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Sample records for abnormally phosphorylated tau

  1. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  2. Abnormally phosphorylated tau is associated with neuronal and axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J M; Hampton, D W; Patani, R; Pryce, G; Crowther, R A; Reynolds, R; Franklin, R J M; Giovannoni, G; Compston, D A S; Baker, D; Spillantini, M G; Chandran, S

    2008-07-01

    The pathological correlate of clinical disability and progression in multiple sclerosis is neuronal and axonal loss; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Abnormal phosphorylation of tau is a common feature of some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the presence of tau hyperphosphorylation and its relationship with neuronal and axonal loss in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (CEAE) and in brain samples from patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. We report the novel finding of abnormal tau phosphorylation in CEAE. We further show that accumulation of insoluble tau is associated with both neuronal and axonal loss that correlates with progression from relapsing-remitting to chronic stages of EAE. Significantly, analysis of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis brain tissue also revealed abnormally phosphorylated tau and the formation of insoluble tau. Together, these observations provide the first evidence implicating abnormal tau in the neurodegenerative phase of tissue injury in experimental and human demyelinating disease.

  3. Psychotic Alzheimer's disease is associated with gender-specific tau phosphorylation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Jeremy; Acker, Chris; Davies, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L; Jimenez, Heidy; Azose, Miriam; Greenwald, Blaine S; Murray, Patrick S; Kirkwood, Caitlin M; Kofler, Julia; Sweet, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests that psychotic Alzheimer's disease (AD + P) is associated with an acceleration of frontal degeneration, with tau pathology playing a primary role. Previous histopathologic and biomarker studies have specifically implicated tau pathology in this condition. To precisely quantify tau abnormalities in the frontal cortex in AD + P, we used a sensitive biochemical assay of total tau and 4 epitopes of phospho-tau relevant in AD pathology in a postmortem sample of AD + P and AD - P. Samples of superior frontal gyrus from 26 AD subjects without psychosis and 45 AD + P subjects with psychosis were analyzed. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrate that AD + P females, but not males, had significantly higher levels of phosphorylated tau in the frontal cortex. In males, but not females, AD + P was associated with the presence of α-synuclein pathology. These results support a gender dissociation of pathology in AD + P. The design of future studies aimed at the elucidation of cognitive and/or functional outcomes; regional brain metabolic deficits; or genetic correlates of AD + P should take gender into consideration.

  4. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  5. Abnormal interaction of VDAC1 with amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau causes mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between voltage-dependent anion channel 1 protein (VDAC1) and amyloid beta (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using brain specimens from AD patients, control subjects and 6-, 12- and 24-month-old Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, we studied VDAC1 protein levels. Further, we also studied the interaction between VDAC1 and Aβ (monomers and oligomers) and phosphorylated tau, using cortical issues from AD patients, control subjects, APP, APP/PS1 and 3XTg.AD mice. We also studied age- and VDAC1-linked, mutant APP/Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in APP and non-transgenic wild-type (WT) mice. We found progressively increased levels of VDAC1 in the cortical tissues from the brains of patients with AD, relative to control subjects, and significantly increased levels of VDAC1 in the cerebral cortices of 6-, 12- and 24-month-old APP transgenic mice, relative to the age-matched control WT mice. Interestingly, we found VDAC1 interacted with Aβ and phosphorylated tau in the brains from AD patients and from APP, APP/PS1 and 3XTg.AD mice. We found progressively increased mitochondrial dysfunction in APP mice relative to WT mice. These observations led us to conclude that VDAC1 interacts with Aβ, and phosphorylated tau may in turn block mitochondrial pores, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD pathogenesis. Based on current study observations, we propose that reduced levels of VDAC1, Aβ and phosphorylated tau may reduce the abnormal interaction between VDAC1 and APP, VDAC1 and Aβ, and VDAC1 and phosphorylated tau; and that reduced levels of VDAC1, Aβ and phosphorylated tau may maintain normal mitochondrial pore opening and pore closure, ultimately leading to normal mitochondrial function, mitochondria supplying ATP to nerve terminals and boosting synaptic and cognitive function in AD. PMID:22926141

  6. Abnormal tau phosphorylation in the thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Ávila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier

    2011-01-01

    A key symptom in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the loss of declarative memory. The anatomical substrate that supports this kind of memory involves the neural circuits of the medial temporal lobe, and in particular, of the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex. A main feature of AD is the abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein and the presence of tangles. The sequence of cellular changes related to tau phosphorylation and tangle formation has been studied with an antibody that binds to diffuse phosphotau (AT8). Moreover, another tau antibody (PHF-1) has been used to follow the pathway of neurofibrillary (tau aggregation) degeneration in AD. We have used a variety of quantitative immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy to visualize and characterize neurons labeled with AT8 and PHF-1 antibodies. We present here the rather unexpected discovery that in AD, there is conspicuous abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein in a selective subset of dendritic spines. We identified these spines as the typical thorny excrescences of hippocampal CA3 neurons in a pre-tangle state. Since thorny excrescences represent a major synaptic target of granule cell axons (mossy fibers), such aberrant phosphorylation may play an essential role in the memory impairment typical of AD patients.

  7. In Silico Modelling of Novel Drug Ligands Associated with Abnormal Tau Phosphorylation: Implications for Concussion Associated Tauopathy Intervention†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Bi, Weina; Yemul, Shrishailam; Ward, Libby; Freire, Daniel; Mazzola, Paolo; Brathwaite, Justin; Mezei, Mihaly; Sanchez, Roberto; Elder, Gregory A.; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an in silico screening model for characterization of potential novel ligands from commercial drug libraries able to functionally activate certain olfactory receptors (ORs), which are members of the class A rhodopsin-like family of G protein couple receptors (GPCRs), in the brain of murine models of concussion. We previously found that concussions may significantly influence expression of certain ORs, e.g. OR4M1 in subjects with a history of concussion/traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we built a 3-D OR4M1 model and used it in in silico screening of potential novel ligands from commercial drug libraries. We report that in vitro activation of OR4M1 with the commercially available ZINC library compound 10915775 led to a significant attenuation of abnormal tau phosphorylation in embryonic cortico-hippocampal neuronal cultures derived from NSE-OR4M1 transgenic mice, possibly through modulation of the JNK signaling pathway. The attenuation of abnormal tau phosphorylation was rather selective since ZINC10915775 significantly decreased tau phosphorylation on tau Ser202/T205 (AT8 epitope) and tau Thr212/Ser214 (AT100 epitope), but not on tau Ser396/404 (PHF-1 epitope). Moreover, no response of ZINC10915775 was found in control hippocampal neuronal cultures derived from wild type littermates. Our in silico model provides novel means to pharmacologically modulate select ubiquitously expressed ORs in the brain through high affinity ligand activation to prevent and eventually to treat concussion induced down regulation of ORs and subsequent cascade of tau pathology. PMID:26910498

  8. Phosphorylation of tau is regulated by PKN.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Kawamata, T; Mukai, H; Hasegawa, H; Isagawa, T; Yasuda, M; Hashimoto, T; Terashima, A; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Ono, Y; Tanaka, C

    2001-03-30

    For the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein, tau plays a pivotal role in regulating microtubule networks in neurons. Tau promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules. The potential for tau to bind to microtubules is down-regulated after local phosphorylation. When we investigated the effects of PKN activation on tau phosphorylation, we found that PKN triggers disruption of the microtubule array both in vitro and in vivo and predominantly phosphorylates tau in microtubule binding domains (MBDs). PKN has a catalytic domain highly homologous to protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that phosphorylates Ser-313 (= Ser-324, the number used in this study) in MBDs. Thus, we identified the phosphorylation sites of PKN and PKC subtypes (PKC-alpha, -betaI, -betaII, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta, and -lambda) in MBDs. PKN phosphorylates Ser-258, Ser-320, and Ser-352, although all PKC subtypes phosphorylate Ser-258, Ser-293, Ser-324, and Ser-352. There is a PKN-specific phosphorylation site, Ser-320, in MBDs. HIA3, a novel phosphorylation-dependent antibody recognizing phosphorylated tau at Ser-320, showed immunoreactivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the active form of PKN, but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the inactive form of PKN. The immunoreactivity for phosphorylated tau at Ser-320 increased in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, FK506 treatment, which means that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) may be involved in dephosphorylating tau at Ser-320 site. We also noted that PKN reduces the phosphorylation recognized by the phosphorylation-dependent antibodies AT8, AT180, and AT270 in vivo. Thus PKN serves as a regulator of microtubules by specific phosphorylation of tau, which leads to disruption of tubulin assembly.

  9. Changes in tau phosphorylation in hibernating rodents.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; Defelipe, Javier; Avila, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Tau is a cytoskeletal protein present mainly in the neurons of vertebrates. By comparing the sequence of tau molecule among different vertebrates, it was found that the variability of the N-terminal sequence in tau protein is higher than that of the C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is involved mainly in the binding of tau to cellular membranes, whereas the C-terminal region of the tau molecule contains the microtubule-binding sites. We have compared the sequence of Syrian hamster tau with the sequences of other hibernating and nonhibernating rodents and investigated how differences in the N-terminal region of tau could affect the phosphorylation level and tau binding to cell membranes. We also describe a change, in tau phosphorylation, on a casein kinase 1 (ck1)-dependent site that is found only in hibernating rodents. This ck1 site seems to play an important role in the regulation of tau binding to membranes.

  10. An unbiased approach to identifying tau kinases that phosphorylate tau at sites associated with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Annalisa; Brewerton, Suzanne; Bell, Amanda; Sargent, Samantha; Glover, Sarah; Hardy, Clare; Moore, Roger; Calley, John; Ramachandran, Devaki; Poidinger, Michael; Karran, Eric; Davies, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Bose, Suchira

    2013-08-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are composed of paired helical filaments of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The accumulation of these proteinaceous aggregates in AD correlates with synaptic loss and severity of dementia. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathological phosphorylation of tau may identify novel targets for AD. We used an unbiased approach to study the effect of 352 human kinases on their ability to phosphorylate tau at epitopes associated with AD. The kinases were overexpressed together with the longest form of human tau in human neuroblastoma cells. Levels of total and phosphorylated tau (epitopes Ser(P)-202, Thr(P)-231, Ser(P)-235, and Ser(P)-396/404) were measured in cell lysates using AlphaScreen assays. GSK3α, GSK3β, and MAPK13 were found to be the most active tau kinases, phosphorylating tau at all four epitopes. We further dissected the effects of GSK3α and GSK3β using pharmacological and genetic tools in hTau primary cortical neurons. Pathway analysis of the kinases identified in the screen suggested mechanisms for regulation of total tau levels and tau phosphorylation; for example, kinases that affect total tau levels do so by inhibition or activation of translation. A network fishing approach with the kinase hits identified other key molecules putatively involved in tau phosphorylation pathways, including the G-protein signaling through the Ras family of GTPases (MAPK family) pathway. The findings identify novel tau kinases and novel pathways that may be relevant for AD and other tauopathies.

  11. The physiological link between metabolic rate depression and tau phosphorylation in mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Stieler, Jens T; Bullmann, Torsten; Kohl, Franziska; Tøien, Øivind; Brückner, Martina K; Härtig, Wolfgang; Barnes, Brian M; Arendt, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein are hallmarks of a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased tau phosphorylation is assumed to represent an early event in pathogenesis and a pivotal aspect for aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. However, the regulation of tau phosphorylation in vivo and the causes for its increased stage of phosphorylation in AD are still not well understood, a fact that is primarily based on the lack of adequate animal models. Recently we described the reversible formation of highly phosphorylated tau protein in hibernating European ground squirrels. Hence, mammalian hibernation represents a model system very well suited to study molecular mechanisms of both tau phosphorylation and dephosphorylation under in vivo physiological conditions. Here, we analysed the extent and kinetics of hibernation-state dependent tau phosphorylation in various brain regions of three species of hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels, Syrian hamsters and black bears. Overall, tau protein was highly phosphorylated in torpor states and phosphorylation levels decreased after arousal in all species. Differences between brain regions, hibernation-states and phosphosites were observed with respect to degree and kinetics of tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, we tested the phosphate net turnover of tau protein to analyse potential alterations in kinase and/or phosphatase activities during hibernation. Our results demonstrate that the hibernation-state dependent phosphorylation of tau protein is specifically regulated but involves, in addition, passive, temperature driven regulatory mechanisms. By determining the activity-state profile for key enzymes of tau phosphorylation we could identify kinases potentially involved in the differentially regulated, reversible tau phosphorylation that occurs during hibernation. We show that in black bears hibernation is associated with conformational

  12. The role of the VQIVYK peptide in tau protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-María, Ismael; Tortosa, Elena; Cuadros, Raquel; Del Valle, Mercedes; Hernández, Felix; Moreno, Francisco J; Avila, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    Although it remains unclear whether they are related to one another, tau aggregation and phosphorylation are the main pathological hallmarks of the neuronal disorders known as tauopathies. The capacity to aggregate is impaired in a variant of the tau 3R isoform that lacks residues 306-311 (nomenclature for the largest CNS tau isoform) and hence, we have taken advantage of this feature to study how phosphorylation and aggregation may be related as well as the role of this six amino acid peptide (VQIVYK). Through these analyses, we found that the phosphorylation of the tau variant was higher than that of the complete tau protein and that not only the deletion of these residues, but also the interaction of these residues, in tau 3R, with thioflavin-S augmented tau phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, the binding of the peptide containing the residues 306-311 to the whole tau protein provoked an increase in tau phosphorylation. This observation could be physiologically relevant as may suggest that tau-tau interactions, through those residues, facilitate tau phosphorylation. In summary, our data indicate that deletion of residues VQIVYK, in tau protein produces an increase in tau phosphorylation, without tau aggregation, because the VQIVYK peptide, that favors aggregation, is missing. On the other hand, when the whole tau protein interacts with thioflavin-S or the peptide VQIVYK, an increase in both aggregation and phosphorylation occurs.

  13. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  14. Tau Phosphorylation by GSK3 in Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; DeFelipe, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Almost a 20% of the residues of tau protein are phosphorylatable amino acids: serine, threonine, and tyrosine. In this paper we comment on the consequences for tau of being a phosphoprotein. We will focus on serine/threonine phosphorylation. It will be discussed that, depending on the modified residue in tau molecule, phosphorylation could be protective, in processes like hibernation, or toxic like in development of those diseases known as tauopathies, which are characterized by an hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau. PMID:22675648

  15. Caffeine modulates tau phosphorylation and affects Akt signaling in postmitotic neurons.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Kato, Kiyoko; Canuet, Leonides; Ishii, Ryouhei; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Takeda, Masatoshi; Soriano, Salvador

    2011-03-01

    Neuronal cell cycle reentry, which is associated with aberrant tau phosphorylation, is thought to be a mechanism of neurodegeneration in AD. Caffeine is a neuroprotective drug known to inhibit the cell cycle, suggesting that its neuroprotective nature may rely, at least in part, on preventing tau abnormalities secondary to its inhibitory effect on neuronal cell cycle-related pathways. Accordingly, we have explored in the present study the impact of caffeine on cell cycle-linked parameters and tau phosphorylation patterns in an attempt to identify molecular clues to its neuroprotective effect. We show that caffeine blocks the cell cycle at G1 phase in neuroblastoma cells and leads to a decrease in tau phosphorylation; similarly, exposure of postmitotic neurons to caffeine led to changes in tau phosphorylation concomitantly with downregulation of Akt signaling. Taken together, our results show a unique impact of caffeine on tau phosphorylation and warrant further investigation to address whether caffeine may help prevent neuronal death by preventing tau abnormalities secondary to aberrant entry into the cell cycle.

  16. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K.; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six post mortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE. PMID:26556772

  17. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE.

  18. Early growth response 1 (Egr-1) regulates phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yifan; Li, Tong; Qureshi, Hamid Y; Han, Dong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2011-06-10

    In the normal brain, tau protein is phosphorylated at a number of proline- and non-proline directed sites, which reduce tau microtubule binding and thus regulate microtubule dynamics. In Alzheimer disease (AD), tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated, leading to neurofibrillary tangle formation and microtubule disruption, suggesting a loss of regulatory mechanisms controlling tau phosphorylation. Early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is a transcription factor that is significantly up-regulated in AD brain. The pathological significance of this up-regulation is not known. In this study, we found that lentivirus-mediated overexpression of Egr-1 in rat brain hippocampus and primary neurons in culture activates proline-directed kinase Cdk5, inactivates PP1, promotes tau phosphorylation at both proline-directed Ser(396/404) and non-proline-directed Ser(262) sites, and destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, in Egr-1(-/-) mouse brain, Cdk5 activity was decreased, PP1 activity was increased, and tau phosphorylation was reduced at both proline-directed and non-proline-directed sites. By using nerve growth factor-exposed PC12 cells, we determined that Egr-1 activates Cdk5 to promote phosphorylation of tau and inactivates PP1 via phosphorylation. When Cdk5 was inhibited, tau phosphorylation at both proline- and non-proline directed sites and PP1 phosphorylation were blocked, indicating that Egr-1 acts through Cdk5. By using an in vitro kinase assay and HEK-293 cells transfected with tau, PP1, and Cdk5, we found that Cdk5 phosphorylates Ser(396/404) directly. In addition, by phosphorylating and inactivating PP1, Cdk5 promotes tau phosphorylation at Ser(262) indirectly. Our results indicate that Egr-1 is an in vivo regulator of tau phosphorylation and suggest that in AD brain increased levels of Egr-1 aberrantly activate an Egr-1/Cdk5/PP1 pathway, leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau, thus destabilizing the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  19. Reversible phosphorylation of tau to form A68 in heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W; Johnson, G; Sugar, J; Merril, C R; Refolo, L M

    1993-07-01

    A68, the primary protein constituent of Alzheimer's disease-associated neurofibrillary tangles, is an abnormally phosphorylated form of the microtubule-associated protein tau. We find that A68 is formed in neuronal PC12 cells when the cells are subjected to a heat shock (45 degrees C for 30 min). A68 was identified by immunoprecipitation with two different anti-tau antibodies (tau-2 and Alz50). Upon separation by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the tau immunoprecipitates from heat-shocked cells exhibited an additional polypeptide of reduced electrophoretic mobility (approximately 68 kDa) when compared to control cells. A68 was formed with heat shock in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that its production occurred by post-translational modification of existing polypeptides. The tau/A68 polypeptides were identified as phosphoproteins by incorporation of 32P into the immunoprecipitates. The phosphorylation of tau to form A68 was reversed with recovery of the intact cells from the heat shock. Finally, immunoprecipitation of lysates from heat-shocked cells with antibodies to heat shock protein (hsp) 72/73 resulted in co-precipitation of tau with hsp 72, which indicates a stable complex formation between these two proteins. On the other hand, A68 remained unassociated with hsp during the heat shock. These results suggest that tau is reversibly phosphorylated to form A68 in neuronal PC12 cells under conditions of stress.

  20. Intracerebroventricular administration of okadaic acid induces hippocampal glucose uptake dysfunction and tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Broetto, Núbia; Hansen, Fernanda; Brolese, Giovana; Batassini, Cristiane; Lirio, Franciane; Galland, Fabiana; Dos Santos, João Paulo Almeida; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Intraneuronal aggregates of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), together with beta-amyloid plaques and astrogliosis, are histological markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanism of sporadic AD remains poorly understood, but abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is suggested to have a role in NFTs genesis, which leads to neuronal dysfunction and death. Okadaic acid (OKA), a strong inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, has been used to induce dementia similar to AD in rats. We herein investigated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of OKA (100 and 200ng) on hippocampal tau phosphorylation at Ser396, which is considered an important fibrillogenic tau protein site, and on glucose uptake, which is reduced early in AD. ICV infusion of OKA (at 200ng) induced a spatial cognitive deficit, hippocampal astrogliosis (based on GFAP increment) and increase in tau phosphorylation at site 396 in this model. Moreover, we observed a decreased glucose uptake in the hippocampal slices of OKA-treated rats. In vitro exposure of hippocampal slices to OKA altered tau phosphorylation at site 396, without any associated change in glucose uptake activity. Taken together, these findings further our understanding of OKA neurotoxicity, in vivo and vitro, particularly with regard to the role of tau phosphorylation, and reinforce the importance of the OKA dementia model for studying the neurochemical alterations that may occur in AD, such as NFTs and glucose hypometabolism.

  1. Neuroinflammation is not a Prerequisite for Diabetes-induced Tau Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van der Harg, Judith M; Eggels, Leslie; Ruigrok, Silvie R; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; la Fleur, Susanne E; Scheper, Wiep

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau is a key hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder for which Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a risk factor. In animal models for DM, the phosphorylation and aggregation of tau is induced or exacerbated, however the underlying mechanism is unknown. In addition to the metabolic dysfunction, DM is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. This was reported to be associated with a neuroinflammatory response in the hypothalamus of DM animal models. Neuroinflammation is also implicated in the development and progression of AD. It is unknown whether DM also induces neuroinflammation in brain areas affected in AD, the cortex and hippocampus. Here we investigated whether neuroinflammation could be the mechanistic trigger to induce tau phosphorylation in the brain of DM animals. Two distinct diabetic animal models were used; rats on free-choice high-fat high-sugar (fcHFHS) diet that are insulin resistant and streptozotocin-treated rats that are insulin deficient. The streptozotocin-treated animals demonstrated increased tau phosphorylation in the brain as expected, whereas the fcHFHS diet fed animals did not. Remarkably, neither of the diabetic animal models showed reactive microglia or increased GFAP and COX-2 levels in the cortex or hippocampus. From this, we conclude: 1. DM does not induce neuroinflammation in brain regions affected in AD, and 2. Neuroinflammation is not a prerequisite for tau phosphorylation. Neuroinflammation is therefore not the mechanism that explains the close connection between DM and AD.

  2. Structural Impact of Tau Phosphorylation at Threonine 231.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Martin; Kadavath, Harindranath; Biernat, Jacek; Ozenne, Valery; Blackledge, Martin; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-08-04

    Phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau influences the assembly and stabilization of microtubules and is deregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The high flexibility of Tau, however, has prevented an atomic-level description of its phosphorylation-induced structural changes. Employing an extensive set of distance and orientational restraints together with a novel ensemble calculation approach, we determined conformational ensembles of Tau fragments in the non-phosphorylated state and, when phosphorylated at T231/S235 or T231/S235/S237/S238, four important sites of phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease. Comparison of the molecular ensembles showed that phosphorylation of the regulatory T231 does not perturb the backbone conformation of the proximal microtubule-binding (225)KVAVVR(230) motif. Instead, phosphorylated T231 selectively engages in a salt bridge with R230 that can compete with the formation of intermolecular salt bridges to tubulin. Our study provides an ensemble description which will be useful for the analysis of conformational transitions in Tau and other intrinsically disordered proteins.

  3. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  4. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  5. Tau phosphorylation in human, primate, and rat brain: evidence that a pool of tau is highly phosphorylated in vivo and is rapidly dephosphorylated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Garver, T D; Harris, K A; Lehman, R A; Lee, V M; Trojanowski, J Q; Billingsley, M L

    1994-12-01

    The extent of tau phosphorylation is thought to regulate the binding of tau to microtubules: Highly phosphorylated tau does not bind to tubules, whereas dephosphorylated tau can bind to microtubules. It is interesting that the extent of tau phosphorylation in vivo has not been accurately determined. Tau was rapidly isolated from human temporal neocortex and hippocampus, rhesus monkey temporal neocortex, and rat temporal neocortex and hippocampus under conditions that minimized dephosphorylation. In brain slices, we observed that tau isolated under such conditions largely existed in several phosphorylated states, including a pool that was highly phosphorylated; this was determined using epitope-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. This highly phosphorylated tau was dephosphorylated during a 120-min time course in vitro, presumably as a result of neuronal phosphatase activity. The slow-mobility forms of tau were shifted to faster-mobility forms following in vitro incubation with alkaline phosphatase. Laser densitometry was used to estimate the percent of tau in slow-mobility, highly phosphorylated forms. Approximately 25% of immunoreactive tau was present as slow-mobility (66- and 68-kDa) forms of tau. The percentage of immunoreactive tau in faster-mobility pools (42-54 kDa) increased in proportion to the decrease in content of 66-68-kDa tau as a function of neuronal phosphatases or alkaline phosphatase treatment. These data suggest that the turnover of phosphorylated sites on tau is rapid and depends on neuronal phosphatases. Furthermore, tau is highly phosphorylated in normal-appearing human, primate, and rodent brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The self-assembly ability of First microtubule-binding repeat from tau and its modulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Lianxiu; Zeng Zhiyang; Du Jintang; Zhao Yufen; Li Yanmei . E-mail: liym@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-09-22

    Aggregation of abnormally phosphorylated tau in the form of tangs of paired helical filaments (PHFs) is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. It is of fundamental importance to study the mechanism of PHF formation and its modulation by phosphorylation. In this work, we have focused on First microtubule-binding repeat of tau encompassing an abnormal phosphorylation site Ser{sup 262}. The assembly propensities of this repeat and its corresponding phosphorylated form were investigated by turbidity and electron microscopy. Additionally, conformation of the two peptides is also analyzed through circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Our results reveal that both of them are capable of self-assembly and phosphorylation at Ser{sup 262} could speed up the process of assembly. A possible mechanism of PHF formation is proposed and enhancing effect of phosphorylation on assembly provides an explanation to its toxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Electrochemical detection of anti-tau antibodies binding to tau protein and inhibition of GSK-3β-catalyzed phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2016-03-01

    Tau protein hyperphosphorylation triggers tau aggregation and its toxicity, leading to neuronal death and cell-to-cell toxicity. Hence, inhibition of protein kinases is a viable tool toward reduction of tau toxicity. By targeting various epitopes of Tau441 protein immobilized on Au surface, the protein kinase inhibition by anti-tau antibodies was measured by surface electrochemistry. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to measure the charge transfer resistance (Rct) of nonphosphorylated tau-Au film (nTau-Au) and compared with the phosphorylated tau-Au film (pTau-Au). The pTau-Au films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), which indicated high phosphorus content. The Rct factor was used as the measure of inhibition efficacies by anti-tau antibodies (D8, A10, P262, and Tau46) in addition to antibody formulation intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The Rct factor for pTau-Au in the absence of antibodies was 0.25 ± 0.08, indicating a dramatic decrease in Rct on phosphorylation. The Rct factors for Tau46 and A10 were 0.57 ± 0.22 and 0.65 ± 0.26, respectively, indicating phosphorylation inhibition. All antibodies exhibited similar binding to nTau-Au. The proposed electrochemical assay may be used for detection of other posttranslational modifications.

  8. Cholinesterase inhibitors may increase phosphorylated tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Katy A; Wilcock, Gordon K; Vinters, Harry V; Perry, Elaine K; Perry, Robert; Ballard, Clive G; Love, Seth

    2009-05-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro and in animal studies, ChEIs have been shown to influence the processing of Abeta and the phosphorylation of tau, proteins that are the principal constituents of the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, in AD brain. However, little is known about the effects of these drugs on Abeta and tau pathology in AD. Using avidin-biotin immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis, we compared Abeta and tau loads in the frontal and temporal cortices of 72 brains from matched cohorts of AD patients who had or had not received ChEIs. Patients treated with ChEIs had accumulated significantly more phospho-tau in their cerebral cortex than had untreated patients (P = 0.004). Abeta accumulation was reduced but not significantly. These data raise the possibility that increased tau phosphorylation may influence long-term clinical responsiveness to ChEIs.

  9. Exosome-associated Tau Is Secreted in Tauopathy Models and Is Selectively Phosphorylated in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Early Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Saman, Sudad; Kim, WonHee; Raya, Mario; Visnick, Yvonne; Miro, Suhad; Saman, Sarmad; Jackson, Bruce; McKee, Ann C.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Norman C. Y.; Hall, Garth F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent demonstrations that the secretion, uptake, and interneuronal transfer of tau can be modulated by disease-associated tau modifications suggest that secretion may be an important element in tau-induced neurodegeneration. Here, we show that much of the tau secreted by M1C cells occurs via exosomal release, a widely characterized mechanism that mediates unconventional secretion of other aggregation-prone proteins (α-synuclein, prion protein, and β-amyloid) in neurodegenerative disease. Exosome-associated tau is also present in human CSF samples and is phosphorylated at Thr-181 (AT270), an established phosphotau biomarker for Alzheimer disease (AD), in both M1C cells and in CSF samples from patients with mild (Braak stage 3) AD. A preliminary analysis of proteins co-purified with tau in secreted exosomes identified several that are known to be involved in disease-associated tau misprocessing. Our results suggest that exosome-mediated secretion of phosphorylated tau may play a significant role in the abnormal processing of tau and in the genesis of elevated CSF tau in early AD. PMID:22057275

  10. ELISA measurement of specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau in intravenous immunoglobulin products.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Klaver, Andrea C; Coffey, Mary P

    2015-10-01

    The therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products were recently studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Pilot studies produced encouraging results but phase II and III trials gave disappointing results; a further study is in progress. IVIG products contain antibodies to tau protein, the main component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The tau used to detect IVIG's anti-tau antibodies in previous studies was non-phosphorylated recombinant human tau-441, but NFT-associated tau is extensively phosphorylated. The objective of this study was to determine if various IVIG products contain specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau (anti-pTau antibodies). ELISAs were used to evaluate binding of six IVIG products to a 12 amino acid peptide, tau 196-207, which was phosphorylated ("pTau peptide") or non-phosphorylated ("non-pTau peptide") at Serine-199 and Serine-202. Both amino acid residues are phosphorylated in AD NFTs. Each IVIG's "anti-pTau antibody ratio" was calculated by dividing its binding to the pTau peptide by its binding to the non-pTau peptide. Seven experiments were performed and data were pooled, with each experiment contributing one data point from each IVIG product. Mean anti-pTau antibody ratios greater than 1.0, suggesting specific antibodies to phosphorylated tau, were found for three IVIG products. Because administration of antibodies to phosphorylated tau has been found to reduce tau-associated pathology in transgenic mouse models of tauopathy, increasing the levels of anti-pTau antibodies, together with other selected antibodies such as anti-Aβ, in IVIG might increase its ability to slow AD's progression.

  11. Quantitative and combinatory determination of in situ phosphorylation of tau and its FTDP-17 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Taeko; Hosokawa, Tomohisa; Taoka, Masato; Tsutsumi, Koji; Ando, Kanae; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hosokawa, Masato; Hasegawa, Masato; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Tau is hyperphosphorylated in the brains of patients with tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). However, neither the mechanism of hyperphosphorylation nor its contribution to pathogenesis is known. We applied Phos-tag SDS-PAGE, a phosphoaffinity electrophoresis, to the analysis of tau phosphorylation in vitro by Cdk5, in cultured cells and in mouse brain. Here, we found that Cdk5-p25 phosphorylated tau in vitro at Ser404, Ser235, Thr205 and Ser202 in this order. In contrast in cultured cells, Ser404 was preferentially phosphorylated by Cdk5-p35, whereas Thr205 was not phosphorylated. Ser202 and Ser235 were phosphorylated by endogenous kinases. Tau exhibited ~12 phosphorylation isotypes in COS-7 cells with different combinations of phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser202, Thr231, Ser235 and Ser404. These phosphorylation sites were similar to tau phosphorylated in mouse brains. FTDP-17 tau with a mutation in the C-terminal region had different banding patterns, indicating a different phosphorylation pattern. In particular, it was clear that the R406W mutation causes loss of Ser404 phosphorylation. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the Phos-tag technique in the quantitative analysis of site-specific in vivo phosphorylation of tau and provide detailed information on in situ combinatory phosphorylation of tau. PMID:27641626

  12. Discoveries of tau, abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau and others of neurofibrillary degeneration: a personal historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease was described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907, but it was not until approximately 60-70 years later that any new significant developments were reported on the pathology of this disease. The discoveries that laid down the foundation for the exciting research that has been carried out during the last approximately 20 years and that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease are the ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic (senile) plaques, the clinical-pathological correlation of these lesions to the presence of dementia, and the bulk isolation and protein composition of paired helical filaments and plaque amyloid. We discovered tau as the major protein subunit of paired helical filaments/neurofibrillary tangles, the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of this protein in this lesion and in Alzheimer brain cytosol and the gain of toxic function by the cytosolic abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in Alzheimer brain. Here we present a personal historical account of the work in our laboratories that led, in 1986, to the discoveries of tau and its abnormal hyperphosphorylation in paired helical filaments and Alzheimer brain cytosol. This article also describes several major findings which subsequently resulted from the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and in a large part account for the current understanding of the role of this lesion in Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  13. Absence of a Role for Phosphorylation in the Tau Pathology of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Robert Y. K.; Harrington, Charles R.; Wischik, Claude M.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by redistribution of the tau protein pool from soluble to aggregated states. Aggregation forms proteolytically stable core polymers restricted to the repeat domain, and this binding interaction has prion-like properties. We have compared the binding properties of tau and tubulin in vitro using a system in which we can measure binding affinities for proteins alternated between solid and aqueous phases. The study reveals that a phase-shifted repeat domain fragment from the Paired Helical Filament core contains all that is required for high affinity tau-tau binding. Unlike tau-tubulin binding, tau-tau binding shows concentration-dependent enhancement in both phase directions due to an avidity effect which permits one molecule to bind to many as the concentration in the opposite phase increases. Phosphorylation of tau inhibits tau-tau binding and tau-tubulin binding to equivalent extents. Tau-tau binding is favoured over tau-tubulin binding by factors in the range 19–41-fold, irrespective of phosphorylation status. A critical requirement for tau to become aggregation-competent is prior binding to a solid-phase substrate, which induces a conformational change in the repeat domain permitting high-affinity binding to occur even if tau is phosphorylated. The endogenous species enabling this nucleation event to occur in vivo remains to be identified. The findings of the study suggest that development of disease-modifying drugs for tauopathies should not target phosphorylation, but rather should target inhibitors of tau-tau binding or inhibitors of the binding interaction with as yet unidentified endogenous polyanionic substrates required to nucleate tau assembly. PMID:27070645

  14. Characterization of Early Pathological Tau Conformations and Phosphorylation in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nicholas M; Cox, Kristine; Alvarez, Victor E; Stein, Thor D; Poncil, Sharra; McKee, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy that develops after repetitive head injury. Several lines of evidence in other tauopathies suggest that tau oligomer formation induces neurotoxicity and that tau oligomer-mediated neurotoxicity involves induction of axonal dysfunction through exposure of an N-terminal motif in tau, the phosphatase-activating domain (PAD). Additionally, phosphorylation at serine 422 in tau occurs early and correlates with cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We performed immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on fixed brain sections and biochemical analysis of fresh brain extracts to characterize the presence of PAD-exposed tau (TNT1 antibody), tau oligomers (TOC1 antibody), tau phosphorylated at S422 (pS422 antibody), and tau truncated at D421 (TauC3 antibody) in the brains of 9-11 cases with CTE and cases of nondemented aged controls and AD (Braak VI) (n = 6, each). All 3 early tau markers (ie, TNT1, TOC1, and pS422) were present in CTE and displayed extensive colocalization in perivascular tau lesions that are considered diagnostic for CTE. Notably, the TauC3 epitope, which is abundant in AD, was relatively sparse in CTE. Together, these results provide the first description of PAD exposure, TOC1 reactive oligomers, phosphorylation of S422, and TauC3 truncation in the tau pathology of CTE.

  15. Tau phosphorylation and cleavage in ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Chakraborty, Goutam; Mao, Rui-Fen; Paik, Sun-Mee; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mitsuo

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies indicated that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in postnatal day 7 (P7) mice, widely used as a model for the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, was accompanied by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and caspase-3 activation. Presently, we examined whether tau, a microtubule associated protein, is modified by GSK-3beta and caspase-3 in ethanol-treated P7 mouse forebrains. We found that ethanol increased phosphorylated tau recognized by the paired helical filament (PHF)-1 antibody and by the antibody against tau phosphorylated at Ser199. Ethanol also generated tau fragments recognized by an antibody against caspase-cleaved tau (C-tau). C-tau was localized in neurons bearing activated caspase-3 and fragmented nuclei. Over time, cell debris and degenerated projections containing C-tau appeared to be engulfed by activated microglia. A caspase-3 inhibitor partially blocked C-tau formation. Lithium, a GSK-3beta inhibitor, blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation, phosphorylated tau elevation, C-tau formation, and microglial activation. These results indicate that tau is phosphorylated by GSK-3beta and cleaved by caspase-3 during ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing brain.

  16. Estimation of Tau and Phosphorylated Tau181 in Serum of Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Rahul; Rai, Nitish; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Kusum; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Sadanand; Dey, Aparajit B.; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    The elevated level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Tau and phosphorylated Tau181 (p-Tau181) proteins are well established hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Elevated level of p-Tau181 can differentiate AD from other neurodegenerative disease. However, the expression level of these proteins in serum of AD patient is not well set up. This study sought to evaluate the level of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients for an alternative approach to establish protein-based markers by convenient way. Blood samples were collected from 39 AD patients, 37 MCI patients and 37 elderly individuals as controls. The levels of Tau and p-Tau181 in the serum of the different groups were measured by label free real time Surface Plasmon Resonance technology by using specific antibodies, and were further confirmed by the conventional western blot method. An appropriate statistical analysis, including Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), was performed. The concentrations of serum Tau and p-Tau181 were significantly higher (p<0.00001) in AD (Tau; 47.49±9.00ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.161±0.04 ng/μL) compared to MCI (Tau; 39.26±7.78 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.135±0.02 ng/μL) and were further higher compared to elderly controls (Tau; 34.92±6.58 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.122±0.01 ng/ μL). A significant (p<0.0001) downhill correlation was found between Tau as well as p-Tau181 levels with HMSE and MoCA score. This study for the first time reports the concentration of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD and MCI patients. The cutoff values of Tau and p-Tau181 of AD and MCI patients with sensitivity and specificity reveal that serum level of these proteins can be used as a predictive marker for AD and MCI. PMID:27459603

  17. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Opposite effects of two estrogen receptors on tau phosphorylation through disparate effects on the miR-218/PTPA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan-Si; Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Dan; Huang, He-Zhou; Wei, Na; Tan, Lu; Chen, Jian-Guo; Man, Heng-Ye; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The two estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ, mediate the diverse biological functions of estradiol. Opposite effects of ERα and ERβ have been found in estrogen-induced cancer cell proliferation and differentiation as well as in memory-related tasks. However, whether these opposite effects are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unclear. Here, we find that ERα and ERβ play contrasting roles in regulating tau phosphorylation, which is a pathological hallmark of AD. ERα increases the expression of miR-218 to suppress the protein levels of its specific target, protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα). The downregulation of PTPα results in the abnormal tyrosine hyperphosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (resulting in activation) and protein phosphatase 2A (resulting in inactivation), the major tau kinase and phosphatase. Suppressing the increased expression of miR-218 inhibits the ERα-induced tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the PTPα decline. In contrast, ERβ inhibits tau phosphorylation by limiting miR-218 levels and restoring the miR-218 levels antagonized the attenuation of tau phosphorylation by ERβ. These data reveal for the first time opposing roles for ERα and ERβ in AD pathogenesis and suggest potential therapeutic targets for AD. PMID:26111662

  19. Differential phosphorylation of tau proteins during kitten brain development and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Riederer, B M; Mourton-Gilles, C; Frey, P; Delacourte, A; Probst, A

    2001-02-01

    Differential distribution and phosphorylation of tau proteins were studied in developing kitten brain by using several antibodies, and was compared to phosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease. Several antibodies demonstrated the presence of phosphorylated tau proteins during kitten brain development and identified pathological structures in human brain tissue. Antibody AD2, recognized tau in kittens and adult cats, but reacted in Alzheimer's tissue only with a pathological tau form. Antibody AT8 was prominent in developing kitten neurons and was found in axons and dendrites. After the first postnatal month this phosphorylation type disappeared from axons. Furthermore, dephosphorylation of kitten tau with alkaline phosphatase abolished immunoreactivity of AT8, but not that of AD2, pointing to a protection of the AD2 epitope in cats. Tau proteins during early cat brain development are phosphorylated at several sites that are also phosphorylated in paired helical filaments during Alzheimer's disease. In either event, phosphorylation of tau may play a crucial role to modulate microtubule dynamics, contributing to increased microtubule instability and promoting growth of processes during neuronal development or changing dynamic properties of the cytoskeleton and contributing to the formation of pathological structures in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Computational Study of Pseudo-phosphorylation of the Microtubule associated Protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopovich, Dmitriy; Larini, Luca

    This computational study focuses on the effect of pseudo-phosphorylation on the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau. In the axon of the neuron, tau regulates the assembly of microtubules in the cytoskeleton. This is important for both stabilization of and transport across the microtubules. One of the hallmarks of the Alzheimer's disease is that tau is hyper-phosphorylated and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that lay waste to the neurons. It is not known if hyper-phosphorylation directly causes the aggregation of tau into tangles. Experimentally, pseudo-phosphorylation mimics the effects of phosphorylation by mutating certain residues of the protein chain into charged residues. In this study, we will consider the fragment called PHF43 that belongs to the microtubule binding region and has been shown to readily aggregate.

  1. Novel screening cascade identifies MKK4 as key kinase regulating Tau phosphorylation at Ser422.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Fiona; Bohrmann, Bernd; Christensen, Klaus; Graf, Martin; Roth, Doris; Czech, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Phosphorylation of Tau at serine 422 promotes Tau aggregation. The kinase that is responsible for this key phosphorylation event has so far not been identified but could be a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease. We describe here an assay strategy to identify this kinase. Using a combination of screening a library of 65'000 kinase inhibitors and in vitro inhibitor target profiling of the screening hits using the Ambit kinase platform, MKK4 was identified as playing a key role in Tau-S422 phosphorylation in human neuroblastoma cells.

  2. Phosphorylated tau potentiates Aβ-induced mitochondrial damage in mature neurons.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Johnson, Gail V W

    2014-11-01

    Tau phosphorylated at the PHF-1 epitope (S396/S404) is likely involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms by which tau phosphorylated at these sites negatively impacts neuronal functions are still under scrutiny. Previously, we showed that expression of tau truncated at D421 enhances mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Aβ in cortical neurons. To extend these findings, we expressed tau pseudo-phosphorylated at S396/404 (T42EC) in mature and young cortical neurons and evaluated different aspects of mitochondrial function in response to Aβ. Expression of T42EC did not induce significant changes in mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial length, or mitochondrial transport, compared to GFP and full-length tau. However, T42EC expression enhanced Aβ-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss and increased superoxide levels compared to what was observed in mature neurons expressing full-length tau. The same effect was observed in mature neurons that expressed both pseudo-phosphorylated and truncated tau when they were treated with Aβ. Interestingly, the mitochondrial failure induced by Aβ in mature neurons that expressed T42EC, was not observed in young neurons expressing T42EC. These novel findings suggest that phosphorylated tau (PHF-1 epitope) enhances Aβ-induced mitochondrial injury, which contributes to neuronal dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of AD.

  3. Anesthetic Isoflurane Increases Phosphorylated Tau Levels Mediated by Caspase Activation and Aβ Generation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-01-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase activation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ). Phosphorylation of tau protein is another important feature of AD neuropathogenesis. However, the effects of isoflurane on phosphorylated tau levels remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can increase phosphorylated tau levels. 5 to 8 month-old wild-type and AD transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg (APPswe, PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J] were treated with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours. The mice brain tissues were harvested at six, 12 and 24 hours after the anesthesia. For the in vitro studies, primary neurons from wild-type and the AD transgenic mice were exposed to 2% isoflurane for six hours, and were harvested at the end of anesthesia. The harvested brain tissues and neurons were subjected to Western blot analysis by which the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Serine 262 (Tau-PS262) were determined. Here we show that the isoflurane anesthesia increased Tau-PS262 levels in brain tissues and primary neurons from the wild-type and AD transgenic mice. Moreover, the isoflurane anesthesia may induce a greater increase in Tau-PS262 levels in primary neurons and brain tissues from the AD transgenic mice. Finally, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and Aβ generation inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-induced increases in Tau-PS262 levels. In conclusion, clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia increases phosphorylated tau levels, which may result from the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and Aβ generation. These findings will promote more studies to determine the effects of anesthetics on tau phosphorylation. PMID:22745746

  4. Biphasic effects of forskolin on tau phosphorylation and spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qing; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Zhang, Yao; Wu, Feng; Tang, Qian; Wang, Cheng; Shi, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Liu, Sang; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2009-01-01

    To explore the role of protein kinase A (PKA) in regulating tau phosphorylation and spatial memory, we injected forskolin, an activator of PKA, at different concentrations into the rat brains. We found that forskolin at concentrations up to 80 microM enhanced tau phosphorylation and was associated with prominent spatial memory impairment. Higher concentrations of forskolin, up to 200 microM, were associated with reduced phosphorylation levels of tau and no memory deficits. Forskolin elevated cAMP and activated PKA in a dose-dependent manner. When infused at 200 microM, forskolin also resulted in the activation and overexpression of protein phosphatase-2A (PP-2A) and attenuated the okadaic acid-induced PP-2A inhibition. These data suggest that the upregulation of PKA by forskolin to a certain level may activate PP-2A but that the latter can ameliorate the PKA-induced tau phosphorylation and memory impairment in the rats.

  5. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptor-induced tau overexpression mediates neuronal death through suppressing survival signaling ERK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xu-Ying; Tuo, Qing-Zhang; Liuyang, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Ao-Ji; Feng, Xiao-Long; Yan, Xiong; Qiu, Mei; Li, Shen; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Cao, Fu-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of the hyperphosphorylated tau is a pathological hallmark in the brain of Alzheimer disease. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors (E-NMDARs) induces excitatory toxicity that is involved in Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. However, the intrinsic link between E-NMDARs and the tau-induced neuronal damage remains elusive. In the present study, we showed in cultured primary cortical neurons that activation of E-NMDA receptors but not synaptic NMDA receptors dramatically increased tau mRNA and protein levels, with a simultaneous neuronal degeneration and decreased neuronal survival. Memantine, a selective antagonist of E-NMDARs, reversed E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression. Activation of E-NMDARs in wild-type mouse brains resulted in neuron loss in hippocampus, whereas tau deletion in neuronal cultures and in the mouse brains rescued the E-NMDARs-induced neuronal death and degeneration. The E-NMDARs-induced tau overexpression was correlated with a reduced ERK phosphorylation, whereas the increased MEK activity, decreased binding and activity of ERK phosphatase to ERK, and increased ERK phosphorylation were observed in tau knockout mice. On the contrary, addition of tau proteins promoted ERK dephosphorylation in vitro. Taking together, these results indicate that tau overexpression mediates the excitatory toxicity induced by E-NMDAR activation through inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. PMID:27809304

  6. Pesticides induce spatial memory deficits with synaptic impairments and an imbalanced tau phosphorylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning-Ning; Luo, Dan-Ju; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Yu, Cong; Wang, Yi; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used in agriculture, and epidemiological studies suggest that pesticide exposure is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms are elusive. Here, we studied the effects of pesticide exposure on the cognitive ability and the underlying mechanisms in rats. Deltamethrin and carbofuran were administered respectively into the rats once a day for 28 days by gavage. We found that pesticide exposure induced spatial learning and memory deficits with a simultaneous decrease of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, synaptophysin, and synapsin I, all of which are memory-related synaptic proteins. Pesticide exposure also induced tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related phosphorylation sites with activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and inhibition of protein phosphatase-2A. Additionally, neuron loss in the hippocampus and cortex was observed upon administration of the pesticides. These results indicate that the pesticides exposure could induce AD-like pathology and cognitive abnormality in rats.

