms for Molten-Metal Infiltration (D. Halverson, et al.). Combustion Characteristics of Solid-Solid Systems: Experiments and Modeling (S. Kumar, et al.). Microstructure of TiB2 Sintered by the Self-Combustion Method (K. Urabe, et al..). A Laser-Ignition Study of Gasless Reactions Using Thermography (C. Chow & J. Mohler). Shock-Induced Reaction Synthesis-Assisted Processing of Ceramics (R. Ward, et al.). Summary Assessment of the Application of SPS and Related Reaction Processing to Produce Dense Ceramics (R. Rice). Shock Consolidation of Combustion-Synthesized Ceramics (A. Niiler, et al.). High-Pressure Burning Rate of Silicon in Nitrogen (M. Costantino & J. Holt). Preparation of a TiC Single Crystal by the Floating-Zone Method from a Self-Combustion Rod (S. Otani, et al.). PLASMA AND GAS-PHASE SYNTHESIS. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Ceramic Powders and Coatings (T. Yoshida). A Theoretical Comparison of Conventional and Hybrid RF-Plasma Reactors (J. McKelliget & N. El-Kaddah). Homogeneous Nucleation and Particle Growth in Thermal Plasma Synthesis (S. Girshick & C.-P. Chiu). Formation of Refractory Aerosol Particles (R. Flagan, et al.). Ceramic-Powder Synthesis in an Aerosol Reactor (M. Alam, et al.). Silica-Particle Formation Using the Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame Burner (J. Katz, et al.). Synthesis and Properties of Low-Carbon Boron Carbides (C. Adkins, et al.). Synthesis of Si, SiC, and Si3N4 Powders Under High Number Density Conditions (J. Haggerty & J. Flint). Rapid Preparation of Titanium and Other Transition-Metal Nitride- and Carbide Powders by a Carbo-Reduction Method Using Arc-Image Heating (M. Yoshimura, et al.). Microwave Plasma Densification of Aluminum Nitride

  1. High density plasmas and new diagnostics: An overview (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Celona, L. Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.

    2016-02-15

    One of the limiting factors for the full understanding of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) fundamental mechanisms consists of few types of diagnostic tools so far available for such compact machines. Microwave-to-plasma coupling optimisation, new methods of density overboost provided by plasma wave generation, and magnetostatic field tailoring for generating a proper electron energy distribution function, suitable for optimal ion beams formation, require diagnostic tools spanning across the entire electromagnetic spectrum from microwave interferometry to X-ray spectroscopy; these methods are going to be implemented including high resolution and spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy made by quasi-optical methods (pin-hole cameras). The ion confinement optimisation also requires a complete control of cold electrons displacement, which can be performed by optical emission spectroscopy. Several diagnostic tools have been recently developed at INFN-LNS, including “volume-integrated” X-ray spectroscopy in low energy domain (2-30 keV, by using silicon drift detectors) or high energy regime (>30 keV, by using high purity germanium detectors). For the direct detection of the spatially resolved spectral distribution of X-rays produced by the electronic motion, a “pin-hole camera” has been developed also taking profit from previous experiences in the ECRIS field. The paper will give an overview of INFN-LNS strategy in terms of new microwave-to-plasma coupling schemes and advanced diagnostics supporting the design of new ion sources and for optimizing the performances of the existing ones, with the goal of a microwave-absorption oriented design of future machines.

  2. A tyrosinase with an abnormally high tyrosine hydroxylase/dopa oxidase ratio.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Solano, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum[Salanoubat M, Genin S, Artiguenave F, et al. (2002) Nature 415, 497-502] revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). This soil-borne pathogenic bacterium withers a wide range of plants. We detected the expression of two PPO genes (accession numbers NP_518458 and NP_519622) with high similarity to tyrosinases, both containing the six conserved histidines required to bind the pair of type-3 copper ions at the active site. Generation of null mutants in those genes by homologous recombination mutagenesis and protein purification allowed us to correlate each gene with its enzymatic activity. In contrast with all tyrosinases so far studied, the enzyme NP_518458 shows higher monophenolase than o-diphenolase activity and its initial activity does not depend on the presence of l-dopa cofactor. On the other hand, protein NP_519622 is an enzyme with a clear preference to oxidize o-diphenols and only residual monophenolase activity, behaving as a catechol oxidase. These catalytic characteristics are discussed in relation to two other characteristics apart from the six conserved histidines. One is the putative presence of a seventh histidine which interacts with the carboxy group on the substrate and controls the preference for carboxylated and decarboxylated substrates. The second is the size of the residue isosteric with the aromatic F261 reported in sweet potato catechol oxidase which acts as a gate to control accessibility to CuA at the active site.

  3. Reversible Brain Abnormalities in People Without Signs of Mountain Sickness During High-Altitude Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cunxiu; Zhao, Yuhua; Yu, Qian; Yin, Wu; Liu, Haipeng; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming; Gesang, Luobu; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of lowlanders ascending to high-altitude (HA) show no signs of mountain sickness. Whether their brains have indeed suffered from HA environment and the persistent sequelae after return to lowland remain unknown. Thirty-one sea-level college students, who had a 30-day teaching on Qinghai-Tibet plateau underwent MRI scans before, during, and two months after HA exposure. Brain volume, cortical structures, and white matter microstructure were measured. Besides, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and neuropsychiatric behaviors were tested. After 30-day HA exposure, the gray and white matter volumes and cortical surface areas significantly increased, with cortical thicknesses and curvatures changed in a wide spread regions; Anisotropy decreased with diffusivities increased in multiple sites of white matter tracts. Two months after HA exposure, cortical measurements returned to basal level. However, increased anisotropy with decreased diffusivities was observed. Behaviors and serum inflammatory factor did not significant changed during three time-point tests. NSE significantly decreased during HA but increased after HA exposure. Results suggest brain swelling occurred in people without neurological signs at HA, but no negative sequelae in cortical structures and neuropsychiatric functions were left after the return to lowlands. Reoxygenation changed white matter microstructure. PMID:27633944

  4. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  5. Research on plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. Research is presented and resulting conference papers are attached. These papers include 'Characteristics of Plasma-Puff Trigger for an Inverse-Pinch Plasma Switch'; 'Ultra-High-Power Plasma Switch INPUTS for Pulse Power Systems'; 'Characteristics of Switching Plasma in an Inverse-Pinch Switch'; 'Comparative Study of INPIStron and Spark Gap'; and 'INPIStron Switched Pulsed Power for Dense Plasma Pinches.'

  6. External control of ion waves in a plasma by high frequency fields

    DOEpatents

    Kaw, P.K.; Dawson, J.M.

    1973-12-18

    An apparatus and method are described for stabilizing plasma instabilities, in a magnetically confined plasma column by transmitting into the plasma high frequency electromagnetic waves at a frequency close to the electron plasma frequency. The said frequencies, e.g., are between the plasma frequency and 1.5 times the plasma frequency at a power level below the level for producing parametric instabilities in a plasma having temperatures from below 10 eV to about 10 keV or more, at densities from below 10/sup 13/ to above 10/sup 18/ particles/cm/sup 3/. (Official Gazette)

  7. Plasma-Based Tunable High Frequency Power Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semnani, Abbas; Macheret, Sergey; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Power limiters are often employed to protect sensitive receivers from being damaged or saturated by high-power incoming waves. Although wideband low-power limiters based on semiconductor technology are widely available, the options for high-power frequency-selective ones are very few. In this work, we study the application of a gas discharge tube (GDT) integrated in an evanescent-mode (EVA) cavity resonator as a plasma-based power limiter. Plasmas can inherently handle higher power in comparison with semiconductor diodes. Also, using a resonant structure provides the ability of having both lower threshold power and frequency-selective limiting, which are important if only a narrowband high-power signal is targeted. Higher input RF power results in stronger discharge in the GDT and consequently higher electron density which results in larger reflection. It is also possible to tune the threshold power by pre-ionizing the GDT with a DC bias voltage. As a proof of concept, a 2-GHz EVA resonator loaded by a 90-V GDT was fabricated and measured. With reasonable amount of insertion loss, the limiting threshold power was successfully tuned from 8.3 W to 590 mW when the external DC bias was varied from 0 to 80 V. The limiter performed well up to 100 W of maximum available input power.

  8. High plasma uric acid concentration: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High plasma uric acid (UA) is a precipitating factor for gout and renal calculi as well as a strong risk factor for Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The main causes for higher plasma UA are either lower excretion, higher synthesis or both. Higher waist circumference and the BMI are associated with higher insulin resistance and leptin production, and both reduce uric acid excretion. The synthesis of fatty acids (tryglicerides) in the liver is associated with the de novo synthesis of purine, accelerating UA production. The role played by diet on hyperuricemia has not yet been fully clarified, but high intake of fructose-rich industrialized food and high alcohol intake (particularly beer) seem to influence uricemia. It is not known whether UA would be a causal factor or an antioxidant protective response. Most authors do not consider the UA as a risk factor, but presenting antioxidant function. UA contributes to > 50% of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. There is still no consensus if UA is a protective or a risk factor, however, it seems that acute elevation is a protective factor, whereas chronic elevation a risk for disease. PMID:22475652

  9. Determination of plasma lactic acid concentration and specific activity using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bleiberg, B; Steinberg, J J; Katz, S D; Wexler, J; LeJemtel, T

    1991-08-23

    Assessment of lactate metabolism is of particular interest during exercise and in disease states such as diabetes, shock, and absorptive abnormalities of short-chain fatty acids by the colon. We describe an analytical method that introduces radio-active tracers and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to simultaneously analyze concentrations and specific activities (SAs) of plasma lactate. The HPLC conditions included separation on a reversed-phase column (octadecylsilane) and an isocratic buffer (30% acetonitrile in water). [3H]Acetate served as an internal standard. Lactate and acetate were extracted from plasma samples with diethyl ether following a pH adjustment to less than 1.0 and back-extracted into a hydrophilic phase with sodium carbonate (2 mM, pH greater than 10.0). Lactate is detected in the ultraviolet range (242 and 320 nm) by derivatization with alpha-bromoacetophenone. Control plasma samples were studied after an overnight fast for precision and analytical recovery. Calibration curves were linear in the range 0.18-6.0 mM (r = 0.92). The precision was 3% and the analytical recovery was 87%. The detection limit of the method was 36 pmol. Determination of lactate metabolism was performed in a patient with chronic congestive heart failure who was administered primed-continuous L-[U-14C]lactate (10 microCi bolus and 0.3 microCi/min continuously) during a 60-min rest period. Mean arterial lactate concentration and SA were 1.69 +/- 0.2 mM and 253.8 +/- 22 dpm/mumol, respectively. Systemic lactate turnover was 25.65 mumol/kg per min. Lactic acid systemic turnover, organ uptake and release rates can be accurately determined by isocratic HPLC.

  10. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    PubMed

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  11. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  12. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  13. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  14. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  15. High-gradient plasma-wakefield acceleration with two subpicosecond electron bunches.

    PubMed

    Kallos, Efthymios; Katsouleas, Tom; Kimura, Wayne D; Kusche, Karl; Muggli, Patric; Pavlishin, Igor; Pogorelsky, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2008-02-22

    A plasma-wakefield experiment is presented where two 60 MeV subpicosecond electron bunches are sent into a plasma produced by a capillary discharge. Both bunches are shorter than the plasma wavelength, and the phase of the second bunch relative to the plasma wave is adjusted by tuning the plasma density. It is shown that the second bunch experiences a 150 MeV/m loaded accelerating gradient in the wakefield driven by the first bunch. This is the first experiment to directly demonstrate high-gradient, controlled acceleration of a short-pulse trailing electron bunch in a high-density plasma.

  16. High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) data analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Dynamics Explorer mission are to investigate the coupling of energy, mass, and momentum among the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere. At launch, on August 3, 1981, DE-1 was placed into an elliptical polar orbit having an apogee of 23,130 km to allow global auroral imaging and crossings of auroral field lines at altitudes of several thousand kilometers. At the same time DE-2 was placed into a polar orbit, coplanar with that of DE-1 but with a perigee altitude low enough (309 km) for neutral measurements and an apogee altitude of 1012 km. The DE-1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) provided data on low and medium energy electrons and ions from August 13, 1981 until December 1, 1981, when a high-voltage failure occured. Analysis of HAPI data for the time period of this contract has produced new results on the source mechanisms for electron conical distributions, particle acceleration phenomena in auroral acceleration regions, Birkeland currents throughout the nightside auroral regions, the source region for auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), and plasma injection phenomena in the polar cusp.

  17. High density plasma gun generates plasmas at 190 kilometers per second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, P. N.

    1971-01-01

    Gun has thin metal foil disc which positions or localizes gas to be ionized during electrical discharge cycle, overcoming major limiting factor in obtaining such plasmas. Expanding plasma front travels at 190 km/sec, compared to plasmas of 50 to 60 km/sec previously achieved.

  18. Modelling deuterium release from tungsten after high flux high temperature deuterium plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorev, Petr; Matveev, Dmitry; Bakaeva, Anastasiia; Terentyev, Dmitry; Zhurkin, Evgeny E.; Van Oost, Guido; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten is a primary candidate for plasma facing materials for future fusion devices. An important safety concern in the design of plasma facing components is the retention of hydrogen isotopes. Available experimental data is vast and scattered, and a consistent physical model of retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten is still missing. In this work we propose a model of non-equilibrium hydrogen isotopes trapping under fusion relevant plasma exposure conditions. The model is coupled to a diffusion-trapping simulation tool and is used to interpret recent experiments involving high plasma flux exposures. From the computational analysis performed, it is concluded that high flux high temperature exposures (T = 1000 K, flux = 1024 D/m2/s and fluence of 1026 D/m2) result in generation of sub-surface damage and bulk diffusion, so that the retention is driven by both sub-surface plasma-induced defects (bubbles) and trapping at natural defects. On the basis of the non-equilibrium trapping model we have estimated the amount of H stored in the sub-surface region to be ∼10-5 at-1, while the bulk retention is about 4 × 10-7 at-1, calculated by assuming the sub-surface layer thickness of about 10 μm and adjusting the trap concentration to comply with the experimental results for the integral retention.

  19. High bacterial titers in urine are predictive of abnormal postvoid residual urine in patients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Caron, F; Alexandre, K; Pestel-Caron, M; Chassagne, P; Grise, P; Etienne, M

    2015-09-01

    Urine bacterial titers (BTs) are influenced by bacterial and host factors. The impact of an abnormal postvoid residual (PVR) on BT in urine was investigated. A total of 103 inpatients with a urine growing Enterobacteriacae (≥ 10(2) CFU/mL) and a PVR measure were analyzed, mostly female (62%), elderly (mean age: 72 years), with urinary tract infection (25% of asymptomatic bacteriuria) due to Escherichia coli (85%). Fifty-two subjects (56%) had BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL; 48 (53%) had a PVR ≤ 100 mL, while 26 (25%) had a PVR >250 mL. PVR increased with BT, and a significant (P<0.0001) threshold was reached for 10(6) CFU/mL: 100mL mean PVR for patients with BT ≤ 10(5) CFU/mL versus 248 mL for patients with BT >10(5) CFU/mL. High PVR and BT were associated with complicated infections, concomitant bacteremia, and delayed apyrexia. Screening for patients with BT ≥ 10(6) CFU/mL is an easy way to identify patients at high risk for acute retention and voiding disorders.

  20. Assessment of Plasma Transport and Convection at High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere is strongly coupled to the thermosphere and magnetosphere. The magnetospheric coupling occurs via electric fields, field-aligned currents, and particle precipitation. Owing to the interaction of the shocked solar wind with the geomagnetic field, an electric potential difference is generated across the tail of the magnetosphere, with the resulting electric field pointing from dawn to dusk. Energetic particle precipitation from the magnetosphere in the auroral region leads to the creation of ionization and to electron, ion, and neutral gas heating. In order to assess the current understanding of plasma transport and convection at high latitudes, it is necessary to take account of the strong coupling between the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetosphere.

  1. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-15

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  2. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  3. High sensitivity imaging Thomson scattering for low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Meiden, H. J. van der; Al, R. S.; Barth, C. J.; Donne, A. J. H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Groot, B. de; Koppers, W. R.; Pol, M. J. van de; Prins, P. R.; Shumack, A. E.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Westerhout, J.; Wright, G. M.; Rooij, G. J. van; Engeln, R.; Kleyn, A. W.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Schram, D. C.

    2008-01-15

    A highly sensitive imaging Thomson scattering system was developed for low temperature (0.1-10 eV) plasma applications at the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. The essential parts of the diagnostic are a neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser operating at the second harmonic (532 nm), a laser beam line with a unique stray light suppression system and a detection branch consisting of a Littrow spectrometer equipped with an efficient detector based on a ''Generation III'' image intensifier combined with an intensified charged coupled device camera. The system is capable of measuring electron density and temperature profiles of a plasma column of 30 mm in diameter with a spatial resolution of 0.6 mm and an observational error of 3% in the electron density (n{sub e}) and 6% in the electron temperature (T{sub e}) at n{sub e}=4x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. This is achievable at an accumulated laser input energy of 11 J (from 30 laser pulses at 10 Hz repetition frequency). The stray light contribution is below 9x10{sup 17} m{sup -3} in electron density equivalents by the application of a unique stray light suppression system. The amount of laser energy that is required for a n{sub e} and T{sub e} measurement is 7x10{sup 20}/n{sub e} J, which means that single shot measurements are possible for n{sub e}>2x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}.

  4. Milk from dams fed an obesogenic diet combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet induces long-term abnormal mammary gland development in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hue-Beauvais, C; Koch, E; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Galio, L; Chat, S; Letheule, M; Rousseau-Ralliard, D; Jaffrezic, F; Laloë, D; Aujean, E; Révillion, F; Lhotellier, V; Gertler, A; Devinoy, E; Charlier, M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to the metabolic endocrine environment during early life are crucial to mammary gland development. Among these environmental parameters, the initial nutritional event after birth is the consumption of milk, which represents the first maternal support provided to mammalian newborns. Milk is a complex fluid that exerts effects far beyond its immediate nutritional value. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine the effect of the nutritional changes during the neonatal and prepubertal periods on the adult mammary phenotype. Newborn rabbits were suckled by dams fed a high-fat/high-sugar obesogenic (OD) or a control (CON) diet and then subsequently fed either the OD or CON diets from the onset of puberty and throughout early pregnancy. Mammary glands were collected during early pregnancy (Day 8 of pregnancy). Rabbits fed with OD milk and then subjected to an OD diet displayed an abnormal development of the mammary gland: the mammary ducts were markedly enlarged (P < 0.05) and filled with abundant secretory products. Moreover, the alveolar secretory structures were disorganized, with an abnormal aspect characterized by large lumina. Mammary epithelial cells contained numerous large lipid droplets and exhibited fingering of the apical membrane and abnormally enlarged intercellular spaces filled with casein micelles. Leptin has been shown to be involved in modulating several developmental processes. We therefore analyzed its expression in the mammary gland. Mammary leptin mRNA was strongly expressed in rabbits fed with OD milk and subjected to an OD diet by comparison with the CON rabbits. Leptin transcripts and protein were localized in the epithelial cells, indicating that the increase in leptin synthesis occurs in this compartment. Taken together, these findings suggest that early-life nutritional history, in particular through the milking period, can determine subsequent mammary gland development. Moreover, they highlight the potentially important

  5. Vortices, Reconnection and Turbulence in High Electron-Beta Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.

    2004-08-31

    Plasmas in which the kinetic energy exceeds the magnetic energy by a significant factor are common in space and in the laboratory. Such plasmas can convect magnetic fields and create null points in whose vicinity first the ions become unmagnetized, then the electrons. This project focuses on the detailed study of the transition regime of these plasmas.

  6. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  7. Generation of Gigabar Pressures for High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Mangino, D.; Casner, A.; Beg, F. N.; Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Wei, M. S.; Schoff, M. E.; Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser were performed to study gigabar pressures in small (50- μm-diam) Ti and Cu target samples for high-energy-density plasma applications. The samples were precisely placed (better than 10 μm) at the center of a spherical plastic matrix that is irradiated at incident laser intensities of 5 ×1015 W /cm2 . The laser launches a spherical shock wave that converges in the center in order to reach Gbar pressures in the sample. The shock convergence produces a short burst ( 30ps) of x-ray emission. Time-resolved and time-integrated x-ray spectroscopy provides the means to diagnose the plasma conditions in the sample. The time-resolved spectra are compared to predictions from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to infer the material conditions at Gbar pressures. A second x-ray flash delayed by 600ps caused by the breakout of the rebounded shock through the outer surface of the compressed plastic was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by the Fusion Science Center under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  8. High-Intensity High-order Harmonics Generated from Low-Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Bom, L. B. Elouga; Abdul-Hadi, J.; Ganeev, R. A.; Haessler, S.; Salieres, P.