  7. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  8. Sodium tungstate decreases the phosphorylation of tau through GSK3 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ramos, Alberto; Domínguez, Jorge; Zafra, Delia; Corominola, Helena; Gomis, Ramon; Guinovart, Joan J; Avila, Jesús

    2006-02-01

    Tungstate treatment increases the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) at serine 9, which triggers its inactivation both in cultured neural cells and in vivo. GSK3 phosphorylation is dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) induced by tungstate. As a consequence of GSK3 inactivation, the phosphorylation of several GSK3-dependent sites of the microtubule-associated protein tau decreases. Tungstate reduces tau phosphorylation only in primed sequences, namely, those prephosphorylated by other kinases before GSK3beta modification, which are serines 198, 199, or 202 and threonine 231. The phosphorylation at these sites is involved in reduction of the interaction of tau with microtubules that occurs in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Regulated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tau protein: effects on microtubule interaction, intracellular trafficking and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, M L; Kincaid, R L

    1997-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize what is known about tau phosphorylation in the context of both normal cellular function and dysfunction. However, conceptions of tau function continue to evolve, and it is likely that the regulation of tau distribution and metabolism is complex. The roles of microtubule-associated kinases and phosphatases have yet to be fully described, but may afford insight into how tau phosphorylation at the distal end of the axon regulates cytoskeletal-membrane interactions. Finally, lipid and glycosaminoglycan modification of tau structure affords yet more complexity for regulation and aggregation. Continued work will help to determine what is causal and what is coincidental in Alzheimer's disease, and may lead to identification of therapeutic targets for halting the progression of paired helical filament formation. PMID:9169588

  10. Exaggerated phosphorylation of brain tau protein in CRH KO mice exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Novak, Petr; Vargovic, Peter; Lejavova, Katarina; Horvathova, Lubica; Ondicova, Katarina; Manz, George; Filipcik, Peter; Novak, Michal; Mravec, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses are orchestrated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing neurons. Recent findings indicate that stress may promote development of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated relationships among stress, tau protein phosphorylation, and brain NE using wild-type (WT) and CRH-knockout (CRH KO) mice. We assessed expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) at the PHF-1 epitope and NE concentrations in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1/C1 and A2/C2 catecholaminergic cell groups, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and frontal cortex of unstressed, singly stressed or repeatedly stressed mice. Moreover, gene expression and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and CRH receptor mRNA were determined in the LC. Plasma corticosterone levels were also measured. Exposure to a single stress increases tau phosphorylation throughout the brain in WT mice when compared to singly stressed CRH KO animals. In contrast, repeatedly stressed CRH KO mice showed exaggerated tau phosphorylation relative to WT controls. We also observed differences in extent of tau phosphorylation between investigated structures, e.g. the LC and hippocampus. Moreover, CRH deficiency leads to different responses to stress in gene expression of TH, NE concentrations, CRH receptor mRNA, and plasma corticosterone levels. Our data indicate that CRH effects on tau phosphorylation are dependent on whether stress is single or repeated, and differs between brain regions. Our findings indicate that CRH attenuates mechanisms responsible for development of stress-induced tau neuropathology, particularly in conditions of chronic stress. However, the involvement of central catecholaminergic neurons in these mechanisms remains unclear and is in need of further investigation.

  11. Leptin signaling plays a critical role in the geniposide-induced decrease of tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhui; Liu, Zixuan; Zhang, Yonglan; Yin, Fei

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that geniposide attenuates the production of Aβ1-42 both in vitro and in vivo via enhancing leptin receptor signaling. But the role played by geniposide in the phosphorylation of tau and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of geniposide on the phosphorylation of tau and the role of leptin signaling in this process. Our data suggested that, accompanied by the up-regulation of leptin receptor expression, geniposide significantly decreased the phosphorylation of tau in rat primary cultured cortical neurons and in APP/PS1 transgenic mice, and this geniposide-induced decrease of tau phosphorylation could be prevented by leptin antagonist (LA). Furthermore, LA also prevented the phosphorylation of Akt at Ser-473 site and GSK-3β at Ser-9 site induced by geniposide. All these results indicate that geniposide may regulate tau phosphorylation through leptin signaling, and geniposide may be a promising therapeutic compound for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in the future.

  12. Effect of Continuous Propofol Infusion in Rat on Tau Phosphorylation with or without Temperature Control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunxia; Ng, Olivia Tsz-Wa; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Irwin, Michael Garnet; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Wong, Gordon Tin-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest a relationship between anesthesia-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This study further characterized the effects of continuous propofol infusion on tau protein phosphorylation in rats, with or without temperature control. Propofol was administered intravenously to 8-10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and infused to the loss of the righting reflex for 2 h continuously. Proteins from cortex and hippocampus were examined by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Rectal temperature was significantly decreased during propofol infusion. Propofol with hypothermia significantly increased phosphorylation of tau at AT8, AT180, Thr205, and Ser199 in cortex and hippocampus except Ser396. With temperature maintenance, propofol still induced significant elevation of AT8, Thr205, and Ser199 in cortex and hippocampus; however, increase of AT180 and Ser396 was only found in hippocampus and cortex, respectively. Differential effects of propofol with or without hypothermia on multiple tau related kinases, such as Akt/GSK3β, MAPK pathways, or phosphatase (PP2A), were demonstrated in region-specific manner. These findings indicated that propofol increased tau phosphorylation under both normothermic and hypothermic conditions, and temperature control could partially attenuate the hyperphosphorylation of tau. Further studies are warranted to determine the long-term impact of propofol on the tau pathology and cognitive functions.

  13. Functional genomic screen and network analysis reveal novel modifiers of tauopathy dissociated from tau phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Jackson, George R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional genetic screen using loss-of-function and gain-of-function alleles was performed to identify modifiers of tau-induced neurotoxicity using the 2N/4R (full-length) isoform of wild-type human tau expressed in the fly retina. We previously reported eye pigment mutations, which create dysfunctional lysosomes, as potent modifiers; here, we report 37 additional genes identified from ∼1900 genes screened, including the kinases shaggy/GSK-3beta, par-1/MARK, CamKI and Mekk1. Tau acts synergistically with Mekk1 and p38 to down-regulate extracellular regulated kinase activity, with a corresponding decrease in AT8 immunoreactivity (pS202/T205), suggesting that tau can participate in signaling pathways to regulate its own kinases. Modifiers showed poor correlation with tau phosphorylation (using the AT8, 12E8 and AT270 epitopes); moreover, tested suppressors of wild-type tau were equally effective in suppressing toxicity of a phosphorylation-resistant S11A tau construct, demonstrating that changes in tau phosphorylation state are not required to suppress or enhance its toxicity. Genes related to autophagy, the cell cycle, RNA-associated proteins and chromatin-binding proteins constitute a large percentage of identified modifiers. Other functional categories identified include mitochondrial proteins, lipid trafficking, Golgi proteins, kinesins and dynein and the Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (Hop). Network analysis uncovered several other genes highly associated with the functional modifiers, including genes related to the PI3K, Notch, BMP/TGF-β and Hedgehog pathways, and nuclear trafficking. Activity of GSK-3β is strongly upregulated due to TDP-43 expression, and reduced GSK-3β dosage is also a common suppressor of Aβ42 and TDP-43 toxicity. These findings suggest therapeutic targets other than mitigation of tau phosphorylation. PMID:21949350

  14. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  15. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L.; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D.; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Carlson, George A.; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K.; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P.; Müller, Daniel J.; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development. PMID:26458742

  16. Mechanical Dilution of Beta-amyloid Peptide and Phosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer's Disease: Too Simple to be True?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the widespread accumulation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of deposits of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (phospho-tau) respectively. Considerable effort has been expended to identify methods to retard the deposition of these proteins or to enhance their clearance. It is strikingly surprising that until now, very few researchers have attempted to remove these proteins using mechanical procedures. In this article, we start by showing the rationale of mechanical dilution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a therapeutic approach in AD. Then, we present models of implantable systems allowing mechanical dilution of CSF by means of CSF replacement and CSF filtration (liquorpheresis). We conclude that even though this approach seems simplistic, it is feasible and deserves exploration.

  17. Senescence may mediate conversion of tau phosphorylation-induced apoptotic escape to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zhi; Wang, Zhi-Hao

    2015-08-01

    Neurodegeneration is the characteristic pathology in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the nature and molecular mechanism leading to the degeneration are not clarified. Given that only the neurons filled with neurofibrillary tangles survive to the end stage of the disease and the major component of the tangles is the hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, it is conceivable that tau hyperphosphorylation must play a crucial role in AD neurodegeneration. We have demonstrated that tau hyperphosphorylation renders the cells more resistant to the acute apoptosis. The molecular mechanisms involve substrate competition of tau and β-catenin for glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β); activation of Akt; preservation of Bcl-2 and suppression of Bax, cytosolic cytochrome-c, and caspase-3 activity; and upregulation of unfolded protein response (UPR), i.e., up-regulating phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2 and IRE1 with an increased cleavage of ATF6 and ATF4. On the other hand, tau hyperphosphorylation promotes its intracellular accumulation and disrupts axonal transport; hyperphosphorylated tau also impairs cholinergic function and inhibits proteasome activity. These findings indicate that tau hyperphosphorylation and its intracellular accumulation play dual role in the evolution of AD. We speculate that transient tau phosphorylation helps cells abort from an acute apoptosis, while persistent tau hyperphosphorylation/accumulation may trigger cell senescence that eventually causes a chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, the nature of "AD neurodegeneration" may represent a new type of tau-regulated chronic neuron death; and the stage of cell senescence may provide a broad window for the intervention of AD.

  18. Direct analysis of tau from PSP brain identifies new phosphorylation sites and a major fragment of N-terminally cleaved tau containing four microtubule-binding repeats.

    PubMed

    Wray, Selina; Saxton, Malcolm; Anderton, Brian H; Hanger, Diane P

    2008-06-01

    Tangles containing hyperphosphorylated aggregates of insoluble tau are a pathological hallmark of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Several phosphorylation sites on tau in PSP have been identified using phospho-specific antibodies, but no sites have been determined by direct sequencing due to the difficulty in enriching insoluble tau from PSP brain. We describe a new method to enrich insoluble PSP-tau and report eight phosphorylation sites [Ser46, Thr181, Ser202, Thr217, Thr231, Ser235, Ser396/Ser400 (one site) and Thr403/Ser404 (one site)] identified by mass spectrometry. We also describe a 35 kDa C-terminal tau fragment (tau35), lacking the N-terminus of tau but containing four microtubule-binding repeats (4R), that is present only in neurodegenerative disorders in which 4R tau is over-represented. Tau35 was readily detectable in PSP, corticobasal degeneration and 4R forms of fronto-temporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, but was absent from control, Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease brain. Our findings suggest the aggregatory characteristics of PSP-tau differ from those of insoluble tau in Alzheimer's disease brain and this might be related to the presence of a C-terminal cleavage product of tau.

  19. PHOSPHORYLATED TAU: CANDIDATE BIOMARKER FOR AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Murray; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; McMillan, Corey T.; Boller, Ashley; Powers, John; Rascovsky, Katya; Hu, William; Shaw, Les; Irwin, David J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE An increasingly varied clinical spectrum of cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been identified, and objective criteria for clinical trial eligibility is necessary. OBJECTIVE We sought to develop a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of ALS. DESIGN Case-control study. SETTING Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS 51 individuals with ALS and 23 individuals with a disorder associated with a four-repeat tauopathy (4R-tau). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE CSF level of tau phosophorylated at threonine 181 (ptau), and ratio of ptau to total tau (ttau). RESULTS Using a cross-validation prediction procedure, we found significantly reduced CSF levels of ptau and ptau:ttau in ALS relative to 4R-tau and to controls. In the validation cohort, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve for the ptau:ttau ratio was 0.916, and the comparison of ALS to 4R-tau showed sensitivity=92% and specificity=91.7%. Correct classification based on low CSF ptau:ttau was confirmed in 18 (85.7%) of 21 cases with autopsy-proven or genetically-determined disease. In patients with available measures, ptau:ttau in ALS correlated with clinical measures of disease severity such as Mini Mental State Exam (n=51) and ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (n=42), and regression analyses related ptau:ttau to MRI (n=10) evidence of disease in the corticospinal tract and white matter projections involving prefrontal cortex. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE CSF ptau:ttau may be a candidate biomarker to provide objective support for the diagnosis of ALS. PMID:24492862

  20. Phosphorylation of tau at both Thr 231 and Ser 262 is required for maximal inhibition of its binding to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Kabat, J; Novak, M; Wu, Q; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    1998-09-15

    The paired helical filaments (PHFs) found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains are composed primarily of the microtubule-associated protein tau. PHF-tau is in a hyperphosphorylated state and is unable to promote microtubule assembly. We investigated whether the inhibition of tau binding to microtubules is increased when tau is phosphorylated by different kinases in combination with GSK-3. We found that when tau was first phosphorylated by A-kinase, C-kinase, cdk5, or CaM kinase II and then by GSK-3, its binding to microtubules was inhibited by 45, 61, 78, and 79%, respectively. Further, the kinase combinations cdk5/GSK-3 and CaM kinase II/GSK-3 rapidly phosphorylated the sites Thr 231 and Ser 235. When these sites were individually replaced by Ala and the phosphorylation experiments repeated, tau binding to microtubules was inhibited by 54 and 71%, respectively. By comparison, when Ser 262 was replaced by Ala, tau binding to microtubules was inhibited by only 8% after phosphorylation by CaM kinase II. From these observations we estimate that the phosphorylation of Thr 231, Ser 235, and Ser 262 contributes approximately 26, approximately 9, and approximately 33%, respectively, of the overall inhibition of tau binding to microtubules. Together, our results indicate that the binding of tau to microtubules is controlled by the phosphorylation of several sites, among which are Thr 231, Ser 235, and Ser 262.

  1. Cytoplasmic Retention of Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A) Induces Alzheimer-like Abnormal Hyperphosphorylation of Tau*

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Wei, Jianshe; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fei; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), and related tauopathies. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), which in turn is modulated by endogenous inhibitor 2 (I2PP2A). In AD brain, I2PP2A is translocated from neuronal nucleus to cytoplasm, where it inhibits PP2A activity and promotes abnormal phosphorylation of Tau. Here we describe the identification of a potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal region of I2PP2A containing a conserved basic motif, 179RKR181, which is sufficient for directing its nuclear localization. The current study further presents an inducible cell model (Tet-Off system) of AD-type abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau by expressing I2PP2A in which the NLS was inactivated by 179RKR181 → AAA along with 168KR169 → AA mutations. In this model, the mutant NLS (mNLS)-I2PP2A (I2PP2AAA-AAA) was retained in the cell cytoplasm, where it physically interacted with PP2A and inhibited its activity. Inhibition of PP2A was associated with the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of Tau, which resulted in microtubule network instability and neurite outgrowth impairment. Expression of mNLS-I2PP2A activated CAMKII and GSK-3β, which are Tau kinases regulated by PP2A. The immunoprecipitation experiments showed the direct interaction of I2PP2A with PP2A and GSK-3β but not with CAMKII. Thus, the cell model provides insights into the nature of the potential NLS and the mechanistic relationship between I2PP2A-induced inhibition of PP2A and hyperphosphorylation of Tau that can be utilized to develop drugs preventing Tau pathology. PMID:25128526

  2. Site-specific phosphorylation of Tau protein is associated with deacetylation of microtubules in mouse spermatogenic cells during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Hiradate, Yuuki; Shirakata, Yoshiki; Kanai, Kenta; Kosaka, Keita; Gotoh, Aina; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Yutaka; Uchida, Takafumi; Sato, Eimei; Tanemura, Kentaro

    2014-05-29

    Tau is one of the microtubule-associated proteins and a major component of paired helical filaments, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Its expression has also been indicated in the testis. However, its function and modification in the testis have not been established. Here, we analyzed the dynamics of phosphorylation patterns during spermatogenesis. The expression of Tau protein and its phosphorylation were shown in the mouse testis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the phosphorylation was strongly detected during meiosis. Correspondingly, the expression of acetylated tubulin was inversely weakened during meiosis. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Tau protein contributes to spermatogenesis, especially in meiosis.

  3. The Cell Cycle Regulator Phosphorylated Retinoblastoma Protein Is Associated with Tau Pathology in Several Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jeremy G.; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Tabaton, Massimo; Hirano, Asao; Castellani, Rudy J.; Santocanale, Corrado; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Zhu, Xiongwei; Lee, Hyoung-gon

    2011-01-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) is a ubiquitous 928 amino acid cell cycle regulatory molecule with diverse biological activities. One critical function of pRb is control of the G1-to-S phase checkpoint of the cell cycle. In the hypophosphorylated state, pRb suppresses the activity of E2F transcription factors thereby inhibiting transcription of cell cycle promoting genes. Upon phosphorylation, primarily by cyclin dependent kinases, phosphorylated pRb dissociates from E2F and permits cell cycle progression. We previously found phosphorylated pRb to be intimately associated with hyperphosphorylated tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer disease (AD), the pathogenesis of which is believed to involve dysregulation of the cell cycle and marked neuronal death. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the presence of phosphorylated pRb in other distinct neurodegenerative diseases that share the common characteristic of hyperphosphorylated tau pathology and neuronal loss with AD. We found colocalized labeling of tau pathology and phosphorylated pRb in Pick disease and progressive supranuclear palsy (3 cases each), neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1 (2 cases) and Parkinson-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of Guam, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 and dementia pugilistica (1 case each). These observations further implicate aberrant neuronal cell cycle progression in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly tauopathies, and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21666500

  4. Non-Aggregating Tau Phosphorylation by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Contributes to Motor Neuron Degeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M.; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C.; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C.; Cantu, Jorge A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O.; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Ma, Long

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35−/− compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration. PMID:25878277

  5. PKA modulates GSK-3β- and cdk5-catalyzed phosphorylation of tau in site- and kinase-specific manners

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Liang, Zhihou; Shi, Jianhua; Yin, Dongmei; El-Akkad, Ezzat; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tau protein is regulated by several kinases, especially glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (cdk5) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Phosphorylation of tau by PKA primes it for phosphorylation by GSK-3β, but the site-specific modulation of GSK-3β–catalyzed tau phosphorylation by the prephosphorylation has not been well investigated. Here, we found that prephosphorylation by PKA promotes GSK-3β–catalyzed tau phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser199, Ser202, Thr205, Thr217, Thr231, Ser396 and Ser422, but inhibits its phosphorylation at Thr212 and Ser404. In contrast, the prephosphorylation had no significant effect on its subsequent phosphorylation by cdk5 at Thr181, Ser199, Thr205, Thr231 and Ser422; inhibited it at Ser202, Thr212, Thr217 and Ser404; and slightly promoted it at Ser396. These studies reveal the nature of the inter-regulation of tau phosphorylation by the three major tau kinases. PMID:17078951

  6. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V W; Jo, Chulman

    2016-04-26

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD.

  7. Fisetin stimulates autophagic degradation of phosphorylated tau via the activation of TFEB and Nrf2 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunhyo; Choi, Ki Ju; Cho, Sun-Jung; Yun, Sang-Moon; Jeon, Jae-Pil; Koh, Young Ho; Song, Jihyun; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Jo, Chulman

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we examined the effect of fisetin, a flavonol, on tau levels. Treatment of cortical cells or primary neurons with fisetin resulted in significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated tau. In addition, fisetin decreased the levels of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in an active GSK-3β-induced tau aggregation model. However, there was no difference in activities of tau kinases and phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 2A, irrespective of fisetin treatment. Fisetin activated autophagy together with the activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and Nrf2 transcriptional factors. The activation of autophagy including TFEB is likely due to fisetin-mediated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibition, since the phosphorylation levels of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 were decreased in the presence of fisetin. Indeed, fisetin-induced phosphorylated tau degradation was attenuated by chemical inhibitors of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Together the results indicate that fisetin reduces levels of phosphorylated tau through the autophagy pathway activated by TFEB and Nrf2. Our result suggests fisetin should be evaluated further as a potential preventive and therapeutic drug candidate for AD. PMID:27112200

  8. Extracellular Vesicles Containing P301L Mutant Tau Accelerate Pathological Tau Phosphorylation and Oligomer Formation but Do Not Seed Mature Neurofibrillary Tangles in ALZ17 Mice.

    PubMed

    Baker, Siân; Polanco, Juan Carlos; Götz, Jϋrgen

    2016-10-04

    In Alzheimer's disease, the distribution of neurofibrillary tangles, a histological hallmark comprised of phosphorylated forms of the protein tau, follows a distinct pattern through anatomically connected brain regions. The well-documented correlation between the severity of tau pathology and disease progression implies a prion-like seeding and spreading mechanism for tau. Experimentally, this has been addressed in transgenic mice by the injection of protein lysates isolated from brains of transgenic mice or patients with tauopathies, including AD, that were shown to behave like seeds, accelerating tau pathology and tangle formation in predisposed mice. More specifically, in vivo data suggest that brain lysates from mice harboring the P301S mutation of tau can seed protein aggregation when injected into the hippocampi of human wild-type tau transgenic ALZ17 mice. Here, we compared the seeding potential of lysates and extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes (EVs) from wild-type and human P301L tau transgenic rTg4510 mouse brains. We show that transgenic EVs cause increased tau phosphorylation and soluble oligomer formation in a manner comparable to that of freely available proteins in brain lysates, a prerequisite for the formation of mature protein aggregates.

  9. Tau-tubulin kinase 1 expression, phosphorylation and co-localization with phospho-Ser422 tau in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Lund, Harald; Cowburn, Richard F; Gustafsson, Elin; Strömberg, Kia; Svensson, Anne; Dahllund, Leif; Malinowsky, David; Sunnemark, Dan

    2013-07-01

    Recent reports have implicated tau-tubulin kinase 1 (TTBK1) in the pathological phosphorylation of tau that occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was undertaken to provide an extensive characterization of TTBK1 mRNA and protein expression in human brain from AD cases and non-demented controls so as to better understand the disease relevance of this novel kinase. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed abundant expression of TTBK1 in the somatodendritic compartment of cortical and hippocampal neurons of both AD cases and controls. TTBK1 immunoreactivity appeared to vary with the level of phospho-tau staining, and was strong in the somatodendritic compartment of apparently healthy hippocampal neurons as well as in pre-tangle neurons where it co-localized with diffuse phospho-Ser422 tau staining. Ser422 was confirmed as a TTBK1 substrate in vitro, and an antibody towards the site, in addition to labeling AT8-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), neuritic plaques and neuropil threads, also labeled a small population of neurons that were unlabeled with AT8. These data suggest a role for TTBK1 in pre-tangle formation prior to the formation of fibrillar tau and strengthen the idea that tau is phosphorylated at Ser422 at an early/intermediate stage in NFT formation.

  10. Aluminum interaction with human brain tau protein phosphorylation by various kinases

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae; Abou Zeid, M.M.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.); Abdel-Ghany, M.E.; Shalloway, D. . Section of Biochemistry, Mol, and Cell Biology); Blancato, J. . Environmental Monit. Systems Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an indispensable process for energy and signal transduction in biological systems. AlCl[sub 3] at 10 nM to 10 [mu]M range activated in-vitro [[gamma][sup [minus]32]P]ATP phosphorylation of the brain ([tau]) [Gamma] protein in both normal human or E.coli expressed [Gamma] forms; in the presence of the kinases P34,PKP, and PKC. However, higher concentrations of AlCl[sub 3] inhibited the [Gamma] phosphorylation with P34, PKP, and PKC to a maximum at 1 mM level. AlCl[sub 3] at 100 [mu]M to 500 [mu]M range induced non-enzymatic phosphorylation of [Gamma] with [gamma]-ATP, [gamma]-GTP, and [alpha]-GRP. AlCl[sub 3] activated histone phosphorylation by P34 in a similar pattern. The hyperphosphorylation of [Gamma] by Al[sup 3+] was accompanied in molecular shift and mobility retardation in SDS-PAGE. This may demonstrate the mechanism of the long term neurological effect of Al[sub 3+] in human brain leading to the formation of the neutrofibrillary tangles related to Alzeheimer's disease.

  11. Extracellular α-synuclein leads to microtubule destabilization via GSK-3β-dependent Tau phosphorylation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gąssowska, Magdalena; Czapski, Grzegorz A; Pająk, Beata; Cieślik, Magdalena; Lenkiewicz, Anna M; Adamczyk, Agata

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein (ASN) plays an important role in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Novel and most interesting data showed elevated tauopathy in PD and suggested relationship between ASN and Tau protein. However, the mechanism of ASN-evoked Tau protein modification is not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of extracellular ASN in Tau hyperphosphorylation in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and the involvement of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in ASN-dependent Tau modification. Our results indicated that exogenously added ASN increases Tau phosphorylation at Ser396. Accordingly, the GSK-3β inhibitor (SB-216763) prevented ASN-evoked Tau hyperphosphorylation, but the CDK5 inhibitor had no effect. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that ASN affected GSK-3β via increasing of protein level and activation of this enzyme. GSK-3β activity evaluated by its phosphorylation status assay showed that ASN significantly increased the phosphorylation of this enzyme at Tyr216 with parallel decrease in phosphorylation at Ser9, indicative of stimulation of GSK-3β activity. Moreover, the effect of ASN on microtubule (MT) destabilization and cell death with simultaneous the involvement of GSK-3β in these processes were analyzed. ASN treatment increased the amount of free tubulin and concomitantly reduced the amount of polymerized tubulin and SB-216763 suppressed these ASN-induced changes in tubulin, indicating that GSK-3β is involved in ASN-evoked MT destabilization. ASN-induced apoptotic processes lead to decrease in PC12 cells viability and SB-216763 protected those cells against ASN-evoked cytotoxicity. Concluding, extracellular ASN is involved in GSK-3β-dependent Tau hyperphosphorylation, which leads to microtubule destabilization. GSK-3β inhibition may be an effective strategy for protecting against ASN-induced cytotoxicity.

  12. Reducing Aβ load and tau phosphorylation: Emerging perspective for treating Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Jaspreet; Khan, Aamir

    2015-10-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex, progressive neurological disorder affecting elderly population of above 65 years of age, characterized by failure of memory, loss of acquired skills leading to apraxia, agnosia, aphasia and frequent disturbances in emotion with interpersonal and social deterioration. The extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of amyloid beta protein and highly phosphorylated tau protein, the key components involved in pathogenesis of AD are considered as the pathological hallmark of this disease. This has led to immense development in the field of treatment for AD. Recent evidences suggest that removal of protein deposits from AD brains are the newer attempts for treating AD. The major developments in this direction are the amyloid and tau based therapeutics, which could hold the key to treatment of AD in the near future. Several putative drugs have been thoroughly investigated in preclinical studies, but many of them have failed to produce results in the clinical scenario. Therefore, failures from the past can be treated as lessons for the development of efficacious drugs. In addition to this, various non- pharmacological interventions and miscellaneous drugs are also being used now for combating the AD like disease progression. Thus, present review discusses about the disease modifying therapies together with the various non-pharmacological interventions and miscellaneous drugs for treating AD.

  13. Interactions between glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, protein kinase B, and protein phosphatase 2A in tau phosphorylation in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Wen; Winblad, Bengt; Guan, Zhizhong; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how tau phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3 beta), protein kinase B (PKB), and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells. Results showed that GSK3 beta overexpression significantly increased PKB phosphorylation at the S473 site but not the T308 site. Neither GSK3 beta nor PKB overexpression could reduce the PP2AC phosphorylation at the Y307 site. In contrast, either PKB or GSK3 beta knockdown could increase PP2A phosphorylation at the Y307 site. PP2AC knockdown increased GSK3 beta phosphorylation at the S9 site but not at the Y216 site, and PKB phosphorylation at the T308 site but not at the S473 site. Tau phosphorylation at the S396 site was increased by GSK3 beta or PKB overexpression. Tau phosphorylation at the S214 site was only induced by PKB overexpression in the study. While GSK3 beta knockdown decreased tau phosphorylation at the S396 site, PKB knockdown increased tau phosphorylation at both the S396 and S214 sites. PP2AC knockdown decreased tau phosphorylation at the S396 and S214 sites. These findings suggest that tau phosphorylation at the S396 and S214 sites is differentially regulated by GSK3 beta, PKB, and PP2A in N2a cells. The final phosphorylation state of tau is possibly caused by the synergic action of the three enzymes.

  14. Insulin Resistance Prevents AMPK-induced Tau Dephosphorylation through Akt-mediated Increase in AMPKSer-485 Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bhumsoo; Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Pacut, Crystal; Backus, Carey; Feldman, Eva L.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance (IR) is the central feature of MetS. Recent studies suggest that MetS is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved fuel-sensing enzyme and a key player in regulating energy metabolism. In this report, we examined the role of IR on the regulation of AMPK phosphorylation and AMPK-mediated Tau phosphorylation. We found that AMPKSer-485, but not AMPKThr-172, phosphorylation is increased in the cortex of db/db and high fat diet-fed obese mice, two mouse models of IR. In vitro, treatment of human cortical stem cell line (HK-5320) and primary mouse embryonic cortical neurons with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), induced AMPK phosphorylation at both Thr-172 and Ser-485. AMPK activation also triggered Tau dephosphorylation. When IR was mimicked in vitro by chronically treating the cells with insulin, AICAR specifically induced AMPKSer-485, but not AMPKThr-172, hyperphosphorylation whereas AICAR-induced Tau dephosphorylation was inhibited. IR also resulted in the overactivation of Akt by AICAR treatment; however, preventing Akt overactivation during IR prevented AMPKSer-485 hyperphosphorylation and restored AMPK-mediated Tau dephosphorylation. Transfection of AMPKS485A mutant caused similar results. Therefore, our results suggest the following mechanism for the adverse effect of IR on AD pathology: IR → chronic overactivation of Akt → AMPKSer-485 hyperphosphorylation → inhibition of AMPK-mediated Tau dephosphorylation. Together, our results show for the first time a possible contribution of IR-induced AMPKSer-485 phosphorylation to the increased risk of AD in obesity and diabetes. PMID:26100639

  15. Activation of mTOR signaling leads to orthopedic surgery-induced cognitive decline in mice through β-amyloid accumulation and tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenzhen; Lu, Keliang; Wang, Jiawan; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious complication following surgery, however, the mechanism of POCD remains to be elucidated. Previous evidence has revealed that POCD may be associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative processes. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been reported to be crucial in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the implications of mTOR in POCD remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, western blotting and enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay were used to determine the expression of mTOR and any associated downstream targets; contextual fear conditioning was used to estimate the learning and memory ability of mice. Using an animal model of orthopedic surgery, it was found that surgical injury impaired hippocampal‑dependent memory and enhanced the levels of phosphorylated mTOR at Serine‑2448, phosphorylated 70‑kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) at Threonine‑389 with accumulation of β‑amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau at Serine-396, compared with the control group. Pretreatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, restored the abnormal mTOR/p70S6K signaling induced by surgery, attenuated the accumulation of Aβ and reduced the phosphorylation of tau protein. Rapamycin also reversed the surgery‑induced cognitive dysfunction. The results of the present study suggested that the surgical stimulus activated mTOR/p70S6K signaling excessively, and that the inhibition of mTOR signaling with rapamycin may prevent postoperative cognitive deficits, partly through attenuating the accumulation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein.

  16. The Co-chaperone BAG2 Mediates Cold-Induced Accumulation of Phosphorylated Tau in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Cesar Augusto Dias; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; de Oliveira, Adriele Silva Alves; Oliveira, Fernando Augusto; Almeida, Maria Camila; Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro

    2016-05-01

    Inclusions of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders classified as "tauopathy," of which Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent form. Dysregulation of tau phosphorylation disrupts neuron structure and function, and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates to form neurotoxic inclusions. The abundance of ubiquitin in tau inclusions suggests a defect in ubiquitin-mediated tau protein degradation by the proteasome. Under the temperature of 37 °C, the co-chaperone BAG2 protein targets phosphorylated tau for degradation via by a more-efficient, ubiquitin-independent pathway. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, cold exposure induces the accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. The SH-SY5Y cell line differentiates into neuron-like cells on treatment with retinoic acid and is an established model for research on the effects of cold on tau phosphorylation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BAG2 mediates the cold-induced accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. Our findings show that cold exposure causes a decrease in BAG2 expression in undifferentiated cells. Conversely, BAG2 expression is increased in differentiated cells exposed to cold. Further, undifferentiated cells exposed to cold had an increased proportion of p-tau to total tau, suggesting an accumulation of p-tau that is consistent with decreased levels of BAG2. Overexpression of BAG2 in cold-exposed undifferentiated cells restored levels of p-tau to those of 37 °C undifferentiated control. Interestingly, although BAG2 expression increased in differentiated cells, this increase was not accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of p-tau to total tau. Further, overexpression of BAG2 in cold exposed differentiated cells showed no significant difference in p-tau levels compared to 37 °C controls. Taken together, these data show that expression of BAG2 is differently regulated in a differentiation-dependent context. Our results suggest that

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tau Peptides for the Investigation of Conformational Changes Induced by Specific Phosphorylation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Neha S; Kukic, Predrag; Lippens, Guy; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2017-01-01

    The Tau protein plays an important role due to its biomolecular interactions in neurodegenerative diseases. The lack of stable structure and various posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation at various sites in the Tau protein pose a challenge for many experimental methods that are traditionally used to study protein folding and aggregation. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can help around deciphering relationship between phosphorylation and various intermediate and stable conformations of the Tau protein which occur on longer timescales. This chapter outlines protocols for the preparation, execution, and analysis of all-atom MD simulations of a 21-amino acid-long phosphorylated Tau peptide with the aim of generating biologically relevant structural and dynamic information. The simulations are done in explicit solvent and starting from nearly extended configurations of the peptide. The scaled MD method implemented in AMBER14 was chosen to achieve enhanced conformational sampling in addition to a conventional MD approach, thereby allowing the characterization of folding for such an intrinsically disordered peptide at 293 K. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the simulation trajectories to establish correlations with NMR data (i.e., chemical shifts and NOEs). Finally, in-depth discussions are provided for commonly encountered problems.

  18. Increased tau phosphorylation and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in the brain of mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Senger, Mario Roberto; Kunzler, Alice; Degrossoli, Adriana; de Simone, Salvatore Giovanni; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Somensi, Nauana; Girardi, Carolina Saibro; de Souza, Celeste da Silva Freitas; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Moreira, José Claudio Fonseca; Silva-Jr, Floriano Paes; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitosis caused by several species of the genus Leishmania, an obligate intramacrophagic parasite. Although neurologic symptoms have been observed in human cases of leishmaniasis, the manifestation of neurodegenerative processes is poorly studied. The aim of the present work was to investigate if peripheral infection of BALB/c mice with Leishmania amazonensis affects tau phosphorylation and RAGE protein content in the brain, which represent biochemical markers of neurodegenerative processes observed in diseases with a pro-inflammatory component, including Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. Four months after a single right hind footpad subcutaneous injection of L. amazonensis, the brain cortex of BALB/c mice was isolated. Western blot analysis indicated an increase in tau phosphorylation (Ser(396)) and RAGE immunocontent in infected animals. Brain tissue TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were not different from control animals; however, increased protein carbonylation, decreased IFN-γ levels and impairment in antioxidant defenses were detected. Systemic antioxidant treatment (NAC 20mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited tau phosphorylation and recovered IFN-γ levels. These data, altogether, indicate an association between impaired redox state, tau phosphorylation and RAGE up-regulation in the brain cortex of animals infected with L. amazonensis. In this context, it is possible that neurologic symptoms associated to chronic leishmaniasis are associated to disruptions in the homeostasis of CNS proteins, such as tau and RAGE, as consequence of oxidative stress. This is the first demonstration of alterations in biochemical parameters of neurodegeneration in an experimental model of Leishmania infection.

  19. The Effects of Alpha Boswellic Acid on Reelin Expression and Tau Phosphorylation in Human Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Esmat; Katouli, Fatemeh Hedayati; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Shasaltaneh, Marzieh Dehghan; Parandavar, Elham; Bayati, Samaneh; Afrasiabi, Ali; Nazari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular glycoprotein which contributes to synaptic plasticity and function of memory in the adult brain. It has been indicated that the Reelin signaling cascade participates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides the neurons, glial cells such as astrocytes also express Reelin protein. While functional loss of astrocytes has been reported to be associated with AD, dysfunction of astrocytic Reelin signaling pathway has not received much attention. Therefore, we investigated the effects of α-boswellic acid (ABA) as one of the major component of Boswellia serrata resin on primary fetal human astrocytes under a stress paradigm as a possible model for AD through study on Reelin cascade. For this aim, we used streptozotocin (STZ), in which from an outlook generates Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes, and assayed Reelin expression, Tau and Akt phosphorylation as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in the presences of ABA. Our results indicated that while STZ (100 µM) down-regulated the expression of Reelin, ABA (25 µM) up-regulated its expression (p < 0.01) for 24 h. ABA efficiently reduced hyperphosphorylated Tau (Ser404) in STZ-treated astrocytes (p < 0.01). Furthermore, STZ-induced apoptosis by increasing cleaved caspase three (p < 0.01) and ROS generation (p < 0.01), a further pathological hallmark of Tauopathy. On the other hand, ABA decreased ROS generation and promoted proliferation of astrocytes through elevating Survivin expression (p < 0.01). These results showed that ABA could be considered as a potent therapeutic agent for prevention and decreasing the progression of Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes; however, more in vivo studies would be needed.

  20. Orexin-A is Associated with Increases in Cerebrospinal Fluid Phosphorylated-Tau in Cognitively Normal Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Ricardo S.; Ducca, Emma L.; Wohlleber, Margaret E.; Tanzi, Emily B.; Gumb, Tyler; Twumasi, Akosua; Tweardy, Samuel; Lewis, Clifton; Fischer, Esther; Koushyk, Viachaslau; Cuartero-Toledo, Maria; Sheikh, Mohammed O.; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Lu, Shou-En; Mosconi, Lisa; Glodzik, Lidia; Schuetz, Sonja; Varga, Andrew W.; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M.; de Leon, Mony J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the role of orexin-A with respect to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers, and explore its relationship to cognition and sleep characteristics in a group of cognitively normal elderly individuals. Methods: Subjects were recruited from multiple community sources for National Institutes of Health supported studies on normal aging, sleep and CSF biomarkers. Sixty-three participants underwent home monitoring for sleep-disordered breathing, clinical, sleep and cognitive evaluations, as well as a lumbar puncture to obtain CSF. Individuals with medical history or with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of disorders that may affect brain structure or function were excluded. Correlation and linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between orexin-A and CSF AD-biomarkers controlling for potential sociodemographic and sleep confounders. Results: Levels of orexin-A, amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42), phosphorylated-tau (P-Tau), total-tau (T-Tau), Apolipoprotein E4 status, age, years of education, reported total sleep time, number of awakenings, apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI), excessive daytime sleepiness, and a cognitive battery were analyzed. Subjects were 69.59 ± 8.55 years of age, 57.1% were female, and 30.2% were apolipoprotein E4+. Orexin-A was positively correlated with Aβ42, P-Tau, and T-Tau. The associations between orexin-A and the AD-biomarkers were driven mainly by the relationship between orexin-A and P-Tau and were not influenced by other clinical or sleep characteristics that were available. Conclusions: Orexin-A is associated with increased P-Tau in normal elderly individuals. Increases in orexin-A and P-Tau might be a consequence of the reduction in the proportion of the deeper, more restorative slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep reported with aging. Clinical Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01962779. Citation: Osorio RS, Ducca EL, Wohlleber ME, Tanzi EB

  1. Osmotin attenuates amyloid beta-induced memory impairment, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tahir; Yoon, Gwang Ho; Shah, Shahid Ali; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include amyloid beta (Aβ) accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotection of novel osmotin, a plant protein extracted from Nicotiana tabacum that has been considered to be a homolog of mammalian adiponectin. Here, we observed that treatment with osmotin (15 μg/g, intraperitoneally, 4 hr) at 3 and 40 days post-intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ1-42 significantly ameliorated Aβ1-42-induced memory impairment in mice. These results revealed that osmotin reverses Aβ1-42 injection-induced synaptic deficits, Aβ accumulation and BACE-1 expression. Treatment with osmotin also alleviated the Aβ1-42-induced hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein at serine 413 through the regulation of the aberrant phosphorylation of p-PI3K, p-Akt (serine 473) and p-GSK3β (serine 9). Moreover, our western blots and immunohistochemical results indicated that osmotin prevented Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis and neurodegeneration in the Aβ1-42-treated mice. Furthermore, osmotin attenuated Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a novel osmotin against Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. Our results demonstrated that this ubiquitous plant protein could potentially serve as a novel, promising, and accessible neuroprotective agent against progressive neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:26118757

  2. MicroRNA-922 promotes tau phosphorylation by downregulating ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) expression in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-B; Wu, L; Xiong, R; Wang, L-L; Zhang, B; Wang, C; Li, H; Liang, L; Chen, S-D

    2014-09-05

    Decreased levels of soluble ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) have been reported in the brains of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and the introduction of UCHL1 rescued the synaptic and cognitive function of AD model mice. Obviously, a reduction in the levels of UCHL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of UCHL1 levels in AD have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRs) have been shown to participate in the process of AD. In our study, we discovered that microRNA-922 decreased the levels of UCHL1. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) mainly consisting of the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau are the defining pathological features of AD. In the present study, we found the levels of UCHL1 affected the levels of phosphorylated tau: the phosphorylated tau levels increased after knockdown of UCHL1 expression, and the phosphorylated tau levels decreased when UCHL1 was overexpressed. Furthermore, overexpression of microRNA-922 increased the phosphorylated tau levels. In conclusion, miR-922 increasing the levels of phosphorylated tau by regulating UCHL1 levels contributed to the pathogenesis of AD. Our study partly explained one of the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of UCHL1 levels in AD patients and could enrich the content of tau pathology in the pathogenesis of AD.

  3. Connecting the Dots Between Tau Dysfunction and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess; Götz, Jürgen; Feany, Mel B.

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathies are devastating and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative diseases, which are histopathologically defined by insoluble filamentous deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein within neurons and glia. Identifying the causes of abnormal tau phosphorylation and subsequent aggregation has been the focus of much research, and is currently a major target for the development of therapeutic interventions for tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. Recently much has been learned about the sequence of events that lead from tau dysfunction to neuronal death. This review focuses on the cascade of events that are catalyzed by pathological tau, and highlights current and potential therapeutic strategies to target this pathway. PMID:25172552

  4. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    SciTech Connect

    Amniai, Laziza; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. {yields} pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. {yields} Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  5. Effect of truncated-ApoE4 overexpression on tau phosphorylation in cultured N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Chen, Juan; Feng, Youmei

    2006-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal amino acids 272-299-truncated apoE4 (delta272-299) is the main fragments of apoE4 hydrolysate in neurons. The effects of truncated-ApoE4 (delta272-299) overexpression on tau phosphorylation in cultured N2a cells were investigated. The truncated-apoE4 (delta272-299) cDNA was subcloned into pEGFP-c3 to form recombinant pEGFP-T-apoE4. pEGFP-c3, pEGFP-T-apoE4 and pEGFP-apoE4 were transfected into N2a cells respectively by lipofectamine 2000 method. After 24--48 h, tau phosphorylation was detected by Western blot assay and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity by using GSK-3 activity assay. The results showed that the overexpression of both full length-apoE4 and truncated apoE4 fragments in N2a cells induced a dramatic increase in phosphorylation of tau at Ser202 sites and the activation of GSK-3 as compared with untransfected cells, most significantly in the cells transfected with pEGFP-T-apoE4 (P < 0.05). It was concluded that in vitro overexpression of truncated-ApoE4 (delta272-299) can result in tau hyperphosphorylation in N2a cells by activating GSK-3, suggesting truncated-ApoE4 (delta272-299) might contribute the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

  6. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  7. The relationship between truncation and phosphorylation at the C-terminus of tau protein in the paired helical filaments of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel A.; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María C.; Luna-Arias, Juan P.; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A.; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Harrington, Charles R.; Wischik, Claude M.; Mena, Raúl; Florán-Garduño, Benjamin; Luna-Muñoz, José

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that, in the early stages of tau processing in Alzheimer's disease, the N-terminal part of the molecule undergoes a characteristic cascade of phosphorylation and progressive misfolding of the proteins resulting in a structural conformation detected by Alz-50. In this immunohistochemical study of AD brain tissue, we have found that C-terminal truncation of tau at Asp-421 was an early event in tau aggregation and analyzed the relationship between phospho-dependent tau epitopes located at the C-terminus with truncation at Glu-391. The aim of this study was to determine whether C-terminal truncation may trigger events leading to the assembly of insoluble PHFs from soluble tau aggregates present in pre-tangle cells. Our findings suggest that there is a complex interaction between phosphorylated and truncated tau species. A model is presented here in which truncated tau protein represents an early neurotoxic species while phosphorylated tau species may provide a neuroprotective role in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25717290

  8. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Amniai, Laziza; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2011-09-09

    We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  9. The GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reduces pathology-specific tau phosphorylation and improves motor function in a transgenic hTauP301L mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Barkholt, Pernille; Fabricius, Katrine; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-03-01

    In addition to a prominent role in glycemic control, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists exhibit neuroprotective properties. There is mounting experimental evidence that GLP-1 receptor agonists, including liraglutide, may enhance synaptic plasticity, counteract cognitive deficits and ameliorate neurodegenerative features in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), predominantly in the context of β-amyloid toxicity. Here we characterized the effects of liraglutide in a transgenic mutant tau (hTauP301L) mouse tauopathy model, which develops age-dependent pathology-specific neuronal tau phosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangle formation with progressively compromised motor function (limb clasping). Liraglutide (500 µg/kg/day, s.c., q.d., n=18) or vehicle (n=18) was administered to hTauP301L mice for 6 months from the age of three months. Vehicle-dosed wild-type FVB/N mice served as normal control (n=17). The onset and severity of hind limb clasping was markedly different in liraglutide and vehicle-dosed transgenic mice. Clasping behavior was observed in 61% of vehicle-dosed hTauP301L mice with a 55% survival rate in 9-month old transgenic mice. In contrast, liraglutide treatment reduced the clasping rate to 39% of hTauP301L mice, and fully prevented clasping-associated lethality resulting in a survival rate of 89%. Stereological analyses demonstrated that hTauP301L mice exhibited hindbrain-dominant neuronal accumulation of phosphorylated tau closely correlated to the severity of clasping behavior. In correspondence, liraglutide treatment significantly reduced neuronal phospho-tau load by 61.9±10.2% (p<0.001) in hTauP301L mice, as compared to vehicle-dosed controls. In conclusion, liraglutide significantly reduced tau pathology in a transgenic mouse tauopathy model.

  10. Comparison of CID, ETD and metastable atom-activated dissociation (MAD) of doubly and triply charged phosphorylated tau peptides.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shannon L; Zimmermann, Carolyn M; Singer, David; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf; Jackson, Glen P

    2012-06-01

    The fragmentation behavior of the 2+ and 3+ charge states of eleven different phosphorylated tau peptides was studied using collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and metastable atom-activated dissociation (MAD). The synthetic peptides studied contain up to two known phosphorylation sites on serine or threonine residues, at least two basic residues, and between four and eight potential sites of phosphorylation. CID produced mainly b-/y-type ions with abundant neutral losses of the phosphorylation modification. ETD produced c-/z-type ions in highest abundance but also showed numerous y-type ions at a frequency about 50% that of the z-type ions. The major peaks observed in the ETD spectra correspond to the charge-reduced product ions and small neutral losses from the charge-reduced peaks. ETD of the 2+ charge state of each peptide generally produced fewer backbone cleavages than the 3+ charge state, consistent with previous reports. Regardless of charge state, MAD achieved more extensive backbone cleavage than CID or ETD, while retaining the modification(s) in most cases. In all but one case, unambiguous modification site determination was achieved with MAD. MAD produced 15-20% better sequence coverage than CID and ETD for both the 2+ and 3+ charge states and very different fragmentation products indicating that the mechanism of fragmentation in MAD is unique and complementary to CID and ETD.

  11. Perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) promotes Tau phosphorylation in the rat brain in a GSK-3β and CDK5 dependent manner: Relevance to neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Gąssowska, Magdalena; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Moczydłowska, Joanna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Pilutin, Anna; Gutowska, Izabela; Strużyńska, Lidia; Chlubek, Dariusz; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-03-10

    Hyperphosphorylation of Tau is involved in the pathomechanism of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's diseases as well as Autism. Epidemiological data suggest the significance of early life exposure to lead (Pb) in etiology of disorders affecting brain function. However, the precise mechanisms by which Pb exerts neurotoxic effects are not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of perinatal exposure to low dose of Pb on the Tau pathology in the developing rat brain. Furthermore, the involvement of two major Tau-kinases: glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) in Pb-induced Tau modification was evaluated. Pregnant female rats were divided into control and Pb-treated group. The control animals were maintained on drinking water while females from the Pb-treated group received 0.1% lead acetate (PbAc) in drinking water, starting from the first day of gestation until weaning of the offspring. During the feeding of pups, mothers from the Pb-treated group were still receiving PbAc. Pups of both groups were weaned at postnatal day 21 and then until postnatal day 28 received only drinking water. 28-day old pups were sacrificed and Tau mRNA and protein level as well as Tau phosphorylation were analyzed in forebrain cortex (FC), cerebellum (C) and hippocampus (H). Concomitantly, we examined the effect of Pb exposure on GSK-3β and CDK5 activation. Our data revealed that pre- and neonatal exposure to Pb (concentration of Pb in whole blood below 10μg/dL, considered safe for humans) caused significant increase in the phosphorylation of Tau at Ser396 and Ser199/202 with parallel rise in the level of total Tau protein in FC and C. Tau hyperphosphorylation in Pb-treated animals was accompanied by elevated activity of GSK-3β and CDK5. Western blot analysis revealed activation of GSK-3β in FC and C as well as CDK5 in C, via increased phosphorylation of Tyr-216 and calpain-dependent p25

  12. Pharmacological inhibition of PTEN attenuates cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane via inhibition of NR2B-mediated tau phosphorylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Chen, Xin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianfang; Li, Shiyong; Zhao, Yilin; Wang, Jintao; Luo, Ailin

    2017-03-01

    Evidence has shown that children exposed to repeated anesthesia in early childhood display long-term cognitive disabilities. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Our previous study has indicated the involvement of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in isoflurane-induced decrease of self-renewal capacity in hippocampal neural precursor cells. Additionally, it is demonstrated by others that PTEN inhibition could protect against cognitive impairment via reduction of tau phosphorylation in the alzheimer's disease model. Therefore, in the present in vivo study, we aimed to examine the effects of PTEN inhibition on the cognitive dysfunction and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane. Our results showed that the neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane resulted in the activation of PTEN in the hippocampus. The treatment of PTEN inhibitor BPV (pic) restored PSD-95 synthesis, and attenuated tau phosphorylation as well as the cognitive dysfunction caused by the repeated isoflurane exposures. In addition, BPV (pic) treatment reversed the activation of NR2B-containing NMDARs induced by repeated isoflurane exposures, while in turn, the antagonism of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil alleviated tau phosphorylation, indicating a possible role of NR2B as the downstream of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation in the neonatal rats repeatedly exposed to isoflurane. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role of PTEN in mediating tau phosphorylation and cognitive deficits caused by neonatal repeated exposures to isoflurane, implying that targeting on PTEN may be a potential therapeutic approach for the anesthetic-related cognitive decline in the developing brain.

  13. Development of Posiphen, an Inhibitor of Phosphorylated Tau Expression, as a Treatment of TBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Posiphen reversed this deficit, indicating a beneficial effect of the drug in brain even at the lowest concentration used in this study. We...APP, tau, alpha-synuclein, drug trial 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...clinical studies testing efficacy of this small molecule drug to treat TBI patients. The studies funded to date (“base”) intended to demonstrate

  14. Ilex latifolia Prevents Amyloid β Protein (25-35)-Induced Memory Impairment by Inhibiting Apoptosis and Tau Phosphorylation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Youn; Lee, Hong Kyu; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yoo, Jae Kuk; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2015-12-01

    Ilex latifolia Thunb. (Aquifoliaceae), a Chinese bitter tea called "kudingcha," has been widely consumed as a health beverage and found to possess antioxidant, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ischemic activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of an ethanol extract of I. latifolia against amyloid β protein (Aβ)-induced memory impairment in mice and neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons. Memory impairment in mice was induced by intracerebroventricular injection of 15 nmol Aβ (25-35) and measured by the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test. Chronic administration of I. latifolia (25-100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly prevented Aβ (25-35)-induced memory loss. I. latifolia also prevented the decrease of glutathione concentrations, increased lipid peroxidation, expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and changes in apoptosis-associated proteins in the memory-impaired mouse brain. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to 10 μM Aβ (25-35) for 36 h induced neuronal apoptotic death. The neuronal cell death, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, generation of reactive oxygen species, and expression of proapoptotic proteins caused by Aβ (25-35) in the cultured neurons were inhibited by treatment with I. latifolia (1-50 μg/mL). These results suggest that I. latifolia may have a possible therapeutic role in managing cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanism might involve the antiapoptotic effects mediated by antioxidant activity and inhibition of p-tau formation.

  15. An Ultra-specific Avian Antibody to Phosphorylated Tau Protein Reveals a Unique Mechanism for Phosphoepitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Heather H.; Tu, Chao; Cao, Wei; Klein, Anne; Ramsey, Renee; Fennell, Brian J.; Lambert, Matthew; Ní Shúilleabháin, Deirdre; Autin, Bénédicte; Kouranova, Eugenia; Laxmanan, Sri; Braithwaite, Steven; Wu, Leeying; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Milici, Anthony J.; Dumin, Jo Ann; LaVallie, Edward R.; Arai, Maya; Corcoran, Christopher; Paulsen, Janet E.; Gill, Davinder; Cunningham, Orla; Bard, Joel; Mosyak, Lydia; Finlay, William J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly specific antibodies to phosphoepitopes are valuable tools to study phosphorylation in disease states, but their discovery is largely empirical, and the molecular mechanisms mediating phosphospecific binding are poorly understood. Here, we report the generation and characterization of extremely specific recombinant chicken antibodies to three phosphoepitopes on the Alzheimer disease-associated protein tau. Each antibody shows full specificity for a single phosphopeptide. The chimeric IgG pT231/pS235_1 exhibits a KD of 0.35 nm in 1:1 binding to its cognate phosphopeptide. This IgG is murine ortholog-cross-reactive, specifically recognizing the pathological form of tau in brain samples from Alzheimer patients and a mouse model of tauopathy. To better understand the underlying binding mechanisms allowing such remarkable specificity, we determined the structure of pT231/pS235_1 Fab in complex with its cognate phosphopeptide at 1.9 Å resolution. The Fab fragment exhibits novel complementarity determining region (CDR) structures with a “bowl-like” conformation in CDR-H2 that tightly and specifically interacts with the phospho-Thr-231 phosphate group, as well as a long, disulfide-constrained CDR-H3 that mediates peptide recognition. This binding mechanism differs distinctly from either peptide- or hapten-specific antibodies described to date. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed that pT231/pS235_1 binds a truly compound epitope, as neither phosphorylated Ser-235 nor free peptide shows any measurable binding affinity. PMID:23148212

  16. A novel DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: effect on Tau and amyloid pathologies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coutadeur, Séverine; Benyamine, Hélène; Delalonde, Laurence; de Oliveira, Catherine; Leblond, Bertrand; Foucourt, Alicia; Besson, Thierry; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Taverne, Thierry; Girard, Angélique; Pando, Matthew P; Désiré, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene is located within the Down Syndrome (DS) critical region on chromosome 21 and is implicated in the generation of Tau and amyloid pathologies that are associated with the early onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD) observed in DS. DYRK1A is also found associated with neurofibrillary tangles in sporadic AD and phosphorylates key AD players (Tau, amyloid precursor, protein, etc). Thus, DYRK1A may be an important therapeutic target to modify the course of Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ) pathologies. Here, we describe EHT 5372 (methyl 9-(2,4-dichlorophenylamino) thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazoline-2-carbimidate), a novel, highly potent (IC50 = 0.22 nM) DYRK1A inhibitor with a high degree of selectivity over 339 kinases. Models in which inhibition of DYRK1A by siRNA reduced and DYRK1A over-expression induced Tau phosphorylation or Aβ production were used. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation at multiple AD-relevant sites in biochemical and cellular assays. EHT 5372 also normalizes both Aβ-induced Tau phosphorylation and DYRK1A-stimulated Aβ production. DYRK1A is thus as a key element of Aβ-mediated Tau hyperphosphorylation, which links Tau and amyloid pathologies. EHT 5372 and other compounds in its class warrant in vivo investigation as a novel, high-potential therapy for AD and other Tau opathies. Inhibition of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a new high-potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease. Here we describe EHT 5372, a novel potent and selective DYRK1A inhibitor. EHT 5372 inhibits DYRK1A-induced Tau phosphorylation, Aβ production and Aβ effects on phospho-Tau, including Tau aggregation.

  17. Neuronal Cell Death and Degeneration through Increased Nitroxidative Stress and Tau Phosphorylation in HIV-1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms for increased neurodegeneration and neurocognitive deficits in HIV-infected people are unclear. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms of increased neurodegeneration in 5-month old male HIV-1 Transgenic (Tg) rats compared to the age- and gender-matched wild-type (WT) by evaluating histological changes and biochemical parameters of the key proteins involved in the cell death signaling and apoptosis. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed decreased neuronal cells with elevated astrogliosis in HIV-1 Tg rats compared to WT. Mechanistic studies revealed that increased levels of nitroxidative stress marker proteins such as NADPH-oxidase, cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases such as JNK and p38K, activated cell-cycle dependent CDK5, hypoxia-inducible protein-1α, nitrated proteins, hyperphosphorylated tau, and amyloid plaques in HIV-Tg rats were consistently observed in HIV-1 Tg rats. Confocal microscopy and cell viability analyses showed that treatment with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or a specific inhibitor of iNOS 1400W significantly prevented the increased apoptosis of neuro-2A cells by HIV-1 Tat or gp120 protein, demonstrating the causal role of HIV-1 mediated nitroxidative stress and protein nitration in promoting neuronal cell death. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis confirmed nitration of Hsp90, evaluated as an example of nitrated proteins, suggesting possible involvement of nitrated proteins in neuronal damage. Further, activated p-JNK directly binds tau and phosphorylates multiple amino acids, suggesting an important role of p-JNK in tau hyperphosphorylation and tauopathy. These changes were accompanied with elevated levels of many apoptosis-related proteins Bax and cleaved (activated) caspase-3 as well as proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1. Collectively, these results

  18. Potential of the Antibody Against cis-Phosphorylated Tau in the Early Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Alzheimer Disease and Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun Ping; Kondo, Asami; Albayram, Onder; Herbert, Megan K; Liu, Hekun; Zhou, Xiao Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) share a common neuropathologic signature-neurofibrillary tangles made of phosphorylated tau-but do not have the same pathogenesis or symptoms. Although whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) could cause AD has not been established, CTE is shown to be associated with TBI. Until recently, whether and how TBI leads to tau-mediated neurodegeneration was unknown. The unique prolyl isomerase Pin1 protects against the development of tau-mediated neurodegeneration in AD by converting the phosphorylated Thr231-Pro motif in tau (ptau) from the pathogenic cis conformation to the physiologic trans conformation, thereby restoring ptau function. The recent development of antibodies able to distinguish and eliminate both conformations specifically has led to the discovery of cis-ptau as a precursor of tau-induced pathologic change and an early driver of neurodegeneration that directly links TBI to CTE and possibly to AD. Within hours of TBI in mice or neuronal stress in vitro, neurons prominently produce cis-ptau, which causes and spreads cis-ptau pathologic changes, termed cistauosis. Cistauosis eventually leads to widespread tau-mediated neurodegeneration and brain atrophy. Cistauosis is effectively blocked by the cis-ptau antibody, which targets intracellular cis-ptau for proteasome-mediated degradation and prevents extracellular cis-ptau from spreading to other neurons. Treating TBI mice with cis-ptau antibody not only blocks early cistauosis but also prevents development and spreading of tau-mediated neurodegeneration and brain atrophy and restores brain histopathologic features and functional outcomes. Thus, cistauosis is a common early disease mechanism for AD, TBI, and CTE, and cis-ptau and its antibody may be useful for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these devastating diseases.

  19. Monitoring of Intracellular Tau Aggregation Regulated by OGA/OGT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md Mamunul; Nam, Ghilsoo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-08-26

    Abnormal phosphorylation of tau has been considered as a key pathogenic mechanism inducing tau aggregation in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, collectively called tauopathies. Recent evidence showed that tau phosphorylation sites are protected with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in normal brain. In pathological condition, tau is de-glycosylated and becomes a substrate for kinases. Despite the importance of O-GlcNAcylation in tau pathology, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), and an enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAc to tau, has not been carefully investigated in the context of tau aggregation. Here, we investigated intracellular tau aggregation regulated by BZX2, an inhibitor of OGT. Upon the inhibition of OGT, tau phosphorylation increased 2.0-fold at Ser199 and 1.5-fold at Ser396, resulting in increased tau aggregation. Moreover, the BZX2 induced tau aggregation was efficiently reduced by the treatment of Thiamet G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Our results demonstrated the protective role of OGT in tau aggregation and also suggest the counter-regulatory mechanism of OGA and OGT in tau pathology.

  20. Tamoxifen inhibits CDK5 kinase activity by interacting with p35/p25 and modulates the pattern of tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Caroline; Zhang, Bing; Le Parc, Annabelle; Baratte, Blandine; Colas, Pierre; Couturier, Cyril; Kosik, Kenneth S; Landrieu, Isabelle; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bach, Stéphane

    2015-04-23

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a multifunctional enzyme that plays numerous roles, notably in brain development. CDK5 is activated through its association with the activators, p35 and p39, rather than by cyclins. Proteolytic procession of the N-terminal part of its activators has been linked to Alzheimer's disease and various other neuropathies. The interaction with the proteolytic product p25 prolongs CDK5 activation and modifies the substrate specificity. In order to discover small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between CDK5 and p25, we have used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based screening assay. Among the 1,760 compounds screened, the generic drug tamoxifen has been identified. The inhibition of the CDK5 activity by tamoxifen was notably validated by monitoring the phosphorylation state of tau protein. The study of the molecular mechanism of inhibition indicates that tamoxifen interacts with p25 to block the CDK5/p25 interaction and pave the way for new treatments of tauopathies.

  1. Activation of Cdk5/p25 and tau phosphorylation following chronic brain hypoperfusion in rats involves microRNA-195 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Hua; Ban, Tao; Liu, Cheng-Di; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wang, Xu; Yan, Mei-Ling; Hu, Xue-Ling; Su, Xiao-Lin; Bao, Ya-Nan; Sun, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Lin-Jing; Pei, Shuang-Chao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Zong, De-Kang; Ai, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Chronic brain hypoperfusion (CBH) is a common clinical feature of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Our previous study reported that the down-regulation of microRNA-195 (miR-195) promotes amyloidogenesis via regulation of amyloid precursor protein and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression at the post-transcriptional level in CBH rats with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO). CBH owing to unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO) increases tau phosphorylation levels at multiple phosphorylation sites in the brain, but the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether miR-195 could both deregulate amyloid metabolism and indirectly deregulate tau phosphorylation in CBH. We observed that 2VO leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser202/Thr205, Ser262, Thr231, and Ser422 and to the conversion from cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5)/p35 to Cdk5/p25 in rat hippocampi. Endogenous miR-195 was knocked down using over-expression of its antisense molecule (pre-AMO-miR-195) via a lentivirus (lenti-pre-AMO-miR-195); this knockdown increased the tau phosphorylation at Ser202/Thr205, Ser262, Thr231, Ser422, and the Cdk5/p25 activation, but over-expression of miR-195 using lenti-pre-miR-195 decreased the tau phosphorylation and Cdk5/p25 activation. Further in vitro studies demonstrated that miR-195 over-expression prevented tau hyperphosphorylation and Cdk5/p35 activity, which were increased by miR-195 inhibition. A dual luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-195 bound to the Cdk5r1 gene, which encodes p35 protein, in the 3'UTR and inhibited p35 expression. We concluded that tau hyperphosphorylation involves the down-regulation of miR-195, which is mediated by Cdk5/p25 activation in 2VO rats. Our findings demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-195 led to increased vulnerability via the regulation of multiple targets

  2. Attenuation of synaptic toxicity and MARK4/PAR1-mediated Tau phosphorylation by methylene blue for Alzheimer’s disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenchao; Lee, Seongsoo; Huang, Xiaoran; Liu, Song; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang-Min; Tang, Hongxiang; Ashford, J. Wesson; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. Critical components of the two AD pathological pathways, Aβ-amyloidosis and Tauopathy, have been considered as therapeutic targets. Among them, much effort is focused on aberrant Tau phosphorylation and targeting Tau-phosphorylating kinases. Methylene blue (MB), a phenothiazine dye that crosses the blood-brain barrier, has been shown to hit multiple molecular targets involved in AD and have beneficial effects in clinical studies. Here we present evidence that microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (MARK4) is a novel target of MB. MB partially rescued the synaptic toxicity in Drosophila larva overexpressing PAR1 (MARK analog). In 293T culture, MB decreased MARK4-mediated Tau phosphorylation in a dose dependent manner. Further studies revealed a two-fold mechanism by MB including down-regulation of MARK4 protein level through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and inhibition of MARK4 kinase activity in vitro. This study highlights the importance of MARK4 as a viable target for Tauopathy and provides fresh insight into the complex mechanism used by MB to treat AD. PMID:27708431

  3. Oligomer Formation of Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylated in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation (“hyperphosphorylation”) and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. PMID:25339173

  4. Microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (p110mark). A novel protein kinase that regulates tau-microtubule interactions and dynamic instability by phosphorylation at the Alzheimer-specific site serine 262.

    PubMed

    Drewes, G; Trinczek, B; Illenberger, S; Biernat, J; Schmitt-Ulms, G; Meyer, H E; Mandelkow, E M; Mandelkow, E

    1995-03-31

    Aberrant phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is one of the pathological features of neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease. The phosphorylation of Ser-262 within the microtubule binding region of tau is of particular interest because so far it is observed only in Alzheimer's disease (Hasegawa, M., Morishima-Kawashima, M., Takio, K., Suzuki, M., Titani, K., and Ihara, Y. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 26, 17047-17054) and because phosphorylation of this site alone dramatically reduces the affinity for microtubules in vitro (Biernat, J., Gustke, N., Drewes, G., Mandelkow, E.-M., and Mandelkow, E. (1993) Neuron 11, 153-163). Here we describe the purification and characterization of a protein-serine kinase from brain tissue with an apparent molecular mass of 110 kDa on SDS gels. This kinase specifically phosphorylates tau on its KIGS or KCGS motifs in the repeat domain, whereas no significant phosphorylation outside this region was detected. Phosphorylation occurs mainly on Ser-262 located in the first repeat. This largely abolishes tau's binding to microtubules and makes them dynamically unstable, in contrast to other protein kinases that phosphorylate tau at or near the repeat domain. The data suggest a role for this novel kinase in cellular events involving rearrangement of the microtuble-associated proteins/microtubule arrays and their pathological degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Ravaglia, Sabrina; Bini, Paola; Sinforiani, Elena; Franciotta, Diego; Zardini, Elisabetta; Tosca, Pietro; Moglia, Arrigo; Costa, Alfredo

    2008-12-01

    In 31 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), 19 with probable vascular dementia (VaD) and 20 with Possible AD and Possible VaD, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels hyperphosphorylated at threonine 181 (Ptau) were measured by ELISA. Thirty-six age-matched subjects were used as controls. The severity of the cognitive decline was assessed at the time of CSF analysis and after a 12-month follow-up. The groups had comparable age, degree of cognitive impairment and disease duration; these parameters were not related to P-tau levels. P-tau discriminated between demented patients and controls, but no significant difference emerged between AD and the other groups. By contrast, higher P-tau values were found to predict, independently of the clinical diagnosis, a more rapid evolution of cognitive decline. Whether these findings are due to a lack of CSF P-tau specificity or to the low reliability of clinical and radiological criteria remains unclear. P-tau may be useful in the evaluation of disease evolution, by predicting the rate of cognitive decline.

  6. Grape derived polyphenols attenuate tau neuropathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Santa-Maria, Ismael; Ho, Lap; Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Ono, Kenjiro; Teplow, David B; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2010-01-01

    Aggregation of microtubule-associated protein tau into insoluble intracellular neurofibrillary tangles is a characteristic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy, argyrophilic grain disease, corticobasal degeneration, frontotemporal dementias with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, and Pick's disease. Tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated in AD and aberrant tau phosphorylation contributes to the neuropathology of AD and other tauopathies. Anti-aggregation and anti-phosphorylation are main approaches for tau-based therapy. In this study, we report that a select grape-seed polyphenol extract (GSPE) could potently interfere with the assembly of tau peptides into neurotoxic aggregates. Moreover, oral administration of GSPE significantly attenuated the development of AD type tau neuropathology in the brain of TMHT mouse model of AD through mechanisms associated with attenuation of extracellular signal-receptor kinase 1/2 signaling in the brain.

  7. Brain-Wide Insulin Resistance, Tau Phosphorylation Changes, and Hippocampal Neprilysin and Amyloid-β Alterations in a Monkey Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Corraliza, Jose; Wong, Harrison; Mazzella, Matthew J.; Che, Shaoli; Lee, Sang Han; Petkova, Eva; Wagner, Janice D.; Hemby, Scott E.; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that diabetic individuals are at a greater risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). To examine the mechanisms by which diabetes mellitus (DM) may contribute to AD pathology in humans, we examined brain tissue from streptozotocin-treated type 1 diabetic adult male vervet monkeys receiving twice-daily exogenous insulin injections for 8–20 weeks. We found greater inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 in each brain region examined of the diabetic monkeys when compared with controls, consistent with a pattern of brain insulin resistance that is similar to that reported in the human AD brain. Additionally, a widespread increase in phosphorylated tau was seen, including brain areas vulnerable in AD, as well as relatively spared structures, such as the cerebellum. An increase in active ERK1/2 was also detected, consistent with DM leading to changes in tau-kinase activity broadly within the brain. In contrast to these widespread changes, we found an increase in soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) levels that was restricted to the temporal lobe, with the greatest increase seen in the hippocampus. Consistent with this localized Aβ increase, a hippocampus-restricted decrease in the protein and mRNA for the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) was found, whereas various Aβ-clearing and -degrading proteins were unchanged. Thus, we document multiple biochemical changes in the insulin-controlled DM monkey brain that can link DM with the risk of developing AD, including dysregulation of the insulin-signaling pathway, changes in tau phosphorylation, and a decrease in NEP expression in the hippocampus that is coupled with a localized increase in Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Given that diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), understanding the mechanisms by which DM promotes AD is important. We report that DM in a nonhuman primate brain leads to changes in the levels or

  8. Protein restriction cycles reduce IGF-1 and phosphorylated Tau, and improve behavioral performance in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parrella, Edoardo; Maxim, Tom; Maialetti, Francesca; Zhang, Lu; Wan, Junxiang; Wei, Min; Cohen, Pinchas; Fontana, Luigi; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In laboratory animals, calorie restriction (CR) protects against aging, oxidative stress, and neurodegenerative pathologies. Reduced levels of growth hormone and IGF-1, which mediate some of the protective effects of CR, can also extend longevity and/or protect against age-related diseases in rodents and humans. However, severely restricted diets are difficult to maintain and are associated with chronically low weight and other major side effects. Here we show that 4 months of periodic protein restriction cycles (PRCs) with supplementation of nonessential amino acids in mice already displaying significant cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-like pathology reduced circulating IGF-1 levels by 30–70% and caused an 8-fold increase in IGFBP-1. Whereas PRCs did not affect the levels of β amyloid (Aβ), they decreased tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus and alleviated the age-dependent impairment in cognitive performance. These results indicate that periodic protein restriction cycles without CR can promote changes in circulating growth factors and tau phosphorylation associated with protection against age-related neuropathologies. PMID:23362919

  9. CSF tau levels influence cortical plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Esposito, Zaira; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Codecá, Claudia; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Martorana, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative process characterized by progressive neuronal degeneration, reduced levels of neurotransmitters, and altered forms of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of AD, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins are supposed to interfere with synaptic transmission. In the current study, we investigated the correlation between motor cortical plasticity, measured with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and the levels of Aβ₁₋₄₂, total tau (t-Tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients. We found that the overall rTMS after effects were milder in AD patients in comparison with controls. In AD patients the amount of rTMS-induced inhibition correlated with CSF t-Tau, but not with Aβ₁₋₄₂ CSF levels. Surprisingly, higher CSF t-Tau levels were associated to a stronger inhibition of the motor evoked potentials, implying that the expected effects of the 1 Hz rTMS protocol were more evident in patients with more pathological t-Tau CSF levels. These data could be interpreted as the consequence of CSF t-Tau mediated abnormal excitatory activity and could suggest that CSF t-Tau may impact mechanisms of cortical plasticity.

  10. β-Amyloid Oligomers Induce Phosphorylation of Tau and Inactivation of Insulin Receptor Substrate via c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling: Suppression by Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Yang, Fusheng; Rosario, Emily R.; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Beech, Walter; Gant, Dana J.; Chen, Ping Ping; Hudspeth, Beverly; Chen, Cory; Zhao, Yongle; Vinters, Harry V.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    Both insulin resistance (type II diabetes) and β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomers are implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we investigate the role of Aβ oligomer-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation leading to phosphorylation and degradation of the adaptor protein insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). IRS-1 couples insulin and other trophic factor receptors to downstream kinases and neuroprotective signaling. Increased phospho-IRS-1 is found in AD brain and insulin-resistant tissues from diabetics. Here, we report Aβ oligomers significantly increased active JNK and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser616) and tau (Ser422) in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas JNK inhibition blocked these responses. The omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) similarly inhibited JNK and the phosphorylation of IRS-1 and tau in cultured hippocampal neurons. Feeding 3xTg-AD transgenic mice a diet high in saturated and omega-6 fat increased active JNK and phosphorylated IRS-1 and tau. Treatment of the 3xTg-AD mice on high-fat diet with fish oil or curcumin or a combination of both for 4 months reduced phosphorylated JNK, IRS-1, and tau and prevented the degradation of total IRS-1. This was accompanied by improvement in Y-maze performance. Mice fed with fish oil and curcumin for 1 month had more significant effects on Y-maze, and the combination showed more significant inhibition of JNK, IRS-1, and tau phosphorylation. These data indicate JNK mediates Aβ oligomer inactivation of IRS-1 and phospho-tau pathology and that dietary treatment with fish oil/DHA, curcumin, or a combination of both has the potential to improve insulin/trophic signaling and cognitive deficits in AD. PMID:19605645

  11. What Renders TAU Toxic

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Xia, Di; Leinenga, Gerhard; Chew, Yee Lian; Nicholas, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    TAU is a microtubule-associated protein that under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) forms insoluble, filamentous aggregates. When 20 years after TAU’s discovery the first TAU transgenic mouse models were established, one declared goal that was achieved was the modeling of authentic TAU aggregate formation in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. However, as we review here, it has become increasingly clear that TAU causes damage much before these filamentous aggregates develop. In fact, because TAU is a scaffolding protein, increased levels and an altered subcellular localization (due to an increased insolubility and impaired clearance) result in the interaction of TAU with cellular proteins with which it would otherwise either not interact or do so to a lesser degree, thereby impairing their physiological functions. We specifically discuss the non-axonal localization of TAU, the role phosphorylation has in TAU toxicity and how TAU impairs mitochondrial functions. A major emphasis is on what we have learned from the four available TAU knock-out models in mice, and the knock-out of the TAU/MAP2 homolog PTL-1 in worms. It has been proposed that in human pathological conditions such as AD, a rare toxic TAU species exists which needs to be specifically removed to abrogate TAU’s toxicity and restore neuronal functions. However, what is toxic in one context may not be in another, and simply reducing, but not fully abolishing TAU levels may be sufficient to abrogate TAU toxicity. PMID:23772223

  12. Abnormalities of the Duo/Rac-1/PAK1 Pathway Drive Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation in Frontal Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, María D.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent studies on GTPases have suggested that reduced Duo and Cdc42 transcript expression is involved in dendritic spine loss in schizophrenia. In murine models, Duo and Cdc42 phosphorylate PAK1, which modifies the activity of regulatory myosin light chain (MLC) and cofilin by altering their phosphorylation. Therefore, we hypothesized that in schizophrenia abnormal Duo and Cdc42 expression result in changes in MLC and/or cofilin phosphorylation, which may alter actin cytoskeleton dynamics underlying dendritic spine maintenance. METHODS We performed Western blot protein expression analysis in postmortem brains from patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and a comparison group. We focused our studies in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (n=33 comparison group; n=36 schizophrenia) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (n=29 comparison group; n=35 schizophrenia). RESULTS In both ACC and DLPFC, we found a reduction of Duo expression and PAK1 phosphorylation in schizophrenia. Cdc42 protein expression was decreased in ACC, but not in DLPFC. In ACC, we observed decreased PAK1 phosphorylation and increased MLC (pMLC) phosphorylation, while in DLPFC pMLC remained unchanged. DISCUSSION These data suggest a novel mechanism that may underlie dendritic spine loss in schizophrenia. The increase in pMLC seen in ACC may be associated with dendritic spine shrinkage. The lack of an effect on pMLC in DLPFC suggests that in schizophrenia PAK1 downstream pathways are differentially affected in these cortical areas. PMID:22458949

  13. Human P301L-Mutant Tau Expression in Mouse Entorhinal-Hippocampal Network Causes Tau Aggregation and Presynaptic Pathology but No Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Julie A.; Koyama, Akihiko; Maeda, Sumihiro; Ho, Kaitlyn; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B.; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest pathological hallmarks in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It can occur before significant Aβ deposition and appears to “spread” into anatomically connected brain regions. To determine whether this early-stage pathology is sufficient to cause disease progression and cognitive decline in experimental models, we overexpressed mutant human tau (hTauP301L) predominantly in layer II/III neurons of the mouse EC. Cognitive functions remained normal in mice at 4, 8, 12 and 16 months of age, despite early and extensive tau accumulation in the EC. Perforant path (PP) axon terminals within the dentate gyrus (DG) contained abnormal conformations of tau even in young EC-hTau mice, and phosphorylated tau increased with age in both the EC and PP. In old mice, ultrastructural alterations in presynaptic terminals were observed at PP-to-granule cell synapses. Phosphorylated tau was more abundant in presynaptic than postsynaptic elements. Human and pathological tau was also detected within hippocampal neurons of this mouse model. Thus, hTauP301L accumulation predominantly in the EC and related presynaptic pathology in hippocampal circuits was not sufficient to cause robust cognitive deficits within the age range analyzed here. PMID:23029293

  14. Small Molecule p75NTR Ligands Reduce Pathological Phosphorylation and Misfolding of Tau, Inflammatory Changes, Cholinergic Degeneration, and Cognitive Deficits in AβPPL/S Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V.; Shen, Lin; Griend, Lilith Vander; Quach, Lisa N.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Saw, Nay; Yang, Tao; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR ) is involved in degenerative mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, p75NTR levels are increased in AD and the receptor is expressed by neurons that are particularly vulnerable in the disease. Therefore, modulating p75NTR function may be a significant disease-modifying treatment approach. Prior studies indicated that the non-peptide, small molecule p75NTR ligands LM11A-31, and chemically unrelated LM11A-24, could block amyloid-β-induced deleterious signaling and neurodegeneration in vitro, and LM11A-31 was found to mitigate neuritic degeneration and behavioral deficits in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we determined whether these in vivo findings represent class effects of p75NTR ligands by examining LM11A-24 effects. In addition, the range of compound effects was further examined by evaluating tau pathology and neuroinflammation. Following oral administration, both ligands reached brain concentrations known to provide neuroprotection in vitro. Compound induction of p75NTR cleavage provided evidence for CNS target engagement. LM11A-31 and LM11A-24 reduced excessive phosphorylation of tau, and LM11A-31 also inhibited its aberrant folding. Both ligands decreased activation of microglia, while LM11A-31 attenuated reactive astrocytes. Along with decreased inflammatory responses, both ligands reduced cholinergic neurite degeneration. In addition to the amelioration of neuropathology in AD model mice, LM11A-31, but not LM11A-24, prevented impairments in water maze performance, while both ligands prevented deficits in fear conditioning. These findings support a role for p75NTR ligands in preventing fundamental tau-related pathologic mechanisms in AD, and further validate the development of these small molecules as a new class of therapeutic compounds. PMID:24898660

  15. Discovery of a highly selective glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor (PF-04802367) that modulates tau phosphorylation in brain: Translation for PET neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Normandin, Marc D.; Chang, Jeanne S.; Chang, George C.; Taylor, Christine K.; Trapa, Patrick; Plummer, Mark S.; Para, Kimberly S.; Conn, Edward L.; Lopresti-Morrow, Lori; Lanyon, Lorraine F.; Cook, James M.; Richter, Karl E. G.; Nolan, Charlie E.; Schachter, Joel B.; Janat, Fouad; Che, Ye; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Lefker, Bruce A.; Enerson, Bradley E.; Livni, Elijahu; Wang, Lu; Guehl, Nicolas; Patnaik, Debasis; Wagner, Florence F.; Perlis, Roy; Holson, Edward B.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) regulates multiple cellular processes in diabetes, oncology and neurology. We have identified N-(3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)-5-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)oxazole-4-carboxamide (PF-04802367 or PF-367) as a highly potent inhibitor, which is among the most selective antagonists of GSK-3 to date. We demonstrated its efficacy in modulation of tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Whereas the kinetics of PF-367 binding in brain tissues are too fast for an effective therapeutic agent, the pharmacokinetic profile of PF-367 is ideal for discovery of radiopharmaceuticals for GSK-3 in the central nervous system. A 11C-isotopologue of PF-367 was synthesized and preliminary PET imaging studies in non-human primates confirmed that we have overcome the two major obstacles for imaging GSK-3, namely, reasonable brain permeability and displaceable binding. PMID:27355874

  16. Rosiglitazone ameliorates diffuse axonal injury by reducing loss of tau and up-regulating caveolin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong-lin; Song, Jin-ning; Ma, Xu-dong; Zhang, Bin-fei; Li, Dan-dong; Pang, Hong-gang

    2016-01-01

    Rosiglitazone up-regulates caveolin-1 levels and has neuroprotective effects in both chronic and acute brain injury. Therefore, we postulated that rosiglitazone may ameliorate diffuse axonal injury via its ability to up-regulate caveolin-1, inhibit expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein, and reduce the loss and abnormal phosphorylation of tau. In the present study, intraperitoneal injection of rosiglitazone significantly reduced the levels of amyloid-beta precursor protein and hyperphosphorylated tau (phosphorylated at Ser404(p-tau (S404)), and it increased the expression of total tau and caveolin-1 in the rat cortex. Our results show that rosiglitazone inhibits the expression of amyloid-beta precursor protein and lowers p-tau (S404) levels, and it reduces the loss of total tau, possibly by up-regulating caveolin-1. These actions of rosiglitazone may underlie its neuroprotective effects in the treatment of diffuse axonal injury. PMID:27482223

  17. Highly potent and specific GSK-3beta inhibitors that block tau phosphorylation and decrease alpha-synuclein protein expression in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Gaisina, Irina N; Petukhov, Pavel A; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; King, LaShaunda T; Blond, Sylvie Y; Duka, Tetyana; Rusnak, Milan; Sidhu, Anita

    2006-02-01

    Research by Klein and co-workers suggests that the inhibition of GSK-3beta by small molecules may offer an important strategy in the treatment of a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and bipolar disorders. Based on results from kinase-screening assays that identified a staurosporine analogue as a modest inhibitor of GSK-3beta, a series of 3-indolyl-4-indazolylmaleimides was prepared for study in both enzymatic and cell-based assays. Most strikingly, whereas we identified ligands having poor to high potency for GSK-3beta inhibition, only ligands with a Ki value of less than 8 nM, namely maleimides 18 and 22, were found to inhibit Tau phosphorylation at a GSK-3beta-specific site (Ser 396/404). Accordingly, maleimides 18 and 22 may protect neuronal cells against cell death by decreasing the level of alpha-Syn protein expression. We conclude that the GSK-3beta inhibitors described herein offer promise in defending cells against MPP+-induced neurotoxicity and that such compounds will be valuable to explore in animal models of Parkinson's disease as well as in other Tau-related neurodegenerative disease states.

  18. Dysregulation of Protein Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation in Alzheimer's Disease: A Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2006-01-01

    Studies during the last two decades have provided new insights into the molecular mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the milestone findings in AD research was the demonstration that neurofibrillary degeneration characterized by tau pathology is central to the pathogenesis of AD and other tauopathies and that abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau is pivotal to neurofibrillary degeneration. This article reviews the recent research advances in tau pathology and the underlying dysregulation of the protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system. An updated model of the mechanism of neurofibrillary degeneration is also presented, and a promising therapeutic target to treat AD by correcting dysregulation of protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is discussed. PMID:17047304

  19. Tau as a Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Krishnamurthy, Pavan K.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are primarily composed of aggregates of hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein tau. It is likely that an imbalance of kinase and phosphatase activities leads to the abnormal phosphorylation of tau and subsequent aggregation. The wide ranging therapeutic approaches that are being developed include to inhibit tau kinases, to enhance phosphatase activity, to promote microtubule stability, and to reduce tau aggregate formation and/or enhance their clearance with small molecule drugs or by immunotherapeutic means. Most of these promising approaches are still in preclinical development whilst some have progressed to Phase II clinical trials. By pursuing these lines of study, a viable therapy for AD and related tauopathies may be obtained. PMID:21679154

  20. Tau physics and tau factories

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Substantial progress in tau lepton physics requires larger and cleaner samples of /tau/'s produced in e/sup +/e/sup minus/ ..-->.. /tau//sup +//tau//sup minus/. Single-tagging of the /tau/ pair is crucial. Possibilities for such progress at particle factories are discussed with emphasis on the Tau-Charm Factory concept. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  2. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J.; Crary, John F.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M.; Ironside, James W.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Munoz, David G.; Murray, Melissa E.; Nelson, Peter T.; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N.; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A.; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J.; Mann, David M.; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C.; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J.; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B.; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D.; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A.; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B.; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C.; Vinters, Harry V.; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B.; White, Charles L.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M.; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  3. Abnormal phosphoinositide metabolism and protein phosphorylation in platelets from a patient with the grey platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rendu, F; Marche, P; Hovig, T; Maclouf, J; Lebret, M; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S; Caen, J P

    1987-10-01

    Washed platelets isolated from one patient suffering from the inherited grey platelet syndrome were studied during thrombin-induced activation. The agonist-induced changes in (i) morphology, (ii) typical functional cell responses, (iii) membrane phospholipid metabolism and protein phosphorylation were studied and compared with the changes obtained with normal platelets. The morphology of the platelets as visualized by electron microscopy confirmed the almost total absence of intracellular alpha-granules and marked vacuolization. During thrombin stimulation the morphological changes were clearly delayed as compared to normal platelets, the granule centralization and aggregation occurred only 15 s after thrombin addition instead of 5 s in normal platelets. After 15 s, however, even though no alpha-granules were observed, a ring-like structure occurred centrally, indicating that they are not a prerequisite for this reaction. The whole release reaction, i.e. liberation of [14C]serotonin from dense granules and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity from lysosomes, and the thromboxane synthesis were delayed and remained lower than in normal platelets. No thrombin-induced phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphate breakdown was measurable on 32P-prelabelled platelets although [32P]phosphatidate formation occurred normally. Phosphorylation time courses of myosin light chain (P20) and of protein P43 (mol wt 43,000) markedly differed from those of controls, being less than half of the normal during the first 15 s and remaining subnormal even after complete aggregation. These results suggest that in platelets devoid of alpha-granules a deficient transmembrane signalling system is likely responsible for the impaired physiological responses.

  4. Triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice exhibit region-specific abnormalities in brain myelination patterns prior to appearance of amyloid and tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Maya K.; Sudol, Kelly L.; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Frazer, Maria E.; Bowers, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressively debilitating brain disorder pathologically defined by extracellular amyloid plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic disintegrity. AD has not been widely considered a disease of white matter, but more recent evidence suggests the existence of abnormalities in myelination patterns and myelin attrition in AD-afflicted human brains. Herein, we demonstrate that triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice, which harbor the human amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutant transgene, presenilin knock-in mutation, and tau P301L mutant transgene, exhibit significant region-specific alterations in myelination patterns and in oligodendrocyte marker expression profiles at time points preceding the appearance of amyloid and tau pathology. These immunohistochemical signatures are coincident with age-related alterations in axonal and myelin sheath ultrastructure as visualized by comparative electron microscopic examination of 3xTg-AD and non-transgenic mouse brain tissue. Overall, these findings indicate 3xTg-AD mice represent a viable model in which to examine mechanisms underlying AD-related myelination and neural transmission defects that occur early during pre-symptomatic stages of the disease process. PMID:18661556

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid tau and amyloid-β1-42 in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Skillbäck, Tobias; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Rosén, Christoffer; Mattsson, Niklas; Nägga, Katarina; Kilander, Lena; Religa, Dorota; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Schott, Jonathan M; Blennow, Kaj; Eriksdotter, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia groups 53%, 34%, 67% and 53% of the subjects, respectively had abnormal amyloid-β1-42 levels, 41%, 41%, 28% and 28% had abnormal total tau levels, and 29%, 28%, 25% and 19% had abnormal phosphorylated tau levels. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers were strongly associated with specific clinical dementia diagnoses with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia showing the greatest difference in biomarker levels. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42, total tau, phosphorylated tau and the amyloid-β1-42:phosphorylated tau ratio all correlated with poor cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease, as did cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 in Parkinson's disease dementia and vascular dementia. The results support the use of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers to differentiate between dementias in clinical practice, and to estimate disease severity.

  6. Pioglitazone prevents tau oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tadanori; Shirafuji, Norimichi; Makino, Chiemi; Yen, Shu-Hui; Kanaan, Nicholas M; Ueno, Asako; Suzuki, Jinya; Ikawa, Masamichi; Matsunaga, Akiko; Yamamura, Osamu; Kuriyama, Masaru; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-09-23

    Tau aggregation and amyloid β protein (Aβ) deposition are the main causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation modulates Aβ production. To test whether the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) is also effective in preventing tau aggregation in AD, we used a cellular model in which wild-type tau protein (4R0N) is overexpressed (M1C cells) (Hamano et al., 2012) as well as primary neuronal cultures. PIO reduced both phosphorylated and total tau levels, and inactivated glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a major tau kinase, associated with activation of Akt. In addition, PIO decreased cleaved caspase3 and C-terminal truncated tau species by caspase, which is expected to decrease tau aggregation. A fractionation study showed that PIO reduced high molecular-weight (120 kDa), oligomeric tau species in Tris Insoluble, sarkosyl-soluble fractions. Tau decrease was reversed by adding GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Together, our current results support the idea that PPARγ agonists may be useful therapeutic agents for AD.

  7. O-GlcNAcylation modulates the self-aggregation ability of the fourth microtubule-binding repeat of tau

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.-H.; Si Tong; Wu Weihui; Hu Jia; Du Jintang; Zhao Yufen; Li Yanmei

    2008-10-10

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), tau protein is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into paired helical filaments (PHFs). It was discovered recently that tau is also O-GlcNAcylated in human brains. And O-GlcNAcylation may regulate phosphorylation of tau in a site-specific manner. In this work, we focused on the fourth microtubule-binding repeat (R4) of tau, which has an O-GlcNAcylation site-Ser356. The aggregation behavior of this repeat and its O-GlcNAcylated form was investigated by turbidity, precipitation assay and electron microscopy. In addition, conformations of these two peptides were analyzed with circular dichroism (CD). Our results revealed that O-GlcNAcylation at Ser356 could greatly slow down the aggregation speed of R4 peptide. This modulation of O-GlcNAcylation on tau aggregation implies a new perspective of tau pathology.

  8. Olfactory Dysfunctions and Decreased Nitric Oxide Production in the Brain of Human P301L Tau Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Ding, Wenting; Zhu, Xiaonan; Chen, Ruzhu; Wang, Xuelan

    2016-04-01

    Different patterns of olfactory dysfunction have been found in both patients and mouse models of Alzheimer's Disease. However, the underlying mechanism of the dysfunction remained unknown. Deficits of nitric oxide production in brain can cause olfactory dysfunction by preventing the formation of olfactory memory. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavioral changes in olfaction and alterations in metabolites of nitric oxide, nitrate/nitrite concentration, in the brain of human P301L tau transgenic mice. The tau mice showed impairments in olfaction and increased abnormal phosphorylation of Tau protein at AT8 in different brain areas, especially in olfactory bulb. We now report that these olfactory deficits and Tau pathological changes were accompanied by decreased nitrate/nitrite concentration in the brain, especially in the olfactory bulb, and reduced expression of nNOS in the brain of tau mice. These findings provided evidence of olfactory dysfunctions correlated with decreased nitric oxide production in the brain of tau mice.

  9. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  10. Altered protein phosphatase 2A methylation and Tau phosphorylation in the young and aged brain of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Jean-Marie; Wasek, Brandi; Taleski, Goce; Smith, Josephine; Arning, Erland; Sontag, Estelle; Bottiglieri, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Common functional polymorphisms in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, a key enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, influence risk for a variety of complex disorders, including developmental, vascular, and neurological diseases. MTHFR deficiency is associated with elevation of homocysteine levels and alterations in the methylation cycle. Here, using young and aged Mthfr knockout mouse models, we show that mild MTHFR deficiency can lead to brain-region specific impairment of the methylation of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Relative to wild-type controls, decreased expression levels of PP2A and leucine carboxyl methyltransferase (LCMT1) were primarily observed in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and to a lesser extent in the cortex of young null Mthfr−/− and aged heterozygous Mthfr+/− mice. A marked down regulation of LCMT1 correlated with the loss of PP2A/Bα holoenzymes. Dietary folate deficiency significantly decreased LCMT1, methylated PP2A and PP2A/Bα levels in all brain regions examined from aged Mthfr+/+ mice, and further exacerbated the regional effects of MTHFR deficiency in aged Mthfr+/− mice. In turn, the down regulation of PP2A/Bα was associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Tau, a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our findings identify hypomethylation of PP2A enzymes, which are major CNS phosphatases, as a novel mechanism by which MTHFR deficiency and Mthfr gene-diet interactions could lead to disruption of neuronal homeostasis, and increase the risk for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including age-related diseases like sporadic AD. PMID:25202269

  11. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  12. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation.

  13. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  14. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko; Ochi, Takafumi

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvement of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.

  15. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal region of phosphorylated tau (residues 68-71) improves spatial memory in okadaic acid induced tauopathy model rats.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sarada; Savanur, Ganesh; Madhavadas, Sowmya

    2017-01-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia, characterized by progressive loss of memory and other cognitive functions. The cognitive impairment in patients with AD is closely associated with loss of synapses and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) containing hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus. Effective treatment for AD is still not available. In this study, the sequence comprising of residues 50-71 in the N-terminal region of tau, containing theoretically predicted B- and T-cell epitopes in close proximity to pathologically relevant phospho-serine (residue 68) and phospho-threonine (residues 69, 71) was selected as a potential immunotherapeutic peptide. This 22-residue long phospho-peptide ((50)TPTEDGSEEPGSETSDAKpSpTPpT(71)) was custom synthesized and its therapeutic potential was tested in experimental rats. For this purpose, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were intranasally treated with okadaic acid (OA), a selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase PP2A. Within a day of OA administration, these rats showed marked impairment in cognitive functions with a significant increase in p-tau/t-tau ratio in the hippocampal homogenates. Passive immunization studies conducted in these OA treated rats with polyclonal anti-phospho-peptide antibodies resulted in a significant improvement in learning and memory functions in Barne's maze task. Further, p-tau levels in the hippocampal homogenates were reduced. In addition, these antibodies effectively prevented the aggregation of recombinant tau in vitro. These results demonstrate that targeting N-terminal region of tau harbouring the phospho-residue cluster 68-71 would be beneficial and may present an effective therapeutic opportunity for AD and other tauopathies.

  16. The BET-Bromodomain Inhibitor JQ1 Reduces Inflammation and Tau Phosphorylation at Ser396 in the Brain of the 3xTg Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magistri, Marco; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Makhmutova, Madina; Patel, Prutha; Sartor, Gregory C.; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Wahlestedt, Claes; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by well-defined neuropathological brain changes including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and the presence of chronic neuroinflammation. Objective: The brain penetrant BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 has been shown to regulate inflammation responses in vitro and in vivo, but its therapeutic potential in AD is currently unknown. Method: Three-month-old 3xTg mice were injected once a day with JQ1 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle for 15 weeks. At the end of the treatment learning and memory was assessed using the modified Barnes maze and the Y maze behavioral tests. Tissue from the brain and other organs was collected for molecular evaluation of neuroinflammation tau pathology and amyloid β. 
Results: JQ1 treatment reduced splenomegaly and neuroinflammation in the brain of treated mice where we observed a reduction in the expression of the pro-inflammatory modulators Il-1b, Il-6, Tnfa, Ccl2, Nos2 and Ptgs2. Additionally, JQ1-treated mice showed a reduction of tau phosphorylation at Ser396 in the hippocampus and frontal cortex while total levels of tau remained unaffected. On the other hand, JQ1 did not ameliorate learning and memory deficits in 7-month-old 3xTg mice. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggest that BET bromodomain inhibitors hold the promise to be used for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by neuroinflammation. PMID:27117003

  17. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ.