    2009-07-25

    We study the generation of high-order harmonics from lowly ionized plasma, using the 10 TW, 10 Hz laser of the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS). We perform detailed studies on the enhancement of a single order of the high-order harmonic spectrum generated in plasma using the fundamental and second harmonic of the ALLS beam line. We observe quasi-monochromatic harmonics for various targets, including Mn, Cr, Sn, and In. We identify most of the ionic/neutral transitions responsible for the enhancement, which all have strong oscillator strengths. We demonstrate intensity enhancements of the 13th, 17th, 29th, and 33rd harmonics from these targets using the 800 nm pump laser and varying its chirp. We also characterized the attosecond nature of such plasma harmonics, measuring attosecond pulse trains with 360 as duration for chromium plasma, using the technique of 'Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference of Two-photon Transitions'(RABBIT). These results show that plasma harmonics are intense source of ultrashort coherent soft x-rays.

  9. High fusion performance from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhacker, M.; Gibson, A.; Gormezano, C.; Lomas, P. J.; Thomas, P. R.; Watkins, M. L.; Andrew, P.; Balet, B.; Borba, D.; Challis, C. D.; Coffey, I.; Cottrell, G. A.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Deliyanakis, N.; Fasoli, A.; Gowers, C. W.; Guo, H. Y.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Jones, T. T. C.; Kerner, W.; König, R. W. T.; Loughlin, M. J.; Maas, A.; Marcus, F. B.; Nave, M. F. F.; Rimini, F. G.; Sadler, G. J.; Sharapov, S. E.; Sips, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Taroni, A.; Tubbing, B. J. D.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Ward, D. J.; JET Team

    1999-02-01

    High fusion power experiments using DT mixtures in ELM-free H mode and optimized shear regimes in JET are reported. A fusion power of 16.1 MW has been produced in an ELM-free H mode at 4.2 MA/3.6 T. The transient value of the fusion amplification factor was 0.95+/-0.17, consistent with the high value of nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0) = 8.7 × 1020+/-20% m-3 s keV, and was maintained for about half an energy confinement time until excessive edge pressure gradients resulted in discharge termination by MHD instabilities. The ratio of DD to DT fusion powers (from separate but otherwise similar discharges) showed the expected factor of 210, validating DD projections of DT performance for similar pressure profiles and good plasma mixture control, which was achieved by loading the vessel walls with the appropriate DT mix. Magnetic fluctuation spectra showed no evidence of Alfvénic instabilities driven by alpha particles, in agreement with theoretical model calculations. Alpha particle heating has been unambiguously observed, its effect being separated successfully from possible isotope effects on energy confinement by varying the tritium concentration in otherwise similar discharges. The scan showed that there was no, or at most a very weak, isotope effect on the energy confinement time. The highest electron temperature was clearly correlated with the maximum alpha particle heating power and the optimum DT mixture; the maximum increase was 1.3+/-0.23 keV with 1.3 MW of alpha particle heating power, consistent with classical expectations for alpha particle confinement and heating. In the optimized shear regime, clear internal transport barriers were established for the first time in DT, with a power similar to that required in DD. The ion thermal conductivity in the plasma core approached neoclassical levels. Real time power control maintained the plasma core close to limits set by pressure gradient driven MHD instabilities, allowing 8.2 MW of DT fusion power with nDT(0)τEdiaTi(0

  10. Lipid metabolism abnormalities in alcohol-treated rabbits: a morphometric and haematologic study comparing high and low alcohol doses

    PubMed Central

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Zhao, Garida; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteonecrosis remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the morphological changes in bone marrow fat cells and the changes in the serum lipid levels in alcohol-treated rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were randomly assigned into three groups: Four rabbits intragastrically received low-dose alcohol (LDA) (15 ml/kg per day) containing 15% ethanol for 4 weeks, five rabbits received high-dose alcohol (HDA) (30 ml/kg per day) for 4 weeks and six rabbits received physiologic saline for 4 weeks as a control group. Six weeks after the initial alcohol administration, all rabbits were sacrificed. The mean size of the bone marrow fat cells in rabbits treated with HDA was significantly larger than that in the control group (P = 0.0001). Haematologically, the levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the rabbits treated with both low-dose and HDA were significantly higher than those in the control group (P = 0.001 for both comparisons). The results of this study are that there are lipid metabolism abnormalities, both morphologically and haematologically, after alcohol administration. Also these findings were more apparent in rabbits treated with HDA than those treated with LDA. PMID:21645143

  11. Abnormal Mammary Adipose Tissue Environment of Brca1 Mutant Mice Show a Persistent Deposition of Highly Vascularized Multilocular Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laundette P; Buelto, Destiney; Tago, Elaine; Owusu-Boaitey, Kwadwo E

    2011-12-08

    A major challenge to breast cancer research is the identification of alterations in the architecture and composition of the breast that are associated with breast cancer progression. The aim of the present investigation was to characterize the mammary adipose phenotype from Brca1 mutant mice in the expectation that this would shed light on the role of the mammary tissue environment in the early stages of breast tumorigenesis. We observed that histological sections of mammary tissue from adult Brca1 mutant mice abnormally display small, multilocular adipocytes that are reminiscent of brown adipose tissue (BAT) as compared to wildtype mice. Using a marker for BAT, the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), we demonstrated that these multilocular adipose regions in Brca1 mutant mice stain positive for UCP1. Transcriptionally, UCP1 mRNA levels in the Brca1 mutant mice were elevated greater than 50-fold compared to age-matched mammary glands from wildtype mice. Indeed, BAT has characteristics that are favorable for tumor growth, including high vascularity. Therefore, we also demonstrated that the multilocular brown adipose phenotype in the mammary fat pad of Brca1 mutant mice displayed regions of increased vascularity as evidenced by a significant increase in the protein expression of CD31, a marker for angiogenesis. This Brca1 mutant mouse model should provide a physiologically relevant context to determine whether brown adipose tissue can play a role in breast cancer development.

  12. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  13. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  14. Schlieren High Speed Imaging on Fluid Flow in Liquid Induced by Plasma-driven Interfacial Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Effective plasma-based water purification depends heavily on the transport of plasma-derived reactive species from the plasma into the liquid. Plasma interactions at the liquid-gas boundary are known to drive circulation in the bulk liquid. This forced circulation is not well understood. A 2-D plasma- in-liquid water apparatus is currently being investigated as a means to study the plasma-liquid interface to understand not only reactive species flows but to also understand plasma- driven fluid dynamic effects in the bulk fluid. Using Schlieren high speed imaging, plasma-induced density gradients near the interfacial region and into the bulk solution are measured to investigate the nature of these interfacial forces. Plasma-induced flow was also measured using particle imaging velocimetry. NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  15. A scheme to produce high density and high temperature plasma for opacity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The opacity of shock-compressed material is of general scientific interest for astrophysical plasmas and for inertial confinement fusion research. A proposal is suggested to produce high temperature plasma with density around 1 g/cm{sup −3}. Two types of opacity target (the sandwich target and the foam enhanced sandwich target) are investigated numerically. The foam enhanced sandwich target has structure of foam–solid-sample-solid-foam. The foam will increase laser absorption efficiency and the ablating pressure. Hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the laser can be fully absorbed by the under-critical-density foam and a faster shock is produced inside the CH layer. High intensity lasers heat opacity target from both sides. The CH layers must be thick enough to keep the laser away from the sample. The laser-driven shocks move inward and collide at the center. Part of their kinetic energy is converted into internal energy and high density and high temperature local thermodynamic equilibrium sample plasma is produced. The plasma produced by laser heating the foam enhanced sandwich target has higher sample temperature than by laser heating the sandwich target. It may be useful for measuring the opacity of shock compressed material in laboratory.

  16. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition.

  17. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  18. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot highplasma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, L.; Fulton, D. P.; Ruskov, E.; Lau, C.; Deng, B. H.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements. PMID:28000675

  19. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot highplasma.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, L; Fulton, D P; Ruskov, E; Lau, C; Deng, B H; Tajima, T; Binderbauer, M W; Holod, I; Lin, Z; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M; Dettrick, S A; Steinhauer, L C

    2016-12-21

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  20. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot highplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Fulton, D. P.; Ruskov, E.; Lau, C.; Deng, B. H.; Tajima, T.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Gota, H.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S. A.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  1. High-energy ion generation in interaction. of short laser pulse with high-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Y.; Bychenkov, V. Y.; Flippo, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mima, K.; Mourou, G.; Sheng, Z. M.; Umstadter, D.

    2002-03-01

    Multi-MeV ion production from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a high-density plasma, accompanied by an underdense preplasma, has been studied with a particle-in-cell simulation and good agreement is found with experiment. The mechanism primarily responsible for the acceleration of ions is identified. Comparison with experiments sheds light on the ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, preplasma scale length, and relative ion energies for a multi-species plasma. Two regimes of maximum ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, I, have been identified: subrelativistic, ∝I; and relativistic, ∝. Simulations show that the energy of the accelerated ions versus the preplasma scale length increases linearly and then saturates. In contrast, the ion energy decreases with the thickness of the solid-density plasma.

  2. Plasma puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Choi, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on a hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for the azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide range of fill gas pressure of Ar, He and N2. The optimal fill gas pressure for the azimuthally uniform plasma-puff was about 120 mTorr and 450 Torr for He and N2, and between 120 mTorr and 5 Torr for Ar. The inverse pinch switch was triggered with the plasma-puff and the switching capability under various electrical parameters and working gas pressures of Ar, He and N2 was determined. It was also shown that the azimuthally uniform switching discharges were dependent on the type of fill gas and its fill pressure. A new concept of plasma-focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of inverse pinch switch with plasma-focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr.

  3. Abnormal white matter integrity related to head impact exposure in a season of high school varsity football.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Elizabeth M; Whitlow, Christopher T; Urban, Jillian E; Espeland, Mark A; Jung, Youngkyoo; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Gioia, Gerard A; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D; Maldjian, Joseph A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cumulative effects of head impacts from a season of high school football produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measureable changes in the brain in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussion. Players from a local high school football team were instrumented with the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS™) during all practices and games. All players received pre- and postseason MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was also conducted. Total impacts and risk-weighted cumulative exposure (RWE), including linear (RWELinear), rotational (RWERotational), and combined components (RWECP), were computed from the sensor data. Fractional, linear, planar, and spherical anisotropies (FA, CL, CP, and CS, respectively), as well as mean diffusivity (MD), were used to determine total number of abnormal white matter voxels defined as 2 standard deviations above or below the group mean. Delta (post-preseason) ImPACT scores for each individual were computed and compared to the DTI measures using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. None of the players analyzed experienced clinical concussion (N=24). Regression analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship between RWECP and FA. Secondary analyses demonstrated additional statistically significant linear associations between RWE (RWECP and RWELinear) and all DTI measures. There was also a strong correlation between DTI measures and change in Verbal Memory subscore of the ImPACT. We demonstrate that a single season of football can produce brain MRI changes in the absence of clinical concussion. Similar brain MRI changes have been previously associated with mild traumatic brain injury.

  4. Abnormal responses of electronic pocket dosimeters caused by high frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from digital cellular telephones.

    PubMed

    Deji, Shizuhiko; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2005-09-01

    High frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from digital cellular telephones (cell phones) occasionally cause abnormally high and erroneous indicated dose readings on electronic pocket dosimeters (EPDs). Electric field strength distribution around a cell phone transmitting 1.5 GHz band with a maximum power of 0.8 W was analyzed by using an isotropic probe with tri-axial dipole antennas. Five types of EPDs were exposed to the fields for 50 s under configurations relative to the cell phone. The electric field distribution expanded around the phone's antenna and had a maximum electric field strength of 36.5 +/- 0.3 V m(-1). The cell phone gave rise to erroneous indicated dose readings on four out of five EPDs. The maximum value of erroneous indicated dosage for 50 s reached 1,283 microSv, which was about 2.6% of the annual effective dose limit of 50 mSv. The electromagnetic susceptibility of the EPDs was higher in the sections where the semiconductor detectors or electric circuit boards were located. The distance required to prevent electromagnetic interference differed for each EPD and ranged from 2.0 to 21.0 cm from the cell phone. The electric and magnetic field immunity levels of the EPDs varied from 9.2 V m(-1) to greater than 37.6 V m(-1), and from 0.03 A m(-1) to greater than 0.51 A m(-1). The EPDs displayed erroneous dose readings during exposure but recovered their normal performance after the cell phone ceased transmitting. The electromagnetic immunity levels of the EPDs were either equal to or greater than the IEC-standard. The immunity levels should be enhanced greater than the IEC-standard from the standpoint of radiation protection. The simplest and most reliable measure to prevent potential malfunction is to prohibit the radiation workers from carrying cell phones to their workplace.

  5. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  6. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  7. Stability in high gain plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, E.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Murakami, M.; Wade, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    Fusion power gain has been increased by a factor of 3 in DIII-D plasmas through the use of strong discharge shaping and tailoring of the pressure and current density profiles. H-mode plasmas with weak or negative central magnetic shear are found to have neoclassical ion confinement throughout most of the plasma volume. Improved MHD stability is achieved by controlling the plasma pressure profile width. The highest fusion power gain Q (ratio of fusion power to input power) in deuterium plasmas was 0.0015, which extrapolates to an equivalent Q of 0.32 in a deuterium-tritium plasma and is similar to values achieved in tokamaks of larger size and magnetic fields.

  8. Stability in High Gain Plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, E. A.; Hong, R. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Sabbagh, S.; Strait, E. J.; Rice, B. W.; Ferron, J. R.; Greenfield, C. M.; Austin, M. E.; Chan, V. S.; DeBoo, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Forest, C. B.; Leonard, A. W.; Schissel, D. P.; Whyte, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    Fusion power gain has been increased by a factor of 3 in DIII-D plasmas through the use of strong discharge shaping and tailoring of the pressure and current density profiles. H-mode plasmas with weak or negative central magnetic shear are found to have neoclassical ion confinement throughout most of the plasma volume. Improved MHD stability is achieved by controlling the plasma pressure profile width. The highest fusion power gain Q (ratio of fusion power to input power) in deuterium plasmas was 0.0015. which extrapolates to an equivalent Q of 0.32 in a deuterium-tritium plasma and is similar to values achieved in tokamaks of larger size and magnetic fields.

  9. Simulations of a High-Transformer-Ratio Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using Multiple Electron Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Kallos, Efthymios; Muggli, Patric; Katsouleas, Thomas; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Park, Jangho

    2009-01-22

    Particle-in-cell simulations of a plasma wakefield accelerator in the linear regime are presented, consisting of four electron bunches that are fed into a high-density plasma. It is found that a high transformer ratio can be maintained over 43 cm of plasma if the charge in each bunch is increased linearly, the bunches are placed 1.5 plasma wavelengths apart and the bunch emmitances are adjusted to compensate for the nonlinear focusing forces. The generated wakefield is sampled by a test witness bunch whose energy gain after the plasma is six times the energy loss of the drive bunches.

  10. High Power, Solid-State RF Generation for Plasma Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Pierren, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Radio Frequency heating systems are rarely used by the small-scale validation platform experiments due to the high cost and complexity of these systems. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing an all-solid-state RF plasma heating system that uses EHT's nanosecond pulser technology in an inductive adder configuration to drive nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL). The system under development does not require the use of vacuum tube technology, is inherently lower cost, and is more robust than traditional high power RF heating schemes. The inductive adder can produce 0 to20 kV pulses into 50 Ohms with sub-10 ns rise times. The inductive adder has been used to drive NLTLs near 2 GHz with other frequencies to be tested in the future. EHT will present experimental results, including RF measurements with D-dot probes and capacitve voltage probes. During this program, EHT will test the system on Helicity Injected Torus at the University of Washington and the High Beta Tokamak at Columbia University.

  11. Blistering on tungsten surface exposed to high flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. Y.; Liu, W.; Luo, G. N.; Yuan, Y.; Jia, Y. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-04-01

    The blistering behaviour of tungsten surfaces exposed to very high fluxes (1-2 × 1024/m2/s) of low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasmas was investigated as a function of ion fluence (0.2-7 × 1026 D/m2) and surface temperature (423-873 K). Blisters were observed under all conditions, especially up to temperatures of 873 K. The blister parameters are evaluated with blister size, blister density and surface coverage. The blister size always peaked at less than 0.5 μm and no blister larger than 10 μm is observed even at high fluence. The blister densities are found in high magnitude of 106 blisters/m2, with the surface coverages lower than 2%. The formation of cracks in the sub-surface region was observed by cross-section imaging. Changes in blister size and shape with fluence and temperature suggest processes of predominantly nucleation and subsequent growth of blisters. The smaller blister size is considered to be caused by a combination of flux-related effects such as enhanced defect formation in the near surface region, reduced deuterium diffusivity and relatively short exposure times.

  12. Coaxial plasma thrusters for high specific impulse propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F.; Gerwin, Richard A.; Barnes, Cris W.; Henins, Ivars; Mayo, Robert; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Scarberry, Richard; Wurden, Glen

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental basis for coaxial plasma thruster performance is presented and the steady-state, ideal MHD properties of a coaxial thruster using an annular magnetic nozzle are discussed. Formulas for power usage, thrust, mass flow rate, and specific impulse are acquired and employed to assess thruster performance. The performance estimates are compared with the observed properties of an unoptimized coaxial plasma gun. These comparisons support the hypothesis that ideal MHD has an important role in coaxial plasma thruster dynamics.

  13. Formation of high-{beta} plasma and stable confinement of toroidal electron plasma in Ring Trap 1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Furukawa, M.; Yano, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Vogel, G.; Mikami, H.

    2011-05-15

    Formation of high-{beta} electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma and stable confinement of pure electron plasma have been realized in the Ring Trap 1 device, a magnetospheric configuration generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. The effects of coil levitation resulted in drastic improvements of the confinement properties, and the maximum local {beta} value has exceeded 70%. Hot electrons are major component of electron populations, and its particle confinement time is 0.5 s. Plasma has a peaked density profile in strong field region [H. Saitoh et al., 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference EXC/9-4Rb (2010)]. In pure electron plasma experiment, inward particle diffusion is realized, and electrons are stably trapped for more than 300 s. When the plasma is in turbulent state during beam injection, plasma flow has a shear, which activates the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability. The canonical angular momentum of the particle is not conserved in this phase, realizing the radial diffusion of charged particles across closed magnetic surfaces. [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys Rev. Lett. 104, 235004 (2010); H. Saitoh et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 112111 (2010).].

  14. Characterization of Wet Air Plasma Jet Powered by Sinusoidal High Voltage and Nanosecond Pulses for Plasma Agricultural Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Shimada, Keisuke; Konishi, Hideaki; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2015-09-01

    Not only for the plasma sterilization but also for many of plasma life-science applications, atmospheric pressure plasma devices that allowed us to control its state and reactive species production are deserved to resolve the roles of the chemical species. Influence of the hydroxyl radical and ozone on germination of conidia of a strawberry pathogen is presented. Water addition to air plasma jet significantly improves germination suppression performance, while measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) are reduced. Although the results show a negative correlation between ROS and the germination suppression, this infers the importance of chemical composition generated by plasma. For further control of the plasma product, a plasma jet powered by sinusoidal high voltage and nanosecond pulses is developed and characterized with the voltage-charge Lissajous. Control of breakdown phase and discharge power by pulse-imposed phase is presented. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) Grant Number 15K17480 and Exploratory Research Grant Number 23644199.

  15. Plasma BDNF and PDGF-AA levels are associated with high TCD velocity and stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Hyacinth, Hyacinth I; Gee, Beatrice E; Adamkiewicz, Thomas V; Adams, Robert J; Kutlar, Abdullah; Stiles, Jonathan K; Hibbert, Jacqueline M

    2012-10-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) associated cerebrovascular disease includes vascular remodeling, abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) and infarction. We studied the relationships between plasma brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), platelet derived growth factors (PDGF-AA and -AB/BB) and high trans-cranial Doppler (TCD) velocity, an indication of CBF velocity. Baseline plasma samples from 39 children (19 SCA with abnormal/high TCD [SATCD], 13 SCA with normal TCD [SNTCD] and 7 healthy non-SCA), were assayed for BDNF, PDGF-AA and -AB/BB plus 11 other cytokines. The sensitivity, specificity and usefulness of these biomarkers for stroke prediction was investigated. All subject groups were of similar age and gender distribution. Mean BDNF was significantly higher among SATCD than SNTCD (p=0.004) as was mean PDGF-AA (p=0.001). Similarly, mean PDGF-AA was higher among SCA subjects who developed stroke than those who did not (p=0.012). Elevated BDNF and PDGF-AA were good predictors of the presence of abnormally high CBF velocity and were both associated with severity of anemia. Elevated PDGF-AA predicted risk for stroke development. Stroke incidence and high TCD velocity were associated with elevated BDNF and PDGF-AA. These findings suggest a role for BDNF and PDGF-AA in the patho-physiological mechanism of cerebrovascular disease in SCA.

  16. Plasma and electric field boundaries at high and low altitudes on July 29, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Johnson, R. G.; Young, D. T.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Hot plasma observations at high and low altitudes were compared. The plasma ion composition at high altitudes outside the plasmasphere was 0+. Heavy ions were also observed at low altitudes outside the plasmasphere. It is shown that at times these ions are found well below the plasmapause inside the plasmasphere. Comparisons of the low altitude plasma and dc electric fields show that the outer limits of the plasmasphere is not always corotating at the low L-shells. The corotation boundary, the estimated plasmapause boundary at the boundary of the inner edge of plasma sheet ions were at the same position. The inner edge of plasma sheet electrons is observed at higher latitudes than the plasmasphere boundary during disturbed times. The inner edge of the plasma sheaths shows a strong dawn to dusk asymmetry. At the same time the inner edge of the ring current and plasma sheath also moves to high latitudes reflecting an apparent inflation of the magnetosphere.

  17. Nucleophilic addition to olefins. 19. Abnormally high intrinsic barrier in the reaction of piperidine and morpholine with benzylideneacetylacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Bernasconi, C.F.; Kanavarioti, A.

    1986-11-26

    The title reaction leads to the formation of the zwitterionic Michael adduct T/sup +/-/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/NH/sup +/)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/) which is in rapid acid-base equilibrium with its anionic form T/sup -/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/N)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/). Rate (K/sub 1/, k/sub -1/) and equilibrium constants (K/sub 1/) for nucleophilic addition and the pK/sub a/ of the T/sup +/-/-adducts were determined in 50% Me/sub 2/SO-50% water at 20/sup 0/C. From an interpolation of the rate constants to K/sub 1/ = 1 an intrinsic rate constant, log k/sub 0/ = 0.3, was determined. This value deviates negatively by approximately 2.5 log units from a correlation of log k/sub 0/ for amine addition to five olefins of the type PhCH=CXY, with log k/sub 0/ for the deprotonation of the corresponding carbon acids CH/sub 2/XY. Two major factors are believed to contribute to this depressed intrinsic rate constant or enhanced intrinsic barrier: (1) steric inhibition of resonance in T/sup +/-/ with the steric effect developing ahead of C-N bond formation (this conclusion is supported by an X-ray crystallographic study of p-methoxybenzylideneacetylacetone which shows that steric hindrance to optimal ..pi..-overlap in the adduct T/sup+/-/ is already present in the substrate); (2) intramolecular hydrogen bonding in T/sup +/-/, which is inferred from abnormally high pK/sub a/ values and whose development lags behind C-N bond formation. These effects are shown to be manifestations of the Principle of Nonperfect Synchronization.

  18. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  19. High atherogenic index of plasma in subclinical hypothyroidism: Implications in assessment of cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Ravichandran, Kandasamy; Nanda, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A controversy exists regarding the association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and dyslipidemia. Moreover, studies on lipid ratios and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in SH are rare, particularly in the Indian scenario. Aim: This study aimed to investigate abnormalities in conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP in SH and attempted to correlate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and AIP in SH. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis of patient records of SH subjects and euthyroid subjects, age, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, TSH, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, lipid ratios, and AIP were compared between the two groups. The correlation of TSH and AIP in SH was studied. Spearman's correlation, Mann–Whitney U-test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results: Triglyceride, triglyceride/HDL-C, and AIP were significantly higher in SH as compared to euthyroid group, but there was no correlation between TSH and AIP in SH. AIP emerged as the significant single factor associated with SH in multiple logistic regressions. Conclusion: The positive association of dyslipidemia and SH indicates a need for regular screening of these patients to enable early diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia. Even in patients who have a normal conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP have to be calculated for better assessment of atherogenic risk. PMID:27730076

  20. Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K.

    2012-10-23

    We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

  1. Minimal Plasma Response Models for Design of Tokamak Equilibrium Controllers with High Dynamic Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, D. A.; Walker, M. L.; Leuer, J. A.

    1999-11-01

    We describe a model of linearized plasma shape and position response which is based on low poloidal mode number (m<=2, approximately vertical and major radial) displacements of the plasma current distribution. The model introduces minimal plasma degrees of freedom while providing sufficient accuracy for high performance controller design. The effects of significant variation in plasma poloidal beta, internal inductance, and separatrix configuration are taken into account. Models which can predict plasma shape and position variation with reasonable accuracy are particularly important for design of dynamic controllers in devices with significant variation in auxiliary heating input power and plasma shape --- conditions common in the DIII--D tokamak. Model predictions are validated using experimental response data from DIII--D. Application of the plasma response model to design of multivariable dynamic plasma controllers recently implemented on DIII--D is described.

  2. Spectroscopic Measurement of High-Frequency Electric Fields in the Interaction of Explosive Debris Plasma with Ambient, Magnetized Background Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton; Schaeffer, Derek; Everson, Erik; Clark, Eric; Vincena, Stephen; van Compernolle, Bart; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The explosive expansion of dense, high-beta debris plasma into relatively tenuous, magnetized background plasma is relevant to a wide variety of astrophysical and space environments. Electric fields play a fundamental role in the coupling of momentum and energy from debris to background, and emission spectroscopy provides a powerful diagnostic for assessing electric fields via the Stark effect. A recent experiment utilizing a unique experimental platform at UCLA that combines the Large Plasma Device and the Raptor laser facility has investigated the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of a laser-produced carbon (C) debris plasma through a preformed, ambient, magnetized helium (He) background plasma via emission spectroscopy. Spectral profiles of the He II 468.6 nm line have been analyzed via single-mode and multi-mode time-dependent Stark broadening models for hydrogen-like ions, yielding large magnitude (~100 kV/cm), high-frequency (~100 GHz) electric fields. The measurements suggest the development of an electron beam-plasma instability, and a simple instability saturation model demonstrates that the measured electric field magnitudes are feasible under the experimental conditions.

  3. Synthesis of highly functionalised plasma polymer films from protonated precursor ions via the plasma α-γ transition.

    PubMed

    Saboohi, Solmaz; Coad, Bryan R; Griesser, Hans J; Michelmore, Andrew; Short, Robert D

    2017-02-15

    Chemically functionalized surfaces may be produced via plasma polymerization, however a high degree of functional group retention is often difficult to achieve. Here, the plasma polymerization of three structurally related ester precursors, ethyl isobutyrate (EIB), methyl isobutyrate (MIB) and ethyl trimethylacetate (ETMA) is compared at low and high pressure. In moving from a low pressure to higher pressure regime, significant changes in the plasma chemistry and resulting plasma polymer deposit were observed with much higher retention of chemical functionality at the higher pressure observed. Until now these changes would have been attributed to a decrease in the energy/molecule, however we show by direct measurement of the chemistry and physics of the plasma that there is fundamental shift in the properties of the plasma and surface interactions which explain the results. At low pressure (α regime) precursor fragmentation and neutral deposition dominate resulting in poor functional group retention. Increasing the pressure such that the sheath region close to surfaces becomes collisional (γ regime) favours production of protonated precursor ions which retain functionality and dominate the deposition process rather than radical species.

  4. Interaction of high voltage surfaces with the space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    High voltage solar arrays provide spacecraft power while optimizing mass and power efficiency. Operating such arrays in the space plasma environment can result in anomalously large currents being collected through insulation defects. Two thicknesses of the insulating material were tested, with no effect found due to insulator thickness. In these tests the polyimide thickness was always much less than the pinhole diameter. The pinhole area was varied over an area range of more than 30:1. It was found that the current collected was independent of the pinhole area for hole diameters from 0.35 to 2.0 mm. Two types of adhesives were tried in two different configurations. The adhesives were chosen for their extreme difference in vacuum qualifications. Neither adhesive types nor configuration made a significant difference in current collection. The temperature of the insulating material was also varied. It was found that current collection decreased with increasing temperature. Tests were conducted to see if pinhole current collection decreased with time, as was indicated by the effects of several short tests. Current was collected for over four hours while the conductor potential was held constant at 1000 volts. A smooth decrease with time was not observed, but rather a roughly constant current collection with brief surges to high values. Tests were also conducted with the simulated solar cell biased negative. The current was found to be proportional to pinhole area.

  5. Abnormal monsoon years and their control on erosion and sediment flux in the high, arid northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookhagen, Bodo; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2005-02-01

    The interplay between topography and Indian summer monsoon circulation profoundly controls precipitation distribution, sediment transport, and river discharge along the Southern Himalayan Mountain Front (SHF). The Higher Himalayas form a major orographic barrier that separates humid sectors to the south and arid regions to the north. During the Indian summer monsoon, vortices transport moisture from the Bay of Bengal, swirl along the SHF to the northwest, and cause heavy rainfall when colliding with the mountain front. In the eastern and central parts of the Himalaya, precipitation measurements derived from passive microwave analysis (SSM/I) show a strong gradient, with high values at medium elevations and extensive penetration of moisture along major river valleys into the orogen. The end of the monsoonal conveyer belt is near the Sutlej Valley in the NW Himalaya, where precipitation is lower and rainfall maxima move to lower elevations. This region thus comprises a climatic transition zone that is very sensitive to changes in Indian summer monsoon strength. To constrain magnitude, temporal, and spatial distribution of precipitation, we analyzed high-resolution passive microwave data from the last decade and identified an abnormal monsoon year (AMY) in 2002. During the 2002 AMY, violent rainstorms conquered orographic barriers and penetrated far into otherwise arid regions in the northwest Himalaya at elevations in excess of 3 km asl. While precipitation in these regions was significantly increased and triggered extensive erosional processes (i.e., debris flows) on sparsely vegetated, steep hillslopes, mean rainfall along the low to medium elevations was not significantly greater in magnitude. This shift may thus play an important role in the overall sediment flux toward the Himalayan foreland. Using extended precipitation and sediment flux records for the last century, we show that these events have a decadal recurrence interval during the present-day monsoon

  6. A plasma generator utilizing the high intensity ASTROMAG magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, James D.; Post, R. S.; Lane, B. G.; Tarrh, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The magnet configuration for the proposed particle astrophysics magnet facility (ASTROMAG) on the space station includes a cusp magnetic field with an intensity of a few tesla. With these large magnets (or others) located in the outer ionosphere, many quite interesting and unique plasma physics experiments become possible. First there are studies utilizing the magnet alone to examine the supersonic, sub-Alfvenic interaction with the ambient medium; the scale length for the magnet perturbation is approx. 20 m. The magnetic field geometry when combined with the Earth's and their relative motion will give rise to a host of plasma phenomena: ring nulls, x-points, ion-acoustic and lower-hybrid shocks, electron heating (possible shuttle glow without a surface) launching of Alfvenwaves, etc. Second, active experiments are possible for a controlled study of fundamental plasma phenomena. A controlled variable species plasma can be made by using an RF ion source; use of two soft iron rings placed about the line cusp would give an adequate resonance zone (ECH or ICH) and a confining volume suitable for gas efficiency. The emanating plasma can be used to study free expansion of plasma along and across field lines (polar wind), plasma flows around the space platform, turbulent mixing in the wake region, long wavelength spectrum of convecting modes, plasma-dust interactions, etc.

  7. Erosion of beryllium under high-flux plasma impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, R. P.; Björkas, C.; Nishijima, D.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2013-07-01

    Be sputtering yields, measured by weight loss, in PISCES-B are a factor of 5-10 less than that predicted by binary collision approximations. Measurements show the BeO surface is removed early in the plasma bombardment. Modeling of molecular ions (D2+ and D3+) species and redeposition cannot explain the difference. Surface morphology that evolves during the exposure reduces the sputtering yield by a factor of 2-3. Plasma fuel atoms retained in the surface decrease the sputtering yield compared to calculations of a pure Be surface. These effects may explain the measured erosion rates in the absence of Be impurities within the plasma. By introducing Be impurity ions into the plasma, it is possible to simulate a controllable amount of redeposition. The weight loss from eroding Be targets, with Be seeding, is unchanged until the concentration of Be ions in the plasma greatly exceeds the sputtering yield in the non-beryllium seeded exposure.

  8. Observation of the hot electron interchange instability in a high beta dipolar confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Eugenio Enrique

    In this thesis the first study of the high beta, hot electron interchange (HEI) instability in a laboratory, dipolar confined plasma is presented. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a new research facility that explores the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. In initial experiments long-pulse, quasi-steady state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 sec have been produced with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Creation of high-pressure, high beta plasma is possible only when intense HEI instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. LDX plasma exist within one of three regimes characterized by its response to heating and fueling. The observed HEI instability depends on the regime and can take one of three forms: as quasiperiodic bursts during the low density, low beta plasma regime, as local high beta relaxation events in the high beta plasma regime, and as global, intense energy relaxation bursts, both in the high beta and afterglow plasma regimes. Measurements of the HEI instability are made using high-impedance, floating potential probes and fast Mirnov coils. Analysis of these signals reveals the extent of the transport during high beta plasmas. During intense high beta HEI instabilities, fluctuations at the edge significantly exceed the magnitude of the equilibrium field generated by the high beta electrons and energetic electron confinement ends in under 100 musec. For heated plasmas, one of the consequences of the observed high beta transport is the presence of hysteresis in the neutral gas fueling required to stabilize and maintain the high beta plasma. Finally, a nonlinear, self-consistent numerical simulation of the growth and saturation of the HEI instability has been adapted for LDX and compared to experimental observations.

  9. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  10. Electrochemical properties of modified highly ordered pyrolytic graphite by using ambient plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Yang, Cheol-Soo; Jeong, HaeKyung

    2016-01-01

    Surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is reformed by using ambient plasma. The HOPG film shows various pore structures after the plasma treatment, indicating improved electrochemical properties for supercapacitor applications because of the increase of the surface area. We also compare water effect on the film during the plasma treatment. Water might protect HOPG surface from the plasma and provide oxygen functional groups onto it, resulting in lower infected pores and higher impedance compared with them of HOPG film without water. Ambient plasma, therefore, could be considered as an economic and effective method for sample reformations.

  11. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  12. Brain Anatomical Abnormalities in High-Risk Individuals, First-Episode, and Chronic Schizophrenia: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis of Illness Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Di, Xin; McAlonan, Grainne M.; Gong, Qi-yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study reviewed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies on high-risk individuals with schizophrenia, patients experiencing their first-episode schizophrenia (FES), and those with chronic schizophrenia. We predicted that gray matter abnormalities would show progressive changes, with most extensive abnormalities in the chronic group relative to FES and least in the high-risk group. Method: Forty-one VBM studies were reviewed. Eight high-risk studies, 14 FES studies, and 19 chronic studies were analyzed using anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis. Results: Less gray matter in the high-risk group relative to controls was observed in anterior cingulate regions, left amygdala, and right insula. Lower gray matter volumes in FES compared with controls were also found in the anterior cingulate and right insula but not the amygdala. Lower gray matter volumes in the chronic group were most extensive, incorporating similar regions to those found in FES and high-risk groups but extending to superior temporal gyri, thalamus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gryus. Subtraction analysis revealed less frontotemporal, striatal, and cerebellar gray matter in FES than the high-risk group; the high-risk group had less gray matter in left subcallosal gyrus, left amygdala, and left inferior frontal gyrus compared with FES. Subtraction analysis confirmed lower gray matter volumes through ventral-dorsal anterior cingulate, right insula, left amygdala and thalamus in chronic schizophrenia relative to FES. Conclusions: Frontotemporal brain structural abnormalities are evident in nonpsychotic individuals at high risk of developing schizophrenia. The present meta-analysis indicates that these gray matter abnormalities become more extensive through first-episode and chronic illness. Thus, schizophrenia appears to be a progressive cortico-striato-thalamic loop disorder. PMID:19633214

  13. Advanced Physical Models and Numerical Methods for High Enthalpy and Plasma Flows Applied to Hypersonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    nonequilibrium. For example, the plasma transport may transition between rarefied and continuum flow , requiring appropriate models for each case through...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0023 Advanced Physical Models and Numerical Methods for High Enthalpy and Plasma Flows Applied to Hypersonics...2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Physical Models and Numerical Methods for High Enthalpy and Plasma Flows Applied to Hypersonics 5a

  14. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  15. Ionospheric Plasma Outflow Under High Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Bouhram, M.; Dubouloz, N.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Berthomier, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    The polar cusp is well-known to be one of the most intense source regions of iono- spheric outflow. Since this region is of direct access for solar wind plasma, changes in the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind dynamic pressure are expected to influence the ion outflow. We report combined observations from the Interball- Auroral in the high-altitude range (10,000-20,000km) and the FAST satellite in the mid-altitude range (4000 km) revealing enhanced ion outflows in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock and CME. Several case studies based on the anal- ysis of ion data recorded from several orbits before and after the pressure impulse are made to investigate how the dynamic pressure affects the amount of outflowing ions. We found a clear relationship between the ion outflow variations and the dy- namic pressure changes when choosing average ion flux and average ion energy flux, inferred from global conservation laws, as parameters to characterize the ion outflow.

  16. Operational Characteristics of a High Voltage Dense Plasma Focus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    material from the inner surface of the outer electrode, hence, a cleaner plasma experiment is possible and the possibility of restrike is reduced. In...equilibrium plasma is balanced by the mag- netic pressure, pm’ at the surface . That is, pm= B 2/8w = Pth = nDkT. Also, from Ampere’s law, neglecting...The forming plasma sheath is in contact with the insulator--and its large surface area--until the sheath lifts off the insulator and begins its ,4

  17. High Throughput Sequencing of Extracellular RNA from Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Kirsty M.; Rubio, Renee; Abderazzaq, Fieda; Das, Saumya; Wang, Yaoyu E.

    2017-01-01

    The presence and relative stability of extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) in biofluids has led to an emerging recognition of their promise as ‘liquid biopsies’ for diseases. Most prior studies on discovery of exRNAs as disease-specific biomarkers have focused on microRNAs (miRNAs) using technologies such as qRT-PCR and microarrays. The recent application of next-generation sequencing to discovery of exRNA biomarkers has revealed the presence of potential novel miRNAs as well as other RNA species such as tRNAs, snoRNAs, piRNAs and lncRNAs in biofluids. At the same time, the use of RNA sequencing for biofluids poses unique challenges, including low amounts of input RNAs, the presence of exRNAs in different compartments with varying degrees of vulnerability to isolation techniques, and the high abundance of specific RNA species (thereby limiting the sensitivity of detection of less abundant species). Moreover, discovery in human diseases often relies on archival biospecimens of varying age and limiting amounts of samples. In this study, we have tested RNA isolation methods to optimize profiling exRNAs by RNA sequencing in individuals without any known diseases. Our findings are consistent with other recent studies that detect microRNAs and ribosomal RNAs as the major exRNA species in plasma. Similar to other recent studies, we found that the landscape of biofluid microRNA transcriptome is dominated by several abundant microRNAs that appear to comprise conserved extracellular miRNAs. There is reasonable correlation of sets of conserved miRNAs across biological replicates, and even across other data sets obtained at different investigative sites. Conversely, the detection of less abundant miRNAs is far more dependent on the exact methodology of RNA isolation and profiling. This study highlights the challenges in detecting and quantifying less abundant plasma miRNAs in health and disease using RNA sequencing platforms. PMID:28060806

  18. Associations between sexually transmitted infections, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and abnormal cervical Pap smear results in OB/GYN outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the meaning and usefulness of sexually transmitted infection (STI) test when caring for patients who have abnormal cervical cytology and/or positive high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test results. Methods Among patients who underwent liquid-based cervical cytology and HPV DNA tests at the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic, 800 patients who showed abnormal cervical cytology were compared with 200 patients in the control group. Both groups were simultaneously tested via multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for seven types of STI-causative microorganisms. Results The positive rate of high-risk HPV infection in total STIs positive group was 1.47 times higher than that of total STIs negative group. The probability of a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) was significantly higher in patients testing positive for total STIs (1.46 times), Chlamydia trachomatis (3.21 times), or Mycoplasma genitalicum (3.58 times) than in those testing negative. The total STIs positive rate was significantly higher for those having a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) when high-risk HPV test result was negative. Conclusion Correlations were present not only between STIs and high-risk HPV infection but also between abnormal cervical cytology and STIs. Therefore, additional evaluation of STIs will be helpful to appropriately diagnose and treat patients with abnormal cervical cytology, positive results on high-risk HPV DNA test, or a cytological diagnosis of ASC-US despite negative high-risk HPV DNA test result. PMID:27329197

  19. Advances in physical study of high enthalpy plasma jets of technological interest: emission spectra and plasma characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belevtsev, A. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Markin, A. V.; Tazikova, T. F.; Tereshkin, S. A.