  18. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  19. Tau Structures

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesus; Jiménez, Juan S.; Sayas, Carmen L.; Bolós, Marta; Zabala, Juan C.; Rivas, Germán; Hernández, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in axonal stabilization, neuronal development, and neuronal polarity. In this review, we focus on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary tau structures. We describe the structure of tau from its specific residues until its conformation in dimers, oligomers, and larger polymers in physiological and pathological situations. PMID:27877124

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) mediates tau protein dyshomeostasis: implication for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhi; Bereczki, Erika; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Shan; Li, Chunxia; Ji, Xinying; Branca, Rui M; Lehtiö, Janne; Guan, Zhizhong; Filipcik, Peter; Xu, Shaohua; Winblad, Bengt; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2013-05-31

    Previous evidence from post-mortem Alzheimer disease (AD) brains and drug (especially rapamycin)-oriented in vitro and in vivo models implicated an aberrant accumulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) in tangle-bearing neurons in AD brains and its role in the formation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. Compelling evidence indicated that the sequential molecular events such as the synthesis and phosphorylation of tau can be regulated through p70 S6 kinase, the well characterized immediate downstream target of mTor. In the present study, we further identified that the active form of mTor per se accumulates in tangle-bearing neurons, particularly those at early stages in AD brains. By using mass spectrometry and Western blotting, we identified three phosphoepitopes of tau directly phosphorylated by mTor. We have developed a variety of stable cell lines with genetic modification of mTor activity using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as background. In these cellular systems, we not only confirmed the tau phosphorylation sites found in vitro but also found that mTor mediates the synthesis and aggregation of tau, resulting in compromised microtubule stability. Changes of mTor activity cause fluctuation of the level of a battery of tau kinases such as protein kinase A, v-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, and tau protein phosphatase 2A. These results implicate mTor in promoting an imbalance of tau homeostasis, a condition required for neurons to maintain physiological function.

  1. AlphaScreen HTS and live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays for identification of Tau-Fyn SH3 interaction inhibitors for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J Nicholas; Diggs, Pauleatha V; Nebane, N Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Maddry, Joseph A; Suto, Mark J; Roberson, Erik D

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, and with Americans' increasing longevity, it is becoming an epidemic. There are currently no effective treatments for this disorder. Abnormalities of Tau track more closely with cognitive decline than the most studied therapeutic target in AD, amyloid-β, but the optimal strategy for targeting Tau has not yet been identified. On the basis of considerable preclinical data from AD models, we hypothesize that interactions between Tau and the Src-family tyrosine kinase, Fyn, are pathogenic in AD. Genetically reducing either Tau or Fyn is protective in AD mouse models, and a dominant negative fragment of Tau that alters Fyn localization is also protective. Here, we describe a new AlphaScreen assay and a live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using a novel BRET pair for quantifying the Tau-Fyn interaction. We used these assays to map the binding site on Tau for Fyn to the fifth and sixth PXXP motifs to show that AD-associated phosphorylation at microtubule affinity regulating kinase sites increases the affinity of the Tau-Fyn interaction and to identify Tau-Fyn interaction inhibitors by high-throughput screening. This screen has identified a variety of chemically tractable hits, suggesting that the Tau-Fyn interaction may represent a good drug target for AD.

  2. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Lysine Posttranslational Modifications of Tau Protein from Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stefani N; Yang, Austin J

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have greatly facilitated the robust identification and quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including those that are present at substoichiometric site occupancies. The abnormal posttranslational modification and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it is thought that the primary mode of regulation of tau occurs through PTMs. Several studies have been published regarding tau phosphorylation; however, other tau PTMs such as ubiquitylation, acetylation, methylation, oxidation, sumoylation, nitration, and glycosylation have not been analyzed as extensively. The comprehensive detection and delineation of these PTMs is critical for drug target discovery and validation. Lysine-directed PTMs including ubiquitylation, acetylation, and methylation play key regulatory roles with respect to the rates of tau turnover and aggregation. MS-based analytical approaches have been used to gain insight into the tau lysine-directed PTM signature that is most closely associated with neurofibrillary lesion formation. This chapter provides details pertaining to the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based analysis of the lysine-directed posttranslational modification of tau.

  3. Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Tauopathies, and Possible Neuroprotective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R

    2016-01-06

    Abnormal deposition of misprocessed and aggregated proteins is a common final pathway of most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by the extraneuronal deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) protein in the form of plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in the form of filaments. Based on the biochemically diverse range of pathological tau proteins, a number of approaches have been proposed to develop new potential therapeutics. Here we discuss some of the most promising ones: inhibition of tau phosphorylation, proteolysis and aggregation, promotion of intra- and extracellular tau clearance, and stabilization of microtubules. We also emphasize the need to achieve a full understanding of the biological roles and post-translational modifications of normal tau, as well as the molecular events responsible for selective neuronal vulnerability to tau pathology and its propagation. It is concluded that answering key questions on the relationship between Aβ and tau pathology should lead to a better understanding of the nature of secondary tauopathies, especially AD, and open new therapeutic targets and strategies.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Lysine Posttranslational Modifications of Tau Protein from Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Yang, Austin J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have greatly facilitated the robust identification and quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including those that are present at substoichiometric site occupancies. The abnormal posttranslational modification and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and it is thought that the primary mode of regulation of tau occurs through PTMs. Several studies have been published regarding tau phosphorylation; however, other tau PTMs such as ubiquitylation, acetylation, methylation, oxidation, sumoylation, nitration, and glycosylation have not been analyzed as extensively. The comprehensive detection and delineation of these PTMs is critical for drug target discovery and validation. Lysine-directed PTMs including ubiquitylation, acetylation, and methylation play key regulatory roles with respect to the rates of tau turnover and aggregation. MS-based analytical approaches have been used to gain insight into the tau lysine-directed PTM signature that is most closely associated with neurofibrillary lesion formation. This chapter provides details pertaining to the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based analysis of the lysine-directed posttranslational modification of tau. PMID:27975250

  5. Does neuroinflammation drive the relationship between tau hyperphosphorylation and dementia development following traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Corrigan, Frances

    2017-02-01

    A history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is linked to an increased risk for the later development of dementia. This encompasses a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), with AD linked to history of moderate-severe TBI and CTE to a history of repeated concussion. Of note, both AD and CTE are characterized by the abnormal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, which are thought to play an important role in the development of neurodegeneration. Hyperphosphorylation of tau leads to destabilization of microtubules, interrupting axonal transport, whilst tau aggregates are associated with synaptic dysfunction. The exact mechanisms via which TBI may promote the later tauopathy and its role in the later development of dementia are yet to be fully determined. Following TBI, it is proposed that axonal injury may provide the initial perturbation of tau, by promoting its dissociation from microtubules, facilitating its phosphorylation and aggregation. Altered tau dynamics may then be exacerbated by the chronic persistent inflammatory response that has been shown to persist for decades following the initial impact. Importantly, immune activation has been shown to play a role in accelerating disease progression in other tauopathies, with pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IL-1β, shown to activate kinases that promote tau hyperphosphorylation. Thus, targeting the inflammatory response in the sub-acute phase following TBI may represent a promising target to halt the alterations in tau dynamics that may precede overt neurodegeneration and later development of dementia.

  6. Truncation and activation of GSK-3β by calpain I: a molecular mechanism links to tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Yu, Dian; Cao, Maohong; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau is pivotally involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is a primary tau kinase that is most implicated in tau pathology in AD. However, the exact molecular nature of GSK-3β involved in AD is unclear. In the present study, we found that GSK-3β was truncated at C-terminus and correlated with over-activation of calpain I in AD brain. Truncation of GSK-3β was positively correlated with tau hyperphosphorylation, tangles score and Braak stage in human brain. Calpain I proteolyzed GSK-3β in vitro at C-terminus, leading to an increase of its kinase activity, but keeping its characteristic to preferentially phosphorylate the protein kinase A-primed tau. Excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid (KA) caused GSK-3β truncation at C-terminus and hyperphosphorylation of tau in mouse brain. Inhibition of calpain prevented the KA-induced changes. These findings suggest that truncation of GSK-3β by Ca2+/calpain I markedly increases its activity and involvement of this mechanism probably is responsible for up-regulation of GSK-3β and consequent abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofibrillary degeneration in AD. PMID:25641096

  7. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation.

  8. A novel tubulin-dependent protein kinase forming a paired helical filament epitope on tau.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, K; Ihara, Y; Uchida, T; Imahori, K

    1988-09-01

    From rat brain microtubule proteins, we purified a protein kinase that phosphorylated tau, one of microtubule-associated proteins. The electrophoretic mobility of the phosphorylated tau on SDS-polyacrylamide gel decreased. The enzyme was not activated by cyclic nucleotides, calmodulin, or phospholipids, and was inhibited by the calcium ions. The kinase bound to tau. The phosphorylation of tau was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation. From these results we propose an idea that the phosphorylation could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Human tau phosphorylated by the kinase carried an epitope of the paired helical filaments that accumulate in the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Spatially pathogenic forms of tau detected in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Larionov, Sergey; Wielgat, Przemyslaw; Wang, Yiner; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Neumann, Harald

    2010-09-30

    In tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD) tau molecules have lost their normal spatial distance to each other and appear in oligomeric or aggregated forms. Conventional immunostaining methods allow detection of abnormally phosphorylated or conformationally altered aggregated tau proteins, but fail to visualize oligomeric forms of tau. Here we show that tau molecules that lost their normal spatial localization can be detected on a subcellular level in postmortem central nervous system (CNS) tissue sections of AD patients by fluorescence lifetime-based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Paraffin sections were co-immunostained with two tau-specific monoclonal antibodies recognizing the same epitope, but labeled with distinct fluorescence dyes suitable for spatial resolution at a nanometer scale by lifetime-based FRET. A FRET signal was detected in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of CNS tissue sections of AD patients, showing associated tau proteins typically reflecting either fibrillary, oligomeric or aggregated tau. The 'pretangle-like' structures within the neuronal perikarya did not contain spatially pathogenic forms of tau accordingly to this method. Data demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime-based FRET can be applied to human brain tissue sections to detect pathogenic forms of tau molecules that lost their normal spatial distance.

  10. Missense point mutations of tau to segregate with FTDP-17 exhibit site-specific effects on microtubule structure in COS cells: a novel action of R406W mutation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, N; Tomiyama, T; Mori, H

    2000-05-01

    Missense and splicing point mutations have been found in the tau gene in families with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Of these mutations, we examined four exonic missense point mutations (G272V, P301L, V337M and R406W) in 3-repeat or 4-repeat tau isoform on the transfection experiment. The effects of two mutations (G272V or P301L) on microtubules were subtle whereas those of two other mutations (V337M or R406W) were dramatically significant when these two mutations were constructed into 3-repeat tau but not into 4-repeat tau. The R406W mutation induced an alternation of microtubules to form dotted or fragmented forms retaining colocalization of tau with tubulin whereas the V337M mutation predominantly disrupted microtubule networks and diminished colocalization of tau and tubulin. The effect of the mutations on microtubules were thus site-dependent and isoform-dependent. Tau with R406W mutation was found to be colocalized with tubulin without filamentous structures on confocal views, suggesting that the carboxyl region of tau played a different role from tubulin-binding domain on microtubule assemble. Another abnormal property was identified in tau with R406W mutation that failed to suffer phosphorylation. Thus, diverse effects of tau mutations on microtubules may explain the various clinicopathologies of FTDP-17 and related tauopathies.

  11. Clioquinol rescues Parkinsonism and dementia phenotypes of the tau knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Lei, Peng; Ayton, Scott; Appukuttan, Ambili Thoppuvalappil; Volitakis, Irene; Adlard, Paul A; Finkelstein, David I; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-09-01

    Iron accumulation and tau protein deposition are pathological features of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's diseases (PD). Soluble tau protein is lower in affected regions of these diseases, and we previously reported that tau knockout mice display motor and cognitive behavioral abnormities, brain atrophy, neuronal death in substantia nigra, and iron accumulation in the brain that all emerged between 6 and 12 months of age. This argues for a loss of tau function in AD and PD. We also showed that treatment with the moderate iron chelator, clioquinol (CQ) restored iron levels and prevented neuronal atrophy and attendant behavioral decline in 12-month old tau KO mice when commenced prior to the onset of deterioration (6 months). However, therapies for AD and PD will need to treat the disease once it is already manifest. So, in the current study, we tested whether CQ could also rescue the phenotype of mice with a developed phenotype. We found that 5-month treatment of symptomatic (13 months old) tau KO mice with CQ increased nigral tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation (which induces activity) and reversed the motor deficits. Treatment also reversed cognitive deficits and raised BDNF levels in the hippocampus, which was accompanied by attenuated brain atrophy, and reduced iron content in the brain. These data raise the possibility that lowering brain iron levels in symptomatic patients could reverse neuronal atrophy and improve brain function, possibly by elevating neurotrophins.

  12. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies.

  13. Role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Jia, Hengchuan; She, Xiaojun; Cui, Bo; Zhang, Na; Chen, Xuewei; Xu, Chuanxiang; An, Gaihong; Ma, Qiang

    2014-05-15

    Chronic noise exposure has been associated with abnormalities in glutamate (Glu)-NMDAR signaling and tau hyperphosphorylation. However, further studies are necessary to clarify potential causal relationships. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups in the present study: control with isotonic saline instillation (n=10); noise exposure (100 dB SPL white noise, 4h/d × 14d) and treated with saline (n=10); and noise exposure and treated with MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally; n=10). The levels of tau phosphorylated at Ser202 and Ser396, and proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after the last noise exposure. We showed that phosphorylated tau levels were enhanced in noise-exposed-rat hippocampus and PFC. MK-801 decreased the hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser202 and Ser396 sites in the hippocampus and PFC. Furthermore, MK-801 reversed noise-induced GSK3β overexpression but had no significant effect on PP2A levels. This suggests that MK-801 protects against chronic-noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC. These findings demonstrate that Glu-NMDAR signaling may be involved in triggering aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC after chronic noise exposure.

  14. Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Tauopathies, and Possible Neuroprotective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal deposition of misprocessed and aggregated proteins is a common final pathway of most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is characterized by the extraneuronal deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) protein in the form of plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in the form of filaments. Based on the biochemically diverse range of pathological tau proteins, a number of approaches have been proposed to develop new potential therapeutics. Here we discuss some of the most promising ones: inhibition of tau phosphorylation, proteolysis and aggregation, promotion of intra- and extracellular tau clearance, and stabilization of microtubules. We also emphasize the need to achieve a full understanding of the biological roles and post-translational modifications of normal tau, as well as the molecular events responsible for selective neuronal vulnerability to tau pathology and its propagation. It is concluded that answering key questions on the relationship between Aβ and tau pathology should lead to a better understanding of the nature of secondary tauopathies, especially AD, and open new therapeutic targets and strategies. PMID:26751493

  15. Persistence of histone H2AX phosphorylation after meiotic chromosome synapsis and abnormal centromere cohesion in Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp-1) null oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feikun; Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the impact of aneuploidy on human health little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of structural or numerical chromosome abnormalities during meiosis. Here, we provide novel evidence indicating that lack of PARP-1 function during oogenesis predisposes the female gamete to genome instability. During prophase I of meiosis, a high proportion of Parp-1 (−/−) mouse oocytes exhibit a spectrum of meiotic defects including incomplete homologous chromosome synapsis or persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation in fully synapsed chromosomes at the late pachytene stage. Moreover, the X chromosome bivalent is also prone to exhibit persistent double strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In striking contrast, such defects were not detected in mutant pachytene spermatocytes. In fully-grown wild type oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage, PARP-1 protein associates with nuclear speckles and upon meiotic resumption, undergoes a striking re-localization towards spindle poles as well as pericentric heterochromatin domains at the metaphase II stage. Notably, a high proportion of in vivo matured Parp-1 (−/−) oocytes show lack of recruitment of the kinetochore-associated protein BUB3 to centromeric domains and fail to maintain metaphase II arrest. Defects in chromatin modifications in the form of persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation during prophase I of meiosis and deficient sister chromatid cohesion during metaphase II predispose mutant oocytes to premature anaphase II onset upon removal from the oviductal environment. Our results indicate that PARP-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of chromosome stability at key stages of meiosis in the female germ line. Moreover, in the metaphase II stage oocyte PARP-1 is required for the regulation of centromere structure and function through a mechanism that involves the recruitment of BUB3 protein to centromeric domains. PMID:19463809

  16. The role of tau in the pathological process and clinical expression of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vuono, Romina; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; de Silva, Rohan; Cisbani, Giulia; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Spillantini, Maria G.; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of the huntingtin gene HTT. While several genetic modifiers, distinct from the Huntington’s disease locus itself, have been identified as being linked to the clinical expression and progression of Huntington’s disease, the exact molecular mechanisms driving its pathogenic cascade and clinical features, especially the dementia, are not fully understood. Recently the microtubule associated protein tau, MAPT, which is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, has been implicated in Huntington’s disease. We explored this association in more detail at the neuropathological, genetic and clinical level. We first investigated tau pathology by looking for the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, co-localization of tau with mutant HTT and its oligomeric intermediates in post-mortem brain samples from patients with Huntington’s disease (n = 16) compared to cases with a known tauopathy and healthy controls. Next, we undertook a genotype–phenotype analysis of a large cohort of patients with Huntington’s disease (n = 960) with a particular focus on cognitive decline. We report not only on the tau pathology in the Huntington’s disease brain but also the association between genetic variation in tau gene and the clinical expression and progression of the disease. We found extensive pathological inclusions containing abnormally phosphorylated tau protein that co-localized in some instances with mutant HTT. We confirmed this related to the disease process rather than age, by showing it is also present in two patients with young-onset Huntington’s disease (26 and 40 years old at death). In addition we demonstrate that tau oligomers (suggested to be the most likely neurotoxic tau entity) are present in the Huntington’s disease brains. Finally we highlight the clinical significance of this pathology by demonstrating that the MAPT

  17. The role of tau in the pathological process and clinical expression of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Vuono, Romina; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; de Silva, Rohan; Cisbani, Giulia; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Spillantini, Maria G; Cicchetti, Francesca; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of the huntingtin gene HTT. While several genetic modifiers, distinct from the Huntington's disease locus itself, have been identified as being linked to the clinical expression and progression of Huntington's disease, the exact molecular mechanisms driving its pathogenic cascade and clinical features, especially the dementia, are not fully understood. Recently the microtubule associated protein tau, MAPT, which is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, has been implicated in Huntington's disease. We explored this association in more detail at the neuropathological, genetic and clinical level. We first investigated tau pathology by looking for the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, co-localization of tau with mutant HTT and its oligomeric intermediates in post-mortem brain samples from patients with Huntington's disease (n = 16) compared to cases with a known tauopathy and healthy controls. Next, we undertook a genotype-phenotype analysis of a large cohort of patients with Huntington's disease (n = 960) with a particular focus on cognitive decline. We report not only on the tau pathology in the Huntington's disease brain but also the association between genetic variation in tau gene and the clinical expression and progression of the disease. We found extensive pathological inclusions containing abnormally phosphorylated tau protein that co-localized in some instances with mutant HTT. We confirmed this related to the disease process rather than age, by showing it is also present in two patients with young-onset Huntington's disease (26 and 40 years old at death). In addition we demonstrate that tau oligomers (suggested to be the most likely neurotoxic tau entity) are present in the Huntington's disease brains. Finally we highlight the clinical significance of this pathology by demonstrating that the MAPT haplotypes affect the rate

  18. NMR Meets Tau: Insights into Its Function and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Smet, Caroline; Huvent, Isabelle; Gandhi, Neha S.; Gigant, Benoît; Despres, Clément; Qi, Haoling; Lopez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focus on what we have learned from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau. We consider both the mechanistic details of Tau: the tubulin relationship and its aggregation process. Phosphorylation of Tau is intimately linked to both aspects. NMR spectroscopy has depicted accurate phosphorylation patterns by different kinases, and its non-destructive character has allowed functional assays with the same samples. Finally, we will discuss other post-translational modifications of Tau and its interaction with other cellular factors in relationship to its (dys)function. PMID:27338491

  19. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  20. Lost after translation: missorting of Tau protein and consequences for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zempel, Hans; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated-protein that is sorted into neuronal axons in physiological conditions. In Alzheimer disease (AD) and other tauopathies, Tau sorting mechanisms fail and Tau becomes missorted into the somatodendritic compartment. In AD, aberrant amyloid-β (Aβ) production might trigger Tau missorting. The physiological axonal sorting of Tau depends on the developmental stage of the neuron, the phosphorylation state of Tau and the microtubule cytoskeleton. Disease-associated missorting of Tau is connected to increased phosphorylation and aggregation of Tau, and impaired microtubule interactions. Disease-causing mechanisms involve impaired transport, aberrant kinase activation, non-physiological interactions of Tau, and prion-like spreading. In this review we focus on the physiological and pathological (mis)sorting of Tau, the underlying mechanisms, and effects in disease.

  1. Tau as a biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schraen-Maschke, Susanna; Sergeant, Nicolas; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Bombois, Stephanie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Caillet-Boudin, Marie-Laure; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sablonniere, Bernard; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Buee, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Summary The microtubule associated protein Tau is mainly expressed in neurons of the central nervous system and is crucial in axonal maintenance and axonal transport. The rationale for Tau as a biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases is that it is a major component of abnormal intraneuronal aggregates observed in numerous of these diseases named Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. The molecular diversity of Tau is very useful when analysing it in the brain or in the peripheral fluids. Immunohistochemical and biochemical characterisation of Tau aggregates in the brain allows the post-mortem classification and differential diagnosis of Tauopathies. As peripheral biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease in the cerebrospinal fluid, Tau proteins are now validated for diagnosis and predictive purposes. For the future, the detailed characterization of Tau in brain and in peripheral fluids will lead to novel promising biomarkers for differential diagnosis of dementia and monitoring of therapeutics. PMID:20477391

  2. Interaction of Tau with Fe65 links tau to APP.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Christian; Canu, Nadia; Zambrano, Nicola; Serafino, Annalucia; Minopoli, Giuseppina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Amadoro, Giuseppina; Russo, Tommaso; Calissano, Pietro

    2005-03-01

    The beta-amyloid precursor protein APP and the microtubule-associated protein Tau play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the possible molecular events linking these two proteins are still unknown. Here, we show that Fe65, one of the ligands of the APP cytodomain, is associated with Tau in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization, and FRET experiments. Deletion studies indicated that the N-terminal domain of Tau and the PTB1 domain of Fe65 are required for this association. This interaction is regulated by the phosphorylation of Tau at selected sites, by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), and requires an intact microtubule network. Furthermore, laser scanner microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation experiments provide preliminary evidence of possible complex(es) involving Tau, Fe65, APP. These findings open new perspectives for the study of the possible crosstalk between these proteins in the pathogenesis of AD.

  3. Theory of {tau} mesonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.A.

    1997-02-01

    Studies of {tau} mesonic decays are presented. A mechanism for the axial-vector current at low energies is proposed. The VMD is used to treat the vector current. All the meson vertices of both normal parity and abnormal parity (Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly) are obtained from an effective chiral theory of mesons. a{sub 1} dominance is found in the decay modes of the {tau} lepton: 3{pi}, f(1285){pi}. Both the {rho} and the a{sub 1} meson contribute to the decay {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}K{nu}; it is found that the vector current is dominant. CVC is tested by studying e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}. The branching ratios of {tau}{r_arrow}{omega}{pi}{nu} and K{bar K}{nu} are calculated. In terms of a similar mechanism the {Delta}s=1 decay modes of the {tau} lepton are studied and K{sub a} dominance is found in {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}{pi}{nu} and K{sup {asterisk}}{eta}{nu}. The suppression of {tau}{r_arrow}K{rho}{nu} is revealed. The branching ratio of {tau}{r_arrow}{eta}K{nu} is computed. As a test of this theory, the form factors of {pi}{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} and K{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} are determined. The theoretical results agree with data reasonably well. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  5. LRRK2 Mediated Changes in TAU Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    c ausative factor for inherited PD [1-4] and in multiple Genome Wide Association Studies ( GWAS ) it has also been found to be associated with PD [5...Kwok, H.H., Tan, L.C., Zhao, W.T., Prakash, K.M., Au, W.L., Pavanni, R., Ng, Y.Y., Satake, W., Zhao, Y., et al. (2010). Analysis of GWAS -linked

  6. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  7. Hyperphosphorylation results in tau dysfunction in DNA folding and protection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; He, Hai-Jin; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Jun-Ye; Lu, Jing; He, Ying-Ge; Pan, Rong; Wei, Yan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau occurs in preclinical and clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hyperphosphorylated tau is the main constituent of the paired helical filaments in the brains of mild cognitive impairment and AD patients. While most of the work described so far focused on the relationship between hyperphosphorylation of tau and microtubule disassembly as well as axonal transport impairments, both phenomena ultimately leading to cell death, little work has been done to study the correlation between tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage. As we showed in this study, tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage co-occurred under formaldehyde treatment in N2a cells, indicating that phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) induced by formaldehyde may be involved in DNA impairment. After phosphorylation, the effect of tau in preventing DNA from thermal denaturation was diminished, its ability to accelerate DNA renaturation was lost, and its function in protecting DNA from reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack was impaired. Thus, p-Tau is not only associated with the disassembly of the microtubule system, but also plays a crucial role in DNA impairment. Hyperphosphorylation-mediated dysfunction of tau protein in prevention of DNA structure from damage under the attack of ROS may provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying tauopathies.

  8. Thermodynamics of the interaction between Alzheimer's disease related tau protein and DNA.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Benítez, María J; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús; Jiménez, Juan S

    2014-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation can be considered as one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other tauophaties. Besides its well-known role as a microtubule associated protein, Tau displays a key function as a protector of genomic integrity in stress situations. Phosphorylation has been proven to regulate multiple processes including nuclear translocation of Tau. In this contribution, we are addressing the physicochemical nature of DNA-Tau interaction including the plausible influence of phosphorylation. By means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we measured the equilibrium constant and the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated to the Tau-DNA complex formation. Our results show that unphosphorylated Tau binding to DNA is reversible. This fact is in agreement with the protective role attributed to nuclear Tau, which stops binding to DNA once the insult is over. According to our thermodynamic data, oscillations in the concentration of dephosphorylated Tau available to DNA must be the variable determining the extent of Tau binding and DNA protection. In addition, thermodynamics of the interaction suggest that hydrophobicity must represent an important contribution to the stability of the Tau-DNA complex. SPR results together with those from Tau expression in HEK cells show that phosphorylation induces changes in Tau protein which prevent it from binding to DNA. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding is analogous to the Tau-microtubules binding inhibition induced by phosphorylation. Our results suggest that hydrophobicity may control Tau location and DNA interaction and that impairment of this Tau-DNA interaction, due to Tau hyperphosphorylation, could contribute to Alzheimer's pathogenesis.

  9. NMDA receptor dysfunction contributes to impaired brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission in a Tau transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Martire, Alberto; Derisbourg, Maxime; Laurent, Cyril; Belarbi, Karim; Leboucher, Antoine; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Grosjean, Marie-Eve; Demeyer, Dominique; Muhr-Tailleux, Anne; Buisson, Alain; Sergeant, Nicolas; Hamdane, Malika; Humez, Sandrine; Popoli, Patrizia; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-02-01

    While the spatiotemporal development of Tau pathology has been correlated with occurrence of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's patients, mechanisms underlying these deficits remain unclear. Both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor TrkB play a critical role in hippocampus-dependent synaptic plasticity and memory. When applied on hippocampal slices, BDNF is able to enhance AMPA receptor-dependent hippocampal basal synaptic transmission through a mechanism involving TrkB and N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptors (NMDAR). Using THY-Tau22 transgenic mice, we demonstrated that hippocampal Tau pathology is associated with loss of synaptic enhancement normally induced by exogenous BDNF. This defective response was concomitant to significant memory impairments. We show here that loss of BDNF response was due to impaired NMDAR function. Indeed, we observed a significant reduction of NMDA-induced field excitatory postsynaptic potential depression in the hippocampus of Tau mice together with a reduced phosphorylation of NR2B at the Y1472, known to be critical for NMDAR function. Interestingly, we found that both NR2B and Src, one of the NR2B main kinases, interact with Tau and are mislocalized to the insoluble protein fraction rich in pathological Tau species. Defective response to BDNF was thus likely related to abnormal interaction of Src and NR2B with Tau in THY-Tau22 animals. These are the first data demonstrating a relationship between Tau pathology and synaptic effects of BDNF and supporting a contribution of defective BDNF response and impaired NMDAR function to the cognitive deficits associated with Tauopathies.

  10. Escitalopram Ameliorates Forskolin-Induced Tau Hyperphosphorylation in HEK239/tau441 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Wang, Yan-Juan; Gong, Wei-Gang; Zhou, Qi-Da; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of escitalopram (a widely used and highly efficacious antidepressant from the SSRI class) on tau hyperphosphorylation, HEK293/tau441 cells were pretreated with 4 μM of forskolin for 2 h. Then we treated the cells with different doses of escitalopram (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 μM) for 22 h. We measured the phosphorylation level of tau by Western blotting. It was shown that escitalopram could protect tau from hyperphosphorylation induced by pharmacological activation of protein kinase A (PKA) at a dose of 20, 40, and 80 μM in vitro. Interestingly, the same dose of escitalopram could also increase the level of serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β (inactive form) and the phosphorylation level of Akt at Ser473 (active form) with no significant change in the level of total GSK-3β and Akt. Unexpectedly, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor (5-HT1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not decrease forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Our results suggest that escitalopram can ameliorate forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation, which is not through the typical 5-HT1A pathway, and Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway is involved. These findings may support an effective role of antidepressants in the prevention of dementia associated with depression in patients.

  11. Global Conformation of Tau Protein Mapped by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gorantla, Nalini Vijay; Khandelwal, Puneet; Poddar, Pankaj; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive neuronal loss in the brain. Its two major hallmarks are extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by aggregation of amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) and Tau protein respectively. Aβ-42 is a transmembrane protein, which is produced after the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases, thus obtained peptide is released extracellularly and gets deposited on the neuron forming senile plaques. NFTs are composed of microtubule-associated protein-Tau (MAPT). Tau protein's major function is to stabilize the microtubule that provides a track on which the cargo proteins are shuttled and the stabilized microtubule also maintains shape and integrity of the neuronal cell. Tau protein is subjected to various modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, glycation, acetylation, truncation, glycosylation, deamination, and oxidation; these modifications ultimately lead to its aggregation. Phosphorylation is the major modification and is extensively studied with respect to Tau protein. Tau protein, however, undergoes certain level of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which regulates its affinity for microtubule and ultimately leading to microtubule assembly and disassembly. Our main aim was to study the native state of longest isoform of Tau (hTau40WT-4R2N) and its shortest isoform, (hTau23WT-3R0N), at various temperatures such as 10, 25, and 37 °C. Raman spectroscopic results suggested that the proportion of random coils or unordered structure depends on the temperature of the protein environment. Upon increase in the temperature from 10 to 37 °C, the proportion of random coils or unordered structures increased in the case of hTau40WT. However, we did not find a significant effect of temperature on the structure of hTau23WT. This current approach enables one to analyze the global conformation of soluble Tau in solution.

  12. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces both direct and indirect tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser(202)/Thr(205)), PHF-1 (Ser(396)/Ser(404)) and AT180 (Thr(231)) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Changes in microtubule-associated protein tau during peripheral nerve injury and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guang-bin; Shen, Mi; Gu, Xiao-song; Yi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Tau, a primary component of microtubule-associated protein, promotes microtubule assembly and/or disassembly and maintains the stability of the microtubule structure. Although the importance of tau in neurodegenerative diseases has been well demonstrated, whether tau is involved in peripheral nerve regeneration remains unknown. In the current study, we obtained sciatic nerve tissue from adult rats 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after sciatic nerve crush and examined tau mRNA and protein expression levels and the location of tau in the sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury. The results from our quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that compared with the uninjured control sciatic nerve, mRNA expression levels for both tau and tau tubulin kinase 1, a serine/threonine kinase that regulates tau phosphorylation, were decreased following peripheral nerve injury. Our western blot assay results suggested that the protein expression levels of tau and phosphorylated tau initially decreased 1 day post nerve injury but then gradually increased. The results of our immunohistochemical labeling showed that the location of tau protein was not altered by nerve injury. Thus, these results showed that the expression of tau was changed following sciatic nerve crush, suggesting that tau may be involved in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration. PMID:27857758

  14. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone Ameliorates Cognitive Impairment by Inhibiting Expression of Tau Pathology in ApoE-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yang; Nie, Shuke; Zhu, Wende; Liu, Fang; Guo, Hailong; Chu, Jiewen; Cao, Xue B.; Jiang, Xingjun; Zhang, Yunjian; Li, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a tyrosine kinase B agonist that mimics the neuroprotective properties of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which can not efficiently deliver into the brain, has been reported to be useful in ameliorating cognitive impairment in many diseases. Researches have indicated that apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mouse was associated with cognitive alteration via various mechanisms. Our present study investigated the possible mechanisms of cognitive impairment of ApoE-KO mouse fed with western type diet and the protective effects of 7,8-DHF in improving spatial learning and memory in ApoE-KO mouse. Five-weeks-old ApoE-KO mice and C57BL/6 mice were chronically treated with 7,8-DHF (with a dosage of 5 mg/kg) or vehicles orally for 25 weeks, and then subjected to Morris water maze at the age of 30 weeks to evaluate the cognitive performances. Afterward, histology analysis and western blotting were performed. Spatial learning and memory deficits were observed in ApoE-KO mice, which were consistent with higher expression of active-asparaginyl endopeptidase (active-AEP) as well as AEP-derived truncated tau N368 compared with normal group. In addition to that, long-term treatment of 7,8-DHF dramatically ameliorated cognitive decline in ApoE-KO mice, accompanied by the activation in phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) pathway and down-regulated expression of tau S396 and PHF-tau (phosphorylated tau at ser396 and ser404 epitope). These findings suggested that cognitive impairment of ApoE-KO mouse might associate with tau pathology and 7,8-DHF could activate AKT and then phosphorylate its downstream molecule to inhibit expression of abnormal tau, meanwhile, 7,8-DHF could reduce the expression of active-AEP and then inhibit production of truncated tau N368. PMID:27965573

  15. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  16. Activation of asparaginyl endopeptidase leads to Tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Tung, Yunn Chyn; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-06-14

    Neurofibrillary pathology of abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau is a key lesion of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, and its density in the brain directly correlates with dementia. The phosphorylation of Tau is regulated by protein phosphatase 2A, which in turn is regulated by inhibitor 2, I2(PP2A). In acidic conditions such as generated by brain ischemia and hypoxia, especially in association with hyperglycemia as in diabetes, I2(PP2A) is cleaved by asparaginyl endopeptidase at Asn-175 into the N-terminal fragment (I2NTF) and the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF). Both I2NTF and I2CTF are known to bind to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and inhibit its activity. Here we show that the level of activated asparaginyl endopeptidase is significantly increased, and this enzyme and I2(PP2A) translocate, respectively, from neuronal lysosomes and nucleus to the cytoplasm where they interact and are associated with hyperphosphorylated Tau in Alzheimer disease brain. Asparaginyl endopeptidase from Alzheimer disease brain could cleave GST-I2(PP2A), except when I2(PP2A) was mutated at the cleavage site Asn-175 to Gln. Finally, an induction of acidosis by treatment with kainic acid or pH 6.0 medium activated asparaginyl endopeptidase and consequently produced the cleavage of I2(PP2A), inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A, and hyperphosphorylation of Tau, and the knockdown of asparaginyl endopeptidase with siRNA abolished this pathway in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest the involvement of brain acidosis in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and asparaginyl endopeptidase-I2(PP2A)-protein phosphatase 2A-Tau hyperphosphorylation pathway as a therapeutic target.

  17. Chronic noise exposure causes persistence of tau hyperphosphorylation and formation of NFT tau in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Zhu, Lixing; She, Xiaojun; Wu, Mingquan; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Tianhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Liu, Hongtao

    2012-12-01

    The non-auditory effects of noise exposure on the central nervous system have been established both epidemiologically and experimentally. Chronic noise exposure (CNE) has been associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathological changes. However, experimental evidence for these associations remains limited. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of CNE [100 dB sound pressure level (SPL) white noise, 4 h/d×14 d] on tau phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a noise-exposed group and a control group. The levels of radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA)-soluble and RIPA-insoluble phosphorylated tau at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422 in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex were measured at different time points (days 0, 3, 7, and 14) after the end of the last noise exposure. Exposure to white noise for 14 consecutive days significantly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422, the sites typically phosphorylated in AD brains, in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Tau hyperphosphorylation persisted for 7 to 14 d after the cessation of noise exposure. These alterations were also concomitant with the generation of pathological neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) tau 3, 7 and 14 d after the end of the stimulus. Furthermore, lasting increases in proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were found to occur in close correspondence with increase in tau hyperphosphorylation. The results of this study show that CNE leads to long-lasting increases in non-NFT hyperphosphorylated tau and delayed formation of misfolded NFT tau in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Our results also provide evidence for the involvement of GSK3β and PP2A in these processes.

  18. Proline Conformation in a Functional Tau Fragment.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Puneet; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lopez, Juan; Smet, Caroline; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, G

    2016-01-16

    The conformational state of distinct prolines can determine the folding of a protein but equally other biological processes when coupled to a conformation-sensitive secondary reaction. For the neuronal tau protein, the importance of proline conformation is underscored by its interaction with different prolyl cis/trans isomerases. The proline conformation would gain even further importance after phosphorylation of the preceding residue by various proline-directed kinases. A number of molecular diseases including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury were thereby recently qualified as "cistauosis", as they would imply a cis conformation for the pThr231-Pro232 prolyl bond. We here investigate by NMR spectroscopy the conformation of all prolines in a functional Tau fragment, Tau[208-324]. Although we can detect and identify some minor conformers in the cis form, we show that all prolines are for over 90% in the trans conformation. Phosphorylation by CDK2/CycA3, which notably leads to complete modification of the Thr231 residue, does not change this conclusion. Our data hence disagree with the notion that specific prolyl bonds in tau would adopt preferentially the cis conformation.

  19. The Role of Tau in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Potential as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal deposition of proteins in and around neurons is a common pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Among these pathological proteins, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intraneuronal filaments in a spectrum of neurological disorders. The discovery that dominant mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau are associated with familial frontotemporal dementia strongly supports abnormal tau protein as directly involved in disease pathogenesis. This and other evidence suggest that tau is a worthwhile target for the prevention or treatment of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. However, it is critical to understand the normal biological roles of tau, the specific molecular events that induce tau to become neurotoxic, the biochemical nature of pathogenic tau, the means by which pathogenic tau exerts neurotoxicity, and how tau pathology propagates. Based on known differences between normal and abnormal tau, a number of approaches have been taken toward the discovery of potential therapeutics. Key questions still remain open, such as the nature of the connection between the amyloid-β protein of Alzheimer's disease and tau pathology. Answers to these questions should help better understand the nature of tauopathies and may also reveal new therapeutic targets and strategies. PMID:24278740

  20. Regulation of Microtubule Assembly by Tau and not by Pin1.

    PubMed

    Kutter, Steffen; Eichner, Timo; Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Kern, Dorothee

    2016-05-08

    The molecular mechanism by which the microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau regulates the formation of microtubules (MTs) is poorly understood. The activity of tau is controlled via phosphorylation at specific Ser/Thr sites. Of those phosphorylation sites, 17 precede a proline, making them potential recognition sites for the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 binding and catalysis of phosphorylated tau at the AT180 epitope, which was implicated in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to be crucial for restoring tau's ability to promote MT polymerization in vitro and in vivo [1]. Surprisingly, we discover that Pin1 does not promote phosphorylated tau-induced MT formation in vitro, refuting the commonly accepted model in which Pin1 binding and catalysis on the A180 epitope restores the function of the Alzheimer's associated phosphorylated tau in tubulin assembly [1, 2]. Using turbidity assays, time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and time-resolved negative stain electron microscopy (EM), we investigate the mechanism of tau-mediated MT assembly and the role of the Thr231 and Ser235 phosphorylation on this process. We discover novel GTP-tubulin ring-shaped species, which are detectable in the earliest stage of tau-induced polymerization and may play a crucial role in the early nucleation phase of MT assembly. Finally, by NMR and SAXS experiments, we show that the tau molecules must be located on the surface of MTs and tubulin rings during the polymerization reaction. The interaction between tau and tubulin is multipartite, with a high affinity interaction of the four tubulin-binding repeats, and a weaker interaction with the proline-rich sequence and the termini of tau.

  1. Obesity, diabetes, and leptin resistance promote tau pathology in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed

    Platt, T L; Beckett, T L; Kohler, K; Niedowicz, D M; Murphy, M P

    2016-02-19

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) convey an increased risk for developing dementia. The microtubule-associated protein tau is implicated in neurodegenerative disease by undergoing hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, leading to cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration. Enzymes involved in the regulation of tau phosphorylation, such as GSK3β, are tightly associated with pathways found to be dysregulated in T2DM. We have shown previously that leptin-resistant mice, which develop obesity and a diabetic phenotype, display elevated levels of tau phosphorylation. Here we show cells cultured with leptin, an adipokine shown to have neuroprotective effects, reduces tau phosphorylation. To explore how this mechanism works in vivo we transduced an existing diabetic mouse line (Lepr(db/db)) with a tau mutant (tau(P301L)) via adeno-associated virus (AAV). The resulting phenotype included a striking increase in tau phosphorylation and the number of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) found within the hippocampus. We conclude that leptin resistance-induced obesity and diabetes accelerates the development of tau pathology. This model of metabolic dysfunction and tauopathy provides a new system in which to explore the mechanisms underlying the ways in which leptin resistance and diabetes influence development of tau pathology, and may ultimately be related to the development of NFTs.

  2. Stages and Conformations of the Tau Repeat Domain during Aggregation and Its Effect on Neuronal Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Tepper, Katharina; Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Biernat, Jacek; Wegmann, Susanne; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the aggregation and posttranslational modifications of Tau protein. Its “repeat domain” (TauRD) is mainly responsible for the aggregation properties, and oligomeric forms are thought to dominate the toxic effects of Tau. Here we investigated the conformational transitions of this domain during oligomerization and aggregation in different states of β-propensity and pseudo-phosphorylation, using several complementary imaging and spectroscopic methods. Although the repeat domain generally aggregates more readily than full-length Tau, its aggregation was greatly slowed down by phosphorylation or pseudo-phosphorylation at the KXGS motifs, concomitant with an extended phase of oligomerization. Analogous effects were observed with pro-aggregant variants of TauRD. Oligomers became most evident in the case of the pro-aggregant mutant TauRDΔK280, as monitored by atomic force microscopy, and the fluorescence lifetime of Alexa-labeled Tau (time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)), consistent with its pronounced toxicity in mouse models. In cell models or primary neurons, neither oligomers nor fibrils of TauRD or TauRDΔK280 had a toxic effect, as seen by assays with lactate dehydrogenase and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, respectively. However, oligomers of pro-aggregant TauRDΔK280 specifically caused a loss of spine density in differentiated neurons, indicating a locally restricted impairment of function. PMID:24825901

  3. Tau polarisation at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Ricard

    1999-04-01

    The measurements of the tau polarisation at LEP I are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the new preliminary results presented at this conference. The ALEPH collaboration has studied the polarisation as a function of the polar angle using a new method based on the tau direction reconstruction and fully exploiting the angular correlations. A second traditional approach, based on the single tau decays has been also developed. The DELPHI collaboration has also studied the full data sample using an individual tau decay method and an inclusive hadronic selection. The results from the four experiments are presented with discussion of the compatibility among the methods and experiments.

  4. High-fat, high-sugar, and high-cholesterol consumption does not impact tau pathogenesis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Gratuze, Maud; Julien, Jacinthe; Morin, Françoise; Calon, Frédéric; Hébert, Sébastien S; Marette, André; Planel, Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The origin of AD is multifactorial, and many metabolic disorders originating from overconsumption of fat, cholesterol, and sugar are associated with higher risk of AD later in life. However, the effects of fat, cholesterol, and sugar overconsumption on tau pathology in AD remain controversial. Using the hTau mice, a model of AD-like tau pathology, we assessed the effects of high-fat, high-cholesterol, and/or high-sugar diets on tau pathogenesis. Surprisingly, we found no effects of these compounds, even combined, on tau phosphorylation, O-GlcNAcylation, splicing, cleavage, and aggregation, suggesting that their overconsumption does not seem to worsen tau pathology in these mice.

  5. Alzheimer-related decrease in CYFIP2 links amyloid production to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory loss

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sachin Suresh; Mizuno, Keiko; Ghosh, Anshua; Aziz, Wajeeha; Troakes, Claire; Daoud, Jason; Golash, Vidushi; Noble, Wendy; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss, plaques resulting from abnormal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and presence of neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Currently, it is not known what links these abnormalities together. Cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) has been suggested to regulate mRNA translation at synapses and this may include local synthesis of APP and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, a kinase that can phosphorylate tau. Further, CYFIP2 is part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein complex, which has been implicated in actin polymerization at synapses, a process thought to be required for memory formation. Our previous studies on p25 dysregulation put forward the hypothesis that CYFIP2 expression is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease and that this contributes to memory impairment, abnormal APP processing and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here, we tested this hypothesis. First, in post-mortem tissue CYFIP2 expression was reduced by ∼50% in severe Alzheimer’s hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus when normalized to expression of a neuronal or synaptic marker protein. Interestingly, there was also a trend for decreased expression in mild Alzheimer’s disease hippocampus. Second, CYFIP2 expression was reduced in old but not in young Tg2576 mice, a model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we tested the direct impact of reduced CYFIP2 expression in heterozygous null mutant mice. We found that in hippocampus this reduced expression causes an increase in APP and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein, but not mRNA expression, and elevates production of amyloid-β42. Reduced CYFIP2 expression also increases alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II protein expression, and this is associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau at serine-214. The reduced expression also

  6. Effect of treadmill exercise on PI3K/AKT/mTOR, autophagy, and Tau hyperphosphorylation in the cerebral cortex of NSE/htau23 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun-Bum; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurofibrillary tangles, one of pathological features of Alzheimer’s disease, are produced by the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein. This study aimed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise on PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal transmission, autophagy, and cognitive ability that are involved in the hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein. Methods Experimental animals (NSE/htau23 mice) were divided into non-transgenic control group (Non-Tg-Control; CON; n = 7), transgenic control group (Tg-CON; n = 7), and transgenic exercise group (Tg-Treadmill Exercise; TE; n = 7). The Tg-TE group was subjected to treadmill exercise for 12 weeks. After the treadmill exercise was completed, the cognitive ability was determined by conducting underwater maze tests. Western blot was conducted to determine the phosphorylation status of PI3K/AKT/mTOR proteins and autophagy-related proteins (Beclin-1, p62, LC3-B); hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein (Ser199/202, Ser404, Thr231, PHF-1); and phosphorylation of GSK-3β, which is involved in the phosphorylation of tau protein in the cerebral cortex of experimental animals. Results In the Tg-TE group that was subjected to treadmill exercise for 12 weeks, abnormal mTOR phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT proteins was improved via increased phosphorylation and its activity was inhibited by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation compared with those in the Tg-CON group, which was used as the control group. In addition, the expression of Beclin-1 protein involved in autophagosome formation was increased in the Tg-TE group compared with that in the Tg-CON group, whereas that of p62 protein was reduced in the Tg-TE group compared with that in the Tg-CON group. Autophagy was activated owing to the increased expression of LC3-B that controls the completion of autophagosome formation. The hyperphosphorylation and aggregation (Ser199/202, Ser404, Thr231, PHF-1) of tau protein was found to be reduced in the Tg

  7. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of a Combined Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid t-PrP, t-tau, p-tau, and Aβ42 in the Differential Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease from Alzheimer’s Disease with Emphasis on Atypical Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Abu Rumeileh, Samir; Lattanzio, Francesca; Stanzani Maserati, Michelangelo; Rizzi, Romana; Capellari, Sabina; Parchi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    According to recent studies, the determination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total tau (t-tau)/phosphorylated tau (p-tau) ratio and total prion protein (t-PrP) levels significantly improves the accuracy of the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in atypical cases with clinical or laboratory features mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). However, this has neither been validated nor tested in series including atypical CJD variants. Furthermore, the added diagnostic value of amyloid-β (Aβ)42 remains unclear. To address these issues, we measured t-PrP, 14-3-3, t-tau, p-tau, and Aβ42 CSF levels in 45 typical and 44 atypical/rapidly progressive AD patients, 54 typical and 54 atypical CJD patients, and 33 controls. CJD patients showed significantly lower CSF t-PrP levels than controls and AD patients. Furthermore, atypical CJD was associated with lower t-PrP levels in comparison to typical CJD. T-tau, 14-3-3, or t-PrP alone yielded, respectively, 80.6, 63.0, and 73.0% sensitivity and 75.3, 92.1, and 75% specificity in distinguishing AD from CJD. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses of biomarker combinations, the (t-tau×Aβ42)/(p-tau×t-PrP) ratio achieved the best accuracy, with 98.1% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity overall, and 96.2% sensitivity and 95.5% specificity for the “atypical” disease groups. Our results show that the combined analysis of CSF t-PrP, t-tau, p-tau, and Aβ42 is clinically useful in the differential diagnosis between CJD and AD. Furthermore, the finding of reduced CSF t-PrP levels in CJD patients suggest that, likewise Aβ42 in AD, CSF t-PrP levels reflect the extent of PrPc conversion into abnormal PrP (PrPSc) and the burden of PrPSc deposition in CJD. PMID:27886009

  9. Methylglyoxal induces tau hyperphosphorylation via promoting AGEs formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Jiang, Xia; Lv, Bing-Ling; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The hyperphosphorylated tau is a major protein component of neurofibrillary tangle, which is one of hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the level of methylglyoxal (MG) is significantly increased in the AD brains, the role of MG in tau phosphorylation is still not reported. Here, we found that MG could induce tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites in neuroblastoma 2a cells under maintaining normal cell viability. MG treatment increased the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and p38 MAPK were activated, whereas the level and activity of JNK, Erk1/2, cdk5, and PP2A were not altered after MG treatment. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK-3β or p38 attenuated the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Aminoguanidine, a blocker of AGEs formation, could effectively reverse the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. These data suggest that MG induces AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation through AGEs formation involving RAGE up-regulation and GSK-3β activation and p38 activation is also partially involved in MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Thus, targeting MG may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation.