    1998-10-01

    Offers a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and plasma characteristics of high enthalpy atmospheric pressure argon and nitrogen jets produced by a high- current industrially important arc plasmatron with a vortex stabilized channel-anode (I<=3D500A, G=3D1-4g/s, jet diameter at a minimum-6mm). The spectra are taken at different distances from the cathode in the 200-950nm region with a spectral resolution=3D0.01nm allowing a fine structure of vibronic bands to be essentially resolved except that due to the dublet (spin) splitting and Λ-doubling. Also derived (through the Abel inversion) are radial distributions of plasma components. The spectra obtained have been used for determining plasma composition, the electron component parameters (by atomic/ionic Stark half-widths and intensities) and the assessment of rotational and vibrational temperatures by simulating molecular bands.

  20. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  1. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  2. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-12-31

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  3. Plasma (Accretion) Disks with High Magnetic Energy Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, F.; Coppi, B.

    2006-04-01

    ``Corrugated'' plasma disks can form in the dominant gravity of a central object when the peak plasma pressure in the disk is of the same order as that of the pressure of the ``external'' magnetic field, while the magnetic field resulting from internal plasma currents is of the same order as the external field. The corrugation refers to a periodic variation of the plasma density in a region around the equatorial plane. The considered structure represents a transition between a ``classical'' accretion disk and a ``rings sequence'' configuration^2. The common feature of the ``corrugated'' and the ``rings sequence'' configurations is the ``crystal'' structure of the magnetic surfaces that consist of a sequence of pairs of oppositely directed toroidal current density filaments. The connection between the characteristics of these configurations and those of the marginally stable ballooning modes that can be found in a model accretion disk is pointed out and analyzed.

  4. High voltage space plasma interactions. [charging the solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Two primary problems resulted from plasma interactions; one of concern to operations in geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the other in low orbits (LEO). The two problems are not the same. Spacecraft charging has become widely recognized as a problem, particularly for communications satellites operating in GEO. The very thin thermal plasmas at GEO are insufficient to bleed off voltage buildups due to higher energy charged particle radiation collected on outer surfaces. Resulting differential charging/discharging causes electrical transients, spurious command signals and possible direct overload damage. An extensive NASA/Air Force program has been underway for several years to address this problem. At lower altitudes, the denser plasmas of the plasmasphere/ionosphere provide sufficient thermal current to limit such charging to a few volts or less. Unfortunately, these thermal plasma currents which solve the GEO spacecraft charging problem can become large enough to cause just the opposite problem in LEO.

  5. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High Temperature Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    DIAGNOSTICS OF PLASMA SPECIES IN PACVD PROCESS FOR HARD FACE COATING DEPOSITION W. C. Roman, J. H. Stufflebeam , A. C. Eckbreth and C. J. Ultee 50 MS 1 SELF...PROCESS FOR HARD FACE COATING DEPOSITION* W. C. Roman J. H. Stufflebeam A. C. Eckbreth C. J. Ultee UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER East Hartford...Anaheim, CA, Published in Proceedings of Symposium K - "Plasma Processing and Synthesis of Materials," April 20-24, 1987. (31 Roman, W., Stufflebeam

  6. Laminar shocks in high power laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Trines, R.

    2014-02-15

    We propose a theory to describe laminar ion sound structures in a collisionless plasma. Reflection of a small fraction of the upstream ions converts the well known ion acoustic soliton into a structure with a steep potential gradient upstream and with downstream oscillations. The theory provides a simple interpretation of results dating back more than forty years but, more importantly, is shown to provide an explanation for recent observations on laser produced plasmas relevant to inertial fusion and to ion acceleration.

  7. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  8. An atmospheric-pressure, high-aspect-ratio, cold micro-plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X.; Wu, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium Ar micro-plasma generated inside a micro-tube with plasma radius of 3 μm and length of 2.7 cm is reported. The electron density of the plasma plume estimated from the broadening of the Ar emission line reaches as high as 3 × 1016 cm−3. The electron temperature obtained from CR model is 1.5 ev while the gas temperature of the plasma estimated from the N2 rotational spectrum is close to room temperature. The sheath thickness of the plasma could be close to the radius of the plasma. The ignition voltages of the plasma increase one order when the radius of the dielectric tube is decreased from 1 mm to 3 μm. PMID:25502006

  9. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  10. Patients with MCI and N400 or P600 abnormalities are at very high risk for conversion to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Olichney, J.M.; Taylor, J.R.; Gatherwright, J.; Salmon, D.P.; Bressler, A.J.; Kutas, M.; Iragui-Madoz, V.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought cognitive event-related potential (ERP) biomarkers of disease progression and subsequent conversion to dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Background Two ERP components, the P600 and N400, are sensitive to abnormal episodic/declarative memory and semantic processing. When congruous category-exemplars are repeated, smaller P600s (relative to initial presentation) are normally elicited. Repetitions of semantically incongruous words yield smaller N400 amplitude. In mild Alzheimer disease (AD), abnormalities of both the N400 and P600 repetition effects are present, suggesting a wide-spread failure of synaptic plasticity. Methods Patients with amnestic MCI (n = 32) were longitudinally studied annually with an ERP paradigm in which semantically congruous (50%) and incongruous target words are repeated 10 to 140 seconds after initial presentation. ERP data were analyzed to contrast MCI-to-AD converters (within 3 years) vs nonconverters, using split-plot analyses of variance. Results A statistically significant P600 congruous word repetition effect was found only in the nonconverter group (F = 9.9, p = 0.005 vs MCI converters). This effect correlated with verbal memory measures. Repetition of incongruous words produced a significant N400 amplitude attenuation (across right-hemisphere sites) in nonconverters, but not in converters. Patients with MCI with abnormal/reduced N400 or P600 word repetition effects had an 87 to 88% likelihood of dementia within 3 years while those with normal/spared N400 and P600 repetition effects had only an 11 to 27% likelihood. Conclusions Abnormalities of the P600 or N400 in mild cognitive impairment are associated with an increased risk of subsequent conversion to Alzheimer disease (AD). These event-related potential components may offer useful biomarkers for the detection and staging of very early AD. PMID:18077800

  11. Critical particle circulation caused by high-performance steady-state plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Steady-state operation focused on the fusion reactor has been investigated in magnetic confined fusion devices, and plasma performance and duration time are steadily extended by the improvement of the quality of plasma heating and sophisticating plasma operation using the understanding of long-pulse plasma experiments. When higher-performance helium steady-state plasma discharges with duration time over 40 min, electron density of 1.2x1019 m-3, ion and electron temperatures over 2 keV and heating power of 1.2MW were repeatedly achieved in LHD, time-evolution of the wall-pumping and increasing frequency of impurity contaminations around the plasma edge clearly occurred. These are strongly related to the increasing mixed-material layer caused by continuous divertor erosion around geometrical dense divertor plates, which consists of carbon (> 90%) and iron (< a few %) with amorphous structure, that can retain the helium particles and affect the particle balance in long-pulse discharges. The mixed-material layer is easily exfoliated by the thermal stress and helium explosion in the layer, and small pieces of exfoliation enter the plasma edge in all toroidal sections. Uncontrolled flake contamination was one of the causes of plasma termination in long-pulse experiments. Increased plasma performance using higher heating power (~ 3.3 MW) with high quality makes robust plasma against impurity contaminations, and then a small amount of contamination of mixed-material does not terminate the helium plasma. Carbon impurity was circulated from the divertor plates and around the plates to the plasma edge in long-pulse plasma discharges, and the circulation was increased by the plasma duration and performance. The eroded material plays an important role in degrading the plasma performance as an impurity source and in the controllability of particle fueling in long-pulse discharges.

  12. Spatio-temporal optimization of a laser produced Al-plasma: Generation of highly ionized species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smijesh, N.; H. Rao, Kavya; Klemke, N.; Philip, R.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    Laser produced plasmas are transient in nature, and their properties, which depend on the laser parameters as well as the material properties and the irradiation conditions, can be tailored for different applications. Highly ionized Al plasmas generated using 7 ns and negatively chirped 60 ps pulses are optimized for the purpose of generating Al IV and Al III, respectively. The plasma is optimized spatio-temporally for Al IV or Al III with irradiation energy as the control parameter using time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Plasmas attuned for higher charged states could be utilized as a good alternative source for the generation of high order harmonics.

  13. Particle and field characteristics of the high-latitude plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, G. K.; Mccarthy, M.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Etcheto, J.; Anderson, K. A.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Particle and field data obtained by eight ISEE spacecraft experiments are used to define more precisely the characteristics of the high-latitude boundary region of the plasma sheet. A region immediately adjacent to the high-latitude plasma sheet boundary has particle and field characteristics distinctly different from those observed in the lobe and deeper in the central plasma sheet. Electrons over a broad energy interval are 'field-aligned' and bidirectional, whereas in the plasma sheet the distributions are more isotropic. The region supports intense ion flows, large-amplitude electric fields, and enhanced broad-band electrostatic noise.

  14. Achieving a long-lived high-beta plasma state by energetic beam injection.

    PubMed

    Guo, H Y; Binderbauer, M W; Tajima, T; Milroy, R D; Steinhauer, L C; Yang, X; Garate, E G; Gota, H; Korepanov, S; Necas, A; Roche, T; Smirnov, A; Trask, E

    2015-04-23

    Developing a stable plasma state with high-beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressures) is of critical importance for an economic magnetic fusion reactor. At the forefront of this endeavour is the field-reversed configuration. Here we demonstrate the kinetic stabilizing effect of fast ions on a disruptive magneto-hydrodynamic instability, known as a tilt mode, which poses a central obstacle to further field-reversed configuration development, by energetic beam injection. This technique, combined with the synergistic effect of active plasma boundary control, enables a fully stable ultra-high-beta (approaching 100%) plasma with a long lifetime.

  15. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  16. Simulative research on the expansion of cathode plasma in high-current electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qifu; Liu Lie

    2012-09-15

    The expansion of cathode plasma has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetime of high-current electron beam diode. Realistic modeling of such plasma is of great necessity in order to discuss the dynamics of cathode plasma. Using the method of particle-in-cell, the expansion of cathode plasma is simulated in this paper by a scaled-down diode model. It is found that the formation of cathode plasma increases the current density in the diode. This consequently leads to the decrease of the potential at plasma front. Once the current density has been increased to a certain value, the potential at plasma front would then be equal to or lower than the plasma potential. Then the ions would move towards the anode, and the expansion of cathode plasma is thereby formed. Different factors affecting the plasma expansion velocity are discussed in this paper. It is shown that the decrease of proton genatation rate has the benefit of reducing the plasma expansion velocity.

  17. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  18. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  19. Effects of plasma turbulence on electron collection by a high-voltage spherical probe in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmadesso, P. J.; Ganguli, G.

    1992-05-01

    The effects of electron trapping and plasma turbulence on the current-voltage relation for a positively charged high-voltage spherical probe in a magnetized plasma are studied. When the neutral density is low enough so that ionization can be ignored, the present results indicate that the sheath structure and the current-voltage relation of a charged sphere configured as the originally planned SPEAR I experiment would be substantially influenced by the combined action of trapped electrons and plasma instabilities. Reduced levels of current collection relative to Linson's (1969) model are found. Variation of the scattering parameter over the whole range of physically realizable values results in a range of predicted current collection values which is a small fraction of the interval between the Parker-Murphy and Langmuir-Blodgett limits.

  20. Pencil lead plasma for generating multimicrojoule high-order harmonics with a broad spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Pertot, Y.; Elouga Bom, L. B.; Ozaki, T.; Bhardwaj, V. R.

    2011-03-07

    Using the plasma harmonic method, we show the generation of efficient and intense high-order harmonics from plasma of pencil lead. We demonstrate multimicrojoule energy in each harmonic order for the 11th to the 17th order of a Ti:sapphire laser. By analyzing the target morphology and the plasma composition, we conclude that these intense harmonics are generated from nanoparticles of graphitic carbon.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasma plumes: A versatile approach for optimization of high-order harmonic generation in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Elouga Bom, L. B.; Ozaki, T.

    2011-08-15

    The time-resolved studies of laser-produced Ag, In, Pt, V, Mn, and Ga plasmas are presented from the point of view of plasma application as the nonlinear optical medium for high-order harmonic generation of laser radiation. We show that optimization of plasma formation using this technique allows the enhancement of harmonic generation efficiency and extension of maximal harmonic order.

  2. Modeling aluminum etch chemistry in high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Ho, P.; Buss, R.

    1997-08-01

    The authors have assembled a chemical reaction mechanism that describes the BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasma etch of Al metallization layers. The reaction set for gas-phase and surface processes was derived either from literature data or estimated from data on related systems. A well-mixed reactor model was used to develop the mechanism and test it against experimental measurements of plasma species and etch-rates in processing reactors. Finally, use of reduced chemistry mechanisms are demonstrated in 2-D simulations for a complex reactor geometry.

  3. Laser-plasma spectra of highly ionized fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Nagel, D. J.; Behring, W. E.; Cowan, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Lines between 11.3 and 17.2 A of lithium-like, helium-like, and hydrogen-like fluorine have been observed in spectra of laser-produced plasmas. These lines include nine members of the Lyman series of F IX; eight members of the principal series of F VIII; and satellite lines arising from doubly excited configurations of F VII and F VIII. Similar satellite lines of the abundant solar elements have been identified in soft X-ray spectra of solar flares. A wavelength list of fluorine lines is given, and physical conditions in the plasma are discussed.

  4. Electron runaway across a magnetic field in a collisional high-atomic-number plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Welch, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Nonthermal x-ray spectra observed in high-atomic-number z-pinch plasmas indicate that electrons with energies greatly in excess of the plasma temperature are present. A favorite mechanism for the production of these nonthermal electrons is acceleration in inductive electric fields produced by localized collapse of plasma into pinch spots. One problem with this acceleration mechanism is the presence of intense azimuthal magnetic fields embedded in the plasma which impede the runaway of electrons along the electric field. In this work, a fluid model for nonthermal electron flow in dense, high-atomic-number plasmas is employed to determine how collisions affect their energy gain in crossed electric and magnetic fields. The simple scaling laws derived from this model are compared with IPRPO particle-in-cell simulations of the same plasma environment. Large cross-field energy gains are calculated by both models for high-atomic number plasmas where the electron scattering (momentum-transfer) frequency v{sub s} is of order Zv{sub e}, where v{sub e} is the rate associated with collisional energy loss and Z is the plasma ionization level. Once a threshold electric field is exceeded, a large number of scattering collisions across the magnetic field and along the electric field can occur in an energy-loss time and much larger energy gains are possible than in hydrogenic plasmas.

  5. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  6. Dynamic high pressure generation through plasma implosion driven by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Yuan, T.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-03-01

    When an intense laser pulse is loaded upon solids, very high impact pressure can be generated on the surface. In this letter, we simulate this process through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and find that the pressure as high as 0.13 TPa can be generated after the laser pulse with intensity 1015 W/cm2 and 5 picosecond duration is injected upon a nanometer solid-density plasma. The peak pressure is shown to be resulted from an energetic high-density plasma bunch, produced through plasma implosion under extremely high light pressure.

  7. Interaction of high-energy trapped particles with ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Novakovaskii, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    1988-12-01

    A theory is derived for the interaction of high-energy trapped particleswith ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-..beta.. plasma. A dispersionrelation is derived to describe the ballooning modes in the presence ofsuch particles; the effects of the high plasma ..beta.. are taken into account.The stability boundary for ballooning modes with zero and finite frequenciesis studied. The effects of finite bananas on the stability of ballooningmodes with zero frequencies are determined.

  8. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  9. Laboratory of plasma studies. Papers on high power particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains paper on Exploding metal film active anode sources experiments on the Lion extractor Ion Diode; Long conductor time plasma opening switch experiments; and Focusing studies of an applied B{sub r} extraction diode on the Lion accelerator.

  10. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M. E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Kerr, S.

    2014-11-15

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  11. Helicon wave coupling in KSTAR plasmas for off-axis current drive in high electron pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Wi, H. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kwak, J. G.

    2017-04-01

    A helicon wave current drive is proposed as an efficient off-axis current drive in the high electron β plasmas that are expected in fusion reactors. A high frequency helicon wave coupling was analyzed using the surface impedance at a plasma boundary. A slow wave coupling, which may compete with the helicon wave coupling at a frequency of 500 MHz, is estimated to be lower than the fast wave coupling by an order of magnitude in the KSTAR edge plasma density and in practical Faraday shield misalignment with the magnetic pitch. A traveling wave antenna, which is a two port combline antenna, was analyzed using a simplified lumped element model. The results show that the traveling wave antenna provides load resiliency because of its insensitivity to loading resistance, provided that the loading resistance at a radiating element is limited within a practical range. The combline antenna is attractive because it does not require a matching system and exhibits a high selectivity of parallel refractive index. Based on the analysis, a seven element combline antenna was fabricated and installed at an off-mid-plane offset of 30 cm from the mid-plane in KSTAR. The low power RF characteristics measured during several plasma discharges showed no evidence of slow wave coupling. This is consistent with the expectation made through the surface impedance analysis which predicted low slow wave coupling. The wave coupling to the plasma is easily controlled by a radial outer-gap control and gas puffing. No plasma confinement degradation was observed during the radial outer-gap control of up to 3 cm in H-mode discharges. In a ELMy plasmas, only a small reflection peak was observed during a very short portion of the ELM bursting period. If the number of radiating elements is increased for high power operation, then complete load resiliency can be expected. A very large coupling can be problematic for maintaining a parallel refractive index, although this issue can be mitigated by

  12. Magnetospheric plasma studies using data from the dynamics high and low altitude plasma instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, J. N.

    1984-05-01

    Plasma measurements made on Dynamics Explorer 1 and 2 spacecraft are providing new information on the altitude dependence of polar-cap plasma populations, their sources, and the acceleration processes they undergo. This study found that the polar-rain electron population apparently exhibits no significant altitude dependence between altitudes of a few hundred to approximately 20,000 km. This result was expected from the magnetosheath-like energy spectrum of the low-altitude polar rain. In this case of the polar wind, a significant velocity increase was theoretically predicted to occur between the two spacecraft altitudes, and this effect was confirmed by DE-1 plasma measurements. A major result of this study of the accelerated polar wind is its significant conic component, which indicates that the ions are heated perpendicularly as they emerge from the polar-cap ionosphere. The gradual decrease in polar-wind energy observed to occur from the cusp across to the nightside polar cap suggests that the perpendicular heating process, probably in cyclotron waves, is most intense near the cusp region. Significant altitude effects are also observed in the plasmas that occupy magnetic flux tubes connected to polar-cap auroral arcs (or theta auroras). At DE-2, typical low-energy (approximately 100 eV) inverted-V electron distributtions are observed. At DE-1 the electron and positive-ion distribution functions are consistent with electrostatic potential drops that are at times below the typical DE-1 altitude of 15,000 to 20,000 km and at times above these altitudes.

  13. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  14. Study on Electrodeless Electric Propulsion in High-Density Helicon Plasma with Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takamichi; Ishii, Hiroki; Otsuka, Shuhei; Teshigahara, Naoto; Fujitsuka, Hiroaki; Waseda, Shimpei; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    To establish electrodeless electric propulsion, we have been developing a new electrodeless plasma acceleration thruster using high-density helicon plasmas and permanent magnets, and characterizing them by, e.g., electrostatic and magnetic probes, a high-resolution spectrometer (measuring argon line intensity and line intensity ratio to derive plasma parameters), and a high-speed camera measurements (deriving radial distribution of electron density), in addition to a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) method to measure plasma flow velocity, where they are under development. Here, we will present preliminary acceleration methods using such as Rotating Magnetic Field coil and m = 0 coil along with results of various measurements mentioned above to estimate the plasma performance.

  15. High-Density Plasma Sources and Technology for the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hideo

    1998-10-01

    These days, rapid progress in semiconductor devices such as LSI, flat panel displays and solar cells requires technical innovation in plasma-aided deposition and etching. Due to the primary importance of plasma sources, a great deal of effort has been made to develop high-density large-diameter sources and to control reactive plasmas for the next generation. Here I briefly review high-density sources developed so far, focusing mainly on current understanding of nonlinear coupling from RF antenna to high density sources, and on chemistry control of highly dissociated plasmas. First of all, I introduce various high density sources such as ECR, helicon, inductively-coupled and surface-wave plasmas; then they are classified into three categories depending on the antenna-induced electromagnetic fields. In general, antenna-plasma coupling is nonlinear, which causes plasma density jump with a discharge power increase in most high-density sources. I describe such examples of helicon,(H. Sugai et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion) 39 (1997) A445. and surface wave discharges along with a model explaining the mechanism. In the case of inductive RF discharge, power transfer efficiency measurements(K. Suzuki, K. Nakamura, H. Ohkubo, H. Sugai, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.) 7 (1998) 13. enable discrimination of electrostatic coupling from inductive coupling, and a few methods to reduce the electrostatic coupling will be presented. The wave excitation and absorption processes in surface wave discharge(H. Sugai, I. Ghanashev, M. Nagatsu, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.) 7 (1998) 192. will then be discussed, but only qualitatively as the physics involved there is not clearly understood yet. Besides the discharge physics described above, plasma chemistry significantly influences the processing performance in high density plasmas. The radical composition is markedly different from the low density case, due to secondary processes accompanied with electron-impact dissociation of radicals

  16. High Performance Plasma Operation on DIII-D During Extended Periods Without Boronization

    SciTech Connect

    West, W P; Groth, M; Hyatt, A W; Jackson, G L; Wade, M R; Greenfield, C M; Politzer, P A

    2007-06-27

    High performance plasmas, including both hybrid and advanced tokamak (AT) bench-mark discharges, were shown to be highly repeatable in DIII-D over 6000 plasma-seconds of operation during the 2006 campaign with no intervening boron depositions or high temperature bakes. Hybrid and AT discharges with identical control targets were repeated after the initial boronization at the beginning of the 2006 campaign, and again just before and after a second boronization near the end of the 2006 campaign. After a long entry vent between the 2006 and 2007 campaigns, similar discharges were again repeated after the standard high temperature baking and plasma cleanup, but prior to a boronization. Performance metrics, such as {beta}, confinement quality, and density control, were extremely well repeated. A low performance daily reference shot (DRS) was also established as a routine monitor of impurity influx. Over the 2006 campaign, the DRS database indicated little to no secular increase in impurity content. Oxygen content and Ni line emission were higher after the intervening vent, but were still minor contributors to plasma contamination. This indicates that erosion of boron films used for wall conditioning will not be a limitation to establishing long pulse high performance discharges in the new generation of superconducting tokamaks if graphite is used as the primary plasma facing material. These results contrast with recent work in devices using high-Z metallic plasma facing materials, where very frequent refreshing of boron films is required for high performance plasma operation.

  17. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  18. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  19. Highly efficient treatment of industrial wastewater by solution plasma with low environmental load.

    PubMed

    Cai, Long-fei; Wu, Yun-ying; Wu, Yun-hai; Yamauti, Siro; Saito, Nagahiro

    2013-01-01

    Advanced oxidation techniques are efficient processes to dispose of organic contaminants in industrial wastewater with low secondary pollution. The solution plasma technique was featured as an advanced oxidation technique with low secondary pollution and high efficiency. However, the solution plasma technique reported previously could only treat wastewater of less than 200 mL owing to the limited plasma generated by only one pair of electrodes. In this work, multiple pairs of electrodes were installed at the bottom of the reaction vessel to generate plasma for decomposing methylene blue trihydrate (MB) and methyl orange (MO) solutions with a batch amount of 18 L/batch. The solution plasma technique was compared with direct ozonation in decomposition of MB and MO wastewater. A surprising phenomenon is that MO was more readily decomposed than MB by using direct ozonation, whereas the removal of MO was too low, and MB was more readily decomposed than MO by using the solution plasma technique.

  20. Heating of a Magnetized High Density Hydrogen Plasma Column Around the ICR Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graswinckel, M. F.; Guadamuz, S.; Koch, R.; Maggiora, R.; Van De Pol, M.; Vietti, G.; Van Rooij, G.

    2011-12-01

    A single and double loop antenna system are investigated in the ICR frequency range (5-25 MHz) to enable control of the plasma temperature in a 1-10 cm diameter, 1020 m-3 hydrogen plasma column in B = 0.8T Wave propagation is evaluated on basis of damping lengths derived from the dispersion relation. The antenna is numerically analyzed with the TOPCYL code. Simulation results are compared with measured loading resistances and good agreement was found for the vacuum and saltwater column cases. Hydrogen plasma loading resistances determined from network analyzer measurements are typically higher than those predicted from simulation. This points to coupling of RF power to additional loss mechanisms. High RF power operation (1 kW) of the antenna increased the power deposited on the plasma endplate and accelerated the plasma, but the plasma temperature near the endplate remained constant.

  1. Plasma reflection from highly Si-doped InGaAs/AlAsSb quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Gozu, Shin-ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-04

    In this study, we have evaluated the plasma reflection from highly Si-doped In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs{sub 0.56}Sb{sub 0.44} multiple quantum wells (MQWs) in order to understand the plasma effect in quantum wells. Plasma resonances were clearly observed in these MQWs for carrier densities larger than 7.5x10{sup 18} /cm{sup 3}. By comparing the experimentally obtained wavenumbers of these plasma resonances with those obtained from a theory and an empirical fit of bulk InGaAs which includes the effect of conduction band non-parabolicity, the plasma resonances of MQWs were found to match well with the empirical fit. This implied that the conduction band non-parabolicity played a role in modifying the plasma resonance, as in bulk InGaAs.

  2. Simple Method for Assaying Colistin Methanesulfonate in Plasma and Urine Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Milne, Robert W.; Nation, Roger L.; Turnidge, John D.; Coulthard, Kingsley; Valentine, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of colistimethate sodium in plasma and urine. The accuracy and reproducibility was within 10.1 and 11.2% with rat plasma and urine, respectively. Several commonly coadministered antibacterial agents do not interfere with the assay. PMID:12234867

  3. High-speed imaging system of luminous intensity distribution of plasma using light emission CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirofumi; Saito, Hideo; Yuasa, Kunio; Yuge, Youji; Nakajima, Masato

    1995-02-01

    The authors developed a light emission computed tomography (LECT) system for plasma diagnosis supporting the high speed data collection function. In this paper, we describe the principles of the system and experiments in reconstructing the luminous intensity distribution of plasma in a discharge tube with the system.

  4. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Burin, Michael J.

    2014-11-18

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  5. Development of High-Throughput Liquid Treatment System using Slot Antenna Excited Microwave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takitou, Sho; Ito, Michiko; Takashima, Seigou; Nomura, Norio; Kitagawa, Tominori; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to plasma production under liquid and its industrial applications as well as investigation of chemical reactions as a result of plasma-liquid interactions. In various kinds of plasma production techniques, we have proposed pulsed microwave excited plasma using slot antenna, where damage to the slot electrode can be minimized and plasma volume can be increased. Furthermore, we have proposed an in-line microwave plasma system where plasma is efficiently produced under reduced pressures using Venturi effect, and have demonstrated enhancement of organic decomposition efficiency. For practical use of the plasma liquid treatment, however, cost-effective and more efficient treatment system with high treatment capability is required. In this study, we propose further enhancement of the treatment speed by designing four-parallel-type liquid treatment device where four discharges for the treatment are performed using one microwave power source. Decomposition speed of newly-developed plasma system is investigated. Not only high decomposition rate but also enhanced energy efficiency is realized.

  6. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of a High Density Electron-Hole Plasma in High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinho; Reitze, Dave H.; Kono, Junichiro; Belyanin, Alexey; Solomon, Glenn; McGill, Steve

    2009-03-01

    We study the inter-Landau level relaxation dynamics of a dense electron-hole plasma in high magnetic fields (up to 31 T). Intense 150 fs pump pulses create carrier densities approaching 10^13/cm^2 in In0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs multiple quantum wells. Relaxation dynamics are probed as a function of Landau level (LL) and magnetic field using time-resolved transient absorption (TRTA) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL), which provide complementary information about the relaxation processes. Manifestly non-exponential decays of the TRTA signals are observed at high fields (above 15 T). TRPL emissions measured in the plane of the wells reveal the presence of multiple emission bursts from the LLs at high magnetic fields, suggesting a complicated relaxation process mediated by the field whereby carriers get trapped in a specific LL, emit PL though recombination, and then `reload' as the carriers relax down to the previously occupied LLs.

  7. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounder, J. D.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-08-01

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 °C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 °C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled laboratory

  8. Production and study of high-beta plasma confined by a superconducting dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.C.; Ellsworth, J.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Mahar, S.; Roach, A.

    2006-05-15

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [J. Kesner et al., in Fusion Energy 1998, 1165 (1999)] is a new research facility that is exploring the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. Unlike other configurations in which stability depends on curvature and magnetic shear, magnetohydrodynamic stability of a dipole derives from plasma compressibility. Theoretically, the dipole magnetic geometry can stabilize a centrally peaked plasma pressure that exceeds the local magnetic pressure ({beta}>1), and the absence of magnetic shear allows particle and energy confinement to decouple. In initial experiments, long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 s have been produced that are consistent with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Detailed measurements have been made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. In these initial experiments, the high-field superconducting floating coil was supported by three thin supports. The plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 and 6.4 GHz, and a population of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV, dominates the plasma pressure. Creation of high-pressure, high-beta plasma is possible only when intense hot electron interchange instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. A dramatic transition from a low-density, low-beta regime to a more quiescent, high-beta regime is observed when the plasma fueling rate and confinement time become sufficiently large.

  9. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  10. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  11. Evaluation of oxidative DNA lesions in plasma and nuclear abnormalities in erythrocytes of wild fish (Liza aurata) as an integrated approach to genotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Ahmad, I; Maria, V L; Ferreira, C S S; Serafim, A; Bebianno, M J; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A

    2010-12-21

    Genetic lesions (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA) were seasonally quantified in the blood of Liza aurata caught at Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a multi-contaminated aquatic system. Thus, five critical sites were assessed and compared with a reference site (Torreira). Oxidative DNA damage was found in Gafanha (harbour-water area), Laranjo (metal-contaminated) and Vagos (contaminated with PAHs) in the spring; Rio Novo do Principe (near a former paper-mill effluent) in the autumn; Rio Novo do Principe and Vagos in the winter. ENA were higher than Torreira at VAG (spring and winter). Torreira did not display seasonal variation neither in terms of 8-OHdG or total ENA. A positive correlation between 8-OHdG and ENA was found, suggesting oxidative stress as a mechanism involved in the formation of ENA. This study clearly demonstrates the presence of DNA-damaging substances in Ria de Aveiro and recommends the use of 8-OHdG and ENA as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

  12. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  13. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  14. High Performance Plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    time as determined by magnetic analysis using the EFIT code [11] plotted against two conventional tokamak scaling relations, ITER89P and ITER98y2...injected. Plasmas with βt (=2µ0<p>/B 2 = a measure of magnetic confinement efficiency) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT ...efficiency) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code. â limiting phenomena have been observed, and the

  15. Storm time plasma transport at middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Associated with the large-scale enhancement of the ionospheric convection electric field during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, solar-produced F region plasma is transported to and through the noontime cleft from a source region at middle and low latitudes in the afternoon sector. As a result of the offset between the geomagnetic and geographic poles, the afternoon sector region of strong sunward convection is shifted to increasingly lower geographic latitude throughout the interval between 12 UT and 24 UT. A snowplow effect occurs in which the convection cell continually encounters fresh corotating ionospheric plasma along its equatorward edge, producing a latitudinally narrow region of storm-enhanced plasma density (SED) and increased total electron content which is advected toward higher latitudes in the noon sector. The Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar regularly observes SED as a spatially continuous, large-scale feature spanning local times between noon and midnight and at latitudes between the polar cap and its mid- or low-latitude source region. For local times away from noon, the latitude of most probable SED occurrence moves equatorward by 6[degrees] for an increase of 2 in the Kp index. During strong disturbances the topside SED is observed to be convecting sunward at [approximately]750 m s[sup [minus]1] with a flux of 10[sup 14] m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. This feature accounts for the pronounced enhancement of ionospheric density near dusk at middle latitudes observed during the early stages of magnetic storms (called the dusk effect) and constitutes a source for the enhanced F region plasma observed in the polar cap during disturbed conditions. 34 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  17. Modeling of high-explosive driven plasma compression opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Goforth, J. H.

    The initial path of the current through a plasma compression switch is through a thin (500-nm thick) metal foil. The current explodes the foil to form the seed for the conducting plasma. The behavior of the foil at this point is the same as an exploding metal fuse for which we have a simple model. We have, therefore, chosen this model as our starting point. The fuse model assumes that the foil material is homogeneous and is characterized by a single temperature and density. The thickness of the foil is assumed to be much less than the magnetic diffusion skin depth so that the magnetic field varies linearly across the foil. For the present application we assume that the side of the foil away from the channel is fixed in space while the side by the channel is untamped. The foil/plasma will, therefore, cross the channel at the expansion velocity as the foil explodes. Equations for the electrical resistance of the foil, the magnetic fields, the motion of the foil, and the kinetic and internal energies are all solved selfconsistantly. The electrical resistivity, the pressure, and the specific energy of aluminum are taken from the Los Alamos SESAME EOS library. In the case of aluminum we have created a SESAME-style table based on the theory of More and Lee which we have modified to agree with experiment where possible.

  18. LHCD experiments in high performance plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Baranov, Y.; Dobbing, J. A.; Fischer, B.; Goniche, M.; Gormezano, C.; Romero, J. A.; Schild, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Challis, C. D.; Sips, A. C. C.; Tubbing, B.

    1997-04-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) has been used for current profile shaping in the shear optimisation experiments in 1996/97 in JET. PLH≲3MW has been applied in the initial current ramp-up in order to control the internal inductance. An internal transport barrier with improved central electron confinement has been produced in this phase with LHCD alone. This has resulted in a peaking of the electron temperature profile and Te0 above 10keV at ne0⩽1.5×1019 m-3. The profile of the LH driven current, as determined by hard X-ray mesurements, is peaked at approximately mid-radius in these conditions. Good coupling of the LH waves has been obtained by the use of a near gas feed. This method reduces the risk of plasma-launcher interaction, since the launcher can be positioned in the shadow of the poloidal limiters. A reflection coefficient of 5% has been maintained at a plasma-launcher distance of 8 cm and PLH=5 MW has been coupled to divertor plasmas in L-mode with this method.

  19. Dust Particle Dynamics in The Presence of Highly Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Brian; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    Complex plasmas are four component plasmas that contain, in addition to the usual electrons, ions, and neutral atoms, macroscopic electrically charged (nanometer to micrometer) sized ``dust'' particles. These macroscopic particles typically obtain a net negative charge due to the higher mobility of electrons compared to that of ions. Because the electrons, ions, and dust particles are charged, their dynamics may be significantly modified by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Possible consequences of this modification may be the charging rate and the equilibrium charge. For example, in the presence of a strong horizontal magnetic field (B >1 Tesla), it may be possible to observe dust particle gx B deflection and, from that deflection, determine the dust grain charge. In this poster, we present recent data from performing multiple particle dropping experiments to characterize the g x B deflection in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX). This work is supported by funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Grant Number DE - SC0010485 and the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, JPL-1543114.

  20. Radar observations of structured plasma in high-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickrey, J. F.

    1981-03-01

    Coordinated measuremens between the Chatanika radar and the TRIAD satellite were investigated and the production mechanisms responsible for localized high latitude scintillation was examined. The radar measured that latitudinal variations of plasma density and electric field while the satellite measured the latitudinal variation of field aligned current. Field aligned ionization enhancements or plasma blobs with steep poleward and equatorward edges were a common feature of the midnight sector auroral F-region. The plasma blobs are unstable to the current convective instability with growth rate of several millihertz. Field aligned currents have a further destabilizing influence. The presence of plasma density irregularities associated with the blobs were verified by observing scintillation on the TRIAD satellite telemetry signal at 150 MHz. The F-region irregularities exist despite the presence of a highly conducting auroral E-region to which the F-region plasma is connected by the geomagnetic field lines.

  1. A high-charge-state plasma neutralizer for an energetic H/sup -/ beam

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Leung, K.N.; Stearns, J.W.; Olson, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    A high-charge-state plasma neutralizer for a beam of energetic H/sup -/ ions offers the potential of high optimum neutralization efficiency (approx.85%) relative to a gas target (50 to 60%), and considerably reduced target thickness. We have calculated cross sections for charge-changing interactions of fast H/sup -/ and H/sup 0/ in collision with highly charged ions using a semiclassical model for H/sup -/, and the Classical-Trajectory Monte Carlo method plus Born calculations, to obtain correct asymptotic cross sections in the high-energy limit. Charge-state fractions as a function of plasma line density, and f/sub 0//sup max/, the maximum H/sup 0/ fraction, are calculated using these cross sections; we find that f/sub 0//sup mx/ approx. = 85% for ion charge states in the range 1+ to 10+, and that target ion line density for f/sub 0//sup max/ decreases approximately as the square of the plasma ion charge state. The maximum neutral fraction is also high for a partially ionized plasma. We have built a small multicusp plasma generator to use a a plasma neutralizer; preliminary results show that the plasma contains argon ions with an average charge state between 2+ and 3+ for a steady-state discharge.

  2. In vitro effects of l-carnitine and glutamine on motility, acrosomal abnormality, and plasma membrane integrity of rabbit sperm during liquid-storage.

    PubMed

    Sarıözkan, Serpil; Ozdamar, Saim; Türk, Gaffari; Cantürk, Fazile; Yay, Arzu

    2014-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of l-carnitine and glutamine (Gln) on the sperm quality parameters of liquid-stored rabbit semen maintained up to 24 h at 5°C. Pooled and extended ejaculates were divided into two equal portions. l-Carnitine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2mM were added to the first portion, and glutamine was added at the same doses to the second portion. All samples were cooled to 5°C and examined at 0, 6, 12 and 24 h of liquid storage. Supplementation of the semen extender with three different doses of l-carnitine provided significant increases in the percentage of motile sperm at 12 h (P<0.01), and 24h (P<0.001) and enabled significant protection of the sperm plasma membrane (P<0.01) at 12 and 24h of cool-storage, in comparison to the control samples. Only the 2mM dose of l-carnitine significantly (P<0.01) decreased the rate of acrosomal damage when compared to the control group. Furthermore, all doses of Gln caused a significant (P<0.01) decrease in acrosomal damage at 6h, and provided significant improvement (P<0.01) in sperm motility, acrosomal and plasma membrane integrities at 12 and 24h of liquid storage, when compared to the controls. In conclusion, the supplementation of liquid-stored rabbit semen with l-carnitine and Gln provided a protection for sperm against cool storage-induced functional and structural damages.

  3. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Witte, Katharina; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Kanngiesser, Birgit; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  4. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Witte, Katharina; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Kanngießer, Birgit; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  5. High average power, highly brilliant laser-produced plasma source for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Grötzsch, Daniel; Neitzel, Michael; Günther, Sabrina; Baumann, Jonas; Kanngießer, Birgit; Witte, Katharina; Jung, Robert; Stiel, Holger; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a novel laser-produced plasma source is presented which delivers pulsed broadband soft X-radiation in the range between 100 and 1200 eV. The source was designed in view of long operating hours, high stability, and cost effectiveness. It relies on a rotating and translating metal target and achieves high stability through an on-line monitoring device using a four quadrant extreme ultraviolet diode in a pinhole camera arrangement. The source can be operated with three different laser pulse durations and various target materials and is equipped with two beamlines for simultaneous experiments. Characterization measurements are presented with special emphasis on the source position and emission stability of the source. As a first application, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure measurement on a thin polyimide foil shows the potential of the source for soft X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Plasma Potassium Levels in Healthy Prehypertension Subjects and the Role of A High Potassium Drink.

    PubMed

    Farapti, Farapti; Sayogo, Savitri; Siregar, Parlindungan

    2017-02-24

    Most populations around the world consume less than the recommended levels of potassium. Long term low potassium intake could lead to decreased plasma potassium levels and induce hypokalemia. The increasing of plasma potassium levels 0,2-0,4 mmol/L by improving potassium intake decreased significantly blood pressure (BP). Assessing plasma potassium levels in healthy people related to potassium intake have not been studied. In this study, we analysed plasma potassium levels in prehypertension (PHT) subjects and to evaluate the effect of tender coconut water (TCW) as a high potassium drink on plasma potassium levels in PHT adults. Thirthy-two female aged 25-44 years were randomly allocated to 14 days on TCW or water in a parallel randomized clinical trial . The treatment (T) group received TCW 300 ml twice daily and the control (C) group received water 300 ml twice daily too. At baseline, plasma potassium levels was 3.71±0.41 mmol/L, and 22.58% were categorized as hypokalemia. After 14 days treatment, potassium plasma level between T and C groups were not significantly different (p=0,247). The change of plasma potassium levels in both groups showed tendency to increase but not statistically significant (p=0.166). In healthy prehypertension women, the low levels of potassium plasma may be caused by low potassium intake for long time and intervension with TCW 300 ml twice daily for 14 consecutive days has not proven yet to increase plasma potassium levels. It is necessary to give higher dose and longer time to increase potassium plasma in low potassium plasma level subjects.

  7. Feasibility study of fusion plasma heating by relativistic high-current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research will be to study the feasibility of fusion plasma heating using ultra-short high intensity electron beam by dissipating the energy of excited wakes either in linear or nonlinear regimes.