  10. Tau-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease: active and passive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Seripa, Davide; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Lozupone, Madia; Santamato, Andrea; Tortelli, Rosanna; Galizia, Ilaria; Prete, Camilla; Daniele, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of tau protein in Alzheimer's disease included microtubule-stabilizing agents, tau protein kinase inhibitors, tau aggregation inhibitors, active and passive immunotherapies and, more recently, inhibitors of tau acetylation. Animal studies have shown that both active and passive approaches can remove tau pathology and, in some cases, improve cognitive function. Two active vaccines targeting either nonphosphorylated (AAD-vac1) and phosphorylated tau (ACI-35) have entered Phase I testing. Notwithstanding, the recent discontinuation of the monoclonal antibody RG7345 for Alzheimer's disease, two other antitau antibodies, BMS-986168 and C2N-8E12, are also currently in Phase I testing for progressive supranuclear palsy. After the recent impressive results in animal studies obtained by salsalate, the dimer of salicylic acid, inhibitors of tau acetylation are being actively pursued.

  11. Tetrahydrohyperforin prevents cognitive deficit, Aβ deposition, tau phosphorylation and synaptotoxicity in the APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9 model of Alzheimer's disease: a possible effect on APP processing

    PubMed Central

    Inestrosa, N C; Tapia-Rojas, C; Griffith, T N; Carvajal, F J; Benito, M J; Rivera-Dictter, A; Alvarez, A R; Serrano, F G; Hancke, J L; Burgos, P V; Parodi, J; Varela-Nallar, L

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation and synaptic alterations. Previous studies indicated that hyperforin, a component of the St John's Wort, prevents Aβ neurotoxicity and some behavioral impairments in a rat model of AD. In this study we examined the ability of tetrahydrohyperforin (IDN5607), a stable hyperforin derivative, to prevent the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in an in vivo model of AD. In double transgenic APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9 mice, IDN5706 improves memory and prevents the impairment of synaptic plasticity in a dose-dependent manner, inducing a recovery of long-term potentiation. In agreement with these findings, IDN5706 prevented the decrease in synaptic proteins in hippocampus and cortex. In addition, decreased levels of tau hyperphosphorylation, astrogliosis, and total fibrillar and oligomeric forms of Aβ were determined in double transgenic mice treated with IDN5706. In cultured cells, IDN5706 decreased the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein that leads to Aβ peptide generation. These findings indicate that IDN5706 ameliorates AD neuropathology and could be considered of therapeutic relevance in AD treatment. PMID:22832522

  12. Function and regulation of tau conformations in the development and treatment of traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Albayram, Onder; Herbert, Megan K; Kondo, Asami; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Baxley, Sean; Lian, Xiaolan; Hansen, Madison; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2016-01-01

    One of the two common hallmark lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains is neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which are composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (p-tau). NFTs are also a defining feature of other neurodegenerative disorders and have recently been identified in the brains of patients suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However, NFTs are not normally observed in traumatic brain injury (TBI) until months or years after injury. This raises the question of whether NFTs are a cause or a consequence of long-term neurodegeneration following TBI. Two conformations of phosphorylated tau, cis p-tau and trans p-tau, which are regulated by the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1, have been previously identified. By generating a polyclonal and monoclonal antibody (Ab) pair capable of distinguishing between cis and trans isoforms of p-tau (cis p-tau and trans p-tau, respectively), cis p-tau was identified as a precursor of tau pathology and an early driver of neurodegeneration in AD, TBI and CTE. Histological studies shows the appearance of robust cis p-tau in the early stages of human mild cognitive impairment (MCI), AD and CTE brains, as well as after sport- and military-related TBI. Notably, cis p-tau appears within hours after closed head injury and long before other known pathogenic p-tau conformations including oligomers, pre-fibrillary tangles and NFTs. Importantly, cis p-tau monoclonal antibody treatment not only eliminates cis p-tau induction and tau pathology, but also restores many neuropathological and functional outcome in TBI mouse models. Thus, cis p-tau is an early driver of tau pathology in TBI and CTE and detection of cis p-tau in human bodily fluids could potentially provide new diagnostic and prognostic tools. Furthermore, humanization of the cis p-tau antibody could ultimately be developed as a new treatment for AD, TBI and CTE.

  13. Passive immunization targeting the N-terminal projection domain of tau decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease and tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chun-ling; Chen, Xia; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain is a histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and a family of related neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies. At present there is no effective treatment available for these progressive neurodegenerative diseases which are clinically characterized by dementia in mid to old-age. Here we report the treatment of 14-17-months-old 3xTg-AD mice with tau antibodies 43D (tau 6-18) and 77E9 (tau 184-195) to the N-terminal projection domain of tau or mouse IgG as a control by intraperitoneal injection once a week for 4 weeks, and the effects of the passive immunization on reduction of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ accumulation and cognitive performance in these animals. We found that treatment with tau antibodies 43D and 77E9 reduced total tau level, decreased tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser199, Ser202/Thr205 (AT8), Thr205, Ser262/356 (12E8), and Ser396/404 (PHF-1) sites, and a trend to reduce Aβ pathology. Most importantly, targeting N-terminal tau especially by 43D (tau 6-18) improved reference memory in the Morris water maze task in 3xTg-AD mice. We did not observe any abnormality in general physical characteristics of the treated animals with either of the two antibodies during the course of this study. Taken together, our studies demonstrate for the first time (1) that passive immunization targeting normal tau can effectively clear the hyperphosphorylated protein and possibly reduce Aβ pathology from the brain and (2) that targeting N-terminal projection domain of tau containing amino acid 6-18 is especially beneficial. Thus, targeting selective epitopes of N-terminal domain of tau may present a novel effective therapeutic opportunity for Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  14. Truncation and Activation of Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-regulated Kinase 1A by Calpain I

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianlan; Zhang, Xinhua; Shi, Jianhua; Qian, Wei; Ji, Yuhua; Cao, Maohong; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation and dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of Tau are pivotally involved in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and/or other tauopathies. Alternative splicing of Tau exon 10, which encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat, generates Tau isoforms containing three and four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-Taus and 4R-Taus, respectively. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) lies at the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21. Overexpression of this kinase may contribute to the early Tau pathology in Down syndrome via phosphorylation of Tau and dysregulation of Tau exon 10. Here, we report that Dyrk1A was truncated at the C terminus and was associated with overactivation of calpain I in AD brain. Calpain I proteolyzed Dyrk1A in vitro first at the C terminus and further at the N terminus and enhanced its kinase activity toward Tau via increased Vmax but not Km. C-terminal truncation of Dyrk1A resulted in stronger activity than its full-length protein in promotion of exon 10 exclusion and phosphorylation of Tau. Dyrk1A was truncated in kainic acid-induced excitotoxic mouse brains and coincided with an increase in 3R-Tau expression and phosphorylation of Tau via calpain activation. Moreover, truncation of Dyrk1A was correlated with an increase in the ratio of 3R-Tau/4R-Tau and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD brain. Collectively, these findings suggest that truncation/activation of Dyrk1A by Ca2+/calpain I might contribute to Tau pathology via promotion of exon 10 exclusion and hyperphosphorylation of Tau in AD brain. PMID:25918155

  15. Tau and neurodegenerative disease: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, tau protein was isolated as a microtubule-associated factor from the porcine brain. In the previous year, a paired helical filament (PHF) protein had been identified in neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD), but it was not until 1986 that the PHF protein and tau were discovered to be one and the same. In the AD brain, tau was found to be abnormally hyperphosphorylated, and it inhibited rather than promoted in vitro microtubule assembly. Almost 80 disease-causing exonic missense and intronic silent mutations in the tau gene have been found in familial cases of frontotemporal dementia but, to date, no such mutation has been found in AD. The first phase I clinical trial of an active tau immunization vaccine in patients with AD was recently completed. Assays for tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma are now available, and tau radiotracers for PET are under development. In this article, we provide an overview of the pivotal discoveries in the tau research field over the past 40 years. We also review the current status of the field, including disease mechanisms and therapeutic approaches.

  16. Tau protein and tau aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Bruno; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by pathological aggregation of two proteins, tau and Abeta-amyloid, both of which are considered to be toxic to neurons. In this review we summarize recent advances on small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation with emphasis on tau, with activities mediated by the direct interference of self-assembly. The inhibitors can be clustered in several compound classes according to their chemical structure, with subsequent description of the structure-activity relationships, showing that hydrophobic interactions are prevailing. The description is extended to the pharmacological profile of the compounds in order to evaluate their drug-likeness, with special attention to toxicity and bioavailability. The collected data indicate that following the improvements of the in vitro inhibitory potencies, the consideration of the in vivo pharmacokinetics is an absolute prerequisite for the development of compounds suitable for a transfer from bench to bedside.

  17. Conformational features of tau fibrils from Alzheimer’s disease brain are faithfully propagated by unmodified recombinant protein

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Olga A.; March, Zachary M.; Robinson, Anne S.; Colby, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrils composed of tau protein are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we show that when recombinant tau protein is seeded with paired helical filaments (PHFs) isolated from AD brain, the amyloid formed shares many of the structural features of AD PHFs. In contrast, tau amyloids formed with heparin as an inducing agent—a common biochemical model of tau misfolding—are structurally distinct from brain-derived PHFs. Using ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and chemical denaturation, we found that AD seeded recombinant tau fibrils were not significantly different than tau fibrils isolated from AD brain tissue. Tau fibrils produced by incubating recombinant tau with heparin had significantly narrower fibrils with a longer periodicity, higher chemical stability, and distinct secondary structure compared to AD PHFs. The addition of heparin to the reaction of recombinant tau and AD PHFs also corrupted the templating process, resulting in a mixture of fibril conformations. Our results suggest that AD-isolated PHFs act as a conformational template for the formation of recombinant tau fibrils. Therefore, the use of AD PHFs as seeds to stimulate recombinant tau amyloid formation produces synthetic tau fibers that that closely resemble those associated with AD pathology and provides a biochemical model of tau misfolding that may be of improved utility for structural studies and drug screening. These results also demonstrate that posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation are not a prerequisite for the propagation of the tau fibril conformation found in AD. PMID:24033133

  18. A novel tau-tubulin kinase from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Tomizawa, K; Sato, K; Ohtake, A; Omori, A

    1995-09-18

    During purification of tau protein kinase I and II from the bovine brain extract, a new tau protein kinase was detected and purified with phosphocellulose, gel filtration, S-Sepharose and AF-Heparin column chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration and activity staining on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme is a Ser/Thr protein kinase phosphorylating tau, beta-tubulin, MAP2 and alpha-casein. Employing many synthetic peptides, the recognition site of this enzyme appears to be -SR-. The enzyme requires no second messenger and is inhibited with high concentration of heparin, but not by inhibitors of CKI. These results indicate that this enzyme, tau-tubulin kinase is novel and distinct from TPKI, II and CKI, II.

  19. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  20. Induction of intracellular tau aggregation is promoted by α-synuclein seeds, and provides novel insights into the hyperphosphorylation of tau

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Elisa A.; Giasson, Benoit I.

    2011-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic proteinaceous inclusions, primarily composed of tau or α-synuclein (α-syn), are predominant pathological features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), respectively. However, the co-existence of these pathological aggregates is identified in many neurodegenerative disorders, including spectrum disorders of AD and PD. While α-syn can spontaneously polymerize into amyloidogenic fibrils, in vitro, tau polymerization requires an inducing agent. The current study presents a human-derived cellular model, in which recombinant, pre-formed α-syn fibrils cross-seed intracellular tau to promote the formation of neurofibrillary tangle-like aggregates. These aggregates were hyperphosphorylated, Triton-insoluble, and thioflavin S-positive, either co-mingling with endogenously expressed α-syn aggregates, or induced by only exogenously applied recombinant α-syn fibrils. Further, filamentous, amyloidogenic tau took over the cellular soma, displacing the nucleus and isolating or displacing organelles, likely preventing cellular function. While a significant proportion of wild-type tau formed these cellular inclusions, the P301L mutation in tau increased aggregation propensity resulting from α-syn seeds to over 50% of total tau protein. The role of phosphorylation on the development of these tau aggregates was investigated by co-expressing glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta or MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2. Expression of either kinase inhibited the formation of α-syn-induced tau aggregates. Analyses of phosphorylation sites suggest that multiple complex factors may be associated with this effect, and that Triton-soluble versus Triton-insoluble tau may be independently targeted by kinases. The current work not only provides an exceptional cellular model of tau pathology, but also examines α-syn-induced tau inclusion formation and provides novel insights into hyperphosphorylation observed in disease. PMID:21613474

  1. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition improves memory and reduces total tau levels in a mouse model of tau deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tau pathology is associated with a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Few treatments have been demonstrated to diminish the impact of tau pathology in mouse models and none are yet effective in humans. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an enzyme that removes acetyl groups from cytoplasmic proteins, rather than nuclear histones. Its substrates include tubulin, heat shock protein 90 and cortactin. Tubastatin A is a selective inhibitor of HDAC6. Modification of tau pathology by specific inhibition of HDAC6 presents a potential therapeutic approach in tauopathy. Methods We treated rTg4510 mouse models of tau deposition and non-transgenic mice with tubastatin (25 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) from 5 to 7 months of age. Cognitive behavior analysis, histology and biochemical analysis were applied to access the effect of tubastatin on memory, tau pathology and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume). Results We present data showing that tubastatin restored memory function in rTg4510 mice and reversed a hyperactivity phenotype. We further found that tubastatin reduced the levels of total tau, both histologically and by western analysis. Reduction in total tau levels was positively correlated with memory improvement in these mice. However, there was no impact on phosphorylated forms of tau, either by histology or western analysis, nor was there an impact on silver positive inclusions histologically. Conclusion Potential mechanisms by which HDAC6 inhibitors might benefit the rTg4510 mouse include stabilization of microtubules secondary to increased tubulin acetylation, increased degradation of tau secondary to increased acetylation of HSP90 or both. These data support the use of HDAC6 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against tau pathology. PMID:24576665

  2. Immunological memory to hyperphosphorylated tau in asymptomatic individuals.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Gabriel; Wadia, Jehangir S; Zhu, Xueyong; Keogh, Elissa; Kükrer, Başak; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Inganäs, Hanna; Siregar, Berdien; Perdok, Gerrard; Diefenbach, Otto; Nahar, Tariq; Sprengers, Imke; Koldijk, Martin H; der Linden, Els C Brinkman-van; Peferoen, Laura A; Zhang, Heng; Yu, Wenli; Li, Xinyi; Wagner, Michelle; Moreno, Veronica; Kim, Julie; Costa, Martha; West, Kiana; Fulton, Zara; Chammas, Lucy; Luckashenak, Nancy; Fletcher, Lauren; Holland, Trevin; Arnold, Carrie; Anthony Williamson, R; Hoozemans, Jeroen J; Apetri, Adrian; Bard, Frederique; Wilson, Ian A; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2017-05-01

    Several reports have described the presence of antibodies against Alzheimer's disease-associated hyperphosphorylated forms of tau in serum of healthy individuals. To characterize the specificities that can be found, we interrogated peripheral IgG(+) memory B cells from asymptomatic blood donors for reactivity to a panel of phosphorylated tau peptides using a single-cell screening assay. Antibody sequences were recovered, cloned, and expressed as full-length IgGs. In total, 52 somatically mutated tau-binding antibodies were identified, corresponding to 35 unique clonal families. Forty-one of these antibodies recognize epitopes in the proline-rich and C-terminal domains, and binding of 26 of these antibodies is strictly phosphorylation dependent. Thirteen antibodies showed inhibitory activity in a P301S lysate seeded in vitro tau aggregation assay. Two such antibodies, CBTAU-7.1 and CBTAU-22.1, which bind to the proline-rich and C-terminal regions of tau, respectively, were characterized in more detail. CBTAU-7.1 recognizes an epitope that is similar to that of murine anti-PHF antibody AT8, but has different phospho requirements. Both CBTAU-7.1 and CBTAU-22.1 detect pathological tau deposits in post-mortem brain tissue. CBTAU-7.1 reveals a similar IHC distribution pattern as AT8, immunostaining (pre)tangles, threads, and neuritic plaques. CBTAU-22.1 shows selective detection of neurofibrillary changes by IHC. Taken together, these results suggest the presence of an ongoing antigen-driven immune response against tau in healthy individuals. The wide range of specificities to tau suggests that the human immune repertoire may contain antibodies that can serve as biomarkers or be exploited for therapy.

  3. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  4. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes. PMID:26834532

  5. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes.

  6. Paired helical filaments from Alzheimer disease brain induce intracellular accumulation of Tau protein in aggresomes.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Varghese, Merina; Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Dzhun, Anastasiya; Wang, Jun; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2012-06-08

    Abnormal folding of tau protein leads to the generation of paired helical filaments (PHFs) and neurofibrillary tangles, a key neuropathological feature in Alzheimer disease and tauopathies. A specific anatomical pattern of pathological changes developing in the brain suggests that once tau pathology is initiated it propagates between neighboring neuronal cells, possibly spreading along the axonal network. We studied whether PHFs released from degenerating neurons could be taken up by surrounding cells and promote spreading of tau pathology. Neuronal and non-neuronal cells overexpressing green fluorescent protein-tagged tau (GFP-Tau) were treated with isolated fractions of human Alzheimer disease-derived PHFs for 24 h. We found that cells internalized PHFs through an endocytic mechanism and developed intracellular GFP-Tau aggregates with attributes of aggresomes. This was particularly evident by the perinuclear localization of aggregates and redistribution of the vimentin intermediate filament network and retrograde motor protein dynein. Furthermore, the content of Sarkosyl-insoluble tau, a measure of abnormal tau aggregation, increased 3-fold in PHF-treated cells. An exosome-related mechanism did not appear to be involved in the release of GFP-Tau from untreated cells. The evidence that cells can internalize PHFs, leading to formation of aggresome-like bodies, opens new therapeutic avenues to prevent propagation and spreading of tau pathology.

  7. Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Disease Brain Induce Intracellular Accumulation of Tau Protein in Aggresomes*

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Maria, Ismael; Varghese, Merina; Ksiȩżak-Reding, Hanna; Dzhun, Anastasiya; Wang, Jun; Pasinetti, Giulio M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal folding of tau protein leads to the generation of paired helical filaments (PHFs) and neurofibrillary tangles, a key neuropathological feature in Alzheimer disease and tauopathies. A specific anatomical pattern of pathological changes developing in the brain suggests that once tau pathology is initiated it propagates between neighboring neuronal cells, possibly spreading along the axonal network. We studied whether PHFs released from degenerating neurons could be taken up by surrounding cells and promote spreading of tau pathology. Neuronal and non-neuronal cells overexpressing green fluorescent protein-tagged tau (GFP-Tau) were treated with isolated fractions of human Alzheimer disease-derived PHFs for 24 h. We found that cells internalized PHFs through an endocytic mechanism and developed intracellular GFP-Tau aggregates with attributes of aggresomes. This was particularly evident by the perinuclear localization of aggregates and redistribution of the vimentin intermediate filament network and retrograde motor protein dynein. Furthermore, the content of Sarkosyl-insoluble tau, a measure of abnormal tau aggregation, increased 3-fold in PHF-treated cells. An exosome-related mechanism did not appear to be involved in the release of GFP-Tau from untreated cells. The evidence that cells can internalize PHFs, leading to formation of aggresome-like bodies, opens new therapeutic avenues to prevent propagation and spreading of tau pathology. PMID:22496370

  8. Interaction of cinnamaldehyde and epicatechin with tau: implications of beneficial effects in modulating Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Roshni C; Lew, John; Graves, Donald J

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal modifications in tau such as hyperphosphorylation, oxidation, and glycation interfere with its interaction with microtubules leading to its dissociation and self-aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously we reported that an aqueous extract of cinnamon has the ability to inhibit tau aggregation in vitro and can even induce dissociation of tangles isolated from AD brain. In the present study, we carried out investigations with cinnamaldehyde (CA) and epicatechin (EC), two components of active cinnamon extract. We found that CA and the oxidized form of EC (ECox) inhibited tau aggregation in vitro and the activity was due to their interaction with the two cysteine residues in tau. Mass spectrometry of a synthetic peptide, SKCGS, representing the actual tau sequence, identified the thiol as reacting with CA and ECox. Use of a cysteine double mutant of tau showed the necessity of cysteine for aggregation inhibition by CA. The interaction of CA with tau cysteines was reversible and the presence of CA did not impair the biological function of tau in tubulin assembly in vitro. Further, these compounds protected tau from oxidation caused by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2, and prevented subsequent formation of high molecular weight species that are considered to stimulate tangle formation. Finally, we observed that EC can sequester highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxidation such as acrolein. Our results suggest that small molecules that form a reversible interaction with cysteines have the potential to protect tau from abnormal modifications.

  9. CSF tau markers are correlated with hippocampal volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Leonardo C; Chupin, Marie; Lamari, Foudil; Jardel, Claude; Leclercq, Delphine; Colliot, Olivier; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Dubois, Bruno; Sarazin, Marie

    2012-07-01

    Hippocampal atrophy as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers are supportive features for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are assumed to be indirect pathological markers of the disease. In AD patients, antemortem MRI hippocampal volumes (HVs) correlate with the density of neurofibrillary tangles (but not with senile plaques) at autopsy suggesting that HVs may better correlate with CSF tau and hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau) levels than CSF amyloid beta protein (Aβ)(42) level. Here, we tested this hypothesis in a well-defined AD group. Patients were selected according to the New Research Criteria for AD, including specific episodic memory deficit and CSF AD profile (defined as abnormal ratio of Aβ(42):tau). MRI was performed within 6 months of lumbar puncture. HVs were obtained using automated segmentation software. Thirty-six patients were included. Left HV correlated with CSF tau (R = -0.53) and P-tau (R = -0.56) levels. Mean HVs correlated with the CSF P-tau level (R = -0.52). No correlation was found between any brain measurement and CSF Aβ(42) level. The CSF tau and P-tau levels, but not the CSF Aβ(42) level, correlated with HV, suggesting that CSF tau markers reflect the neuronal loss associated with the physiopathological process of AD.

  10. Deletion of Neurotrophin Signaling through the Glucocorticoid Receptor Pathway Causes Tau Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Arango-Lievano, Margarita; Peguet, Camille; Catteau, Matthias; Parmentier, Marie-Laure; Wu, Synphen; Chao, Moses V; Ginsberg, Stephen D.; Jeanneteau, Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Molecular and cellular mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in the brain have remained unknown and are potential therapeutic targets. Phosphorylation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling integrates both pathways for remodeling synaptic structure and plasticity. The goal of this study is to test the role of the BDNF-dependent pathway on glucocorticoid signaling in a mouse model of glucocorticoid resistance. We report that deletion of GR phosphorylation at BDNF-responding sites and downstream signaling via the MAPK-phosphatase DUSP1 triggers tau phosphorylation and dendritic spine atrophy in mouse cortex. In human cortex, DUSP1 protein expression correlates with tau phosphorylation, synaptic defects and cognitive decline in subjects diagnosed with AD. These findings provide evidence for a causal role of BDNF-dependent GR signaling in tau neuropathology and indicate that DUSP1 is a potential target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27849045

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  12. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Divergent CSF tau alterations in two common tauopathies: Alzheimer’s disease and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wagshal, Dana; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Guss, Valerie; Hall, Tracey; Berisha, Flora; Lobach, Iryna; Karydas, Anna; Voltarelli, Lisa; Scherling, Carole; Heuer, Hilary; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Miller, Zachary; Coppola, Giovanni; Ahlijanian, Michael; Soares, Holly; Kramer, Joel H; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Meredith, Jere; Boxer, Adam L

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated CSF tau is considered a biomarker of neuronal injury in newly developed Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) criteria. However, previous studies have failed to detect alterations of tau species in other primary tauopathies. We assessed CSF tau protein abnormalities in AD, a tauopathy with prominent Aβ pathology, and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a primary tauopathy characterized by deposition of four microtubule binding repeat (4R) tau with minimal Aβ pathology. Methods 26 normal control (NC), 37 AD, and 24 PSP patients participated in the study. AD and PSP were matched for severity using the clinical dementia rating sum of boxes (CDR-sb) scores. The INNO BIA AlzBio3 multiplex immunoassay was used to measure CSF Aβ, total tau, and ptau181. Additional, novel ELISAs targeting different N-terminal and central tau epitopes were developed to examine CSF tau components and to investigate interactions between diagnostic group, demographics, and genetic variables. Results PSP had lower CSF N-terminal and C-terminal tau concentrations than NC and AD measured with both the novel tau ELISAs and the standard AlzBio3 tau and ptau assays. AD had higher total tau and ptau levels than NC and PSP. There was a gender by diagnosis interaction in both AD and PSP for most tau species, with lower concentrations for male compared to female patients. Conclusions CSF tau fragment concentrations are different in PSP compared with AD despite the presence of severe tau pathology and neuronal injury in both disorders. CSF tau concentration likely reflects multiple factors in addition to the degree of neuronal injury. PMID:24899730

  14. Halting of Caspase Activity Protects Tau from MC1-Conformational Change and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma; Kestoras, Dimitra; Gibson, Yolanda; Hamilton, Lucy; Goodson, Ross; Jones, Sophie; Eversden, Sarah; Davies, Peter; O'Neill, Michael; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Wolak, Joanna

    2016-10-18

    Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies in which tau, a microtubule-associated protein, loses its ability to stabilize microtubules. Several post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and truncation increase tau's propensity to aggregate thus forming NFTs; however, the mechanisms underlying tau conformational change and aggregation still remain to be defined. Caspase activation and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of tau is thought to be a potential trigger of this disease-related pathological conformation. The aim of this work was to investigate the link between caspase activation and a disease-related conformational change of tau in a neuroblastoma cell-based model of spontaneous tau aggregation. We demonstrated that caspase induction initiates proteolytic cleavage of tau and generation of conformationally altered and aggregated tau recognized by the MC1 conformational antibody. Most importantly, these events were shown to be attenuated with caspase inhibitors. This implies that therapeutics aimed at inhibiting caspase-mediated tau cleavage may prove beneficial in slowing cleavage and aggregation, thus potentially halting tau pathology and disease progression.

  15. Tau Acts as a Mediator for Alzheimer's Disease-Related Synaptic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dezhi; Miller, Eric C.; Teravskis, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The two histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are amyloid plaques containing multiple forms of Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles containing phosphorylated tau proteins. As mild cognitive impairment frequently occurs long before the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the scientific community has been increasingly interested in the roles of Aβ and tau in earlier cellular changes that lead to functional deficits. Therefore, great progress has recently been made in understanding how Aβ or tau causes synaptic dysfunction. However, the interaction between the Aβ and tau-initiated intracellular cascades that lead to synaptic dysfunction remains elusive. The cornerstone of the two decade-old hypothetical amyloid cascade model is that amyloid pathologies precede tau pathologies. Although the premise of Aβ-tau pathway remains valid, the model keeps evolving as new signaling events are discovered that lead to functional deficits and neurodegeneration. Recent progress has been made in understanding Aβ-PrPC-Fyn-mediated neurotoxicity and synaptic deficits. Although still elusive, many novel upstream and downstream signaling molecules have been found to modulate tau mislocalization and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here we will discuss the mechanistic interactions between Aβ-PrPC-mediated neurotoxicity and tau-mediated synaptic deficits in an updated amyloid cascade model with calcium and tau as the central mediators. PMID:24712999

  16. Autophagic degradation of tau in primary neurons and its enhancement by trehalose.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Ulrike; Wang, Yipeng; Kumar, Satish; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2012-10-01

    Modulating the tau level may represent a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD), as accumulating evidence shows that Abeta-induced neurodegeneration is mediated by tau. It is therefore important to understand the expression and degradation of tau in neurons. Recently we showed that overexpressed mutant tau and tau aggregates are degraded via the autophagic pathway in an N2a cell model. Here we investigated whether autophagy is involved in the degradation of endogenous tau in cultured primary neurons. We activated this pathway in primary neurons with trehalose, an enhancer of autophagy. This resulted in the reduction of endogenous tau protein. Tau phosphorylation at several sites elevated in AD pathology had little influence on its degradation by autophagy. Furthermore, by using a neuronal cell model of tauopathy, we showed that activation of autophagy suppresses tau aggregation and eliminates cytotoxicity. Notably, apart from activating autophagy, trehalose also inhibits tau aggregation directly. Thus, trehalose may be a good candidate for developing therapeutic strategies for AD and other tauopathies.

  17. Measurements of the decays tau/sup -/. -->. rho/sup -/. nu. /sub tau/, tau/sup -/. -->. pi. /sup -/. nu. /sub tau/ and tau/sup -/. -->. K*-(892). nu. /sub tau/ using the MARK II detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo favored decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and the Cabibbo suppressed decay mode tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/ (892)..nu../sub tau/ are presented. The energy dependence of the tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ production cross section is obtained for the decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and these spectra agree well with the classification of the tau/sup -/ as a spin-1/2 point particle. Fits to the production cross section yield a measurement of M/sub tau/ = (1787 +- 10) MeV/c/sup 2/ for the tau mass. Ninety-five percent confidence upper limits for the forbidden decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(1430)..nu../sub tau/ and the tau neutrino mass are presented.

  18. Neuronal activity enhances tau propagation and tau pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jessica W; Hussaini, S Abid; Bastille, Isle M; Rodriguez, Gustavo A; Mrejeru, Ana; Rilett, Kelly; Sanders, David W; Cook, Casey; Fu, Hongjun; Boonen, Rick A C M; Herman, Mathieu; Nahmani, Eden; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Y Helen; Diamond, Marc I; Clelland, Catherine L; Wray, Selina; Duff, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Tau protein can transfer between neurons transneuronally and trans-synaptically, which is thought to explain the progressive spread of tauopathy observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that physiological tau released from donor cells can transfer to recipient cells via the medium, suggesting that at least one mechanism by which tau can transfer is via the extracellular space. Neuronal activity has been shown to regulate tau secretion, but its effect on tau pathology is unknown. Using optogenetic and chemogenetic approaches, we found that increased neuronal activity stimulates the release of tau in vitro and enhances tau pathology in vivo. These data have implications for disease pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies.

  19. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion causes decrease of O-GlcNAcylation, hyperphosphorylation of tau and behavioral deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Gu, Jin-hua; Dai, Chun-ling; Liu, Qun; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is also an etiological factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, how CCH causes cognitive impairment and contributes to Alzheimer’s pathology is poorly understood. Here we produced a mouse model of CCH by unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO) and studied the behavioral changes and brain abnormalities in mice 2.5 months after UCCAO. We found that CCH caused significant short-term memory deficits and mild long-term spatial memory impairment, as well as decreased level of protein O-GlcNAcylation, increased level of tau phosphorylation, dysregulated synaptic proteins and insulin signaling, and selective neurodegeneration in the brain. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the effects of CCH on memory and cognition and the likely link between AD and VaD. PMID:24575038

  20. Tau hyperphosphorylation in apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Genis, L; Chen, Y; Shohami, E; Michaelson, D M

    2000-05-15

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have learning and memory impairments that are associated with specific neurochemical changes and hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the cytoskeletal protein tau. Furthermore, such mice are highly susceptible to the sequelae of brain trauma and their ability to recover from head injury is impaired. In the present study we investigated the extent that the neuronal maintenance and repair impairments of apoE-deficient mice are related to aberrations at the tau phosphorylation level. This was pursued by subjecting control and apoE-deficient mice to closed head injury (CHI) and examination, utilizing immunoblot assays, of the resulting effects on tau phosphorylation. The results thus obtained revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice is hyperphosphorylated before CHI and that this insult results in transient tau hyperphosphorylation, whose extent and time course in the two mouse groups varied markedly. Tau hyperphosphorylation in the injured controls was maximal by about 4 hr after injury and reverted to basal levels by 24 hr. In contrast, almost no head injury-induced tau hyperphosphorylation was observed in the apoE-deficient mice at 4 hr after injury. Some tau hyper-phosphorylation was detected in the head-injured apoE-deficient mice after longer time intervals, but its extent was markedly lower than the maximal values obtained in the head injured controls. These findings show that the chronic neuronal impairments brought about by apoE deficiency and the acute response to head injury are both associated with hyperphosphorylation of the same tau domain and that the ability of apoE-deficient mice to mount the acute tau hyperphosphorylation response to head injury is impaired.

  1. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  2. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  3. A Novel, Ultrasensitive Assay for Tau: Potential for Assessing Traumatic Brain Injury in Tissues and Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Binggong; Davies, Peter; Wagner, Amy K.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a cause of death and disability and can lead to tauopathy-related dementia at an early age. Pathologically, TBI results in axonal injury that is coupled to tau hyperphosphorylation, leading to microtubule instability and tau-mediated neurodegeneration. This suggests that the forms of this protein might serve as neuroinjury-related biomarkers for diagnosis of injury severity and prognosis of the neurological damage prior to clinical expression. We initially determined whether we could detect tau in body fluids using a highly sensitive assay. We used a novel immunoassay, enhanced immunoassay using multi-arrayed fiberoptics (EIMAF) either alone or in combination with rolling circle amplification (a-EIMAF) for the detection of total (T) and phosphorylated (P) tau proteins from brains and biofluids (blood, CSF) of rodents following controlled cortical impact (CCI) and human patients post severe TBI (sTBI). This assay technology for tau is the most sensitive to date with a detection limit of approximately 100 ag/mL for either T-tau and P-tau. In the rodent models, T-tau and P-tau levels in brain and blood increased following CCI during the acute phase and remained high during the chronic phase (30 d). In human CSF samples, T-tau and P-tau increased during the sampling period (5–6 d). T-tau and P-tau in human serum rose during the acute phase and decreased during the chronic stage but was still detectable beyond six months post sTBI. Thus, EIMAF has the potential for assessing both the severity of the proximal injury and the prognosis using easily accessible samples. PMID:25177776

  4. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  5. Boronate-tau mediated uptake in neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Pallas-Bazarra, Noemi; García, Carlos; Langa, Elena; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    We modified tau protein with boronic acid to facilitate its delivery into non neural or neural cultured cells lacking tau protein. Our results indicate that the incorporated tau promotes the formation of cytoplasmic extensions in non-neuronal cells, as well as the appearance of neurites in cultured tau knockout hippocampal neurons. In addition, boronated tau is incorporated into hippocampal neurons of tau knockout mice after intracranial injection in vivo. These findings describe a novel method to deliver exogenous tau protein into cells.

  6. Tau Protein Modifications and Interactions: Their Role in Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Wasik, Urszula; Goras, Marcelina; Filipek, Anna; Niewiadomska, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Tau protein is abundant in the central nervous system and involved in microtubule assembly and stabilization. It is predominantly associated with axonal microtubules and present at lower level in dendrites where it is engaged in signaling functions. Post-translational modifications of tau and its interaction with several proteins play an important regulatory role in the physiology of tau. As a consequence of abnormal modifications and expression, tau is redistributed from neuronal processes to the soma and forms toxic oligomers or aggregated deposits. The accumulation of tau protein is increasingly recognized as the neuropathological hallmark of a number of dementia disorders known as tauopathies. Dysfunction of tau protein may contribute to collapse of cytoskeleton, thereby causing improper anterograde and retrograde movement of motor proteins and their cargos on microtubules. These disturbances in intraneuronal signaling may compromise synaptic transmission as well as trophic support mechanisms in neurons. PMID:24646911

  7. Plasma tau in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Janelidze, Shorena; Insel, Philip S.; Andreasson, Ulf; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Baker, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Jeromin, Andreas; Hanlon, David; Song, Linan; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test whether plasma tau is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) and whether it is related to changes in cognition, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (including β-amyloid [Aβ] and tau), brain atrophy, and brain metabolism. Methods: This was a study of plasma tau in prospectively followed patients with AD (n = 179), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 195), and cognitive healthy controls (n = 189) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and cross-sectionally studied patients with AD (n = 61), mild cognitive impairment (n = 212), and subjective cognitive decline (n = 174) and controls (n = 274) from the Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably (BioFINDER) study at Lund University, Sweden. A total of 1284 participants were studied. Associations were tested between plasma tau and diagnosis, CSF biomarkers, MRI measures, 18fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and cognition. Results: Higher plasma tau was associated with AD dementia, higher CSF tau, and lower CSF Aβ42, but the correlations were weak and differed between ADNI and BioFINDER. Longitudinal analysis in ADNI showed significant associations between plasma tau and worse cognition, more atrophy, and more hypometabolism during follow-up. Conclusions: Plasma tau partly reflects AD pathology, but the overlap between normal aging and AD is large, especially in patients without dementia. Despite group-level differences, these results do not support plasma tau as an AD biomarker in individual people. Future studies may test longitudinal plasma tau measurements in AD. PMID:27694257

  8. Interactions between Tau and α-synuclein augment neurotoxicity in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bidisha; Jackson, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies have suggested considerable overlap between tauopathies and synucleinopathies. Several genome-wide association studies have identified alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) and Tau (MAPT) polymorphisms as common risk factors for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanisms by which subtle variations in the expression of wild-type SNCA and MAPT influence risk for PD and the underlying cellular events that effect neurotoxicity remain unclear. To examine causes of neurotoxicity associated with the α-Syn/Tau interaction, we used the fruit fly as a model. We utilized misexpression paradigms in three different tissues to probe the α-Syn/Tau interaction: the retina, dopaminergic neurons and the larval neuromuscular junction. Misexpression of Tau and α-Syn enhanced a rough eye phenotype and loss of dopaminergic neurons in fly tauopathy and synucleinopathy models, respectively. Our findings suggest that interactions between α-Syn and Tau at the cellular level cause disruption of cytoskeletal organization, axonal transport defects and aberrant synaptic organization that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death associated with sporadic PD. α-Syn did not alter levels of Tau phosphorylated at the AT8 epitope. However, α-Syn and Tau colocalized in ubiquitin-positive aggregates in eye imaginal discs. The presence of Tau also led to an increase in urea soluble α-Syn. Our findings have important implications in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying α-Syn/Tau-mediated synaptic dysfunction, which likely arise in the early asymptomatic phase of sporadic PD. PMID:24430504

  9. Tau Deletion Prevents Stress-Induced Dendritic Atrophy in Prefrontal Cortex: Role of Synaptic Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Sofia; Teplytska, Larysa; Vaz-Silva, Joao; Dioli, Chrysoula; Trindade, Rita; Morais, Monica; Webhofer, Christian; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Almeida, Osborne F X; Turck, Christoph W; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis; Filiou, Michaela D

    2016-04-12

    Tau protein in dendrites and synapses has been recently implicated in synaptic degeneration and neuronal malfunction. Chronic stress, a well-known inducer of neuronal/synaptic atrophy, triggers hyperphosphorylation of Tau protein and cognitive deficits. However, the cause-effect relationship between these events remains to be established. To test the involvement of Tau in stress-induced impairments of cognition, we investigated the impact of stress on cognitive behavior, neuronal structure, and the synaptic proteome in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of Tau knock-out (Tau-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Whereas exposure to chronic stress resulted in atrophy of apical dendrites and spine loss in PFC neurons as well as significant impairments in working memory in WT mice, such changes were absent in Tau-KO animals. Quantitative proteomic analysis of PFC synaptosomal fractions, combined with transmission electron microscopy analysis, suggested a prominent role for mitochondria in the regulation of the effects of stress. Specifically, chronically stressed animals exhibit Tau-dependent alterations in the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial transport and oxidative phosphorylation as well as in the synaptic localization of mitochondria in PFC. These findings provide evidence for a causal role of Tau in mediating stress-elicited neuronal atrophy and cognitive impairment and indicate that Tau may exert its effects through synaptic mitochondria.

  10. Halting of Caspase Activity Protects Tau from MC1-Conformational Change and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma; Kestoras, Dimitra; Gibson, Yolanda; Hamilton, Lucy; Goodson, Ross; Jones, Sophie; Eversden, Sarah; Davies, Peter; O’Neill, Michael; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Wolak, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies in which tau, a microtubule-associated protein, loses its ability to stabilize microtubules. Several post-translational modifications including phosphorylation and truncation increase tau’s propensity to aggregate thus forming NFTs; however, the mechanisms underlying tau conformational change and aggregation still remain to be defined. Caspase activation and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of tau is thought to be a potential trigger of this disease-related pathological conformation. The aim of this work was to investigate the link between caspase activation and a disease-related conformational change of tau in a neuroblastoma cell-based model of spontaneous tau aggregation. We demonstrated that caspase induction initiates proteolytic cleavage of tau and generation of conformationally altered and aggregated tau recognized by the MC1 conformational antibody. Most importantly, these events were shown to be attenuated with caspase inhibitors. This implies that therapeutics aimed at inhibiting caspase-mediated tau cleavage may prove beneficial in slowing cleavage and aggregation, thus potentially halting tau pathology and disease progression. PMID:27589517

  11. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  12. Structure of a Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme: Insights into B55-Mediated Tau Dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Chen, Y; Zhang, P; Jeffrey, P; Shi, Y

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) regulates many essential aspects of cellular physiology. Members of the regulatory B/B55/PR55 family are thought to play a key role in the dephosphorylation of Tau, whose hyperphosphorylation contributes to Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms of the PP2A-Tau connection remain largely enigmatic. Here, we report the complete reconstitution of a Tau dephosphorylation assay and the crystal structure of a heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme involving the regulatory subunit B?. We show that B? specifically and markedly facilitates dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated Tau in our reconstituted assay. The B? subunit comprises a seven-bladed ? propeller, with an acidic, substrate-binding groove located in the center of the propeller. The ? propeller latches onto the ridge of the PP2A scaffold subunit with the help of a protruding ? hairpin arm. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies revealed the underpinnings of PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of Tau.

  13. Tau immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2015-06-01

    Targeting pathological tau protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies has shown great potential in animal models. Given that tau lesions correlate better with the degree of dementia than do amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, their clearance may be clinically more efficacious than removing Aβ when cognitive deficits become evident in AD. Several complementary mechanisms of antibody-mediated removal of tau aggregates are likely to act in concert and the importance of each one may depend on antibody properties, the disease, and its stage. Clinical trials of tau immunotherapy are already underway and several more are likely to be initiated in the near future.

  14. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates.

  15. Expression of Tau Produces Aberrant Plasma Membrane Blebbing in Glial Cells Through RhoA-ROCK-Dependent F-Actin Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Torres-Cruz, Francisco M; Rodríguez-Cruz, Fanny; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; Barragán-Andrade, Norma; Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Ripova, Daniela; Ávila, Jesús; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco

    2016-03-21

    Abnormal aggregation of Tau in glial cells has been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies; however, the pathological significance of these aggregates remains unsolved to date. In this study, we evaluated whether full-length Tau (Tau441) and its aspartic acid421-truncated Tau variant (Tau421) produce alterations in the normal organization of the cytoskeleton and plasma membrane (PM) when transiently expressed in cultured C6-glial cells. Forty-eight hours post-transfection, abnormal microtubule bundling was observed in the majority of the cells, which expressed either Tau441 or Tau421. Moreover, both variants of Tau produced extensive PM blebbing associated with cortical redistribution of filamentous actin (F-Actin). These effects were reverted when Tau-expressing cells were incubated with drugs that depolymerize F-Actin. In addition, when glial cells showing Tau-induced PM blebbing were incubated with inhibitors of the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway, both formation of abnormal PM blebs and F-Actin remodeling were avoided. All of these effects were initiated upstream by abnormal Tau-induced microtubule bundling, which may release the microtubule-bound guanine nucleotide exchange factor-H1 (GEF-H1) into the cytoplasm in order to activate its major effector RhoA-GTPase. These results may represent a new mechanism of Tau toxicity in which Tau-induced microtubule bundling produces activation of the Rho-GTPase-ROCK pathway that in turn mediates the remodeling of cortical Actin and PM blebbing. In AD and other tauopathies, these Tau-induced abnormalities may occur and contribute to the impairment of glial activity.

  16. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  17. Lack of exon 10 in the murine tau gene results in mild sensorimotor defects with aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex species-specific, developmental- and tissue-dependent mechanisms regulate alternative splicing of tau, thereby diversifying tau protein synthesis. The functional role of alternative splicing of tau e.g. exon 10 has never been examined in vivo, although genetic studies suggest that it is important to neurodegenerative disease. Results Gene-targeting was used to delete exon 10 in murine tau on both alleles (E10−/−) to study its functional role. Moreover, mice devoid of exon 10 (E10+/−) on one allele were generated to investigate the effects of 1:1 balanced expression of 4R-/3R-tau protein, since equal amounts of 4R-/3R-tau protein are synthesized in human brain. Middle-aged E10−/− mice displayed sensorimotor disturbances in the rotarod when compared to age-matched E10+/− and wild-type mice, and their muscular grip strength was less than that of E10+/− mice. The performance of E10+/− mice and wild-type mice (E10+/+) was similar in sensorimotor tests. Cognitive abilities or anxiety-like behaviours did not depend on exon 10 in tau, and neither pathological inclusions nor gene-dependent morphological abnormalities were found. Conclusion Ablation of exon 10 in the murine tau gene alters alternative splicing and tau protein synthesis which results in mild sensorimotor phenotypes with aging. Presumably related microtubule-stabilizing genes rescue other functions. PMID:24261309

  18. Effects of interferon-tau on cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Junko; Nishikura, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Tajima, Motoshi; Onuma, Misao

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the antiviral effects of bovine interferon-tau (boIFN-tau) on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were examined in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro experiments, the replication of cytopathic and non-cytopathic BVDV was inhibited in the bovine cells treated with boIFN-tau. The replication of BVDV was completely suppressed by boIFN-tau at a concentration higher than 10(2) U/ml. In order to examine the effect of boIFN-tau on virus propagation in cattle persistently infected (PI) with non-cytopathic BVDV, boIFN-tau was subcutaneously administered to PI cattle at 10(5) U/kg or 10(6) U/kg body weight 5 times per week for 2 weeks. No physical abnormality such as depression was observed in the cattle during the experiment. The mean BVDV titers in the serum of the PI cattle decreased slightly during the boIFN-tau administration period with the dose of 10(6) U/kg. However, the BVDV titers in the serum returned to the pre-administration level after the final boIFN-tau administration. These results suggest that boIFN-tau demonstrates an anti-BVDV effect, reducing the BVDV level in serum transiently when injected into PI cattle.