  8. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  9. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  10. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-08-25

    Here, we describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  11. Thermal plasma process for recovering monomers and high value carbons from polymeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Knight, Richard; Grossmann, Elihu D.; Guddeti, Ravikishan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of recycling polymeric waste products into monomers and high value forms of carbon by pyrolytic conversion using an induction coupled RF plasma heated reactor.

  12. Particle-In-Cell simulations of high pressure plasmas using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Markus; Atteln, Frank; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Mertmann, Philipp; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are widely used to understand the fundamental phenomena in low-temperature plasmas. Particularly plasmas at very low gas pressures are studied using PIC methods. The inherent drawback of these methods is that they are very time consuming -- certain stability conditions has to be satisfied. This holds even more for the PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas due to the very high collision rates. The simulations take up to very much time to run on standard computers and require the help of computer clusters or super computers. Recent advances in the field of graphics processing units (GPUs) provides every personal computer with a highly parallel multi processor architecture for very little money. This architecture is freely programmable and can be used to implement a wide class of problems. In this paper we present the concepts of a fully parallel PIC simulation of high pressure plasmas using the benefits of GPU programming.

  13. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Krygier, A; Cochran, G E; Foster, P S; Scott, G G; Wilson, L A; Bailey, J; Bourgeois, N; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Rajeev, P P; Freeman, R R; Schumacher, D W

    2016-08-25

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  14. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  15. Self-induced gaseous plasma as high power microwave opening switch medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.; Liu, C.

    2015-04-15

    Self-induced gaseous plasma is evaluated as active opening switch medium for pulsed high power microwave radiation. The self-induced plasma switch is investigated for N{sub 2} and Ar environments under pressure conditions ranging from 25 to 700 Torr. A multi-pass TE{sub 111} resonator is used to significantly reduce the delay time inherently associated with plasma generation. The plasma forms under the pulsed excitation of a 4 MW magnetron inside the central dielectric tube of the resonator, which isolates the inner atmospheric gas from the outer vacuum environment. The path from the power source to the load is designed such that the pulse passes through the plasma twice with a 35 ns delay between these two passes. In the first pass, initial plasma density is generated, while the second affects the transition to a highly reflective state with as much as 30 dB attenuation. Experimental data revealed that virtually zero delay time may be achieved for N{sub 2} at 25 Torr. A two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the plasma formation times for comparison with experimental data. The delay time predicted from this model agrees well with the experimental values in the lower pressure regime (error < 25%), however, due to filamentary plasma formation at higher pressures, simulated delay times may be underestimated by as much as 50%.

  16. Preliminary investigation of high power microwave plasmas for electrothermal thruster use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, John L.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported from preliminary tests to evaluate the high power microwave electrothermal thruster (MET) concept, which employs a free-floating plasma discharge maintained by applied CW microwave power to heat a propellant gas flow. Stable plasmas have been created and maintained in helium (He), nitrogen (N2), and hydrogen (H2) as propellants in both the TM(sub 011) and TM(sub 012) modes at discharge pressures from 10 Pa to 69 kPa. Reproducible starting conditions of pressure and power have been documented for all the plasmas. Vortical inflow of the propellant gas was observed to cause the formation of on-axis 'spike' plasmas. The formation and unformation conditions of these plasmas were studied. Operation in the spike plasma condition enables maximum power absorption with minimum wall heating and offers maximum efficiency in heating the propellant gas. In the spike condition, plasmas of the three propellant gases were investigated in an open channel configuration to a maximum applied power level of 11.2 kW (in N2). Microwave power coupling efficiencies of over 90 percent were routinely obtained at absorbed power levels up to 2 kW. Magnetic nozzle effects were investigated with a superconducting solenoid Al magnet applying a high magnetic field to the plasmas in and exiting from the discharge tube.

  17. Method for minimizing decarburization and other high temperature oxygen reactions in a plasma sprayed material

    DOEpatents

    Lenling, William J.; Henfling, Joseph A.; Smith, Mark F.

    1993-06-08

    A method is disclosed for spray coating material which employs a plasma gun that has a cathode, an anode, an arc gas inlet, a first powder injection port, and a second powder injection port. A suitable arc gas is introduced through the arc gas inlet, and ionization of the arc gas between the cathode and the anode forms a plasma. The plasma is directed to emenate from an open-ended chamber defined by the boundary of the anode. A coating is deposited upon a base metal part by suspending a binder powder within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the first powder injection port; a material subject to degradation by high temperature oxygen reactions is suspended within a carrier gas that is fed into the plasma through the second injection port. The material fed through the second injection port experiences a cooler portion of the plasma and has a shorter dwell time within the plasma to minimize high temperature oxygen reactions. The material of the first port and the material of the second port intermingle within the plasma to form a uniform coating having constituent percentages related to the powder-feed rates of the materials through the respective ports.

  18. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  19. The effect of chronic erythrocytic polycythemia and high altitude upon plasma and blood volumes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. R.; Smith, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of two kinds of physiological chronic erythrocytic polycythemias in order to differentiate the specific effect of erythrocytic polycythemia from the general effects of high altitude upon the plasma volume. The two kinds were produced hormonally in female chickens, at sea level, or by protracted high-altitude exposures. It appears that the vascular system of the body may account for an increase in red blood cell mass either by reduction in plasma volume, or by no change in plasma volume, resulting in differential changes in total blood volumes.

  20. Effects of high voltage nanosecond pulsed plasma and micro DBD plasma on seed germination, growth development and physiological activities in spinach.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sang-Hye; Choi, Ki-Hong; Pengkit, Anchalee; Im, Jun Sup; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Park, Yeunsoo; Hong, Eun Jeong; Jung, Sun Kyung; Choi, Eun-Ha; Park, Gyungsoon

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed seed germination, seedling growth, and physiological aspects after treatment with high voltage nanosecond pulsed plasma and micro DBD plasma in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), a green leafy vegetable known to have low germination rate. Both germination and dry weight of seedlings increased after high voltage pulse shots were applied to spinach seeds. However seeds treated with many shots (10 shots) showed a decrease in germination rate and seedling growth. Seeds treated with air DBD plasma exhibited slightly higher germination and subsequent seedling growth than those treated with N2 plasma. Seed surface was degenerated after treated with high voltage pulsed plasma and micro DBD plasma but no significant difference in the degree of degeneration was observed among micro DBD plasma treatment time. Level of GA3 hormone and mRNA expression of an amylolytic enzyme-related gene in seeds were elevated 1 day after treatment with high voltage pulsed plasma. The relative amount of chlorophyll and total polyphenols in spinach seedlings grown from seeds treated with air DBD plasma was increased in 30 s, 1 min, and 3 min treatments. Taken together, our results suggest a possibility that plasma can enhance seed germination by triggering biochemical processes in seeds.

  1. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  2. Quantitation of Physostigmine in Plasma by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    temperature (ca. 220 c) in the absence of stabilizing agents such as acetylsalicylic acid , dilute ammonia, pyridostigmine, or neostigmine. However...purchased from Aldrich Chemical Co. (Milwaukee, WI). Sodium dihydrogen phosphate and picric acid were purchased from Baker Chemical Co. (Phillipsburg, NJ...enzymes of the plasma, 20 jtl of dimethylphysostigmine (1 jig/ml) as an internal standard, 0.5 ml of 0.1 M picric acid (pH 7), and 0.5 ml of 0.1 M sodium

  3. Electrostatic Waves in Dense Dusty Plasmas with High Fugacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. N.

    Propagation of electrostatic dust modes has been reviewed in the light of the concept of dust fugacity defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 and R are the dust number density and the grain size (radius) while the plasma Debye length (λD) is given through λD-2=λDe-2+λDi-2. Dusty plasmas are defined to be tenuous, dilute or dense when f≪1, ˜1, or ≫1, respectively. Attention is focused on “Dust-Acoustic Waves” (DAWs) and “Dust-Coulomb Waves” (DCWs) which exist in the tenuous (f≪1) and the dense (f≫1) regimes, respectively. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed in terms of an effective pressure called “Coulomb Pressure defined by PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain charge. In the lowest order, the DCW phase speed is given by ω/k=PC/ρdδ, where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density and δ≡ω2/ω1 is the ratio of charging frequencies. Thus, DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) modes which are driven by magnetic field pressure. In the dilute regime, the two waves loose their identities and merge into a single mode, which may be called “Dust Charge-Density Wave” (DCDW). When the grains are closest, DCW dispersion relation is identical with that of “Dust-Lattice Waves” (DLWs). Dense dusty plasmas are governed by a new scale-length defined by λR≡1/4πnd0Rδ, which characterizes the effective shielding length due to grain collective interactions. The scale-length λR plays a fundamental role in dense dusty plasmas, which is very similar to that of the Debye length λD in the tenuous regime. The two scale-lengths are related to the fugacity through fδ≡λD2/λR2. The frequency spectrum as well as the damping rates for various dust modes have been analytically obtained, and compared with the numerical solutions of the kinetic (Vlasov) dispersion relation.

  4. High Power LaB6 Plasma Source Performance for the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2016-10-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept is a linear encapsulated ring cusp. Due to the complex field geometry, plasma injection into the device requires careful consideration. A high power thermionic plasma source (>0.25MW; >10A/cm2) has been developed with consideration to phase space for optimal coupling. We present the performance of the plasma source, comparison with alternative plasma sources, and plasma coupling with the CFR field configuration. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  5. High Current Systems for HyperV and PLX Plasma Railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Messer, S.; Elton, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2011-10-01

    HyperV is developing gas fed, pulsed, plasma railgun accelerators for PLX and other high momentum plasma applications. The present 2.5 cm square-bore plasma railgun forms plasma armatures from high density neutral gas (argon), preionizes it electrothermally, and accelerates the armature with 30 cm long parallel-plate railgun electrodes driven by a pulse forming network (PFN). Recent experiments have successfully formed and accelerated plasma armatures of ~4 mg at 40 km/s, with PFN currents of ~400 kA. In order to further increase railgun performance to the PLX design goal of 8 mg at 50 km/s, the PFN was upgraded to support currents of up to ~750 kA. A high voltage, high current linear array spark-gap switch and flexible, low-inductance transmission line were designed and constructed to handle the increased current load. We will describe these systems and present initial performance data from high current operation of the plasma rail gun from spectroscopy, interferometry, and imaging systems as well as pressure, magnetic field, and optical diagnostics. High current performance of railgun bore materials for electrodes and insulators will also be discussed as well as plans for upcoming experimentation with advanced materials. Supported by the U.S. DOE Joint Program in HEDLP.

  6. Climatology of highplasma measurements in Earth's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ross; Gerrard, Andrew J.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Kim, Hyomin; Manweiler, Jerry W.

    2017-01-01

    Since their launch in August 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instruments on the NASA Van Allen Probes spacecraft have been making continuous high-resolution measurements of Earth's ring current plasma environment. After a full traversal through all magnetic local times, a climatology (i.e., a survey of observations) of high-beta (β) plasma events (defined here as β > 1) as measured by the RBSPICE instrument in the ˜45 keV to ˜600 keV proton energy range in the inner magnetosphere (L < 5.8) has been constructed. In this paper we report this climatology of such highplasma occurrences, durations, and their general characteristics. Specifically, we show that most high-β events in the RBSPICE energy range are associated with postdusk/premidnight sector particle injections or plasma patches and can last from minutes to hours. While most of these events have a β less than 2, there are a number of observations reaching β greater than 4. Other observations of particular note are high-β events during relatively minor geomagnetic storms and examples of very long duration highplasmas. We show that highplasmas are a relatively common occurrence in the inner magnetosphere during both quiet and active times. As such, the waves generated by these plasmas may have an underappreciated role in the inner magnetosphere, and thus the study of these plasmas and their instabilities may be more important than has been currently addressed.

  7. High pulse pressure is not associated with abnormal activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, T A L; Pedersen, E B; Munk, K; Hjortdal, V E; Emmertsen, K; Andersen, N H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between pulse pressure (PP)--a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness-and activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in adult patients with repaired coarctation and normal left ventricular (LV) function. A total of 114 patients (44 (26-74) years, 13 (0.1-40) years at repair) and 20 healthy controls were examined with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, vasoactive hormone levels and magnetic resonance of the thoracic aorta. Forty-one patients (36%) were taking antihypertensives (28 RAAS inhibitors). Fifty-one had mean 24-h blood pressures >130/80 mm Hg. Hypertension was not associated with age at repair (P=0.257). Patients had higher PP and LV mass compared with controls (52±11 vs. 45±5 mm Hg and 221±71 vs. 154±55 g, respectively; both P<0.05). Differences were more pronounced in the presence of recoarctation, but independently of RAA levels. Even normotensive patients had higher LV mass than controls. LV mass and recoarctation were correlated with PP levels. In conclusion, adult patients with repaired coarctation have increased PP and LV mass compared with controls. PP increased with increasing recoarctation. Hypertension was present also in the absence of recoarctation. These changes could not be explained by abnormal activation of the RAAS.

  8. Altered DNA methylation associated with an abnormal liver phenotype in a cattle model with a high incidence of perinatal pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Hélène; Jouneau, Luc; Campion, Évelyne; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Larcher, Thibaut; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Balzergue, Sandrine; Ledevin, Mireille; Prézelin, Audrey; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Heyman, Yvan; Richard, Christophe; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Renard, Jean-Paul; Jammes, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Cloning enables the generation of both clinically normal and pathological individuals from the same donor cells, and may therefore be a DNA sequence-independent driver of phenotypic variability. We took advantage of cattle clones with identical genotypes but different developmental abilities to investigate the role of epigenetic factors in perinatal mortality, a complex trait with increasing prevalence in dairy cattle. We studied livers from pathological clones dying during the perinatal period, clinically normal adult clones with the same genotypes as perinatal clones and conventional age-matched controls. The livers from deceased perinatal clones displayed histological lesions, modifications to quantitative histomorphometric and metabolic parameters such as glycogen storage and fatty acid composition, and an absence of birth-induced maturation. In a genome-wide epigenetic analysis, we identified DNA methylation patterns underlying these phenotypic alterations and targeting genes relevant to liver metabolism, including the type 2 diabetes gene TCF7L2. The adult clones were devoid of major phenotypic and epigenetic abnormalities in the liver, ruling out the effects of genotype on the phenotype observed. These results thus provide the first demonstration of a genome-wide association between DNA methylation and perinatal mortality in cattle, and highlight epigenetics as a driving force for phenotypic variability in farmed animals. PMID:27958319

  9. Plasma torch for ignition, flameholding and enhancement of combustion in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Billingsley, Matthew C. (Inventor); Sanders, Darius D. (Inventor); Schetz, Joseph A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Preheating of fuel and injection into a plasma torch plume fro adjacent the plasma torch plume provides for only ignition with reduced delay but improved fuel-air mixing and fuel atomization as well as combustion reaction enhancement. Heat exchange also reduced erosion of the anode of the plasma torch. Fuel mixing atomization, fuel mixture distribution enhancement and combustion reaction enhancement are improved by unsteady plasma torch energization, integral formation of the heat exchanger, fuel injection nozzle and plasma torch anode in a more compact, low-profile arrangement which is not intrusive on a highspeed air flow with which the invention is particularly effective and further enhanced by use of nitrogen as a feedstock material and inclusion of high pressure gases in the fuel to cause effervescence during injection.

  10. Cold plasma distribution above a few thousand kilometers at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Great advances with respect to the study of the earth's magnetosphere could be achieved in connection with the launch of the Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1 and 2 spacecraft. These advances were made possible partly because of the unique combination of coplanar orbits which simultaneously sample the low altitude ionospheric and atmospheric signature (DE-2) and the high altitude phenomena of the inner magnetosphere (DE-1). It was, thus, feasible to obtain new measurements of the coupling of plasmas and fields between these fundamentally important regions. One basic element of the coupling involves the interchange of low energy plasma between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The flow characteristics of the low energy plasma are indicators of the magnetospheric and ionospheric electric fields which drive the current system. The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) instrument has been designed for conducting measurements regarding this plasma population. Attention is given to details regarding RIMS, an example RIMS orbit, plasma trough characteristics, and polar cap phenomena.

  11. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  12. Three dimensional space charge model for large high voltage satellites. [plasma sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooks, D.; Parker, L. W.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    High power solar arrays for satellite power systems with dimensions of kilometers, and with tens of kilovolts distributed over their surface face many plasma interaction problems that must be properly anticipated. In most cases, the effects cannot be adequately modeled without detailed knowledge of the plasma sheath structure and space charge effects. Two computer programs were developed to provide fully self consistent plasma sheath models in three dimensions as a result of efforts to model the experimental plasma sheath studies at NASA/JSC. Preliminary results indicate that for the conditions considered, the Child-Langmuir diode theory can provide a useful estimate of the plasma sheath thickness. The limitations of this conclusion are discussed. Some of the models presented exhibit the strong ion focusing observed in the JSC experiments.

  13. Generation of neutral and high-density electron–positron pair plasmas in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sarri, G.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Schumaker, W.; Di Piazza, A.; Reville, B.; Dzelzainis, T.; Doria, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Grittani, G.; Kar, S.; Keitel, C. H.; Krushelnick, K.; Kuschel, S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Shukla, N.; Silva, L. O.; Symes, D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Vargas, M.; Vieira, J.; Zepf, M.

    2015-01-01

    Electron–positron pair plasmas represent a unique state of matter, whereby there exists an intrinsic and complete symmetry between negatively charged (matter) and positively charged (antimatter) particles. These plasmas play a fundamental role in the dynamics of ultra-massive astrophysical objects and are believed to be associated with the emission of ultra-bright gamma-ray bursts. Despite extensive theoretical modelling, our knowledge of this state of matter is still speculative, owing to the extreme difficulty in recreating neutral matter–antimatter plasmas in the laboratory. Here we show that, by using a compact laser-driven setup, ion-free electron–positron plasmas with unique characteristics can be produced. Their charge neutrality (same amount of matter and antimatter), high-density and small divergence finally open up the possibility of studying electron–positron plasmas in controlled laboratory experiments. PMID:25903920

  14. Radiation properties and hydrodynamics evolution of highly charged ions in laser-produced silicon plasma.

    PubMed

    Min, Qi; Su, Maogen; Cao, Shiquan; Sun, Duixiong; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong

    2016-11-15

    We present a simplified radiation hydrodynamic model based on the fluid dynamic equations and the radiative transfer equation, which can be used to investigate the radiation properties and dynamics evolution of highly charged ions in a laser-produced plasma in vacuum. The outputs of the model consist of the evolution of the electron temperature, atom, and ion density, and the temporal and spatial evolution of various transient particles in plasma, as well as the simulated spectrum related to certain experimental conditions in a specified spectral window. In order to test the model and provide valuable experimental feedback, a series of EUV emission spectra of silicon plasmas have been measured using the spatio-temporally resolved laser produced plasma technique. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma is reliably reconstructed by using this model.

  15. High resolution equilibrium calculations of pedestal and SOL plasma in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, S. Yu; Martynov, A. A.; Drozdov, V. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Poshekhonov, Yu Yu

    2017-02-01

    For integrated modeling of equilibrium, stability and dynamics of the divertor tokamak plasma with scrape-off layer (SOL) high resolution equilibrium calculations are needed. A new version of the CAXE equilibrium code computes the tokamak equilibrium on a numerical grid adaptive to magnetic surfaces both in the plasma region with closed flux surfaces and in the SOL region with open magnetic lines. The plasma profiles can be prescribed independently in each region with nested flux surfaces, and realistic SOL profiles with very short pressure drop off length can be accurately treated. The influence of the finite current density in SOL on the connection length is studied. From the point of view of the MHD equilibrium and stability modeling, self-consistent calculations of diverted tokamak configurations with finite current density at the separatrix require taking into account plasma outside the separatrix. Calculated high resolution equilibria provide an input to new versions of the ideal MHD stability codes treating tokamak plasma with SOL. The study of the influence of the pressure gradient profile in the pedestal plasma inside and outside the separatrix on the pedestal height limit set by external kink-ballooning mode stability is presented. Another possible application of the high resolution pedestal and SOL equilibrium code is a coupling to the SOLPS code with a purpose to increase equilibrium accuracy and support self-consistent plasma flow/equilibrium modeling.

  16. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to <3 × 1018 m-3, while an argon fill pressure was varied from ˜0.02 Pa to 0.75 Pa as well as the magnetic field mentioned above, with the fixed radio frequency (rf) and power of 7 MHz and ˜3.5 kW, respectively. The observed magnetic field reduction rate, a decrease of the magnetic field divided by the vacuum one, was up to 18%. However, in a certain parameter regime, where the product of ion and electron Hall terms is a key parameter, the measured diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  17. Production of high quality syngas from argon/water plasma gasification of biomass and waste.

    PubMed

    Hlina, M; Hrabovsky, M; Kavka, T; Konrad, M

    2014-01-01

    Extremely hot thermal plasma was used for the gasification of biomass (spruce sawdust, wood pellets) and waste (waste plastics, pyrolysis oil). The plasma was produced by a plasma torch with DC electric arc using unique hybrid stabilization. The torch input power of 100-110 kW and the mass flow rate of the gasified materials of tens kg/h was set up during experiments. Produced synthetic gas featured very high content of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (together approximately 90%) that is in a good agreement with theory. High quality of the produced gas is given by extreme parameters of used plasma--composition, very high temperature and low mass flow rate.

  18. Postionisation of a spatially nonuniform plasma plume under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krestovskikh, D. A.; Ivanov, K. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Bukin, V. V.; Volkov, R. V.; Rupasov, A. A.; Savel’ev, A. B.

    2017-02-01

    The plasma plume formed by a high-power nanosecond laser pulse on the surface of solid targets as well as the plume parameters after its irradiation by a high-intensity femtosecond laser pulse are investigated by optical diagnostic techniques. Two-dimensional patterns of the electron plasma density are reconstructed from experimentally recorded interferograms at different stages of plasma evolution. It is shown that the interaction of the high-intensity femtosecond radiation with the plasma cloud is accompanied by the field ionisation of atoms and ions as well as by a significant increase in the electron density throughout the interaction volume. Presented at ECLIM2016 (Moscow, 18–23 September 2016).

  19. A simple, high performance Thomson scattering diagnostic for high temperature plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, D.J.D.; Cekic, M.

    1994-02-01

    This Thomson scattering diagnostic is used to measure the electron temperature and density of the plasma in the MST reversed-field pinch, a magnetic confinement fusion research device. This diagnostic system is unique for its type in that it combines high performance with simple design and low cost components. In the design of this instrument, careful attention was given to the suppression of stray laser line light with simple and effective beam dumps, viewing dumps, aperatures, and a holographic edge filter. This allows the use of a single grating monochromator for dispersion of the Thomson scattered spectrum onto the microchannel plate detector. Alignment and calibration procedures for the laser beam delivery system, the scattered light collection system, and the spectrometer and detector are described. A sample Thomson scattered spectrum illustrates typical data.

  20. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  1. Shaped Plasma Lenses for Optical Beam Control at High Laser Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Palastro, J. P.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Gordon, D. F.; Penano, J. R.; Helle, M. H.; Kaganovich, D.

    2016-10-01

    A plasma channel is a cylindrical plasma column with an on-axis density minimum. A short plasma channel can focus a laser pulse in much the same manner as a conventional lens or off-axis parabola. If the plasma has an off-axis density maximum (``inverse channel''), it behaves like a negative lens and acts to defocus the pulse. In either case, a shaped plasma lens (SPL) may be placed in the beamline at locations where the laser intensity or fluence is orders of magnitude above the damage threshold for conventional solid optics. When placed after an off-axis parabola, SPLs may provide additional flexibility and spot size control and may also be useful in suppressing laser prepulse. For high power, ultrashort laser pulses, the broad laser bandwidth and extreme intensities produce chromatic and phase aberrations and amplitude distortions that degrade the lens focusing or defocusing performance. Although there have been a few experiments that demonstrate laser pulse focusing by a shaped plasma lens, generation and control of the plasma present significant challenges. Potential applications of SPLs to laser-plasma accelerators will be discussed. Supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  2. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  3. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Asai, Tomohiko; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 × 10(17) m(-3), i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  4. [Ischemic changes and blood coagulation abnormalities as complications of pneumococcal meningitis].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Takashi; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Takashima, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Keishiro; Shimizu, Takako; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Ohashi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    One explanation for cerebral infarctions that occur as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis is blood coagulation abnormalities. We investigated the clinical features, laboratory test results, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and pathological features of 10 patients with pneumococcal meningitis between 2006 and 2013 to examine the abnormal findings that may be associated with prognosis. Five patients (50%) that had Glasgow Outcome Scale scores between 1 and 4 were classified as the poor outcome group. In this group, the MRI revealed a high signal intensity on the diffusion-weighted image (DWI), and there was an abnormal signal along the cerebral cortex and Virchow-Robin spaces, which were characterized pathologically by ischemic changes. The plasma thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) levels showed greater differences between the poor and good prognosis groups than platlet and D-dimer levels; this suggested that high plasma TAT levels indicate a poor prognosis.

  5. Ion drag force in plasmas at high electronegativity.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I; Yu, M Y; Stenflo, L; Xu, S

    2005-07-01

    The electric as well as the positive- and negative-ion drag forces on an isolated dust grain in an electronegative plasma are studied for large negative-ion densities, when the negative ions are not Boltzmann distributed. The investigation is carried out for submicrometer dust particles, so that the theory of Coulomb scattering is applicable for describing ion-dust interaction. Among the forces acting on the dust grain, the negative-ion drag force is found to be important. The effects of the negative-ion density, neutral-gas pressure, and dust-grain size on the forces are also considered. It is shown that by increasing the density of the negative ions one can effectively manipulate the dust grains. Our results imply that both dust voids and balls can be formed.

  6. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  7. High voltage plasma sheath analysis related to TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1991-01-01

    On the first mission of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1), a 1.8 m diameter spherical satellite will be deployed a distance of 20 km above the space shuttle Orbiter on an insulated conducting tether. The satellite will be held at electric potentials up to 5000 volts positive with respect to the ambient plasma. Due to the passage of the conducting tether through the Earth's magnetic field, an emf will be created, driving electrons down the tether to the orbiter, out through an electron gun into the ionosphere and back into the positive biased satellite. Instrumentation on the satellite will measure electron flow to the surface at several locations, but these detectors have a limited range of acceptance angle. The problem addressed herein is the determination of the electron current distribution over the satellite surface and the angle of incidence of the incoming electrons relative to the surface normal.

  8. High voltage plasma sheath analysis related to TSS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1991-10-01

    On the first mission of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1), a 1.8 m diameter spherical satellite will be deployed a distance of 20 km above the space shuttle Orbiter on an insulated conducting tether. The satellite will be held at electric potentials up to 5000 volts positive with respect to the ambient plasma. Due to the passage of the conducting tether through the Earth's magnetic field, an emf will be created, driving electrons down the tether to the orbiter, out through an electron gun into the ionosphere and back into the positive biased satellite. Instrumentation on the satellite will measure electron flow to the surface at several locations, but these detectors have a limited range of acceptance angle. The problem addressed herein is the determination of the electron current distribution over the satellite surface and the angle of incidence of the incoming electrons relative to the surface normal.

  9. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W. Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-05-15

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  12. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W.; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  13. Experimental study of a very high frequency, 162 MHz, segmented electrode, capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, Nishant; Harvey, Cleo; Gaman, Cezar; Ellingboe, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharge operating at a very high frequency, 30-300 MHz, offers many advantages over standard 13.56 MHz CCP. However, there is a limited flexibility on the choice of driving frequency and substrate size due to plasma non-uniformity caused by the standing wave effect and edge effect. To overcome this issue segmented electrode CCP's are proposed and researched. Despite its numerous advantages the power coupling mechanism and plasma chemistry in this type of discharge are not fully understood due to lack of experimental data. In this paper, we present the experimental study of a segmented electrode, 3x4 tile array (10x10 cm square tile with 1 cm tile-to-tile separation), CCP discharge driven at 162 MHz. We measured plasma uniformity and gas temperature using hairpin probe and optical emission spectroscopy respectively. A homemade RF compensated Langmuir probe is employed to measure the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) by second harmonic technique. Energy resolved quadrupole mass spectrometer is utilized to measure the ion energy distribution. Discharge/plasma properties are investigated for several operating conditions and for power coupling mode in both washer board and checker board configuration. The experimental results show that the uniform plasma density can be maintained over a large area along with highly non-equilibrium condition to produce unique gas phase plasma chemistry.

  14. Proteomic analysis of microvesicles from plasma of healthy donors reveals high individual variability.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Amador, Patricia; Royo, Felix; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Conde-Vancells, Javier; Palomo-Diez, Laura; Borras, Francesc E; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2012-06-27

    Healthy blood plasma is required for several therapeutic procedures. To maximize successful therapeutic outcomes it is critical to control the quality of blood plasma. Clearly initiatives to improve the safety of blood transfusions will have a high economical and social impact. A detailed knowledge of the composition of healthy blood plasma is essential to facilitate such improvements. Apart from free proteins, lipids and metabolites, blood plasma also contains cell-derived microvesicles, including exosomes and microparticles from several different cellular origins. In this study, we have purified microvesicles smaller than 220nm from plasma of healthy donors and performed proteomic, ultra-structural, biochemical and functional analyses. We have detected 161 microvesicle-associated proteins, including many associated with the complement and coagulation signal-transduction cascades. Several proteases and protease inhibitors associated with acute phase responses were present, indicating that these microvesicles may be involved in these processes. There was a remarkably high variability in the protein content of plasma from different donors. In addition, we report that this variability could be relevant for their interaction with cellular systems. This work provides valuable information on plasma microvesicles and a foundation to understand microvesicle biology and clinical implications.

  15. Plasma-based amplification and manipulation of high-power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Goetz

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade the increasing availability of Tera- and Petawatt class lasers with ps to fs pulse duration has intensified the interest in the relativistic interaction between laser radiation and matter. Today laser intensities up to 1022 W/cm2 can be achieved. Most high intensity lasers today rely on amplification schemes that can only hardly be scaled to higher power levels due to material damage thresholds. An alternative approach that allows circumventing these issues is the use of plasma as an amplification medium. Langmuir or ion waves may be used as optical components, scattering the energy from a long pump pulse into a short seed pulse. Damage thresholds of solid-state materials are not only limiting the generation of high power laser light, but also its subsequent manipulation. Again, plasma can provide an alternative approach to light manipulation. We recently proposed the concept of transient plasma photonic crystals, which aims at transferring and extending the concept of photonic crystals to the realm of plasma physics in the range of optical frequencies. In my presentation I will discuss Brillouin type plasma-based laser amplifiers and show that the ion plasma waves, driven by the two laser pulses, eventually form photonic crystals. The properties and possible future applications of these plasma photonic crystals as efficient Bragg type mirrors or polarizers will be discussed.

  16. Robust control of long-pulse, high performance plasmas in KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Youngmu; Hahn, S. H.; Han, H. S.; Woo, M. H.; Joung, M.; Kim, Jayhyun; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, H.-S.; Yoon, S. W.; Oh, Y. K.; Na, Y. S.; Eidietis, N. W.; Walker, M. L.; Lanctot, M. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Mueller, D. A.; Kstar Team

    2016-10-01

    The goal of KSTAR is to achieve and demonstrate high performance, steady state tokamak operations in long pulse up to 300 s. In recent years, we made significant progresses on plasma control and performance for this advanced tokamak (AT) operation. First of all, the plasma equilibrium magnetic control has been substantially improved by applying fully decoupled multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) isoflux shape controllers [1]. The MIMO shape controllers were designed using a newly developed design method by taking the plasma equilibrium response into account self-consistently. More than eight shape control variables including plasma currents are controlled independently on each other with high accuracy (less than 1cm error on average) and with wide variations of plasma shape. By virtue of this robust control, various long pulse H-mode discharges have been operated up to 60 s, which was the maximum pulse length allowable in current KSTAR system. Also, plasma performance has been improved accordingly. A fully non-inductive H-mode operation [1] was achieved for the first time in KSTAR, through the so-called `high betap' operation with betap 3.0. In addition, various experimental attempts for advanced scenario development have been conducted such as the `hybrid' [2] and `high li' scenarios[3].

  17. High-resolution submicron retarding field energy analyzer for low-temperature plasma analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M. G.; Stevens, J. E.; Woodworth, J. R.

    1999-12-20

    A retarding potential energy analyzer having 750 nm diameter, self-aligned grid apertures and micron scale grid separation has been fabricated using polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide. High-resolution in situ measurements of ion velocity distributions have been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas. Measurement results agree well with those from a macroscopic analyzer. Important differences are observed in the energies of plasma ions when measured with respect to chamber wall versus those measured with respect to the plasma floating potential. Preliminary measurements under rf bias conditions have also been made and results follow the expected trends. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Generation of high energy electron accelerated by using a tapered capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Taehee; Lee, Seungwoo; Suk, Hyyong

    2014-10-01

    The tapered plasma density in a gas-filled capillary waveguide can suppress the dephasing problem in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). As a result, the acceleration distance and the gained electron energy are expected to be increased. For this purpose, we developed a tapered capillary waveguide, which can produce a plasma density of ~ 1018 cm-3. Using this capillary discharge plasma, we performed the acceleration experiments with the high power laser system (20 TW/40 fs) constructed at GIST. In this presentation, the detailed electron acceleration experiments will be reported.

  19. Theory and Observations of High Frequency Alfven Eigenmodes in Low Aspect Ratio Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; E. Fredrickson; E. Belova; C.Z. Cheng; D. Gates; S. Kaye; R. White

    2003-06-27

    New observations of sub-cyclotron frequency instability in low aspect ratio plasma in National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX) are reported. The frequencies of observed instabilities correlate with the characteristic Alfven velocity of the plasma. A theory of localized Compressional Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE) and Global shear Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in low aspect ratio plasma is presented to explain the observed high frequency instabilities. CAE's/GAE's are driven by the velocity space gradient of energetic super-Alfvenic beam ions via Doppler shifted cyclotron resonances. One of the main damping mechanisms of GAE's, the continuum damping, is treated perturbatively within the framework of ideal MHD. Properties of these cyclotron instabilities ions are presented.

  20. Analysis of doxylamine in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, K J; Stump, D; Zizzamia, J A

    1983-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay for the quantitative determination of doxylamine in plasma is described. The drug levels of doxylamine in plasma were monitored after the oral administration of a single 25-mg tablet of doxylamine succinate to each of 20 male volunteers. The compound was extracted from the plasma samples, concentrated under a nitrogen stream, and analyzed by HPLC using normal-phase chromatography with detection at 254 nm. The detection limit is approximately 5 ng/ml.

  1. High-order harmonic generation from plasma plume pumped by 400 nm wavelength laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, Rashid A.; Elouga Bom, Luc B.; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2007-09-24

    The authors present their study on high-order harmonic generation pumped by 400 nm wavelength laser from plasma plumes produced on the surfaces of various solid-state targets. The maximum harmonic cutoff was observed for Be plasma (31st harmonic, {lambda}=12.9 nm). They compared these results with harmonic generation pumped by 800 nm wavelength laser. The authors demonstrated single harmonic enhancement for Cr, Sn, Sb, and Mn plasmas. They also studied the use of varying the chirp of the pump laser to control the enhancement of single harmonics within the plateau.

  2. X-ray spectroscopy of high temperature plasma in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culhane, J. L.

    X-ray spectroscopic observations with high wavelength resolution provide information on plasma density, temperature, and emission, together with bulk and turbulent velocity data for the hot plasma. Observations carried out during the 1980 solar maximum with spectrometers on the SMM, P78-1, and Hinotori spacecraft are examined with emphasis on the advances made possible by these missions. During the next solar maximum, flare studies with particular emphasis on the impulsive phase will be undertaken by the Japanese Solar-A mission. Those instruments is designed to study the hot plasma are described, and their proposed role in clarifying the nature of the impulsive phase is discussed.

  3. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  4. Highplasma formation and observation of peaked density profile in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Mizushima, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Furukawa, M.; Kawai, Y.; Harima, K.; Kawazura, Y.; Kaneko, Y.; Tadachi, K.; Emoto, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Sugiura, T.; Vogel, G.

    2011-06-01

    High-β ECH plasma is generated and stably sustained in a magnetospheric configuration, the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device, generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. Geomagnetic-field compensation and optimized operation have realized drastic improvements in plasma properties. The maximum local β value has reached 70% and the pressure profiles have a rather steep gradient near the superconducting magnet. Electrons of the highplasma typically consist of 70% hot (~50 keV) and the rest of cold populations. Confinement time of the hot component plasma is 0.5 s with the optimized neutral gas pressure. By removing the coil support structure, the peaked density profile is observed in the strong field region.

  5. Characterization of Plasma Discharges in a High-Field Magnetic Tandem Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1998-01-01

    High density magnetized plasma discharges in open-ended geometries, like Tandem Mirrors, have a variety of space applications. Chief among them is the production of variable Specific Impulse (I(sub sp)) and variable thrust in a magnetic nozzle. Our research group is pursuing the experimental characterization of such discharges in our high-field facility located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL). These studies focus on identifying plasma stability criteria as functions of density, temperature and magnetic field strength. Plasma heating is accomplished by both Electron and Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ECR and ICR) at frequencies of 2-3 Ghz and 1-30 Mhz respectively, for both Hydrogen and Helium. Electron density and temperature has measured by movable Langmuir probes. Macroscopic plasma stability is being investigated in ongoing research.

  6. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Taro; SUGANUMA, Narufumi; HERING, Kurt G.; VEHMAS, Tapio; ITOH, Harumi; AKIRA, Masanori; TAKASHIMA, Yoshihiro; HIRANO, Harukazu; KUSAKA, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects’ occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades. PMID:25810443

  7. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  8. Experimental investigations of the formation of a plasma mirror for high-frequency microwave beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meger, R. A.; Mathew, J.; Gregor, J. A.; Pechacek, R. E.; Fernsler, R. F.; Manheimer, W.; Robson, A. E.

    1995-06-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been studying the use of a magnetically confined plasma sheet as a reflector for high-frequency (X-band) microwaves for broadband radar applications [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-19, 1228 (1991)]. A planar sheet plasma (50 cm×60 cm×1 cm) is produced using a 2-10 kV fast rise time square wave voltage source and a linear hollow cathode. Reproducible plasma distributions with density ≥1.2×1012 cm-3 have been formed in a low-pressure (100-500 mTorr of air) chamber located inside of a 100-300 G uniform magnetic field. One to ten pulse bursts of 20-1000 μs duration plasma sheets have been produced with pulse repetition frequencies of up to 10 kHz. Turn on and off times of the plasma are less than 10 μs each. The far-field antenna pattern of microwaves reflected off the plasma sheet is similar to that from a metal plate at the same location [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci PS-20, 1036 (1992)]. Interferometer measurements show the critical surface to remain nearly stationary during the current pulse. Plasma density measurements and optical emissions indicate that the plasma is produced by a flux of energetic electrons formed near the hollow cathode. The sheet appears to be stable to driver voltage and current fluctuations (NRL Memorandum Report No. 7461, 28 March 1994, NTIS Document No. AD-A278758).

  9. Flow and Noise Control in High Speed and High Reynolds Number Jets Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, M.; Kastner, J.; Kim, J.-H.; Utkin, Y.; Adamovich, I.; Brown, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    The idea of manipulating flow to change its characteristics is over a century old. Manipulating instabilities of a jet to increase its mixing and to reduce its radiated noise started in the 1970s. While the effort has been successful in low-speed and low Reynolds number jets, available actuators capabilities in terms of their amplitude, bandwidth, and phasing have fallen short in control of high-speed and high Reynolds number jets of practical interest. Localized arc filament plasma actuators have recently been developed and extensively used at Gas Dynamics and Turbulence Laboratory (GDTL) for control of highspeed and high Reynolds number jets. While the technique has been quite successful and is very promising, all the work up to this point had been carried out using small high subsonic and low supersonic jets from a 2.54 cm diameter nozzle exit with a Reynolds number of about a million. The preliminary work reported in this paper is a first attempt to evaluate the scalability of the technique. The power supply/plasma generator was designed and built in-house at GDTL to operate 8 actuators simultaneously over a large frequency range (0 to 200 kHz) with independent control over phase and duty cycle of each actuator. This allowed forcing the small jet at GDTL with azimuthal modes m = 0, 1, 2, 3, plus or minus 1, plus or minus 2, and plus or minus 4 over a large range of frequencies. This power supply was taken to and used, with minor modifications, at the NASA Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). At NATR, 32 actuators were distributed around the 7.5 in. nozzle (a linear increase with nozzle exit diameter would require 60 actuators). With this arrangement only 8 actuators could operate simultaneously, thus limiting the forcing of the jet at NATR to only three azimuthal modes m = plus or minus 1, 4, and 8. Very preliminary results at NATR indicate that the trends observed in the larger NASA facility in terms of the effects of actuation frequency and azimuthal modes are

  10. Optimization of plasma effect in laser drilling of high aspect ratio microvias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, V. N.; Cheshev, E. A.; Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Khomich, V. Yu; Mikolutskiy, S. I.; Vasil'yeva, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The simple theoretical model of heating side walls by laser plasma in the laser drilling of high aspect ratio microvias in metals and semiconductors is proposed. According to this model the recommendations are given on how to avoid the undesirable effect of melting side walls by laser plasma, strongly deteriorating microdrilling quality. The obtained results constitute a physical basis for the development of clean laser microdrilling. Particular estimations are given for the laser drilling of silicon wafers.