  19. Subcutaneous liraglutide ameliorates methylglyoxal-induced Alzheimer-like tau pathology and cognitive impairment by modulating tau hyperphosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liqin; Chen, Zhou; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaohong; Ke, Linfang; Zheng, Zhongjie; Lin, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Lijuan; Liu, Libin

    2017-01-01

    Memory deterioration and synapse damage with accumulation of β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau are hallmark lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methylglyoxal (MG), a key intermediate of glucose metabolism, is elevated in AD brains and modifies Aβ42, increasing misfolding and leading to the accumulation of senile plaques. Liraglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is neurotrophic and neuroprotective. However, whether liraglutide can protect against AD-like memory-related deficits and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by MG in vivo is not known. Here, we report that MG induces tau hyperphosphorylation and causes ultrastructural hippocampal damage and cognitive impairment in C57BL/6J mice. Liraglutide reduced these effects via activation of the protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathways. Our data reveal that liraglutide may alleviate AD-like cognitive impairment by decreasing the phosphorylation of tau. PMID:28337257

  20. Synaptic Amyloid-β Oligomers Precede p-Tau and Differentiate High Pathology Control Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bilousova, Tina; Miller, Carol A.; Poon, Wayne W.; Vinters, Harry V.; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Hayden, Eric Y.; Teplow, David B.; Glabe, Charles; Albay, Ricardo; Cole, Gregory M.; Teng, Edmond; Gylys, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) aggregates form the two discrete pathologies of Alzheimer disease (AD), and oligomeric assemblies of each protein are localized to synapses. To determine the sequence by which pathology appears in synapses, Aβ and p-tau were quantified across AD disease stages in parietal cortex. Nondemented cases with high levels of AD-related pathology were included to determine factors that confer protection from clinical symptoms. Flow cytometric analysis of synaptosome preparations was used to quantify Aβ and p-tau in large populations of individual synaptic terminals. Soluble Aβ oligomers were assayed by a single antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total in situ Aβ was elevated in patients with early- and late-stage AD dementia, but not in high pathology nondemented controls compared with age-matched normal controls. However, soluble Aβ oligomers were highest in early AD synapses, and this assay distinguished early AD cases from high pathology controls. Overall, synapse-associated p-tau did not increase until late-stage disease in human and transgenic rat cortex, and p-tau was elevated in individual Aβ-positive synaptosomes in early AD. These results suggest that soluble oligomers in surviving neocortical synaptic terminals are associated with dementia onset and suggest an amyloid cascade hypothesis in which oligomeric Aβ drives phosphorylated tau accumulation and synaptic spread. These results indicate that antiamyloid therapies will be less effective once p-tau pathology is developed. PMID:26718979

  1. A Smart Near-Infrared Fluorescence Probe for Selective Detection of Tau Fibrils in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yujin; Park, Kwang-Su; Ha, Taewoong; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Hwang, Yu Jin; Lee, Junghee; Ryu, Hoon; Choo, Hyunah; Chong, Youhoon

    2016-11-16

    Development of a novel, tau-selective smart near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe was attempted by combining the previously identified core scaffold 3,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylaniline-4-yl moiety, with the characteristic donor-π-acceptor architecture of the smart NIRF Aβ probes DANIR-2c and MCAAD-3. A series of compounds (2 and 3) were prepared, which were identified as "turn-on" NIRF probes for the visual detection of tau aggregates and Aβ fibrils (λem = 650 nm, Stokes shifts = 70-110 nm). In particular, combination of the 3,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylanilin-4-yl moiety and the donor part of MCAAD-3 endowed the resulting probes, 3g and 3h, with significant selectivity toward tau aggregates (selectivity for tau over Aβ = 5.7 and 3.8); they showed much higher fluorescence intensities upon binding to tau aggregates (FItau = 49 and 108) than when bound to Aβ fibrils (FIAβ = 9 and 28). Quantitative analysis of binding affinities and fluorescence properties of 3g and 3h revealed that microenvironment-sensitive molecular rotor-like behavior, rather than binding affinity to the target, is responsible for their selective turn-on fluorescence detection of tau fibrils. Selective fluorescent labeling of tau fibrils by 3g and 3h was further demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining of human Alzheimer's disease brain sections, which showed colocalization of the probes (3g and 3h) and phosphorylated tau antibody.

  2. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death.

    PubMed

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Parmentier, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT)-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau) protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11). We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts) and tissues (the developing eye disc), as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Silencing [Formula: see text] Rescues Tau Pathologies and Memory Deficits through Rescuing PP2A and Inhibiting GSK-3β Signaling in Human Tau Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Ma, Rong-Hong; Li, Xia-Chun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Shi, Hai-Rong; Wei, Wei; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Increase of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A [Formula: see text] is associated with protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) inhibition and tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Down-regulating [Formula: see text] attenuated amyloidogenesis and improved the cognitive functions in transgenic mice expressing amyloid precursor protein (tg2576). Here, we found that silencing [Formula: see text] by hippocampal infusion of [Formula: see text] down-regulated [Formula: see text] (~45%) with reduction of tau phosphorylation/accumulation, improvement of memory deficits, and dendritic plasticity in 12-month-old human tau transgenic mice. Silencing [Formula: see text] not only restored PP2A activity but also inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) with a significant activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt. In HEK293/tau and N2a/tau cells, silencing [Formula: see text] by [Formula: see text] also significantly reduced tau hyperphosphorylation with restoration of PP2A activity and inhibition of GSK-3β, demonstrated by the decreased GSK-3β total protein and mRNA levels, and the increased inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β at serine-9. Furthermore, activation of PKA but not Akt mediated the inhibition of GSK-3β by [Formula: see text] silencing. We conclude that targeting [Formula: see text] can improve tau pathologies and memory deficits in human tau transgenic mice, and activation of PKA contributes to GSK-3β inhibition induced by silencing [Formula: see text]in vitro, suggesting that [Formula: see text] is a promising multiple target of AD.

  4. Silencing I2PP2A Rescues Tau Pathologies and Memory Deficits through Rescuing PP2A and Inhibiting GSK-3β Signaling in Human Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Ma, Rong-Hong; Li, Xia-Chun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Shi, Hai-Rong; Wei, Wei; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Increase of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A I2PP2A is associated with protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) inhibition and tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Down-regulating I2PP2A attenuated amyloidogenesis and improved the cognitive functions in transgenic mice expressing amyloid precursor protein (tg2576). Here, we found that silencing I2PP2A by hippocampal infusion of Lenti - siI2PP2A down-regulated I2PP2A (~45%) with reduction of tau phosphorylation/accumulation, improvement of memory deficits, and dendritic plasticity in 12-month-old human tau transgenic mice. Silencing I2PP2A not only restored PP2A activity but also inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) with a significant activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt. In HEK293/tau and N2a/tau cells, silencing I2PP2A by pSUPER - siI2PP2A also significantly reduced tau hyperphosphorylation with restoration of PP2A activity and inhibition of GSK-3β, demonstrated by the decreased GSK-3β total protein and mRNA levels, and the increased inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β at serine-9. Furthermore, activation of PKA but not Akt mediated the inhibition of GSK-3β by I2PP2A silencing. We conclude that targeting I2PP2A can improve tau pathologies and memory deficits in human tau transgenic mice, and activation of PKA contributes to GSK-3β inhibition induced by silencing I2PP2A in vitro, suggesting that I2PP2A is a promising multiple target of AD. PMID:24987368

  5. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  6. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  7. CP violation in hadronic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; Szynkman, Alejandro; O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the {delta}S=0 decays {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to {tau}{yields}{pi}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{yields}{rho}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}{yields}4{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (triple-product asymmetry)

  8. Loss of intramolecular electrostatic interactions and limited conformational ensemble may promote self-association of cis-tau peptide.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Self-association of proteins can be triggered by a change in the distribution of the conformational ensemble. Posttranslational modification, such as phosphorylation, can induce a shift in the ensemble of conformations. In the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, the formation of intra-cellular neurofibrillary tangles deposition is a result of self-aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Biochemical and NMR studies suggest that the cis peptidyl prolyl conformation of a phosphorylated threonine-proline motif in the tau protein renders tau more prone to aggregation than the trans isomer. However, little is known about the role of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerization in tau aggregation. Here, we show that intra-molecular electrostatic interactions are better formed in the trans isomer. We explore the conformational landscape of the tau segment containing the phosphorylated-Thr(231)-Pro(232) motif using accelerated molecular dynamics and show that intra-molecular electrostatic interactions are coupled to the isomeric state of the peptidyl prolyl bond. Our results suggest that the loss of intra-molecular interactions and the more restricted conformational ensemble of the cis isomer could favor self-aggregation. The results are consistent with experiments, providing valuable complementary atomistic insights and a hypothetical model for isomer specific aggregation of the tau protein.

  9. TDP-43 is a component of ubiquitin-positive tau-negative inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tetsuaki . E-mail: arai@prit.go.jp; Hasegawa, Masato . E-mail: masato@prit.go.jp; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Ikeda, Kenji; Nonaka, Takashi; Mori, Hiroshi; Mann, David; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Mari; Hashizume, Yoshio; Oda, Tatsuro

    2006-12-22

    Ubiquitin-positive tau-negative neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites are common pathological features in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with or without symptoms of motor neuron disease and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses, we have identified a TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), a nuclear factor that functions in regulating transcription and alternative splicing, as a component of these structures in FTLD. Furthermore, skein-like inclusions, neuronal intranuclear inclusions, and glial inclusions in the spinal cord of ALS patients are also positive for TDP-43. Dephosphorylation treatment of the sarkosyl insoluble fraction has shown that abnormal phosphorylation takes place in accumulated TDP-43. The common occurrence of intracellular accumulations of TDP-43 supports the hypothesis that these disorders represent a clinicopathological entity of a single disease, and suggests that they can be newly classified as a proteinopathy of TDP-43.

  10. Effects of microtubule-associated protein tau expression on neural stem cell migration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Xia, Peng; Hou, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Hong-Li; Wang, Tie-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Our preliminary proteomics analysis suggested that expression of microtubule-associated protein tau is elevated in the spinal cord after injury. Therefore, the first aim of the present study was to examine tau expression in the injured spinal cord. The second aim was to determine whether tau can regulate neural stem cell migration, a critical factor in the successful treatment of spinal cord injury. We established rat models of spinal cord injury and injected them with mouse hippocampal neural stem cells through the tail vein. We used immunohistochemistry to show that the expression of tau protein and the number of migrated neural stem cells were markedly increased in the injured spinal cord. Furthermore, using a Transwell assay, we showed that neural stem cell migration was not affected by an elevated tau concentration in the outer chamber, but it was decreased by changes in intracellular tau phosphorylation state. These results demonstrate that neural stem cells have targeted migration capability at the site of injury, and that although tau is not a chemokine for targeted migration of neural stem cells, intracellular tau phosphorylation/dephosphorylation can inhibit cell migration.

  11. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  12. Lysine methylation is an endogenous post-translational modification of tau protein in human brain and a modulator of aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Liao, Zhongping; Clark, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau dissociates from the neuronal cytoskeleton and aggregates to form cytoplasmic inclusions. Although hyper-phosphorylation of tau Ser and Thr residues is an established trigger of tau misfunction and aggregation, tau modifications extend to Lys residues as well, raising the possibility that different modification signatures depress or promote aggregation propensity depending on site occupancy. To identify Lys-residue modifications associated with normal tau function, soluble tau proteins isolated from four cognitively normal human brains were characterized by mass spectrometry methods. The major detectable Lys modification was found to be methylation, which appeared in the form of mono- and di-methyl Lys residues distributed among at least eleven sites. Unlike tau phosphorylation sites, the frequency of Lys methylation was highest in the microtubule binding repeat region that mediates both microtubule binding and homotypic interactions. When purified recombinant human tau was modified in vitro through reductive methylation, its ability to promote tubulin polymerization was retained, whereas its aggregation propensity was greatly attenuated at both nucleation and extension steps. These data establish Lys methylation as part of the normal tau post-translational modification signature in human brain, and suggest that it can function in part to protect against pathological tau aggregation. PMID:24869773

  13. Alzheimer's disease-type neuronal tau hyperphosphorylation induced by Aβ oligomers

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Fernanda G.; Wu, Diana; Lambert, Mary P.; Fernandez, Sara J.; Velasco, Pauline T.; Lacor, Pascale N.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Jerecic, Jasna; Acton, Paul J.; Shughrue, Paul J.; Chen-Dodson, Elizabeth; Kinney, Gene G.; Klein, William L.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by presence of extracellular fibrillar Aβ in amyloid plaques, intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau and elevated brain levels of soluble Aβ oligomers (ADDLs). A major question is how these disparate facets of AD pathology are mechanistically related. Here we show that, independent of the presence of fibrils, ADDLs stimulate tau phosphorylation in mature cultures of hippocampal neurons and in neuroblastoma cells at epitopes characteristically hyperphosphorylated in AD. A monoclonal antibody that targets ADDLs blocked their attachment to synaptic binding sites and prevented tau hyperphosphorylation. Tau phosphorylation was blocked by the Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7(t-butyl)pyrazol(3,4-D)pyramide (PP1), and by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Significantly, tau hyperphosphorylation was also induced by a soluble aqueous extract containing Aβ oligomers from AD brains, but not by an extract from non-AD brains. Aβ oligomers have been increasingly implicated as the main neurotoxins in AD, and the current results provide a unifying mechanism in which oligomer activity is directly linked to tau hyperphosphorylation in AD pathology. PMID:17403556

  14. Glucose deficit triggers tau pathology and synaptic dysfunction in a tauopathy mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lauretti, E; Li, J-G; Di Meco, A; Praticò, D

    2017-01-01

    Clinical investigations have highlighted a biological link between reduced brain glucose metabolism and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation may influence amyloid beta formation in vivo but no data are available on the effect that this condition might have on tau protein metabolism. In the current paper, we investigated the effect of glucose deficit on tau phosphorylation, memory and learning, and synaptic function in a transgenic mouse model of tauopathy, the h-tau mice. Compared with controls, h-tau mice with brain glucose deficit showed significant memory impairments, reduction of synaptic long-term potentiation, increased tau phosphorylation, which was mediated by the activation of P38 MAPK Kinase pathway. We believe our studies demonstrate for the first time that reduced glucose availability in the central nervous system directly triggers behavioral deficits by promoting the development of tau neuropathology and synaptic dysfunction. Since restoring brain glucose levels and metabolism could afford the opportunity to positively influence the entire AD phenotype, this approach should be considered as a novel and viable therapy for preventing and/or halting the disease progression. PMID:28140402

  15. Tau Reduction Prevents Disease in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gheyara, Ania L; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Djukic, Biljana; Craft, Ryan J; Ho, Kaitlyn; Guo, Weikun; Finucane, Mariel M; Sanchez, Pascal E; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing levels of the microtubule-associated protein tau has shown promise as a potential treatment strategy for diseases with secondary epileptic features such as Alzheimer disease. We wanted to determine whether tau reduction may also be of benefit in intractable genetic epilepsies. Methods We studied a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe childhood epilepsy caused by mutations in the human SCN1A gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.1. We genetically deleted 1 or 2 Tau alleles in mice carrying an Nav1.1 truncation mutation (R1407X) that causes Dravet syndrome in humans, and examined their survival, epileptic activity, related hippocampal alterations, and behavioral abnormalities using observation, electroencephalographic recordings, acute slice electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and behavioral assays. Results Tau ablation prevented the high mortality of Dravet mice and reduced the frequency of spontaneous and febrile seizures. It reduced interictal epileptic spikes in vivo and drug-induced epileptic activity in brain slices ex vivo. Tau ablation also prevented biochemical changes in the hippocampus indicative of epileptic activity and ameliorated abnormalities in learning and memory, nest building, and open field behaviors in Dravet mice. Deletion of only 1 Tau allele was sufficient to suppress epileptic activity and improve survival and nesting performance. Interpretation Tau reduction may be of therapeutic benefit in Dravet syndrome and other intractable genetic epilepsies. Ann Neurol 2014;76:443–456 PMID:25042160

  16. Hadronic Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-25

    Precision measurements of the exclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, where the h represent either a pion or a kaon, from the BABAR Experiment are presented. The branching fraction for {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the first resonant plus non-resonant measurement of this mode and the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also a first measurement. In addition we present the new measurement of the branching fraction of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-06-10

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:27030011

  19. Tau isoforms imbalance impairs the axonal transport of the amyloid precursor protein in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas; Čarná, Mária; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2016-11-11

    Tau, as a microtubule-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of microtubule dynamics, axonal transport and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule binding repeats. While tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here we addressed this question using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectories analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP-vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Contrarely, the imbalance towards the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoforms imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  20. Tau Isoforms Imbalance Impairs the Axonal Transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Human Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas E; Čarná, Mária E; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2017-01-04

    Tau, as a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of MT dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) MT binding repeats. Although tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here, we addressed this issue using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content, neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectory analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Conversely, the imbalance toward the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoform imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  1. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A.; O’Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M.; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D.; Cosentino, Stephanie; O’Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D.; O’Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P.; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5’ splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the ‘missing’ +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the ‘stem’ when the

  2. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A; O'Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D; O'Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Lynch, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5' splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the 'missing' +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the 'stem' when the stem

  3. Hyperphosphorylation of tau protein in the ipsilateral thalamus after focal cortical infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Da-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Wan-Yong; Wang-Qin, Run-Qi; Xu, An-Ding; Ruan, Yi-Wen

    2014-01-16

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau has been considered as an important risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. It has been found also in the cortex after focal cerebral ischemia. The present study is aimed at investigating changes of tau protein expression in the ipsilateral thalamus remote from the primary ischemic lesion site after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The number of neurons in the ventroposterior thalamic nucleus (VPN) was evaluated using Nissl staining and neuronal nuclei (NeuN) immunostaining. Total tau and phosphorylated tau at threonine 231 (p-T231-tau) and serine 199 (p-S199-tau) levels, respectively, in the thalamus were measured using immunostaining and immunoblotting. Moreover, apoptosis was detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. It was found that the numbers of intact neurons and NeuN(+) cells within the ipsilateral VPN were reduced significantly compared with the sham-operated group, but the levels of p-T231-tau and p-S199-tau in the ipsilateral thalamus were increased significantly in rats subjected to ischemia for 3 days, 7 days and 28 days. Furthermore, the number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased in the ipsilateral VPN at 7 days and 28 days after MCAO. Thus, hyperphosphorylated tau protein is observed in ipsilateral thalamus after focal cerebral infarction in this study. Our findings suggest that the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau protein induced by ischemia may be associated with the secondary thalamic damage after focal cortical infarction via an apoptotic pathway.

  4. Antisense-mediated Exon Skipping Decreases Tau Protein Expression: A Potential Therapy For Tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Sud, Reeteka; Geller, Evan T; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2014-07-29

    In Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and a number of other neurodegenerative diseases, the microtubule associated protein tau aggregates to form intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and glial tangles, abnormal structures that are part of disease pathogenesis. Disorders with aggregated tau are called tauopathies. Presently, there are no disease-modifying treatments for this disease class. Tau is encoded by the MAPT gene. We propose that reducing MAPT expression and thus the amount of tau protein made could prevent aggregation, and potentially be an approach to treat tauopathies. We tested 31 morpholinos, complementary to the sense strand of the MAPT gene to identify oligonucleotides that can downregulate MAPT expression and reduce the amount of tau protein produced. Oligonucleotides were tested in human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y and IMR32. We identified several morpholinos that reduced MAPT mRNA expression up to 50% and tau protein levels up to ~80%. The two most potent oligonucleotides spanned the 3' boundary of exons 1 and 5, masking the 5'-splice sites of these exons. Both morpholinos induced skipping of the targeted exons. These in vitro findings were confirmed in mice transgenic for the entire human MAPT gene and that express human tau protein. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using modified oligonucleotides to alter tau expression.

  5. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Liraglutide Improves Water Maze Learning and Memory Performance While Reduces Hyperphosphorylation of Tau and Neurofilaments in APP/PS1/Tau Triple Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Gang; Guo, Ai; Chen, Yanlin; Fu, Rongxia; Deng, Yanqiu

    2017-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to explore how liraglutide affects AD-like pathology and cognitive function in APP/PS1/Tau triple transgenic (3 × Tg) Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice. Male 3 × Tg mice and C57BL/6 J mice were treated for 8 weeks with liraglutide (300 μg/kg/day, subcutaneous injection) or saline. Levels of phosphorylated tau, neurofilaments (NFs), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in brain tissues were assessed with western blots. Fluoro-Jade-B labeling were applied to detect pathological changes. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess the spatial learning and memory. Liraglutide decreased levels of hyperphosphorylated tau and NFs in 3 × Tg liraglutide-treated (Tg + LIR) mice, increased ERK phosphorylation, and decreased JNK phosphorylation. Liraglutide also decreased the number of degenerative neurons in the hippocampus and cortex of Tg + LIR mice, and shortened their escape latencies and increased their hidden platform crossings in the MWM task. Liraglutide did not significantly affect the animals' body weight (BW) or fasting blood glucose. Liraglutide can reduce hyperphosphorylation of tau and NFs and reduce neuronal degeneration, apparently through alterations in JNK and ERK signaling, which may be related to its positive effects on AD-like learning and memory impairment.

  7. Beneficial effects of caffeine in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Cyril; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Derisbourg, Maxime; Leboucher, Antoine; Demeyer, Dominique; Carrier, Sébastien; Schneider, Marion; Hamdane, Malika; Müller, Christa E; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2014-09-01

    Tau pathology found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Epidemiologic evidences support that habitual caffeine intake prevents memory decline during aging and reduces the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. So far, experimental studies addressed the impact of caffeine in models mimicking the amyloid pathology of AD. However, in vivo effects of caffeine in a model of AD-like tauopathy remain unknown. Here, we evaluated effects of chronic caffeine intake (0.3 g/L through drinking water), given at an early pathologic stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like tau pathology. We found that chronic caffeine intake prevents from the development of spatial memory deficits in tau mice. Improved memory was associated with reduced hippocampal tau phosphorylation and proteolytic fragments. Moreover, caffeine treatment mitigated several proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers found upregulated in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 animals. Together, our data support that moderate caffeine intake is beneficial in a model of AD-like tau pathology, paving the way for future clinical evaluation in AD patients.

  8. PERK activation mitigates tau pathology in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Julius; Xu, Hong; Rösler, Thomas W; De Andrade, Anderson; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Arzberger, Thomas; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Müller, Ulrich; Höglinger, Günter U

    2017-03-01

    The RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is genetically associated with the tauopathy progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). To elucidate the functional mechanisms underlying this association, we explored PERK activity in brains of PSP patients and its function in three tauopathy models (cultured human neurons overexpressing 4-repeat wild-type tau or treated with the environmental neurotoxin annonacin, and P301S tau transgenic mice). In vitro, treatment with a pharmacological PERK activator CCT020312 or PERK overexpression reduced tau phosphorylation, tau conformational change and 4-repeat tau isoforms, and increased cell viability. In vivo, the PERK activator significantly improved memory and locomotor function, reduced tau pathology, and prevented dendritic spine and motoneuron loss in P301S tau mice. Importantly, the PERK substrate EIF2A, mediating some detrimental effects of PERK signaling, was downregulated in PSP brains and tauopathy models, suggesting that the alternative PERK-NRF2 pathway accounts for these beneficial effects in the context of tauopathies. In summary, PERK activation may be a novel strategy to treat PSP and eventually other tauopathies.

  9. Site-specific dephosphorylation of tau of apolipoprotein E-deficient and control mice by M1 muscarinic agonist treatment.

    PubMed

    Genis, I; Fisher, A; Michaelson, D M

    1999-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice have memory deficits that are associated with synaptic loss of basal forebrain cholinergic projections and with hyperphosphorylation of distinct epitopes of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Furthermore, treatment of apoE-deficient mice with the M1 selective agonist 1-methylpiperidine-4-spiro-(2'-methylthiazoline) [AF150(S)] abolishes their memory deficits and results in recovery of their brain cholinergic markers. In the present study, we used a panel of anti-tau monoclonal antibodies to further map the tau epitopes that are hyperphosphorylated in apoE-deficient mice and examined the effects of prolonged treatment with AF150(S). This revealed that tau of apoE-deficient mice contains a distinct, hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" domain which is localized N-terminally to the microtubule binding domain of tau, and that AF150(S) has an epitope-specific tau dephosphorylating effect whose magnitude is affected by apoE deficiency. Accordingly, epitopes which reside in the hyperphosphorylated "hot spot" are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in apoE-deficient mice but are almost unaffected in the controls, whereas epitopes which flank this tau domain are dephosphorylated by AF150(S) in both mice groups. In contrast, epitopes located at the N and C terminals of tau are unaffected by AF150(S) in both groups of mice. These findings suggest that apoE deficiency results in hyperphosphorylation of a distinct tau domain whose excess phosphorylation can be reduced by muscarinic treatment.

  10. Soluble Conformers of Aβ and Tau Alter Selective Proteins Governing Axonal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mathew A.; LaCroix, Michael; Amar, Fatou; Larson, Megan E.; Forster, Colleen; Aguzzi, Adriano; Bennett, David A.; Ramsden, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Despite the demonstration that amyloid-β (Aβ) can trigger increased tau phosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in vivo, the molecular link associating Aβ and tau pathologies remains ill defined. Here, we observed that exposure of cultured primary neurons to Aβ trimers isolated from brain tissue of subjects with Alzheimer's disease led to a specific conformational change of tau detected by the antibody Alz50. A similar association was supported by postmortem human brain analyses. To study the role of Aβ trimers in vivo, we created a novel bigenic Tg-Aβ+Tau mouse line by crossing Tg2576 (Tg-Aβ) and rTg4510 (Tg-Tau) mice. Before neurodegeneration and amyloidosis, apparent Aβ trimers were increased by ∼2-fold in 3-month-old Tg-Aβ and Tg-Aβ+Tau mice compared with younger mice, whereas soluble monomeric Aβ levels were unchanged. Under these conditions, the expression of soluble Alz50-tau conformers rose by ∼2.2-fold in the forebrains of Tg-Aβ+Tau mice compared with nontransgenic littermates. In parallel, APP accumulated intracellularly, suggestive of a putative dysfunction of anterograde axonal transport. We found that the protein abundance of the kinesin-1 light chain (KLC1) was reduced selectively in vivo and in vitro when soluble Aβ trimers/Alz50-tau were present. Importantly, the reduction in KLC1 was prevented by the intraneuronal delivery of Alz50 antibodies. Collectively, our findings reveal that specific soluble conformers of Aβ and tau cooperatively disrupt axonal transport independently from plaques and tangles. Finally, these results suggest that not all endogenous Aβ oligomers trigger the same deleterious changes and that the role of each assembly should be considered separately. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanistic link between amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, the two major proteins composing the neuropathological lesions detected in brain tissue of Alzheimer's disease subjects, remains unclear. Here, we report that the

  11. Rapid alteration of protein phosphorylation during postmortem: implication in the study of protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Yanchong; Hu, Wen; Xie, Shutao; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification of proteins. Postmortem tissues are widely being utilized in the biomedical studies, but the effects of postmortem on protein phosphorylation have not been received enough attention. In the present study, we found here that most proteins in mouse brain, heart, liver, and kidney were rapidly dephosphorylated to various degrees during 20 sec to 10 min postmortem. Phosphorylation of tau at Thr212 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 was reduced by 50% in the brain with 40 sec postmortem, a regular time for tissue processing. During postmortem, phosphorylation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and AMP activated kinase (AMPK) was increased in the brain, but not in other organs. Perfusion of the brain with cold or room temperature phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) also caused significant alteration of protein phosphorylation. Cooling down and maintaining mouse brains in the ice-cold buffer prevented the alteration effectively. This study suggests that phosphorylation of proteins is rapidly changed during postmortem. Thus, immediate processing of tissues followed by cooling down in ice-cold buffer is vitally important and perfusion has to be avoided when protein phosphorylation is to be studied. PMID:26511732

  12. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Association of Cerebrospinal Fluid β-Amyloid 1-42, T-tau, P-tau181, and α-Synuclein Levels With Clinical Features of Drug-Naive Patients With Early Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Irwin, David J.; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.; Siderowf, Andrew; Caspell, Chelsea; Coffey, Christopher S.; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Pan, Sarah; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Simuni, Tanya; Tanner, Caroline M.; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W.; Chowdhury, Sohini; Mollenhauer, Brit; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Importance We observed a significant correlation between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of tau proteins and α-synuclein, but not β-amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42), and lower concentration of CSF biomarkers, as compared with healthy controls, in a cohort of entirely untreated patients with Parkinson disease (PD) at the earliest stage of the disease studied so far. Objective To evaluate the baseline characteristics and relationship to clinical features of CSF biomarkers (Aβ1–42, total tau [T-tau], tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [P-tau181], and α-synuclein) in drug-naive patients with early PD and demographically matched healthy controls enrolled in the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of the initial 102 research volunteers (63 patients with PD and 39 healthy controls) of the PPMI cohort. Main Outcomes and Measures The CSF biomarkers were measured by INNO-BIA AlzBio3 immunoassay (Aβ1–42, T-tau, and P-tau181; Innogenetics Inc) or by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (α-synuclein). Clinical features including diagnosis, demographic characteristics, motor, neuropsychiatric, and cognitive assessments, and DaTscan were systematically assessed according to the PPMI study protocol. Results Slightly, but significantly, lower levels of Aβ1–42, T-tau, P-tau181, α-synuclein, and T-tau/Aβ1–42 were seen in subjects with PD compared with healthy controls but with a marked overlap between groups. Using multivariate regression analysis, we found that lower Aβ1–42 and P-tau181 levels were associated with PD diagnosis and that decreased CSF T-tau and α-synuclein were associated with increased motor severity. Notably, when we classified patients with PD by their motor phenotypes, lower CSF Aβ1–42 and P-tau181 concentrations were associated with the postural instability–gait disturbance–dominant phenotype but not with the tremor-dominant or intermediate phenotype. Finally, we

  15. Intranasal NAP (davunetide) decreases tau hyperphosphorylation and moderately improves behavioral deficits in mice overexpressing α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Iddo; Ostritsky, Regina; Richter, Franziska; Zhu, Chunni; Fleming, Sheila M; Lemesre, Vincent; Stewart, Alistair J; Morimoto, Bruce H; Gozes, Illana; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified strong associations between the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) and polymorphisms in the genes encoding α-synuclein and the microtubule-associated protein tau. However, the contribution of tau and its phosphorylated form (p-tau) to α-synuclein-induced pathology and neuronal dysfunction remains controversial. We have assessed the effects of NAP (davunetide), an eight-amino acid peptide that decreases tau hyperphosphorylation, in mice overexpressing wild-type human α-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn mice), a model that recapitulates aspects of PD. We found that the p-tau/tau level increased in a subcortical tissue block that includes the striatum and brain stem, and in the cerebellum of the Thy1-aSyn mice compared to nontransgenic controls. Intermittent intranasal NAP administration at 2 μg/mouse per day, 5 days a week, for 24 weeks, starting at 4 weeks of age, significantly decreased the ratio of p-tau/tau levels in the subcortical region while a higher dose of 15 μg/mouse per day induced a decrease in p-tau/tau levels in the cerebellum. Both NAP doses reduced hyperactivity, improved habituation to a novel environment, and reduced olfactory deficits in the Thy1-aSyn mice, but neither dose improved the severe deficits of motor coordination observed on the challenging beam and pole, contrasting with previous data obtained with continuous daily administration of the drug. The data reveal novel effects of NAP on brain p-tau/tau and behavioral outcomes in this model of synucleinopathy and suggest that sustained exposure to NAP may be necessary for maximal benefits. PMID:25505609

  16. Intranasal NAP (davunetide) decreases tau hyperphosphorylation and moderately improves behavioral deficits in mice overexpressing α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Ostritsky, Regina; Richter, Franziska; Zhu, Chunni; Fleming, Sheila M; Lemesre, Vincent; Stewart, Alistair J; Morimoto, Bruce H; Gozes, Illana; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified strong associations between the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) and polymorphisms in the genes encoding α-synuclein and the microtubule-associated protein tau. However, the contribution of tau and its phosphorylated form (p-tau) to α-synuclein-induced pathology and neuronal dysfunction remains controversial. We have assessed the effects of NAP (davunetide), an eight-amino acid peptide that decreases tau hyperphosphorylation, in mice overexpressing wild-type human α-synuclein (Thy1-aSyn mice), a model that recapitulates aspects of PD. We found that the p-tau/tau level increased in a subcortical tissue block that includes the striatum and brain stem, and in the cerebellum of the Thy1-aSyn mice compared to nontransgenic controls. Intermittent intranasal NAP administration at 2 μg/mouse per day, 5 days a week, for 24 weeks, starting at 4 weeks of age, significantly decreased the ratio of p-tau/tau levels in the subcortical region while a higher dose of 15 μg/mouse per day induced a decrease in p-tau/tau levels in the cerebellum. Both NAP doses reduced hyperactivity, improved habituation to a novel environment, and reduced olfactory deficits in the Thy1-aSyn mice, but neither dose improved the severe deficits of motor coordination observed on the challenging beam and pole, contrasting with previous data obtained with continuous daily administration of the drug. The data reveal novel effects of NAP on brain p-tau/tau and behavioral outcomes in this model of synucleinopathy and suggest that sustained exposure to NAP may be necessary for maximal benefits.

  17. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  18. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão B; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B

    2016-07-28

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer's disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued.

  19. A Quantitative Analysis of Brain Soluble Tau and the Tau Secretion Factor.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengcheng; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Caselli, Richard J; Yin, Junxiang; Zhuang, Ningning; Shi, Jiong

    2017-01-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) represent products of insoluble tau protein in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau level is a biomarker in AD diagnosis. The soluble portion of tau protein in brain parenchyma is presumably the source for CSF tau but this has not previously been quantified. We measured CSF tau and soluble brain tau at autopsy in temporal and frontal brain tissue samples from 7 cognitive normal, 12 mild cognitively impaired, and 19 AD subjects. Based on the measured brain soluble tau, we calculated the whole brain tau load and estimated tau secretion factor. Our results suggest that the increase in NFT in AD is likely attributable to post-translational processes; the increase in CSF tau in AD patients is due to an accelerated carrier-based secretion. Moreover, cognitive dysfunction assessed by final Mini-Mental State Examination scores correlated with the secretion factor but not with the soluble tau.

  20. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  1. New perspectives on the role of tau in Alzheimer's disease. Implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel; Avila, Jesús

    2014-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias constitute a major public health issue due to an increasingly aged population as a consequence of generally improved medical care and demographic changes. Current drug treatment of AD, the most prevalent dementia, with cholinesterase inhibitors or NMDA antagonists have demonstrated very modest, symptomatic efficacy, leaving an unmet medical need for new, more effective therapies. While drug development efforts in the last two decades have primarily focused on the amyloid cascade hypothesis, so far with disappointing results, tau-based strategies have received little attention until recently despite that the presence of extensive tau pathology is central to the disease. The discovery of mutations within the tau gene that cause fronto-temporal dementia demonstrated that tau dysfunction, in the absence of amyloid pathology, was sufficient to cause neuronal loss and clinical dementia. Abnormal levels and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein have been reported to be the underlying cause of a group of neurodegenerative disorders collectively known as 'tauopathies'. The detrimental consequence is the loss of affinity between this protein and the microtubules, increased production of fibrillary aggregates and the accumulation of insoluble intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. However, it has become clear in recent years that tau is not only a microtubule interacting protein, but rather has additional roles in cellular processes. This review focuses on emerging therapeutic strategies aimed at treating the underlying causes of the tau pathology in tauopathies and AD, including some novel approaches on the verge of providing new treatment paradigms within the coming years.

  2. FcγRIIb-SHIP2 axis links Aβ to tau pathology by disrupting phosphoinositide metabolism in Alzheimer's disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Tae-In; Park, Hyejin; Gwon, Youngdae; Song, Sungmin; Kim, Seo-Hyun; Moon, Seo Won; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ)-containing extracellular plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau-loaded intracellular neurofibrillary tangles are neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Aβ exerts neuropathogenic activity through tau, the mechanistic link between Aβ and tau pathology remains unknown. Here, we showed that the FcγRIIb-SHIP2 axis is critical in Aβ1-42-induced tau pathology. Fcgr2b knockout or antagonistic FcγRIIb antibody inhibited Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and rescued memory impairments in AD mouse models. FcγRIIb phosphorylation at Tyr273 was found in AD brains, in neuronal cells exposed to Aβ1-42, and recruited SHIP2 to form a protein complex. Consequently, treatment with Aβ1-42 increased PtdIns(3,4)P2 levels from PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to mediate tau hyperphosphorylation. Further, we found that targeting SHIP2 expression by lentiviral siRNA in 3xTg-AD mice or pharmacological inhibition of SHIP2 potently rescued tau hyperphosphorylation and memory impairments. Thus, we concluded that the FcγRIIb-SHIP2 axis links Aβ neurotoxicity to tau pathology by dysregulating PtdIns(3,4)P2 metabolism, providing insight into therapeutic potential against AD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18691.001 PMID:27834631

  3. Development of a cellular tau enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for screening GSK-3β inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Goang-Won; Noh, Min-Young; Kang, Byung Yong; Ku, Il-Whea; Park, Jiseon; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2011-10-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase also known as tau protein kinase I, has been implicated in the pathogenic conditions of Alzheimer's disease. Many investigators have focused on GSK-3 inhibitor as a therapeutic drug. In this study, we established a cell-based assay for the screening of novel GSK-3β inhibitors. For this purpose, four-repeat tau cDNAs were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells (HEK293-Tau). The proliferation of HEK293-Tau cells was no different from that of HEK293 cells, as measured by the bromodeoxyuridine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BrdU ELISA). The concentration-dependent reduction of tau phosphorylation by GSK-3 inhibitors, LiCl, Chir98023, and SB415286, was examined by immunoblot analysis and Tau ELISA (in situ ELISA). Highly consistent data were obtained, suggesting that this novel ELISA method is highly reproducible. Using this ELISA strategy, we isolated a few candidate compounds, including compounds 114 and 149, from several hundreds of synthetic agents and demonstrated that such candidates protect nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells against amyloid-β-induced cell death. These data indicate that this Tau ELISA method in HEK293-Tau cells may be a suitable cell-based assay system to screen for GSK-3β inhibitors.

  4. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  5. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  6. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  7. Longitudinal assessment of tau and amyloid beta in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Mattison, Hayley A; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Auinger, Peggy; McDermott, Michael P; Stewart, Tessandra; Kang, Un Jung; Cain, Kevin C; Shi, Min

    2013-11-01

    Tau gene has been consistently associated with the risk of Parkinson disease in recent genome wide association studies. In addition, alterations of the levels of total tau, phosphorylated tau [181P], and amyloid beta 1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in patients with sporadic Parkinson disease and asymptomatic carriers of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mutations, in patterns that clearly differ from those typically described for patients with Alzheimer disease. To further determine the potential roles of these molecules in Parkinson disease pathogenesis and/or in tracking the disease progression, especially at early stages, the current study assessed all three proteins in 403 Parkinson disease patients enrolled in the DATATOP (Deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism) placebo-controlled clinical trial, the largest cohort to date with cerebrospinal fluid samples collected longitudinally. These initially drug-naive patients at early disease stages were clinically evaluated, and cerebrospinal fluid was collected at baseline and then at endpoint, defined as the time at which symptomatic anti-Parkinson disease medications were determined to be required. General linear models were used to test for associations between baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarker levels or their rates of change and changes in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (total or part III motor score) over time. Robust associations among candidate markers are readily noted. Baseline levels of amyloid beta were weakly but negatively correlated with baseline Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total scores. Baseline phosphorylated tau/total tau and phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta were significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale change. While medications (deprenyl and/or tocopherol) did not appear to alter biomarkers appreciably, a weak but significant positive correlation between the rate of change in total

  8. Tau-Directed Immunotherapy: A Promising Strategy for Treating Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Sulana K.; Joly-Amado, Aurelie; Gordon, Marcia N.; Morgan, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy directed against tau is a promising treatment strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and tauopathies. We review initial studies on tau-directed immunotherapy, and present data from our laboratory testing antibodies using the rTg4510 mouse model, which deposits tau in forebrain neurons. Numerous antibodies have been tested for their efficacy in treating both pathology and cognitive function, in different mouse models, by different routes of administration, and at different ages or durations. We report, here, that the conformation-specific antibody MC-1 produces some degree of improvement to both cognition and pathology in rTg4510. Pathological improvements as measured by Gallyas staining for fully formed tangles and phosphorylated tau appeared four days after intracranial injection into the hippocampus. We also examined markers for microglial activation, which did not appear impacted from treatment. Behavioral effects were noted after continuous infusion of antibodies into the lateral ventricle for approximately 2 weeks. We examined basic motor skills, which were not impacted by treatment, but did note cognitive improvements with both novel object and radial arm water maze testing. Our results support earlier reports in the initial review presented here, and collectively show promise for this strategy of treatment. The general absence of extracellular tau deposits may avoid the opsonization and phagocytosis mechanisms activated by antibodies against amyloid, and make anti tau approaches a safer method of immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26538351

  9. Alzheimer disease therapy--moving from amyloid-β to tau.

    PubMed

    Giacobini, Ezio; Gold, Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD) have focused mainly on reducing levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. Some compounds have achieved this goal, but none has produced clinically meaningful results. Several methodological issues relating to clinical trials of these agents might explain this failure; an additional consideration is that the amyloid cascade hypothesis--which places amyloid plaques at the heart of AD pathogenesis--does not fully integrate a large body of data relevant to the emergence of clinical AD. Importantly, amyloid deposition is not strongly correlated with cognition in multivariate analyses, unlike hyperphosphorylated tau, neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss, which are closely associated with memory deficits. Targeting tau pathology, therefore, might be more clinically effective than Aβ-directed therapies. Furthermore, numerous immunization studies in animal models indicate that reduction of intracellular levels of tau and phosphorylated tau is possible, and is associated with improved cognitive performance. Several tau-related vaccines are in advanced preclinical stages and will soon enter clinical trials. In this article, we present a critical analysis of the failure of Aβ-directed therapies, discuss limitations of the amyloid cascade hypothesis, and suggest the potential value of tau-targeted therapy for AD.

  10. GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies novel risk variants for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S.K.; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M.; Benitez, Bruno; Jeng, Amanda T.; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A.; Arnold, Steve E.; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau) and Aβ42 are established biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n=1,269), identifying three novel genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (P=4.89×10−9 for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (P=1.07×10−8 and P=3.22×10−9 for tau and ptau respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (P = 3.58×10−8 for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent datasets rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology and global cognitive decline (P=2.67×10−4, 0.039, 4.86×10−5 respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. PMID:23562540

  11. Puerarin Ameliorates D-Galactose Induced Enhanced Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Tau Hyperphosphorylation in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tao; Yin, Ni-Na; Han, Yong-Ming; Yuan, Fang; Duan, Yan-Jun; Shen, Feng; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Chen, Ze-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced neurogenesis has been reported in the hippocampus of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized with amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, tau hyperphosphorylation, and progressive neuronal loss. Previously we reported that tau phosphorylation played an essential role in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3), a crucial tau kinase, could induce increased hippocampal neurogenesis. In the present study, we found that treatment of D-galactose rats with Puerarin could significantly improve behavioral performance and ameliorate the enhanced neurogenesis and microtubule-associated protein tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of D-galactose rat brains. FGF-2/GSK-3 signaling pathway might be involved in the effects of Puerarin on hippocampal neurogenesis and tau hyperphosphorylation. Our finding provides primary in vivo evidence that Puerarin can attenuate AD-like enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and tau hyperphosphorylation. Our finding also suggests Puerarin can be served as a treatment for age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD.

  12. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  13. GSK-3β-induced Tau pathology drives hippocampal neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease: involvement of astrocyte–neuron interactions

    PubMed Central

    L'Episcopo, F; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Tirolo, C; Pulvirenti, A; Giugno, R; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Serapide, M F; Cisbani, G; Barker, R A; Cicchetti, F; Marchetti, B

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has emerged as a critical factor in several pathways involved in hippocampal neuronal maintenance and function. In Huntington's disease (HD), there are early hippocampal deficits both in patients and transgenic mouse models, which prompted us to investigate whether disease-specific changes in GSK-3β expression may underlie these abnormalities. Thirty-three postmortem hippocampal samples from HD patients (neuropathological grades 2–4) and age- and sex-matched normal control cases were analyzed using real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCRs (qPCRs) and immunohistochemistry. In vitro and in vivo studies looking at hippocampal pathology and GSK-3β were also undertaken in transgenic R6/2 and wild-type mice. We identified a disease and stage-dependent upregulation of GSK-3β mRNA and protein levels in the HD hippocampus, with the active isoform pGSK-3β-Tyr216 being strongly expressed in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and astrocytes at a time when phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope was also present in these same neurons. This upregulation of pGSK-3β-Tyr216 was also found in the R6/2 hippocampus in vivo and linked to the increased vulnerability of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro. In addition, the increased expression of GSK-3β in the astrocytes of R6/2 mice appeared to be the main driver of Tau phosphorylation and caspase3 activation-induced neuronal death, at least in part via an exacerbated production of major proinflammatory mediators. This stage-dependent overactivation of GSK-3β in HD-affected hippocampal neurons and astrocytes therefore points to GSK-3β as being a critical factor in the pathological development of this condition. As such, therapeutic targeting of this pathway may help ameliorate neuronal dysfunction in HD. PMID:27124580

  14. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  15. Tau-66: evidence for a novel tau conformation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, N; García-Sierra, F; Fu, Y; Beckett, L A; Mufson, E J; Kuret, J; Berry, R W; Binder, L I

    2001-06-01

    We have characterized a novel monoclonal antibody, Tau-66, raised against recombinant human tau. Immunohistochemistry using Tau-66 reveals a somatic-neuronal stain in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) that is more intense in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain than in normal brain. In hippocampus, Tau-66 yields a pattern similar to STG, except that neurofibrillary lesions are preferentially stained if present. In mild AD cases, Tau-66 stains plaques lacking obvious dystrophic neurites (termed herein 'diffuse reticulated plaques') in STG and the hippocampus. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis reveals that Tau-66 is specific for tau, as there is no cross-reactivity with MAP2, tubulin, Abeta(1-40), or Abeta(1-42), although Tau-66 fails to react with tau or any other polypeptide on western blots. The epitope of Tau-66, as assessed by ELISA testing of tau deletion mutants, appears discontinuous, requiring residues 155-244 and 305-314. Tau-66 reactivity exhibits buffer and temperature sensitivity in an ELISA format and is readily abolished by SDS treatment. Taken together these lines of evidence indicate that the Tau-66 epitope is conformation-dependent, perhaps involving a close interaction of the proline-rich and the third microtubule-binding regions. This is the first indication that tau can undergo this novel folding event and that this conformation of tau is involved in AD pathology.

  16. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bloom, George S

    2014-04-01

    The defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD) include conspicuous changes in both brain histology and behavior. The AD brain is characterized microscopically by the combined presence of 2 classes of abnormal structures, extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, both of which comprise highly insoluble, densely packed filaments. The soluble building blocks of these structures are amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides for plaques and tau for tangles. Amyloid-β peptides are proteolytic fragments of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein, whereas tau is a brain-specific, axon-enriched microtubule-associated protein. The behavioral symptoms of AD correlate with the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and they are a direct consequence of the damage and destruction of synapses that mediate memory and cognition. Synapse loss can be caused by the failure of live neurons to maintain functional axons and dendrites or by neuron death. During the past dozen years, a steadily accumulating body of evidence has indicated that soluble forms of Aβ and tau work together, independently of their accumulation into plaques and tangles, to drive healthy neurons into the diseased state and that hallmark toxic properties of Aβ require tau. For instance, acute neuron death, delayed neuron death following ectopic cell cycle reentry, and synaptic dysfunction are triggered by soluble, extracellular Aβ species and depend on soluble, cytoplasmic tau. Therefore, Aβ is upstream of tau in AD pathogenesis and triggers the conversion of tau from a normal to a toxic state, but there is also evidence that toxic tau enhances Aβ toxicity via a feedback loop. Because soluble toxic aggregates of both Aβ and tau can self-propagate and spread throughout the brain by prionlike mechanisms, successful therapeutic intervention for AD would benefit from detecting these species before plaques, tangles, and cognitive impairment become evident and from interfering with the destructive

  18. Behavioral deficit, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction precede tau pathology in P301S transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Magali; Stack, Cliona; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia N.; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Beal, Flint

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal tau accumulation can lead to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. P301S mice overexpress the human tau mutated gene, resulting in tau hyperphosphorylation and tangle formation. Mice also develop synaptic deficits and microglial activation prior to any neurodegeneration and tangles. Oxidative stress can also affect tauopathy. We studied the role of oxidative stress in relationship to behavioral abnormalities and disease progression in P301S mice at 2, 7, and 10 mo of age. At 7 mo of age, P301S mice had behavioral abnormalities, such as hyperactivity and disinhibition. At the same age, we observed increased carbonyls in P301S mitochondria (∼215 and 55% increase, males/females), and deregulation in the activity and content of mitochondrial enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species formation and energy metabolism, such as citrate synthase (∼19 and ∼5% decrease, males/females), MnSOD (∼16% decrease, males only), cytochrome C (∼19% decrease, females only), and cytochrome C oxidase (∼20% increase, females only). These changes in mitochondria proteome appeared before tau hyperphosphorylation and tangle formation, which were observed at 10 mo and were associated with GSK3β activation. At that age, mitochondria proteome deregulation became more apparent in male P301S mitochondria. The data strongly suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial abnormalities appear prior to tau pathology.—Dumont, M., Stack, C., Elipenahli, C., Jainuddin, S., Gerges, M., Starkova, M. N., Yang, L., Starkov, A. A., Beal, F. Behavioral deficit, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction precede tau pathology in P301S transgenic mice. PMID:21825035

  19. Hyperphosphorylated Tau in an α-synuclein-overexpressing transgenic model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Thomas; Credle, Joel; Rodriguez, Olga; Wills, Jonathan; Oaks, Adam W; Masliah, Eliezer; Sidhu, Anita

    2011-05-01

    Although clinically distinct diseases, tauopathies and synucleinopathies share a common genesis and mechanisms, leading to overlapping degenerative changes within neurons. In human postmortem striatum of Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD with dementia, we have recently described elevated levels of tauopathy, indexed as increased hyperphosphorylated Tau (p-Tau). Here we assessed tauopathy in striatum of a transgenic animal model of PD, overexpressing human α-synuclein under the platelet-derived growth factor promoter. At 11 months of age, large and progressive increases in p-Tau in transgenic mice, hyperphosphorylated at sites reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease, were noted, along with elevated levels of α-synuclein and glycogen synthase kinase 3β phosphorylated at Tyr216 (p-GSK-3β), a major kinase involved in the hyperphosphorylation of Tau. Differential Triton X-100 extraction of striata showed the presence of aggregated α-synuclein in the transgenic mice, along with p-Tau and p-GSK-3β, which was also confirmed through immunohistochemistry. After p-Tau formation, both Tau and microtubule-associated protein 1 (MAP1) dissociated from the cytoskeleton, consistent with the diminished ability of these cytoskeleton-binding proteins to bind microtubules. Increases in free tubulin and actin were also noted, indicative of cytoskeleton remodeling and destabilization. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of the transgenic animals showed a reduction in brain volume of transgenic mice, indicating substantial atrophy. From immunohistochemical studies, α-synuclein, p-Tau and p-GSK-3β were found to be overexpressed and co-localized in large inclusion bodies, reminiscent of Lewy bodies. The elevated state of tauopathy seen in these platelet-derived growth factor-α-synuclein mice provides further confirmation that PD may be a tauopathic disease.

  20. Atorvastatin ameliorates cognitive impairment, Aβ1-42 production and Tau hyperphosphorylation in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Huaxia; Li, Chenli; Wang, Fangyan; Shi, Yaosheng; Liu, Lingjiang; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Aiming; Zhang, Junfang; Wang, Chuang; Chen, Zhongming

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) interacts with the serine/threonine protein kinase AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway and deactivates GSK3β signaling, which result in microtubule protein tau phosphorylation. Atorvastatin, a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, has been proven to improve learning and memory performance, reduce Aβ and phosphorylated tau levels in mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it still remains unclear whether atorvastatin is responsible for regulation of AKT/GSK3β signaling and contributes to subsequent down-regulation of Aβ1-42 and phosphorylated tau in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg APP/PS1) mice. Herein, we aimed to investigate the possible impacts of atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) on the memory deficit by behavioral tests and changes of AKT/GSK3β signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex by western blot test in Tg APP/PS1 mice. The results showed that treatment with atorvastatin significantly reversed the memory deficit in the Tg APP/PS1 mice in a novel object recognition and the Morris water maze tests. Moreover, atorvastatin significantly attenuated Aβ1-42 accumulation and phosphorylation of tau (Ser396) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Tg APP/PS1 mice. In addition, atorvastatin treatment also increased phosphorylation of AKT, inhibited GSK3β activity by increasing phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser9) and decreasing the beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. These results indicated that the memory ameliorating effect of atorvastatin may be, in part, by regulation the AKT/GSK3β signaling which may contribute to down-regulation of Aβ1-42 and tau hyperphosphorylation.

  1. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  2. Current advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focused on considerations targeting Aβ and tau

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs mainly the memory and cognitive function in elderly. Extracellular beta amyloid deposition and intracellular tau hyperphosphorylation are the two pathological events that are thought to cause neuronal dysfunction in AD. Since the detailed mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of AD are still not clear, the current treatments are those drugs that can alleviate the symptoms of AD patients. Recent studies have indicated that these symptom-reliving drugs also have the ability of regulating amyloid precursor protein processing and tau phosphorylation. Thus the pharmacological mechanism of these drugs may be too simply-evaluated. This review summarizes the current status of AD therapy and some potential preclinical considerations that target beta amyloid and tau protein are also discussed. PMID:23210837

  3. Escitalopram Ameliorates Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Spatial Memory Deficits Induced by Protein Kinase A Activation in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Wang, Yan-Juan; Gong, Wei-Gang; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the effect of escitalopram pretreatment on protein kinase A (PKA)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficits in rats using western blot and behavioral tests, respectively. We demonstrated that escitalopram effectively ameliorated tau hyperphosphorylation and the spatial memory deficits induced by PKA activation. We measured the total and activity-dependent Ser9-phosphorylated levels of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β in hippocampal extracts. No significant change in the total level of GSK-3β was observed between the different groups. However, compared with forskolin injection alone, pretreatment with escitalopram increased the level of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. We also demonstrated that escitalopram increased Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (the active form of Akt). Furthermore, we identified other important kinases and phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase 2A, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, and MAP kinase kinase-1/2, that have previously been reported to play a crucial role in tau phosphorylation; however, we did not detect any significant change in the activation of these kinases or phosphatases in our study. We unexpectedly demonstrated that forskolin caused anxiety-like behavior in rats, and pretreatment with escitalopram did not significantly ameliorate the anxiety-like behavior induced by forskolin. These data provide the first evidence that escitalopram ameliorates forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory impairment in rats; these effects do not occur via the anti-anxiety activity of escitalopram but may involve the Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  4. Secretion of full-length tau or tau fragments in a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-11-10

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Several studies have suggested that tau may be secreted to extracellular medium and may be responsible of spreading of neurodegeneration. The overexpression of tau in cultured non-neuronal cells leads to the secretion of this protein. The proline-rich region of tau may serve as a membrane-binding site during the secretion of the full-length tau molecule. Tau fragments lacking this proline-region are either not secreted or are secreted in a distinct manner to the full-length molecule.

  5. Region-Specific Vulnerability to Oxidative Stress, Neuroinflammation, and Tau Hyperphosphorylation in Experimental Diabetes Mellitus Mice.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Montasir; Hasan, Zafrul; Motoi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the pathological hallmarks of AD is hyperphosphorylated tau protein, which forms neurofibrillary tangles. Oxidative stress and the activation of inflammatory pathways are features that are associated with both DM and AD. However, the brain region specificity of AD-related neurodegeneration, which mainly occurs in the hippocampus while the cerebellum is relatively unaffected, has not yet been clarified. Therefore, we used experimental DM mice (caused by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin [STZ]) to determine whether these neurodegeneration-associated mechanisms were associated with region-specific selective vulnerability or tau phosphorylation. The hippocampus, midbrain, and cerebellum of aged (14 to 18 months old) non-transgenic (NTg) and transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type human tau (Tg601 mice) were evaluated after a treatment with STZ. The STZ injection increased reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and malondialdehyde in the hippocampus, but not in the midbrain or cerebellum. The STZ treatment also increased the number of Iba-1-positive and CD68-positive microglial cells, astrocytes, and IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18 levels in the hippocampus, but not in the midbrain or cerebellum. Tau hyperphosphorylation was also enhanced in the hippocampus, but not in the midbrain or cerebellum. When the effects of STZ were compared between Tg601 and NTg mice, microglial proliferation and elevations in IL-6 and phosphorylated tau were higher in Tg601 mice. These results suggest that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in STZ-treated mice are associated with tau hyperphosphorylation, which may contribute to selective neurodegeneration in human AD.

  6. Tau protein in frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3).

    PubMed

    Yancopoulou, Despina; Crowther, R Anthony; Chakrabarti, Lisa; Gydesen, Susanne; Brown, Jeremy M; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2003-08-01

    Recent work on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has revealed the existence of at least 3 genetically distinct groups of inherited FTD: FTDP-17, FTD and motor neuron disease linked to chromosome 9, and FTD linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3). Tau, on chromosome 17, is the only gene where mutations have been identified and its involvement in FTD has been firmly established. The genes on chromosome 9 and chromosome 3 associated with familial forms of FTD remain to be identified. Abnormal aggregates of tau protein characterize the brain lesions of FTDP-17 patients and ubiquitin inclusions have been found in FTD with motor neuron disease linked to chromosome 9. In this study the frontal cortices of 3 FTD-3 patients from a unique Danish family were examined for characteristic neuropathological features. In these brains tau inclusions were present in neurons and some glial cells in the absence of beta-amyloid deposits. The presence of filamentous tau protein in the frontal cortex of these patients suggests a possible link between tau and the genetic defect present on chromosome 3 and associated with FTD-3, although the limited amount of tau deposits observed makes it difficult to define this as a tauopathy.

  7. Progressive Motor Deficit is Mediated by the Denervation of Neuromuscular Junctions and Axonal Degeneration in Transgenic Mice Expressing Mutant (P301S) Tau Protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhuoran; Valkenburg, Femke; Hornix, Betty E; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Zhou, Xingdong; Mari, Muriel; Reggiori, Fulvio; Van Dam, Debby; Eggen, Bart J L; De Deyn, Peter P; Boddeke, Erik

    2017-02-10

    Tauopathies include a variety of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathological aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, resulting in progressive cognitive decline and motor impairment. The underlying mechanism for motor deficits related to tauopathy is not yet fully understood. Here, we use a novel transgenic tau mouse line, Tau 58/4, with enhanced neuron-specific expression of P301S mutant tau to investigate the motor abnormalities in association with the peripheral nervous system. Using stationary beam, gait, and rotarod tests, motor deficits were found in Tau 58/4 mice already 3 months after birth, which deteriorated during aging. Hyperphosphorylated tau was detected in the cell bodies and axons of motor neurons. At the age of 9 and 12 months, significant denervation of the neuromuscular junction in the extensor digitorum longus muscle was observed in Tau 58/4 mice, compared to wild-type mice. Muscle hypotrophy was observed in Tau 58/4 mice at 9 and 12 months. Using electron microscopy, we observed ultrastructural changes in the sciatic nerve of 12-month-old Tau 58/4 mice indicative of the loss of large axonal fibers and hypomyelination (assessed by g-ratio). We conclude that the accumulated hyperphosphorylated tau in the axon terminals may induce dying-back axonal degeneration, myelin abnormalities, neuromuscular junction denervation, and muscular atrophy, which may be the mechanisms responsible for the deterioration of the motor function in Tau 58/4 mice. Tau 58/4 mice represent an interesting neuromuscular degeneration model, and the pathological mechanisms might be responsible for motor signs observed in some human tauopathies.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease and Tauopathies-Prion-Like Seeded Aggregation and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tau pathology (tangles and threads) and extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology are defining features of Alzheimer’s disease. For 25 years, most research has focused on the amyloid hypothesis of AD pathogenesis and progression. But, because of failures in clinical trials of Aβ-targeted therapies and the new concept of prion-like propagation of intracellular abnormal proteins, tau has come back into the spotlight as a candidate therapeutic target in AD. Tau pathologies are found in a range of neurodegenerative disorders, but extensive analyses of pathological tau in diseased brains has demonstrated that the abnormal tau protein in each disease is structurally distinct, supporting the idea that progression of the diverse but characteristic tau pathologies occurs through prion-like seed-dependent aggregation. Therefore, intervention in the conversion of normal tau to abnormal forms and in cell-to-cell transmission of tau may be the key to development of disease-modifying therapies for AD and other dementing disorders. PMID:27136595

  9. The Link Between DYRK1A Overexpression and Several-fold Enhancement of Neurofibrillary Degeneration with 3-Repeat Tau Protein in Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Barua, Madhabi; Kuchna, Izabela; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Wang, Kuo-Chiang; Wegiel, Jarek; Ma, Shuang Yang; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Silverman, Wayne P.; Reisberg, Barry; Monteiro, Isabel; Leon, Mony de; Wisniewski, Thomas; Dalton, Arthur; Lai, Florence; Hwang, Yu-Wen; Adayev, Tatyana; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Iqbal, Inge-Grundke; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Triplication of chromosome 21 in Down syndrome (DS) results in overexpression of the minibrain kinase/dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylated and regulated kinase 1A gene (DYRK1A). DYRK1A phosphorylates cytoplasmic tau protein and appears in intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). We have previously shown significantly more DYRK1A-positive NFTs in DS brains than in sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) brains. This study demonstrates a gene dosage–proportional increase in the level of DYRK1A in DS in the cytoplasm and the cell nucleus and enhanced cytoplasmic and nuclear immunoreactivity of DYRK1A in DS. The results suggest that overexpressed DYRK1A may alter both phosphorylation of tau and alternative splicing factor (ASF). Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed modification of ASF phosphorylation in DS/AD and AD in comparison to controls. Altered phosphorylation of ASF by overexpressed nuclear DYRK1A may contribute to the alternative splicing of the tau gene and an increase by 2.68× of the 3R/4R ratio in DS/AD, and a several-fold increase in the number of 3R-tau–positive NFTs in DS/AD subjects compared to in sporadic AD subjects. These data support the hypothesis that phosphorylation of ASF by overexpressed DYRK1A may contribute to alternative splicing of exon 10, increased expression of 3R tau, and early onset of neurofibrillary degeneration in DS. PMID:21157379

  10. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  11. Mechanisms of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis and Prevention: The Brain, Neural Pathology, N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptors, Tau Protein and Other Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kocahan, Sayad; Doğan, Zumrut

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the appearance of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the intracellular environment, neuronal death and the loss of synapses, all of which contribute to cognitive decline in a progressive manner. A number of hypotheses have been advanced to explain AD. Abnormal tau phosphorylation may contribute to the formation of abnormal neurofibrillary structures. Many different structures are susceptible to AD, including the reticular formation, the nuclei in the brain stem (e.g., raphe nucleus), thalamus, hypothalamus, locus ceruleus, amygdala, substantia nigra, striatum, and claustrum. Excitotoxicity results from continuous, low-level activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Premature synaptotoxicity, changes in neurotransmitter expression, neurophils loss, accumulation of amyloid β-protein deposits (amyloid/senile plaques), and neuronal loss and brain atrophy are all associated with stages of AD progression. Several recent studies have examined the relationship between Aβ and NMDA receptors. Aβ-induced spine loss is associated with a decrease in glutamate receptors and is dependent upon the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, which has also been linked to long-term depression. PMID:28138104

  12. Tau Protein and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fuster-Matanzo, Almudena; Llorens-Martín, María; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Avila, Jesús; Hernández, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein found in the axonal compartment that stabilizes neuronal microtubules under normal physiological conditions. Tau metabolism has attracted much attention because of its role in neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies, mainly Alzheimer disease. Here, we review recent findings suggesting that axonal outgrowth in subgranular zone during adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires a dynamic microtubule network and tau protein facilitates to maintain that dynamic cytoskeleton. Those functions are carried out in part by tau isoform with only three microtubule-binding domains (without exon 10) and by presence of hyperphosphorylated tau forms. Thus, tau is a good marker and a valuable tool to study new axons in adult neurogenesis. PMID:22787440

  13. Tau appearance in atmospheric neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi

    1998-10-24

    If the correct interpretation of the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data is {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation, the contained data sample should already have more than 10 {tau} appearance events. We study the challenging task of detecting the {tau}, focusing on the decay chain {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} in events with quasi-elastic {tau} production. The background level, which is currently quite uncertain because of a lack of relevant neutral current data, can be measured by the near detector in the K2K experiment. Our estimates of the background suggest that it may be possible to detect {tau} appearance in Super-Kamiokande with 5-10 years of running.

  14. Effects of ginkgolide A on okadaic acid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Cui; Hu, Meili; Pan, Jian; Chen, Jianhua; Duan, Peilu; Zhai, Tianlong; Ding, Jingna; Xu, Cunji

    2012-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia leading to the irreversible loss of neurons, and Tau hyperphosphorylation has an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Ginkgolide A is one of the active components of Ginkgo biloba extracts which has been proven to have neuroprotective effects, but the effect of ginkgolide A on Tau hyperphosphorylation has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of ginkgolide A on cell viability, Tau hyperphosphorylation, and the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in N2a cell lines were explored, and methods such as the MTT assay, ELISA, and Western blots techniques were used. The results showed that ginkgolide A could increase cell viability and suppress the phosphorylation level of Tau in cell lysates, meanwhile, GSK3β was inhibited with phosphorylation at Ser9. Moreover, treatment of the cells with ginkgolide A promoted phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, suggesting that the activation of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway may be the mechanism for ginkgolide A to prevent the intracellular accumulation of p-Tau induced by okadaic acid and to protect the cells from Tau hyperphosphorylation-related toxicity.

  15. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  16. cis p-tau: early driver of brain injury and tauopathy blocked by antibody

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Qiu, Jianhua; Moncaster, Juliet; Chen, Chun-Hau; Yao, Yandan; Lin, Yu-Min; Driver, Jane A; Sun, Yan; Wei, Shuo; Luo, Man-Li; Albayram, Onder; Huang, Pengyu; Rotenberg, Alexander; Ryo, Akihide; Goldstein, Lee E; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; McKee, Ann C.; Meehan, William; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), characterized by acute neurological dysfunction, is one of the best known environmental risk factors for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), whose defining pathologic features include tauopathy made of phosphorylated tau (p-tau). However, tauopathy has not been detected in early stages after TBI and how TBI leads to tauopathy is unknown. Here we find robust cis p-tau pathology after sport- and military-related TBI in humans and mice. Acutely after TBI in mice and stress in vitro, neurons prominently produce cis p-tau, which disrupts axonal microtubule network and mitochondrial transport, spreads to other neurons, and leads to apoptosis. This process, termed “cistauosis”, appears long before other tauopathy. Treating TBI mice with cis antibody blocks cistauosis, prevents tauopathy development and spread, and restores many TBI-related structural and functional sequelae. Thus, cis p-tau is a major early driver after TBI and leads to tauopathy in CTE and AD, and cis antibody may be further developed to detect and treat TBI, and prevent progressive neurodegeneration after injury. PMID:26176913

  17. Antibody against early driver of neurodegeneration cis P-tau blocks brain injury and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Asami; Shahpasand, Koorosh; Mannix, Rebekah; Qiu, Jianhua; Moncaster, Juliet; Chen, Chun-Hau; Yao, Yandan; Lin, Yu-Min; Driver, Jane A; Sun, Yan; Wei, Shuo; Luo, Man-Li; Albayram, Onder; Huang, Pengyu; Rotenberg, Alexander; Ryo, Akihide; Goldstein, Lee E; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; McKee, Ann C; Meehan, William; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-07-23

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), characterized by acute neurological dysfunction, is one of the best known environmental risk factors for chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease, the defining pathologic features of which include tauopathy made of phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau). However, tauopathy has not been detected in the early stages after TBI, and how TBI leads to tauopathy is unknown. Here we find robust cis P-tau pathology after TBI in humans and mice. After TBI in mice and stress in vitro, neurons acutely produce cis P-tau, which disrupts axonal microtubule networks and mitochondrial transport, spreads to other neurons, and leads to apoptosis. This process, which we term 'cistauosis', appears long before other tauopathy. Treating TBI mice with cis antibody blocks cistauosis, prevents tauopathy development and spread, and restores many TBI-related structural and functional sequelae. Thus, cis P-tau is a major early driver of disease after TBI and leads to tauopathy in chronic traumatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease. The cis antibody may be further developed to detect and treat TBI, and prevent progressive neurodegeneration after injury.

  18. Formation and Propagation of Tau Oligomeric Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Julia E.; Kayed, Rakez

    2013-01-01

    Tau misfolding and aggregation leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which have long been considered one of the main pathological hallmarks for numerous neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). However, recent studies completed both in vitro and in vivo suggest that intermediate forms of tau, known as tau oligomers, between the monomeric form and NFTs are the true toxic species in disease and the best targets for anti-tau therapies. However, the exact mechanism by which the spread of pathology occurs is unknown. Evidence suggests that tau oligomers may act as templates for the misfolding of native tau, thereby seeding the spread of the toxic forms of the protein. Recently, researchers have reported the ability of tau oligomers to enter and exit cells, propagating from disease-affected regions to unaffected areas. While the mechanism by which the spreading of misfolded tau occurs has yet to be elucidated, there are a few different models which have been proposed, including cell membrane stress and pore-formation, endocytosis and exocytosis, and non-traditional secretion of protein not enclosed by a membrane. Coming to an understanding of how toxic tau species seed and spread through the brain will be crucial to finding effective treatments for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:23882255

  19. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  20. Developmental exposure to lead (Pb) alters the expression of the human tau gene and its products in a transgenic animal model.

    PubMed

    Dash, M; Eid, A; Subaiea, G; Chang, J; Deeb, R; Masoud, A; Renehan, W E; Adem, A; Zawia, N H

    2016-07-01

    Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathological aggregation of the tau protein in the human brain. The best known of these illnesses is Alzheimer's disease (AD); a disease where the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) becomes hyperphosphorylated (lowering its binding affinity to microtubules) and aggregates within neurons in the form of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). In this paper we examine whether environmental factors play a significant role in tau pathogenesis. Our studies were conducted in a double mutant mouse model that expressed the human tau gene and lacked the gene for murine tau. The human tau mouse model was tested for the transgene's ability to respond to an environmental toxicant. Pups were developmentally exposed to lead (Pb) from postnatal day (PND) 1-20 with 0.2% Pb acetate. Mice were then sacrificed at PND 20, 30, 40 and 60. Protein and mRNA levels for tau and CDK5 as well as tau phosphorylation at Ser396 were determined. In addition, the potential role of miRNA in tau expression was investigated by measuring levels of miR-34c, a miRNA that targets the mRNA for human tau, at PND20 and 50. The expression of the human tau transgene was altered by developmental exposure to Pb. This exposure also altered the expression of miR-34c. Our findings are the first of their kind to test the responsiveness of the human tau gene to an environmental toxicant and to examine an epigenetic mechanism that may be involved in the regulation of this gene's expression.

  1. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain.

  2. Baseline CSF p-tau levels independently predict progression of hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, W J.P.; Vrenken, H; Barnes, J; Sluimer, I C.; Verwey, N A.; Blankenstein, M A.; Klein, M; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Barkhof, F; van der Flier, W M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether baseline CSF biomarkers are associated with hippocampal atrophy rate as a measure of disease progression in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls, controlling for baseline neuropsychological and MRI findings. Methods: We assessed data from 31 patients with AD, 25 patients with MCI, and 19 controls (mean age 68 ± 8 years; 39 [52%] female) who visited our memory clinic and had received serial MRI scanning (scan interval 1.7 ± 0.7 years). At baseline, CSF biomarkers (amyloid β 1-42, tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau]) were obtained, as well as neuropsychological data. Baseline MRI scans were assessed using visual rating scales for medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities. Hippocampal atrophy rates were estimated using regional nonlinear “fluid” registration of follow-up scan to baseline scan. Results: Stepwise multiple linear regression, adjusted for age and sex, showed that increased CSF p-tau levels (β [standard error]: −0.79 [0.35]) at baseline was independently associated with higher subsequent hippocampal atrophy rates (p < 0.05), together with poorer memory performance (0.09 [0.04]) and more severe MTA (−0.60 [0.21]). The association of memory function with hippocampal atrophy rate was explained by the link with diagnosis, because it disappeared from the model after we additionally corrected for diagnosis. Conclusions: Baseline CSF levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 are independently associated with subsequent disease progression, as reflected by hippocampal atrophy rate. This effect is independent of baseline neuropsychological and MRI predictors. Our results imply that predicting disease progression can best be achieved by combining information from different modalities. GLOSSARY Aβ1-42 = amyloid β 1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; FOV = field of view; GCA = global cortical

  3. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  4. The Search for B+ to Tau+ Nu(Tau) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, L.A.; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} using 288 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup o}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = 0.88{sub -0.67}{sup +0.68}(stat.) {+-} 0.11(syst.) x 10{sup -4} and extract an upper limit on the branching fraction, at the 90% confidence level, of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -4}. We calculate the product of the B meson decay constant and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.0{sub -3.6}{sup +2.3}(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.4}(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  5. CSF T-Tau/Aβ42 predicts white matter microstructure in healthy adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bendlin, Barbara B; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Johnson, Sterling C; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Willette, Auriel A; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Sodhi, Aparna; Ries, Michele L; Birdsill, Alex C; Alexander, Andrew L; Rowley, Howard A; Puglielli, Luigi; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers T-Tau and Aβ(42) are linked with Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet little is known about the relationship between CSF biomarkers and structural brain alteration in healthy adults. In this study we examined the extent to which AD biomarkers measured in CSF predict brain microstructure indexed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volume indexed by T1-weighted imaging. Forty-three middle-aged adults with parental family history of AD received baseline lumbar puncture and MRI approximately 3.5 years later. Voxel-wise image analysis methods were used to test whether baseline CSF Aβ(42), total tau (T-Tau), phosphorylated tau (P-Tau) and neurofilament light protein predicted brain microstructure as indexed by DTI and gray matter volume indexed by T1-weighted imaging. T-Tau and T-Tau/Aβ(42) were widely correlated with indices of brain microstructure (mean, axial, and radial diffusivity), notably in white matter regions adjacent to gray matter structures affected in the earliest stages of AD. None of the CSF biomarkers were related to gray matter volume. Elevated P-Tau and P-Tau/Aβ(42) levels were associated with lower recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Overall, the results suggest that CSF biomarkers are related to brain microstructure in healthy adults with elevated risk of developing AD. Furthermore, the results clearly suggest that early pathological changes in AD can be detected with DTI and occur not only in cortex, but also in white matter.

  6. Whole Genome Expression Analysis in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy Identifies MECP2 as a Possible Regulator of Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole M.; Jiang, Shanya; Binder, Jessica; Wright, Carrie; Gopalan, Banu; Lamb, Bruce T.; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT or tau) correlates with the development of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. While numerous attempts have been made to model AD-relevant tau pathology in various animal models, there has been very limited success for these models to fully recapitulate the progression of disease as seen in human tauopathies. Here, we performed whole genome gene expression in a genomic mouse model of tauopathy that expressed human MAPT gene under the control of endogenous human MAPT promoter and also were complete knockout for endogenous mouse tau [referred to as ‘hTauMaptKO(Duke)′ mice]. First, whole genome expression analysis revealed 64 genes, which were differentially expressed (32 up-regulated and 32 down-regulated) in the hippocampus of 6-month-old hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice compared to age-matched non-transgenic controls. Genes relevant to neuronal function or neurological disease include up-regulated genes: PKC-alpha (Prkca), MECP2 (Mecp2), STRN4 (Strn4), SLC40a1 (Slc40a1), POLD2 (Pold2), PCSK2 (Pcsk2), and down-regulated genes: KRT12 (Krt12), LASS1 (Cers1), PLAT (Plat), and NRXN1 (Nrxn1). Second, network analysis suggested anatomical structure development, cellular metabolic process, cell death, signal transduction, and stress response were significantly altered biological processes in the hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice as compared to age-matched non-transgenic controls. Further characterization of a sub-group of significantly altered genes revealed elevated phosphorylation of MECP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein-2), which binds to methylated CpGs and associates with chromatin, in hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice compared to age-matched controls. Third, phoshpho-MECP2 was elevated in autopsy brain samples from human AD compared to healthy controls. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of MECP2 in human tau expressing N2a cells resulted in a

  7. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; ...

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  8. Measurement of the Semileptonic Decays B->D tau nu and B->D* tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. They select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton ({ell} = e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. They perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} ({tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. They measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and R(D*) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D* {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D) = (41.6 {+-} 11.7 {+-} 5.2)% and R(D*) = (29.7 {+-} 5.6 {+-} 1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fractions, they obtain {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.06)% and {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1.62 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. They also present, for the first time, distributions of

  9. Exclusive branching-fraction measurements of semileptonic tau decays into three charged hadrons, into phipi(-)nu tau, and into phi K(-)nu tau.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2008-01-11

    Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 342 fb(-1) collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, we measure B(tau(-)--> pi(-)pi(-)pi+nu(tau)(ex.K(S0))=(8.83+/-0.01+/-0.13)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)pi+nu tau(ex.K(S0))=(0.273+/-0.002+/-0.009)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)K+nu tau)=(0.1346+/-0.0010+/-0.0036)%, and B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau)=(1.58+/-0.13+/-0.12)x10;{-5}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These include significant improvements over previous measurements and a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau) in which no resonance structure is assumed. We also report a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi(-)nu tau)=(3.42+/-0.55+/-0.25)x10(-5), a new measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi K(-)nu tau)=(3.39+/-0.20+/-0.28)x10(-5) and a first upper limit on B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau(ex.var phi)).

  10. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  11. Stabilizing the Hsp70-Tau Complex Promotes Turnover in Models of Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Young, Zapporah T; Rauch, Jennifer N; Assimon, Victoria A; Jinwal, Umesh K; Ahn, Misol; Li, Xiaokai; Dunyak, Bryan M; Ahmad, Atta; Carlson, George A; Srinivasan, Sharan R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2016-08-18

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is a chaperone that normally scans the proteome and initiates the turnover of some proteins (termed clients) by linking them to the degradation pathways. This activity is critical to normal protein homeostasis, yet it appears to fail in diseases associated with abnormal protein accumulation. It is not clear why Hsp70 promotes client degradation under some conditions, while sparing that protein under others. Here, we used a combination of chemical biology and genetic strategies to systematically perturb the affinity of Hsp70 for the model client, tau. This approach revealed that tight complexes between Hsp70 and tau were associated with enhanced turnover while transient interactions favored tau retention. These results suggest that client affinity is one important parameter governing Hsp70-mediated quality control.

  12. Neuronal plasticity in hibernation and the proposed role of the microtubule-associated protein tau as a "master switch" regulating synaptic gain in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Thomas; Bullmann, Torsten

    2013-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of adaptive changes in brain structure and learning abilities during hibernation as a behavioral strategy used by several mammalian species to minimize energy expenditure under current or anticipated inhospitable environmental conditions. One cellular mechanism that contributes to the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during hibernation is reversible phosphorylation of enzymes and proteins, which limits rates of flux through metabolic pathways. Reversible phosphorylation during hibernation also affects synaptic membrane proteins, a process known to be involved in synaptic plasticity. This mechanism of reversible protein phosphorylation also affects the microtubule-associated protein tau, thereby generating a condition that in the adult human brain is associated with aggregation of tau protein to paired helical filaments (PHFs), as observed in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we put forward the concept that phosphorylation of tau is a neuroprotective mechanism to escape NMDA-mediated hyperexcitability of neurons that would otherwise occur during slow gradual cooling of the brain. Phosphorylation of tau and its subsequent targeting to subsynaptic sites might, thus, work as a kind of "master switch," regulating NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic gain in a wide array of neuronal networks, thereby enabling entry into torpor. If this condition lasts too long, however, it may eventually turn into a pathological trigger, driving a cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, as in Alzheimer's disease or other "tauopathies".

  13. The Tau Tubulin Kinases TTBK1/2 Promote Accumulation of Pathological TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Liachko, Nicole F.; Loomis, Elaine; Greenup, Lynne; Murrell, Jill R.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Raskind, Murray A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological aggregates of phosphorylated TDP-43 characterize amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP), two devastating groups of neurodegenerative disease. Kinase hyperactivity may be a consistent feature of ALS and FTLD-TDP, as phosphorylated TDP-43 is not observed in the absence of neurodegeneration. By examining changes in TDP-43 phosphorylation state, we have identified kinases controlling TDP-43 phosphorylation in a C. elegans model of ALS. In this kinome-wide survey, we identified homologs of the tau tubulin kinases 1 and 2 (TTBK1 and TTBK2), which were also identified in a prior screen for kinase modifiers of TDP-43 behavioral phenotypes. Using refined methodology, we demonstrate TTBK1 and TTBK2 directly phosphorylate TDP-43 in vitro and promote TDP-43 phosphorylation in mammalian cultured cells. TTBK1/2 overexpression drives phosphorylation and relocalization of TDP-43 from the nucleus to cytoplasmic inclusions reminiscent of neuropathologic changes in disease states. Furthermore, protein levels of TTBK1 and TTBK2 are increased in frontal cortex of FTLD-TDP patients, and TTBK1 and TTBK2 co-localize with TDP-43 inclusions in ALS spinal cord. These kinases may represent attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for TDP-43 proteinopathies such as ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:25473830

  14. Glycan Determinants of Heparin-Tau Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy; Eliezer, David; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Tessier, Peter; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Fuming; Wang, Chunyu

    2017-03-14

    Tau aggregates into paired helical filaments within neurons, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Heparin promotes tau aggregation and recently has been shown to be involved in the cellular uptake of tau aggregates. Although the tau-heparin interaction has been extensively studied, little is known about the glycan determinants of this interaction. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the interaction between two tau fragments, K18 and K19, and several polysaccharides, including heparin, heparin oligosaccharides, chemically modified heparin, and related glycans. Using a heparin-immobilized chip, SPR revealed that tau K18 and K19 bind heparin with a KD of 0.2 and 70 μM, respectively. In SPR competition experiments, N-desulfation and 2-O-desulfation had no effect on heparin binding to K18, whereas 6-O-desulfation severely reduced binding, suggesting a critical role for 6-O-sulfation in the tau-heparin interaction. The tau-heparin interaction became stronger with longer-chain heparin oligosaccharides. As expected for an electrostatics-driven interaction, a moderate amount of salt (0.3 M NaCl) abolished binding. NMR showed the largest chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) in R2 in tau K18, which was absent in K19, revealing differential binding sites in K18 and K19 to heparin. Dermatan sulfate binding produced minimal CSP, whereas dermatan disulfate, with the additional 6-O-sulfo group, induced much larger CSP. 2-O-desulfated heparin induced much larger CSP in K18 than 6-O-desulfated heparin. Our data demonstrate a crucial role for the 6-O-sulfo group in the tau-heparin interaction, which to our knowledge has not been reported before.

  15. Improved discrimination of autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer's disease (AD) from non-AD dementias using CSF P-tau(181P).

    PubMed

    Koopman, Karen; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Nagels, Guy; De Deyn, Peter P; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2009-09-01

    To establish diagnostic accuracy (acc) and optimal cut-off levels of CSF tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau(181P)) for discriminating Alzheimer's disease (AD) from non-AD dementias in autopsy-confirmed dementia patients, CSF levels of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta(1-42)), total tau protein (T-tau) and P-tau(181P) from patients with definite AD (n=95) and non-AD dementias (n=50) were determined with single-parameter ELISA kits. Optimal P-tau(181P) cut-off levels for differentiating AD from pooled non-AD dementias, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) were 50.4pg/mL (acc=0.73), 52.8pg/mL (acc=0.73) and 35.3pg/mL (acc=0.90), respectively. The optimal CSF P-tau(181P) cut-off level for discriminating AD from non-AD dementias was 50.4pg/mL. Optimal CSF P-tau(181P) cut-off levels differed between non-AD diagnostic dementia categories.

  16. Determining the specificity of monoclonal antibody HPT-101 to tau-peptides with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Stangner, Tim; Wagner, Carolin; Singer, David; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Gutsche, Christof; Dzubiella, Joachim; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kremer, Friedrich

    2013-12-23

    Optical tweezers-assisted dynamic force spectroscopy is employed to investigate specific receptor-ligand interactions on the level of single binding events. In particular, we analyze binding of the phosphorylation-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HPT-101 to synthetic tau-peptides with two potential phosphorylation sites (Thr231 and Ser235), being the most probable markers for Alzheimer's disease. Whereas the typical interpretation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggests that this monoclonal antibody binds exclusively to the double-phosphorylated tau-peptide, we show here by DFS that the specificity of only mAb HPT-101 is apparent. In fact, binding occurs also to each sort of monophosphorylated peptide. Therefore, we characterize the unbinding process by analyzing the measured rupture force distributions, from which the lifetime of the bond without force τ0, its characteristic length xts, and the free energy of activation ΔG are extracted for the three mAb/peptide combinations. This information is used to build a simple theoretical model to predict features of the unbinding process for the double-phosphorylated peptide purely based on data on the monophosphorylated ones. Finally, we introduce a method to combine binding and unbinding measurements to estimate the relative affinity of the bonds. The values obtained for this quantity are in accordance with ELISA, showing how DFS can offer important insights about the dynamic binding process that are not accessible with this common and widespread assay.

  17. Inhibitory effect of corcin on aggregation of 1N/4R human tau protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karakani, Ali Mohammadi; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Mahmood Ghaffari, Seyed; Ahmadian, Shahin; Mokhtari, Farzad; Jalili Firuzi, Mahshad; Zahra Bathaie, Seyedeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. One of the hallmarks of AD is an abnormal accumulation of fibril forms of tau protein which is known as a microtubule associated protein. In this regard, inhibition of tau aggregation has been documented to be a potent therapeutic approach in AD and tauopathies. Unfortunately, the available synthetic drugs have modest beneficial efficacy with several side effects. Therefore, pipeline drugs from natural sources with anti-aggregation properties can be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. Among medicinal plants, saffron (Crocus sativus, L.), as a traditional herbal medicine has different pharmacological properties and can be used as treatment for several nervous system impairment including depression and dementia. Crocin as a major constituent of saffron is the glycosylated form of crocetin. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of crocin on aggregation of recombinant human tau protein 1N/4R isoform using biochemical methods and cell culture. Results: Results revealed that tau protein under the fibrillation condition and in the presence of crocin had enough stability with low tendency for aggregation. Crocin inhibited tau aggregation with IC50 of 100 µg/ml. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that crocin could suppress the formation of tau protein filaments. Conclusion: Inhibitory effect of crocin could be related to its interference with nucleation phase that led to increases in monomer species of tau protein. Based on our results, crocin is recommended as a proper candidate to be used in AD treatment. PMID:26124935

  18. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  19. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  20. Amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau synergy drives metabolic decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, T A; Mathotaarachchi, S; Mohades, S; Benedet, A L; Chung, C-O; Shin, M; Wang, S; Beaudry, T; Kang, M S; Soucy, J-P; Labbe, A; Gauthier, S; Rosa-Neto, P

    2017-02-01

    This study was designed to test the interaction between amyloid-β and tau proteins as a determinant of metabolic decline in preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed 120 cognitively normal individuals with [(18)F]florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measurements at baseline, as well as [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET at baseline and at 24 months. A voxel-based interaction model was built to test the associations between continuous measurements of CSF biomarkers, [(18)F]florbetapir and [(18)F]FDG standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR). We found that the synergistic interaction between [(18)F]florbetapir SUVR and CSF phosphorylated tau (p-tau) measurements, rather than the sum of their independent effects, was associated with a 24-month metabolic decline in basal and mesial temporal, orbitofrontal, and anterior and posterior cingulate cortices (P<0.001). In contrast, interactions using CSF amyloid-β1-42 and total tau biomarkers did not associate with metabolic decline over a time frame of 24 months. The interaction found in this study further support the framework that amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates synergistically interact to cause downstream AD neurodegeneration. In fact, the regions displaying the metabolic decline reported here were confined to brain networks affected early by amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Preventive clinical trials may benefit from using a combination of amyloid-β PET and p-tau biomarkers to enrich study populations of cognitively normal subjects with a high probability of disease progression in studies, using [(18)F]FDG as a biomarker of efficacy.

  1. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies.

  2. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  3. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  4. Reduced miR-512 and the Elevated Expression of Its Targets cFLIP and MCL1 Localize to Neurons With Hyperphosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Mezache, Louisa; Mikhail, Madison; Garofalo, Michela; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-10-01

    The cause for the neurofibrillary tangles and plaques in Alzheimer disease likely relates to an abnormal accumulation of their key components, which include β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. We segregated Alzheimer brain sections from people with end-stage disease into those with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau protein and those without and compared each to normal brains for global microRNA patterns. A significant reduced expression of several microRNAs, including miR-512, was evident in the Alzheimer brain sections with abundant hyperphosphorylated tau. Immunohistochemistry documented that 2 known targets of microRNA-512, cFLIP and MCL1, were significantly over expressed and each colocalized to neurons with the abnormal tau protein. Analysis for apoptosis including activated caspase-3, increased caspase-4 and caspase-8, apoptosis initiating factor, APAF-1 activity, and the TUNEL assay was negative in the areas where neurons showed hyperphosphorylated tau. MCM2 expression, a marker of neuroprogenitor cells, was significantly reduced in the Alzheimer sections that contained the hyperphosphorylated tau. These results suggest that a basic defect in Alzheimer disease may be the reduced microRNA-driven increased expression of proteins that may alter the apoptotic/antiapoptotic balance of neurons. This, in turn, could lead to the accumulation of key Alzheimer proteins such as hyperphosphorylated tau that ultimately prevent normal neuronal function and lead to disease symptomatology.

  5. Higgs mediated lepton flavor violating tau decays {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-07-01

    The size of the branching ratios for the {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} decays induced by a lepton flavor violating Higgs interaction H{tau}{mu} is studied in the framework of effective field theories. The best constraint on the H{tau}{mu} vertex, derived from the know measurement on the muon anomalous magnetic moment, is used to impose the upper bounds Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma})<7.5x10{sup -10} and Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma})<2.3x10{sup -12}, which are more stringent than current experimental limits on this class of transitions.

  6. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  7. Anti-tau antibody reduces insoluble tau and decreases brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Jiang, Hong; Mahan, Thomas E; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Diamond, Marc I; Holtzman, David M

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously found a strong reduction in tau pathology and insoluble tau in P301S tau transgenic mice following intracerebroventricular infusion of the anti-tau antibody HJ8.5. We sought to determine the effects of HJ8.5 in the same model following peripheral administration. Methods The primary objective was to determine if HJ8.5 administered at a dose of 50 mg kg−1 week−1 by intraperitoneal (IP) injection to 6-month-old P301S mice for 3 months would influence phospho-tau (p-tau) accumulation, tau insolubility, and neurodegeneration. Results Treatment with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a very strong decrease in detergent-insoluble tau. Importantly, HJ8.5 significantly reduced the loss of cortical and hippocampal tissue volumes compared to control treated mice. HJ8.5 treatment reduced hippocampal CA1 cellular layer staining with the p-tau antibody AT8 and thio-S-positive tau aggregates in piriform cortex and amygdala. Moreover, mice treated with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a decrease in motor/sensorimotor deficits compared to vehicle-treated mice. Some effects of HJ8.5, including reduction in brain atrophy, and p-tau immunostaining were also seen with a dose of 10 mg kg−1 week−1. In BV2-microglial cells, we observed significantly higher uptake of P301S tau aggregates in the presence of HJ8.5. HJ8.5 treatment also resulted in a large dose-dependent increase of tau in the plasma. Interpretation Our results indicate that systemically administered anti-tau antibody HJ8.5 significantly decreases insoluble tau, decreases brain atrophy, and improves motor/sensorimotor function in a mouse model of tauopathy. These data further support the idea that anti-tau antibodies should be further assessed as a potential treatment for tauopathies. PMID:25815354

  8. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissiere, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganit, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; Schott, G

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level.

  9. Orbital motions and light curves of young binaries XZ Tau and VY Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Zharova, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Roe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The results of our speckle interferometric observations of young binaries VY Tau and XZ Tau are presented. For the first time, we found a relative displacement of VY Tau components as well as a preliminary orbit for XZ Tau. It appeared that the orbit is appreciably non-circular and is inclined by i ≲ 47◦ from the plane of the sky. It means that the rotation axis of XZ Tau A and the axis of its jet are significantly non-perpendicular to the orbital plane. We found that the average brightness of XZ Tau had been increasing from the beginning of the last century up to the mid-thirties and then it decreased by Δ B > 2 mag. The maximal brightness has been reached significantly later on the time of periastron passage. The total brightness of XZ Tau's components varied in a non-regular way from 1970 to 1985 when eruptions of hot gas from XZ Tau A presumably had occurred. In the early nineties the variations became regular following which a chaotic variability had renewed. We also report that a flare activity of VY Tau has resumed after 40 yr pause, parameters of the previous and new flares are similar, and the flares are related with the A component.

  10. Survey of Volatiles in the Disks Around GV Tau N and AA Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika

    2010-02-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to characterize the gas phase volatiles, particularly organic molecules, in circumstellar disks toward Tauri stars GV Tau N and AA Tau. These sources have recently been found to exhibit rich molecular absorption (GV Tau N; Gibb et al. 2007) and emission (AA Tau; Carr et al. 2008) spectra that sample distinct regions of the circumstellar disk. If we are to understand the distribution of materials in disks and place our solar system in context, these systems must be studied in detail. As such, we propose to perform a near-infrared survey of these two sources.

  11. The structure of human tau-tubulin kinase 1 both in the apo form and in complex with an inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Susan E.; Chang, ChiehYing J.; Kimura, S. Roy; Gao, Mian; Xie, Dianlin; Zhang, Yaqun; Zhang, Guifen; Gill, Martin B.; Mastalerz, Harold; Thompson, Lorin A.; Cacace, Angela M.; Sheriff, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Tau-tubulin kinase 1 (TTBK1) is a dual-specificity (serine/threonine and tyrosine) kinase belonging to the casein kinase 1 superfamily. TTBK1 is a neuron-specific kinase that regulates tau phosphorylation. Hyperphosphorylation of tau is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Two kinase-domain constructs of TTBK1 were expressed in a baculovirus-infected insect-cell system and purified. The purified TTBK1 kinase-domain proteins were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected and the structure of TTBK1 was determined by molecular replacement both as an apo structure and in complex with a kinase inhibitor. PMID:24637750

  12. Ironing out Tau's Role in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease affects more than five million people worldwide, yet no therapeutic has been identified that can slow or halt the progression of this debilitating disease. A new study in tau knockout mice suggests that tau deficiency causes impaired ferroportin-coupled iron export, by retention of the amyloid precursor protein, a neuronal ferroxidase partner, in the endoplasmic reticulum. This leads to parkinsonism through intracellular iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons (pages X-Y). PMID:22310680

  13. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A.; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-01-01

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD. PMID:26507666

  14. Alternative application of Tau protein in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnosis: Improvement for weakly positive 14-3-3 protein in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Jae Wook; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Jeongmin; Park, Jun Sun; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Lee, Sol Moe; An, SeongSoo A; Lee, Myung Koo; Ju, Young Ran

    2015-10-28

    The 14-3-3 protein has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). However, weakly positive 14-3-3 leads to false positive results and an incorrect diagnosis. We attempted to use quantitative data for tau protein to provide an accurate diagnosis based on weak 14-3-3 protein. Sixty-two patients with sCJD, including pathologically confirmed, clinically definite, and probable cases, and 89 non-CJD patients were investigated based on a Korean population. Among them, 20 sCJD and 14 non-CJD showed weakly positive 14-3-3. The total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein levels were measured by ELISA, and the p-tau to t-tau ratio (p/t ratio) was calculated. The combined use of the 14-3-3 protein assay, t-tau levels, and p/t ratio improved the specificity of diagnosis compared with the use of the 14-3-3 protein assay alone (47% for 14-3-3 alone; 85.94% for 14-3-3 combined with t-tau; 90.62% for 14-3-3 combined with the p/t ratio). In addition, 18 of 20 sCJD and 12 of 14 non-CJD who were weakly positive for 14-3-3 were positive for the p/t ratio and negative for the p/t ratio, respectively. When used in combination with the 14-3-3 protein, the tau protein is useful as a biomarker for the precise diagnosis of sCJD.