  11. Plasma mechanism of terahertz photomixing in high-electron mobility transistor under interband photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Khmyrova, I.; Satou, A.; Vaccaro, P. O.; Aida, T.; Shur, M.

    2002-11-01

    We show that modulated near-infrared radiation can generate terahertz plasma oscillations in the channel of a high-electron mobility transistor. This effect is associated with a temporarily periodic injection of the electrons photoexcited by modulated near-infrared radiation into the transistor channel. The excitation of the plasma oscillations has the resonant character. It results in the pertinent excitation of the electric current in the external circuit that can be used for generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation.

  12. Prevalence of High-Risk HPV Types and Abnormal Cervical Cytology in American Indian/Alaska Native Women, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Grace A.; Datta, S. Deblina; Mickiewicz, Theresa; Koutsky, Laura A.; Ghanem, Khalil; Hagensee, Michael; Kerndt, Peter; Hsu, Katherine; Weinstock, Hillard; Shlay, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We described prevalence estimates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), HPV types 16 and 18, and abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women compared with women of other races/ethnicities. Methods A total of 9,706 women presenting for cervical screening in a sentinel network of 26 clinics (sexually transmitted disease, family planning, and primary care) received Pap smears and HR-HPV type-specific testing. We compared characteristics of 291 women self-identified as AI/AN with other racial/ethnic minority groups. Results In our population, AI/AN and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women had similar age- and clinic-adjusted prevalences of HR-HPV (29.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 23.9, 34.3 for AI/AN women vs. 25.8%, 95% CI 24.4, 27.2 for NHW women), HPV 16 and 18 (6.7%, 95% CI 3.9, 9.6 for AI/AN women vs. 8.8%, 95% CI 7.9, 9.7 for NHW women), and abnormal Pap smear test results (16%, 95% CI 11.7, 20.3 for AI/AN women vs. 14.9%, 95% CI 13.7, 16.0 for NHW women). AI/AN women had a higher prevalence of HR-HPV than Hispanic women, and a similar prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 as compared with Hispanic and African American women. Conclusions We could not demonstrate differences in the prevalence of HR-HPV, HPV 16 and 18, or abnormal Pap smear test results between AI/AN and NHW women. This finding should improve confidence in the benefit of HPV vaccine and Pap smear screening in the AI/AN population as an effective strategy to reduce rates of cervical cancer. PMID:21553660

  13. PREFACE: 13th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The High-Tech Plasma Processes - 13th European Plasma Conference (HTPP-2014) was held in Toulouse (France) on 22-27 June 2014. The conference series started in 1990 as a thermal plasma conference and has gradually expanded to include other related topics. Now the High-Tech Plasma Processes - European Plasma Conference (HTPP) is an international conference organised in Europe every two years with topics encompassing the whole field of plasma processing science. The aim of the conference is to bring different scientific communities together, to facilitate contacts between science, technology and industry and to provide a platform for the exploration of both the fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas. For this edition of HTPP, as was the case for the last, we have acheived a well balanced participation from the communities of both thermal and non-thermal plasma researchers. 142 people from 17 countries attended the conference with the total number of contributions being 155, consisting of 8 plenary and 8 invited talks plus 51 oral and 88 poster contributions. We have received numerous papers corresponding to the contributions of HTPP-2014 that have been submitted for publication in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Each submitted contribution has been peer reviewed (60 referees with at least two reviewing each paper) and the Editors are very grateful to the referees for their careful support in improving the original manuscripts. In total, 52 manuscripts have been accepted for publication covering a range of topics of plasma processing science from plasma fundamentals to process applications through to experiments, diagnostics and modelling. We have grouped the papers into the following 5 topics: - Arc-Materials Interaction and Metallurgy - Plasma Torches and Spraying - Synthesis of Powders and Nanomaterials - Deposition and Surface Treatment - Non-Equilibrium Plasmas We deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high

  14. Highly charged ions in magnetic fusion plasmas: research opportunities and diagnostic necessities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-07-01

    Highly charged ions play a crucial role in magnetic fusion plasmas. These plasmas are excellent sources for producing highly charged ions and copious amounts of radiation for studying their atomic properties. These studies include calibration of density diagnostics, x-ray production by charge exchange, line identifications and accurate wavelength measurements, and benchmark data for ionization balance calculations. Studies of magnetic fusion plasmas also consume a large amount of atomic data, especially in order to develop new spectral diagnostics. Examples we give are the need for highly accurate wavelengths as references for measurements of bulk plasma motion, the need for accurate line excitation rates that encompass both electron-impact excitation and indirect line formation processes, for accurate position and resonance strength information of dielectronic recombination satellite lines that may broaden or shift diagnostic lines or that may provide electron temperature information, and the need for accurate ionization balance calculations. We show that the highly charged ions of several elements are of special current interest to magnetic fusion, notably highly charged ions of argon, iron, krypton, xenon, and foremost of tungsten. The electron temperatures thought to be achievable in the near future may produce W70+ ions and possibly ions with even higher charge states. This means that all but a few of the most highly charged ions are of potential interest as plasma diagnostics or are available for basic research.

  15. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  16. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  17. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  18. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  19. High Frequency Plasma Waves Associated With Solar Wind Reconnection Exhausts: WIND/WAVES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, K. E.; Bale, S. D.; Phan, T. D.; Davis, M.; Gosling, J. T.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of strong plasma wave activity near reconnection X-line regions in THE laboratory and in the Earth's magnetosphere have suggested that plasma waves may play AN important role in the reconnection process by providing anomalous resistivity through wave-particle interactions and by accelerating electrons. Recent observations of quasi-steady magnetic reconnection in the solar wind introduces an important new environment to study the role of plasma waves in a collisionless plasma associated with the reconnection process. We have used observations by the WIND spacecraft to study high frequency plasma waves associated with 28 solar wind reconnection exhausts. The TNR (Thermal Noise Receiver) experiment included in the WAVES instrument on WIND measures electric spectral density from 4 to 256 kHz and the TDS (Time Domain Sampler) experiment also included in WAVES samples electric field waveforms at rates up to 120,000 samples/s. A large fraction (79%) of the investigated events showed significant enhancements in the wave power around ~ 4 kHz, while only about one third (39%) of the exhausts were associated with intensifications around THE local electron plasma frequency (few tens of kHz). TDS waveform samples revealed three different wave modes: electron solitary waves, ion acoustic waves and Langmuir waves. The intense plasma waves were most frequently observed close to the X-line and near the exhaust boundaries, although wave emissions were commonly observed elsewhere within the exhausts as well

  20. An improved process for high nutrition of germinated brown rice production: Low-pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua Han; Chang, Hung Chia; Chen, Yu Kuo; Hung, Chien Lun; Lin, Su Yi; Chen, Yi Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Brown rice was exposed to low-pressure plasma ranging from 1 to 3kV for 10min. Treatment of brown rice in low-pressure plasma increases the germination percentage, seedling length, and water uptake in laboratory germination tests. Of the various treatments, 3-kV plasma exposure for 10min yielded the best results. In germinating brown rice, α-amylase activity was significantly higher in treated groups than in controls. The higher enzyme activity in plasma-treated brown rice likely triggers the rapid germination and earlier vigor of the seedlings. Low-pressure plasma also increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels from ∼19 to ∼28mg/100g. In addition, a marked increase in the antioxidant activity of brown rice was observed with plasma treatments compared to controls. The main finding of this study indicates that low-pressure plasma is effective at enhancing the growth and GABA accumulation of germinated brown rice, which can supply high nutrition to consumer.

  1. High resolution measurements of density structures in the Jovian plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansher, J. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    A recent effort to digitize the plasma density by using the low frequency cutoff of trapped continuum radiation in the vicinity of the Jovian plasma sheet has revealed the existence of sharply defined density structures in the plasma sheet. These structures typically have a plasma density which is relatively constant but of order 50 percent greater or less than in the surrounding plasma. At the boundaries of these structures, the transitions from low to high density occur on time scales of about ten seconds, which correspond to spatial dimensions on the order of a few ion Larmor radii. The structures themselves last for intervals from less than a minute to more than five minutes, corresponding to size scales from a fraction of a Jovian radius to more than a Jovian radius, depending of the velocity of the structure relative to the spacecraft. In view of the importance of near corotation plasma flows, these structures are likely to be limited in both the longitudinal and radial dimensions and, therefore, could represent flux tubes with greatly varying plasma content. These observations are presented as among the first to directly address the theoretically proposed interchange instability.

  2. Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, David Michael

    1994-06-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T e~100eV), high-density (ne>1022cm-3) plasmas created with intense (~1012-1016W/cm2), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO2) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of ~3μm and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce ~3.5mJ, ~130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 1016W/cm2. In the insulator, SiO2, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities ~1016W/cm2, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Mechanism of high-energy electron production in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism of high-energy electron production in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulses with a solid target is proposed and analysed. The theoretical dependences of fast-electron kinetic energy on the parameters of laser radiation and target material are given. The effect of ionisation of the target material is considered. The generation of ultrastrong magnetic fields in the laser plasma is shown to play the key part in the formation, transfer, and acceleration of electron beams. This results in the production of vortex electric fields accelerating electrons. The theoretical dependences yield well-proved limits for the electron energy and are in good agreement with the results of experiments performed on high-intensity laser setups, including the results obtained with participation of the author.

  4. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations during an oral fat load and after short term high-fat, high-fat high-protein and high-fructose diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PCSK9 (Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin type 9) is a circulating protein that promotes hypercholesterolemia by decreasing hepatic LDL receptor protein. Under non interventional conditions, its expression is driven by sterol response element binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and follows a diurnal rhythm synchronous with cholesterol synthesis. Plasma PCSK9 is associated to LDL-C and to a lesser extent plasma triglycerides and insulin resistance. We aimed to verify the effect on plasma PCSK9 concentrations of dietary interventions that affect these parameters. Methods We performed nutritional interventions in young healthy male volunteers and offspring of type 2 diabetic (OffT2D) patients that are more prone to develop insulin resistance, including: i) acute post-prandial hyperlipidemic challenge (n=10), ii) 4 days of high-fat (HF) or high-fat/high-protein (HFHP) (n=10), iii) 7 (HFruc1, n=16) or 6 (HFruc2, n=9) days of hypercaloric high-fructose diets. An acute oral fat load was also performed in two patients bearing the R104C-V114A loss-of-function (LOF) PCSK9 mutation. Plasma PCSK9 concentrations were measured by ELISA. For the HFruc1 study, intrahepatocellular (IHCL) and intramyocellular lipids were measured by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Hepatic and whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed with a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (0.3 and 1.0 mU.kg-1.min-1). Findings HF and HFHP short-term diets, as well as an acute hyperlipidemic oral load, did not significantly change PCSK9 concentrations. In addition, post-prandial plasma triglyceride excursion was not altered in two carriers of PCSK9 LOF mutation compared with non carriers. In contrast, hypercaloric 7-day HFruc1 diet increased plasma PCSK9 concentrations by 28% (p=0.05) in healthy volunteers and by 34% (p=0.001) in OffT2D patients. In another independent study, 6-day HFruc2 diet increased plasma PCSK9 levels by 93% (p<0.0001) in young healthy male volunteers. Spearman

  5. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  6. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  8. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  9. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  10. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Assess Brain Structural Abnormalities in the Murine Mucopolysaccharidosis VII Model

    PubMed Central

    Poptani, Harish; Kumar, Manoj; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Kim, Sungheon; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Pickup, Stephen; Li, Joel; Parente, Michael K; Wolfe, John H.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed to characterize brain structural abnormalities in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII). μMRI demonstrated a decrease in the volume of anterior commissure and corpus callosum and a slight increase in the volume of the hippocampus in MPS VII vs. wild-type mice. DTI indices were analyzed in gray and white matter. In vivo and ex vivo DTI demonstrated significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, external capsule and hippocampus in MPS VII vs. control brains. Significantly increased mean diffusivity was also found in the anterior commissure and corpus callosum from ex-vivo DTI. Significantly reduced linear anisotropy was observed from the hippocampus from in-vivo DTI, whereas significantly decreased planar anisotropy and spherical anisotropy were observed in the external capsule from only ex-vivo DTI. There were corresponding morphological differences in the brains of MPS VII mice by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Luxol fast blue staining demonstrated less intense staining of the corpus callosum and external capsule; myelin abnormalities in the corpus callosum were also demonstrated quantitatively in toluidine blue-stained sections and confirmed by electron microscopy. These results demonstrate the potential for μMRI and DTI for quantitative assessment of brain pathology in murine models of brain diseases. PMID:24335527

  11. Observation of a new high-β and high-density state of a magnetospheric plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2014-08-01

    A new high-β and high-density state is reported for a plasma confined in a laboratory magnetosphere. In order to expand the parameter regime of an electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment, the 8.2 GHz microwave power of the Ring Trap 1 device has been upgraded with the installation of a new waveguide system. The rated input power launched from a klystron was increased from 25 to 50 kW, which enabled the more stable formation of a hot-electron highplasma. The diamagnetic signal (the averaged value of four magnetic loops signals) of a plasma reached 5.2 mWb. According to a two-dimensional Grad-Shafranov analysis, the corresponding local β value is close to 100%.

  12. Observation of a new high-β and high-density state of a magnetospheric plasma in RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2014-08-15

    A new high-β and high-density state is reported for a plasma confined in a laboratory magnetosphere. In order to expand the parameter regime of an electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment, the 8.2 GHz microwave power of the Ring Trap 1 device has been upgraded with the installation of a new waveguide system. The rated input power launched from a klystron was increased from 25 to 50 kW, which enabled the more stable formation of a hot-electron highplasma. The diamagnetic signal (the averaged value of four magnetic loops signals) of a plasma reached 5.2 mWb. According to a two-dimensional Grad-Shafranov analysis, the corresponding local β value is close to 100%.

  13. Microfluidic Pipette Tip for High-Purity and High-Throughput Blood Plasma Separation from Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeongyeon; Oh, Sein; You, Dongwon; Choi, Sungyoung

    2017-02-07

    Blood plasma separation from whole blood is often limited by numerous blood cells which can compromise separation processes and thus deteriorate separation performance such as purity and throughput. To address this challenge, we present a microfluidic pipet tip composed of slant array ridges that enable autonomous blood cell focusing without significant deviation as well as facilitating a high degree of parallelization without compromising separation purity. With these advantages, we achieved high-purity (99.88%) and high-throughput (904.3 μL min(-1)) plasma separation from whole blood. In combination with a smart pipet, we successfully demonstrated rapid, inexpensive, and equipment-free blood plasma preparation for pretransfusion testing.

  14. Characterization of plasma expansion dynamics in a high power diode with a carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, J.-C.; Liu, L.; Cai, D.

    2014-06-09

    Thermal plasma expansion is characterised during the operation of a high power diode with an explosive emission carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode driven by a 250 kV, 150 ns accelerating pulse. It is found that a quasi-stationary state of plasma expansion is obtained during the main part of the accelerating pulse and the whole plasma expansion exhibits an “U”-shape velocity evolution. A theoretical model describing the dynamics of plasma expansion is developed, which indicates that the plasma expansion velocity is determined by equilibrium between the diode current density and plasma thermal electron current density.

  15. Characterization of plasma expansion dynamics in a high power diode with a carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, J.-C.; Liu, L.; Cai, D.

    2014-06-01

    Thermal plasma expansion is characterised during the operation of a high power diode with an explosive emission carbon-fiber-aluminum cathode driven by a 250 kV, 150 ns accelerating pulse. It is found that a quasi-stationary state of plasma expansion is obtained during the main part of the accelerating pulse and the whole plasma expansion exhibits an "U"-shape velocity evolution. A theoretical model describing the dynamics of plasma expansion is developed, which indicates that the plasma expansion velocity is determined by equilibrium between the diode current density and plasma thermal electron current density.

  16. High-Performance Liquid-Chromatographic Analysis of Plasma Iohexol Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schwertner, Harvey A; Weld, Kyle J

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a high-performance liquid-chromatographic (HPLC) method using photodiode array detection and isocratic conditions was developed for the analysis of plasma iohexol concentrations. Plasma proteins were precipitated with 1:1 volume of plasma and acetonitrile-ethanol-water (60:38.4:1.6, v/v/v). Iohexol concentrations in the supernatant phase were analyzed on a Waters Symmetry C-18 reversed-phase column under isocratic conditions at 245 nm. The extraction recoveries of iohexol from plasma were >95% and the plasma iohexol calibration curves were linear (R(2) ≥ 0.9998) from 10 to 1500 µg/mL. The within-day coefficients of variation (CVs) at plasma iohexol concentrations of 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 5.1, 3.5, 1.3 and 2.5%, respectively; the between-day CVs at 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 8.6, 4.2, 4.0 and 3.7%, respectively. The day-to-day accuracies of the method at plasma iohexol concentrations of 50, 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 89.0, 99.4, 108.4, 103.6 and 101.2%, respectively (n = 5). The lower limit of plasma iohexol quantitation was 10 µg/mL and no interferences >9 µg/mL were found in over 75 pre-dose porcine plasma samples. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining the glomerular filtration rates of iohexol in the porcine (Sus scrofa) model.

  17. PREFACE: 12th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizes, Alain; Ghedini, Emanuele; Gherardi, Matteo; Sanibondi, Paolo; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    The High-Tech Plasma Processes - 12th European Plasma Conference (HTPP-12) was held in Bologna (Italy) on 24-29 June 2012. The conference series started in 1990 as a thermal plasma conference and gradually expanded to include other topic fields as well. Now the High-Tech Plasma Processes - European Plasma Conference (HTPP) is a bi-annual international conference based in Europe with topics encompassing the whole area of plasma processing science. The aim of the conference is to bring different scientific communities together, facilitate the contacts between science, technology and industry and provide a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas. Thanks to the efforts of the conference chairman, Professor Vittorio Colombo and of the co-chair, Professor Piero Favia, a well balanced participation from both the communities of thermal and nonthermal plasma researchers was achieved; this resulted in just about 196 attendees from 39 countries, with 8 plenary and 15 invited talks, plus 50 oral and 140 poster contributions. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series gathers papers from regular contributions of HTPP-12; each contribution submitted for publication has been peer reviewed and the Editors are very grateful to the referees for their careful support in improving the original manuscripts. In the end, 39 manuscripts were accepted for publication, covering different topics of plasma processing science: from plasma fundamentals and modelling to source design and process diagnostics, from nanomaterial synthesis to surface modification, from waste treatment to plasma applications in a liquid environment. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the international scientific committee, the local

  18. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  19. Using Plasma-Activated High Performance Fibers with Nanocrystalline Structure in Producing New Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, V.; Korneeva, N.

    2008-08-01

    A wet-pull-out method for investigation of interaction between the high performance polyethylene (HPPE) fiber and polymer matrix is discussed. The paper concerns a cold plasma technique for improving the bond of the HPPE fibers to the matrices and the fibers impregnation with the matrix. Controlled parameters are pull-out force and the height of the matrix capillary lifting along the fiber both in air and in vacuum, in combination with plasma activation of the fibers. The method allows one to estimate the wetting and impregnation of multi-filament fiber with the matrix and simultaneously measure the joint strength. Coupled action of plasma treatment and vacuum impregnation of the fibers improves the joint strength by a factor of 3. Plasma activated HPPE fibers impregnated in air show the value of shear strength τ of 4 Kg/mm2. To understand the effect of treatment initial and plasma-activated fibers were used to fabricate composite materials (CM). The properties and failure modes were compared to those of CM reinforced with untreated fibers. The failure mode of CM reinforced with plasma-activated fibers points to a high strength of the bond between the fibers and the matrix.

  20. Plasma uniformity and phase-controlled etching in a very high frequency capacitive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Dougyong; Woo, Jehun; Lim, Kyungchun; Kim, Kyungsun; Volynets, Vladimir; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2009-07-15

    The influence of controlled phase shift between very high frequency (100 MHz) voltages applied to the powered electrodes on the plasma uniformity and etch rate was studied in a capacitive triode-type reactor. Radial profiles of plasma optical emission were measured as a function of the phase shift in process (C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/O{sub 2}/Ar) plasma with the low frequency bias power both turned off and on. Radial profiles of KrF photoresist etch rate over a 300 mm wafer were obtained in the same conditions (with the bias power turned on). Besides, plasma density at the wafer center and edge was measured versus the phase shift in pure Ar plasma. It occurred that all measured characteristics strongly depend on the phase shift and correlate with each other. It has been shown that the phase-shift control can considerably improve both the plasma and etch-rate uniformity in very high-frequency capacitive reactors.