  15. Tau-Driven Neuronal and Neurotrophic Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Early Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaro, Nadia; Barini, Erica; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Goedert, Michel; Medini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by intraneuronal inclusions of hyperphosphorylated tau protein and abnormal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key modulator of neuronal survival and function. The severity of both these pathological hallmarks correlate with the degree of cognitive impairment in patients. However, how tau pathology specifically modifies BDNF signaling and affects neuronal function during early prodromal stages of tauopathy remains unclear. Here, we report that the mild tauopathy developing in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of the P301S tau transgenic (P301S) mouse induces functional retinal changes by disrupting BDNF signaling via the TrkB receptor. In adult P301S mice, the physiological visual response of RGCs to pattern light stimuli and retinal acuity decline significantly. As a consequence, the activity-dependent secretion of BDNF in the vitreous is impaired in P301S mice. Further, in P301S retinas, TrkB receptors are selectively upregulated, but uncoupled from downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling. We also show that the impairment of TrkB signaling is triggered by tau pathology and mediates the tau-induced dysfunction of visual response. Overall our results identify a neurotrophin-mediated mechanism by which tau induces neuronal dysfunction during prodromal stages of tauopathy and define tau-driven pathophysiological changes of potential value to support early diagnosis and informed therapeutic decisions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This work highlights the potential molecular mechanisms by which initial tauopathy induces neuronal dysfunction. Combining clinically used electrophysiological techniques (i.e., electroretinography) and molecular analyses, this work shows that in a relevant model of early tauopathy, the retina of the P301S mutant human tau transgenic mouse, mild tau pathology results in functional changes of neuronal activity, likely due to selective impairment

  16. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  17. Phosphorylation: Implications in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishakha; Ram, Mahendra; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Raju; Roy, Birendra Kumar; Singh, Kaushal Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Post translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in variety of cellular activities and phosphorylation is one of the most extensively studied PTM, which regulates a number of cellular functions like cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling in healthy condition. However, alterations in phosphorylation pathways result in serious outcomes in the form of diseases, especially cancer. Many signalling pathways including Tyrosine kinase, MAP kinase, Cadherin-catenin complex, Cyclin-dependent kinase etc. are major players of the cell cycle and deregulation in their phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade has been shown to be manifested in the form of various types of cancers. Tyrosine kinase family encompasses the greatest number of oncoproteins. MAPK cascade has an importance role in cancer growth and progression. Bcl-2 family proteins serve either proapoptotic or antiapoptotic function. Cadherin-catenin complex regulates cell adhesion properties and cyclins are the key regulators of cell cycle. Altered phosphorylations in any of the above pathways are strongly associated with cancer, at the same time they serve as the potential tergets for drug development against cancer. Drugs targeting tyrosine kinase are potent anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of MEK, PI3K and ERK signalling pathways are undergoing clinical trials. Thus, drugs targeting phosphorylation pathways represent a promising area for cancer therapy.

  18. FLZ Alleviates the Memory Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease via Decreasing Beta-Amyloid Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Tai, Wen-Jiao; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide and mainly characterized by the aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau. FLZ is a novel synthetic derivative of natural squamosamide and has been proved to improve memory deficits in dementia animal models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of FLZ’s neuroprotective effect in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. The results showed that treatment with FLZ significantly improved the memory deficits of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and decreased apoptosis of SH-SY5Y (APPwt/swe) cells. FLZ markedly attenuated Aβ accumulation and tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ interfered APP processing, i.e., FLZ decreased β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) phosphorylation, APP-carboxy-terminal fragment (APP-CTF) production and β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. These results indicated that FLZ reduced Aβ production through inhibiting amyloidogenic pathway. The mechanistic study about FLZ’s inhibitory effect on tau phosphorylation revealed t the involvement of Akt/glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway. FLZ treatment increased Akt activity and inhibited GSK3β activity both in vivo and in vitro. The inhibitory effect of FLZ on GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation was suppressed by inhibiting Akt activity, indicating that Akt/GSK3β pathway might be the possible mechanism involved in the inhibitory effect of FLZ on tau hyperphosphorylation. These results suggested FLZ might be a potential anti-AD drug as it not only reduced Aβ production via inhibition amyloidogenic APP processing pathway, but also attenuated tau hyperphosphoylation mediated by Akt/GSK3β. PMID:24223757

  19. The winds from HL Tau

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (∼1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1−0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s−1. PMID:27559304

  20. No Overt Deficits in Aged Tau-Deficient C57Bl/6.Mapttm1(EGFP)Kit GFP Knockin Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Hummel, Annika; Bi, Mian; Ippati, Stefania; van der Hoven, Julia; Volkerling, Alexander; Lee, Wei S.; Tan, Daniel C. S.; Bongers, Andre; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D.; Ittner, Lars M.

    2016-01-01

    Several mouse lines with knockout of the tau-encoding MAPT gene have been reported in the past; they received recent attention due to reports that tau reduction prevented Aβ-induced deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the effects of long-term depletion of tau in vivo remained controversial. Here, we used the tau-deficient GFP knockin line Mapttm1(EGFP)kit on a pure C57Bl/6 background and subjected a large cohort of males and females to a range of motor, memory and behavior tests and imaging analysis, at the advanced age of over 16 months. Neither heterozygous nor homozygous Mapttm1(EGFP)kit mice presented with deficits or abnormalities compared to wild-type littermates. Differences to reports using other tau knockout models may be due to different genetic backgrounds, respective gene targeting strategies or other confounding factors, such as nutrition. To this end, we report no functional or morphological deficits upon tau reduction or depletion in aged mice. PMID:27736877

  1. No Overt Deficits in Aged Tau-Deficient C57Bl/6.Mapttm1(EGFP)Kit GFP Knockin Mice.

    PubMed

    van Hummel, Annika; Bi, Mian; Ippati, Stefania; van der Hoven, Julia; Volkerling, Alexander; Lee, Wei S; Tan, Daniel C S; Bongers, Andre; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Several mouse lines with knockout of the tau-encoding MAPT gene have been reported in the past; they received recent attention due to reports that tau reduction prevented Aβ-induced deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. However, the effects of long-term depletion of tau in vivo remained controversial. Here, we used the tau-deficient GFP knockin line Mapttm1(EGFP)kit on a pure C57Bl/6 background and subjected a large cohort of males and females to a range of motor, memory and behavior tests and imaging analysis, at the advanced age of over 16 months. Neither heterozygous nor homozygous Mapttm1(EGFP)kit mice presented with deficits or abnormalities compared to wild-type littermates. Differences to reports using other tau knockout models may be due to different genetic backgrounds, respective gene targeting strategies or other confounding factors, such as nutrition. To this end, we report no functional or morphological deficits upon tau reduction or depletion in aged mice.

  2. The effect of insulin deficiency on tau and neurofilament in the insulin knockout mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, Ruben; E-mail: ruben.schechter@okstate.edu; Beju, Delia; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2005-09-09

    Complications of diabetes mellitus within the nervous system are peripheral and central neuropathy. In peripheral neuropathy, defects in neurofilament and microtubules have been demonstrated. In this study, we examined the effects of insulin deficiency within the brain in insulin knockout mice (I(-/-)). The I(-/-) exhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau, at threonine 231, and neurofilament. In addition, we showed hyperphosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK-3 {beta}) at serine 9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK 1) showed decrease in phosphorylation, whereas ERK 2 showed no changes. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated swollen mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, and dispersion of the nuclear chromatin. Microtubules showed decrease in the number of intermicrotubule bridges and neurofilament presented as bunches. Thus, lack of insulin brain stimulation induces JNK hyperphosphorylation followed by hyperphosphorylation of tau and neurofilament, and ultrastructural cellular damage, that over time may induce decrease in cognition and learning disabilities.

  3. Glutamate system, amyloid ß peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Revett, Timothy J; Baker, Glen B; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid ß peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid ß and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid ß production, but also amyloid ß can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects hippocampal neurons against advanced glycation end product-induced tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; An, F-M; Yin, L; Liu, A-R; Yin, D-K; Yao, W-B; Gao, X-D

    2014-01-03

    We have previously demonstrated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist ameliorated neurodegenerative changes in rat models of diabetes-related Alzheimer's disease (AD), and protected neurons from glucose toxicity in vitro. Herein, we investigated the effects of GLP-1 receptor mediates on cell toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are associated with glucose toxicity, and the molecular mechanism in PC12 cells and the primary hippocampal neurons. Our study demonstrated that the similar protection effects of GLP-1 existed in PC12 cells treated with glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) in hyperglycemic conditions or with glycoaldehyde-BSA alone. Additionally, glucose-BSA alone did not induce significant cytotoxicity in PC12 cells, but resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons in 24h. And we found that GLP-1 could reduce cell tau phosphorylation induced by high glucose or glucose-BSA. Furthermore, our data in the present study suggested that GLP-1 regulated tau phosphorylation induced by AGEs through a signaling pathway involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), similarly to the GSK-3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Our findings suggest that GLP-1 can protect neurons from diabetes-associated AGE insults in vitro, and provide new evidence for a potential therapeutic value of GLP-1 receptor agonist in the treatment of AD especially diabetes-related AD.

  5. Citalopram attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficit induced by social isolation rearing in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wang, Yan-Juan; Zhou, Qi-Da; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-05-01

    Social isolation (SI) is considered as a chronic stress. Here, middle-aged rats (8 months) were group or isolation reared for 6 weeks. Following the initial two-week period of rearing, citalopram (10 mg/kg i.p.) was administered for 28 days. Changes in recognition memory, depression and anxiety-like behavior, and phosphorylated tau were investigated. We found that SI did not lead to obvious depression/anxiety-like behavior in middle-aged rats. Memory deficits and increased tau hyperphosphorylation at Tau-1, Ser396 episodes could be almost reversed by citalopram. The level of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β (inactive form) was significantly decreased in the SI group which also could be almost reversed by citalopram, suggesting that the citalopram could prevent GSK-3β from SI-induced overactivation. The melatonin level was decreased in SI group compared with group housed (GH) group, and citalopram could partly restore the level of melatonin. We also found that citalopram could increase MT1 and MT2 in mRNA level. Our results demonstrate that citalopram increases the level of melatonin which negatively regulates GSK-3β and attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation and spatial memory deficit induced by SI in middle-aged rats. Suggesting that SI might constitute a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and citalopram may represent a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD.

  6. Infantile postnatal exposure to lead (Pb) enhances tau expression in the cerebral cortex of aged mice: relevance to AD.

    PubMed

    Bihaqi, Syed Waseem; Bahmani, Azadeh; Adem, Abdu; Zawia, Nasser H

    2014-09-01

    The sporadic nature in over 90% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases, the differential susceptibility and course of illness, and latent onset of the disease suggest involvement of an environmental component in the etiology of late onset AD (LOAD). Recent reports from our lab have demonstrated that molecular alterations favor abundant tau phosphorylation and immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of aged primates with infantile lead (Pb) exposure (Bihaqi and Zawia, 2013). Here we report that developmental Pb exposure results in elevation of protein and mRNA levels of tau in aged mice. Western blot analysis revealed aberrant site-specific tau hyperphosphorylation accompanied by elevated cyclin dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) levels in aged mice with prior Pb exposure. Mice with developmental Pb exposure also displayed altered protein ratio of p35/p25 with more Serine/Threonine phosphatase activity at old age. These changes favored increase in tau phosphorylation, thus providing evidence that neurodegenerative diseases may be in part due to environmental influences that occur during development.

  7. WWOX dysfunction induces sequential aggregation of TRAPPC6AΔ, TIAF1, tau and amyloid β, and causes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, J-Y; Chang, N-S

    2015-01-01

    Aggregated vesicle-trafficking protein isoform TRAPPC6AΔ (TPC6AΔ) has a critical role in causing caspase activation, tau aggregation and Aβ generation in the brains of nondemented middle-aged humans, patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and 3-week-old Wwox gene knockout mice. WWOX blocks neurodegeneration via interactions with tau and tau-phosphorylating enzymes. WWOX deficiency leads to epilepsy, mental retardation and early death. Here, we demonstrated that TGF-β1 induces shuttling of endogenous wild-type TPC6A and TPC6AΔ in between nucleoli and mitochondria (~40–60 min per round trip), and WWOX reduces the shuttling time by 50%. TGF-β1 initially maximizes the binding of TPC6AΔ to the C-terminal tail of WWOX, followed by dissociation. TPC6AΔ then undergoes aggregation, together with TIAF1 (TGF-β1-induced antiapoptotic factor), in the mitochondria to induce apoptosis. An additional rescue scenario is that TGF-β1 induces Tyr33 phosphorylation and unfolding of WWOX and its the N-terminal WW domain slowly binds TPC6AΔ to block aggregation and apoptosis. Similarly, loss of WWOX induces TPC6AΔ polymerization first, then aggregation of TIAF1, amyloid β and tau, and subsequent cell death, suggesting that a cascade of protein aggregation leads to neurodegeneration. PMID:27551439

  8. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  9. Tau Proteins Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Kovac, Andrej; Majerova, Petra; Bullock, Kristin M; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Tauopathies are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injuries. It has been demonstrated that amyloid-beta peptides, alpha-synuclein, and prion proteins cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), contributing to their abilities to induce disease. Very little is known about whether tau proteins can cross the BBB. Here we systematically characterized several key forms of tau proteins to cross the BBB, including Tau-441 (2N4R), Tau-410 (2N3R), truncated tau 151-391 (0N4R), and truncated tau 121-227. All of these tau proteins crossed the BBB readily and bidirectonally; however, only Tau-410 had a saturable component to its influx. The tau proteins also entered the blood after their injection into the brain, with Tau 121-227 having the slowest exit from brain. The tau proteins varied in regards to their enzymatic stability in brain and blood and in their peripheral pharmacokinetics. These results show that blood-borne tau proteins could contribute to brain tauopathies. The result also suggest that the CNS can contribute to blood levels of tau, raising the possibility that, as suggested for other misfolded proteins, blood levels of tau proteins could be used as a biomarker of CNS disease.

  10. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  11. The influence of phospho-tau on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles. PMID:23715095

  12. Chronic copper exposure exacerbates both amyloid and tau pathology and selectively dysregulates cdk5 in a mouse model of AD.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Cheng, David; Laferla, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    Excess copper exposure is thought to be linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. However, the mechanism by which copper affects the CNS remains unclear. To investigate the effect of chronic copper exposure on both beta-amyloid and tau pathologies, we treated young triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mice with 250 ppm copper-containing water for a period of 3 or 9 months. Copper exposure resulted in altered amyloid precursor protein processing; increased accumulation of the amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic product, C99 fragment, along with increased generation of amyloid-beta peptides and oligomers. These changes were found to be mediated via up-regulation of BACE1 as significant increases in BACE1 levels and deposits were detected around plaques in mice following copper exposure. Furthermore, tau pathology within hippocampal neurons was exacerbated in copper-exposed 3xTg-AD group. Increased tau phosphorylation was closely correlated with aberrant cdk5/p25 activation, suggesting a role for this kinase in the development of copper-induced tau pathology. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic copper exposure accelerates not only amyloid pathology but also tau pathology in a mouse model of AD.

  13. Oxidative stress induces transient O-GlcNAc elevation and tau dephosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Kátai, Emese; Pál, József; Poór, Viktor Soma; Purewal, Rupeena; Miseta, Attila; Nagy, Tamás

    2016-12-01

    O-linked β-N-acetlyglucosamine or O-GlcNAc modification is a dynamic post-translational modification occurring on the Ser/Thr residues of many intracellular proteins. The chronic imbalance between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAc on tau protein is considered as one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, many studies also showed that O-GlcNAc levels can elevate upon acute stress and suggested that this might facilitate cell survival. However, many consider chronic stress, including oxidative damage as a major risk factor in the development of the disease. In this study, using the neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y we investigated the dynamic nature of O-GlcNAc after treatment with 0.5 mM H2 O2 for 30 min. to induce oxidative stress. We found that overall O-GlcNAc quickly increased and reached peak level at around 2 hrs post-stress, then returned to baseline levels after about 24 hrs. Interestingly, we also found that tau protein phosphorylation at site S262 showed parallel, whereas at S199 and PHF1 sites showed inverse dynamic to O-Glycosylation. In conclusion, our results show that temporary elevation in O-GlcNAc modification after H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress is detectable in cells of neuronal origin. Furthermore, oxidative stress changes the dynamic balance between O-GlcNAc and phosphorylation on tau proteins.

  14. Horizontal Tau air showers from mountains in deep vally :Traces of Ultrahigh neutrino tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    1999-08-01

    Ultra High Energy (UHE) Tau neutrino may lead to a very peculiar imprint in future underground K m3 detectors in water and ice as well as in air: rarest secondary tau tracks and decay which may exceed the muon ones. Indeed Bremsstrahlung at high energy lead to longer tracks for heavier leptons. Radiation lenght grows nearly with the square of the lepton mass. Indeed electrons are too light and their trace in matter is negligible (decimeters) muon are much better observed, while tau are too short life time and short range to be found. However, because relativistic time expansion, UHE tau traces in matter, above 1017 eV , are relativistically boosted overcoming the corresponding muon tracks, already bounded by bremsstrahlung logaritmic regime. The tau crossing for Kms in water or ice may be confused with common muon tracks; their tau decay may be missunderstood as muonic catastrophic brehmstrallung interactions. To economize UHE tau dicovery, we suggest to look the tau decay in air into the deep valleys montains, like Canyons or deep in escavation mines where horizontal air showers induce fluoresce or Cerenkov lights. The mountain valley width screens from horizontal secondary muons. The valley height increases the solid angle view. The horizontal air Kms-size gap offer a strong discriminator to filter UHE muons against tau. Tens event a year at PeV ( W resonance peak) energies in K m3 excavation gap should be observable . Hunting air shower in the night toward high mountains in Canyons or in a deep excavation may be the best and cheapest way to discover UHE neutrinos , either born by electron antineutrino scattering on electrons at PeV energies, or by direct tau neutrino possibly relic of muonic flavour oscillation even at EeV energies.

  15. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  16. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  17. Protein phosphorylation and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hodges, M; Jossier, M; Boex-Fontvieille, E; Tcherkez, G

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration allows the recycling of carbon atoms of 2-phosphoglycolate produced by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenase activity, as well as the removal of potentially toxic metabolites. The photorespiratory pathway takes place in the light, encompasses four cellular compartments and interacts with several other metabolic pathways and functions. Therefore, the regulation of this cycle is probably of paramount importance to plant metabolism, however, our current knowledge is poor. To rapidly respond to changing conditions, proteins undergo a number of different post-translational modifications that include acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation, but protein phosphorylation is probably the most common. The reversible covalent addition of a phosphate group to a specific amino acid residue allows the modulation of protein function, such as activity, subcellular localisation, capacity to interact with other proteins and stability. Recent data indicate that many photorespiratory enzymes can be phosphorylated, and thus it seems that the photorespiratory cycle is, in part, regulated by protein phosphorylation. In this review, the known phosphorylation sites of each Arabidopsis thaliana photorespiratory enzyme and several photorespiratory-associated proteins are described and discussed. A brief account of phosphoproteomic protocols is also given since the published data compiled in this review are the fruit of this approach.

  18. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  19. Tau neutrino component to tritium beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1995-06-01

    A framework is given for explaining anomalous results of neutrino mass experiments that measure the high energy electron spectrum of tritium {beta} decay. The experimental results have been fit to a negative neutrino mass square. We show that there is a consistent phenomenological interpretation due to a positive mass tau neutrino component of the {beta} decay spectrum, with strong near threshold final state interactions with the He nucleus. If this enhancement is due to new interactions between low energy tau neutrinos and nuclei, then the tritium 0 decay experiments could be used as detectors for cosmic background tau neutrinos. The model predicts a distinctive spectrum shape that is consistent with a recent high statistics LLNL experiment. A fit to the experiment gives a tau neutrino mass of 23 eV. Tau neutrinos of this mass would dominate the mass of the universe. Requirements for a theoretical model are given, as well as models that realize different aspects of these requirements. While qualitatively successful, the theoretical models have such severe quantitative difficulties that the accuracy of the molecular physics of the T-{sup 3}He ion, assumed in the analysis of the experimental data, is called into question.

  20. Loss of Tau protein affects the structure, transcription and repair of neuronal pericentromeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Marcato, Vasco; Sultan, Audrey; Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Loyens, Anne; Talahari, Smail; Bégard, Séverine; Nesslany, Fabrice; Colin, Morvane; Souès, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Bruno; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Pericentromeric heterochromatin (PCH) gives rise to highly dense chromatin sub-structures rich in the epigenetic mark corresponding to the trimethylated form of lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me3) and in heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), which regulate genome expression and stability. We demonstrate that Tau, a protein involved in a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), binds to and localizes within or next to neuronal PCH in primary neuronal cultures from wild-type mice. Concomitantly, we show that the clustered distribution of H3K9me3 and HP1α, two hallmarks of PCH, is disrupted in neurons from Tau-deficient mice (KOTau). Such altered distribution of H3K9me3 that could be rescued by overexpressing nuclear Tau protein was also observed in neurons from AD brains. Moreover, the expression of PCH non-coding RNAs, involved in PCH organization, was disrupted in KOTau neurons that displayed an abnormal accumulation of stress-induced PCH DNA breaks. Altogether, our results demonstrate a new physiological function of Tau in directly regulating neuronal PCH integrity that appears disrupted in AD neurons. PMID:27605042

  1. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  2. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  3. Riluzole Rescues Glutamate Alterations, Cognitive Deficits, and Tau Pathology Associated with P301L Tau Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Holly C.; Weitzner, Daniel S; Rudy, Carolyn C.; Hickman, James E.; Libell, Eric M.; Speer, Rebecca R.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Reed, Miranda N.

    2016-01-01

    In the years preceding a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), hyperexcitability of the hippocampus is a commonly observed phenomenon in those at risk for AD. Our previous work suggests a dysregulation in glutamate neurotransmission may mediate this hyperexcitability, and glutamate dysregulation correlates with cognitive deficits in the rTg(TauP301L)4510 mouse model of AD. To determine whether improving glutamate regulation would attenuate cognitive deficits and AD-related pathology, TauP301L mice were treated with riluzole (~ 12.5 mg/kg/day p.o.), an FDA-approved drug for ALS that lowers extracellular glutamate levels. Riluzole-treated TauP301L mice exhibited improved memory performance that was associated with a decrease in glutamate release and an increase in glutamate uptake in the dentate gyrus (DG), cornu ammonis 3(CA3), and cornu ammonis 1(CA1) regions of the hippocampus. Riluzole treatment also attenuated the TauP301L-mediated increase in hippocampal vesicular glutamate transporter (vGLUT1), and the TauP301L-mediated decrease in hippocampal glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and PSD-95 expression. Riluzole treatment also reduced tau pathology. These findings further elucidate the changes in glutamate regulation associated with tau pathology and open new opportunities for the development of clinically applicable therapeutic approaches to regulate glutamate in vulnerable circuits for those at risk for the development of AD. PMID:26146790

  4. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  5. CP violation in semileptonic tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Castro, G. Lopez; Lozano, L.-T. Lopez

    2005-08-01

    The leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay rates is evaluated within the standard model. The weak phase required for CP violation is introduced through an interesting mechanism involving second order weak interactions, which is also responsible for tiny violations of the {delta}S={delta}Q rule in K{sub l3} decays. The calculated CP asymmetry turns out to be of order 10{sup -12}, leaving a large window for studying effects of nonstandard sources of CP violation in this observable.

  6. Synaptic Contacts Enhance Cell-to-Cell Tau Pathology Propagation.

    PubMed

    Calafate, Sara; Buist, Arjan; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Vijayan, Vinoy; Daneels, Guy; de Strooper, Bart; de Wit, Joris; Verstreken, Patrik; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-05-26

    Accumulation of insoluble Tau protein aggregates and stereotypical propagation of Tau pathology through the brain are common hallmarks of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Propagation of Tau pathology appears to occur along connected neurons, but whether synaptic contacts between neurons are facilitating propagation has not been demonstrated. Using quantitative in vitro models, we demonstrate that, in parallel to non-synaptic mechanisms, synapses, but not merely the close distance between the cells, enhance the propagation of Tau pathology between acceptor hippocampal neurons and Tau donor cells. Similarly, in an artificial neuronal network using microfluidic devices, synapses and synaptic activity are promoting neuronal Tau pathology propagation in parallel to the non-synaptic mechanisms. Our work indicates that the physical presence of synaptic contacts between neurons facilitate Tau pathology propagation. These findings can have implications for synaptic repair therapies, which may turn out to have adverse effects by promoting propagation of Tau pathology.

  7. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  9. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  10. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  11. Mitochondria: the common upstream driver of amyloid-β and tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, D F F; Esteves, A R; Oliveira, C R; Cardoso, S M

    2011-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Evidence shows a mitochondrial-mediated impairment of autophagy that potentiates amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Accordingly, recent data obtained from AD models, in which mitochondrial alterations are a prominent feature, demonstrated abnormalities in microtubule network, involving tubulin and tau post-translational modifications. In this review we will discuss mitochondrial-regulated processes where mitochondrial malfunction is likely to start a sequence of events leading to sirtuin-2 activation, microtubule network breakdown, and impairment of the autophagic pathway. Because sirtuin-2 activity depends on cellular NAD+ availability, mitochondrial regulation of NAD+ levels may contribute to an increase in sirtuin-mediated tubulin deacetylation. A vicious cycle become installed which potentiates tau hyperphosphorylation, together with Aβ overproduction and deposition. Overall, targeting microtubule network constitutes a promising strategy for pharmacological therapy in AD.

  12. X-ray structural analysis of tau-tubulin kinase 1 and its interactions with small molecular inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yafeng; Wan, Paul T; Hillertz, Per; Schweikart, Fritz; Zhao, Yanlong; Wissler, Lisa; Dekker, Niek

    2013-11-01

    Tau-tubulin kinase 1 (TTBK1) is a serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues including S422 in tau protein. Hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is the primary cause of tau pathology and neuronal death associated with Alzheimer's disease. A library of 12 truncation variants comprising the TTBK1 kinase domain was screened for expression in Escherichia coli and insect cells. One variant (residues 14-313) could be purified, but mass spectrometric analysis revealed extensive phosphorylation of the protein. Co-expression with lambda phosphatase in E. coli resulted in production of homogeneous, nonphosphorylated TTBK1. Binding of ATP and several compounds to TTBK1 was characterized by surface plasmon resonance. Crystal structures of TTBK1 in the unliganded form and in complex with ATP, and two high-affinity ATP-competitive inhibitors, 3-[(6,7-dimethoxyquinazolin-4-yl)amino]phenol (1) and methyl 2-bromo-5-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)benzoate (2), were elucidated. The structure revealed two clear basic patches near the ATP pocket providing an explanation of TTBK1 for phosphorylation-primed substrates. Interestingly, compound 2 displayed slow binding kinetics to TTBK1, the structure of TTBK1 in complex with this compound revealed a reorganization of the L199-D200 peptide backbone conformation together with altered hydrogen bonding with compound 2. These conformational changes necessary for the binding of compound 2 are likely the basis of the slow kinetics. This first TTBK1 structure can assist the discovery of novel inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Altered Body Weight Regulation in CK1ε Null and tau Mutant Mice on Regular Chow and High Fat Diets

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lili; Summa, Keith C.; Olker, Christopher; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms results in metabolic dysfunction. Casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε) is a canonical circadian clock gene. Null and tau mutations in CK1ε show distinct effects on circadian period. To investigate the role of CK1ε in body weight regulation under both regular chow (RC) and high fat (HF) diet conditions, we examined body weight on both RC and HF diets in CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mice on a standard 24 hr light-dark (LD) cycle. Given the abnormal entrainment of CK1εtau/tau mice on a 24 hr LD cycle, a separate set of CK1εtau/tau mice were tested under both diet conditions on a 20 hr LD cycle, which more closely matches their endogenous period length. On the RC diet, both CK1ε−/− and CK1εtau/tau mutants on a 24 hr LD cycle and CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle exhibited significantly lower body weights, despite similar overall food intake and activity levels. On the HF diet, CK1εtau/tau mice on a 20 hr LD cycle were protected against the development of HF diet-induced excess weight gain. These results provide additional evidence supporting a link between circadian rhythms and energy regulation at the genetic level, particularly highlighting CK1ε involved in the integration of circadian biology and metabolic physiology. PMID:27144030

  14. Methylene blue upregulates Nrf2/ARE genes and prevents tau-related neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Gerges, Meri; Starkova, Natalia; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Launay, Nathalie; Pujol, Aurora; Kaidery, Navneet Ammal; Thomas, Bobby; Tampellini, Davide; Beal, M. Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB, methylthioninium chloride) is a phenothiazine that crosses the blood brain barrier and acts as a redox cycler. Among its beneficial properties are its abilities to act as an antioxidant, to reduce tau protein aggregation and to improve energy metabolism. These actions are of particular interest for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases with tau protein aggregates known as tauopathies. The present study examined the effects of MB in the P301S mouse model of tauopathy. Both 4 mg/kg MB (low dose) and 40 mg/kg MB (high dose) were administered in the diet ad libitum from 1 to 10 months of age. We assessed behavior, tau pathology, oxidative damage, inflammation and numbers of mitochondria. MB improved the behavioral abnormalities and reduced tau pathology, inflammation and oxidative damage in the P301S mice. These beneficial effects were associated with increased expression of genes regulated by NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE), which play an important role in antioxidant defenses, preventing protein aggregation, and reducing inflammation. The activation of Nrf2/ARE genes is neuroprotective in other transgenic mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and it appears to be an important mediator of the neuroprotective effects of MB in P301S mice. Moreover, we used Nrf2 knock out fibroblasts to show that the upregulation of Nrf2/ARE genes by MB is Nrf2 dependent and not due to secondary effects of the compound. These findings provide further evidence that MB has important neuroprotective effects that may be beneficial in the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases with tau pathology. PMID:24556215

  15. HIV-1-Tat Protein Inhibits SC35-mediated Tau Exon 10 Inclusion through Up-regulation of DYRK1A Kinase.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Ferdous; Pacifici, Marco; Wilk, Anna; Parker-Struckhoff, Amanda; Del Valle, Luis; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E; Parsons, Christopher; Jeansonne, Duane; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca

    2015-12-25

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is implicated in the neuronal damage that contributes to neurocognitive impairment affecting people living with HIV/AIDS. Aberrant splicing of TAU exon 10 results in tauopathies characterized by alterations in the proportion of TAU isoforms containing three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule-binding repeats. The splicing factor SC35/SRSF2 binds to nuclear RNA and facilitates the incorporation of exon 10 in the TAU molecule. Here, we utilized clinical samples, an animal model, and neuronal cell cultures and found that Tat promotes TAU 3R up-regulation through increased levels of phosphorylated SC35, which is retained in nuclear speckles. This mechanism involved Tat-mediated increased expression of DYRK1A and was prevented by DYRK1A silencing. In addition, we found that Tat associates with TAU RNA, further demonstrating that Tat interferes with host RNA metabolism in the absence of viral infection. Altogether, our data unravel a novel mechanism of Tat-mediated neuronal toxicity through dysregulation of the SC35-dependent alternative splicing of TAU exon 10. Furthermore, the increased immunostaining of DYRK1A in HIV+ brains without pathology points at dysregulation of DYRK1A as an early event in the neuronal complications of HIV infection.

  16. HIV-1-Tat Protein Inhibits SC35-mediated Tau Exon 10 Inclusion through Up-regulation of DYRK1A Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Ferdous; Pacifici, Marco; Wilk, Anna; Parker-Struckhoff, Amanda; Del Valle, Luis; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Parsons, Christopher; Jeansonne, Duane; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is implicated in the neuronal damage that contributes to neurocognitive impairment affecting people living with HIV/AIDS. Aberrant splicing of TAU exon 10 results in tauopathies characterized by alterations in the proportion of TAU isoforms containing three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule-binding repeats. The splicing factor SC35/SRSF2 binds to nuclear RNA and facilitates the incorporation of exon 10 in the TAU molecule. Here, we utilized clinical samples, an animal model, and neuronal cell cultures and found that Tat promotes TAU 3R up-regulation through increased levels of phosphorylated SC35, which is retained in nuclear speckles. This mechanism involved Tat-mediated increased expression of DYRK1A and was prevented by DYRK1A silencing. In addition, we found that Tat associates with TAU RNA, further demonstrating that Tat interferes with host RNA metabolism in the absence of viral infection. Altogether, our data unravel a novel mechanism of Tat-mediated neuronal toxicity through dysregulation of the SC35-dependent alternative splicing of TAU exon 10. Furthermore, the increased immunostaining of DYRK1A in HIV+ brains without pathology points at dysregulation of DYRK1A as an early event in the neuronal complications of HIV infection. PMID:26534959

  17. O-GlcNAcylation: A regulator of tau pathology and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid

    2016-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is the posttranslational modification of intracellular proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). The discovery of O-GlcNAc modification of tau and its impact on tau phosphorylation has attracted recent research interest in O-GlcNAc studies in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) field. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc occurs extensively in the brain. The expressions and activities of the enzymes catalyzing O-GlcNAc cycling are several-fold higher in the brain than in the peripheral tissues. The O-GlcNAcylation levels of brain proteins including tau are decreased in AD brain, probably due to decreased brain glucose metabolism. The reduction of brain O-GlcNAcylation appears to mediate the molecular mechanism by which decreased brain glucose metabolism contributes to neurodegeneration. Studies on mouse models of tauopathies suggest a neuroprotective role of pharmacological elevation of brain O-GlcNAc, which could potentially be a promising approach for treating AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Signaling pathways and posttranslational modifications of tau in Alzheimer's disease: the humanization of yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Jürgen J.; Brandt, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, yeast have been frequently employed to study the molecular mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, generally by means of heterologous expression of genes encoding the relevant hallmark proteins. However, it has become evident that substantial posttranslational modifications of many of these proteins are required for the development and progression of potentially disease relevant changes. This is exemplified by the neuronal tau proteins, which are critically involved in a class of neuro-degenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies and which includes Alz-heimer’s disease (AD) as its most common representative. In the course of the disease, tau changes its phosphorylation state and becomes hyperphosphory-lated, gets truncated by proteolytic cleavage, is subject to O-glycosylation, sumoylation, ubiquitinylation, acetylation and some other modifications. This poses the important question, which of these posttranslational modifications are naturally occurring in the yeast model or can be reconstituted by heterol-ogous gene expression. Here, we present an overview on common modifica-tions as they occur in tau during AD, summarize their potential relevance with respect to disease mechanisms and refer to the native yeast enzyme orthologs capable to perform these modifications. We will also discuss potential approaches to humanize yeast in order to create modification patterns resembling the situation in mammalian cells, which could enhance the value of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis as disease models. PMID:28357346

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  20. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  1. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  2. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  3. Search for a low-mass higgs boson in Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau(+)tau(-) at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-30

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau+tau-, tau+-->e+nu(e)nu(tau), or tau+-->mu+nu(mu)nu(tau). The data sample contains 122x10(6) Upsilon(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a narrow structure in the studied tau+tau- invariant mass region of 4.03tau+tau-)<10.10 GeV/c2. We exclude at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) a low-mass Higgs boson decaying to tau+tau- with a product branching fraction B(Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0))xB(A(0)-->tau+tau-)>(1.5-16)x10(-5) across the m(tau+tau-) range. We also set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the tau+tau- decay of the eta(b) at B(eta(b)-->tau+tau-)<8%.

  4. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Impairs Mitochondrial Dynamics in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María José; Vergara-Pulgar, Katiana; Jara, Claudia; Cabezas-Opazo, Fabian; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A

    2017-01-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of aggregates of tau protein. Tau truncated by caspase-3 (D421) or tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/S404 might play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that modify their size and function through mitochondrial dynamics. Recent studies have shown that alterations of mitochondrial dynamics affect synaptic communication. Therefore, we studied the effects of pathological forms of tau on the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. We used primary cortical neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice and immortalized cortical neurons (CN1.4) that were transfected with plasmids containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP with different tau forms: full-length (GFP-T4), truncated (GFP-T4C3), pseudophosphorylated (GFP-T42EC), or both truncated and pseudophosphorylated modifications of tau (GFP-T4C3-2EC). Cells expressing truncated tau showed fragmented mitochondria compared to cells that expressed full-length tau. These findings were corroborated using primary neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice that expressed the truncated and both truncated and pseudophosphorylated forms of tau. Interestingly, mitochondrial fragmentation was accompanied by a significant reduction in levels of optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1) in cells expressing the truncated form of tau. In addition, treatment with low concentrations of amyloid-beta (Aβ) significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and mitochondrial length in cortical cells and primary neurons from tau(-/-) mice that express truncated tau. These results indicate that the presence of tau pathology impairs mitochondrial dynamics by reducing Opa1 levels, an event that could lead to mitochondrial impairment observed in AD.

  5. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  7. BDNF Val66Met moderates memory impairment, hippocampal function and tau in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yen Ying; Hassenstab, Jason; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Maruff, Paul; Snyder, Peter J; Masters, Colin L; Allegri, Ricardo; Chhatwal, Jasmeer; Farlow, Martin R; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Laske, Christoph; Levin, Johannes; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Rossor, Martin; Salloway, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J

    2016-10-01

    SEE ROGAEVA AND SCHMITT-ULMS DOI101093/AWW201 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism is implicated in synaptic excitation and neuronal integrity, and has previously been shown to moderate amyloid-β-related memory decline and hippocampal atrophy in preclinical sporadic Alzheimer's disease. However, the effect of BDNF in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease is unknown. We aimed to determine the effect of BDNF Val66Met on cognitive function, hippocampal function, tau and amyloid-β in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We explored effects of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 on these relationships. The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network conducted clinical, neuropsychological, genetic, biomarker and neuroimaging measures at baseline in 131 mutation non-carriers and 143 preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers on average 12 years before clinical symptom onset. BDNF genotype data were obtained for mutation carriers (95 Val66 homozygotes, 48 Met66 carriers). Among preclinical mutation carriers, Met66 carriers had worse memory performance, lower hippocampal glucose metabolism and increased levels of cerebrospinal fluid tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) than Val66 homozygotes. Cortical amyloid-β and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 levels were significantly different from non-carriers but did not differ between preclinical mutation carrier Val66 homozygotes and Met66 carriers. There was an effect of APOE on amyloid-β levels, but not cognitive function, glucose metabolism or tau. As in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, the deleterious effects of amyloid-β on memory, hippocampal function, and tau in preclinical autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers are greater in Met66 carriers. To date, this is the only genetic factor found to moderate downstream effects of amyloid-β in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Review of recent results on the /tau/ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This is a review of the recent results on the /tau/ lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus//2..pi../sup 0/..nu../sub /tau// with much improved precision, limits on decay modes containing /eta/ mesons, including the second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus///eta/..nu../sub /tau//, and limits on exotic decay modes. The implications of these results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  10. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  11. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413] PMID:27222125

  12. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  13. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  14. Tau--an inhibitor of deacetylase HDAC6 function.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-Maria, Ismael; Gomez de Barreda, Elena; Zhu, Xiongwei; Cuadros, Raquel; Cabrero, Jose Roman; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Dawson, Hana N; Vitek, Michael P; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Avila, Jesus

    2009-06-01

    Analysis of brain microtubule protein from patients with Alzheimer's disease showed decreased alpha tubulin levels along with increased acetylation of the alpha tubulin subunit, mainly in those microtubules from neurons containing neurofibrillary tau pathology. To determine the relationship of tau protein and increased tubulin acetylation, we studied the effect of tau on the acetylation-deacetylation of tubulin. Our results indicate that tau binds to the tubulin-deacetylase, histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), decreasing its activity with a consequent increase in tubulin acetylation. As expected, increased acetylation was also found in tubulin from wild-type mice compared with tubulin from mice lacking tau because of the tau-mediated inhibition of the deacetylase. In addition, we found that an excess of tau protein, as a HDAC6 inhibitor, prevents induction of autophagy by inhibiting proteasome function.

  15. Determination of GPCR Phosphorylation Status: Establishing a Phosphorylation Barcode.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Bradley, Sophie J; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J

    2015-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are rapidly phosphorylated following agonist occupation in a process that mediates receptor uncoupling from its cognate G protein, a process referred to as desensitization. In addition, this process provides a mechanism by which receptors can engage with arrestin adaptor molecules and couple to downstream signaling pathways. The importance of this regulatory process has been highlighted recently by the understanding that ligands can direct receptor signaling along one pathway in preference to another, the phenomenon of signaling bias that is partly mediated by the phosphorylation status or phosphorylation barcode of the receptor. Methods to determine the phosphorylation status of a GPCR in vitro and in vivo are necessary to understand not only the physiological mechanisms involved in GPCR signaling, but also to fully examine the signaling properties of GPCR ligands. This unit describes detailed methods for determining the overall phosphorylation pattern on a receptor (the phosphorylation barcode), as well as mass spectrometry approaches that can define the precise sites that become phosphorylated. These techniques, coupled with the generation and characterization of receptor phosphorylation-specific antibodies, provide a full palate of techniques necessary to determine the phosphorylation status of any given GPCR subtype.

  16. Axonal disruption in white matter underlying cortical sulcus tau pathology in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong Hee; Gangolli, Mihika; Stein, Thor; Alvarez, Victor; McKee, Ann; Brody, David L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. One of the primary defining neuropathological lesions in CTE, based on the first consensus conference, is the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in gray matter sulcal depths. Post-mortem CTE studies have also reported myelin loss, axonal injury and white matter degeneration. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE is restricted to post-mortem neuropathological analysis. We hypothesized that high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI might be useful for detecting white matter microstructural changes directly adjacent to gray matter tau pathology. To test this hypothesis, formalin-fixed post-mortem tissue blocks from the superior frontal cortex of ten individuals with an established diagnosis of CTE were obtained from the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation brain bank. Advanced diffusion MRI data was acquired using an 11.74 T MRI scanner at Washington University with 250 × 250 × 500 µm(3) spatial resolution. Diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and generalized q-sampling imaging analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Following MRI acquisition, tissue sections were tested for phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity in gray matter sulcal depths. Axonal disruption in underlying white matter was assessed using two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis of myelin black gold staining. A robust image co-registration method was applied to accurately quantify the relationship between diffusion MRI parameters and histopathology. We found that white matter underlying sulci with high levels of tau pathology had substantially impaired myelin black gold Fourier transform power coherence, indicating axonal microstructural disruption (r = -0.55, p = 0.0015). Using diffusion tensor MRI, we found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was modestly (r = 0.53) but significantly (p = 0.0012) correlated

  17. Total-tau and phospho-tau(181Thr) in cerebrospinal fluid of neurologically intact population increase with age.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, J; Psujek, M; Bartosik-Psujek, H

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated molecule playing a crucial role in maintenance of neuronal integrity and in many neurodegenerative processes; its pathology has become a hallmark feature at the tissue level. The aim of the study was to estimate total tau and phospho-tau (Thr181) concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy population. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were taken from 129 subjects (age 18-77 years) without known neurologic or psychiatric condition. Both total-tau and phospho-tau levels showed significant correlation with age, which was more pronounced in older population.

  18. Emerging drug targets for Aβ and tau in Alzheimer’s disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    West, Sophie; Bhugra, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Aims Currently, treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) focuses on the cholinergic hypothesis and provides limited symptomatic effects. Research currently focuses on other factors that are thought to contribute to AD development such as tau proteins and Aβ deposits, and how modification of the associated pathology affects outcomes in patients. This systematic review summarizes and appraises the evidence for the emerging drugs affecting Aβ and tau pathology in AD. Methods A comprehensive, systematic online database search was conducted using the databases ScienceDirect and PubMed to include original research articles. A systematic review was conducted following a minimum set of standards, as outlined by The PRISMA Group 1. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed and studies fitting the criteria were selected. No human trials were included in this review. In vitro and in vivo AD models were used to assess efficacy to ensure studied agents were emerging targets without large bodies of evidence. Results The majority of studies showed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) of Aβ and/or tau pathology, or cognitive effects. Many studies conducted in AD animal models have shown a reduction in Aβ peptide burden and a reduction in tau phosphorylation post-intervention. This has the potential to reduce plaque formation and neuronal degeneration. Conclusions There are many emerging targets showing promising results in the effort to modify the pathological effects associated with AD. Many of the trials also provided evidence of the clinical effects of such drugs reducing pathological outcomes, which was often demonstrated as an improvement of cognition. PMID:25753046

  19. Novel Phospho-Tau Monoclonal Antibody Generated Using a Liposomal Vaccine, with Enhanced Recognition of a Conformational Tauopathy Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Theunis, Clara; Adolfsson, Oskar; Crespo-Biel, Natalia; Piorkowska, Kasia; Pihlgren, Maria; Hickman, David T.; Gafner, Valérie; Borghgraef, Peter; Devijver, Herman; Pfeifer, Andrea; Van Leuven, Fred; Muhs, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau is an intrinsically unfolded, very soluble neuronal protein. Under still unknown circumstances, Tau protein forms soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are closely linked to the cause and progression of various brain pathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease. Previously we reported the development of liposome-based vaccines and their efficacy and safety in preclinical mouse models for tauopathy. Here we report the use of a liposomal vaccine for the generation of a monoclonal antibody with particular characteristics that makes it a valuable tool for fundamental studies as well as a candidate antibody for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The specificity and affinity of antibody ACI-5400 were characterized by a panel of methods: (i) measuring the selectivity for a specific phospho-Tau epitope known to be associated with tauopathy, (ii) performing a combination of peptide and protein binding assays, (iii) staining of brain sections from mouse preclinical tauopathy models and from human subjects representing six different tauopathies, and (iv) evaluating the selective binding to pathological epitopes on extracts from tauopathy brains in non-denaturing sandwich assays. We conclude that the ACI-5400 antibody binds to protein Tau phosphorylated at S396 and favors a conformation that is typically present in the brain of tauopathy patients, including Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28035925

  20. Respective roles of neurofilaments, microtubules, MAP1B, and tau in neurite outgrowth and stabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, T B; Beermann, M L

    1994-01-01

    The respective roles of neurofilaments (NFs), microtubules (MTs), and the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) MAP 1B and tau on neurite outgrowth and stabilization were probed by the intracellular delivery of specific antisera into transiently permeabilized NB2a/d1 cells during treatment with dbcAMP. Intracellular delivery of antisera specific for the low (NF-L), middle (NF-M), or extensively phosphorylated high (NF-H) molecular weight subunits did not prevent initial neurite elaboration, nor did it induce retraction of existing neurites elaborated by cells that had been previously treated for 1 d with dbcAMP. By contrast, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against tubulin reduced the percentage of cells with neurites at both these time points. Intracellular delivery of anti-NF-L and anti-NF-M antisera did not induce retraction in cells treated with dbcAMP for 3 d. However, intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, tau, or tubulin induced similar levels of neurite retraction at this time. Intracellular delivery of monoclonal antibodies (RT97 or SMI-31) directed against phosphorylated NF-H induced neurite retraction in cell treated with dbcAMP for 3 d; a monoclonal antibody (SMI-32) directed against nonphosphorylated NF-H did not induce neurite retraction at this time. By contrast, none of the above antisera induced retraction of neurites in cells treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. Neurites develop resistance to retraction by colchicine, first detectable in some neurites after 3 d and in the majority of neurites after 7 d of dbcAMP treatment. We therefore examined whether or not colchicine resistance was compromised by intracellular delivery of the above antisera. Colchicine treatment resulted in rapid neurite retraction after intracellular delivery of antisera directed against extensively phosphorylated NF-H, MAP1B, or tau into cells that had previously been treated with dbcAMP for 7 d. By contrast, colchicine

  1. A dynamic view to the modulation of phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation by inhibition of O-GlcNAcase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cuyue; Welty, Devin F

    2013-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation are reciprocally regulated. As hyperphosphorylation is implicated in tau pathology, approaches have been exploited to reduce the magnitude of tau phosphorylation by increasing the level of tau O-GlcNAcylation. With mathematic models constructed to describe different kinetic scenarios, we analyzed the temporal change of an O-GlcNAcylated protein in contrast to that of the phosphorylated form upon inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). The analyses indicate that when degradation of the modified protein is negligible relative to the naked one, the magnitude of O-GlcNAcylated protein increase is proportional to the level of inhibition, while the extent of phosphorylated protein decline varies due to other factors. Furthermore, the increase of O-GlcNAcylated protein parallels with the decrease of phosphorylated form upon acute or short-term inhibition of OGA, as observed in many in vitro and short term in vivo studies. However, phosphorylated protein is predicted to return to its initial level while O-GlcNAcylated protein to achieve a higher steady level under sustained inhibition. This simulated result is in line with a recent report on long-term inhibition of OGA in transgenic mice. Noticeably, inhibition withdrawal is anticipated to cause a transient rise of phosphorylated protein. If degradation of modified proteins proceeds in addition to the naked one, the characteristic temporal profiles of each form in response to OGA inhibition would depend on the relative importance of individual degradation pathways. The models described herein may serve as a useful investigational tool that will provide insight into pharmacological intervention for tauopathies in particular and for reciprocally modulated reactions in general.

  2. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  3. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  4. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation