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Sample records for abo blood type

  1. ABO Blood Type and Personality Traits in Healthy Japanese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimine, Shoko; Saruwatari, Junji; Kaneda, Ayako; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    There is no scientific consensus that a relationship exists between the ABO blood group and personality traits. However, a recent study hypothesized that the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene is in linkage with the ABO gene. The sample population consisted of 1,427 healthy Japanese subjects who completed the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Each subject's ABO blood type was determined by genotyping the rs8176719 and rs8176746 ABO gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The relationships between the six ABO genotypes or four ABO phenotypes and personality traits were examined using a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), controlling for age and sex. The MANCOVA data showed a significant difference in TCI scores among the ABO genotype groups (F [7, 1393] = 3.354, p = 0.001). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference in the mean scores for Persistence among the genotype groups (F = 2.680, partial η2 = 0.010, p = 0.020). Similarly, dividing the ABO blood type into four phenotypes revealed a significant difference among the phenotype groups (F [7, 1397] = 2.529, p = 0.014). A subsequent univariate analysis showed a significant difference among the phenotype groups in the mean scores for Persistence (F = 2.952, partial η2= 0.006, p = 0.032). We observed a significant association between ABO blood group genotypes and personality traits in a large number of healthy Japanese subjects. However, these results should be regarded as preliminary and should be interpreted with caution because it is possible that the association between ABO blood group genotype and the Persistence trait is relatively weak.

  2. The Classroom-Friendly ABO Blood Types Kit: Blood Agglutination Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Savittree Rochanasmita; Kruatong, Tussatrin; Dahsah, Chanyah; Suwanjinda, Duongdearn

    2012-01-01

    The classroom-friendly ABO blood type kit was developed by combining advantages of modelling and a simulation laboratory to teach the topics of ABO blood types and blood transfusion. Teachers can easily simulate the agglutination reaction on a blood type testing plate in the classroom, and show the students how this reaction occurs by using the…

  3. Relationship of ABO Blood Type on Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Lee, Han-Dong; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    ABO blood groups are associated with various diseases. A relationship between Achilles tendon ruptures and blood type O has been reported, although its pathogenesis was not clear. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published study describing the relationship between blood type and rotator cuff tendon tears. To determine whether patients with rotator cuff tear had a greater prevalence of blood type O than those without rotator cuff tear. A cross-sectional study. Research hospital outpatient evaluation. A total of 316 subjects with shoulder pain were included and divided into "tear" and "no-tear" groups according to ultrasonographic examination. ABO blood group, gender, dominant arm, smoking history, trauma history, and age were compared between the 2 groups and the odds ratios of these factors were evaluated by logistic regression. The tear group (38.6%) had more instances of blood type O than the healthy population (27.2%; P = .002). The adjusted odds ratio for rotator cuff tear for blood type O to non-O was 2.38 (95% confidence interval 1.28-4.42). The odds ratios for rotator cuff tears for smoking, major trauma history, minor trauma history, and age were 2.08, 3.11, 2.29, and 1.06, respectively. Patients with rotator cuff tears were more likely to have blood type O. The odds ratios of factors for rotator cuff tears were high in the following order: major trauma history, blood type O, minor trauma history, and age. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of ABO and Rh blood groups with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Meo, S A; Rouq, F A; Suraya, F; Zaidi, S Z

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic "ABO" blood groups are inherited antigenic substances which are found on the surface of red blood cells in addition to other tissues. Certain hypothesis advocates that genetic predisposition like "ABO" blood group would be associated with occurrence of diseases including type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the potential association between "ABO" and "Rhesus" blood groups with type 2 diabetes. We identified 47 research documents in a data based search including ISI-Web of Science, EMBASE and PubMed. Literature was explored using the key terms including "ABO blood groups" "type 2 diabetes". Studies in which "ABO" blood types and diabetes mellitus were discussed included without restrictions of research documents, types, status and language of the publications. Finally, 15 publications which matched our criteria were included, and remaining studies were excluded. Blood group "B" was associated with high incidence of type 2 diabetes and blood group "O" has a minimum association with type 2 diabetes. Blood group "A" and "AB" were almost equally distributed in both diabetic and non-diabetic population. However, we were unable to find an association between "Rh+ve" and "Rh-ve" blood groups with type 2 diabetes. Subjects with blood group "B" are at high risk while individuals with blood group "O" are at low peril of evolving type 2 diabetes. It is suggested that subjects with blood group "B" should be closely monitored by physicians as these subjects have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Simplification of genotyping techniques of the ABO blood type experiment and exploration of population genetics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Zhou, Yi-ren; Ding, Jia-lin; Wang, Zhi-yuan; Liu, Ling; Wang, Ye-kai; Lou, Hui-ling; Qiao, Shou-yi; Wu, Yan-hua

    2017-05-20

    The ABO blood type is one of the most common and widely used genetic traits in humans. Three glycosyltransferase-encoding gene alleles, I A , I B and i, produce three red blood cell surface antigens, by which the ABO blood type is classified. By using the ABO blood type experiment as an ideal case for genetics teaching, we can easily introduce to the students several genetic concepts, including multiple alleles, gene interaction, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and gene evolution. Herein we have innovated and integrated our ABO blood type genetics experiments. First, in the section of Molecular Genetics, a new method of ABO blood genotyping was established: specific primers based on SNP sites were designed to distinguish three alleles through quantitative real-time PCR. Next, the experimental teaching method of Gene Evolution was innovated in the Population Genetics section: a gene-evolution software was developed to simulate the evolutionary tendency of the ABO genotype encoding alleles under diverse conditions. Our reform aims to extend the contents of genetics experiments, to provide additional teaching approaches, and to improve the learning efficiency of our students eventually.

  6. Sensitive typing of reverse ABO blood groups with a waveguide-mode sensor.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Torahiko; Ashiba, Hiroki; Fujimaki, Makoto; Tanaka, Mutsuo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami; Awazu, Koichi; Makishima, Makoto

    2018-07-01

    Portable, on-site blood typing methods will help provide life-saving blood transfusions to patients during an emergency or natural calamity, such as significant earthquakes. We have previously developed waveguide-mode (WM) sensors for forward ABO and Rh(D) blood typing and detection of antibodies against hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. In this study, we evaluated a WM-sensor for reverse ABO blood typing. Since reverse ABO blood typing is a method for detection of antibodies against type A and type B oligosaccharide antigens on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs), we fixed a synthetic type A or type B trisaccharide antigen on the sensor chip of the WM sensor. We obtained significant changes in the reflectance spectra from a WM sensor on type A antigen with type B plasma and type O plasma and on type B antigen with type A plasma and type O plasma, and no spectrum changes on type A antigen or type B antigen with type AB plasma. Signal enhancement with the addition of a peroxidase reaction failed to increase the sensitivity for detection on oligosaccharide chips. By utilizing hemagglutination detection using regent type A and type B RBCs, we successfully determined reverse ABO blood groups with higher sensitivity compared to a method using oligosaccharide antigens. Thus, functionality of a portable device utilizing a WM sensor can be expanded to include reverse ABO blood typing and, in combination with forward ABO typing and antivirus antibody detection, may be useful for on-site blood testing in emergency settings. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Laboratory Exercise to Determine Human ABO Blood Type by Noninvasive Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael P.; Detzel, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and their association with diseases and nondisease phenotypes is of growing importance in human biology studies. In this laboratory exercise, students determine the genetic basis for their ABO blood type; however, no blood is drawn. Students isolate genomic DNA from buccal mucosa cells that are present…

  8. Understanding thread properties for red blood cell antigen assays: weak ABO blood typing.

    PubMed

    Nilghaz, Azadeh; Zhang, Liyuan; Li, Miaosi; Ballerini, David R; Shen, Wei

    2014-12-24

    "Thread-based microfluidics" research has so far focused on utilizing and manipulating the wicking properties of threads to form controllable microfluidic channels. In this study we aim to understand the separation properties of threads, which are important to their microfluidic detection applications for blood analysis. Confocal microscopy was utilized to investigate the effect of the microscale surface morphologies of fibers on the thread's separation efficiency of red blood cells. We demonstrated the remarkably different separation properties of threads made using silk and cotton fibers. Thread separation properties dominate the clarity of blood typing assays of the ABO groups and some of their weak subgroups (Ax and A3). The microfluidic thread-based analytical devices (μTADs) designed in this work were used to accurately type different blood samples, including 89 normal ABO and 6 weak A subgroups. By selecting thread with the right surface morphology, we were able to build μTADs capable of providing rapid and accurate typing of the weak blood groups with high clarity.

  9. Overuse of preoperative laboratory coagulation testing and ABO blood typing: a French national study.

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Ruchard, D; Drewniak, N; Molliex, S

    2017-12-01

    Following publication of guidelines on routine preoperative tests, the French Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (SFAR), in association with French national public health insurance, conducted a survey to evaluate adherence to guidelines and the economic consequences. Using the French Hospital Discharge Database and National Health Insurance Information system, tests performed during the 30 days before surgery were analysed for two situations: (1) standard laboratory coagulation tests and ABO blood typing in children able to walk and scheduled for tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy; and (2) ABO blood typing in adults before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thyroidectomy, lumbar discectomy or breast surgery. Guidelines do not recommend any preoperative tests in these settings. Between 2013 and 2015, a coagulation test was performed in 49% of the 241 017 children who underwent tonsillectomy and 39% of the 133 790 children who underwent adenoidectomy. A similar pattern was observed for ABO blood typing although re-operation rates for bleeding on the first postoperative day were very low (0.12-0.31% for tonsillectomy and 0.01-0.02% for adenoidectomy). Between 2012 and 2015, ABO blood typing was performed in 32-45% of the 1 114 082 patients who underwent one of the four selected procedures. The transfusion rate was very low (0.02-0.31%). The mean cost for the four procedures over the 4 yr period was €5 310 000 (sd €325 000). Standard laboratory coagulation tests and ABO blood typing are still routinely prescribed before surgery and anaesthesia despite current guidelines. This over-prescription represents a high and unnecessary cost, and should therefore be addressed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Retrospective analysis of forward and reverse ABO typing discrepancies among patients and blood donors in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Makroo, R N; Kakkar, B; Agrawal, S; Chowdhry, M; Prakash, B; Karna, P

    2018-01-12

    The aim of our study was to determine the incidence and causes of ABO typing discrepancies among patients and blood donors at our centre. An accurate interpretation of the ABO blood group of an individual is of utmost importance to ensure patient safety and good transfusion practices. A retrospective observational study was carried out in the Department of Transfusion Medicine in our hospital from March 2013 to December 2015. Records of all patient and blood donor samples were retrieved and analysed for ABO typing discrepancies. In total, 135 853 patient and 62 080 donor samples were analysed for ABO typing discrepancies. The incidence among patients and blood donors was found to be 0·1% (138/135853) and 0·02% (14/62080), respectively. The mean age for patients and blood donors was 48·4 and 29·2 years, respectively. The most common cause of ABO typing discrepancies was due to cold autoantibodies among the patients (50·7%) and blood donors (57%) causing discrepant results in reverse typing. The various other causes of reverse typing discrepancies among patients were weak/missing antibody (25·4%), cold-reacting alloantibody (4·3%), warm autoantibody (2·2%), anti-A1 antibody (2·2%), Bombay phenotype (1·5%), transplantation (0·7%) and rouleaux (0·7%), whereas in blood donors, the causes were cold-reacting antibody (7%) and weak antibody (7%). The major cause of forward typing discrepancies among patients (12·3%) and blood donors (29%) was ABO subgroups. The resolution of ABO typing discrepancy is essential to minimise the chance of transfusion of ABO-incompatible blood. © 2018 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Blood typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... matching; Rh typing; ABO blood typing; Blood group; Anemia - immune hemolytic blood type; ABO blood type; A ... during pregnancy. Careful testing can prevent a severe anemia in the newborn and jaundice .

  12. ABO blood type, long-standing diabetes, and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Naoto; Lin, Yingsong; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Hara, Seiichi; Kubota, Ken; Kamisawa, Terumi

    2013-04-28

    To retrospectively study pancreatic cancer patients with respect to their ABO blood type and diabetes. Our analysis included a cohort of 1017 patients with pancreatic ductal cancer diagnosed at our hospital in Tokyo. They were divided into two groups: 114 patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes (DM group, defined as diabetes lasting for at least three years before the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer) and 903 patients without diabetes (non-DM group). Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors that are associated with long-standing diabetes. The DM group was further divided into three subgroups according to the duration of diabetes (3-5 years, 5.1-14.9 years, and 15 years or more) and univariate analyses were performed. Of the 883 pancreatic cancer patients with serologically assessed ABO blood type, 217 (24.6%) had blood type O. Compared with the non-DM group, the DM group had a higher frequency of blood type B [odds ratio (OR) = 2.61, 95%CI: 1.24-5.47; reference group: blood type A]. Moreover, male (OR = 3.17, 95%CI: 1.67-6.06), older than 70 years of age (OR = 2.19, 95%CI: 1.20-3.98) and presence of a family history of diabetes (OR = 6.21, 95%CI: 3.38-11.36) were associated with long-standing type 2 diabetes. The mean ages were 64.8 ± 9.2 years, 67.1 ± 9.8 years, and 71.7 ± 7.0 years in the subgroups with the duration of diabetes, 3-5 years, 5.1-14.9 years, and 15 years or more, respectively (P = 0.007). A comparison of ABO blood type distribution among the subgroups also showed a significant difference (P = 0.03). The association of pancreatic cancer with blood type and duration of diabetes needs to be further examined in prospective studies.

  13. ABO blood groups and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Çildağ, Songül; Kara, Yasemin; Şentürk, Taşkın

    2017-12-01

    Various genetic and environmental risk factors have been shown to be associated with the incidence of rheumatic diseases. However, the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases poorly understood. Several studies have shown associations of ABO blood groups with various diseases. Our study aimed to determine whether there is an association between the types of rheumatic diseases and ABO and Rh blood groups. The study included the patients, followed up at the Immunology-Rheumatology clinic between January 2016 and December 2016 for diagnosis of rheumatic disease, who had an ABO Rh blood data. Age, gender, type of rheumatic disease, ABO Rh blood groups were recorded. When 823 patients were assessed for blood types, 42.5% patients had A type, 33.2% had O type, 15.4% had B type, and 8.9% had AB type. There was significant difference in the distribution of blood types in rheumatic diseases. While SpA, vasculitis, UCTD, Behçet's and RA were more common in the patients with A blood type; FMF, SLE, SSc and SjS were more common in the patients with O blood type. In addition, the blood type where all the diseases are observed the least commonly was AB. There was significant difference in the distribution of Rh factor in rheumatic diseases. 92.2% patients were Rh positive and 7.8% patients were Rh negative. In our study, we thought that the higher incidence of different rheumatic diseases in different blood types was associated with different genetic predisposition.

  14. ABO Blood Type A Is Associated With Increased Risk of ARDS in Whites Following Both Major Trauma and Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Nuala J.; Shashaty, Michael G. S.; Feng, Rui; Lanken, Paul N.; Gallop, Robert; Kaplan, Sandra; Herlim, Maximilian; Oz, Nathaniel L.; Hiciano, Isabel; Campbell, Ana; Holena, Daniel N.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: ABO glycosyltransferases catalyze antigen modifications on various glycans and glycoproteins and determine the ABO blood types. Blood type A has been associated with increased risk of vascular diseases and differential circulating levels of proteins related to inflammation and endothelial function. The objective of this study was to determine the association of ABO blood types with ARDS risk in patients with major trauma and severe sepsis. Methods: We conducted prospective cohort studies in two populations at an urban tertiary referral, level I trauma center. Critically ill patients (n = 732) presenting after major trauma were followed for 5 days for ARDS development. Additionally, 976 medical patients with severe sepsis were followed for 5 days for ARDS. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Results: ARDS developed in 197 of the 732 trauma patients (27%). Blood type A was associated with increased ARDS risk among whites (37% vs 24%; adjusted OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.14-3.12; P = .014), but not blacks (adjusted OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.33-1.13; P = .114). ARDS developed in 222 of the 976 patients with severe sepsis (23%). Blood type A was also associated with an increased ARDS risk among whites (31% vs 21%; adjusted OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.08-2.59; P = .021) but, again, not among blacks (adjusted OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.59-2.33; P = .652). Conclusions: Blood type A is associated with an increased risk of ARDS in white patients with major trauma and severe sepsis. These results suggest a role for ABO glycans and glycosyltransferases in ARDS susceptibility. PMID:24385226

  15. Prognostic role of ABO blood type in patients with extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type: a triple-center study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jun; Yi, Ping-Yong; Li, Ji-Wei; Liu, Xian-Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Pei-Ying; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2017-07-31

    The prognostic significance of ABO blood type for lymphoma is largely unknown. We evaluated the prognostic role of ABO blood type in patients with extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of 697 patients with newly diagnosed ENKTL from three cancer centers. The prognostic value of ABO blood type was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models. The prognostic values of the International Prognostic Index (IPI) and the Korean Prognostic Index (KPI) were also evaluated. Compared with patients with blood type O, those with blood type non-O tended to display elevated baseline serum C-reactive protein levels (P = 0.038), lower rate of complete remission (P = 0.005), shorter progression-free survival (PFS, P < 0.001), and shorter overall survival (OS, P = 0.001). Patients with blood type O/AB had longer PFS (P < 0.001) and OS (P = 0.001) compared with those with blood type A/B. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that age >60 years (P < 0.001), mass ≥5 cm (P = 0.001), stage III/IV (P < 0.001), elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (P = 0.001), and blood type non-O were independent adverse predictors of OS (P = 0.001). ABO blood type was found to be superior to both the IPI in discriminating patients with different outcomes in the IPI low-risk group and the KPI in distinguishing between the intermediate-to-low- and high-to-intermediate-risk groups. ABO blood type was an independent predictor of clinical outcome for patients with ENKTL.

  16. A novel paper-based assay for the simultaneous determination of Rh typing and forward and reverse ABO blood groups.

    PubMed

    Noiphung, Julaluk; Talalak, Kwanrutai; Hongwarittorrn, Irin; Pupinyo, Naricha; Thirabowonkitphithan, Pannawich; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida

    2015-05-15

    We propose a new, paper-based analytical device (PAD) for blood typing that allows for the simultaneous determination of ABO and Rh blood groups on the same device. The device was successfully fabricated by using a combination of wax printing and wax dipping methods. A 1:2 blood dilution was used for forward grouping, whereas whole blood could be used for reverse grouping. A 30% cell suspension of A-cells or B-cells was used for haemagglutination on the reverse grouping side. The total assay time was 10 min. The ratio between the distance of red blood cell movement and plasma separation is the criterion for agglutination and indicates the presence of the corresponding antigen or antibody. The proposed PAD has excellent reproducibility in that the same blood groups, namely A, AB, and O, were reported by using different PADs that were fabricated on the same day (n=10). The accuracy for detecting blood group A (n=12), B (n=13), AB (n=9), O (n=14), and Rh (n=48) typing were 92%, 85%, 89%, 93%, and 96%, respectively, in comparison with the conventional slide test method. The haematocrit of the sample affects the accuracy of the results, and appropriate dilution is suggested before typing. In conclusion, this study proposes a novel method that is straightforward, time-saving, and inexpensive for the simultaneous determination of ABO and Rh blood groups, which is promising for use in developing countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Association of abo blood groups with gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Huidobro M, Andrea; Torres C, Demetrio; Paredes, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    ABO and Rhesus blood systems are associated with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2). Gestational Diabetes (GDM) is a model to study DM. To study the association between GDM and ABO and Rhesus groups. A retrospective cohort study was performed in 1,078 women who gave birth to a singleton in Talca Regional Hospital, Chile, during 2008. We analyzed personal, obstetric, medical data and ABO and Rh blood groups. GDM was diagnosed in 6.6% of women. Age and body mass index were significantly associated with GDM. There were no differences in Rh blood groups (p = 0.604), while ABO groups were different between GDM and controls. B antigen was present in 3% of GDM women and in 10.8% of controls (p = 0.037), with an odds ratio of 0.25 after adjusting for other associated risk factors (p = 0.06). ABO group is suggested as a possible protector marker for GDM.

  18. Gene distribution of ABO blood type system on the Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) patients in the working area of Puskesmas Bonto Bangun, District of Rilau Ale, Bulukumba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjafaraenan; Alvionita, D. N.; Agus, R.; Sabran, A.

    2018-03-01

    This research is about gene distribution of ABO blood type system on the Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) patients in the working area of Puskesmas Bonto Bangun, District of Rilau Ale, Bulukumba. This research aimed to determine the blood type which is most affected by DHF using ABO blood type system. In this research, there are 104 samples, 8 of them were attacked by DF and 96 were attacked by DHF. From the 96 patients of DHF, there were 38 patients with A-blood type, 17 patients with B-blood type, 36 patients with O-blood type and 5 patients of AB-blood type. The data were tested using genotype frequency test and the results showed that the percentage of A-homozygous blood type (IAIA) is 0:09%; A heterozygous blood type (IAIo) is 0:36%; B-homozygous blood type (IBIB) is 0.01%; B heterozygous blood type (IB Io) is 0.12%; AB blood type (IAIB) is 0.06% and O blood type (IoIo) is 12:36%. So the biggest frequency of genotype are IAIo (0.36%) and IoIo (0.36%). The results showed that O blood type gene is the most affected by DHF. Then continued by the regression test between blood type and DHF, it is obtained that the correlation value is 1 which indicated that there is a strong relationship.

  19. The prognostic value of ABO blood group in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The antigens of the ABO system are expressed on red blood cell membranes as well as on the surface of several other normal and pathological cells and tissues. Following the first clinical observations more than 60 years ago, the role of ABO blood group in cancer biology has been intensely studied by several investigators, and it is now widely recognised that ABO antigens are associated with the risk of developing several types of tumours, namely pancreatic and gastric cancers. However, whether this association also affects the clinical outcome of cancer patients is less certain. In this narrative review, based on literature data, we discuss the role of ABO blood types as prognostic biomarkers in different types of cancers. The current knowledge of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of the association is also analysed. PMID:26674825

  20. ABO/Rh Blood-Typing Model: A Problem-Solving Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Carol

    2005-01-01

    An ARO/Rh Blood-Typing kit useful for students to visualize blood-typing activities and practice problem-solving skills with transfusion reactions is presented. The model also enables students to identify relationships between A, B, and Rh antigens and antibodies in blood and to understand molecular mechanisms involved in transfusion agglutination…

  1. Influence of ABO blood group on sports performance.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Gandini, Giorgio; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Skafidas, Spyros; Festa, Luca; Danese, Elisa; Montagnana, Martina; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico

    2017-06-01

    Despite being a recessive trait, the O blood group is the most frequent worldwide among the ABO blood types. Since running performance has been recognized as a major driver of evolutionary advantage in humans, we planned a study to investigate whether the ABO blood group may have an influence on endurance running performance in middle-aged recreational athletes. The study population consisted of 52 recreational, middle-aged, Caucasian athletes (mean age: 49±13 years, body mass index, 23.4±2.3 kg/m 2 ), regularly engaged in endurance activity. The athletes participated to a scientific event called "Run for Science" (R4S), entailing the completion of a 21.1 km (half-marathon) run under competing conditions. The ABO blood type status of the participants was provided by the local Service of Transfusion Medicine. In univariate analysis, running performance was significantly associated with age and weekly training, but not with body mass index. In multiple linear regression analysis, age and weekly training remained significantly associated with running performance. The ABO blood group status was also found to be independently associated with running time, with O blood type athletes performing better than those with non-O blood groups. Overall, age, weekly training and O blood group type explained 62.2% of the total variance of running performance (age, 41.6%; training regimen, 10.5%; ABO blood group, 10.1%). The results of our study show that recreational athletes with O blood group have better endurance performance compared to those with non-O blood group types. This finding may provide additional support to the putative evolutionary advantages of carrying the O blood group.

  2. Distribution of ABO Blood Groups and Coronary Artery Calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Zhou, Bing-Yang; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Qing, Ping; Gao, Ying; Liu, Geng; Dong, Qian; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-06-01

    ABO blood groups have been confirmed to be associated with cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease. However, whether ABO blood group is correlated with coronary artery calcium (CAC) is still unknown. 301 patients with coronary artery calcium score (CACS) assessed by computed tomography were consecutively enrolled and divided into two groups: with calcium group (CACS>0, n=104) and without calcium group (CACS=0, n=197). Distribution of ABO blood groups was evaluated between the two groups. The percentage of A blood type was significantly higher (p=0.008) and O blood type was significantly lower (p=0.037) in the calcium group. Univariate regression analysis showed that age, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, A blood type were positively correlated with CAC, and O blood type was inversely associated with CAC. Multivariate regression analysis showed that A blood type was independently associated with CAC (odds ratio: 2.217, 95% confidence interval: 1.260-3.900, p=0.006) even after further adjustment for variables that were clearly different between the two groups. Our data has suggested for the first time that A blood type was an independent risk marker for CAC. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Possible Correlation of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases with Rh type and ABO Blood Group System

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Surabhi; Tyagi, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Background: Screening of blood is mandatory for transfusion transmitted diseases and is routinely done in the blood banks. As blood is the major source transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus & many other diseases the hazards can be minimised by effective donor selection and screening. Aim: To find out the correlation between the transfusion transmitted diseases and blood groups and the seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV & syphilis among the apparently healthy human blood donors. Study, Setting & Design: This retrospective study was conducted at the blood bank of a tertiary health care teaching centre for a period of four years. Material and Methods: All voluntary and replacement donors reporting to the blood bank were screened for HIV-1 & 2, HBsAg, HCV and Syphilis. Anti–HIV -1 & 2, HBsAg & anti - HCV was tested using the appropriate Enzyme–linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique using micro–elisa kit supplied by J.Mitra & Co.Ltd. The seropositive samples were again tested on ELISA kits of RFCL &/or BIORAD for further confirmation & ruling out any false positive or false negative results. The rapid plasma reagain (RPR) test was used for estimation of syphilis infection. Statistical Analysis: The data entry was carried out using Microsoft office excel worksheet and was analysed by percentage and comparison. Results: Total of 6000 donors were screened which included voluntary and replacement donors. Seroprevalence of HIV (0.1833 %), HCV (1.28%), HBsAg (1.5833 %) and syphilis (0.4333 %) was detected. In the study done it was also noted - that the NEGATIVE blood groups were more prone to TTIs. Blood group A negative was more prone to TTIs with HIV, HBsAg and VDRL while blood group B negative was more affected by HCV. Conclusion: Seroprevalence of these infections shows that routine screening is a must for blood and blood product safe transfusion. Do negative blood groups predispose to TTIs? A finding which makes us think…. PMID

  4. Possible Correlation of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases with Rh type and ABO Blood Group System.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Surabhi; Tyagi, Alok

    2013-09-01

    Screening of blood is mandatory for transfusion transmitted diseases and is routinely done in the blood banks. As blood is the major source transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus & many other diseases the hazards can be minimised by effective donor selection and screening. To find out the correlation between the transfusion transmitted diseases and blood groups and the seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV & syphilis among the apparently healthy human blood donors. Study, Setting & Design: This retrospective study was conducted at the blood bank of a tertiary health care teaching centre for a period of four years. All voluntary and replacement donors reporting to the blood bank were screened for HIV-1 & 2, HBsAg, HCV and Syphilis. Anti-HIV -1 & 2, HBsAg & anti - HCV was tested using the appropriate Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique using micro-elisa kit supplied by J.Mitra & Co.Ltd. The seropositive samples were again tested on ELISA kits of RFCL &/or BIORAD for further confirmation & ruling out any false positive or false negative results. The rapid plasma reagain (RPR) test was used for estimation of syphilis infection. The data entry was carried out using Microsoft office excel worksheet and was analysed by percentage and comparison. Total of 6000 donors were screened which included voluntary and replacement donors. Seroprevalence of HIV (0.1833 %), HCV (1.28%), HBsAg (1.5833 %) and syphilis (0.4333 %) was detected. In the study done it was also noted - that the NEGATIVE blood groups were more prone to TTIs. Blood group A negative was more prone to TTIs with HIV, HBsAg and VDRL while blood group B negative was more affected by HCV. Seroprevalence of these infections shows that routine screening is a must for blood and blood product safe transfusion. Do negative blood groups predispose to TTIs? A finding which makes us think….

  5. Relationship between ABO blood groups and malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Chowdhuri, A. N. Rai

    1980-01-01

    A total of 736 patients with fever was tested for malaria and classified according to ABO blood group. Of these, 476 cases had patent parasitaemia at the time of investigation. The distribution of blood groups in this group was significantly different from that in 1300 controls from the same area. While group A was found to be more common in malaria cases than in normals, the reverse situation was found for group O. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:6971187

  6. Association of ABO and Rh blood groups with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Suraya, Faryal; Jamil, Badar; Rouq, Fwziah Al; Meo, Anusha Sultan; Sattar, Kamran; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Alasiri, Saleh A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of "ABO" and "Rhesus" blood groups with incidence of breast cancer. In this study, we identified 70 research documents from data based search engines including "PubMed", "ISI-Web of Knowledge", "Embase" and "Google Scholar". The research papers were selected by using the primary key-terms including "ABO blood type", "Rhesus" blood type and "breast cancer". The research documents in which "ABO" and "Rhesus" blood types and breast cancer was debated were included. After screening, we reviewed 32 papers and finally we selected 25 research papers which met the inclusion criteria and remaining documents were excluded. Blood group "A" has high incidence of breast cancer (45.88%), blood group "O" has (31.69%); "B" (16.16%) and blood group "AB" has (6.27%) incidence of breast cancer. Blood group "A" has highest and blood group "AB" has least association with breast cancer. Furthermore, "Rhesus +ve" blood group has high incidence of breast cancer (88.31%) and "Rhesus -ve" blood group has least association with breast cancer (11.68%). Blood group "A" and "Rhesus +ve" have high risk of breast cancer, while blood type "AB" and "Rhesus -ve" are at low peril of breast cancer. Physicians should carefully monitor the females with blood group "A" and "Rh +ve" as these females are more prone to develop breast cancer. To reduce breast cancer incidence and its burden, preventive and screening programs for breast cancer especially in young women are highly recommended.

  7. Distribution of ABO blood groups in the patients with intracranial aneurysm and association of different risk factors with particular blood type.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal Chandra; Bollam, Papireddy; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The association between ABO blood groups and intracranial aneurysms is not well-known. Many co-morbid factors are associated with intracranial aneurysms. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of different blood group in patients with intracranial aneurysm and to look for associations between risk factors and these groups. This retrospective study includes 1,491 cases who underwent surgical operations for intracranial aneurysms from 1993-2014. We have evaluated the information related to clinical history, ABO blood groups and associated risk factors in the patients both ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by chart review of the cases. In our study, out of 1,491 cases, the most common ABO blood groups were group O (668 cases, 44.80%) and Group A (603 cases, 40.44%), and Rh(+) in 1,319 (88.4%) and Rh(-) in 147 (11.6%). Blood Group A (43% vs. 36%) and Group B (16.2% vs. 8.6%) were significantly higher in Caucasian and African Americans respectively. However, in general population, there was no significant difference in blood groups between Caucasians and African Americans. Rh(-) factor was significantly higher in Caucasians compared to African Americans. Incidence of smoking was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with O group compared to others. In addition, incidence of hypercholesterolemia was significantly higher in aneurysm patients with A group compared to others. The racial disparity in the distribution of blood groups, and risk factor association with blood groups in the development of intracranial aneurysm needs to be considered. The findings from our study may be useful in identifying patients at increased risk. Further study may be required to establish the risks from multiple centers studies around the world.

  8. ABO blood groups, Rhesus factor, and Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, Kemal; Oztürk, Perihan; Gül, Mustafa; Benderli, Yasemin Cihan; Cölgeçen, Emine; Inci, Rahime

    2013-09-01

    Recently, numerous studies have been carried out to explain the genetics and immunopathogenesis of Behçet's disease (BD). There is still insufficient understanding of its etiopathogenesis, but substantial genetic and immune system abnormalities have been suggested. Several studies have shown remarkable associations of ABO blood groups with various diseases. This study investigated the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups and Behçet's disease in Turkish patients. Clinical data on gender, ABO, and Rhesus blood type of patients with BD were collected at the Kayseri Education and Research Hospital from 2005 to 2012. A total of 115 patients with BD were assessed for their association with ABO or Rhesus (D) blood groups and compared with the distribution of the blood groups of 25,701 healthy donors admitted to the Kayseri Education and Research Hospital Blood Center in 2010 and 2011. The distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in patients with BD was similar to the healthy donors. No relationship was found between ABO or Rhesus blood groups and BD at our hospital. Further studies with a larger series and in different centers may be valuable for identifying the association between ABO or Rhesus (D) blood groups and BD.

  9. ABO blood groups and psychiatric disorders: a Croatian study.

    PubMed

    Pisk, Sandra Vuk; Vuk, Tomislav; Ivezić, Ena; Jukić, Irena; Bingulac-Popović, Jasna; Filipčić, Igor

    2018-02-15

    The prevalence of ABO alleles is different in different populations, and many studies have shown a correlation between the occurrences of some diseases and different genotypes of ABO blood groups. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between psychiatric syndromes and ABO blood groups. This case-control study involved 156 psychiatric patients and 303 healthy, unrelated, voluntary blood donors. Genomic DNA was isolated from blood on a QIAcube device using a QIAamp DNA Blood mini QIAcube kit. ABO genotyping on five basic ABO alleles was performed using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis. Compared with healthy subjects, a significantly higher proportion of psychiatric patients had AB blood group (χ 2 =9.359, df=3, p=0.025) and, accordingly, a significantly higher incidence of A1B genotype (χ 2 =8.226, df=3, p=0.042). The odds ratio showed that psychiatric disorders occur almost three times more frequently in carriers of AB group compared to other blood groups. However, no statistically significant difference was found in the distribution of ABO blood groups among patients with different psychiatric diagnoses. Likewise, no correlations were found between ABO blood groups and other characteristics of the psychiatric patients (sex, psychiatric heredity, somatic comorbidity, suicidality). The results of this study support the hypothesis of an association between psychiatric disorders and ABO blood groups. The probability is that psychiatric disorders will occur almost three times more frequently in carriers of AB group compared to other ABO blood groups in the Croatian population.

  10. Genetic and Mechanistic Evaluation for the Mixed-Field Agglutination in B3 Blood Type with IVS3+5G>A ABO Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood type B3 is the most common B subtype in the Chinese population with a frequency of 1/900. Although IVS3+5G>A (rs55852701) mutation of B gene has been shown to associate with the development of B3 blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the unique mixed-field agglutination phenotype has not yet been completely addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 16 cases of confirmed B3 individuals and found that IVS3+5G>A attributes to all cases of B3. RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 7 types of aberrant B3 splicing transcripts with most of the transcripts causing early termination and producing non-functional protein during translation. The splicing transcript without exon 3 that was predicted to generate functional B3 glycosyltransferase lacking 19 amino acids at the N-terminal segment constituted only 0.9% of the splicing transcripts. Expression of the B3 cDNA with exon 3 deletion in the K562 erythroleukemia cells revealed that the B3 glycosyltransferase had only 40% of B1 activity in converting H antigen to B antigen. Notably, the typical mixed-field agglutination of B3-RBCs can be mimicked by adding anti-B antibody to the K562-B3 cells. Conclusions/Significance This study thereby demonstrates that both aberrant splicing of B transcripts and the reduced B3 glycosyltransferase activity contribute to weak B expression and the mixed-field agglutination of B3, adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression. PMID:22624005

  11. Genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the mixed-field agglutination in B3 blood type with IVS3+5G>A ABO gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Ping; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Wang, Wei-Ting; Sun, Chien-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The ABO blood type B(3) is the most common B subtype in the Chinese population with a frequency of 1/900. Although IVS3+5G>A (rs55852701) mutation of B gene has been shown to associate with the development of B(3) blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the unique mixed-field agglutination phenotype has not yet been completely addressed. In this study, we analyzed 16 cases of confirmed B(3) individuals and found that IVS3+5G>A attributes to all cases of B(3). RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 7 types of aberrant B(3) splicing transcripts with most of the transcripts causing early termination and producing non-functional protein during translation. The splicing transcript without exon 3 that was predicted to generate functional B(3) glycosyltransferase lacking 19 amino acids at the N-terminal segment constituted only 0.9% of the splicing transcripts. Expression of the B(3) cDNA with exon 3 deletion in the K562 erythroleukemia cells revealed that the B(3) glycosyltransferase had only 40% of B(1) activity in converting H antigen to B antigen. Notably, the typical mixed-field agglutination of B(3)-RBCs can be mimicked by adding anti-B antibody to the K562-B(3) cells. This study thereby demonstrates that both aberrant splicing of B transcripts and the reduced B(3) glycosyltransferase activity contribute to weak B expression and the mixed-field agglutination of B(3), adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression.

  12. Frequency of ABO/Rhesus Blood Groups in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oner, Can; Dogan, Burcu; Telatar, Berrin; Celik Yagan, Canan Fidan; Oguz, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between ABO/Rh blood groups and diabetes mellitus is still controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between ABO/Rhesus blood groups and diabetes in Turkish population. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Istanbul Medeniyet University Göztepe Education and Training Hospital's Diabetes Units. The study group was composed of 421 patients with type-1 diabetes, 484 patients with type-2 diabetes and 432 controls. Blood samples were collected and tested for ABO/Rhesus blood groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 17.0. A significant association was found between blood groups and diabetes mellitus. The frequency of AB blood group was significantly higher in type-1 diabetics; and A blood group was significantly higher in type-2 diabetics. Furthermore, Rh negativity were significantly more frequent in type-2 diabetics.

  13. ABO and Rh blood group genotypes in a cohort of Saudi stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, M; Jawdat, D; Alaskar, A; Cereb, N; Hajeer, A H

    2018-04-01

    The ABO and rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are the most frequently studied genetic markers in a large group of people. Blood type frequencies vary in different racial/ethnic groups. Our objective was to investigate the distribution of the ABO and rhesus (Rh) blood groups by molecular typing method in a population of Saudi stem cell donors. Our data indicate that the most common blood group in our population is group O followed by group A then group B, and finally, the least common is group AB. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The role of ABO blood groups in Crohn's disease and in monitoring response to infliximab treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiao; Wang, Lingyun; Zhang, Shenghong; Feng, Ting; Li, Li; Chen, Baili; Chen, Minhu

    2016-09-01

    The variation in ABO blood groups is reported to be associated with multiple diseases. Infliximab (IFX) has been widely used in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). We aim to investigate the distribution of ABO blood groups in Chinese patients with CD and to explore its impact on response to IFX. Patients with CD were consecutively recruited to the study between 2007 and 2014. CD patients receiving IFX therapy were followed for at least two years. In 293 patients with CD, most patients (40.6%) had blood type O (119/293). The odds ratio (OR) of CD in blood type O patients was 1.06 (95%CI: 0.6-1.86; p=0.84) compared to all other blood types. Among those CD patients, 107 patients received IFX treatment. One year after the first course of IFX, a significant association was found between the overall ABO system and outcomes of IFX treatment (p<0.001). CD patients with blood type AB (OR=4.42, 95% CI: 1.04-18.76; p=0.044) were more likely to achieve mucosal healing, while CD patients with blood type A had a high risk of losing response (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.15-0.96; p=0.040). ABO blood groups are not associated with prevalence of CD. Patients with blood type AB had a better response to IFX while those with blood type A appeared to have a risk of losing response to IFX.

  15. ABO Blood Group and Endometrial Carcinoma: A Preliminary Single-Center Experience from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zaid, Ahmed; Alsabban, Mohannad; Abuzaid, Mohammed; Alomar, Osama; Al-Badawi, Ismail A; Salem, Hany

    2017-12-18

    Inherited ABO blood groups have been shown to play possible contributions in the pathogenesis of various gynecologic and non-gynecologic carcinomas. With regard to gynecologic carcinomas, there is a confined number of studies that explored the relationship between ABO blood group and endometrial carcinoma (EC) in the PubMed-indexed literature. To the best of our knowledge, no such study has ever been conducted in Saudi Arabia. Our study has two objectives: (I) to determine the prevalence of ABO blood groups among Saudi patients with EC, and (II) to explore the relationship between ABO blood group and several clinico-pathological prognostic parameters (namely: menopausal status [age], body mass index [BMI], tumor grade, FIGO [Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique] stage and recurrence) in Saudi patients with EC. A retrospective cross-sectional study from 01-January-2010 to 31-July-2014 was conducted at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia - a referral tertiary healthcare institute. One-hundred and fourteen patients (n=114) were included in the study. Clinico-pathological data were extrapolated from medical records, and their association with ABO blood groups were evaluated. Categorical data were presented as number of cases (n) and percentages (%). Two-tailed Chi-square test was used for univariate analysis. For all purposes, p values <0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. The mean age and BMI were 59.5 ± 10.8 years (range: 31 - 90) and 36.6 ± 8.6 kg/m 2 (range: 17 - 60), respectively. The vast majority of patients were post-menopausal (86%), had BMI >28 kg/m 2 (84.2%), diagnosed with early FIGO stage I-II (76.3%) and developed no recurrence (86.8%). The frequencies of ABO blood group types A, B, AB, and O were 28.1%, 12.3%, 3.5% and 56.1%, respectively. When ABO blood groups were analyzed as four different types (A, B, AB and O), O-type was the most common ABO blood group in pre- and post

  16. Genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the weak A phenotype in Ael blood type with IVS6 + 5G>A ABO gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, D-P; Sun, C-F; Ning, H-C; Peng, C-T; Wang, W-T; Tseng, C-P

    2015-01-01

    Ael is a rare blood type that is characterized by weak agglutination of RBCs when reacts with anti-A antibody in adsorption-elution test. Although IVS6 + 5G→A mutation is known to associate with the Ael blood type, genetic and mechanistic evaluation for the weak agglutination of Ael with IVS6 + 5G→A mutation has not yet been completely addressed. In this study, five cases of confirmed Ael individuals were analysed. The cDNAs for the A(el) alleles were obtained by cloning method for sequence analyses. The erythroleukemia K562 cells were used as the cell study model and were transfected with the A(el) expression construct. Flow cytometry analysis was then performed to determine the levels of surface antigen expression. The results indicated that IVS6 + 5G→A attributes to all cases of Ael . RT-PCR analyses revealed the presence of at least 10 types of aberrant A(el) splicing transcripts. Most of the transcripts caused early termination and produced non-functional protein during translation. Nevertheless, the transcript without exons 5-6 was predicted to generate functional Ael glycosyltransferase lacking 57 amino acids at the N-terminal segment. When the exons 5-6 deletion transcript was stably expressed in the K562 cells, weak agglutination of the cells can be induced by adding anti-A antibody followed by adsorption-elution test. This study demonstrates that aberrant splicing of A transcripts contributes to weak A expression and the weak agglutination of Ael -RBCs, adding to the complexity for the regulatory mechanisms of ABO gene expression. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  18. Correlation of ABO blood groups with spontaneous recanalization in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Liang; Zhou, Bing-Yang; Li, Sha; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Zhu-Rong; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated the relationship between ABO blood groups and cardiovascular disease, the association of ABO blood type with spontaneous recanalization (SR) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been previously investigated. We performed an initial exploratory study on the association of ABO blood groups with the presence of SR in 1209 patients with AMI. They were divided into two groups according to the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) grades: no-SR group (TIMI 0-1, n = 442) and SR group (TIMI 2-3, n = 767). To confirm our primary findings, data from a second AMI population (n = 200) was analyzed. In the initial data, SR group had a significantly higher percentage of blood type O and a lower percentage of blood type A compared to the no-SR group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that blood type O was positively associated with SR (odds ratio: 1.40, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.87, p = .02), and this finding was confirmed in our second population. The present study demonstrates that blood type O was independently and positively associated with an open culprit artery in patients with AMI, suggesting that the ABO blood type is not only associated with the susceptibility to coronary artery disease but also to spontaneous reperfusion in AMI patients.

  19. ABO blood groups and risk for obesity in Arar, Northern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aboel-Fetoh, Nagah M; Alanazi, Arwa R; Alanazi, Abdullah S; Alruwili, Asma N

    2016-12-01

    ABO blood groups are associated with some important chronic diseases. Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk for obesity. This study aimed to determine whether there is an association between ABO blood groups and obesity in apparently healthy attendees of primary healthcare (PHC) centers in Arar city, Northern Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study included 401 participants aged 15 years and older attending three randomly selected PHC centers in Arar city. Data were collected by means of personal interview using a predesigned questionnaire. Anthropometric examination included height and weight measurements with calculation of BMI. ABO and Rh blood groups were determined. The majority of the participants were female (70.8%). The mean±SD age was 28.6±9.1 years. Only 5.7% were underweight. Both normal and overweight participants were equal in number and constituted 28.4%, whereas obese individuals constituted 37.4% with a mean BMI of 28.56±8.0. Blood group O was the most common (44.1%), followed by A (30.9%), B (18.7%), and AB (6.2%). Rh-positive cases constituted 87.0%. Blood group O was the most common type among the obese individuals (44.7%), followed by A, B, and AB groups (30, 20, and 5.3%, respectively). BMI was highest (28.8±9.2) in blood group O. There were no statistically significant differences between different ABO blood groups as regards BMI, Rh, and sex. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference between Rh type and BMI. The prevalence of obesity and overweight is high in the population attending PHC centers of Arar city, Northern Saudi Arabia. There is no association between overweight, obesity, and ABO blood groups or Rh.

  20. Relationship between ABO blood group and pregnancy complications: a systematic literature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Mengoli, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Given the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the surface of a wide range of human cells and tissues, the putative interplay of the ABO system in human biology outside the area of transfusion and transplantation medicine constitutes an intriguing byway of research. Thanks to evidence accumulated over more than 50 years, the involvement of the ABO system in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cardiovascular, infectious and neoplastic disorders, is now acknowledged. However, there is controversial information on the potential association between ABO blood type and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia and related disorders (eclampsia, HELLP syndrome and intrauterine growth restriction), venous thromboembolism, post-partum haemorrhage and gestational diabetes. To elucidate the role of ABO antigens in pregnancy-related complications, we performed a systematic review of the literature published in the past 50 years. A meta-analytical approach was also applied to the existing literature on the association between ABO status and pre-eclampsia. The results of this systematic review are presented and critically discussed, along with the possible pathogenic implications. PMID:27177402

  1. ABO blood groups and susceptibility to brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Behzad; Hajibagheri, Katayon; Afrasiabian, Shahla; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Ghasembegloo, Saeideh

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between blood groups and some infections such as norovirus, cholera, and malaria has been reported. Despite the importance of brucellosis, there is a lack of data on the relationship between blood groups and brucellosis. Thus, in this study, we examined the relationship between blood groups and brucellosis. In this case-control study, the blood groups of 100 patients with brucellosis and 200 healthy individuals were studied. Exclusion criteria for the control group consisted of a positive Coombs Wright test or a history of brucellosis. The chi-square test was used to compare qualitative variables between the two groups. The variables that met inclusion criteria for the regression model were entered into the logistic regression model. A total of 43% patients were female and 57% male; 27% were urban and 73% rural. Regression analysis showed that the likelihood of brucellosis infection was 6.26 times more in people with blood group AB than in those with blood group O (P<0.001). However, Rh type was not associated with brucellosis infection. Thus, there is a relationship between blood group and brucellosis. People with blood group AB were susceptible to brucellosis, but no difference was observed for brucellosis infection in terms of blood Rh type.

  2. Comparison of Lip Print Patterns in Two Indian Subpopulations and Its Correlation in ABO Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    Suragimath, Girish; Sande, Abhijeet R; Kulkarni, Prasad; Nimbal, Anand; Shankar, T.; Gowd, T. Snigdha; Shetty, Prajwal K

    2014-01-01

    Background: The study of lip-print pattern (cheiloscopy) is a scientific method for personal identification and plays a major role in forensic and criminal investigations. Objective: To compare the lip print patterns in Kerala and Maharashtra population and correlate between ABO blood groups. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects, 100 from Maharashtra and 100 from Kerala were considered for the study. Lip prints were recorded, analyzed according to Tsuchihashi classification. The lip print patterns were compared in the two populations, correlated in ABO blood groups. The data obtained was statistically analyzed with SPSS software using chi-square test. Results: In our study, predominant lip print pattern observed in Kerala population was type IV (53%) and Maharashtra population was type II (42%). The difference between the two population was statistically significant (p<0.001). Subjects with A+ and O- blood groups had type II lip print predominance. Subjects with B+, AB+ and O+ blood groups had type IV predominance. The lip print patterns do not show any correlation in ABO blood groups. Conclusion: Lip prints are unique to each individual and are different even in two persons. Lip print patterns were different in the two sub populations studied, and they showed no correlation in ABO blood groups. PMID:25478445

  3. Comparison of Lip Print Patterns in Two Indian Subpopulations and Its Correlation in ABO Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Sr, Ashwinirani; Suragimath, Girish; Sande, Abhijeet R; Kulkarni, Prasad; Nimbal, Anand; Shankar, T; Gowd, T Snigdha; Shetty, Prajwal K

    2014-10-01

    The study of lip-print pattern (cheiloscopy) is a scientific method for personal identification and plays a major role in forensic and criminal investigations. To compare the lip print patterns in Kerala and Maharashtra population and correlate between ABO blood groups. Two hundred subjects, 100 from Maharashtra and 100 from Kerala were considered for the study. Lip prints were recorded, analyzed according to Tsuchihashi classification. The lip print patterns were compared in the two populations, correlated in ABO blood groups. The data obtained was statistically analyzed with SPSS software using chi-square test. In our study, predominant lip print pattern observed in Kerala population was type IV (53%) and Maharashtra population was type II (42%). The difference between the two population was statistically significant (p<0.001). Subjects with A+ and O- blood groups had type II lip print predominance. Subjects with B+, AB+ and O+ blood groups had type IV predominance. The lip print patterns do not show any correlation in ABO blood groups. Lip prints are unique to each individual and are different even in two persons. Lip print patterns were different in the two sub populations studied, and they showed no correlation in ABO blood groups.

  4. Relationship between ABO blood groups and head and neck cancer among Greek patients.

    PubMed

    Kakava, Kassiani; Karelas, Ioannis; Koutrafouris, Ioannis; Damianidis, Savvas; Stampouloglou, Paulos; Papadakis, Georgios; Xenos, Antonios; Krania, Foteini; Sarof, Paulos; Tasopoulos, Georgios; Petridis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    We examined the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers. 195 diagnosed cases and 801 controls were selected from a Greek tertiary cancer center. Information regarding type of head and neck cancer and ABO blood group was collected and registered. The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by A, B and AB among the controls, whereas blood group A followed by O, B and AB was most prevalent among cancer patients. The difference among the distribution between the cases and controls was statistically significant in blood group A (p<0.05), whereas blood group A had 1.52-fold higher risk of developing head and neck cancer compared to people of other blood groups. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of head and neck cancers.

  5. Unreliable patient identification warrants ABO typing at admission to check existing records before transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ferrera-Tourenc, V; Lassale, B; Chiaroni, J; Dettori, I

    2015-06-01

    This study describes patient identification errors leading to transfusional near-misses in blood issued by the Alps Mediterranean French Blood Establishment (EFSAM) to Marseille Public Hospitals (APHM) over an 18-month period. The EFSAM consolidates 14 blood banks in southeast France. It supplies 149 hospitals and maintains a centralized database on ABO types used at all area hospitals. As an added precaution against incompatible transfusion, the APHM requires ABO testing at each admission regardless of whether the patient has an ABO record. The study goal was to determine if admission testing was warranted. Discrepancies between ABO type determined by admission testing and records in the centralized database were investigated. The root cause for each discrepancy was classified as specimen collection or patient admission error. Causes of patient admission events were further subclassified as namesake (name similarity) or impersonation (identity fraud). The incidence of ABO discrepancies was 1:2334 including a 1:3329 incidence of patient admission events. Impersonation was the main cause of identity events accounting for 90.3% of cases. The APHM's ABO control policy prevented 19 incompatible transfusions. In relation to the 48,593 packed red cell units transfused, this would have corresponded to a risk of 1:2526. Collecting and storing ABO typing results in a centralized database is an essential public health tool. It allows crosschecking of current test results with past records and avoids redundant testing. However, as patient identification remains unreliable, ABO typing at each admission is still warranted to prevent transfusion errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Associations between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshio; Ohori, Makoto; Nakashima, Jun; Okubo, Hidenori; Satake, Naoya; Takizawa, Issei; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Riu; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Yoshioka, Kunihiko; Tachibana, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated associations between ABO blood groups and prognosis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 555 patients with prostate cancer who underwent RP were included in the study. No patients received neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy. The effect of ABO blood groups on BCR was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. During the follow-up period (mean, 52.0 months), 166 patients (29.9%) experienced BCR, with a 5-year BCR-free rate of 67.3%. Although the ABO blood group was not a significantly associated with BCR in the univariate analysis, it was an independent predictor of BCR in the multivariate analysis: blood type O patients had a significantly lower risk of BCR compared to type A patients (Hazard ratio, 0.608; 95% confidence interval, 0.410-0.902; P = 0.014). Further analyses revealed that surgical margin status confounded the assessment of the association between the ABO blood group and BCR. In the analyses of patients with a negative surgical margin, the 5-year BCR-free rate in blood type O patients was a significantly higher than that in type A patients (91.2% vs. 71.0%; P = 0.026). Blood type O is significantly associated with a decreased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association.

  7. ABO and Rh blood groups frequency in women with HER2 positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Urun, Y; Utkan, G; Altundag, K; Arslan, O; Onur, H; Arslan, U Y; Kocer, M; Dogan, I; Senler, F C; Yalcin, B; Demirkazik, A; Akbulut, H; Icli, F

    2012-01-01

    The role of genetic factors in the development of cancer is widely accepted. Data on the role of ABO blood group and Rh factor in breast cancer is inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of a possible association between HER2 (+) breast cancer in Turkish women and ABO blood groups and Rh factor. In 294 female patients with HER2 (+) breast cancer, ABO blood groups and Rh factor were examined. The relationship of blood groups with age, menopausal status, and family history of cancer, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status of these patients was evaluated. Blood groups distribution of 22,821 healthy blood donors was also assessed and compared with the patients' blood groups distribution. The median patient age was 47 years (range 20-80) and 56% of the patients were premenopausal. ER and PR were positive in 50 and 60% of the patients, respectively. Overall, the ABO blood group distribution of the 294 HER2 (+) breast cancer patients was similar to that of the healthy blood donors (p=0.36). Likewise there was no correlation between blood type and ER, PR and menopausal status. Rh (-) patients had more frequent family cancer history and this difference was significant for patients with blood group B Rh (-) and O Rh (-) (p = 0.04). In the present study we didn't find any relationship between HER2 status and ABO blood group and Rh factor. However, further studies with larger number of patients are needed to establish the role (if any) of blood groups in patients with breast cancer.

  8. Histopathological Study of Central Nervous System Lesions: Emphasizing Association of Neoplasms with ABO Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Kumarguru, B N; Pallavi, P; Sunila; Manjunath, G V; Vasan, T S; Rajalakshmi, B R

    2017-04-01

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) lesions show considerable geographic and racial variations with respect to the incidence and the pattern of distribution of lesions. The ABO blood status is a readily accessible factor in genetic constitution of the patients. It has been shown to be associated with many diseases. But the influence of blood group status on the pathogenesis of brain tumours is still unclear. To study various histopathological patterns of CNS lesions and to evaluate the association of CNS tumours with the distribution of ABO blood groups in documented cases. In the present study, 147 cases were analyzed. It was an analytical type of study, done at JSS Medical College, Mysore, over a period of 2 years and 8 months from January 2009 to August 2011. Histopathology slides were routinely stained by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stain. Special stains were performed in selected cases. Blood group of the patients and the control group were documented. Blood group distribution pattern was assessed in relation to histopathological diagnosis of various CNS tumours. Histopathological diagnosis of 147 cases included neoplastic lesions (84.35%) and non-neoplastic lesions (15.64%). Neoplastic lesions (84.35%) constituted the majority, which included neuroepithelial tumours (29.25%) as predominant pattern. Non-neoplastic lesions constituted only 15.64%, which included inflammatory lesion (8.16%) as the predominant pattern. ABO blood group data was available in 92 cases (84.4%) of neoplastic lesions, which included 71 cases (48.29%) of primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades. The control group constituted 21,067 healthy voluntary donors. Blood group O was the most frequent blood group in neoplastic lesions (40.21%) and primary CNS neoplasms categorized according to WHO grades (45.07%). The association between the CNS neoplasms and ABO blood groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.055). But a definite change in the pattern of distribution of ABO

  9. ABO blood group and vascular disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Dentali, Francesco; Sironi, Anna Paola; Ageno, Walter; Crestani, Silvia; Franchini, Massimo

    2014-02-01

    It has been well known for many years that the ABO blood group has a major influence on hemostasis, through its influence on von Willebrand factor and, consequently, factor VIII plasma levels. Although the relationship between non-O blood type and the risk of venous thromboembolism is nowadays also well established, the association with arterial thrombotic events (i.e., myocardial infarction [MI] and ischemic stroke) is less well characterized. To elucidate the latter issue, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing literature. After an electronic search strategy using MEDLINE and EMBASE and a manual review of abstract books of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis and of reference lists of all retrieved articles, 28 studies were finally included in our systematic review. The prevalence of non-O blood group was significantly higher in patients with MI (pooled odds ratio [OR]: 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.40; p < 0.001) and ischemic stroke (pooled OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.01-1.35; p = 0.03) than in controls. The restriction of the analysis to high quality studies only confirmed the association with MI (pooled OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.32) but not with ischemic stroke (pooled OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.94-1.74). In conclusion, the results of our meta-analysis confirm the existing literature evidence of a weak association between non-O blood group and vascular arterial thrombosis, in particular myocardial ischemia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Association between Cheiloscopic Patterns and ABO Blood Groups among South Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Khanapure, Sneha; Suhas, H G; Potdar, Shrudha; Sam, George; Sudeep, C B; Arjun, M R

    2017-07-01

    Human beings have few characteristics that are unique from others. Lip prints are one of such feature. They are not changed throughout the life and are not influenced by injuries, diseases, or environmental changes. According to the various antigen-antibody reactions in the bloodstream, different individuals have specific blood groups. To study the distribution of lip print patterns among individuals with different ABO and Rh blood groups and also to know the relation between their characters and blood groups. In the present study, lip prints were collected randomly from 85 individuals, and their blood group matching was performed. This is to identify the most common lip print type and to know any association between lip print types and blood groups. Tsuchihashi's classification of lip prints was used to compare with the ABO and Rh blood grouping systems. It was observed that in individuals with B+, A+, and O- blood groups, predominant pattern was Type IV and individuals having blood group O+ and AB+ common lip print pattern was Type II. This study showed strong association between lip print patterns and ABO blood groups as some blood groups were not included in statistical analysis; further studies including larger sample are essential to substantiate the results. Correlating lip print with blood group helps in identification of the suspects. Along with lip prints, another biological record that remains unchanged throughout the lifetime of a person is the blood group. Determining the blood group of a person from the samples obtained at the site of crime and also recovering lip prints from site can help identify a person.

  11. An ABO blood grouping discrepancy: Probable B(A) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Gupta, Anubhav; Malhotra, Sheetal; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Ratti Ram

    2017-06-01

    In B(A) phenotype, an autosomal dominant phenotype, there is a weak A expression on group B RBCs. We herein report a case of a probable B(A) phenotype in a first time 20-year old male donor. The cell and serum grouping were done using tube technique and also with blood grouping gel card (Diaclone, ABD cards for donors, BioRad, Switzerland). The antisera used were commercial monoclonal IgM type. To check for the weak subgroup of A, cold adsorption and heat elution was performed. The cell grouping was A weak B RhD positive while the serum grouping was B. There was no agglutination with O cells and the autologous control was also negative. It was a group II ABO discrepancy with or without group IV discrepancy. Results for both the eluate and last wash were negative. Hence, the possibility of weak subgroup of A was unlikely. Blood grouping gel card also showed a negative reaction in the anti-A column. One lot of anti-A was showing 'weak +' agglutination while the other lot was showing 'negative' reaction with the donor RBCs by tube technique. There was no agglutination observed with anti-A1 lectin. Our case highlights the serological characteristics of a B(A) phenotype. This case emphasizes the vital role of cell and serum grouping in detecting such discrepancies especially in donors which can lead to mislabeling of the blood unit and may be a potential risk for the transfusion recipient if not resolved appropriately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastroduodenal Ulcers and ABO Blood Group: the Japan Nurses' Health Study (JNHS).

    PubMed

    Alkebsi, Lobna; Ideno, Yuki; Lee, Jung-Su; Suzuki, Shosuke; Nakajima-Shimada, Junko; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sato, Yasunori; Hayashi, Kunihiko

    2018-01-05

    Although several studies have shown that blood type O is associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer, few studies have investigated these associations in Japan. We sought to investigate the association between the ABO blood group and risk of gastroduodenal ulcers (GDU) using combined analysis of both retrospective and prospective data from a large cohort study of Japanese women, the Japan Nurses' Health Study (JNHS; n = 15,019). The impact of the ABO blood group on GDU risk was examined using Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for potential confounders. Compared with women with non-O blood types (A, B, and AB), women with blood type O had a significantly increased risk of GDU from birth (multivariable-adjusted HR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.04-1.34). Moreover, the highest cumulative incidence of GDU was observed in women born pre-1956 with blood type O. In a subgroup analysis stratified by birth year (pre-1956 or post-1955), the multivariable-adjusted HR of women with blood type O was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.00-1.49) and 1.15 (95% CI, 0.98-1.35) in the pre-1956 and post-1955 groups, respectively. In this large, combined, ambispective cohort study of Japanese women, older women with blood type O had a higher risk of developing GDU than those with other blood types.

  13. Gastroduodenal Ulcers and ABO Blood Group: the Japan Nurses’ Health Study (JNHS)

    PubMed Central

    Ideno, Yuki; Lee, Jung-Su; Suzuki, Shosuke; Nakajima-Shimada, Junko; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Sato, Yasunori; Hayashi, Kunihiko

    2018-01-01

    Background Although several studies have shown that blood type O is associated with increased risk of peptic ulcer, few studies have investigated these associations in Japan. We sought to investigate the association between the ABO blood group and risk of gastroduodenal ulcers (GDU) using combined analysis of both retrospective and prospective data from a large cohort study of Japanese women, the Japan Nurses’ Health Study (JNHS; n = 15,019). Methods The impact of the ABO blood group on GDU risk was examined using Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Compared with women with non-O blood types (A, B, and AB), women with blood type O had a significantly increased risk of GDU from birth (multivariable-adjusted HR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.04–1.34). Moreover, the highest cumulative incidence of GDU was observed in women born pre-1956 with blood type O. In a subgroup analysis stratified by birth year (pre-1956 or post-1955), the multivariable-adjusted HR of women with blood type O was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.00–1.49) and 1.15 (95% CI, 0.98–1.35) in the pre-1956 and post-1955 groups, respectively. Conclusion In this large, combined, ambispective cohort study of Japanese women, older women with blood type O had a higher risk of developing GDU than those with other blood types. PMID:29093357

  14. Nearly two decades using the check-type to prevent ABO incompatible transfusions: one institution's experience.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Priscila I; Ziman, Alyssa; Wheeler, Christine; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Monson, Michael; Calhoun, Loni

    2006-09-01

    To detect miscollected (wrong blood in tube [WBIT]) samples, our institution requires a second independently drawn sample (check-type [CT]) on previously untyped, non-group O patients who are likely to require transfusion. During the 17-year period addressed by this report, 94 WBIT errors were detected: 57% by comparison with a historic blood type, 7% by the CT, and 35% by other means. The CT averted 5 potential ABO-incompatible transfusions. Our corrected WBIT error rate is 1 in 3,713 for verified samples tested between 2000 and 2003, the period for which actual number of CTs performed was available. The estimated rate of WBIT for the 17-year period is 1 in 2,262 samples. ABO-incompatible transfusions due to WBIT-type errors are avoided by comparison of current blood type results with a historic type, and the CT is an effective way to create a historic type.

  15. Prevalance of ABO and Rhesus Blood Groups in Blood Donors: A Study from a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of Kumaon Region of Uttarakhand.

    PubMed

    Garg, Parul; Upadhyay, Saloni; Chufal, Sanjay Singh; Hasan, Yuman; Tayal, Ishwer

    2014-12-01

    Backround: ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are hereditary characters and are useful in population genetic studies, in resolving medico-legal issues and more importantly for the immunologic safety of blood during transfusion. This study is aimed to determine the distribution pattern of the ABO and Rh blood groups among blood donors in Kumaon region of Uttarakhand and compare it with other data from similar studies within the India and all over the world. It is a retrospective study carried out at blood bank of Shushila Tewari Hospital of Government Medical College, Haldwani from January 2012 to December 2013. The study was conducted on 12,701 blood donors. ABO and Rh typing was done using slide agglutination method with antisera ABO and Rh (Tulip diagnostics ltd). Doubtful cases were confirmed by tube agglutination method and reverse grouping using known pooled A and B cells. The age group and sex of donors, frequency of ABO and Rh blood groups were reported in simple percentages. The predominant donors belonged to age group between 18-35years (84.28%). Male donors were more than female donors, ratio being 352:1. Replacement donors (99.71%) were much more than voluntary donors (0.91%). The most common blood group was B (32.07%) and least common being AB (10.53%). Blood group 'O' and 'A' had same frequency. The prevalence of Rhesus positive and negative distribution in the studied population was 94.49% and 5.51% respectively. Blood group frequency with respect to ABO and Rhesus positive was found to be shown by formula B> O>A >AB. The frequency for ABO and Rhesus negative was given by the formula B>A>O>AB. Knowledge of frequencies of the different blood groups is very important for blood banks and transfusion service policies that could contribute significantly to the National Health System.

  16. ABO blood group in primary antiphospholipid syndrome: influence in the site of thrombosis?

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Natália Mastantuono; Bydlowski, Sergio Paulo; Soares, Rosangela Paula Silva; de Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira; Bonfá, Eloísa; Seguro, Luciana Parente Costa; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira

    2015-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or obstetric complications associated with presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) but additional factors would also induce thrombosis. ABO (H) blood groups are known to be closely related to thrombosis, especially non-O blood type with venous events. The aim of this study was to investigate possible role of ABO (H) blood types in the thrombotic events in primary APS (PAPS). Seventy PAPS patients were selected for the study and were divided according to ABO blood group in: O PAPS (n = 26) and non-O PAPS (n = 44). ABO blood group phenotyping was performed by indirect technique. aPL anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-βeta2 glycoprotein-1 (aβ2GPI) and the concentrations and activities of von Willebrand factor (VWF) were measured with ELISA. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) was detected by coagulation assays. A significant higher frequency of venous events was observed in non-O PAPS group (72.7 vs. 46.2 %, p = 0.040). In contrast, the frequency of arterial events was significantly higher in the O PAPS compared to the non-O PAPS group (69.2 vs. 36.4 %, respectively; p = 0.013). Frequencies of aCL, LA, aβ2GPI and triple aPL positivity were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). VWF antigen (75.54 ± 8.68 vs. 79.51 ± 7.07 IU/dl, p = 0.041) and activity (70.23 ± 11.96 vs. 77.92 ± 13.67 %, p = 0.020) were decreased in O PAPS compared to non-O blood group. VWF:CB/VWF:Ag ratio was similar among groups (p > 0.05). This is the first report that confirms the role of ABO blood system in thrombosis of PAPS and suggests that non-O blood group was related with venous events and O blood group with arterial thrombosis.

  17. Blood Mixing Upregulates Platelet Membrane-Bound CD40 Ligand Expression in vitro Independent of Abo Compatibility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Go-Shine; Hu, Mei-Hua; Lin, Tso-Chou; Lin, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Ke, Hung-Yen; Zheng, Xu-Zhi; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2017-11-30

    Platelets play a central role in the inflammation response via CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression, which may lead to transfusion reactions. The precise role of platelet CD40L-mediated inflammation in transfusion reactions is unclear. Therefore, we assessed the effects of in vitro blood mixing on platelet CD40L expression. In addition, we examined the effect of ABO compatibility on CD40L expression. Donor packed red blood cells were acquired from a blood bank, and recipient blood was obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery and prepared as washed platelets. Donor blood was mixed with suspended, washed recipient platelets to obtain a final mixing ratio of 1%, 5%, or 10% (vol/vol). The blood mixtures were divided into three groups: Group M, cross-matched blood-type mixing (n = 20); Group S, ABO type-specific uncross-matched blood (n = 20); and Group I, ABO incompatibility (not ABO type-specific blood and not process cross-matched) mixing (n = 20). The blood mixtures were used to detect platelet membrane-bound CD40L expression by flow cytometry. Blood mixing resulted in an increase in CD40L expression in Group M (P < 0.001), Group S (P < 0.001), and Group I (P < 0.001). CD40L expression following blood mixing potentially led to a transfusion reaction in each of the groups. There were no differences in CD40L expression among the three groups (P = 0.988) correlated with ABO compatibility or incompatibility. This indicates that the reactions between red blood cell surface antigens and plasma antibodies do not play a role in the induction of CD40L expression.

  18. HEMOLYSIS AND HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA IN ABO BLOOD GROUP HETEROSPECIFIC NEONATES

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy; Vreman, Hendrik J; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2010-01-01

    Objective We quantified hemolysis and determined the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia in direct antiglobulin titer (DAT) positive, ABO heterospecific neonates and compared variables among O-A and O-B subgroups. Study design Plasma total bilirubin (PTB) was determined predischarge and more frequently if clinically warranted, in DAT positive, blood group A or B neonates of group O mothers. Heme catabolism (and therefore bilirubin production) was indexed by blood carboxyhemoglobin corrected for inspired carbon monoxide (COHbc). Hyperbilirubinemia was defined as any PTB concentration >95th percentile on the hour-of-life-specific bilirubin nomogram. Results Of 164 neonates, 111 were O-A and 53 O-B. Overall, 85 (51.8%) developed hyperbilirubinemia, which tended to be more prevalent in the O-B than O-A neonates (62.3% vs. 46.8% respectively, p=0.053). Importantly, more O-B than O-A newborns developed hyperbilirubinemia at <24 hours (93.9% vs. 48.1%, p<0.0001). COHbc values were globally higher than our previously published newborn values. Babies who developed hyperbilirubinemia had higher COHbc values than the already high values of those non-hyperbilirubinemic, and O-B newborns tended to have higher values than O-A counterparts. Conclusions DAT positive, ABO heterospecificity is associated with increased hemolysis and a high incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. O-B heterospecificity tends to confer even higher risk than O-A counterparts. PMID:20598320

  19. Molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups in some population groups from India.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sabita; Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Vasantha, K; Nadkarni, Anita; Italia, Yazdi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Indian population is characterized by the presence of various castes and tribal groups. Various genetic polymorphisms have been used to differentiate among these groups. Amongst these, the ABO blood group system has been extensively studied. There is no information on molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups from India. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to characterize the common A, B and O alleles by molecular analysis in some Indian population groups. One hundred samples from the mixed population from Mumbai, 101 samples from the Dhodia tribe and 100 samples from the Parsi community were included in this study. Initially, the samples were phenotyped by standard serologic techniques. PCR followed by single strand conformational polymorphsim (SSCP) was used for molecular ABO genotyping. Samples showing atypical SSCP patterns were further analysed by DNA sequencing to characterize rare alleles. Seven common ABO alleles with 19 different genotypes were found in the mixed population. The Dhodias showed 12 different ABO genotypes and the Parsis revealed 15 different ABO genotypes with six common ABO alleles identified in each of them. Two rare alleles were also identified. This study reports the distribution of molecular genotypes of ABO alleles among some population groups from India. Considering the extremely heterogeneous nature of the Indian population, in terms of various genotype markers like blood groups, red cell enzymes, etc., many more ABO alleles are likely to be encountered.

  20. Molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups in some population groups from India

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sabita; Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Vasantha, K.; Nadkarni, Anita; Italia, Yazdi; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Indian population is characterized by the presence of various castes and tribal groups. Various genetic polymorphisms have been used to differentiate among these groups. Amongst these, the ABO blood group system has been extensively studied. There is no information on molecular genotyping of ABO blood groups from India. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to characterize the common A, B and O alleles by molecular analysis in some Indian population groups. Methods: One hundred samples from the mixed population from Mumbai, 101 samples from the Dhodia tribe and 100 samples from the Parsi community were included in this study. Initially, the samples were phenotyped by standard serologic techniques. PCR followed by single strand conformational polymorphsim (SSCP) was used for molecular ABO genotyping. Samples showing atypical SSCP patterns were further analysed by DNA sequencing to characterize rare alleles. Results: Seven common ABO alleles with 19 different genotypes were found in the mixed population. The Dhodias showed 12 different ABO genotypes and the Parsis revealed 15 different ABO genotypes with six common ABO alleles identified in each of them. Two rare alleles were also identified. Interpretation & conclusions: This study reports the distribution of molecular genotypes of ABO alleles among some population groups from India. Considering the extremely heterogeneous nature of the Indian population, in terms of various genotype markers like blood groups, red cell enzymes, etc., many more ABO alleles are likely to be encountered. PMID:24604045

  1. ABO blood group and chronic pancreatitis risk in the NAPS2 cohort.

    PubMed

    Greer, Julia B; LaRusch, Jessica; Brand, Randall E; O'Connell, Michael R; Yadav, Dhiraj; Whitcomb, David C

    2011-11-01

    A risk association has been observed between non-O blood groups and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Chronic pancreatitis also increases risk for pancreatic cancer, raising questions as to whether non-O blood groups are a risk for chronic pancreatitis and whether the pathophysiologic pathways are linked. Our goal was to determine whether ABO blood group may affect the risk of chronic pancreatitis. The study cohort included chronic pancreatitis patients (n = 499) and healthy controls (n = 631) from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 study. Genotyping was performed using Sequenom assay of rs8176746 A/C and rs505922 C/T to classify participants into ABO blood groups. O blood group was nonsignificantly more common among cases (44.7% vs 42.0%; P = 0.36), particularly among cases with alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis (49.3% vs 42%; P = 0.060). Alcoholic patients without coexisting high-risk PRSS1, CFTR, or SPINK1 variants had a significant overrepresentation of O blood type when compared with controls (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.17; P = 0.01). A, B, and AB blood groups were not associated with a greater likelihood of having chronic pancreatitis and may decrease the risk of chronic pancreatitis in individuals who are very heavy drinkers. These results suggest that the mechanism linking non-O blood type with pancreatic pathology is specific to carcinogenesis.

  2. Relation of ABO Blood Groups to the Plaque Characteristic of Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingtao; Zou, Yongpeng; Li, Lulu; Chen, Shuyuan; Hou, Jingbo; Yu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The ABO blood types related to morphological characteristics of atherosclerosis plaque are not clear. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between ABO blood groups and the coronary plaque characteristic. We retrospectively identified the target lesions in 392 acute coronary syndrome patients who underwent optical coherence tomography examination before stenting. Subjects were divided into different groups according to different blood types. The fibrous cap thickness was significantly thicker in O type compared with non-O type (0.075 ± 0.033 mm versus 0.061 ± 0.024, p < 0.001). Meanwhile, the incidence of thin-cap fibroatheroma was also significantly higher in O type compared with non-O type (51.0% versus 71.5%, p < 0.001). The O type showed a significantly larger minimum lumen area [1.26 (0.82, 2.13) versus 1.05 (0.67, 1.82), p = 0.020] and minimum lumen diameter [1.03 (0.74, 1.31) versus 0.95 (0.66, 1.25), p = 0.039] compared with non-O type. There were no differences found in incidence of lipid plaque, plaque rupture, and thrombus between different blood type groups even between O type and non-O type group ( p > 0.05). The plaques of O type blood group were exhibited more stably compared with non-O type blood group. Moreover, the non-O type blood group have more serious coronary artery stenosis than O type blood group.

  3. Association of ABO Blood Group and Body Mass Index: A Cross-Sectional Study from a Ghanaian Population

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Samuel; Abaidoo, Chrissie Stansie

    2018-01-01

    ABO blood group and body mass index (BMI) have individually been appraised as risk factors for certain diseases. From statistical perspective, it may be important to examine the relationship between the ABO blood antigen and BMI. This cross-sectional study involved 412 participants aged 18 to 46 at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi. Weight and height of participants were measured for BMI calculation; blood group determination was done using antisera. Blood group O was the most prevalent (51.2%), while Rhesus-positive individuals constituted 90.3%. 6.3% of the participants were obese, while 18.7% were overweight. There was significant (p=0.006) higher prevalence of obesity in females (10.3%) than in males (3.4%). The study did not observe any significant difference by association of ABO blood group with gender (p=0.973), BMI (p=0.307), or Rhesus status (p=0.723). Regarding gender (p=0.400) and BMI (p=0.197), no statistically significant difference was observed between Rhesus blood groups. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, blood type O, and rhesus positive observed among students in this study is largely similar to what has been reported in published studies in Ghana and from other countries. Overweight and obesity were not associated with ABO blood groups or Rhesus in this study. PMID:29780641

  4. CD144+ endothelial microparticles as a marker of endothelial injury in neonatal ABO blood group incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hisham A E; Tantawy, Azza A G; El-Farrash, Rania A; Ismail, Eman A; Youssif, Noha M

    2014-04-01

    ABO antigens are expressed on the surfaces of red blood cells and the vascular endothelium. We studied circulating endothelial microparticles (EMP) in ABO haemolytic disease of the newborn (ABO HDN) as a marker of endothelial activation to test a hypothesis of possible endothelial injury in neonates with ABO HDN, and its relation with the occurrence and severity of haemolysis. Forty-five neonates with ABO HDN were compared with 20 neonates with Rhesus incompatibility (Rh HDN; haemolytic controls) and 20 healthy neonates with matched mother and infant blood groups (healthy controls). Laboratory investigations were done for markers of haemolysis and von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF Ag). EMP (CD144(+)) levels were measured before and after therapy (exchange transfusion and/or phototherapy). vWF Ag and pre-therapy EMP levels were higher in infants with ABO HDN or Rh HDN than in healthy controls, and were significantly higher in babies with ABO HDN than in those with Rh HDN (p<0.05). In ABO HDN, pre-therapy EMP levels were higher in patients with severe hyperbilirubinaemia than in those with mild and moderate disease or those with Rh HDN (p<0.001). Post-therapy EMP levels were lower than pre-therapy levels in both the ABO HDN and Rh HDN groups; however, the decline in EMP levels was particularly evident after exchange transfusion in ABO neonates with severe hyperbilirubinaemia (p<0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the concentrations of haemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase and indirect bilirubin were independently correlated with pre-therapy EMP levels in ABO HDN. Elevated EMP levels in ABO HDN may reflect an IgG-mediated endothelial injury parallel to the IgG-mediated erythrocyte destruction and could serve as a surrogate marker of vascular dysfunction and disease severity in neonates with this condition.

  5. ABO-incompatible blood transfusion and invasive therapeutic approaches during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Aliç, Yasin; Akpek, Elif A; Dönmez, Asli; Ozkan, Süleyman; Perfusionist, Güray Yener; Aslamaci, Sait

    2008-10-01

    Human error has been identified as a major source of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion which most often results from blood being given to the wrong patient. We present a case of inadvertent administration of ABO-incompatible blood to a 6-mo-old child who underwent congenital heart surgery and discuss the use of invasive therapeutic approaches. Invasive techniques included total circulatory arrest and large-volume exchange transfusion, along with conventional ultrafiltration and plasmapheresis, which could all be performed rapidly and effectively. The combination of standard pharmacologic therapies and alternative invasive techniques after a massive ABO-incompatible blood transfusion led to a favorable outcome in our patient.

  6. Glioblastoma and ABO blood groups: further evidence of an association between the distribution of blood group antigens and brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Al Barbarawi, Mohammed M; Hiasat, Mohammad Y; Al-Qaralleh, Mohammed A; Ababneh, Emad I

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumour that usually leads to death. Several studies have reported a link between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and a risk of developing specific types of cancer, although no consensus has been reached. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and the incidence of glioblastoma. The study cohort consisted of 115 glioblastoma patients who were diagnosed at King Abdullah University Hospital, Jordan, between 2004 and 2015. Three different patient populations made up three control groups and these were selected from among patients at the same institution between 2014 and 2015 as follows: 3,847 healthy blood donors, 654 accidental trauma patients admitted to the Departments of Neurosurgery and Orthopaedics, and 230 age- and sex-matched control subjects recruited blindly from the Departments of Paediatrics and Internal Medicine. There was a significant association between the distribution of ABO blood group antigens and the incidence of glioblastoma. Post hoc residual analysis revealed that individuals with group A had a higher than expected chance of developing glioblastoma, while individuals with group O had a lower than expected chance. Furthermore, individuals with group A were found to be at a 1.62- to 2.28-fold increased risk of developing glioblastoma compared to individuals with group O. In the present study, we demonstrate that, in Jordan, individuals with group A have an increased risk of developing glioblastoma, while individuals with group O have a reduced risk. These findings suggest that the distribution of ABO blood group antigens is associated with a risk of brain tumours and may play an important role in their development. However, further clinical and experimental investigations are required to confirm this association.

  7. ABO blood groups and malaria related clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Deepa; Alwar, Vanamala A; Rameshkumar, Karuna; Ross, Cecil

    2011-03-01

    The study was undertaken to correlate the blood groups and clinical presentations in malaria patients and to understand the differential host susceptibility in malaria. From October 2007 to September 2008, malaria positive patients' samples were evaluated in this study. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, and platelet count of each patient were done on an automated cell counter. After determining the blood groups, malarial species and the severity of clinical course were correlated. A total of 100 patients were included in the study, of which 63 cases were positive for Plasmodium falciparum and 37 cases were positive for P. vivax infection and 11 patients had mixed infection. The results of the blood groups showed 22 - 'A' group, 42 - 'B' group, 35 - 'O' group and 1 was 'AB' group. When the clinical courses between different groups were compared using the following parameters for severe infection--a parasitic load of >10/1000 RBCs, severe anemia with hemoglobin < 6 g%, platelet count of <10,000/mm3, hepato or splenomegaly or clinical signs of severe malaria such as fever >101°F and other organ involvement, it was observed that 'O' group had an advantage over other the groups. The difference in rosetting ability between red blood cells of different 'ABO' blood groups with a diminished rosetting potential in blood group 'O' red blood cells was due to the differential host susceptibility. 'O' group had an advantage over the other three blood groups. Based on literature and the results of this study, the diminished rosetting potential in blood group 'O' red blood cells is suggested as the basis for the differential host susceptibility.

  8. Relationship between ABO blood group and clinicopathological factors and their effect on the survival of Japanese patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Fumiaki; Shimada, Hideaki; Yajima, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Oshima, Yoko; Nanami, Tatsuki; Ito, Masaaki; Kaneko, Hironori

    2017-08-01

    Several studies have evaluated the association between ABO blood group and the prognosis of various types of cancer; however, little is known about the relationship between ABO blood group and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We investigated how ABO blood group and clinicopathological characteristics are related to the survival of Japanese patients with esophageal SCC. We reviewed the medical records of 181 patients who underwent surgery for esophageal SCC between June, 2004 and December, 2015 and analyzed the association between ABO blood group and clinicopathological factors. Clinicopathological factors were also evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses for possible association with survival. The prevalence of each blood group was as follows: A, 35.5%; B, 22.4%; O, 32.8%; and AB, 8.2%. The 5-year overall survival of all patients was 37.1%. Patients with non-type B blood had significantly worse 5-year overall survival than those with type B blood (30.2 vs. 58.8%, P < 0.05). ABO blood groups were associated with the survival of Japanese patients with esophageal SCC. Patients with non-B blood groups had significantly worse overall survival than those with the B blood group.

  9. ABO Blood Groups Influence Macrophage-mediated Phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Donald R.; Hult, Annika K.; Olsson, Martin L.; Liles, W. Conrad; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte polymorphisms associated with a survival advantage to Plasmodium falciparum infection have undergone positive selection. There is a predominance of blood group O in malaria-endemic regions, and several lines of evidence suggest that ABO blood groups may influence the outcome of P. falciparum infection. Based on the hypothesis that enhanced innate clearance of infected polymorphic erythrocytes is associated with protection from severe malaria, we investigated whether P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes are more efficiently cleared by macrophages than infected A and B erythrocytes. We show that human macrophages in vitro and mouse monocytes in vivo phagocytose P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes more avidly than infected A and B erythrocytes and that uptake is associated with increased hemichrome deposition and high molecular weight band 3 aggregates in infected O erythrocytes. Using infected A1, A2, and O erythrocytes, we demonstrate an inverse association of phagocytic capacity with the amount of A antigen on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Finally, we report that enzymatic conversion of B erythrocytes to type as O before infection significantly enhances their uptake by macrophages to observed level comparable to that with infected O wild-type erythrocytes. These data provide the first evidence that ABO blood group antigens influence macrophage clearance of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and suggest an additional mechanism by which blood group O may confer resistance to severe malaria. PMID:23071435

  10. ABO blood groups, Rhesus factor, and anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings.

    PubMed

    Pałgan, Krzysztof; Bartuzi, Zbigniew; Chrzaniecka, Elżbieta

    2017-09-21

    Numerous publications indicate that the prevalence of some infectious, neoplastic and immunological diseases are associated with ABO blood groups. The aim of this study was to verify whether ABO and Rh blood groups are associated with severe anaphylactic reactions after Hymenoptera stings. A study was undertaken of 71,441 Caucasian subjects living in the same geographic area. The study group included 353 patients with diagnosed systemic anaphylaxis to Hymenoptera venom. Control group included 71,088 healthy blood donors. Frequencies of ABO and Rhesus groups in the study and control groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. No statistically significant interactions were observed between the ABO blood group and anaphylactic reactions to Hymenoptera.

  11. The Effect of ABO Blood Groups, Hemoglobinopathy, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Polymorphisms on Malaria Susceptibility and Severity.

    PubMed

    Kuesap, Jiraporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2018-04-01

    Malaria is one of the most important public health problems in tropical areas on the globe. Several factors are associated with susceptibility to malaria and disease severity, including innate immunity such as blood group, hemoglobinopathy, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) polymorphisms. This study was carried out to investigate association among ABO blood group, thalassemia types and HO-1 polymorphisms in malaria. The malarial blood samples were collected from patients along the Thai-Myanmar border. Determination of ABO blood group, thalassemia variants, and HO-1 polymorphisms were performed using agglutination test, low pressure liquid chromatography and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Plasmodium vivax was the major infected malaria species in the study samples. Distribution of ABO blood type in the malaria-infected samples was similar to that in healthy subjects, of which blood type O being most prevalent. Association between blood group A and decreased risk of severe malaria was significant. Six thalassemia types (30%) were detected, i.e. , hemoglobin E (HbE), β-thalassemia, α-thalassemia 1, α-thalassemia 2, HbE with α-thalassemia 2, and β-thalassemia with α-thalassemia 2. Malaria infected samples without thalassemia showed significantly higher risk to severe malaria. The prevalence of HO-1 polymorphisms, S/S, S/L and L/L were 25, 62, and 13%, respectively. Further study with larger sample size is required to confirm the impact of these 3 host genetic factors in malaria patients.

  12. Correlation of ABO and Rh blood groups with transfusion administration and fever onset after hip surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Brdar, Radivoj; Petronic, Ivana; Nikolic, Dejan; Golubovic, Zoran; Bukva, Bojan; Radlovic, Vladimir; Abramovic, Dusan; Ducic, Sinisa; Colovic, Hristina

    2012-01-01

    Aim of our study was to evaluate distribution of ABO and Rh blood type groups in children after hip surgery regarding transfusion administration and fever presence. Four types of ABO blood groups (A; B; AB; O) and 2 types of Rh blood groups (Rh+; Rh-) were evaluated in group with administered transfusion (tr+) and without given transfusion (tr-); and in group with fever (fev+) and without fever (fev-), in 146 children after hip surgery. Tr+ and fev+ groups were divided into 3 groups (0-24h; 25-48h; 49-72h): for tr+ group (Group 1, Group 2, Group 3), and for fev+ group (Group A, Group B, Group C). AB blood group significantly decreased in Group 1 (χ2= 6.44; p<0.05) and A blood group in Group 3 in tr+ group (χ2= 7.68; p<0.01). O blood group significantly increased in Group 3 in tr+ group (χ2= 9.96; p<0.01). AB blood group significantly decreased in Groups B (χ2= 12.2; p<0.01) and C (χ2= 4.2; p<0.05) in fev+ versus fevgroup. B blood group significantly increased in Group C (χ2= 34.4; p<0.01) in fev+group. Administration of transfusion and fever onset in pediatric patients undergoing surgical correction of the hip is not influenced by the ABO and Rh blood groups system in humans. There is correlation between distribution of ABO blood groups with the time of transfusion administration and fever onset in children after hip surgery.

  13. ABO/Rh Blood Groups and Risk of HIV Infection and Hepatitis B Among Blood Donors of Abidjan, Côte D'ivoire.

    PubMed

    Siransy, Liliane Kouabla; Nanga, Zizendorf Yves; Zaba, Flore Sandrine; Tufa, Nyasenu Yawo; Dasse, Sery Romuald

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B and HIV infection are two viral infections that represent real global public health problems. In order to improve their management, some hypotheses suggest that genetic predispositions like ABO and Rh blood groups would influence the occurrence of these diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and the susceptibility to HIV infection and hepatitis B. We conducted a cross-sectional and analytical study in a population of voluntary blood donors in the Blood Transfusion Center of Abidjan. All blood donors who donated blood between January and June 2014 were tested for HBs antigen and anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA tests) and were ABO typed. The total number of examined blood donors during this period was 45,538, of which 0.32% and 8.07% were respectively infected with HIV and hepatitis B virus. O-group donors were more infected than non-O donors. Our study is an outline concerning the search for a link between ABO and Rh blood groups and hepatitis B and HIV infection. Further studies should be conducted to confirm the interaction between these two infections and contribute to the search for new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Relative Risks of Thrombosis and Bleeding in Different ABO Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The ABO blood group system is composed of complex carbohydrate molecules (i.e., the A, B, and H determinants) that are widely expressed on the surface of red blood cells and in a variety of other cell and tissues. Along with their pivotal role in transfusion and transplantation medicine, the ABO antigens participate in many other physiological processes and, in particular, are important determinants of von Willebrand factor and factor VIII circulating plasma levels. The precise influence of the ABO system on hemostasis has led the way to the investigation of a putative implication in the risk of developing cardiovascular disorders. Along with the underlying molecular mechanisms, the current knowledge on the role of ABO blood group antigens in both the thrombotic and hemorrhagic risk will be summarized in this narrative review. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Do ABO Blood Group Antigens Hamper the Therapeutic Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Guido; Hult, Annika; von Bahr, Lena; Alm, Jessica J.; Heldring, Nina; Hamad, Osama A.; Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor; Larsson, Stella; Teramura, Yuji; Roelofs, Helene; Nilsson, Bo; Fibbe, Willem E.; Olsson, Martin L.; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Investigation into predictors for treatment outcome is essential to improve the clinical efficacy of therapeutic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We therefore studied the possible harmful impact of immunogenic ABO blood groups antigens – genetically governed antigenic determinants – at all given steps of MSC-therapy, from cell isolation and preparation for clinical use, to final recipient outcome. We found that clinical MSCs do not inherently express or upregulate ABO blood group antigens after inflammatory challenge or in vitro differentiation. Although antigen adsorption from standard culture supplements was minimal, MSCs adsorbed small quantities of ABO antigen from fresh human AB plasma (ABP), dependent on antigen concentration and adsorption time. Compared to cells washed in non-immunogenic human serum albumin (HSA), MSCs washed with ABP elicited stronger blood responses after exposure to blood from healthy O donors in vitro, containing high titers of ABO antibodies. Clinical evaluation of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients found only very low titers of anti-A/B agglutination in these strongly immunocompromised patients at the time of MSC treatment. Patient analysis revealed a trend for lower clinical response in blood group O recipients treated with ABP-exposed MSC products, but not with HSA-exposed products. We conclude, that clinical grade MSCs are ABO-neutral, but the ABP used for washing and infusion of MSCs can contaminate the cells with immunogenic ABO substance and should therefore be substituted by non-immunogenic HSA, particularly when cells are given to immunocompentent individuals. PMID:24454787

  16. Do ABO blood group antigens hamper the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stromal cells?

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Hult, Annika; von Bahr, Lena; Alm, Jessica J; Heldring, Nina; Hamad, Osama A; Stenbeck-Funke, Lillemor; Larsson, Stella; Teramura, Yuji; Roelofs, Helene; Nilsson, Bo; Fibbe, Willem E; Olsson, Martin L; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Investigation into predictors for treatment outcome is essential to improve the clinical efficacy of therapeutic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We therefore studied the possible harmful impact of immunogenic ABO blood groups antigens - genetically governed antigenic determinants - at all given steps of MSC-therapy, from cell isolation and preparation for clinical use, to final recipient outcome. We found that clinical MSCs do not inherently express or upregulate ABO blood group antigens after inflammatory challenge or in vitro differentiation. Although antigen adsorption from standard culture supplements was minimal, MSCs adsorbed small quantities of ABO antigen from fresh human AB plasma (ABP), dependent on antigen concentration and adsorption time. Compared to cells washed in non-immunogenic human serum albumin (HSA), MSCs washed with ABP elicited stronger blood responses after exposure to blood from healthy O donors in vitro, containing high titers of ABO antibodies. Clinical evaluation of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients found only very low titers of anti-A/B agglutination in these strongly immunocompromised patients at the time of MSC treatment. Patient analysis revealed a trend for lower clinical response in blood group O recipients treated with ABP-exposed MSC products, but not with HSA-exposed products. We conclude, that clinical grade MSCs are ABO-neutral, but the ABP used for washing and infusion of MSCs can contaminate the cells with immunogenic ABO substance and should therefore be substituted by non-immunogenic HSA, particularly when cells are given to immunocompentent individuals.

  17. Association of gene polymorphisms in ABO blood group chromosomal regions and menstrual disorders

    PubMed Central

    SU, YONG; KONG, GUI-LIAN; SU, YA-LI; ZHOU, YAN; LV, LI-FANG; WANG, QIONG; HUANG, BAO-PING; ZHENG, RUI-ZHI; LI, QUAN-ZHONG; YUAN, HUI-JUAN; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located near the gene of the ABO blood group play an important role in the genetic aetiology of menstrual disorders (MDs). Polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction technology was used to detect eight SNPs near the ABO gene location on the chromosomes in 250 cases of MD and 250 cases of normal menstruation. The differences in the distribution of each genotype, as well as the allele frequency in the normal and control groups, were analysed using Pearson's χ2 test to search for disease-associated loci. SHEsis software was used to analyse the linkage disequilibrium and haplotype frequencies and to inspect the correlation between haplotypes and the disease. Compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences in the genotype distribution frequencies of the rs657152 locus of the ABO blood group gene and the rs17250673 locus of the tumour necrosis factor cofactor 2 (TRAF2) gene, which is located downstream of the ABO gene. The allele distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci in the ABO blood group gene exhibited significant differences between the groups. Dominant and recessive genetic model analysis of each locus revealed that the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences from the control group in the genotype distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci, respectively. These results indicate that the ABO blood group gene and TRAF2 gene may be a cause of MDs. PMID:26136981

  18. Evaluation of an automated microplate technique in the Galileo system for ABO and Rh(D) blood grouping.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiyi; Wan, Feng; Lou, Yufeng; Jin, Jiali; Mao, Weilin

    2014-01-01

    A number of automated devices for pretransfusion testing have recently become available. This study evaluated the Immucor Galileo System, a fully automated device based on the microplate hemagglutination technique for ABO/Rh (D) determinations. Routine ABO/Rh typing tests were performed on 13,045 samples using the Immucor automated instruments. Manual tube method was used to resolve ABO forward and reverse grouping discrepancies. D-negative test results were investigated and confirmed manually by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT). The system rejected 70 tests for sample inadequacy. 87 samples were read as "No-type-determined" due to forward and reverse grouping discrepancies. 25 tests gave these results because of sample hemolysis. After further tests, we found 34 tests were caused by weakened RBC antibodies, 5 tests were attributable to weak A and/or B antigens, 4 tests were due to mixed-field reactions, and 8 tests had high titer cold agglutinin with blood qualifications which react only at temperatures below 34 degrees C. In the remaining 11 cases, irregular RBC antibodies were identified in 9 samples (seven anti-M and two anti-P) and two subgroups were identified in 2 samples (one A1 and one A2) by a reference laboratory. As for D typing, 2 weak D+ samples missed by automated systems gave negative results, but weak-positive reactions were observed in the IAT. The Immucor Galileo System is reliable and suited for ABO and D blood groups, some reasons may cause a discrepancy in ABO/D typing using a fully automated system. It is suggested that standardization of sample collection may improve the performance of the fully automated system.

  19. Determination of ABO blood grouping and Rhesus factor from tooth material

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pooja Vijay; Vanishree, M; Anila, K; Hunasgi, Santosh; Suryadevra, Sri Sujan; Kardalkar, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to determine blood groups and Rhesus factor from dentin and pulp using absorption-elution (AE) technique in different time periods at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, respectively. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 cases, 30 patients each at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were included in the study. The samples consisted of males and females with age ranging 13–60 years. Patient's blood group was checked and was considered as “control.” The dentin and pulp of extracted teeth were tested for the presence of ABO/Rh antigen, at respective time periods by AE technique. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed in proportion. For comparison, Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for the small sample. Results: Blood group antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected in dentin and pulp up to 12 months. For both ABO and Rh factor, dentin and pulp showed 100% sensitivity for the samples tested at 0 month and showed a gradual decrease in the sensitivity as time period increased. The sensitivity of pulp was better than dentin for both the blood grouping systems and ABO blood group antigens were better detected than Rh antigens. Conclusion: In dentin and pulp, the antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected up to 12 months but showed a progressive decrease in the antigenicity as the time period increased. When compared the results obtained of dentin and pulp in ABO and Rh factor grouping showed similar results with no statistical significance. The sensitivity of ABO blood grouping was better than Rh factor blood grouping and showed a statistically significant result. PMID:27721625

  20. Determination of ABO blood grouping and Rhesus factor from tooth material.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pooja Vijay; Vanishree, M; Anila, K; Hunasgi, Santosh; Suryadevra, Sri Sujan; Kardalkar, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine blood groups and Rhesus factor from dentin and pulp using absorption-elution (AE) technique in different time periods at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, respectively. A total of 150 cases, 30 patients each at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months were included in the study. The samples consisted of males and females with age ranging 13-60 years. Patient's blood group was checked and was considered as "control." The dentin and pulp of extracted teeth were tested for the presence of ABO/Rh antigen, at respective time periods by AE technique. Data were analyzed in proportion. For comparison, Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used for the small sample. Blood group antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected in dentin and pulp up to 12 months. For both ABO and Rh factor, dentin and pulp showed 100% sensitivity for the samples tested at 0 month and showed a gradual decrease in the sensitivity as time period increased. The sensitivity of pulp was better than dentin for both the blood grouping systems and ABO blood group antigens were better detected than Rh antigens. In dentin and pulp, the antigens of ABO and Rh factor were detected up to 12 months but showed a progressive decrease in the antigenicity as the time period increased. When compared the results obtained of dentin and pulp in ABO and Rh factor grouping showed similar results with no statistical significance. The sensitivity of ABO blood grouping was better than Rh factor blood grouping and showed a statistically significant result.

  1. ABO-Rh blood groups distribution in cardiac syndrome X patients.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Rasmi, Yousef; Nemati, Mohaddeseh; Mohammadzad, Mir Hossein Seyed

    2012-07-01

    Data on frequency distribution of ABO-Rh blood groups in cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients are not available. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ABO-Rh blood groups in these patients. A total of 247 CSX patients' records were reviewed in a cross-sectional study from 2006 to 2010. One hundred forty six patients (59.1%) were female, and the mean patient age was 52 ± 11 years. The frequency of ABO-Rh blood groups was compared to the frequency of these blood groups in the West-Azerbaijan province, Iran; general population. Blood groups distribution among CSX patients showed phenotypes A, B, AB, O and Rh negative as 33.1%, 21.9%, 9.3%, 35.8%, and 7.9%, respectively. According to our results, there were no differences in ABO-Rh blood groups distribution between CSX patients and normal population. These data suggest that ABO-Rh blood groups might be unassociated with CSX.

  2. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing. 493.859 Section 493.859 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.859 Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing. (a) Failure to...

  3. A rapid and reliable PCR method for genotyping the ABO blood group. II: A2 and O2 alleles.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, D S; Dobrovic, A

    1996-01-01

    PCR permits direct genotyping of individuals at the ABO locus. Several methods have been reported for genotyping ABO that rely on differentiating the A, B, and O alleles at specific base substitutions. However, the O allele as defined by serology comprises at least two alleles (O1 and O2) at the molecular level, and most current ABO genotyping methods only take into account the O1 allele. Determining the presence of the O2 allele is critical, as this not-infrequent allele would be mistyped as an A or a B allele by standard PCR typing methods. Furthermore, none of the methods to date distinguish between the A1 and A2 alleles, even though 10% of all white persons are blood group A2. We have developed a method for genotyping the ABO locus that takes the O2 and A2 alleles into account. Typing for A2 and O2 by diagnostic restriction enzyme digestion is a sensitive, nonradioactive assay that provides a convenient method useful for forensic and paternity testing and for clarifying anomalous serological results.

  4. Relationships between skin cancers and blood groups--link between non-melanomas and ABO/Rh factors.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Baykan, Halit; Kavuncuoglu, Erhan; Mutlu, Hasan; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Burhan; Ozyurt, Kemal; Oguz, Arzu

    2013-01-01

    This investigation focused on possible relationships between skin cancers and ABO/Rh blood groups. Between January 2005 and December 2012, medical data of 255 patients with skin cancers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Radiation Oncology and Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinics were retrospectively analyzed. Blood groups of these patients were recorded. The control group consisted of 25701 healthy volunteers who were admitted to Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Blood Donation Center between January 2010 and December 2011. The distribution of the blood groups of the patients with skin cancers was compared to the distribution of ABO/Rh blood groups of healthy controls. The association of the histopathological subtypes of skin cancer with the blood groups was also investigated. Of the patients, 50.2% had A type, 26.3% had O type, 16.1% had B type, and 7.5% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 77.3%. Of the controls, 44.3% had A type, 31.5% had 0 type, 16.1% had B type, and 8.1% had AB blood group with a positive Rh (+) in 87.8%. There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of blood groups and Rh factors (A Rh (-) and 0 Rh positive) between the patients and controls. A total of 36.8% and 20.4% of the patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively, while 39.2% and 27.6% of the controls had A Rh (+) and B Rh (+), respectively. A significant relationship was observed between the patients with BCC and controls in terms of A Rh (-) (p=0.001). Our study results demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between non-melanoma skin cancer and ABO/Rh factors.

  5. PP13, Maternal ABO Blood Groups and the Risk Assessment of Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Meiri, Hamutal; Erez, Offer; Xu, Yi; Tarquini, Federica; Barna, Laszlo; Szilagyi, Andras; Ackerman, Ron; Sammar, Marei; Fule, Tibor; Karaszi, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Chong Jai; Zavodszky, Peter; Papp, Zoltan; Gonen, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Placental Protein 13 (PP13), an early biomarker of preeclampsia, is a placenta-specific galectin that binds beta-galactosides, building-blocks of ABO blood-group antigens, possibly affecting its bioavailability in blood. Methods and Findings We studied PP13-binding to erythrocytes, maternal blood-group effect on serum PP13 and its performance as a predictor of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Datasets of maternal serum PP13 in Caucasian (n = 1078) and Hispanic (n = 242) women were analyzed according to blood groups. In vivo, in vitro and in silico PP13-binding to ABO blood-group antigens and erythrocytes were studied by PP13-immunostainings of placental tissue-microarrays, flow-cytometry of erythrocyte-bound PP13, and model-building of PP13 - blood-group H antigen complex, respectively. Women with blood group AB had the lowest serum PP13 in the first trimester, while those with blood group B had the highest PP13 throughout pregnancy. In accordance, PP13-binding was the strongest to blood-group AB erythrocytes and weakest to blood-group B erythrocytes. PP13-staining of maternal and fetal erythrocytes was revealed, and a plausible molecular model of PP13 complexed with blood-group H antigen was built. Adjustment of PP13 MoMs to maternal ABO blood group improved the prediction accuracy of first trimester maternal serum PP13 MoMs for preeclampsia and IUGR. Conclusions ABO blood group can alter PP13-bioavailability in blood, and it may also be a key determinant for other lectins' bioavailability in the circulation. The adjustment of PP13 MoMs to ABO blood group improves the predictive accuracy of this test. PMID:21799738

  6. Distribution of ABO and Rh Blood Groups in Patients With Keratoconus: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Naderan, Mohammad; Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shoar, Saeed; Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin; Naderan, Morteza; Rezagholizadeh, Farzaneh; Zolfaghari, Masoome; Pahlevani, Rozhin

    2015-07-01

    Association of keratoconus (KC) with genetic predisposition and environmental factors has been well documented. However, no single study has investigated the possible relationship between ABO and Rh blood groups and KC. A case-control study was designed in a university hospital enrolling 214 patients with KC in the case group and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects in the control group. Primary characteristics, ABO blood group, and Rh factors were compared between the two groups. Topographic findings of KC eyes and the severity of the diseases were investigated according to the distribution of the blood groups. Blood group O and Rh(+) phenotype were most frequent in both groups. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of ABO blood groups or Rh factors. Mean keratometery (K), central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness, flat K, steep K, sphere and cylinder, spherical equivalent, and uncorrected visual acuity were all similar between ABO blood groups and Rh(+) and Rh(-) groups. However, the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) had the highest value in AB blood group (0.35 ± 0.22 logMAR, P=0.005). Moreover, the blood group AB revealed the highest frequency for grade 3 KC, followed by grades 1, 2, and 4 (P=0.003). We observed no significant excess of any particular blood group among KC cases compared with healthy subjects. Except BCVA, none of the keratometric or topographic findings was significantly different between blood groups.

  7. Relation of ABO blood groups to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis: an Gensini score assessment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Luo, Song-Hui; Li, Xiao-Lin; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Rui-Xia; Li, Sha; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Chen, Juan; Zeng, Rui-Xiang; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the study on the relationship between ABO blood groups and coronary atherosclerosis has a long history, few data is available regarding ABO to severity of coronary atherosclerosis in a large cohort study. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the relation of the ABO blood groups to the severity of coronary atherosclerosis assessed by Gensini score (GS) in a large Chinese cohort undergoing coronary angiography. A total of 2919 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled, and their baseline characteristics and ABO blood groups were collected. The GS was calculated as 1st tertile (0-10), 2nd tertile (11-36), 3rd tertile (>36) according to angiographic results. The relation of the ABO blood groups to GS was investigated. The frequency of blood group A was significantly higher in the upper GS tertiles (24.4% vs. 28.2% vs. 29.5%, p = 0.032). Multivariable linear regression analysis revealed that blood group A was independently associated with GS (β = 0.043, p = 0.017). Likewise, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that group A remained significantly associated with mid-high GS (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.16-1.80, p = 0.001), and the group O was showed as a protective factor (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.65-0.92, p = 0.004). In this large Chinese cohort study, the data indicated that there was an association between ABO blood groups and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Moreover, the blood group A was an independent risk factor for serious coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is there an association of ABO blood groups and Rhesus factor with alopecia areata?

    PubMed

    İslamoğlu, Zeynep Gizem Kaya; Unal, Mehmet

    2018-01-15

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by noncicatricial hair loss localized on hair, beard, mustache, eyebrow, eyelash, and sometimes on the body. Although etiopathogenesis is not fully understood, many studies show remarkable associations between various diseases and ABO blood groups. However, there is no study with AA and blood groups. Healthy people and patients with AA were included in this study. A total of 155 patients with AA and 299 healthy controls were included in the study. ABO blood group distribution in patients with AA and distribution of healthy donors were similar. However, Rhesus factor positivity in the AA group was significantly higher than in healthy donors. The relationship between stress and AA was high as known. But, ABO blood group and Rhesus factor were not in a significant connection with stress. We conclude that there was no association between ABO blood group and AA, but the observed distribution of Rhesus blood group differed slightly but significantly from that of the healthy population. The result of the study shows a small but statistically significant difference in the Rh blood group between patients with AA and the healthy population blood groups. This result is important because it suggests that genetic factors may influence the development of AA. The role of blood groups in the development of AA remains to be determined. We believe that the studies which will be carried out in other centers with wider series will be more valuable to support this hypothesis. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia. PMID:26925291

  10. Postoperative rebound of antiblood type antibodies and antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible living-related kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Kondo, Tsunenori; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Nozaki, Taiji; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound is attributed to kidney allograft rejection in ABO blood type-incompatible (ABO-I) living-related kidney transplantation (KTx). A total of 191 ABO-I recipients who received ABO-I living-related KTx between 2001 and 2013 were divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of low rebound [(≦1:32), N = 170] and Group 2 consisted of high rebound [(≧1:64), N = 21], according to the levels of the rebounded antiblood type antibodies within 1 year after transplantation. No prophylactic treatment for rejection was administered for elevated antiblood type antibodies, regardless of the levels of the rebounded antibodies. Within 1 year after transplantation, T-cell-mediated rejection was observed in 13 of 170 recipients (13/170, 8%) in Group 1 and in 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Group 2 (Groups 1 vs. 2, P = 0.432). Antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 15 of 170 recipients (15/170, 9%) and 2 of 21 recipients (2/21, 10%) in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.898). In this study, we found no correlation between the postoperative antiblood type antibody rebound and the incidence of acute rejection. We concluded that no treatment is necessary for rebounded antiblood type antibodies. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Advances in Blood Typing.

    PubMed

    Quraishy, N; Sapatnekar, S

    The clinical importance of blood group antigens relates to their ability to evoke immune antibodies that are capable of causing hemolysis. The most important antigens for safe transfusion are ABO and D (Rh), and typing for these antigens is routinely performed for patients awaiting transfusion, prenatal patients, and blood donors. Typing for other blood group antigens, typically of the Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and MNS blood groups, is sometimes necessary, for patients who have, or are likely to develop antibodies to these antigens. The most commonly used typing method is serological typing, based on hemagglutination reactions against specific antisera. This method is generally reliable and practical for routine use, but it has certain drawbacks. In recent years, molecular typing has emerged as an alternative or supplemental typing method. It is based on detecting the polymorphisms and mutations that control the expression of blood group antigens, and using this information to predict the probable antigen type. Molecular typing methods are useful when traditional serological typing methods cannot be used, as when a patient has been transfused and the sample is contaminated with red blood cells from the transfused blood component. Moreover, molecular typing methods can precisely identify clinically significant variant antigens that cannot be distinguished by serological typing; this capability has been exploited for the resolution of typing discrepancies and shows promise for the improved transfusion management of patients with sickle cell anemia. Despite its advantages, molecular typing has certain limitations, and it should be used in conjunction with serological methods. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association between ABO and Rh Blood Groups and Risk of Endometriosis in Iranian Women.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Farideh; Moini, Ashraf; Amirchaghmaghi, Elham; Daliri, Leila; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Mehrak; Hosseini, Rihaneh

    2018-06-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynaecological disease that affects quality of life for women. Several studies have revealed that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of endometriosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups in Iranian women with endometriosis who presented to two referral infertility centers in Tehran, Iran. In this case-control study, women who referred to Royan Institute and Arash Women's Hospital for diagnostic laparoscopy between 2013 and 2014 were assessed. Based on the laparoscopy findings, we categorized the women into two groups: endometriosis and control (women without endometriosis and normal pelvis). Chi-square and logistic regression tests were used for data analysis. In this study, we assessed 433 women, of which 213 patients were assigned to the endometriosis group while the remaining 220 subjects comprised the control group. The most frequent ABO blood group was O (40.6%). The least frequent blood group was AB (4.8%). In terms of Rh blood group, Rh+ (90.1%) was more frequent than Rh- (9.9%). There was no significant correlation between ABO (P=0.091) and Rh (P=0.55) blood groups and risk of endometriosis. Also, there was no significant difference between the two groups with regards to the stage of endometriosis and distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups (P>0.05). Although the O blood group was less dominant in Iranian women with endometriosis, we observed no significant correlation between the risk of endometriosis and the ABO and Rh blood groups. Endometriosis severity was not correlated to any of these blood groups. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequency and correlation of lip prints, fingerprints and ABO blood groups in population of Sriganganagar District, Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Harpreet; Verma, Pradhuman; Padda, Sarfaraz; Raj, Seetharamaiha Sunder

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and uniqueness of different lip print patterns, fingerprint patterns in relation to gender and ABO Rh blood groups among a semi-urban population of Sriganganagar, Rajasthan. The study was conducted on 1200 healthy volunteers aged 18-30 years. The cheiloscopic and dermatographic data of each subject were obtained and were analysed according to the Suzuki and Tsuchihashi and Henry systems of classification, respectively. Two forensic experts analyzed the patterns independently. The ABO Rh blood group was also recorded for each subject. The Chi square statistical analysis was done and tests were considered significant when p value <0.001 and Cohen kappa test was applied to analyze inter-observer reliability. The B+ blood group was noted as most common in both genders while least common were A- among males and AB- in females. Type II lip pattern was most predominant while the least common was Type I' in males and Type I' and Type V in females. The UL fingerprint pattern was the most common, while RL was least noted in both genders. All the fingerprint patterns showed correlation with different lip print patterns. A correlation was found between different blood groups and lip print patterns except Type I (vertical) lip pattern. A positive correlation was observed between all the blood groups and fingerprint patterns, except for RL pattern. There is an association between lip print patterns, fingerprint patterns and ABO blood groups in both the genders. Thus, correlating the uniqueness of these physical evidences sometimes helps the forensic team members in accurate personal identification or it can at least narrow the search for an individual where there are no possible data referring to the identity of the subject. Copyright © 2017 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  14. Allelic Prevalence of ABO Blood Group Genes in Iranian Azari Population

    PubMed Central

    Nojavan, Mohammad; Shamsasenjan, Karrim; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Torabi, Seyd Esmail; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Introduction ABO blood group system is the most important blood group in transfusion and has been widely used in population studies. Several molecular techniques for ABO allele’s detection are widely used for distinguishing various alleles of glycosyl transferase locus on chromosome 9. Methods 744 randomly selected samples from Azari donors of East Azerbaijan province (Iran) were examined using well-adjusted multiplex allele- specific PCR ABO genotyping technique. Results The results were consistent for all individuals. The ABO blood group genotype of 744 healthy Azari blood donors was: 25.8% AA/AO (2), 7.6% AO (1), 1.6% BB, 11.3% B0 (1), 10% AB, 9.3% 0(1)0(1) and 15.3%0(1)0(2). The highest genotype frequency belonged to O01/O02 genotype (15.3%) and the lowest frequency belonged to A101/A102 genotype (0.4%). Conclusions: The frequencies of ABO alleles didn’t show significant differences between East Azerbaijan province population and that of other areas of the country. Meanwhile, statistical analysis of frequencies of A and B alleles between East Azerbaijan province population and neighbor countries showed significant differences whereas the frequency of allele O between them did not show significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusions The frequencies of ABO alleles didn’t show significant differences between East Azerbaijan province population and that of other areas of the country. Meanwhile, statistical analysis of frequencies of A and B alleles between East Azerbaijan province population and neighbor countries showed significant differences whereas the frequency of allele O between them did not show significant difference (P>0.05). PMID:23678461

  15. Allelic Prevalence of ABO Blood Group Genes in Iranian Azari Population.

    PubMed

    Nojavan, Mohammad; Shamsasenjan, Karrim; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Torabi, Seyd Esmail; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    ABO blood group system is the most important blood group in transfusion and has been widely used in population studies. Several molecular techniques for ABO allele's detection are widely used for distinguishing various alleles of glycosyl transferase locus on chromosome 9. 744 randomly selected samples from Azari donors of East Azerbaijan province (Iran) were examined using well-adjusted multiplex allele- specific PCR ABO genotyping technique. The results were consistent for all individuals. The ABO blood group genotype of 744 healthy Azari blood donors was: 25.8% AA/AO (2), 7.6% AO (1), 1.6% BB, 11.3% B0 (1), 10% AB, 9.3% 0(1)0(1) and 15.3%0(1)0(2). The highest genotype frequency belonged to O01/O02 genotype (15.3%) and the lowest frequency belonged to A101/A102 genotype (0.4%). The frequencies of ABO alleles didn't show significant differences between East Azerbaijan province population and that of other areas of the country. Meanwhile, statistical analysis of frequencies of A and B alleles between East Azerbaijan province population and neighbor countries showed significant differences whereas the frequency of allele O between them did not show significant difference (P>0.05). The frequencies of ABO alleles didn't show significant differences between East Azerbaijan province population and that of other areas of the country. Meanwhile, statistical analysis of frequencies of A and B alleles between East Azerbaijan province population and neighbor countries showed significant differences whereas the frequency of allele O between them did not show significant difference (P>0.05).

  16. Blood Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... only get a transfusion with O blood. Type O-negative blood can be given to people with any blood type. That's because it has none of the markers that can set off a reaction. People with this blood type are considered "universal donors" and are in great demand at blood banks. ...

  17. [Evaluation of blood grouping in ABO and Rh systems in health facilities in Benin].

    PubMed

    Anani, L Y; Lafia, E; Ahlonsou, F; Sogbohossou, P; Bigot, A; Fagbohoun, J; Meton, A; Adjaka, A; Latoundji, S; Py, J-Y; Zohoun, I S

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this work is to assess the modalities of blood typing achievement in Benin with the view of their improvement. On the basis of a questionnaire including the detailed operative process, a prospective investigation has been achieved in public and private health centers laboratories. It came out that the execution of ABO and Rh blood typing took place globally on the fringe of the standards. We note that 72.4% of the private laboratories and 48.9% of the public ones lacked at least one equipment and 51.3% at least one material for blood withdrawal; 38.2% of the laboratories did not respect blood withdrawal standards; 1.32% of the laboratories applied the 4×2 rule. The assessment revealed that respectively 10.8% and 30.7% of the blood centers and non-blood centers achieved the globular test solely; the same 40.5% and 46.2% used reagents of different brands. Anti-A1 and anti-H sera, and A1 and A2 red cells were not available in any laboratory. More than 64% of laboratories have senior technicians and biomedical analysis engineers but only 6.6% of the laboratories were directed by biologists, and 9.2% of the laboratories function with only one technician. Instead of some assets, the laboratories assessment noted important non-conformities we ought to raise as a matter of urgency. It is a challenge whose resolution must give blood transfusion centers a reference position relatively to blood grouping when facing blood typing difficulties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. ABO blood group and risk of cancer: A register-based cohort study of 1.6 million blood donors.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Senthil K; Hwang, Jinseub; Rostgaard, Klaus; Nyrén, Olof; Ullum, Henrik; Pedersen, Ole B V; Erikstrup, Christian; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Pawitan, Yudi; Edgren, Gustaf

    2016-10-01

    The associations between ABO blood group and cancer risk have been studied repeatedly, but results have been variable. Consistent associations have only been reported for pancreatic and gastric cancers. We estimated associations between different ABO blood groups and site-specific cancer risk in a large cohort of healthy blood donors from Sweden and Denmark. A total of 1.6 million donors were followed over 27 million person-years (20 million in Sweden and 7 million in Denmark). We observed 119,584 cancer cases. Blood groups A, AB and B were associated either with increased or decreased risk of cancer at 13 anatomical sites (p≤0.05), compared to blood group O. Consistent with assessment using a false discovery rate approach, significant associations with ABO blood group were observed for cancer of the pancreas, breast, and upper gastrointestinal tract (mouth, salivary glands, pharynx, esophageal adenocarcinoma and stomach). Our study reconfirms the association between ABO blood group and cancer risk and exact underlying mechanisms involved needs further research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An exonic missense mutation c.28G>A is associated with weak B blood group by affecting RNA splicing of the ABO gene.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohong; Qian, Chengrui; Wu, Wenman; Lei, Hang; Ding, Qiulan; Zou, Wei; Xiang, Dong; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-09-01

    The amino acid substitutions caused by ABO gene mutations are usually predicted to impact glycosyltransferase's function or its biosynthesis. Here we report an ABO exonic missense mutation that affects B-antigen expression by decreasing the mRNA level of the ABO gene rather than the amino acid change. Serologic studies including plasma total GTB transfer capacity were performed. The exon sequences of the ABO gene were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. B 310 cDNA with c.28G>A (p.G10R) mutation was expressed in HeLa cells and total GTB transfer capacity in cell supernatant was measured. Flow cytometry was performed on these HeLa cells after transfection, and agglutination of Hela-B weak cells was also examined. The mRNA of the ABO gene was analyzed by direct sequencing and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. A minigene construct was prepared to evaluate the potential of splicing. While plasma total GTB transfer capacity was undetectable in this B 3 -like individual, the relative percentage of antigen-expressing cells and mean fluorescence index of the B weak red blood cells (RBCs) were 19 and 14% of normal B RBCs, respectively. There was no significant difference of total GTB transfer capacity in cell supernatant and B-antigen expression on cell surfaces between HeLa cells transfected with B 310 cDNA and B cDNA. The mRNA expression level of B 310 in peripheral whole blood was significantly reduced. The amount of splicing is significantly lower in c.28G>A construct compared to that in wild-type construct after transfection in K562 cells. ABO c.28G>A mutation may cause B 3 -like subgroup by affecting RNA splicing of the ABO gene. © 2017 AABB.

  20. Fingerprints as an Alternative Method to Determine ABO and Rh Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sonam; Deuja, Sajana; Alam, Munna; Karmacharya, Poonam; Mondal, Monami

    2017-01-01

    Blood grouping is conventionally done with invasive method by taking blood samples. The objective of this study is to determine blood group with uninvasive procedure by taking fingerprints of the participants and know the associations between their fingerprints and blood groups. Seven hundred participants of both genders with no any age limitation from Manipal Teaching Hospital and Manipal College of Medical Sciences were randomly selected. The blood grouping was done by cross reacting blood sample with the antibodies. The fingerprints were taken with the help of stamp pad imprinting the finger ridges over A4 size white papers. The loop, whorl and arch patterns were studied. O+ve blood group 224 (32%) was most prevalent among 700 participants. The loop pattern was highly distributed 3708 (53%) in all blood groups except in A-ve blood group with highest distribution of whorl 20 (40%). The mean comparisons of specific fingerprint in total and also in individual fingers with different ABO and ABO-Rh blood groups showed no any statistical association with P>0.05. However, the loop distribution in individual finger was highest in right middle finger (M) of B-ve blood group 5 (10%). The whorl distribution in individual finger was highest in right index (I), left thumb (T) and left ring (R) fingers of AB+ve blood group 20 (5.5% each). Similarly, the arch distribution was highest in right index fingers of A-ve blood group 3 (6%). The mean comparison of different fingerprints with ABO and Rh blood groups showed no significant statistical association concluding fingerprints cannot be used for blood grouping.

  1. Assessment of relationship of ABO blood groups among tobacco induced oral cancer patients of Kanpur Population, Uttar Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Gayathri; Katiyar, Anuradha; Raj, Amrita; Kumar, Amit; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Pandey, Amit

    2017-11-01

    The possibility of association between ABO blood groups and malignancy was first discussed by Anderson DE & Haas C. The association between blood group and oral cancer is least explored and hence this study was undertaken to evaluate relationship of ABO blood groups with an increased risk for oral cancer. The present study was conducted at various cancer hospitals in Kanpur. The study samples comprised 100 oral cancer patients and 50 controls with tobacco chewing habit. The information regarding the socio demographic profile, history on tobacco habits, type of oral cancer and ABO blood group profile was obtained from the case sheets of the patients. The frequency of squamous cell carcinoma was significantly higher in men (78%) than women (22%) and mostly found in the age range of 45-65 years and also consuming chewing type of tobacco. It was found that out of 100 patients, 53 were of blood group B+ve, 28 of O +ve, 16 of A+ve and 3 had the blood group AB+ve. The high potential risk of developing OSCC was more in B+ve blood group (1.96 times), and relative frequency (%) in blood group O+ve (1.64 times) than in the control group Among locations of oral cancers, squamous cell carcinoma of tongue (25%) and buccal mucosa (15%) was more common in B+ve and Carcinoma of floor of mouth (11%) was more common in O+ve blood group cases. It was found that people with blood group B+ve, followed by O+ve had increased risk of developing OSCC with most prevalent being Well Differentiated OSCC as compared to people of other blood groups. The present study reveals that there is an inherited element in the susceptibility against different types of oral cancers. The people with blood group B+ve and O+ve having tobacco chewing habits can be appraised that they are more at risk to develop oral cancer than people with other blood groups.

  2. Modifying the red cell surface: towards an ABO-universal blood supply.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Martin L; Clausen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Eliminating the risk for ABO-incompatible transfusion errors and simplifying logistics by creating a universal blood inventory is a challenging idea. Goldstein and co-workers pioneered the field of enzymatic conversion of blood group A and B red blood cells (RBCs) to O (ECO). Using alpha-galactosidase from coffee beans to produce B-ECO RBCs, proof of principle for this revolutionary concept was achieved in clinical trials. However, because this enzyme has poor kinetic properties and low pH optimum the process was not economically viable. Conversion of group A RBCs was only achieved with the weak A2 subgroup with related enzymes having acidic pH optima. More recently, the identification of entirely new families of bacterial exoglycosidases with remarkably improved kinetic properties for cleaving A and B antigens has reinvigorated the field. Enzymatic conversion of groups A, B and AB RBCs with these novel enzymes resulting in ECO RBCs typing as O can now be achieved with low enzyme protein consumption, short incubation times and at neutral pH. Presently, clinical trials evaluating safety and efficacy of ECO RBCs are ongoing. Here, we review the status of the ECO technology, its impact and potential for introduction into clinical component preparation laboratories.

  3. Molecular bases of the ABO blood groups of Indians from the Brazilian Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Franco, R F; Simões, B P; Guerreiro, J F; Santos, S E; Zago, M A

    1994-01-01

    Phenotype studies of ABO blood groups in most Amerindian populations revealed the exclusive presence of group O. Since group O is the result of the absence of glycosyltransferase activity, its molecular bases may be heterogeneous. We carried out ABO blood group genotyping by analysis of DNA of 30 Indians from 2 Amazonian tribes (Yanomami and Arara), and compared the findings with other populations (Caucasians and Blacks). Two segments of the glycosyltransferase gene were amplified by PCR and digested with KpnI or AluI to detect deletion or base change at positions 258 and 700, respectively. For all subjects, the gene basis of blood group O is the deletion of a single nucleotide at position 258 of the glycosyltransferase A gene, similar to that observed in Caucasoids and Negroids. DNA sequencing of limited regions of the gene supports this conclusion. This finding does not exclude, however, that a heterogeneity of the O allele may be revealed by a more extensive analysis.

  4. The association of ABO blood groups with extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Croatian patients suffering from chronic coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Carević, Vedran; Radić, Mislav; Fabijanić, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of study was to: 1) examine the relationship between ABO blood groups and extent of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), 2) compare ABO blood groups distribution in CAD patients and general population, 3) examine possible differences in traditional risk factors frequency in CAD patients with different ABO blood groups. In the 646 chronic CAD patients (72.4% males) coronary angiograms were scored by quantitative assessment using multiple angiographic scoring system, Traditional risk factors were self reported or measured by standard methods. ABO blood distribution of patients was compared with group of 651 healthy blood donors (74.6% males). Among all ABO blood group patients there was no significant difference between the extent of coronary atherosclerosis with regard to all the three scoring systems: number of affected coronary arteries (P = 0.857), Gensini score (P = 0.818), and number of segments narrowed > 50% (P = 0.781). There was no significant difference in ABO blood group distribution between CAD patients and healthy blood donors. Among CAD patients, men with blood group AB were significantly younger than their pairs with non-AB blood groups (P = 0.008). Among CAD patients with AB blood group, males < 50 yrs were significantly overrepresented when compared with the non-AB groups (P = 0.003). No association between ABO blood groups and the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Croatian CAD patients is observed. Observation that AB blood group might possibly identify Croatian males at risk to develop the premature CAD has to be tested in larger cohort of patients.

  5. Successful ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation:  Blood Group A1B Donor Into A2B Recipient With Anti-A1 Isoagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of the blood group A2B in a recipient was successfully performed in the setting of receiving a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO blood group, including ABO genotyping. The donor and recipient were tested for ABO, non-ABO, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. The donor and recipient were typed for HLA antigens, including T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and immunoglobulin G anti-A1 was demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor-recipient pair was a four-antigen HLA mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests were compatible. The transplant procedure was uneventful; the patient experienced immediate graft function with no episodes of rejection or readmissions more than 2 years later. It may be safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group AB mismatch barrier in the setting of low titer anti-A1 isoagglutinins without the need for pretransplant desensitization even if the antibody produced reacts with anti-human globulin. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Blood Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... typing and cross-matching. There are four major blood groups determined by the presence or absence of two ... A and B – on the surface of red blood cells: Group A Has only the A antigen on red ...

  7. [Frequencies of blood groups, ABO and Rh D incompatibility in post-delivery women and their liveborn].

    PubMed

    Baiochi, Eduardo; Camano, Luiz; Sass, Nelson; Colas, Osmar Ribeiro

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the frequency of different blood phenotypes and to predict the risk of Rh D alloimmunization and maternal-fetal incompatibility in a Brazilian population living in the West zone of the city of São Paulo-Brazil. This descriptive study evaluated 2,372 post-delivery women and their liveborn during one year. Blood types were analyzed by means of tube agglutination tests. The blood type frequencies were: 50.67 O, 32.17 A, 13.45 B, 3.75 AB, 90.34 Rh D(+) and 9.66 Rh D(-). ABO maternal-fetal incompatibility was detected in 18.4% and Rh D incompatibility in 7%. The fraction of Rh D(-) population at high risk for Rh D alloimmunization was 82%, emphasizing the importance of Rh D alloimmunization profilaxis.

  8. ABO, Secretor and Lewis histo-blood group systems influence the digestive form of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória Silveira; Ronchi, Luís Sérgio; de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, can affect the heart, esophagus and colon. The reasons that some patients develop different clinical forms or remain asymptomatic are unclear. It is believed that tissue immunogenetic markers influence the tropism of T. cruzi for different organs. ABO, Secretor and Lewis histo-blood group systems express a variety of tissue carbohydrate antigens that influence the susceptibility or resistance to diseases. This study aimed to examine the association of ABO, secretor and Lewis histo-blood systems with the clinical forms of Chagas disease. We enrolled 339 consecutive adult patients with chronic Chagas disease regardless of gender (cardiomyopathy: n=154; megaesophagus: n=119; megacolon: n=66). The control group was composed by 488 healthy blood donors. IgG anti-T. cruzi antibodies were detected by ELISA. ABO and Lewis phenotypes were defined by standard hemagglutination tests. Secretor (FUT2) and Lewis (FUT3) genotypes, determined by Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), were used to infer the correct histo-blood group antigens expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. The proportions between groups were compared using the χ2 test with Yates correction and Fisher's exact test and the Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were calculated. An alpha error of 5% was considered significant with p-values <0.05 being corrected for multiple comparisons (pc). No statistically significant differences were found for the ABO (X 2 : 2.635; p-value=0.451), Secretor (X 2 : 0.056; p-value=0.812) or Lewis (X 2 : 2.092; p-value=0.351) histo-blood group phenotypes between patients and controls. However, B plus AB Secretor phenotypes were prevalent in pooled data from megaesophagus and megacolon patients (OR: 5.381; 95% CI: 1.230-23.529; p-value=0.011; pc=0.022) in comparison to A plus O Secretor phenotypes. The tissue antigen variability resulting from the combined action of ABO and

  9. [Association between ABO blood groups and coronary heart disease in Chinese Guangxi Zhuang population].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Lin, Yingzhong; Liu, Hairun; Ji, Qingwei; Lu, Zhihong; Lu, Zhengde; Xu, Nengwen; Yuan, Jun; Liu, Ling

    2015-09-01

    To investigate this association between ABO blood groups and coronary heart disease (CHD) in the Chinese Guangxi Zhuang population. From August 2010 to April 2013, we performed a case-control study in a Chinese Zhuang population, which included 1 024 CHD cases and 1 024 age and gender-matched non-CHD controls. The ABO blood groups and biological variables were measured by standard laboratory procedures. The Gensini score was used to evaluate the severity of coronary artery stenosis. Compared to non-CHD control group, CHD group had higher levels of fasting blood glucose ((6.71 ± 6.72) mmol/L vs. (4.98 ± 1.55) mmol/L, P < 0.001), LDL-C ((2.89 ± 1.18) mmol/L vs. (2.60 ± 1.05) mmol/L, P = 0.002) and CRP ((7.74 ± 7.32) mg/L vs. (2.93 ± 2.19)mg/L, P < 0.001) as well as higher proportion of history of hypertension (57.0% vs. 27.5%, P < 0.001), history of diabetes (29.6% vs. 9.6%, P < 0.001), family history of CHD (35.3% vs. 10.6%, P < 0.001) and smoking (51.0% vs. 38.2%, P < 0.001). Logistic analysis indicated that ABO blood groups were associated with CHD risk in the Chinese Zhuang population. Compared with group O, the group B individuals had a higher risk of CHD (OR = 2.33, 95% CI 1.88-2.90, P < 0.001), this result remained after adjustment for the conventional CHD risk factors (OR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.05-2.52, P = 0.047). In addition, there were significant differences of Gensini score between non-O subjects and group O subjects in the CHD group, and MACE at 1-year follow-up was similar between ABO blood groups of CHD individuals. ABO blood groups are associated with CHD risk in the Chinese Zhuang population.

  10. Structural Basis for the ABO Blood-Group Dependence of Plasmodium falciparum Rosetting

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Audrey; Raynal, Bertrand; England, Patrick; Cohen, Jacques H.; Bertrand, Olivier; Peyrard, Thierry; Bentley, Graham A.; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2012-01-01

    The ABO blood group influences susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recent evidence indicates that the protective effect of group O operates by virtue of reduced rosetting of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) with uninfected RBCs. Rosetting is mediated by a subgroup of PfEMP1 adhesins, with RBC binding being assigned to the N-terminal DBL1α1 domain. Here, we identify the ABO blood group as the main receptor for VarO rosetting, with a marked preference for group A over group B, which in turn is preferred to group O RBCs. We show that recombinant NTS-DBL1α1 and NTS-DBL1α1-CIDR1γ reproduce the VarO-iRBC blood group preference and document direct binding to blood group trisaccharides by surface plasmon resonance. More detailed RBC subgroup analysis showed preferred binding to group A1, weaker binding to groups A2 and B, and least binding to groups Ax and O. The 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure of the PfEMP1-VarO Head region, NTS-DBL1α1-CIDR1γ, reveals extensive contacts between the DBL1α1 and CIDR1γ and shows that the NTS-DBL1α1 hinge region is essential for RBC binding. Computer docking of the blood group trisaccharides and subsequent site-directed mutagenesis localized the RBC-binding site to the face opposite to the heparin-binding site of NTS-DBLα1. RBC binding involves residues that are conserved between rosette-forming PfEMP1 adhesins, opening novel opportunities for intervention against severe malaria. By deciphering the structural basis of blood group preferences in rosetting, we provide a link between ABO blood grouppolymorphisms and rosette-forming adhesins, consistent with the selective role of falciparum malaria on human genetic makeup. PMID:22807674

  11. Phenotypic and allelic distribution of the ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups in the Cameroonian population.

    PubMed

    Ndoula, S T; Noubiap, J J N; Nansseu, J R N; Wonkam, A

    2014-06-01

    Data on blood group phenotypes are important for blood transfusion programs, for disease association and population genetics studies. This study aimed at reporting the phenotypic and allelic distribution of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) groups in various ethnolinguistic groups in the Cameroonians. We obtained ABO and Rhesus blood groups and self-identified ethnicity from 14,546 Cameroonian students. Ethnicity was classified in seven major ethnolinguistic groups: Afro-Asiatic, Nilo-Saharan, Niger-Kordofanian/West Atlantic, Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Grassfield, Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Mbam and Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu/Equatorial. ABO allelic frequencies were determined using the Bernstein method. Differences in phenotypic distribution of blood groups were assessed using the chi-square test; a P value <0.05 being considered as statistically significant. The frequencies of the antigens of blood groups O, A, B and AB were 48.62%, 25.07%, 21.86% and 4.45%, respectively. Rhesus-positive was 96.32%. The allelic frequencies of O, A and B genes were 0.6978, 0.1605 and 0.1416, respectively. Phenotypic frequencies of the blood groups in the general study population and in the different ethnolinguistic groups were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations (P > 0.05). The frequencies of O, A, and B blood phenotypes were significantly lower, respectively, in the Nilo-Saharan group (P = 0.009), the Niger-Kordofanian/Benue-Congo/Bantu groups (P = 0.021) and the Niger-Kordofanian/West-Atlantic group. AB blood group was most frequent in the Niger-Kordofanian/Adamawa-Ubangui group (P = 0.024). Our study provides the first data on ethnic distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in the Cameroonian population and suggests that its general profile is similar to those of several sub-Saharan African populations. We found some significant differences in phenotypic distribution amongst major ethnolinguistic groups

  12. Relative Susceptibilities of ABO Blood Groups to Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Afoakwah, Richmond; Aubyn, Edmond; Prah, James; Nwaefuna, Ekene Kwabena; Boampong, Johnson N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical outcome of falciparum malaria in endemic areas is influenced by erythrocyte polymorphisms including the ABO blood groups. Studies have reported association of ABO blood group to resistance, susceptibility, and severity of P. falciparum malaria infection. Individuals with blood group "A" have been found to be highly susceptible to falciparum malaria whereas blood group "O" is said to confer protection against complicated cases. We analyzed samples from 293 young children less than six years old with malaria in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. It was observed that group O was present in about 16.1% of complicated cases weighed against 40.9% of uncomplicated controls. Individuals with complicated malaria were about twice likely to be of blood groups A and B compared to group O (A versus O, OR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.59-2.26, P < 0.0001; B versus O, OR = 1.82. 95% CI = 1.57-2.23, P < 0.0001). Blood group O participants with complicated diseases had low parasitaemia compared to the other blood groups (P < 0.0001). This may give blood group O individuals a survival advantage over the other groups in complicated malaria as suggested. Participants with complicated falciparum malaria were generally anaemic and younger than those with uncomplicated disease.

  13. ABO blood groups: A risk factor for left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombogenic milieu in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan; Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified ABO blood groups as predictors of thromboembolic diseases. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), however, potential association between ABO blood groups and the risk of left atrial (LA) and/or left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombogenic milieu (TM) has not been established. This is a retrospective case-control study that included 125 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) plus TM, as evidenced by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during a period from1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016. The controls were selected randomly from 1072 NVAF without TM at a 1:2 ratio. Potential association between ABO blood groups and TM was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk of TM was higher in patients with blood group A (33.6% vs. 20.2% in non-A blood groups, P=0.005). After adjusting for age, sex, oral anticoagulant use, AF type and duration, and relevant functional measures (e.g., NT-pro BNP level, left atrium diameter, and left ventricular ejection fraction), blood group A remained associated with an increased risk of TM (OR=2.99, 95% CI 1.4-6.388, P=0.005). Blood group A is an independent risk factor for TM in NVAF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ABO blood group phenotype frequency estimation using molecular phenotyping in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S; Ng, J; Oldt, R F; Valdivia, L; Houghton, P; Smith, D G

    2017-11-01

    A much larger sample (N = 2369) was used to evaluate a previously reported distribution of the A, AB and B blood group phenotypes in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques from six different regional populations. These samples, acquired from 15 different breeding and research facilities in the United States, were analyzed using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay that targets single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) responsible for the macaque A, B and AB phenotypes. The frequency distributions of blood group phenotypes of the two species differ significantly from each other and significant regional differentiation within the geographic ranges of each species was also observed. The B blood group phenotype was prevalent in rhesus macaques, especially those from India, while the frequencies of the A, B and AB phenotypes varied significantly among cynomolgus macaques from different geographic regions. The Mauritian cynomolgus macaques, despite having originated in Indonesia, showed significant (P ≪ .01) divergence from the Indonesian animals at the ABO blood group locus. Most Mauritian animals belonged to the B blood group while the Indonesian animals were mostly A. The close similarity in blood group frequency distributions between the Chinese rhesus and Indochinese cynomolgus macaques demonstrates that the introgression between these two species extends beyond the zone of intergradation in Indochina. This study underscores the importance of ABO blood group phenotyping of the domestic supply of macaques and their biospecimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. ABO blood groups, Rhesus negativity, and primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, A. N.; Morris, J. S.; Sherlock, S.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of blood groups and Rhesus negativity in 91 British patients with primary biliary cirrhosis was compared with a sample of registered blood donors. There were no significant differences from the expected proportions calculated from the control groups. Although the number of cases studied is small the analysis does not confirm previous reports of an excess of A group in the disease. If a genetic basis exists for primary biliary cirrhosis alternative markers must be found. PMID:4211827

  16. Mapping the fine specificity of ABO monoclonal reagents with A and B type-specific function-spacer-lipid constructs in kodecytes and inkjet printed on paper.

    PubMed

    Barr, Katie; Korchagina, Elena; Ryzhov, Ivan; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal (MoAb) reagents are routinely used and are usually very reliable for the serologic determination of ABO blood types. However, the fine specificity and cross-reactivity of these reagents are often unknown, particularly against synthetic antigens used in some diagnostic assays. If nonserologic assays or very sensitive techniques other than those specifically prescribed by the manufacturer are used, then there is a risk of incorrect interpretation of results. Forty-seven MoAbs and two polyclonal ABO reagents were tested against red blood cell (RBC) kodecytes prepared with A trisaccharide, A Type 1, A Type 2, A Type 3, A Type 4, B trisaccharide, B Type 1, B Type 2, acquired B trisaccharide, and Le(a) trisaccharide function-spacer-lipid (FSL) constructs. Natural RBCs were tested in parallel. In addition these FSL constructs were printed onto paper with a desktop inkjet printer and used in a novel immunoassay that identifies reactivity through the appearance of alphanumeric characters. Mapping of MoAbs with kodecytes and printed FSL constructs revealed a series of broad recognition patterns. All ABO MoAbs tested were reactive with the RBC dominant Type 2 ABO antigens. Unexpectedly some anti-A reagents were reactive against the B Type 1 antigen, while others were poorly reactive with trisaccharide antigens. All ABO MoAbs detect the RBC dominant Type 2 ABO antigens; however, some reagents may show minor reactivity with inappropriate blood group antigens, which needs to be considered when using these reagents in alternative or highly sensitive analytic systems. © 2014 AABB.

  17. 42 CFR 493.859 - Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; ABO group and D (Rho) typing. 493.859 Section 493.859 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... for Laboratories Performing Tests of Moderate Complexity (including the Subcategory), High Complexity...

  18. Chemical Basis for Qualitative and Quantitative Differences Between ABO Blood Groups and Subgroups: Implications for Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jeyakanthan, M; Tao, K; Zou, L; Meloncelli, P J; Lowary, T L; Suzuki, K; Boland, D; Larsen, I; Burch, M; Shaw, N; Beddows, K; Addonizio, L; Zuckerman, W; Afzali, B; Kim, D H; Mengel, M; Shapiro, A M J; West, L J

    2015-10-01

    Blood group ABH(O) carbohydrate antigens are carried by precursor structures denoted type I-IV chains, creating unique antigen epitopes that may differ in expression between circulating erythrocytes and vascular endothelial cells. Characterization of such differences is invaluable in many clinical settings including transplantation. Monoclonal antibodies were generated and epitope specificities were characterized against chemically synthesized type I-IV ABH and related glycans. Antigen expression was detected on endomyocardial biopsies (n = 50) and spleen (n = 11) by immunohistochemical staining and on erythrocytes by flow cytometry. On vascular endothelial cells of heart and spleen, only type II-based ABH antigens were expressed; type III/IV structures were not detected. Type II-based ABH were expressed on erythrocytes of all blood groups. Group A1 and A2 erythrocytes additionally expressed type III/IV precursors, whereas group B and O erythrocytes did not. Intensity of A/B antigen expression differed among group A1 , A2 , A1 B, A2 B and B erythrocytes. On group A2 erythrocytes, type III H structures were largely un-glycosylated with the terminal "A" sugar α-GalNAc. Together, these studies define qualitative and quantitative differences in ABH antigen expression between erythrocytes and vascular tissues. These expression profiles have important implications that must be considered in clinical settings of ABO-incompatible transplantation when interpreting anti-ABO antibodies measured by hemagglutination assays with reagent erythrocytes. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Thrombin Generating Capacity and Phenotypic Association in ABO Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Romy M W; Mohamed, Abdulrahman B O; Pelkmans, Leonie; Hindawi, Salwa; Hemker, H Coenraad; de Laat, H Bas; Huskens, Dana; Al Dieri, Raed

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with blood group O have a higher bleeding risk than non-O blood groups. This could be explained by the lower levels of FVIII and von Willebrand Factor (VWF) levels in O individuals. We investigated the relationship between blood groups, thrombin generation (TG), prothrombin activation and thrombin inactivation. Plasma levels of VWF, FVIII, antithrombin, fibrinogen, prothrombin and α2Macroglobulin (α2M) levels were determined. TG was measured in platelet rich (PRP) and platelet poor plasma (PPP) of 217 healthy donors and prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation were calculated. VWF and FVIII levels were lower (75% and 78%) and α2M levels were higher (125%) in the O group. TG is 10% lower in the O group in PPP and PRP. Less prothrombin was converted in the O group (86%) and the thrombin decay capacity was lower as well. In the O group, α2M plays a significantly larger role in the inhibition of thrombin (126%). In conclusion, TG is lower in the O group due to lower prothrombin conversion, and a larger contribution of α2M to thrombin inactivation. The former is unrelated to platelet function because it is similar in PRP and PPP, but can be explained by the lower levels of FVIII.

  20. Thrombin Generating Capacity and Phenotypic Association in ABO Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    Hindawi, Salwa; Hemker, H. Coenraad; de Laat, H. Bas; Huskens, Dana; Al Dieri, Raed

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with blood group O have a higher bleeding risk than non-O blood groups. This could be explained by the lower levels of FVIII and von Willebrand Factor (VWF) levels in O individuals. We investigated the relationship between blood groups, thrombin generation (TG), prothrombin activation and thrombin inactivation. Plasma levels of VWF, FVIII, antithrombin, fibrinogen, prothrombin and α2Macroglobulin (α2M) levels were determined. TG was measured in platelet rich (PRP) and platelet poor plasma (PPP) of 217 healthy donors and prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation were calculated. VWF and FVIII levels were lower (75% and 78%) and α2M levels were higher (125%) in the O group. TG is 10% lower in the O group in PPP and PRP. Less prothrombin was converted in the O group (86%) and the thrombin decay capacity was lower as well. In the O group, α2M plays a significantly larger role in the inhibition of thrombin (126%). In conclusion, TG is lower in the O group due to lower prothrombin conversion, and a larger contribution of α2M to thrombin inactivation. The former is unrelated to platelet function because it is similar in PRP and PPP, but can be explained by the lower levels of FVIII. PMID:26509437

  1. Associations between ABO blood groups and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: influence on resection status and survival.

    PubMed

    El Jellas, Khadija; Hoem, Dag; Hagen, Kristin G; Kalvenes, May Britt; Aziz, Sura; Steine, Solrun J; Immervoll, Heike; Johansson, Stefan; Molven, Anders

    2017-07-01

    Both serology-based and genetic studies have reported an association between pancreatic cancer risk and ABO blood groups. We have investigated this relationship in a cohort of pancreatic cancer patients from Western Norway (n = 237) and two control materials (healthy blood donors, n = 379; unselected hospitalized patients, n = 6149). When comparing patient and blood donor ABO allele frequencies, we found only the A 1 allele to be associated with significantly higher risk for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) (23.8% vs. 17.9%; OR = 1.43, P = 0.018). Analyzing phenotypes, blood group A was more frequent among PDAC cases than blood donors (50.8% vs. 40.6%; OR = 1.51, P = 0.021), an enrichment fully explained by the A 1 subgroup. Blood group O frequency was lower in cases than in blood donors (33.8% vs. 42.7%; OR = 0.69, P = 0.039). This lower frequency was confirmed when cases were compared to hospitalized patients (33.8% vs. 42.9%; OR = 0.68, P = 0.012). Results for blood group B varied according to which control cohort was used for comparison. When patients were classified according to surgical treatment, the enrichment of blood group A was most prominent among unresected cases (54.0%), who also had the lowest prevalence of O (28.7%). There was a statistically significant better survival (P = 0.04) for blood group O cases than non-O cases among unresected but not among resected patients. Secretor status did not show an association with PDAC or survival. Our study demonstrates that pancreatic cancer risk is influenced by ABO status, in particular blood groups O and A 1 , and that this association may reflect also in tumor resectability and survival. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. ABO blood groups and risk of deep venous thromboembolism in Chinese Han population from Chaoshan region in South China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Wang, Cantian; Chen, Tingting; Hu, Shuang; Yi, Kaihong; Tan, Xuerui

    2017-04-01

     Objectives: To demonstrate the prevalence of ABO blood groups with deep venous thromboembolism in Chinese Han population. A retrospective study was conducted between January 2010 and March 2015 in The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College in Chaoshan District of Guangdong Province in South China. Eighty nine patients with confirmed diagnosis of deep venous thromboembolism were included. Frequency of blood groups was determined. Results: Of 89 patients with deep venous thromboembolism, 28 patients had blood group A (31.5%), 28 patients had blood group B (31.5%), 13 patients had blood group AB (14.6%), and 20 patients had blood group O (22.5%). Compared with O blood type, the odds ratios of deep venous thromboembolism for A, B and AB were 2.23 (95% CI, 1.27-3.91), 2.34 (95% CI, 1.34-4.09) and  4.43 (95% CI, 2.24-8.76). Conclusion: There is a higher risk of venous thromboembolism in non-O blood groups than O group.

  3. A research on relationship between ABO blood groups and body mass index among Turkish seafarers.

    PubMed

    Nas, Selçuk; Fışkın, Remzi

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate and to reveal the relationship between ABO blood groups and body mass index (BMI) and obesity among Turkish seafarers by using the health examination reports data obtained from 2009 to 2016. The data on age, gender, weight, height and blood groups obtained from 298,247 medical examination reports of Turkish seafarers were used with the official permission of Directorate General of Health for Border and Coastal Areas. Only 116,871 reports included blood group data. Regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were performed to survey relationship between variables. The results of the study were compared with other studies in the related literature. It has been revealed that AB Rh (-) group was associated the highest mean BMI value (mean: 25.952). It is suggested that seafarers with AB Rh (-) blood group, who have the highest mean BMI value, should pay special attention to their weight.

  4. Association of ABO and Rh Blood Groups to Blood-Borne Infections among Blood Donors in Tehran-Iran

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMADALI, Fatemeh; POURFATHOLLAH, Aliakbar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and syphilis infections in blood donors referred to Tehran Blood Transfusion Center (TBTC), and determine any association between blood groups and blood- borne infections between the years of 2005 and 2011. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted at TBTC. All of the donor serum samples were screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis by using third generation ELISA kits and RPR test. Initial reactive samples were tested in duplicate. Confirmatory tests were performed on all repeatedly reactive donations. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse blood grouping. The results were subjected to chi square analysis for determination of statistical difference between the values among different categories according to SPSS program. Results Overall, 2031451 donor serum samples were collected in 2005-2011. Totally, 10451 were positive test for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis. The overall seroprevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis was 0.39%, 0.11%, 0.005%, and 0.010%, respectively. Hepatitis B and HIV infections were significantly associated with blood group of donors (P <0.05) ; percentage of HIV Ag/Ab was higher in donors who had blood group “A” and percentage of HBs Ag was lower in donors who had blood group O. There was no significant association between Hepatitis C and syphilis infections with ABO and Rh blood groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Compared with neighboring countries and the international standards, prevalence of blood-borne infections is relatively low. PMID:25909065

  5. Association of ABO and Rh Blood Groups to Blood-Borne Infections among Blood Donors in Tehran-Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadali, Fatemeh; Pourfathollah, Aliakbar

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and syphilis infections in blood donors referred to Tehran Blood Transfusion Center (TBTC), and determine any association between blood groups and blood- borne infections between the years of 2005 and 2011. This was a retrospective study conducted at TBTC. All of the donor serum samples were screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis by using third generation ELISA kits and RPR test. Initial reactive samples were tested in duplicate. Confirmatory tests were performed on all repeatedly reactive donations. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse blood grouping. The results were subjected to chi square analysis for determination of statistical difference between the values among different categories according to SPSS program. Overall, 2031451 donor serum samples were collected in 2005-2011. Totally, 10451 were positive test for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis. The overall seroprevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis was 0.39%, 0.11%, 0.005%, and 0.010%, respectively. Hepatitis B and HIV infections were significantly associated with blood group of donors (P <0.05) ; percentage of HIV Ag/Ab was higher in donors who had blood group "A" and percentage of HBs Ag was lower in donors who had blood group O. There was no significant association between Hepatitis C and syphilis infections with ABO and Rh blood groups (P>0.05). Compared with neighboring countries and the international standards, prevalence of blood-borne infections is relatively low.

  6. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  7. Association of ABO blood groups with von Willebrand factor, factor VIII and ADAMTS-13 in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Chen, Xiaogang; Yang, Jiezuan; Guo, Renyong

    2017-09-01

    Coagulative and fibrinolytic disorders appear to be associated with the development of lung cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif 13 (ADAMTS-13), and factor VIII (FVIII) activity, in association with O and non-O blood groups in patients with lung cancer. Plasma levels of VWF and ADAMTS-13, and FVIII activity were measured in 115 patients with lung cancer and 98 healthy subjects. Phenotyping of the ABO blood groups was also performed for the two groups. Significantly increased VWF levels and FVIII activity, as well as significantly decreased ADAMTS-13 levels, were observed in patients with distant metastasis as compared with those without distant metastasis and the healthy controls. Plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity were significantly increased in subjects with non-O type blood compared with those with type O blood in the two groups. However, a significant decrease in ADAMTS-13 levels was observed only in the control group among those with non-O type blood, compared with those with type O blood. The results of the present study indicate that increased VWF and decreased ADAMTS-13 levels facilitate the invasiveness and metastasis of lung cancer. Non-O blood groups constitute a risk factor for increased VWF and FVIII in plasma. Continued monitoring of VWF and ADAMTS-13 levels, and of FVIII activity in patients with lung cancer with distinct blood groups may help to minimize the incidence of thrombotic events and improve assessment of disease progression.

  8. Structures for the ABO(H) Blood Group: Which Textbook Is Correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risley, John M.

    2007-09-01

    Six textbooks and two Internet sites show different structures for the A, B, and O(H) antigens of the ABO(H) blood group. However, none of the structures identified as the A, B, and O(H) antigens are correct. The O(H) antigen is a disaccharide, on which the trisaccharide A and B antigens are synthesized. The structures shown in the textbooks and at the Internet sites contain the O(H), A, and B antigens attached at the nonreducing end of various heterosaccharide cores of glycoproteins and glycolipids that are not a part of the specific blood group. This article emphasizes the correct molecular structures because it is important to distinguish between those carbohydrates that make up the antigens and those that are not part of the antigenic structures.

  9. ABO blood grouping from hard and soft tissues of teeth by modified absorption-elution technique.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayan, Bk; Manjunath, M; Joshi, Anagha Ananth

    2013-01-01

    Teeth have always been known as stable tissue that can be preserved both physically and chemically for long periods of time. Blood group substances have been known to be present in both the hard and soft tissues of the teeth. This study aimed at detection of ABO blood group substances from soft and hard tissues of teeth and also to evaluate the reliability of teeth stored for a relatively long period as a source of blood group substances by absorption-elution technique with some modifications. Blood group obtained from the teeth was compared with those obtained from the blood sample. Pulp showed a very large correlation in both fresh and long-standing teeth though it decreased slightly in the latter. Hard tissue showed a large correlation in both the groups indicating that hard tissue is quite reliable to detect blood group and that there is no much difference in the reliability in both the groups. However, combining pulp and hard tissue, correlation is moderate. Correlation of blood grouping with the age, sex, and jaw distribution was carried out. Blood group identification from hard and soft tissues of teeth aids in the identification of an individual.

  10. Assessment of ABO blood grouping and secretor status in the saliva of the patients with oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Rai, Pragati; Acharya, Swetha; Hallikeri, Kaveri

    2015-01-01

    Secretor status may possibly be one of the factors in the etiopathogenesis of oral precancerous lesions and subsequently cancer. Studies have shown the relationship between the pathogenesis of disease and secretor status. They have made known that secretor status is a possible factor influencing disease status. Studies have revealed the association between blood groups and specific diseases. To assess any association of ABO blood grouping with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs) and to examine whether there is any difference in the saliva secretor status in the patients with OPMDs and healthy controls. The study consisted of 90 subjects, with 45 patients assigned to two groups (a) Patients with potentially malignant disorders and (b) healthy controls. ABO blood grouping was done and 1 ml of unstimulated saliva was collected in a sterile test tube. The Wiener agglutination test was performed to analyze the secretor status in both the groups. Chi-square test and odd ratio were used to assess the relationship between ABO blood group and OPMDs. Chi-square test was performed to assess the relationship between secretor status and OPMDs. Probability level was fixed at <0.05. The results demonstrated a statistically significant relation between OPMDs and secretor status (P = 0.00). Eighty-seven percent of patients with OPMDs were nonsecretors, while in the control group sixteen percent of them were nonsecretors. There was no statistically significant relationship between ABO blood groups and OPMDs (P > 0.05). The study confirms the inability to secrete blood group antigens in the saliva of patients with OPMDs which could be regarded as a host risk factor. Results could not propose a relationship between ABO blood group and OPMDs.

  11. A rapid and reliable PCR method for genotyping the ABO blood group.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, D S; Dobrovic, A

    1993-01-01

    The ABO blood group has been used extensively as a marker in population studies, epidemiology, and forensic work. However, until the cloning of the gene, it was not possible to determine the genotype of group A and B individuals without recourse to family studies. We have developed a method to determine the ABO genotype directly from human DNA using multiplex PCR and restriction enzyme analysis. Two PCR fragments spanning positions 258 and 700 of the cDNA sequence are amplified. The site at position 258 allows us to differentiate the O allele from the A and B alleles. The site at position 700 allows us to distinguish the B allele from the A and O alleles. Analysis at the two sites thus allows us to distinguish the three alleles. The multiplex PCR product is digested separately with four enzymes, two for each of the sites. The pair of enzymes for each site cut in a reciprocal fashion. Whereas one enzyme for each site is theoretically sufficient for genotyping, the use of complementary pairs of enzymes prevents the assignment of a false genotype as a result of false negative or partial digestion. This method is fast and reliable, does not rely on probing of blots, and should be widely applicable.

  12. Cardiovascular disease and ABO blood-groups in Africans. Are blood-group A individuals at higher risk of ischemic disease?: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ba, Djibril Marie; Sow, Mamadou Saidou; Diack, Aminata; Dia, Khadidiatou; Mboup, Mouhamed Cherif; Fall, Pape Diadie; Fall, Moussa Daouda

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group system by Karl Landsteiner in 1901, several reports have suggested an important involvement of the ABO blood group system in the susceptibility to thrombosis. Assessing that non-O blood groups in particular A blood group confer a higher risk of venous and arterial thrombosis than group O.Epidemiologic data are typically not available for all racial and ethnics groups.The purpose of this pilot study was to identify a link between ABO blood group and ischemic disease (ID) in Africans, and to analyze whether A blood group individuals were at higher risk of ischemic disease or not. A total of 299 medical records of patients over a three-year period admitted to the cardiology and internal medicine department of military hospital of Ouakam in Senegal were reviewed. We studied data on age, gender, past history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking, sedentarism, obesity, hyperlipidemia, use of estrogen-progestin contraceptives and blood group distribution.In each blood group type, we evaluated the prevalence of ischemic and non-ischemic cardiovascular disease. The medical records were then stratified into two categories to evaluate incidence of ischemic disease: Group 1: Patients carrying blood-group A and Group 2: Patients carrying blood group non-A (O, AB and B). Of the 299 patients whose medical records were reviewed, 92 (30.8%) were carrying blood group A, 175 (58.5%) had blood group O, 13 (4.3%) had blood group B, and 19 (6.4%) had blood group AB.The diagnosis of ischemic disease (ID) was higher in patients with blood group A (61.2%) than in other blood groups, and the diagnosis of non-ischemic disease (NID) was higher in patients with blood group O (73.6%) compared to other groups. In patients with blood group B or AB compared to non-B or non-AB, respectively there was no statistically significant difference in ID incidence.Main risk factor for ID was smoking (56.5%), hypertension (18.4%) and diabetes (14.3%).In our study

  13. Automated red blood cell depletion in ABO incompatible grafts in the pediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Del Fante, Claudia; Scudeller, Luigia; Recupero, Santina; Viarengo, Gianluca; Boghen, Stella; Gurrado, Antonella; Zecca, Marco; Seghatchian, Jerard; Perotti, Cesare

    2017-12-01

    Bone marrow ABO incompatible transplantations require graft manipulation prior to infusion to avoid potentially lethal side effects. We analyzed the influence of pre-manipulation factors (temperature at arrival, transit time, time of storage at 4°C until processing and total time from collection to red blood cell depletion) on the graft quality of 21 red blood cell depletion procedures in ABO incompatible pediatric transplants. Bone marrow collections were processed using the Spectra Optia ® (Terumo BCT) automated device. Temperature at arrival ranged between 4°C and 6°C, median transit time was 9.75h (range 0.33-28), median time of storage at 4°-6°C until processing was 1.8h (range 0.41-18.41) and median time from collection to RBC depletion was 21h (range1-39.4). Median percentage of red blood cell depletion was 97.7 (range 95.4-98.5), median mononuclear cells recovery was 92.2% (range 40-121.2), median CD34+ cell recovery was 93% (range 69.9-161.2), median cell viability was 97.7% (range 94-99.3) and median volume reduction was 83.9% (range 82-92). Graft quality was not significantly different between BM units median age. Our preliminary data show that when all good manifacturing practices are respected the post-manipulation graft quality is excellent also for those units processed after 24h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ABO Mistyping of cis-AB Blood Group by the Automated Microplate Technique.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sejong; Ryu, Mi Ra; Cha, Seung-Yeon; Seo, Ji-Young; Cho, Duck

    2018-01-01

    The cis -AB phenotype, although rare, is the relatively most frequent of ABO subgroups in Koreans. To prevent ABO mistyping of cis -AB samples, our hospital has applied a combination of the manual tile method with automated devices. Herein, we report cases of ABO mistyping detected by the combination testing system. Cases that showed discrepant results by automated devices and the manual tile method were evaluated. These samples were also tested by the standard tube method. The automated devices used in this study were a QWALYS-3 and Galileo NEO. Exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene were sequenced. 13 cases that had the cis -AB allele showed results suggestive of the cis -AB subgroup by manual methods, but were interpreted as AB by either automated device. This happened in 87.5% of these cases by QWALYS-3 and 70.0% by Galileo NEO. Genotyping results showed that 12 cases were ABO*cis-AB01/ABO*O01 or ABO*cis-AB01/ABO*O02 , and one case was ABO*cis-AB01/ ABO*A102. Cis -AB samples were mistyped as AB by the automated microplate technique in some cases. We suggest that the manual tile method can be a simple supplemental test for the detection of the cis -AB phenotype, especially in countries with relatively high cis- AB prevalence.

  15. Impact of Blood Mixing and ABO Compatibility on Platelet-Leukocyte Aggregations and Platelet P-Selectin Expression: An in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Go-Shine; Hu, Mei-Hua; Lin, Tso-Chou; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Ke, Hung-Yen; Zheng, Xu-Zhi; Lin, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2018-05-01

    Effects of blood transfusions on platelet- and leukocyte-related inflammation are unclear. We simulated transfusion using in vitro blood mixing to evaluate platelet-leukocyte aggregations (PLA) and platelet P-selectin expression, and the mechanism of PLA. Donor packed red blood cells (pRBCs) were obtained from a blood bank. Recipient whole blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Blood sample mixtures were divided into four groups: group M, cross-matched blood type mixing; group O, donor type O with other blood type mixing (A, B, or AB); group S, ABO type-specific uncross-matched blood mixing; and group I, ABO incompatibility mixing. Donor pRBCs were added to recipient blood to reach 1%, 5%, and 10% (vol/vol) concentrations. Blood sample mixtures were analyzed to determine the PLA; P-selectin expression; and leukocyte CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 subunits of integrin expression. Analysis of variance tests were used to analyze differences. PLA significantly increased only in groups O and I (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001). Subpopulations of leukocytes significantly increased in all groups. There were no significant differences among the four groups (P = 0.578) in PLA increase. Although there was no significant effect on P-selectin expression (P = 1.000) and leukocyte CD11a and CD18 expression (P = 0.999, P = 0.422) within and between the groups, there was an increase in CD11b expression (P = 0.018). Blood mixing can increase PLA, especially in platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte aggregations, possibly through nonhemolytic reactions. The CD11b integrin with CD18 may play a role in the formation of PLA.

  16. Association between ABO blood/rhesus grouping and hepatitis B and C: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Abolfazl

    2014-06-01

    During past decades, a connection between hepatitis and the host ABO/Rh blood groups has been always under dispute, with no appropriately designed study yet. This study aimed to investigate possible association between ABO blood/Rh groups with both hepatitis B and C. In this case-control setting, 200 healthy individuals (controls), 200 patients with chronic Hepatitis-B infection (HB) and 200 patients with chronic Hepatitis-C infection (HC) were recruited from 2010 to 2013 in Tabriz Sina Hospital. ABO blood and Rh grouping was performed and the results were compared between the case and control groups. Both pair of the control and HB groups and the control and HC groups were matched for their subjects' age and sex. In the control group, 178 subjects (89%) were Rh+ and 22 subjects (11%) were Rh-. In the HB group, there were 180 Rh+ (90%) and 20 Rh- (10%) patients. In the HC group there were 168 Rh+ (84%) and 32 Rh-negative (16%) patients. Both pair of the control and HB groups (p = 0.74), as well as the control and HC groups (p = 0.14) were comparable for the status of Rh. In the control group there were 84 (42%), 32 (16%), 66 (33%) and 18 (9%) subjects with A, B, O and AB blood groups, respectively. The corresponding figures were 84 (42%), 34 (17%), 58 (29%) and 24 (12%) for the HB patients; and 80 (40%), 29 (14.5%), 85 (42.5%) and 6 (3%) for the HC patients. Comparing between the control and HB groups showed no significant difference in terms of the frequency of ABO blood groups (p = 0.70). However, with comparing the control and HC groups, the rate of O blood group was significantly higher in the HC group and concomitantly, the rate of AB blood group was significantly higher in the control group (p = 0.04). Although, there is not a significant association between ABO blood groups and HB, this association is significant between certain ABO blood groups and HC.

  17. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in school-aged Chinese in Taipei City and relationship between ABO blood groups.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzee-Chung; Chen, Liang-Kung; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2003-08-01

    To explore the seropositive rate of antibodies against H. pylori (anti-HP) in Taipei City and to compare the relationship of ABO blood groups and H. pylori infection. In 1993, high school students in Shih-Lin District were randomly selected for blood samplings by their registration number at school. In addition, similar procedures were performed on the well-children clinics of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Besides, randomly selected sera from the adults who took the physical examination were recruited for evaluation. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects before blood samplings and parents were simultaneously informed for those who were younger than 18-year-old. Blood tests for anti-HP and ABO blood groupings were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Chi square tests were used for the comparisons between seroprevalence of H. pylori and ABO blood groups. Totally, 685 subjects were recruited (260 children aged 1-14 years, 425 high school students aged 15-18 years) were evaluated, and another 88 adult healthy volunteers were studied as well for comparison. The age-specific seropositive rate of anti-HP was 1.3 % at age 1-5 years, 7.7 % at age 6-10 years, and 11.5 % at age 11-14 years. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was abruptly increased in young adolescence: 18.6 % at age 15 years, 28.1 % at age 16 years, 32.4 % at age 17 years and 41.0 % at age 18 years, respectively. In the 425 high school students, ABO blood groupings were performed, which disclosed 48.5 % (206/425) of blood group O, 24 % (102/425) of blood group A, 21.8 % (93/425) of blood group B and 5.6 % (24/425) of blood group AB. In comparison of the subjects with blood group O and the other blood groups, no statistical significance could be identified in the seroprevalence of H. pylori (P=0.99). The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in Taipei City in adults is similar to the developed countries, and the abrupt increase of H. pylori during high school may be

  18. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in school-aged Chinese in Taipei City and relationship between ABO blood groups

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzee-Chung; Chen, Liang-Kung; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the seropositive rate of antibodies against H. pylori (anti-HP) in Taipei City and to compare the relationship of ABO blood groups and H. pylori infection. METHODS: In 1993, high school students in Shih-Lin District were randomly selected for blood samplings by their registration number at school. In addition, similar procedures were performed on the well-children clinics of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Besides, randomly selected sera from the adults who took the physical examination were recruited for evaluation. Informed consents were obtained from all the subjects before blood samplings and parents were simultaneously informed for those who were younger than 18-year-old. Blood tests for anti-HP and ABO blood groupings were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Chi square tests were used for the comparisons between seroprevalence of H. pylori and ABO blood groups. RESULTS: Totally, 685 subjects were recruited (260 children aged 1-14 years, 425 high school students aged 15-18 years) were evaluated, and another 88 adult healthy volunteers were studied as well for comparison. The age-specific seropositive rate of anti-HP was 1.3% at age 1-5 years, 7.7% at age 6-10 years, and 11.5% at age 11-14 years. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was abruptly increased in young adolescence: 18.6% at age 15 years, 28.1% at age 16 years, 32.4% at age 17 years and 41.0% at age 18 years, respectively. In the 425 high school students, ABO blood groupings were performed, which disclosed 48.5% (206/425) of blood group O, 24% (102/425) of blood group A, 21.8% (93/425) of blood group B and 5.6% (24/425) of blood group AB. In comparison of the subjects with blood group O and the other blood groups, no statistical significance could be identified in the seroprevalence of H. pylori (P = 0.99). CONCLUSION: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection in Taipei City in adults is similar to the developed countries, and the abrupt increase of H. pylori during

  19. ABO blood group antibody levels in infants exposed to mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Guynes, Anthony; Delaney, Meghan; McMullan, David M; Townsend-McCall, Dee; Kemna, Mariska; Boucek, Robert; Law, Yuk M

    2014-01-01

    ABO sensitization is a barrier to ABO-incompatible heart transplantation in infants. We investigate the development of ABO antibodies in infants with and without mechanical circulatory support (MCS) during their waiting period. Although the proportion of patients with antibodies was similar between the groups, the median age at antibody detection was only 9 days (6-198) for MCS vs. 223 days (28-367) for non-MCS patients (P = 0.028), suggesting MCS is associated with earlier ABO antibody detection.

  20. Access to Liver Transplantation in Different ABO-Blood Groups and "Exceptions Points" in a Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Allocation System: A Brazilian Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Martino, R B; Waisberg, D R; Dias, A P M; Inoue, V B S; Arantes, R M; Haddad, L B P; Rocha-Santos, V; Pinheiro, R S N; Nacif, L S; D'Albuquerque, L A C

    2018-04-01

    In the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) system, patients with "MELD exceptions" points may have unfair privilege in the competition for liver grafts. Furthermore, organ distribution following identical ABO blood types may also result in unjust organ allocation. The aim of this study was to investigate access to liver transplantation in a tertiary Brazilian center, regarding "MELD exceptions" situations and among ABO-blood groups. A total of 465 adult patients on the liver waitlist from August 2015 to August 2016 were followed up until August 2017. Patients were divided into groups according to ABO-blood type and presence of "exceptions points." No differences in outcomes were observed among ABO-blood groups. However, patients from B and AB blood types spent less time on the list than patients from A and O groups (median, 46, 176, 415, and 401 days, respectively; P = .03). "Exceptions points" were granted for 141 patients (30.1%), hepatocellular carcinoma being the most common reason (52.4%). Patients with "exceptions points" showed higher transplantation rate, lower mortality on the list, and lower delta-MELD than non-exceptions patients (56.7% vs 19.1% [P < .01]; 18.4% vs 38.5% [P < .01], and 2.0 ± 2.6 vs 6.9 ± 7.0 [P < .01], respectively). Patients with refractory ascites had a higher mortality rate than those with other "exceptions" or without (48%). The MELD system provides equal access to liver transplantation among ABO-blood types, despite shorter time on the waitlist for AB and B groups. The current MELD exception system provides advantages for candidates with "exception points," resulting in superior outcomes compared with those without exceptions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Providing ABO-identical platelets and cryoprecipitate to (almost) all patients: approach, logistics, and associated decreases in transfusion reaction and red blood cell alloimmunization incidence.

    PubMed

    Henrichs, Kelly F; Howk, Nedda; Masel, Debra S; Thayer, Mark; Refaai, Majed A; Kirkley, Scott A; Heal, Joanna M; Blumberg, Neil

    2012-03-01

    There are multiple benefits to transfusing only ABO-identical blood components. Historically our institution routinely transfused ABO-nonidentical platelets (PLTs) and cryoprecipitate to surgical patients. In April 2005, we implemented a policy of transfusing only ABO-identical components whenever feasible, regardless of outdating or logistic considerations. Technical staff closely monitored product usage and adjusted blood center orders based on recent utilization and planned transfusions. When unable to provide ABO-identical PLTs, ABO-compatible PLTs were washed to remove incompatible plasma. Data on outdating were collected for 18 months before and after implementation. We compared transfusion reaction and red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization incidence for 4 years preceding (2001-2004) and subsequent (2006-2009) to implementation. In the year after implementation, only 11 of 410 surgical patients received ABO-nonidentical PLTs (2.7%). There was a 5.6% increase in outdating of PLTs. Transfusing ABO-identical components was associated with significant reductions in febrile (-46%; 8.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 components; p < 0.0001) and allergic transfusion reactions (-23%; from 7.0 to 5.4 per 10,000 components; p = 0.025). A progressive reduction in de novo RBC alloimmunization incidence also occurred (-50% by 2009; p = 0.03). Providing ABO-identical PLTs to almost all patients was feasible in our setting by changing ordering and inventorying procedures and making the ABO-identical policy a staff priority. Unexpected and striking reductions in febrile and allergic reactions and RBC alloimmunization were observed, of uncertain causal relationship to this ABO policy change, which will require further study. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Types of Blood Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing Find a Blood Drive Home Types of Blood Donations Types of Blood Donations Giving the "right" type of blood donation - ... make an appointment 1-800-RED CROSS About Blood Types There are actually more than 8 different ...

  3. Determination of ABO blood grouping from human oral squamous epithelium by the highly sensitive immunohistochemical staining method EnVision+.

    PubMed

    Noda, Hiroshi; Yokota, Makoto; Tatsumi, Shinji; Sugiyama, Shizuyuki

    2002-03-01

    Using the highly sensitive immunohistochemical staining method EnVision+, which employs a dextran polymer reagent for the secondary antibody, the detection of the ABH antigens was attempted in the oral squamous epithelium. This new technique uses monoclonal antibody as a primary antibody and it takes about three hours for staining. The time is much shorter than conventional absorption-elution testing or absorption-inhibition testing for the determination of ABO blood grouping. Secretor saliva samples were stained at strong intensity by the antibody, which corresponded to its blood group and anti-H. On the one hand, nonsecretor saliva samples were stained at strong intensity only by the antibody that corresponded to its blood group, and at weak intensity only by anti-H. Since human oral squamous epithelium antigens were stained specifically by this method, we can examine the ABO blood group of saliva samples and perform cytodiagnosis at the same time. Our research suggested that the EnVision+ Method is a useful technique for ABO blood grouping of saliva in forensic cases.

  4. Association between ABO and Rh Blood Groups and Risk of Preeclampsia: A Case-Control Study from Iran.

    PubMed

    Aghasadeghi, Firoozeh; Saadat, Mostafa

    2017-04-15

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is a genetic component in the development of PE with estimated heritability around 0.47. Several studies have investigated the association between maternal ABO blood groups (OMIM 110300) and risk of PE, with contradictory results have emerged. Considering that there is no study in this filed from Iranian population, the present case-control study was carried out at Shiraz (south-west Iran). In this study 331 women; 121 pregnant with PE and 210 normotensive pregnant women were included. Using blood group O (for ABO blood groups) or Rh+ (for Rh blood groups) as a reference, odds ratios (ORs) and its 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of PE risk were estimated from logistic regression analysis. Although the A (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.39-1.17, P = 0.165), B (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.48-1.53, P = 0.615) and AB (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.37-3.45, P = 0.812) phenotypes showed lower risks compared with the O blood group, statistical analysis indicated that there was no significant association between ABO phenotypes and risk of PE. The frequency of Rh- phenotype was higher among PE patients compared with the control group. However, the association was not significant (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 0.69-4.65, P = 0.229). Adjusted ORs for age of participants and parity did not change the above-mentioned associations. Our present findings indicate that there is no association between ABO and Rh blood groups and risk of PE in Iranian population.

  5. Association of ABO blood groups and Rh factor with retinal and choroidal thickness.

    PubMed

    Teberik, Kuddusi; Eski, Mehmet Tahir

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate if ABO blood group and Rh factor have an effect on retinal and choroidal thickness. This study was designed prospectively. Retinal nerve fiber layer, retinal, and choroidal thicknesses were measured with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Retinal and choroidal thickness measurements (one subfoveal, three temporal, and three nasal) were obtained at 500-μm intervals up to 1500 μm with the caliper system. In this study, 109 male and 151 female, 260 individuals in total were included. There were 125 subjects in group A, 29 in group B, 34 in group AB, and 72 in group O. Rh factor was positive in 194 subjects and negative in 66. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding age (p = 0.667). The groups did not show any statistical difference in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. There was significant difference found for mean retinal thickness at temporal 1000 μm when four groups were compared (p = 0.037). No statistically significant difference was detected for the remaining retinal and choroidal sectoral regions. The groups did not statistically significantly differ concerning Rh factor (p > 0.05). Although we found a significant difference in retinal thickness in the temporal retina between group B with group A and group O, we suggest that both blood group and Rh factor have no effect on retinal and choroidal thickness.

  6. Post-test probability for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia based on umbilical cord blood bilirubin, direct antiglobulin test, and ABO compatibility results.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Bart; Geerts, Inge; Van Mullem, Mia; Micalessi, Isabel; Saegeman, Veroniek; Moerman, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Many hospitals opt for early postnatal discharge of newborns with a potential risk of readmission for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Assays/algorithms with the possibility to improve prediction of significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia are needed to optimize screening protocols and safe discharge of neonates. This study investigated the predictive value of umbilical cord blood (UCB) testing for significant hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal UCB bilirubin, UCB direct antiglobulin test (DAT), and blood group were determined, as well as the maternal blood group and the red blood cell antibody status. Moreover, in newborns with clinically apparent jaundice after visual assessment, plasma total bilirubin (TB) was measured. Clinical factors positively associated with UCB bilirubin were ABO incompatibility, positive DAT, presence of maternal red cell antibodies, alarming visual assessment and significant hyperbilirubinemia in the first 6 days of life. UCB bilirubin performed clinically well with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.80-0.84). The combined UCB bilirubin, DAT, and blood group analysis outperformed results of these parameters considered separately to detect significant hyperbilirubinemia and correlated exponentially with hyperbilirubinemia post-test probability. Post-test probabilities for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia can be calculated using exponential functions defined by UCB bilirubin, DAT, and ABO compatibility results. • The diagnostic value of the triad umbilical cord blood bilirubin measurement, direct antiglobulin testing and blood group analysis for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia remains unclear in literature. • Currently no guideline recommends screening for hyperbilirubinemia using umbilical cord blood. What is New: • Post-test probability for hyperbilirubinemia correlated exponentially with umbilical cord blood bilirubin in different risk groups defined by direct antiglobulin test and ABO blood group

  7. Relationship between ABO blood groups and von Willebrand factor, ADAMTS13 and factor VIII in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rios, Danyelle R A; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Figueiredo, Roberta C; Guimarães, Daniela A M; Ferreira, Cláudia N; Simões E Silva, Ana C; Carvalho, Maria G; Gomes, Karina B; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant' Ana

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that non-O blood groups subjects present an increased VTE risk as compared to those carrying O blood group. The aim of this study was to investigate the ABO blood groups influence on factor VIII (FVIII) activity, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and ADAMTS13 plasma levels in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Patients undergoing HD (N=195) and 80 healthy subjects (control group) were eligible for this cross-sectional study. The ABO blood group phenotyping was performed by the reverse technique. FVIII activity was measured through coagulometric method, and VWF and ADAMTS13 antigens were assessed by ELISA. FVIII activity and VWF levels were significantly higher and ADAMTS13 levels was decreased in HD patients, as compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.001, in three cases). HD patients carrying non-O blood groups showed a significant increase in FVIII activity (P = 0.001) and VWF levels (P < 0.001) when compared to carriers of O blood group. However, no significant difference was observed in ADAMTS13 levels (P = 0.767). In the control group, increased in FVIII activity (P = 0.001) and VWF levels (P = 0.002) and decreased in ADAMTS13 levels (P = 0.005) were observed in subjects carrying non-O blood groups as compared to carriers of O blood group.Our data confirmed that ABO blood group is an important risk factor for increased procoagulant factors in plasma, as FVIII and VWF. Admitting the possible role of kidneys in ADAMTS13 synthesis or on its metabolism, HD patients were not able to increase ADAMTS13 levels in order to compensate the increase of VWF levels mediated by ABO blood groups. Considering that non-O blood groups constitute a risk factor for thrombosis, it is reasonable to admit that A, B and AB HD patients need a careful and continuous follow-up in order to minimize thrombotic events.

  8. Study on ABO and RhD blood grouping: Comparison between conventional tile method and a new solid phase method (InTec Blood Grouping Test Kit).

    PubMed

    Yousuf, R; Abdul Ghani, S A; Abdul Khalid, N; Leong, C F

    2018-04-01

    'InTec Blood Grouping Test kit' using solid-phase technology is a new method which may be used at outdoor blood donation site or at bed side as an alternative to the conventional tile method in view of its stability at room temperature and fulfilled the criteria as point of care test. This study aimed to compare the efficiency of this solid phase method (InTec Blood Grouping Test Kit) with the conventional tile method in determining the ABO and RhD blood group of healthy donors. A total of 760 voluntary donors who attended the Blood Bank, Penang Hospital or offsite blood donation campaigns from April to May 2014 were recruited. The ABO and RhD blood groups were determined by the conventional tile method and the solid phase method, in which the tube method was used as the gold standard. For ABO blood grouping, the tile method has shown 100% concordance results with the gold standard tube method, whereas the solid-phase method only showed concordance result for 754/760 samples (99.2%). Therefore, for ABO grouping, tile method has 100% sensitivity and specificity while the solid phase method has slightly lower sensitivity of 97.7% but both with good specificity of 100%. For RhD grouping, both the tile and solid phase methods have grouped one RhD positive specimen as negative each, thus giving the sensitivity and specificity of 99.9% and 100% for both methods respectively. The 'InTec Blood Grouping Test Kit' is suitable for offsite usage because of its simplicity and user friendliness. However, further improvement in adding the internal quality control may increase the test sensitivity and validity of the test results.

  9. ABO blood groups as a prognostic factor for recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Montavon Sartorius, Céline; Schoetzau, Andreas; Kettelhack, Henriette; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville F; Fedier, André; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between ABO blood groups (BG) and risk of incidence in cancers including gynecological cancers has been widely studied, showing increased incidence risk for BG A patients. As available data are inconsistent we investigated whether BG and their anti-glycan antibodies (anti-A and anti-B) have prognostic values in gynecological cancers. We retrospectively evaluated 974 patients with gynecological cancers in three cancer centers (Switzerland and Australia) between 1974 and 2014 regarding the relationships between clinico-pathological findings and the BG. Time to disease recurrence was significantly influenced by BG in patients with ovarian (n = 282) and vulvar (n = 67) cancer. BG O or B patients showed a significantly increased risk for ovarian cancer relapse compared to A, 59% and 82%, respectively (p = 0.045; HR O vs A = 1.59 (CI 1.01-2.51) and (p = 0.036; HR A vs B = 0.55 (CI 0.32-0.96). Median time to relapse for advanced stage (n = 126) ovarian cancer patients was 18.2 months for BG O and 32.2 for A (p = 0.031; HR O vs A = 2.07 (CI 1.07-4.02)). BG also significantly influenced relapse-free survival in patients with vulvar cancer (p = 0.002), with BG O tending to have increased relapse risk compared to A (p = 0.089). Blood groups hence associate with recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer: women with BG O seem to have a lower ovarian cancer incidence, however are more likely to relapse earlier. The significance of the BG status as a prognostic value is evident and may be helpful to oncologists in prognosticating disease outcome and selecting the appropriate therapy.

  10. ABO blood groups as a prognostic factor for recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montavon Sartorius, Céline; Schoetzau, Andreas; Kettelhack, Henriette; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville F.; Fedier, André; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between ABO blood groups (BG) and risk of incidence in cancers including gynecological cancers has been widely studied, showing increased incidence risk for BG A patients. As available data are inconsistent we investigated whether BG and their anti-glycan antibodies (anti-A and anti-B) have prognostic values in gynecological cancers. We retrospectively evaluated 974 patients with gynecological cancers in three cancer centers (Switzerland and Australia) between 1974 and 2014 regarding the relationships between clinico-pathological findings and the BG. Time to disease recurrence was significantly influenced by BG in patients with ovarian (n = 282) and vulvar (n = 67) cancer. BG O or B patients showed a significantly increased risk for ovarian cancer relapse compared to A, 59% and 82%, respectively (p = 0.045; HR O vs A = 1.59 (CI 1.01–2.51) and (p = 0.036; HR A vs B = 0.55 (CI 0.32–0.96). Median time to relapse for advanced stage (n = 126) ovarian cancer patients was 18.2 months for BG O and 32.2 for A (p = 0.031; HR O vs A = 2.07 (CI 1.07–4.02)). BG also significantly influenced relapse-free survival in patients with vulvar cancer (p = 0.002), with BG O tending to have increased relapse risk compared to A (p = 0.089). Blood groups hence associate with recurrence in ovarian and vulvar cancer: women with BG O seem to have a lower ovarian cancer incidence, however are more likely to relapse earlier. The significance of the BG status as a prognostic value is evident and may be helpful to oncologists in prognosticating disease outcome and selecting the appropriate therapy. PMID:29596526

  11. Frequencies and ethnic distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups in China: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Zhang, Shikun; Wang, Qiaomei; Shen, Haiping; Zhang, Yiping; Liu, Min

    2017-12-03

    ABO and RhD blood groups are key factors affecting blood transfusion safety. The distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups varies globally, but limited data exist for ethnic distributions of these blood groups in Asian populations. We aimed to evaluate the distribution of ABO and RhD blood groups among Chinese ethnic groups. A population-based cross-sectional study. Data on ABO groups and ethnicities were obtained from the National Free Preconception Health Examination Project (NFPHEP) with participants from 220 counties of 31 provinces in China PARTICIPANTS: There were 3 832 034 participants aged 21-49 years who took part in the NFPHEP from January 2010 to December 2012 and were included in this study. The proportion of ABO and RhD blood groups among different ethnic groups was calculated. ABO and RhD blood distribution was significantly different among nine ethnic groups (P<0.001). Compared with other ethnic groups, the Yi group had more A phenotypes (34.0%), and the Manchu (33.7%) and Mongolian (33.3%) ethnic groups had more B phenotypes. The Zhuang group had the greatest proportion of O phenotypes (41.8%), followed by the Miao group (37.7%). AB phenotypes were more frequent in the Uygur ethnic group (10.6%) but lower in the Zhuang group (5.5%). Meanwhile, RhD negativity (RhD-) was greater in the Uygur group (3.3%) than in the Mongolian (0.3%) and Manchu ethnic groups (0.4%). O RhD- blood groups were more frequent in the Uygur group (0.8%) than in the other ethnic groups (0.1%-0.4%, P<0.001). ABO and RhD blood phenotypes vary across different ethnic groups in China. The diversity in the distribution of the ABO and RhD blood groups in different ethnic groups should be considered when developing rational and evidence-based strategies for blood collection and management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Accuracy of user-friendly blood typing kits tested under simulated military field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bienek, Diane R; Charlton, David G

    2011-04-01

    Rapid user-friendly ABO-Rh blood typing kits (Eldon Home Kit 2511, ABO-Rh Combination Blood Typing Experiment Kit) were evaluated to determine their accuracy when used under simulated military field conditions and after long-term storage at various temperatures and humidities. Rates of positive tests between control groups, experimental groups, and industry standards were measured and analyzed using the Fisher's exact chi-square method to identify significant differences (p < or = 0.05). When Eldon Home Kits 2511 were used in various operational conditions, the results were comparable to those obtained with the control group and with the industry standard. The performance of the ABO-Rh Combination Blood Typing Experiment Kit was adversely affected by prolonged storage in temperatures above 37 degrees C. The diagnostic performance of commercial blood typing kits varies according to product and environmental storage conditions.

  13. Significance of ABO-Rh blood groups in response and prognosis in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether ABO-Rh blood groups have significance in the treatment response and prognosis in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. We retrospectively evaluated files of 335 patients with breast cancer who were treated between 2005 and 2010. Demographic data, clinic- pathological findings, treatments employed, treatment response, and overall and disease-free survivals were reviewed. Relationships between clinic-pathological findings and blood groups were evaluated. 329 women and 6 men were included to the study. Mean age at diagnosis was 55.2 years (range: 26-86). Of the cases, 95% received chemotherapy while 70% were given radiotherapy and 60.9% adjuvant hormone therapy after surgery. Some 63.0% were A blood group, 17.6% O, 14.3% B and 5.1% AB. In addition, 82.0% of the cases were Rh-positive. Mean follow-up was 24.5 months. Median overall and progression-free survival times were 83.9 and 79.5 months, respectively. Overall and disease-free survival times were found to be higher in patients with A and O blood groups (p<0.05). However rates did not differ with the Rh-positive group (p=0.226). In univariate and multivariate analyses, ABO blood groups were identified as factors that had significant effects on overall and disease-survival times (p=0.011 and p=0.002). It was seen that overall and disease-free survival times were higher in breast cancer patients with A and O blood groups when compared to those with other blood groups. It was seen that A and O blood groups had good prognostic value in patients with breast cancer.

  14. [Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

    2001-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil.

  15. ABO incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells or anemia The recipient's and donor's blood are not compatible Urine tests show the presence ... Careful testing of donor and recipient blood types before transfusion or transplant can prevent this problem.

  16. ABO-incompatible heart transplants.

    PubMed

    Hageman, M; Michaud, N; Chinnappan, I; Klein, T; Mettler, B

    2015-04-01

    A month-old baby girl with blood type O positive received a donor heart organ from a donor with blood type B. This was the first institutional ABO-incompatible heart transplant. Infants listed for transplantation may be considered for an ABO-incompatible heart transplant based on their antibody levels and age. The United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) protocol is infants under 24 months with titers less than or equal to 1:4.(1) This recipient's anti-A and anti-B antibodies were monitored with titer assays to determine their levels; antibody levels less than 1:4 are acceptable pre-transplant in order to proceed with donor and transplant arrangements.1 Immediately prior to initiating cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), a complete whole body exchange transfusion of at least two-times the patient's circulating blood volume was performed with packed red blood cells (pRBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and 25% albumin. Titer assays were sent two minutes after initiation of full CPB and then hourly until the cross-clamp was removed. Institutionally, reperfusion of the donor heart is not restored until the antibody level from the titer assay is known and reported as less than 1:4; failing to achieve an immulogically tolerant recipient will provide conditions for hyperacute rejection. The blood collected during the transfusion exchange was immediately processed through a cell saver so the pRBC's could be re-infused to the patient during CPB, as necessary. The remainder of the transplant was performed in the same fashion as an ABO-compatible heart transplant. The patient has shown no signs of rejection following transplantation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Effects of plasma glycosyltransferase on the ABO(H) blood group antigens of human von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Kano, Taiki; Kondo, Kazunao; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsushita, Fumio; Sakai, Kazuya; Matsui, Taei

    2018-04-04

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is one of the plasma protein carrying ABO(H) blood group antigens, but the combining process of these antigens is not clear. In the present study, we examined whether plasma glycosyltransferase affects the blood group antigens on VWF. VWF expressing H-antigen (H-VWF) from blood group O and bovine serum albumin conjugated with H-antigen (H-BSA) were incubated with recombinant α1-3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (rA-transferase) and A-plasma with or without an additional UDP-GalNAc. Transformed antigens were detected by western blotting and ELISA, using an anti-A antibody. Both H-VWF and H-BSA acquired the A-antigen after incubation with rA-transferase and UDP-GalNAc. Incubation with A-plasma very weakly converted the H-antigen on BSA and VWF to A-antigen only in the presence of supplemented UDP-GalNAc. This conversion was enhanced on desialylation of H-VWF. These results indicate that sugar chains of plasma VWF can be modified by the external glycosyltransferase, but that plasma glycosyltransferase has no effect on the blood group antigens of VWF due to its low activity and the lack of donor sugars. Further, sialic acid residues of VWF may exert a protective effect against post-translational glycosylation. Our results clearly exclude the possibility that blood group antigens of VWF are constructed extracellularly in plasma.

  18. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  19. [Analysis for Discordance of Positive and Negative Blood Typing by Gel Card].

    PubMed

    Li, Cui-Ying; Xu, Hong; Lei, Hui-Fen; Liu, Juan; Li, Xiao-Wei

    2017-08-01

    To explore the method of Gel card identifying ABO blood group, determine the inconsistent cause and the distribution of disease affecting factors, and put forward a method of its solutions. To collect 240 positive and negative typing-discordant blood speciments from patients examined by Gel card and send these speciments to blood type reference laboratory for examining with the classic tube method and serological test, such as salivary blood-group substance, in order to performe genotyping method when serologic test can not be determined. Among 240 positive and negative typing-discordant blood speciments from patients examined by Gel card, 107 blood speciments were positive and negative consistent examined by false agglutination test (44.58%), 133 blood specinents were discordent examined by false agglutination (55.42%), out of them, 35 cases (14.58%) with inconsistent cold agglutination test, 22 cases (9.17%) with weakened AB antigenicity, 16 cases (6.67%) with ABO subtyping, 12 cases (5.00%) with positive direct antiglobulin test, 11 cases (4.58%) with reduced or without antibodies, 11 cases (4.58%) with false aggregation caused by drugs or protein, 11 cases (4.58%) with salivary blood-type substances, 8 cases (3.33%) with non-ABO alloantibody, and 7 cases (2.92%) with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The distribution of disease were following: blood disease (16.83%), tumor (11.88%), and cardiopulmonary diseases (11.39%); chi-square test results indicated that the distribution significantly different. The analysis of ABO blood grouping shows a variety factors influencing positive and negative blood typing, and the Gel Card identification can produc more false positive blood types. Therefore, more attention should be paid on the high incidence diseases, such as blood disease, tumor, and cardiopulmonary disease.

  20. Awareness and distribution of ABO, Rhesus blood groups and haemoglobin phenotypes among medical undergraduates in a Nigerian university.

    PubMed

    Akingbola, T S; Yuguda, S; Akinyemi, O O; Olomu, S

    2016-09-01

    In the past two decades the Nigerian government and religious organisations have put more emphasis on knowing the haemoglobin electrophoresis of school children and intending couples respectively. Knowledge of the distribution of blood groups and haemoglobin electrophoretic patterns among young people is vital for the prevention of haemoglobinopathies in the population and for providing effective blood banking services. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the frequency and awareness of blood group and haemoglobinphenotypes among a new set of fourth year clinical medical and dental students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Data, including socio-demographics, self- reported blood group and haemoglobin phenotypes, were obtained from 155 students using a self-administered questionnaire. The ABO, Rhesus (Rh) blood groups and haemoglobin electrophoresis were determined by the tile (slide) technique and cellulose acetate at alkaline phrespectively. Only 43.9% of the participants knew their blood groups while less than a third (29.7%) knew their haemoglobin phenotypes. knowledge of both their blood groups and haemoglobin phenotypes was documented in as low as 20.6% of the respondents. The frequency of haemoglobin AA, AS, AC and. CC were 78.0%, 16.8%, 3.9% and 1.3% respectively. Similarly, the distribution of blood groups were: 0 RhD positive - 47.8%;0 RhD negative- 1.9%;ARhD positive- 21.9%; A RhD negative - 1.3%; B RhD positive - 23.2%; B RhD negative -1.3% and AB RhD positive - 2.6%. No participant was AB RhD negative. Participants who bad previously donated blood and those who were females were more likely to know their blood groups and haemoglobin phenotypes respectively (p<0.05). Awareness of blood groups and haemoglobin phenotypes among the medical and dental students was poor. Documentation and routine screening for haemoglobinphenotypes as well as blood grouping, accompanied by appropriate counseling should be institutionalised in Nigeriantertiary

  1. Stability of user-friendly blood typing kits stored under typical military field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bienek, Diane R; Chang, Cheow K; Charlton, David G

    2009-10-01

    To help preserve in-theater strength within deployed military units, commercially available, rapid, user-friendly ABO-Rh blood typing kits were evaluated to determine their stability in storage conditions commonly encountered by the warfighter. Methods for environmental exposure testing were based on MIL-STD-810F. When Eldon Home Kits 2511 were exposed to various temperature/relative humidity conditions, the results were comparable to those obtained with the control group and those obtained with industry-standard methods. For the ABO-Rh Combination Blood Typing Experiment Kits, 2 of the exposure treatments rendered them unusable. In addition, a third set of exposure treatments adversely affected the kits, resulting in approximately 30% blood type misclassifications. Collectively, this evaluation of commercial blood typing kits revealed that diagnostic performance can vary between products, lots, and environmental storage conditions.

  2. Polymorphisms and allele frequencies of the ABO blood group gene among the Jomon, Epi-Jomon and Okhotsk people in Hokkaido, northern Japan, revealed by ancient DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takehiro; Kazuta, Hisako; Amano, Tetsuya; Ono, Hiroko; Ishida, Hajime; Kodera, Haruto; Matsumura, Hirofumi; Yoneda, Minoru; Dodo, Yukio; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the genetic characteristics of the ancient populations of Hokkaido, northern Japan, polymorphisms of the ABO blood group gene were analyzed for 17 Jomon/Epi-Jomon specimens and 15 Okhotsk specimens using amplified product-length polymorphism and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Five ABO alleles were identified from the Jomon/ Epi-Jomon and Okhotsk people. Allele frequencies of the Jomon/Epi-Jomon and Okhotsk people were compared with those of the modern Asian, European and Oceanic populations. The genetic relationships inferred from principal component analyses indicated that both Jomon/Epi-Jomon and Okhotsk people are included in the same group as modern Asian populations. However, the genetic characteristics of these ancient populations in Hokkaido were significantly different from each other, which is in agreement with the conclusions from mitochondrial DNA and ABCC11 gene analyses that were previously reported.

  3. ABO blood grouping: A potential risk factor for early childhood caries - A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, Lavanya; Jeevanandan, Ganesh; Subramanian, E M G

    2018-01-01

    The paradigm of etiology of early childhood caries (ECC) is shifting toward genetics. Of various inherited factors, blood group of an individual is genetically determined. The aim of the study is to determine if blood group of an individual will serve as a potential risk factor in the development of ECC. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Chennai. Blood samples were collected from a total of 500 children <71 months of age for determination of the blood group. Of which 96 children (24 per blood group) were randomly selected and were included in the study. Oral screening of the selected children was done by a pediatric dentist who was blinded to the blood group of the children. Decayed, extracted, and filling index was noted. Details on other associated factors for the development of ECC such as the socioeconomic status, oral hygiene measures, diet, and feeding practices were collected by directly interviewing the parents through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc Tukey test with significance level set at 0.05. Intergroup analysis of the associated factors showed no significant differences between the children of different blood groups. A statistically significant relation was noted between the blood groups and development of ECC (P = 0.025). Blood group is a potential risk indicator for the development of ECC.

  4. Cryopreservation of Genotyped ABO Subgroup RBCs for Quality Assurance of ABO Grouping Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sinyoung; Song, Sungwook; Kim, Hyun Ok

    2018-03-01

    Quality assurance of newly developed or manufactured blood grouping reagents with reagent red blood cells (RBCs) is crucial in the process of product approval by governmental agency. However, RBCs with rare blood group are not easily available in the fresh state. We investigated the feasibility of cryopreserved and genotyped ABO subgroup RBC reagents for quality assurance purpose. We obtained RBCs from 10 volunteers with ABO subgroup phenotypes. The ABO genotypes and alleles were analyzed by the sequencing of ABO exon 6 and 7. Using the 40% wt/vol high-glycerol method, RBC units were cryopreserved as reagent RBCs into separate cryovials at -80°C. The potency titrations were performed before and after cryopreservation for 6 months and 2 years to evaluate the stability of ABO antigens. ABO genotypes of cryopreserved RBCs were cis-AB01/O01 (n=2), cis-AB01/B101 (n=1), Aw10/B101 (n=2), A201/A201 (n=1), A205/B101 (n=1), A102/B112 (n=1), and A101/B306 (n=1). These ABO subgroup alleles are exclusively present in East-Asian population except for the known ABO*A201 allele. The potency titers of cryopreserved RBCs were not significantly different between pre-freezing and post-freezing. The national performance evaluation of ABO blood grouping reagents could be performed with cryopreserved and genotyped reagent RBCs. © 2018 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. Radiation-induced nausea and vomiting: Is ABO blood group as important as radiation and patient-related factors? An observational study.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mohsen; Namimoghadam, Amir; Korouni, Roghaye; Fashiri, Paria; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Elahimanesh, Farideh; Amiri, Fatemeh; Moradi, Ghobad

    2016-08-01

    Despite the improvements in cancer screening and treatment, it still remains as one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Nausea and vomiting as the side effects of different cancer treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy, are multifactorial and could affect the treatment continuation and patient quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the possible linkage between ABO blood groups and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV), also its incidence and affecting factors.One hundred twenty-eight patients referring to Tohid hospital of Sanandaj, Iran, were selected and the patients and treatment-related factors were determined in a cross-sectional study. Patients' nausea and vomiting were recorded from the onset of treatment until 1 week after treatment accomplishment. Also, previous possible nausea and vomiting were recorded. The frequencies of nausea and vomiting and their peak time were examined during the treatment period.The association between ABO blood group and the incidence of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV) were significant and it seems that A blood group patients are the most vulnerable individuals to these symptoms. The association between Rhesus antigen and the time of maximum severity of RINV may indicate that Rhesus antigen affects the time of maximum severity of RINV. The incidence of RINV was not affected by karnofsky performance status, but it was related to the severity of RINV. Furthermore, among the factors affecting the incidence of nausea and vomiting, nausea and vomiting during patient's previous chemotherapy, radiotherapy region, and background gastrointestinal disease were shown to be three important factors.In addition to familiar RINV-affecting factors, ABO blood group may play an important role and these results address the needs for further studies with larger sample size.

  6. A dispermic chimera was identified in a healthy man with mixed field agglutination reaction in ABO blood grouping and mosaic 46, XY/46, XX karyotype.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaozhen; Ying, Yanlin; Xu, Xianguo; Liu, Ying; Chen, Zhimei; Lan, Xiaofei; Ma, Kairong; He, Ji; Zhu, Faming; Lv, Hangjun; Yan, Lixing

    2013-04-01

    Chimerism is the presence of two or more genetically distinct cell populations in one organism. Here, we reported the identification of dispermic chimerism in a 25-year-old male. Blood grouping was performed with standard gel centrifugation test cards. ABO and HLA-A,-B,-C,-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci genotyping was determined with PCR sequence-based typing. A quantitative analysis of dual red cells populations was measured by flow cytometer. The karyotype was analyzed by G-banded chromosomes. Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis was performed on blood, buccal mucosal and hair shafts samples. A mixed-field agglutination with anti-B antibody was observed with gel centrifugation tests, which showed a double populations of O and B groups RBCs. Two groups RBCs were also observed by flow cytometer with nearly 90% O group cells and 10% B group cells. The normal O01,O02,B101 alleles were identified in DNA sample of the proband. STR analysis revealed three alleles for D8S1179,D3S1358,TH01,D13S317,D16S539,D2S1338,D19S433,TPOX and D18S51 loci. HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 loci had three alleles and a karyotypic mosaic was found with 60% 46, XY and 40% 46, XX karyotype in the proband. In all studies, the third allele was attributable to a dual paternal contribution. A individual with dispermic chimerism was identified, which would generate by fertilization of an oocyte and the corresponding second polar body by two different sperms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison in anesthetic effects of propofol among patients with different ABO blood groups.

    PubMed

    Du, Yiri; Shi, Haixia; Yu, Jianshe

    2017-05-01

    Our study was aimed to investigate anesthetic effects of propofol in patients with different blood groups.A total of 72 participants were enrolled from patients arranged for surgeries of cholecystectomy, tonsillectomy, and spinal operation. Each blood group (A, B, AB, and O) contained 18 participants. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and bispectral index (BIS) were assayed with Philips monitor. These indexes were observed before propofol anesthesia (T0), and then were recorded when concentration of propofol was 1 μg/mL (T1), 2 μg/mL (T2), 3 μg/mL (T3), and 4 μg/mL (T4). The differences in MAP, HR, and BIS at T0 among groups were compared with the χ test. Multiple comparisons were adopted to calculate the differences in MAP, HR, and BIS between groups at T1, T2, T3, and T4.No significant differences in age, sex, and weight of all groups were found (P > .05). Before propofol anesthesia (T0), all the participants exhibited no differences in MAP, HR, and BIS (P > .05). Subsequently, we found obvious differences in ΔMAP, ΔHR, and ΔBIS between groups. The patients in the B blood group showed highest ΔMAP and ΔHR at each time point (P < .05 for both). As for ΔBIS, patients in A blood group exhibited highest value at T3 and T4 (P < .05).The blood group remarkably affects the anesthetic effects of propofol.

  8. Paper-based device for rapid typing of secondary human blood groups.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaosi; Then, Whui Lyn; Li, Lizi; Shen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of bioactive paper for typing of secondary human blood groups. Our recent work on using bioactive paper for human blood typing has led to the discovery of a new method for identifying haemagglutination of red blood cells. The primary human blood groups, i.e., ABO and RhD groups, have been successfully typed with this method. Clinically, however, many secondary blood groups can also cause fatal blood transfusion accidents, despite the fact that the haemagglutination reactions of secondary blood groups are generally weaker than those of the primary blood groups. We describe the design of a user-friendly sensor for rapid typing of secondary blood groups using bioactive paper. We also present mechanistic insights into interactions between secondary blood group antibodies and red blood cells obtained using confocal microscopy. Haemagglutination patterns under different conditions are revealed for optimization of the assay conditions.

  9. Reassessment of ABO blood group, sex, and age on laboratory parameters used to diagnose von Willebrand disorder: potential influence on the diagnosis vs the potential association with risk of thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Soltani, Soma; McDonald, Jane; Grezchnik, Ella; Easton, Leanne; Favaloro, James W C

    2005-12-01

    We reassessed the influence of ABO blood group, sex, and age on plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen, vWF:ristocetin cofactor, vWF:collagen binding assay, and factor VIII coagulant (FVIII:C). Data show that levels of vWF and FVIII:C increase with increasing age (P < .001 for all parameters) and that the ABO blood group influences plasma levels such that O group levels are significantly less than non-O group levels. There was no significant association with sex and Rh status. The selection of normal ranges based on ABO blood groups may influence the clinical diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (vWD) but might not be clinically relevant or help identify people at increased risk of bleeding. Differences in ABO-related ranges were more extensive at the high end of the ranges. This is of particular interest because high levels of vWF and FVIII are associated with thrombosis risk, and an ABO relationship also has been described. O group individuals may or may not be at greater risk for bleeding (they have lower levels of vWF and FVIII:C) and are more likely to be diagnosed with vWD. It also is possible that O group status may be protective for thrombosis.

  10. Comparative study of substrate and product binding to the human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Soya, Naoto; Shoemaker, Glen K; Palcic, Monica M; Klassen, John S

    2009-11-01

    The first comparative thermodynamic study of the human blood group glycosyltransferases, alpha-(1-->3)-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and alpha-(1-->3)-galactosyltransferase (GTB), interacting with donor substrates, donor and acceptor analogs, and trisaccharide products in vitro is reported. The binding constants, measured at 24 degrees C with the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ES-MS) assay, provide new insights into these model GTs and their interactions with substrate and product. Notably, the recombinant forms of GTA and GTB used in this study are shown to exist as homodimers, stabilized by noncovalent interactions at neutral pH. In the absence of divalent metal ion, neither GTA nor GTB exhibits any appreciable affinity for its native donors (UDP-GalNAc, UDP-Gal). Upon introduction of Mn(2+), both donors undergo enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis in the presence of either GTA or GTB. Hydrolysis of UDP-GalNAc in the presence of GTA proceeds very rapidly under the solution conditions investigated and a binding constant could not be directly measured. In contrast, the rate of hydrolysis of UDP-Gal in the presence of GTB is significantly slower and, utilizing a modified approach to analyze the ES-MS data, a binding constant of 2 x 10(4) M(-1) was established. GTA and GTB bind the donor analogs UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-Glc with affinities similar to those measured for UDP-Gal and UDP-GalNAc (GTB only), suggesting that the native donors and donor analogs bind to the GTA and GTB through similar interactions. The binding constant determined for GTA and UDP-GlcNAc (approximately 1 x 10(4) M(-1)), therefore, provides an estimate for the binding constant for GTA and UDP-GalNAc. Binding of GTA and GTB with the A and B trisaccharide products was also investigated for the first time. In the absence of UDP and Mn(2+), both GTA and GTB recognize their respective trisaccharide products but with a low affinity approximately 10(3) M(-1); the presence of UDP and Mn(2

  11. ABO grouping of highly-dilute blood by the absorption-elution technique using nitrocellulose beads--application to a casework investigation.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, N; Matoba, R; Kobayashi, T; Matsuda, H; Yoshida, K; Fukita, K

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports a homicidal case in which the absorption-elution technique using nitrocellulose beads as immunoadsorbents was successfully applied to ABO grouping from highly-diluted blood. A 21-year-old man was found dead in bed while staying in a hotel. He had multiple wounds over the entire body. By autopsy the cause of death was decided to be traumatic shock. The victim's blood group was A. A bucket filled with faint-colored water was found at the scene. By means of the absorption-elution technique using nitrocellulose beads the water was grouped as B. Later, a 32-year-old man staying in the hotel together with the victim was suspected and arrested. The suspect's blood group was B. He confessed that he had injured himself in the hands with a knife during the struggle and washed them in the water.

  12. A and B antigen levels acquired by group O donor-derived erythrocytes following ABO-non-identical transfusion or minor ABO-incompatible haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hult, A K; Dykes, J H; Storry, J R; Olsson, M L

    2017-06-01

    ABO-incompatible haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) presents a challenge to blood component transfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the weak blood group A or B antigen expression by donor-derived group O red blood cells (RBC) observed following transfusion or minor ABO-incompatible HSCT. In addition, in vitro experiments were performed to elucidate possible mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. A sensitive flow cytometry assay for the semi-quantification of RBC A/B antigen levels was used to assess patient samples and evaluate in vitro experiments. Analysis of blood samples from patients, originally typed as A, B and AB but recently transplanted or transfused with cells from group O donors, revealed the A antigen expression on donor-derived RBC, ranging from very low levels in non-secretor individuals to almost subgroup A x -like profiles in group A secretors. The B antigen expression was less readily detectable. In vitro experiments, in which group O donor RBC were incubated with (i) group A/B secretor/non-secretor donor plasma or (ii) group A/B donor RBC in the absence of plasma, supported the proposed adsorption of A/B antigen-bearing glycolipids from secretor plasma but also indicated a secretor-independent mechanism for A/B antigen acquisition as well as direct cell-to-cell transfer of ABO antigens. The in vivo conversion of donor-derived blood group O RBC to ABO subgroup-like RBC after transfusion or minor ABO-incompatible HSCT raises the question of appropriate component selection. Based on these data, AB plasma should be transfused following ABO-incompatible HSCT. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  13. Distribution of blood type among dengue hemorrhagic fever patients in Semarang City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Erna; Endah wahyuningsih, Nur; Murwani, Retno; Purdianingrum, Julliana; Adib Mubarak, M.; Budiharjo, Anto

    2018-05-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus which is transmitted through bites of Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus [1]’ In Indonesia particularly, there has not been much research on ABO blood type associated with dengue fever occurrence[2]. This study aims to see the ABO blood group description and its relation to the incidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Semarang. The DHF sample cases were obtained from three hospitals in Semarang city (n=39), from the period of March to May 2017 and the control groups were obtained from healthy respondents with matched age, sex, and the district location (n=39). The data was analyzed by Chi-Square test. The frequency distribution of blood groups in DHF patients was 6 type A (15.4%), 10 type B (25.6%), 7 type AB (17.9%) and 16 type O (41.0%). In control there were 10 type A (25.6%), 12 type B (30.8%), 9 type AB (23.1%) and 8 type O (20.5%). Comparison between blood group B, AB and O to blood group A resulted in the p-value of 0.875, 1.00, and 0.136 which not significant. Although DHF cases at three hospitals in Semarang are not related to blood type, the highest percentage of the patients had O blood group (41%).

  14. ABO and Rhesus blood groups and risk of endometriosis in a French Caucasian population of 633 patients living in the same geographic area.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Bruno; Chartier, Mélanie; Souza, Carlos; Santulli, Pietro; Lafay-Pillet, Marie-Christine; de Ziegler, Dominique; Chapron, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The identification of epidemiological factors increasing the risk of endometriosis could shorten the time to diagnosis. Specific blood groups may be more common in patients with endometriosis. We designed a cross-sectional study of 633 Caucasian women living in the same geographic area. Study group included 311 patients with histologically proven endometriosis. Control group included 322 patients without endometriosis as checked during surgery. Frequencies of ABO and Rhesus groups in the study and control groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. We observed a higher proportion of Rh-negative women in the study group, as compared to healthy controls. Multivariate analysis showed that Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis (aOR = 1.90; 95% CI: 1.20-2.90). There was no significant difference in ABO group distribution between patients and controls. There was no difference when taking into account either the clinical forms (superficial endometriosis, endometrioma, and deep infiltration endometriosis) or the rAFS stages. Rh-negative women are twice as likely to develop endometriosis. Chromosome 1p, which contains the genes coding for the Rhesus, could also harbor endometriosis susceptibility genes.

  15. [Teaching design and practice of human blood type traits in genetics comprehensive laboratory course].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Hu, Dong-mei; Yu, Da-de; Dong, Ming-liang; Li, Yun; Fan, Ying-ming; Wang, Yan-wei; Zhang, Jin-feng

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive laboratory courses, which enable students to aptly apply theoretic knowledge and master experiment skills, play an important role in the present educational reform of laboratory courses. We utilized human ABO blood type as the experimental subject, and designed the experiment--"Molecular Genotyping of Human ABO Blood Type and Analysis of Population Genetic Equilibrium". In the experiment, DNA in mucosal cells is extracted from students' saliva, and each student's genotype is identified using a series of molecular genetics technologies, including PCR amplification of target fragments, enzymatic digestion, and electrophoretic separation. Then, taking the whole class as an analogous Mendel population, a survey of genotype frequency of ABO blood type is conducted, followed with analyses of various population genetic parameters using Popgene. Through the open laboratory course, students can not only master molecular genetic experimental skills, but also improve their understanding of theoretic knowledge through independent design and optimization of molecular techniques. After five years of research and practice, a stable experimental system of molecular genetics has been established to identify six genotypes of ABO blood types, namely I(A)I(A), I(A)i, I(B)I(B), I(B)i, I(A)I(B) and ii. Laboratory courses of molecular and population genetics have been integrated by calculating the frequencies of the six genotypes and three multiple alleles and testing population genetic equilibrium. The goal of the open laboratory course with independent design and implementation by the students has been achieved. This laboratory course has proved effective and received good reviews from the students. It could be applied as a genetics laboratory course for the biology majors directly, and its ideas and methods could be promoted and applied to other biological laboratory courses.

  16. Types of Blood Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Donation Programs Advertise With Us Sponsorship Opportunities Education. Advocacy. Innovation. What We Do Board of Directors Staff Our Member Blood Centers Our Partners Foundation for America's Blood Centers ADRP Donate blood and save someone's ... ROOM BLOG CAREERS CONTACT 2018 Summer ...

  17. The impact of blood type O on mortality of severe trauma patients: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Wataru; Endo, Akira; Koguchi, Hazuki; Sugimoto, Momoko; Murata, Kiyoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2018-05-02

    Recent studies have implicated the differences in the ABO blood system as a potential risk for various diseases, including hemostatic disorders and hemorrhage. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the difference in the ABO blood type on mortality in patients with severe trauma. A retrospective observational study was conducted in two tertiary emergency critical care medical centers in Japan. Patients with trauma with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15 were included. The association between the different blood types (type O versus other blood types) and the outcomes of all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortalities (exsanguination, traumatic brain injury, and others), ventilator-free days (VFD), and total transfusion volume were evaluated using univariate and multivariate competing-risk regression models. Moreover, the impact of blood type O on the outcomes was assessed using regression coefficients in the multivariate analysis adjusted for age, ISS, and the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). A total of 901 patients were included in this study. The study population was divided based on the ABO blood type: type O, 284 (32%); type A, 285 (32%); type B, 209 (23%); and type AB, 123 (13%). Blood type O was associated with high mortality (28% in patients with blood type O versus 11% in patients with other blood types; p <  0.001). Moreover, this association was observed in a multivariate model (adjusted odds ratio = 2.86, 95% confidence interval 1.84-4.46; p <  0.001). The impact of blood type O on all-cause in-hospital mortality was comparable to 12 increases in the ISS, 1.5 decreases in the RTS, and 26 increases in age. Furthermore, blood type O was significantly associated with higher cause-specific mortalities and shorter VFD compared with the other blood types; however, a significant difference was not observed in the transfusion volume between the two groups. Blood type O was significantly associated with high mortality in severe trauma patients and

  18. Transfusion Support for ABO-Incompatible Progenitor Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kopko, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary ABO-incompatible transplants comprise up to 50% of allogeneic progenitor cell transplants. Major, minor and bidirectional ABO-incompatible transplants each have unique complications that can occur, including hemolysis at the time of progenitor cell infusion, hemolysis during donor engraftment, passenger lymphocyte syndrome, delayed red blood cell engraftment, and pure red cell aplasia. Appropriate transfusion support during the different phases of the allogeneic progenitor cell transplant process is an important part of ABO-incompatible transplantation. PMID:27022318

  19. Blood typing South American camelids.

    PubMed

    Miller, W J; Hollander, P J; Franklin, W L

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary blood typing tests were made on New World camelids, guanacos, llamas, and two hybrids. Erythrocyte samples were tested against a battery of cattle blood typing reagents. Three different reagents were prepared from rabbit anti-erythrocyte sera. Transferrin variation and lectin polymorphism also were observed. No naturally occurring isoantibodies were found. Blood typing tests of New World camelids were shown to be feasible for studies of taxonomic relationships.

  20. Validation of paper-based assay for rapid blood typing.

    PubMed

    Al-Tamimi, Mohammad; Shen, Wei; Zeineddine, Rania; Tran, Huy; Garnier, Gil

    2012-02-07

    We developed and validated a new paper-based assay for the detection of human blood type. Our method involves spotting a 3 μL blood sample on a paper surface where grouping antibodies have already been introduced. A thin film chromatograph tank was used to chromatographically elute the blood spot with 0.9% NaCl buffer for 10 min by capillary absorption. Agglutinated red blood cells (RBCs) were fixed on the paper substrate, resulting in a high optical density of the spot, with no visual trace in the buffer wicking path. Conversely, nonagglutinated RBCs could easily be eluted by the buffer and had low optical density of the spot and clearly visible trace of RBCs in the buffer wicking path. Different paper substrates had comparable ability to fix agglutinated blood, while a more porous substrate like Kleenex paper had enhanced ability to elute nonagglutinated blood. Using optimized conditions, a rapid assay for detection of blood groups was developed by spotting blood to antibodies absorbed to paper and eluted with 200 μL of 0.9% NaCl buffer directly by pipetting. RBCs fixation on paper accurately detected blood groups (ABO and RhD) using ascending buffer for 10 min or using a rapid elution step in 100/100 blood samples including 4 weak AB and 4 weak RhD samples. The assay has excellent reproducibility where the same blood group was obtained in 26 samples assessed in 2 different days. Agglutinated blood fixation on porous paper substrate provides a new, simple, and sensitive assay for rapid detection of blood group for point-of-care applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients and its relationship with HIV infection, ABO blood groups and life style in a university hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Feleke; Kassu, Afework; Mengistu, Getahun; Adugna, Solomon; Andualem, Berhanu; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Ota, Fusao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) among dyspeptic patients and to assess the relationship between H pylori infection, blood group, HIV infection and life style of the patients. METHODS: In a hospital-based cross-sectional study, patients attending Outpatient Department of University of Gondar Hospital were enrolled. Socio-demographic information was collected using questionnaires. Serum was analyzed for anti-H pylori IgG antibodies using a commercial kit. HIV serostatus was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood grouping was performed by slide agglutination tests. RESULTS: A total of 215 dyspeptic patients were included in the study. One hundred and sixteen patients (54%) were females and 99 (46%) were males. Anti-H pylori IgG antibodies were detected in sera of 184 (85.6%) patients. The prevalence was significantly higher in patients aged 50 years and above. Twenty point five percent of the patients were found to be seropositive for HIV. No significant association was found between sex, ABO blood groups, consumption of spicy diets, socio-economic status and seropositivity for H pylori. However, alcohol consumption was significantly associated with H pylori serology. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of H pylori infection is associated with a history of alcohol intake and older age. The effect of different diet, alcohol and socioeconomic status as risk factors for H pylori infection needs further study. PMID:16610007

  2. ABO, Rhesus, and Kell Antigens, Alleles, and Haplotypes in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Debapriya; Datta, Suvro Sankha; Montemayor, Celina; Bhattacharya, Prasun; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Flegel, Willy A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the blood group antigens in the population of eastern India. Frequencies of some common alleles and haplotypes were unknown. We describe phenotype, allele, and haplotype frequencies in the state of West Bengal, India. Methods We tested 1,528 blood donors at the Medical College Hospital, Kolkata. The common antigens of the ABO, Rhesus, and Kell blood group systems were determined by standard serologic methods in tubes. Allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated with an iterative method that yielded maximum-likelihood estimates under the assumption of a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Results The prevalence of ABO antigens were B (34%), O (32%), A (25%), and AB (9%) with ABO allele frequencies for O = 0.567, A = 0.189, and B = 0.244. The D antigen (RH1) was observed in 96.6% of the blood donors with RH haplotype frequencies, such as for CDe = 0.688809, cde = 0.16983 and CdE = 0.000654. The K antigen (K1) was observed in 12 donors (0.79%) with KEL allele frequencies for K = 0.004 and k = 0.996. Conclusions: For the Bengali population living in the south of West Bengal, we established the frequencies of the major clinically relevant antigens in the ABO, Rhesus, and Kell blood group systems and derived estimates for the underlying ABO and KEL alleles and RH haplotypes. Such blood donor screening will improve the availability of compatible red cell units for transfusion. Our approach using widely available routine methods can readily be applied in other regions, where the sufficient supply of blood typed for the Rh and K antigens is lacking. PMID:29593462

  3. Molecular blood group typing in Banjar, Jawa, Mandailing and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abd Gani, Rahayu; Manaf, Siti Mariam; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Chambers, Geoffrey Keith; Norazmi, Mohd Noor; Edinur, Hisham Atan

    2015-08-01

    In this study we genotyped ABO, Rhesus, Kell, Kidd and Duffy blood group loci in DNA samples from 120 unrelated individuals representing four Malay subethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia (Banjar: n = 30, Jawa: n = 30, Mandailing: n = 30 and Kelantan: n = 30). Analyses were performed using commercial polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing kits (BAG Health Care GmbH, Lich, Germany). Overall, the present study has successfully compiled blood group datasets for the four Malay subethnic groups and used the datasets for studying ancestry and health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of ABO/Rh blood groups and their association with hepatitis B virus infection in 3.8 million Chinese adults: A population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Zhang, S; Liu, M; Wang, Q; Shen, H; Zhang, Y

    2018-04-01

    ABO and Rh blood groups play a vital role in blood transfusion safety and clinical practice and are thought to be linked with disease susceptibility. The results from previous studies that focused on the association between blood groups and HBV infection remain controversial. China has the world's largest burden of HBV infection. We assessed the distribution of ABO/Rh blood groups in Chinese adults and examined the association between these groups and HBV infection. We did a nationwide cross-sectional study using data from a physical check-up programme from 31 provinces examined between 2010 and 2012. ELISA was used to test for HBsAg in serologic samples. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate aOR of the association between ABO and Rh blood groups and HBV infection. Among 3 827 125 participants, the proportion of participants with blood group A was highest (30.54%), followed by O (30.37%), B (29.42%) and AB (9.66%). A total of 38 907 (1.02%) were Rh-D negative. The prevalence of HBsAg in blood groups O, A, B and AB were 6.34%, 5.55%, 5.18% and 5.06%, respectively. HBsAg prevalence was 5.65% in Rh-D-positive and 3.96% in Rh-D-negative participants. After controlling for other potential risk factors, multivariate models showed that participants with blood group O (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.20-1.25) were at higher risk of HBV infection compared with group AB. Rh-D-positive participants (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.37-1.52) were at higher risk of HBV infection than Rh-D-negative participants. The associations between ABO/Rh blood groups and HBV infection were similar in subgroup analysis. The proportions of O, A, B and AB blood groups were approximately 3:3:3:1, and nearly 1 in 100 people was Rh-D negative among Chinese adults. Blood group O and Rh-D positivity were both associated with increased HBV infection. The risk of HBV infection and blood safety should be taken into consideration in clinical practice, especially when transfusing

  5. Quantitative and multiplexed detection for blood typing based on quantum dot-magnetic bead assay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Ya-Han; Li, Ru-Qing; Lu, Hua; Zhao, Shu-Ming; Jiang, Tian-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and reliable blood grouping is essential for safe blood transfusion. However, conventional methods are qualitative and use only single-antigen detection. We overcame these limitations by developing a simple, quantitative, and multiplexed detection method for blood grouping using quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic beads. In the QD fluorescence assay (QFA), blood group A and B antigens were quantified using QD labeling and magnetic beads, and the blood groups were identified according to the R value (the value was calculated with the fluorescence intensity from dual QD labeling) of A and B antigens. The optimized performance of QFA was established by blood typing 791 clinical samples. Quantitative and multiplexed detection for blood group antigens can be completed within 35 min with more than 10 5 red blood cells. When conditions are optimized, the assay performance is satisfactory for weak samples. The coefficients of variation between and within days were less than 10% and the reproducibility was good. The ABO blood groups of 791 clinical samples were identified by QFA, and the accuracy obtained was 100% compared with the tube test. Receiver-operating characteristic curves revealed that the QFA has high sensitivity and specificity toward clinical samples, and the cutoff points of the R value of A and B antigens were 1.483 and 1.576, respectively. In this study, we reported a novel quantitative and multiplexed method for the identification of ABO blood groups and presented an effective alternative for quantitative blood typing. This method can be used as an effective tool to improve blood typing and further guarantee clinical transfusion safety.

  6. Glycosyltransferases A and B: Four Critical Amino Acids Determine Blood Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Natisha L.; Palcic, Monica M.; Evans, Stephen V.

    2005-12-01

    Human A, B, and O blood type is determined by the presence or absence of distinct carbohydrate structures on red blood cells. Type O individuals have α-fucose(1→2)galactose disaccharides [O(H) structures] on their cell surfaces while in type A or B individuals, the O antigen is capped by the addition of an α- N -acetylgalactosamine or α-galactose residue, respectively. The addition of these monosaccharides is catalyzed by glycosyltransferase A (GTA) or glycosyltransferase B (GTB). These are homologous enzymes differing by only 4 amino acids out of 354 that change the specificity from GTA to GTB. In this review the chemistry of the blood group ABO system and the role of GTA, GTB, and the four critical amino acids in determining blood group status are discussed. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  7. Impact of rituximab desensitization on blood-type-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation: a Japanese multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H; Teramukai, S; Haga, H; Tanabe, M; Mori, A; Ikegami, T; Kawagishi, N; Ohdan, H; Kasahara, M; Umeshita, K

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of rituximab prophylaxis on outcomes of ABO-blood-type-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (ABO-I LDLT) in 381 adult patients in the Japanese registry of ABO-I LDLT. Patients underwent dual or triple immunosuppression with or without B cell desensitization therapies such as plasmapheresis, splenectomy, local infusion, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. Era before 2005, intensive care unit-bound status, high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and absence of rituximab prophylaxis were significant risk factors for overall survival and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the univariate analysis. After adjustment for era effects in the multivariate analysis, only absence of rituximab prophylaxis was a significant risk factor for AMR, and there were no significant risk factors for survival. Rituximab prophylaxis significantly decreased the incidence of AMR, especially hepatic necrosis (p < 0.001). In the rituximab group, other B cell desensitization therapies had no add-on effects. Multiple or large rituximab doses significantly increased the incidence of infection, and early administration had no advantage. In conclusion, outcomes in adult ABO-I LDLT have significantly improved in the latest era coincident with the introduction of rituximab. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. The relationship between helminth infections and low haemoglobin levels in Ethiopian children with blood type A.

    PubMed

    Degarege, A; Yimam, Y; Madhivanan, P; Erko, B

    2017-05-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the nature of association of ABO blood type with helminth infection and related reduction in haemoglobin concentration. Stool samples were collected from 403 school-age children attending Tikur Wuha Elementary School from February to April 2011. Helminth infection was examined using formol-ether concentration and thick Kato-Katz (two slides per stool specimen) techniques. Haemoglobin level was determined using a HemoCue machine and ABO blood type was determined using the antisera haemagglutination test. Nutritional status was assessed using height and weight measurements. Out of 403 children examined, 169, 120, 96 and 18 had blood type O, A, B and AB, respectively. The prevalences of helminth infections were 46.9% for hookworm, 24.6% for Schistosoma mansoni, 4.2% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 1.7% for Trichuris trichiura and 58.3% for any helminth species. The relative odds of infection with at least one helminth species was significantly higher among children with blood type A (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.28-3.45) or blood type B (AOR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.22-3.56) as compared to children with blood type O. Among children infected with helminths, mean haemoglobin concentration was lower in those with blood type A than those with blood type O (β, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.72 to -0.01). The relative odds of hookworm infection (AOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.08-2.92) and related reduction in haemogobin levels (β, -0.45; 95% CI, -0.84 to -0.04) was higher among children with blood type A as compared to those with blood type O. Although the difference was not significant, the relative odds of S. mansoni or A. lumbricoides infections and related reduction in haemoglobin levels was also higher in children with blood type A or B as compared to children with blood type O. In conclusion, children with blood type A are associated with an increased risk of helminth, particularly hookworm, infection and related reduction

  9. Clinical evaluation of the endothelial tie-2 crossmatch in ABO compatible and ABO incompatible renal transplants.

    PubMed

    Kafetzi, Maria L; Boletis, John N; Melexopoulou, Christine A; Tsakris, Athanassios; Iniotaki, Aliki G; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2013-11-01

    The necessity of detection of other than the classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and MHC class I-related chain A (MICA) directed antibodies prior to organ transplantation has already been repeatedly reported. A commercial flow cytometric endothelial crossmatch (CM) using isolated peripheral blood tie-2 positive cells provides a tool to detect non-MHC antibodies in addition to antibodies directed to MHC class I and II. The vast majority of circulating tie-2 positive cells expresses HLA-DR but not the A, B blood group antigens. Tie-2 cells are circulating surrogate endothelial cells. In this retrospective study we evaluated the endothelial CM in 51 renal transplantations, 30 with ABO compatible grafts and 21 with ABO incompatible grafts. Fifteen of the ABO compatible recipients (group A) developed unexplained rejection episodes (RE) while the remaining 15 had no RE (group B). Five cases of group A and none of group B had a positive tie-2 CM before transplantation (p=0.042). A positive tie-2 CM was also correlated with graft failure in ABO compatible transplants (p=0.02). No significant correlation was found between a positive pre-transplant tie-2 CM and RE in the ABO incompatible group. This study strongly suggest that a positive tie-2 CM may predict post-transplantation complications in ABO compatible grafts while negative reactions are not predictive. The test is not significantly correlated with RE in ABO incompatible grafts possibly due to applied desensitization. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Yes, we should keep ABO agglutination test within bedside transfusion checks].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G

    2008-11-01

    ABO incompatible transfusions are still a frequent cause of serious adverse transfusion reactions. Bedside check is intended to detect patient errors and prevent ABO mismatch. France is one of the few countries that includes ABO agglutination test for red blood cells in bedside checks. Evaluation of this ABO agglutination test, performed with a special card, shows that, on the field, despite frequent users' mishandling, it can detect up to 93% of ABO incompatibilities. This is not enough to rely on this sole test for bedside checks. But, linking it with an another test, currently, checks that the right blood is given to the right patient, rises the sensitivity of the whole bedside procedure up to an estimated 99.65%, for detection of ABO incompatibilities. This linkage has been introduced in the French regulation in 2003. Since then, the incidence of ABO incompatible transfusions has decreased dramatically and faster than in any other country, so France has now, probably, the lowest rate of ABO incompatible transfusions. The investigation of the few ABO accidents that still occur, shows that professionals have always bypassed this linkage. On the other hand, introducing bedside recipient and blood products barcode or radio-chip checks in all the 1500 French hospitals, though technically possible, would provide very little enhancement and lead to major difficulties and expenses. Linkage of ABO agglutination test to patient and blood checks within the bedside procedure has proved to be efficient and should be kept.

  11. Chemotherapy-induced B-cell depletion in hepatoblastoma patients undergoing ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Mali, Vidyadhar Padmakar; Rahayatri, Tri Hening; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Uchida, Hajime; Shigeta, Takanobu; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kasahara, Mureo

    2016-05-01

    LT from ABO-I donors requires preconditioning regimens to prevent postoperative catastrophic AMR. NAC for HBL is known to cause myelosuppression leading to a reduction in the number and function of lymphocytes. We investigated this chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression in HBL patients listed for LT from ABO-I donors with reference to the kinetics of B, T cells, and anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers. Between 2005 and 2015, of the 319 patients who underwent LDLT at our institute, 12 were indicated for unresectable HBL. Three patients with unresectable HBL who underwent LDLT from ABO-I donors are included in this study. Immunosuppression consisted of a standard regime of tacrolimus and low-dose steroids as in ABO compatible/identical LDLT. No additional preoperative therapies for B-cell depletion were used. Absolute lymphocyte counts, lymphocyte subsets (including CD20+ B cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD8+ T cells), and anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers were measured before LDLT and postoperatively. The median age at diagnosis was 19 months (range, 3-31 months). The median follow-up was seven months (range, 6-15 months). The median interval from the last NAC to LDLT was 33 days (range, 25-52 days). The median interval from LDLT to adjuvant chemotherapy was 28 days (range, 22-36 days). The counts of CD20+ B cells before LDLT were depleted to median 5 cells/mm(3) (range, 0-6 cells/mm(3)). There was a transient rebound in the CD20+ B cell counts on day seven (maximum of 82 cells/mm(3)) followed by a decline starting at 14 days after LDLT that was sustained for the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Anti-ABO blood type isoagglutinin titers were lowered to between 1:1 and 1:16 before LDLT and remained low for the duration of follow-up in this study. All of the three patients remained in good health without either acute cellular or AMR after LDLT. The B-cell depletion that occurs after cisplatin-based chemotherapy for HBL may help accomplish safe ABO-I LDLT

  12. Glycosyltransfer in mutants of putative catalytic residue Glu303 of the human ABO(H) A and B blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB proceeds through a labile active site.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Ryan J; Gagnon, Susannah M L; Polakowski, Robert; Rose, Natisha L; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Letts, James A; Johal, Asha R; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana N; Palcic, Monica M; Evans, Stephen V

    2017-04-01

    The homologous glycosyltransferases α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GTB) carry out the final synthetic step of the closely related human ABO(H) blood group A and B antigens. The catalytic mechanism of these model retaining enzymes remains under debate, where Glu303 has been suggested to act as a putative nucleophile in a double displacement mechanism, a local dipole stabilizing the intermediate in an orthogonal associative mechanism or a general base to stabilize the reactive oxocarbenium ion-like intermediate in an SNi-like mechanism. Kinetic analysis of GTA and GTB point mutants E303C, E303D, E303Q and E303A shows that despite the enzymes having nearly identical sequences, the corresponding mutants of GTA/GTB have up to a 13-fold difference in their residual activities relative to wild type. High-resolution single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal, surprisingly, that the mutated Cys, Asp and Gln functional groups are no more than 0.8 Å further from the anomeric carbon of donor substrate compared to wild type. However, complicating the analysis is the observation that Glu303 itself plays a critical role in maintaining the stability of a strained "double-turn" in the active site through several hydrogen bonds, and any mutation other than E303Q leads to significantly higher thermal motion or even disorder in the substrate recognition pockets. Thus, there is a remarkable juxtaposition of the mutants E303C and E303D, which retain significant activity despite disrupted active site architecture, with GTB/E303Q, which maintains active site architecture but exhibits zero activity. These findings indicate that nucleophilicity at position 303 is more catalytically valuable than active site stability and highlight the mechanistic elasticity of these enzymes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The influence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in differential recognition of inhibitory acceptor analogs by human ABO(H) blood group A and B glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa P; Seto, Nina O L; Cai, Ye; Leinala, Eeva K; Borisova, Svetlana N; Palcic, Monica M; Evans, Stephen V

    2003-12-05

    Human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB catalyze the final monosaccharide addition in the biosynthesis of the human A and B blood group antigens. GTA and GTB utilize a common acceptor, the H antigen disaccharide alpha-l-Fucp-(1-->2)-beta-d-Galp-OR, but different donors, where GTA transfers GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc and GTB transfers Gal from UDP-Gal. GTA and GTB are two of the most homologous enzymes known to transfer different donors and differ in only 4 amino acid residues, but one in particular (Leu/Met-266) has been shown to dominate the selection between donor sugars. The structures of the A and B glycosyltransferases have been determined to high resolution in complex with two inhibitory acceptor analogs alpha-l-Fucp(1-->2)-beta-d-(3-deoxy)-Galp-OR and alpha-l-Fucp-(1-->2)-beta-d-(3-amino)-Galp-OR, in which the 3-hydroxyl moiety of the Gal ring has been replaced by hydrogen or an amino group, respectively. Remarkably, although the 3-deoxy inhibitor occupies the same conformation and position observed for the native H antigen in GTA and GTB, the 3-amino analog is recognized differently by the two enzymes. The 3-amino substitution introduces a novel intramolecular hydrogen bond between O2' on Fuc and N3' on Gal, which alters the minimum-energy conformation of the inhibitor. In the absence of UDP, the 3-amino analog can be accommodated by either GTA or GTB with the l-Fuc residue partially occupying the vacant UDP binding site. However, in the presence of UDP, the analog is forced to abandon the intramolecular hydrogen bond, and the l-Fuc residue is shifted to a less ordered conformation. Further, the residue Leu/Met-266 that was thought important only in distinguishing between donor substrates is observed to interact differently with the 3-amino acceptor analog in GTA and GTB. These observations explain why the 3-deoxy analog acts as a competitive inhibitor of the glycosyltransferase reaction, whereas the 3-amino analog displays complex modes of

  14. High Resolution Structures of the Human ABO(H) Blood Group Enzymes in Complex with Donor Analogs Reveal That the Enzymes Utilize Multiple Donor Conformations to Bind Substrates in a Stepwise Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Susannah M. L.; Meloncelli, Peter J.; Zheng, Ruixiang B.; Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Johal, Asha R.; Borisova, Svetlana N.; Lowary, Todd L.; Evans, Stephen V.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous glycosyltransferases α-(1→3)-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-(1→3)-galactosyltransferase (GTB) catalyze the final step in ABO(H) blood group A and B antigen synthesis through sugar transfer from activated donor to the H antigen acceptor. These enzymes have a GT-A fold type with characteristic mobile polypeptide loops that cover the active site upon substrate binding and, despite intense investigation, many aspects of substrate specificity and catalysis remain unclear. The structures of GTA, GTB, and their chimeras have been determined to between 1.55 and 1.39 Å resolution in complex with natural donors UDP-Gal, UDP-Glc and, in an attempt to overcome one of the common problems associated with three-dimensional studies, the non-hydrolyzable donor analog UDP-phosphono-galactose (UDP-C-Gal). Whereas the uracil moieties of the donors are observed to maintain a constant location, the sugar moieties lie in four distinct conformations, varying from extended to the “tucked under” conformation associated with catalysis, each stabilized by different hydrogen bonding partners with the enzyme. Further, several structures show clear evidence that the donor sugar is disordered over two of the observed conformations and so provide evidence for stepwise insertion into the active site. Although the natural donors can both assume the tucked under conformation in complex with enzyme, UDP-C-Gal cannot. Whereas UDP-C-Gal was designed to be “isosteric” with natural donor, the small differences in structure imposed by changing the epimeric oxygen atom to carbon appear to render the enzyme incapable of binding the analog in the active conformation and so preclude its use as a substrate mimic in GTA and GTB. PMID:26374898

  15. Specific issues in living donor kidney transplantation: ABO - incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Thaiss, Friedrich

    2009-12-29

    Pre-emptive living kidney transplantation is the best choice of therapy to treat patients with advanced renal insufficiency. Unfortunately in up to one third of all cases kidney donation was refused due to blood group incompatibility. Limitations in donor availability for kidney transplantation therefore require that ABO-incompatible transplantation is safely established. This has changed when a new protocol was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2001. Almost 400 ABO-incompatible transplantations have since been performed in more than 20 centers with this protocol in Europe. ABO-incompatible living kidney transplantation can now be offered to our patients with advanced kidney disease as a safe procedure. To get more insight into the role ABO-incompatible organ transplantation might play in the near future transplantation centers currently involved in these processes should share their data to answer the unresolved issues we are concerned. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and blood groups in a population of African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Leske, M Cristina

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the possible relationship of hypertension and diabetes with the ABO, Rhesus, and Duffy blood groups, which are known markers of African ancestry. Population-based study. A random sample of 1253 Barbados residents, > or = 40 years of age. Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure >140 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure >90 mm Hg or use of antihypertensive treatment; type 2 diabetes was defined as a glycosylated hemoglobin level >10% and/or a history of treatment in those >30 years of age. In logistic regression analyses, elevated diastolic blood pressure was positively associated with years of age (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval CI 1.02-1.05), the Rhesus D+ antigen (OR 2.68, 95% CI 1.21-5.97) and body mass index (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.19-1.96), but negatively associated with the ABO blood group A allele (OR 0.68, 95% CI .48-.97). A separate logistic regression model indicated that the likelihood of diabetes increased with years of age (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.04), hypertension (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.10-2.20), body mass index (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.29-2.20), and waist-hip ratio (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.05-1.75), but decreased with presence of the Rhesus C+ antigen (OR .66, 95% CI .44-.97). The associations of diabetes and hypertension to these blood groups support possible genetic influences on both conditions in this and similar African-origin populations; however, further investigations in other settings are necessary to more fully elucidate these findings.

  17. Acquired Downregulation of Donor-Specific Antibody Production After ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, M; Saito, K; Nakagawa, Y; Imai, N; Ito, Y; Aoki, T; Kamimura, M; Narita, I; Tomita, Y; Takahashi, K

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of long-term B cell immunity against donor blood group antigens in recipients who undergo ABO-incompatible (ABOi) living-donor kidney transplantation (LKTx) is unknown. To address this question, we evaluated serial anti-A and anti-B antibody titers in 50 adult recipients. Donor-specific antibody titers remained low (≤1:4) in 42 recipients (84%). However, antibodies against nondonor blood group antigens were continuously produced in recipients with blood type O. We stimulated recipients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro to investigate whether B cells produced antibodies against donor blood group antigens in the absence of graft adsorption in vivo. Antibodies in cell culture supernatant were measured using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Thirty-five healthy volunteers and 57 recipients who underwent ABO-compatible LKTx served as controls. Antibody production in vitro against donor blood group antigens by cells from ABOi LKTx patients was lower than in the control groups. Immunoglobulin deposits were undetectable in biopsies of grafts of eight recipients with low antibody titers (≤1:4) after ABOi LKTx. One patient with blood type A1 who received a second ABOi LKTx from a type B donor did not produce B-specific antibodies. These findings suggest diminished donor-specific antibody production function in the setting of adult ABOi LKTx. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. A 3.0-kb deletion including an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 of the ABO blood group gene in an individual with the Bm phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sano, R; Kuboya, E; Nakajima, T; Takahashi, Y; Takahashi, K; Kubo, R; Kominato, Y; Takeshita, H; Yamao, H; Kishida, T; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Uchikawa, M

    2015-04-01

    We developed a sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR) for detection of a 5.8-kb deletion (B(m) 5.8) involving an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 of the ABO blood group gene. Using this SSP-PCR, we performed genetic analysis of 382 individuals with Bm or ABm. The 5.8-kb deletion was found in 380 individuals, and disruption of the GATA motif in the regulatory element was found in one individual. Furthermore, a novel 3.0-kb deletion involving the element (B(m) 3.0) was demonstrated in the remaining individual. Comparisons of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in intron 1 between B(m) 5.8 and B(m) 3.0 suggested that these deletions occurred independently. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kohei; Obara, Hideaki; Sugita, Kayoko; Shinoda, Masahiro; Kitago, Minoru; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kentaro; Mori, Takehiko; Takano, Yaoko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Itano, Osamu; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-07-07

    Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi), a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium, is an enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species. We report the first case of H. cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after liver transplantation. A 48-year-old male, who had been a dog breeder for 15 years, underwent ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation for hepatitis C virus-induced decompensated cirrhosis using an anti-hepatitis B core antibody-positive graft. The patient was preoperatively administered rituximab and underwent plasma exchange twice to overcome blood type incompatibility. After discharge, he had been doing well with immunosuppression therapy comprising cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid according to the ABO-incompatible protocol of our institution. However, 7 mo after transplantation, he was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of recurrent cellulitis on the left lower extremity, and H. cinaedi was detected by both blood culture and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Antibiotics improved his symptoms, and he was discharged at day 30 after admission. Clinicians should be more aware of H. cinaedi in immunocompromised patients, such as ABO-incompatible transplant recipients.

  20. INDIVIDUAL BLOOD DIFFERENCES IN MEXICAN INDIANS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE Rh BLOOD TYPES AND Hr FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Alexander S.; Zepeda, J. Preciado; Sonn, Eve B.; Polivka, H. R.

    1945-01-01

    98 Mexican Indians were tested for the blood properties A-B-O, A1-A2, M-N, P, Rh'-Rh''-Rh0-rh, and Hr. Of the 98 Indians, 90.8 per cent belonged to group 0, 6.1 per cent belonged to A1, and 3.1 per cent to group B. There were 61.2 per cent of type M, 3.1 per cent of type N, and 35.7 per cent of type MN. Of the 95 Mexican Indians tested with anti-P serum, 21.1 per cent were found to lack the P agglutinogen. In tests for the Rh blood types, 48.0 per cent of the Indians were found to belong to type Rh1, 9.2 per cent to type Rh2, 41.8 per cent to type Rh1Rh2, and 1 per cent to type Rh0. There were no bloods giving intermediate reactions. Of the 95 Indians tested for the Hr factor 44.2 per cent were found to lack this property. The reactions for the Rh blood types and Hr factor were correlated with each other and the results supported the conclusion of Race et al. that in addition to the six standard allelic genes and the so called intermediate genes, there is one or possibly two genes having the property of determining agglutinogens which react with anti-Rh' and anti-Rh'' sera, but not with anti-Hr serum. This gene (or genes) appears to be relatively common among Mexican Indians (approximately 3.3 per cent) in contrast to its rareness in white individuals. PMID:19871476

  1. Paper diagnostic for instantaneous blood typing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Thouas, George; Shen, Wei; Whyte, Gordon; Garnier, Gil

    2010-05-15

    Agglutinated blood transports differently onto paper than stable blood with well dispersed red cells. This difference was investigated to develop instantaneous blood typing tests using specific antibody-antigen interactions to trigger blood agglutination. Two series of experiments were performed. The first related the level of agglutination and the fluidic properties of blood on its transport in paper. Blood samples were mixed at different ratios with specific and nonspecific antibodies; a droplet of each mixture was deposited onto a filter paper strip, and the kinetics of wicking and red cell separation were measured. Agglutinated blood phase separated, with the red blood cells (RBC) forming a distinct spot upon contact with paper while the plasma wicked; in contrast, stable blood suspensions wicked uniformly. The second study analyzed the wicking and the chromatographic separation of droplets of blood deposited onto paper strips pretreated with specific and nonspecific antibodies. Drastic differences in transport occurred. Blood agglutinated by interaction with one of its specific antibodies phase separated, causing a chromatographic separation. The red cells wicked very little while the plasma wicked at a faster rate than the original blood sample. Blood agglutination and wicking in paper followed the concepts of colloids chemistry. The immunoglobin M antibodies agglutinated the red blood cells by polymer bridging, upon selective adsorption on the specific antigen at their surface. The transport kinetics was viscosity controlled, with the viscosity of red cells drastically increasing upon blood agglutination. Three arm prototypes were investigated for single-step blood typing.

  2. Comprehensive haematological indices reference intervals for a healthy Omani population: First comprehensive study in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and Middle Eastern countries based on age, gender and ABO blood group comparison.

    PubMed

    Al-Mawali, Adhra; Pinto, Avinash Daniel; Al-Busaidi, Raiya; Al-Lawati, Rabab H; Morsi, Magdi

    2018-01-01

    Reference intervals for venous blood parameters differs with age, gender, geographic region, and ethnic groups. Hence local laboratory reference intervals are important to improve the diagnostic accuracy of health assessments and diseases. However, there have been no comprehensive published reference intervals established in Oman, the Gulf Cooperation Council or Middle Eastern countries. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for full blood count in healthy Omani adults. Venous blood specimens were collected from 2202 healthy individuals aged 18 to 69 years from January 2012 to April 2017, and analysed by Sysmex XS-1000i and Cell-Dyn Sapphire automated haematology analysers. Results were statistically analysed and compared by gender, age, and ABO blood group. The lower and upper reference limits of the haematology reference intervals were established at the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles respectively. Reference intervals were calculated for 17 haematology parameters which included red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet parameters. Red blood cell (RBC), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelet and platelet haematocrit counts of the healthy donors were significantly different between males and females at all ages (p < 0.05), with males having higher mean values of RBC, HGB and HCT than females. Other complete blood count parameters showed no significant differences between genders, age groups, instruments, or blood groups. Our study showed a lower haemoglobin limit for the normal reference interval in males and females than the currently used in Oman. Data from this study established specific reference intervals which could be considered for general use in Oman. The differences in haematology reference intervals highlights the necessity to establish reference intervals for venous blood parameters among the healthy population in each country or at least in each region.

  3. Toxoplasmosis-associated difference in intelligence and personality in men depends on their Rhesus blood group but not ABO blood group.

    PubMed

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Preiss, Marek; Klose, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The parasite Toxoplasma gondii influences the behaviour of infected animals and probably also personality of infected humans. Subjects with a Rhesus-positive blood group are protected against certain behavioural effects associated with Toxoplasma infection, including the deterioration of reaction times and personality factor shift. Here, we searched for differences in the toxoplasmosis-associated effects between RhD-positive and RhD-negative subjects by testing 502 soldiers with two personality tests and two intelligence tests. The infected subjects expressed lower levels of all potentially pathognomic factors measured with the N-70 questionnaire and in neurasthenia measured with NEO-PI-R. The RhD-positive, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed lower while RhD-negative, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed higher intelligence than their Toxoplasma-free peers. The observed Toxoplasma-associated differences were always larger in RhD-negative than in RhD-positive subjects. RhD phenotype plays an important role in the strength and direction of association between latent toxoplasmosis and not only psychomotor performance, but also personality and intelligence.

  4. Toxoplasmosis-Associated Difference in Intelligence and Personality in Men Depends on Their Rhesus Blood Group but Not ABO Blood Group

    PubMed Central

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Preiss, Marek; Klose, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Background The parasite Toxoplasma gondii influences the behaviour of infected animals and probably also personality of infected humans. Subjects with a Rhesus-positive blood group are protected against certain behavioural effects associated with Toxoplasma infection, including the deterioration of reaction times and personality factor shift. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we searched for differences in the toxoplasmosis-associated effects between RhD-positive and RhD-negative subjects by testing 502 soldiers with two personality tests and two intelligence tests. The infected subjects expressed lower levels of all potentially pathognomic factors measured with the N-70 questionnaire and in neurasthenia measured with NEO-PI-R. The RhD-positive, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed lower while RhD-negative, Toxoplasma-infected subjects expressed higher intelligence than their Toxoplasma-free peers. The observed Toxoplasma-associated differences were always larger in RhD-negative than in RhD-positive subjects. Conclusions RhD phenotype plays an important role in the strength and direction of association between latent toxoplasmosis and not only psychomotor performance, but also personality and intelligence. PMID:23593448

  5. Automated point-of-care testing for ABO agglutination test: proof of concept and validation.

    PubMed

    El Kenz, H; Corazza, F

    2015-07-01

    ABO-incompatible red blood cell transfusions still represent an important hazard in transfusion medicine. Therefore, some countries have introduced a systematic bedside ABO agglutination test checking that the right blood is given to the right patient. However, this strategy requires an extremely time-consuming learning programme and relies on a subjective interpretation of ABO test cards agglutination. We developed a prototype of a fully automated device performing the bedside agglutination test that could be completed by reading of a barcoded wristband. This POCT checks the ABO compatibility between the patient and the blood bag. Proof of concept and analytical validation of the prototype has been completed on 451 blood samples: 238 donor packed red blood cells, 137 consecutive unselected patients for whom a blood group determination had been ordered and on 76 patient samples selected with pathology that could possibly interfere with or impair performances of the assay. We observed 100% concordance for ABO blood groups between the POCT and the laboratory instrument. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of ABO determination with a simple POCT device eliminating manipulation and subjective interpretation responsible for transfusion errors. This device should be linked to the blood bank system allowing all cross-check of the results. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress ABO transcription in vitro, leading to reduced expression of the antigens.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Handa, Hiroshi; Tsukada, Junichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2017-03-01

    The ABO system is of fundamental importance in the fields of transfusion and transplantation and has apparent associations with certain diseases, including cardiovascular disorders. ABO expression is reduced in the late phase of erythroid differentiation in vitro, whereas histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote cell differentiation. Therefore, whether or not HDACIs could reduce the amount of ABO transcripts and A or B antigens is an intriguing issue. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions were carried out for the ABO transcripts in erythroid-lineage K562 and epithelial-lineage KATOIII cells after incubation with HDACIs, such as sodium butyrate, panobinostat, vorinostat, and sodium valproate. Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to evaluate the amounts of antigen in KATOIII cells treated with panobinostat. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and luciferase assays were performed on both cell types to examine the mechanisms of ABO suppression. HDACIs reduced the ABO transcripts in both K562 and KATOIII cells, with panobinostat exerting the most significant effect. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a decrease in B-antigen expression on panobinostat-treated KATOIII cells. ChIP assays indicated that panobinostat altered the modification of histones in the transcriptional regulatory regions of ABO, and luciferase assays demonstrated reduced activity of these elements. ABO transcription seems to be regulated by an epigenetic mechanism. Panobinostat appears to suppress ABO transcription, reducing the amount of antigens on the surface of cultured cells. © 2016 AABB.

  7. Changing practice: red blood cell typing by molecular methods for patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Casas, Jessica; Friedman, David F; Jackson, Tannoa; Vege, Sunitha; Westhoff, Connie M; Chou, Stella T

    2015-06-01

    Extended red blood cell (RBC) antigen matching is recommended to limit alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). DNA-based testing to predict blood group phenotypes has enhanced availability of antigen-negative donor units and improved typing of transfused patients, but replacement of routine serologic typing for non-ABO antigens with molecular typing for patients has not been reported. This study compared the historical RBC antigen phenotypes obtained by hemagglutination methods with genotype predictions in 494 patients with SCD. For discrepant results, repeat serologic testing was performed and/or investigated by gene sequencing for silent or variant alleles. Seventy-one typing discrepancies were identified among 6360 antigen comparisons (1.1%). New specimens for repeat serologic testing were obtained for 66 discrepancies and retyping agreed with the genotype in 64 cases. One repeat Jk(b-) serologic phenotype, predicted Jk(b+) by genotype, was found by direct sequencing of JK to be a silenced allele, and one N typing discrepancy remains under investigation. Fifteen false-negative serologic results were associated with alleles encoding weak antigens or single-dose Fy(b) expression. DNA-based RBC typing provided improved accuracy and expanded information on RBC antigens compared to hemagglutination methods, leading to its implementation as the primary method for extended RBC typing for patients with SCD at our institution. © 2015 AABB.

  8. High-resolution crystal structures and STD NMR mapping of human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases in complex with trisaccharide reaction products suggest a molecular basis for product release.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Susannah M L; Legg, Max S G; Sindhuwinata, Nora; Letts, James A; Johal, Asha R; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana N; Palcic, Monica M; Peters, Thomas; Evans, Stephen V

    2017-10-01

    The human ABO(H) blood group A- and B-synthesizing glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB have been structurally characterized to high resolution in complex with their respective trisaccharide antigen products. These findings are particularly timely and relevant given the dearth of glycosyltransferase structures collected in complex with their saccharide reaction products. GTA and GTB utilize the same acceptor substrates, oligosaccharides terminating with α-l-Fucp-(1→2)-β-d-Galp-OR (where R is a glycolipid or glycoprotein), but use distinct UDP donor sugars, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-galactose, to generate the blood group A (α-l-Fucp-(1→2)[α-d-GalNAcp-(1→3)]-β-d-Galp-OR) and blood group B (α-l-Fucp-(1→2)[α-d-Galp-(1→3)]-β-d-Galp-OR) determinant structures, respectively. Structures of GTA and GTB in complex with their respective trisaccharide products reveal a conflict between the transferred sugar monosaccharide and the β-phosphate of the UDP donor. Mapping of the binding epitopes by saturation transfer difference NMR measurements yielded data consistent with the X-ray structural results. Taken together these data suggest a mechanism of product release where monosaccharide transfer to the H-antigen acceptor induces active site disorder and ejection of the UDP leaving group prior to trisaccharide egress. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Application of a Multivariant, Caucasian-Specific, Genotyped Donor Panel for Performance Validation of MDmulticard®, ID-System®, and Scangel® RhD/ABO Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Christoph; Rainer, Esther; Pircher, Elfriede; Markut, Lydia; Körmöczi, Günther F.; Jungbauer, Christof; Wessin, Dietmar; Klinghofer, Roswitha; Schennach, Harald; Schwind, Peter; Schönitzer, Diether

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Validations of routinely used serological typing methods require intense performance evaluations typically including large numbers of samples before routine application. However, such evaluations could be improved considering information about the frequency of standard blood groups and their variants. Methods Using RHD and ABO population genetic data, a Caucasian-specific donor panel was compiled for a performance comparison of the three RhD and ABO serological typing methods MDmulticard (Medion Diagnostics), ID-System (DiaMed) and ScanGel (Bio-Rad). The final test panel included standard and variant RHD and ABO genotypes, e.g. RhD categories, partial and weak RhDs, RhD DELs, and ABO samples, mainly to interpret weak serological reactivity for blood group A specificity. All samples were from individuals recorded in our local DNA blood group typing database. Results For ‘standard’ blood groups, results of performance were clearly interpretable for all three serological methods compared. However, when focusing on specific variant phenotypes, pronounced differences in reaction strengths and specificities were observed between them. Conclusions A genetically and ethnically predefined donor test panel consisting of 93 individual samples only, delivered highly significant results for serological performance comparisons. Such small panels offer impressive representative powers, higher as such based on statistical chances and large numbers only. PMID:21113264

  10. ABO alleles are linked with haplotypes of an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 with a few exceptions attributable to genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Sano, R; Takahashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Kubo, R; Kobayashi, M; Takahashi, K; Takeshita, H; Kominato, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigation of transcriptional regulation of the ABO genes has identified a candidate erythroid cell-specific regulatory element, named the +5·8-kb site, in the first intron of ABO. Six haplotypes of the site have been reported previously. The present genetic population study demonstrated that each haplotype was mostly linked with specific ABO alleles with a few exceptions, possibly as a result of hybrid formation between common ABO alleles. Thus, investigation of these haplotypes could provide a clue to further elucidation of ABO alleles. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. AB0 blood types: impact on development of prosthetic mechanical valve thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Astarcıoğlu, Mehmet Ali; Kalçık, Macit; Yesin, Mahmut; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Şen, Taner; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The non-O alleles of the ABO genotype have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We aimed to assess the association between blood group status and prosthetic valve thrombosis. Methods: The association between AB0 blood group status and prosthetic valve thrombosis was assessed in this retrospective study. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed in 149 patients with a diagnosis of prosthetic valve thrombosis and in 192 control subjects. Results: Non-0 blood group type (p<0.001), presence of NYHA class III-IV status (p<0.001), and central nervous system (p<0.001) and non-central nervous system (p<0.001) emboli were significantly more prevalent in prosthetic valve thrombosis patients than in the control subjects. The incidence of ineffective anticoagulation was higher in patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis than in controls (p<0.001), as was the presence of moderate to severe left atrial spontaneous echo contrast (p<0.001). The non-0 blood prosthetic valve thrombosis subgroup had a higher incidence of obstructive thrombi and central nervous system thrombotic events than having 0 blood prosthetic valve thrombosis subgroup. Non-0 blood group, ineffective anticoagulation, left atrial spontaneous echo contrast, and a poor NYHA functional capacity were identified to be the predictors of prosthetic valve thrombosis. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that patients with non-0 compared with 0 blood groups have higher incidence of prosthetic valve thrombosis and central nervous system embolism and similar rates of non-central nervous system embolism at presentation compared with 0 blood group type. Thus, non-O blood group may be a risk factor that may be prone to the development of prosthetic valve thrombosis in patients with prosthetic heart valves. PMID:27488753

  12. Blood type gene locus has no influence on ACE association with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Braae, Anne; Medway, Christopher; Carrasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven; Kehoe, Patrick G; Morgan, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The ABO blood group locus was recently found to contribute independently and via interactions with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene variation to plasma levels of ACE. Variation in ACE has previously been not only implicated as individually conferring susceptibility for Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also proposed to confer risk via interactions with other as yet unknown genes. More recently, larger studies have not supported ACE as a risk factor for AD, whereas the role of ACE pathway in AD has come under increased levels of scrutiny with respect to various aspects of AD pathology and possible therapies. We explored the potential combined involvement of ABO and ACE variations in the genetic susceptibility of 2067 AD cases compared with 1376 nondemented elderly. Including the effects of ABO haplotype did not provide any evidence for the genetic association of ACE with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcomes Following ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation Performed After Desensitization by Nonantigen-Specific Immunoadsorption.

    PubMed

    Becker, Luis E; Siebert, Daniela; Süsal, Caner; Opelz, Gerhard; Leo, Albrecht; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Schemmer, Peter; Schaefer, Sebastian Markus; Klein, Katrin; Beimler, Jörg; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat; Morath, Christian

    2015-11-01

    For desensitization of ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients we recently proposed nonantigen-specific immunoadsorption (IA) and rituximab. We now compared clinical outcomes of 34 ABO-incompatible living-donor kidney recipients who were transplanted using this protocol with that of 68 matched ABO-compatible patients. In addition, we analyzed efficacy and cost of nonantigen-specific as compared to blood group antigen-specific IA. Before desensitization, the median isoagglutinin titer of 34 ABO-incompatible patients was 1:64 (Coombs technique). Patients received a median of 7 preoperative IA treatments. Twenty-four patients had a median of 2 additional plasmapheresis treatments to reach the preoperative target isoagglutinin titer of 1:8 or less. After a median postoperative follow-up of 22 months, overall graft survival in the ABO-incompatible group was not significantly different from that in ABO-compatible patients (log-rank P = 0.20), whereas patient survival tended to be lower (log-rank P = 0.05). The incidence of rejection episodes was 15% in both groups. The ABO-incompatible kidney recipients had a higher incidence of BK virus replication (P = 0.04) and nephropathy (P = 0.01) and showed more often colonization with multidrug resistant bacteria (P = 0.02). In comparison to blood group antigen-specific IA, nonantigen-specific IA showed equal efficacy but was associated with reduction in cost. Clinical outcomes of ABO-incompatible patients desensitized with a nonantigen-specific IA device and rituximab do not differ from that of matched ABO-compatible patients although a trend toward reduced patient survival was noted. Special attention must be paid to the higher incidence of BK virus infection in recipients of ABO-incompatible grafts.

  14. Associations of ABO, D, and Lewis blood groups and HLA Class I and Class II alleles with West Nile virus Lineage 2 disease outcome in Greece, 2010 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Politis, Constantina; Parara, Myrsini; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hasapopoulou, Eleni; Iniotaki, Aliki; Siorenta, Alexandra; Richardson, Clive; Papa, Anna; Kavallierou, Lilian; Asariotou, Marina; Katsarou, Olga; Mougiou, Athina; Dadiotis, Lukas; Alexandropoulou, Zafeiria; Megalou, Angelica; Magoula, Evangelia; Papadopoulou, Margarita; Pervanidou, Danai; Baka, Agoritsa; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2016-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection, commonly asymptomatic, may cause mild West Nile fever (WNF) or potentially fatal neuroinvasive disease (WNND). An outbreak of 262 cases of the new Lineage 2 strain in Greece in 2010 continued with high mortality (17%) in WNND. The objective was to investigate ABO, D, and Lewis blood groups, as well as HLA Class I and Class II alleles, in relation to WNV Lineage 2 disease morbidity. A cohort of 132 Greek WNV cases in 2010 to 2013 (65% male; mean age 64 years; 41% WNF, 59% WNND) was compared to 51,339 healthy WNV-negative blood donors and 246 healthy subjects. Blood group A was more common in WNV cases (51%) than blood donors (39%) and group O less common (32% vs. 42%). D negativity within group A was higher in WNV than in blood donors (18% vs. 10%, p = 0.044). The frequency of secretors (Lewis(a-b+)) was 60% in WNV and 68% in donors (p = 0.16). HLA alleles C*08, DRB1*O4:O5, and DQB1*O2 occurred significantly less frequently in WNV than controls (p < 0.05 unadjusted for multiple testing) and DRB1*10:O1 more frequently (p = 0.039). This first study of symptomatic WNV Lineage 2 suggests A/D negativity as a new risk factor associated with WNV infection and level of morbidity. Further studies are required of the possibility that HLA C*08, DRB1*O4:O5, and DQB1*O2 are protective alleles and DRB1*10:O1 a "susceptible" allele to WNV infection and the role of secretor status in relation to WNV infection. © 2016 AABB.

  15. Blood Type Biochemistry and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, D Rose; Sumner, Susan CJ

    2016-01-01

    Associations between blood type and disease have been studied since the early 1900s when researchers determined that antibodies and antigens are inherited. In the 1950s, the chemical identification of the carbohydrate structure of surface antigens led to the understanding of biosynthetic pathways. The blood type is defined by oligosaccharide structures, which are specific to the antigens, thus, blood group antigens are secondary gene products, while the primary gene products are various glycosyltransferase enzymes that attach the sugar molecules to the oligosaccharide chain. Blood group antigens are found on red blood cells, platelets, leukocytes, plasma proteins, certain tissues, and various cell surface enzymes, and also exist in soluble form in body secretions such as breast milk, seminal fluid, saliva, sweat, gastric secretions, urine, and amniotic fluid. Recent advances in technology, biochemistry, and genetics have clarified the functional classifications of human blood group antigens, the structure of the A, B, H, and Lewis determinants and the enzymes that produce them, and the association of blood group antigens with disease risks. Further research to identify differences in the biochemical composition of blood group antigens, and the relationship to risks for disease, can be important for the identification of targets for the development of nutritional intervention strategies, or the identification of druggable targets. PMID:27599872

  16. Automated typing of red blood cell and platelet antigens: a whole-genome sequencing study.

    PubMed

    Lane, William J; Westhoff, Connie M; Gleadall, Nicholas S; Aguad, Maria; Smeland-Wagman, Robin; Vege, Sunitha; Simmons, Daimon P; Mah, Helen H; Lebo, Matthew S; Walter, Klaudia; Soranzo, Nicole; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Danesh, John; Roberts, David J; Watkins, Nick A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Butterworth, Adam S; Kaufman, Richard M; Rehm, Heidi L; Silberstein, Leslie E; Green, Robert C

    2018-06-01

    There are more than 300 known red blood cell (RBC) antigens and 33 platelet antigens that differ between individuals. Sensitisation to antigens is a serious complication that can occur in prenatal medicine and after blood transfusion, particularly for patients who require multiple transfusions. Although pre-transfusion compatibility testing largely relies on serological methods, reagents are not available for many antigens. Methods based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have been used, but typing for ABO and Rh-the most important blood groups-cannot be done with SNP typing alone. We aimed to develop a novel method based on whole-genome sequencing to identify RBC and platelet antigens. This whole-genome sequencing study is a subanalysis of data from patients in the whole-genome sequencing arm of the MedSeq Project randomised controlled trial (NCT01736566) with no measured patient outcomes. We created a database of molecular changes in RBC and platelet antigens and developed an automated antigen-typing algorithm based on whole-genome sequencing (bloodTyper). This algorithm was iteratively improved to address cis-trans haplotype ambiguities and homologous gene alignments. Whole-genome sequencing data from 110 MedSeq participants (30 × depth) were used to initially validate bloodTyper through comparison with conventional serology and SNP methods for typing of 38 RBC antigens in 12 blood-group systems and 22 human platelet antigens. bloodTyper was further validated with whole-genome sequencing data from 200 INTERVAL trial participants (15 × depth) with serological comparisons. We iteratively improved bloodTyper by comparing its typing results with conventional serological and SNP typing in three rounds of testing. The initial whole-genome sequencing typing algorithm was 99·5% concordant across the first 20 MedSeq genomes. Addressing discordances led to development of an improved algorithm that was 99·8% concordant for the remaining 90 Med

  17. [No relationship between blood type and personality: evidence from large-scale surveys in Japan and the US].

    PubMed

    Nawata, Kengo

    2014-06-01

    Despite the widespread popular belief in Japan about a relationship between personality and ABO blood type, this association has not been empirically substantiated. This study provides more robust evidence that there is no relationship between blood type and personality, through a secondary analysis of large-scale survey data. Recent data (after 2000) were collected using large-scale random sampling from over 10,000 people in total from both Japan and the US. Effect sizes were calculated. Japanese datasets from 2004 (N = 2,878-2,938), and 2,005 (N = 3,618-3,692) as well as one dataset from the US in 2004 (N = 3,037-3,092) were used. In all the datasets, 65 of 68 items yielded non-significant differences between blood groups. Effect sizes (eta2) were less than .003. This means that blood type explained less than 0.3% of the total variance in personality. These results show the non-relevance of blood type for personality.

  18. Efficacy of Uncross-Matched Type O Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion to Traumatic Shock Patients: a Propensity Score Match Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung Hee; Choi, Donghwan; Cho, Jayun; Kwon, Junsik; Huh, Yo; Moon, Jonghwan; Kim, Younghwan; Jung, Kyoungwon; Lee, John Cook Jong

    2017-12-01

    A new blood bank system was established in our trauma bay, which allowed immediate utilization of uncross-matched type O packed red blood cells (UORBCs). We investigated the efficacy of UORBC compared to that of the ABO type-specific packed red blood cells (ABO RBCs) from before the bank was installed. From March 2016 to February 2017, data from trauma patients who received UORBCs in the trauma bay were compared with those of trauma patients who received ABO RBCs from January 2013 to December 2015. Propensity matching was used to overcome retrospective bias. The primary outcome was 24-hour mortality, while the secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS). Data from 252 patients were reviewed and UORBCs were administered to 64 patients. The time to transfusion from emergency room admission was shorter in the UORBC group (11 [7-16] minutes vs. 44 [29-72] minutes, P < 0.001). After propensity matching, 47 patients were included in each group. The 24-hour mortality (4 [8.5%] vs. 9 [13.8%], P = 0.135), in-hospital mortality (14 [29.8%] vs. 18 [38.3%], P = 0.384), and ICU LOS (9 [4-19] days vs. 5 [0-19] days, P = 0.155) did not differ significantly between groups. The utilization of UORBCs resulted in a faster transfusion but did not significantly improve the clinical outcomes in traumatic shock patients in this study. However, the tendency for lower mortality in the UORBC group suggested the need for a large study. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  19. Outcome of ABO-incompatible adult living-donor liver transplantation for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-In; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Kang, Woo-Hyoung; Cho, Hwui-Dong; Jwa, Eun-Kyoung; Kwon, Jae-Hyun; Tak, Eun-Young; Kirchner, Varvara A

    2018-06-01

    Living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) can simultaneously cure hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and underlying liver cirrhosis, improving long-term results in patients with HCC. ABO-incompatible LDLT could expand the living-donor pool, reduce waiting times for deceased-donor liver transplantation, and improve long-term survival for some patients with HCC. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients undergoing LDLT for HCC from November 2008 to December 2015 at a single institution in Korea. In total, 165 patients underwent ABO-incompatible and 753 patients underwent ABO-compatible LDLT for HCC. ABO-incompatible recipients underwent desensitization to overcome the ABO blood group barrier, including pretransplant plasma exchange and rituximab administration (300-375 mg/m 2 /body surface area). We performed 1:1 propensity score matching and included 165 patients in each group. 82.4% of ABO-incompatible and 83.0% of -compatible LDLT groups had HCC within conventional Milan criteria, respectively, and 92.1% and 92.7% of patients in each group had a Child-Pugh score of A or B. ABO-incompatible and -compatible LDLT groups were followed up for 48.0 and 48.7 months, respectively, with both groups showing comparable recurrence-free survival rates (hazard ratio [HR] 1.14; 95% CI 0.68-1.90; p = 0.630) and overall patient-survival outcomes (HR 1.10; 95% CI 0.60-2.00; p = 0.763). These findings suggested that ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is a feasible option for patients with HCC, especially for those with compensated cirrhosis with HCC within conventional Milan criteria. Despite hypothetical immunological concerns that the desensitization protocol for breaking through the ABO blood group barrier might have a negative impact on the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, our experience demonstrated no significant differences in the long-term overall survival and recurrence-free survival rates between patients receiving ABO-compatible or ABO

  20. pH-induced conformational changes in human ABO(H) blood group glycosyltransferases confirm the importance of electrostatic interactions in the formation of the semi-closed state.

    PubMed

    Johal, Asha R; Blackler, Ryan J; Alfaro, Javier A; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana; Evans, Stephen V

    2014-03-01

    The homologous human ABO(H) A and B blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB have two mobile polypeptide loops surrounding their active sites that serve to allow substrate access and product egress and to recognize and sequester substrates for catalysis. Previous studies have established that these enzymes can move from the "open" state to the "semi-closed" then "closed" states in response to addition of a substrate. The contribution of electrostatic interactions to these conformational changes has now been demonstrated by the determination at various pH of the structures of GTA, GTB and the chimeric enzyme ABBA. At near-neutral pH, GTA displays the closed state in which both mobile loops order around the active site, whereas ABBA and GTB display the open state. At low pH, the apparent protonation of the DXD motif in GTA leads to the expulsion of the donor analog to yield the open state, whereas at high pH, both ABBA and GTB form the semi-closed state in which the first mobile loop becomes an ordered α-helix. Step-wise deprotonation of GTB in increments of 0.5 between pH 6.5 and 10.0 shows that helix ordering is gradual, which indicates that the formation of the semi-closed state is dependent on electrostatic forces consistent with the binding of substrate. Spectropolarimetric studies of the corresponding stand-alone peptide in solution reveal no tendency toward helix formation from pH 7.0 to 10.0, which shows that pH-dependent stability is a product of the larger protein environment and underlines the importance of substrate in active site ordering.

  1. ABO and rhesus antigens in a cosmopolitan Nigeria population.

    PubMed

    Nwauche, C A; Ejele, O A

    2004-01-01

    Port Harcourt is a cosmopolitan city consisting of several ethnic groupings such as Ikwerre, Ijaw, Igbo, Ogonis, Efik-Ibibio, Edo, Yoruba, Hausa and foreign nationals. ABO and Rhesus D antigens were screened in this cross-sectional study with the aim of generating data that would assist in the running of an efficient blood transfusion service for a cosmopolitan city as Port Harcourt. Blood donors were sampled and screened for ABO and Rhesus D antigens at three Health facilities within Port Harcourt: University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Braithwaite Memorial Hospital and Orogbum Health centre. A total of 936 blood donors were tested in this study. The results of the ABO screening shows that blood group O was the highest with 527 (56.30%) followed by blood group A, B and lastly AB with 212 (22.65%), 178 (19.02%) and 18(2.10%) respectively. The highest contribution to blood group O was from the Ibos with 220 (23.50%) while the Ijaws gave the highest contribution of Rhesus "D" antigen with 370 (39.53%), closely followed by the Igbos with 334 (0.43%). Rhesus negativity values in this study was 7.26% of which the highest contributors were also the Ijaws with 33 (3.53%) and Igbos with 27(2.89%). The increased demand for safe blood calls for an efficient Blood, Transfusion Service at the local, state and national levels. It is hoped that the data generated in this study would assist in the planning and establishment of a functional Blood service that would not only meet the ever increasing demand for blood products, but also play a vital role in the control of HIV/AIDS and . Hepatitis B global scourge.

  2. Clinico-serologic co-relation in bi-directional ABO incompatible hemopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sabita; Dhar, Supriya; Mishra, Deepak; Chandy, Mammen

    2015-01-01

    The ABO blood group system is of prime significance in red cell transfusion and organ transplantation. However, ABO compatibility is not critical in allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and approximately 40-50% of hemopoietic stem cell transplants are ABO incompatible. This incompatibility may be major, minor or bi-directional. Though there are descriptions of transfusion practice and protocols in ABO incompatible HSCT, there are considerable variations and transfusion support in these patients can be very challenging. The immunohematologic observations in two cases of bi-directional ABO incompatible HSCT have been described, and clinico-serologic correlation has been attempted. In both cases, peripheral blood stem cell harvests were obtained using the Cobe spectra cell separator. Immunohematologic assessments in the donor and recipient were done as a part of pre HSCT evaluation. Both the standard tube technique and column agglutination method (Ortho Biovue Micro Bead System) was used. Antibody screen was done by column agglutination method using three cell panel (Surgiscreen cells). Isoagglutinin titration was done by the master dilution method and standard validated techniques were used. The pattern of laboratory findings in the two cases was different and so were the clinical outcomes. Although there was early engraftment in the first case, the second case developed pure red cell aplasia and this was well-reflected in the immunohematologic assessments. Immunohematologic assessment correlated well with the clinical picture and could be used to predict clinical outcome and onset of complications in ABO incompatible HSCT.

  3. Impact of ABO incompatibility on patients' outcome after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia - a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ciceri, Fabio; Arcese, William; Tischer, Johanna; Koc, Yener; Bruno, Benedetto; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Maertens, Johan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-06-01

    A significant proportion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants are performed with ABO-mismatched donors. The impact of ABO mismatch on outcome following transplantation remains controversial and there are no published data regarding the impact of ABO mismatch in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving haploidentical transplants. Using the European Blood and Marrow Transplant Acute Leukemia Working Group registry we identified 837 patients who underwent haploidentical transplantation. Comparative analysis was performed between patients who received ABO-matched versus ABO-mismatched haploidentical transplants for common clinical outcome variables. Our cohort consisted of 522 ABO-matched patients and 315 ABO-mismatched patients including 150 with minor, 127 with major, and 38 with bi-directional ABO mismatching. There were no significant differences between ABO matched and mismatched patients in terms of baseline disease and clinical characteristics. Major ABO mismatching was associated with inferior day 100 engraftment rate whereas multivariate analysis showed that bi-directional mismatching was associated with increased risk of grade II-IV acute graft- versus -host disease [hazard ratio (HR) 2.387; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-4.66; P =0.01). Non-relapse mortality, relapse incidence, leukemia-free survival, overall survival, and chronic graft- versus -host disease rates were comparable between ABO-matched and -mismatched patients. Focused analysis on stem cell source showed that patients with minor mismatching transplanted with bone marrow grafts experienced increased grade II-IV acute graft- versus -host disease rates (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.00-4.10; P =0.04). Patients with major ABO mismatching and bone marrow grafts had decreased survival (HR=1.82; CI 95%: 1.048 - 3.18; P =0.033). In conclusion, ABO incompatibility has a marginal but significant clinical effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation. Copyright© Ferrata

  4. Impact of ABO incompatibility on patients’ outcome after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia - a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Huang, Xiao-jun; Ciceri, Fabio; Arcese, William; Tischer, Johanna; Koc, Yener; Bruno, Benedetto; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Maertens, Johan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants are performed with ABO-mismatched donors. The impact of ABO mismatch on outcome following transplantation remains controversial and there are no published data regarding the impact of ABO mismatch in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving haploidentical transplants. Using the European Blood and Marrow Transplant Acute Leukemia Working Group registry we identified 837 patients who underwent haploidentical transplantation. Comparative analysis was performed between patients who received ABO-matched versus ABO-mismatched haploidentical transplants for common clinical outcome variables. Our cohort consisted of 522 ABO-matched patients and 315 ABO-mismatched patients including 150 with minor, 127 with major, and 38 with bi-directional ABO mismatching. There were no significant differences between ABO matched and mismatched patients in terms of baseline disease and clinical characteristics. Major ABO mismatching was associated with inferior day 100 engraftment rate whereas multivariate analysis showed that bi-directional mismatching was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease [hazard ratio (HR) 2.387; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22–4.66; P=0.01). Non-relapse mortality, relapse incidence, leukemia-free survival, overall survival, and chronic graft-versus-host disease rates were comparable between ABO-matched and -mismatched patients. Focused analysis on stem cell source showed that patients with minor mismatching transplanted with bone marrow grafts experienced increased grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease rates (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.00–4.10; P=0.04). Patients with major ABO mismatching and bone marrow grafts had decreased survival (HR=1.82; CI 95%: 1.048 – 3.18; P=0.033). In conclusion, ABO incompatibility has a marginal but significant clinical effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation. PMID:28255020

  5. Blood metals concentration in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giovanni; Bocca, Beatrice; Peruzzu, Angela; Tolu, Francesco; Asara, Yolande; Farace, Cristiano; Oggiano, Riccardo; Madeddu, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms for the onset of diabetes and the development of diabetic complications remain under extensive investigations. One of these mechanisms is abnormal homeostasis of metals, as either deficiency or excess of metals, can contribute to certain diabetic outcomes. Therefore, this paper will report the blood levels of chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn) in subjects with type 1 diabetes (n = 192, mean age 48.8 years, mean disease duration 20.6 years), type 2 diabetes (n = 68, mean age 68.4 years, mean disease duration 10.2 years), and in control subjects (n = 59, mean age 57.2 years), and discuss the results indicating their possible role in diabetes. The metal concentrations were measured by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-induced acid digestion of blood samples. The accuracy was checked using a blood-based certified reference material, and recoveries of all elements were in the range of 92-101 % of certified values. Type 1 diabetes was found to be associated with Cr (p = 0.02), Mn (p < 0.001), Ni (p < 0.001), Pb (p = 0.02), and Zn (p < 0.001) deficiency, and type 2 diabetes with Cr (p = 0.014), Mn (p < 0.001), and Ni (p < 0.001) deficiency. These deficiencies were appreciated also subdividing the understudied patients for gender and age groups. Furthermore, in type 1 diabetes, there was a positive correlation between Pb and age (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.400) and Pb and BMI (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.309), while a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.002, ρ = -0.218). In type 2 diabetes, there was a negative correlation between Fe and age (p = 0.017, ρ = -0.294) and Fe and BMI (p = 0.026, ρ = -0.301). Thus, these elements may play a role in both forms of diabetes and combined mineral supplementations could have beneficial effects.

  6. Rapid ABO genotyping by high-speed droplet allele-specific PCR using crude samples.

    PubMed

    Taira, Chiaki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takeichi, Naoya; Furukawa, Satomi; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Okumura, Nobuo; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-01-01

    ABO genotyping has common tools for personal identification of forensic and transplantation field. We developed a new method based on a droplet allele-specific PCR (droplet-AS-PCR) that enabled rapid PCR amplification. We attempted rapid ABO genotyping using crude DNA isolated from dried blood and buccal cells. We designed allele-specific primers for three SNPs (at nucleotides 261, 526, and 803) in exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene. We pretreated dried blood and buccal cells with proteinase K, and obtained crude DNAs without DNA purification. Droplet-AS-PCR allowed specific amplification of the SNPs at the three loci using crude DNA, with results similar to those for DNA extracted from fresh peripheral blood. The sensitivity of the methods was 5%-10%. The genotyping of extracted DNA and crude DNA were completed within 8 and 9 minutes, respectively. The genotypes determined by the droplet-AS-PCR method were always consistent with those obtained by direct sequencing. The droplet-AS-PCR method enabled rapid and specific amplification of three SNPs of the ABO gene from crude DNA treated with proteinase K. ABO genotyping by the droplet-AS-PCR has the potential to be applied to various fields including a forensic medicine and transplantation medical care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Common variation in the ABO glycosyltransferase is associated with susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Andrew E.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Auburn, Sarah; Diakite, Mahamadou; Forton, Julian T.; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Peshu, Norbert; Williams, Thomas N.; Marsh, Kevin; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Taylor, Terrie E.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing epidemiological and molecular evidence that ABO blood group affects host susceptibility to severe Plasmodium falciparum infection. The high frequency of common ABO alleles means that even modest differences in susceptibility could have a significant impact on the health of people living in malaria endemic regions. We performed an association study, the first to utilize key molecular genetic variation underlying the ABO system, genotyping >9000 individuals across 3 African populations. Using population- and family-based tests we demonstrated that alleles producing functional ABO enzymes are associated with greater risk of severe malaria phenotypes (particularly malarial anemia) in comparison with the frameshift deletion underlying blood group O: Case-control allelic odds ratio (OR) 1.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09 – 1.32, P=0.0003; Family-studies allelic OR 1.19, CI 1.08 – 1.32, P=0.001; Pooled across all studies allelic OR 1.18, CI 1.11 - 1.26, P=2×10−7. Analyzing the family trios we found suggestive evidence of a parent-of-origin effect at the ABO locus. Non-O haplotypes inherited from mothers, but not fathers, are significantly associated with severe malaria (likelihood ratio test of Weinberg, P=0.046). Finally we used HapMap data to demonstrate a region of low FST (−0.001) between the three main HapMap population groups across the ABO locus, an outlier in the empirical distribution of FST across chromosome 9 (~99.5 – 99.9th centile). This low FST region may be a signal of longstanding balancing selection at the ABO locus, caused by multiple infectious pathogens including P. falciparum. PMID:18003641

  8. Selective interactions among Rh, ABO, and sex ratio of newborns.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, C Y; Walton, R

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that the Rh and ABO blood systems behave like the HLA system in relation to mother-conception tolerance-rejection mechanisms was tested in 25,501 mother-infant pairs. According to this hypothesis, heterozygotes carrying a paternal gene that is not present in their mothers should be better tolerated than homozygotes. Significantly more BO infants born to AO mothers. AO infants born to BO mothers, Rh(+) heterozygotes born to Rh(-) mothers, and less significantly AO infants born to OO mothers confirm the hypothesis. Fewer homozygotes occurred in Rh(-) infants born to Rh(+) mothers and in O infants born to non-O mothers. Deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium found in the ABO system were modified by the Rh and sex of the infant. These data strongly support the hypothesis that at least two feto-maternal systems influence the destiny of pregnancies: the classical known incompatibility system which operates late in pregnancy and a new one which is based on the induction of maternal tolerance early in pregnancy: maternal tolerance seems to be better elicited by heterozygous eggs or embryos carrying a gene not present in the mother. The data also support the hypothesis that the sex ratio is influenced by feto-maternal tolerance-rejection mechanisms associated with the ABO and Rh systems.

  9. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach. Part I: Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    In this article, part I of a series, the forensic methods used in "typing" human blood, which as physical evidence is often found in the dried state, are outlined. Background information about individualization, antibody typing, fresh blood, dried blood, and additional systems is provided. (CW)

  10. Determination of ABO genotypes with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Yamamoto, Y; Tanegashima, A; Kane, M; Ikehara, Y; Fukunaga, T; Nishi, K

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding the specific glycosyltransferases which catalyze the conversion of the H antigen to A or B antigens shows a slight but distinct variation in its allelic nucleotide sequence and can be divided into 6 genotypes when digested with specific restriction enzymes. We extracted DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using SDS/proteinase K treatment followed by phenol/chloroform extraction. The sequence of nucleotides for the A, B and O genes was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA fragments of 128 bp and 200 bp could be amplified in the second round of PCR, using an aliquot of the first round PCR product as template. Degraded DNA from paraffin blocks stored for up to 10.7 years could be successfully typed. The ABO genotype was deduced from the digestion patterns with an appropriate combination of restriction enzymes and was compatible with the phenotype obtained from the blood sample.

  11. An Automatic Lab-on-Disc System for Blood Typing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Fan, Yi-Hua; Chen, Shia-Chung; Lee, Kuan-Hua; Lou, Liao-Yong

    2018-04-01

    A blood-typing assay is a critical test to ensure the serological compatibility of a donor and an intended recipient prior to a blood transfusion. This article presents a lab-on-disc blood-typing system to conduct a total of eight assays for a patient, including forward-typing tests, reverse-typing tests, and irregular-antibody tests. These assays are carried out in a microfluidic disc simultaneously. A blood-typing apparatus was designed to automatically manipulate the disc. The blood type can be determined by integrating the results of red blood cell (RBC) agglutination in the microchannels. The experimental results of our current 40 blood samples show that the results agree with those examined in the hospital. The accuracy reaches 97.5%.

  12. Duration of Red Blood Cell Storage Is Associated with Increased Incidence of Deep Vein Thrombosis and in Hospital Mortality in Patients with Traumatic Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-22

    Verhoeven AJ: Prolonged maintenance of 2, 3- diphosphoglycerate acid and adenosine triphosphate in red blood cells during storage. Transfusion 2008...ABO blood group geno- type and factor VIII levels as independent risk factors for venous thromboembolism. Thromb Haemost 2005, 93(3):468-474. 41. Koch

  13. Blood Type 0 is not associated with increased blood loss in extensive spine surgery✩

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Ghobrial, Michael; Fu, Alexander Y.; Lee, Jae H.; Egan, Cameron; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kasuya, Yusuke; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To investigate whether Type O blood group status is associated with increased intraoperative blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion in extensive spine surgery. Design Retrospective comparative study. Setting University-affiliated, non-profit teaching hospital. Measurements Data from 1,050 ASA physical status 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 patients who underwent spine surgeries involving 4 or more vertebral levels were analyzed. Patients with Type O blood were matched to similar patients with other blood types using propensity scores, which were estimated via demographic and morphometric data, medical history variables, and extent of surgery. Intraoperative estimated blood loss (EBL) was compared among matched patients using a linear regression model; intraoperative transfusion requirement in volume of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, cell salvaged blood, volume of intraoperative infusion of hetastarch, 5% albumin, crystalloids, and hospital length of hospital (LOS) were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Main Results Intraoperative EBL and requirement of blood product transfusion were similar in patients with Type O blood group and those with other blood groups. Conclusion There was no association between Type O blood and increased intraoperative blood loss or blood transfusion requirement during extensive spine surgery, with similar hospital LOS in Type O and non-O patients. PMID:25172503

  14. How-to-Do-It: Infection Control Guidelines for Blood Typing & Blood Smear Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Edwin A.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a set of guidelines for infection control of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and the serum hepatitis viruses during blood typing procedures. Emphasizes that disposal of blood contaminated materials should comply with local health department recommendations. (RT)

  15. FUT2 non-secretor status is associated with Type 1 diabetes susceptibility in Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Ihara, K; Fukano, C; Ayabe, T; Fukami, M; Ogata, T; Kawamura, T; Urakami, T; Kikuchi, N; Yokota, I; Takemoto, K; Mukai, T; Nishii, A; Kikuchi, T; Mori, T; Shimura, N; Sasaki, G; Kizu, R; Takubo, N; Soneda, S; Fujisawa, T; Takaya, R; Kizaki, Z; Kanzaki, S; Hanaki, K; Matsuura, N; Kasahara, Y; Kosaka, K; Takahashi, T; Minamitani, K; Matsuo, S; Mochizuki, H; Kobayashi, K; Koike, A; Horikawa, R; Teno, S; Tsubouchi, K; Mochizuki, T; Igarashi, Y; Amemiya, S; Sugihara, S

    2017-04-01

    To examine the contribution of the FUT2 gene and ABO blood type to the development of Type 1 diabetes in Japanese children. We analysed FUT2 variants and ABO genotypes in a total of 531 Japanese children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and 448 control subjects. The possible association of FUT2 variants and ABO genotypes with the onset of Type 1 diabetes was statistically examined. The se2 genotype (c.385A>T) of the FUT2 gene was found to confer susceptibility to Type 1A diabetes in a recessive effects model [odds ratio for se2/se2, 1.68 (95% CI 1.20-2.35); corrected P value = 0.0075]. The FUT2 gene contributed to the development of Type 1 diabetes in the present cohort of Japanese children. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  16. Agglutinating mouse IgG3 compares favourably with IgMs in typing of the blood group B antigen: Functionality and stability studies

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Tomasz; Bzowska, Monika; Kulesza, Małgorzata; Kabat, Agnieszka Martyna; Jemioła-Rzemińska, Małgorzata; Czaplicki, Dominik; Makuch, Krzysztof; Jucha, Jarosław; Karabasz, Alicja; Bereta, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Mouse immunoglobulins M (IgMs) that recognize human blood group antigens induce haemagglutination and are used worldwide for diagnostic blood typing. Contrary to the current belief that IgGs are too small to simultaneously bind antigens on two different erythrocytes, we obtained agglutinating mouse IgG3 that recognized antigen B of the human ABO blood group system. Mouse IgG3 is an intriguing isotype that has the ability to form Fc-dependent oligomers. However, F(ab′)2 fragments of the IgG3 were sufficient to agglutinate type B red blood cells; therefore, IgG3-triggered agglutination did not require oligomerization. Molecular modelling indicated that mouse IgG3 has a larger range of Fab arms than other mouse IgG subclasses and that the unique properties of mouse IgG3 are likely due to the structure of its hinge region. With a focus on applications in diagnostics, we compared the stability of IgG3 and two IgMs in formulated blood typing reagents using an accelerated storage approach and differential scanning calorimetry. IgG3 was much more stable than IgMs. Interestingly, the rapid decrease in IgM activity was caused by aggregation of the molecules and a previously unknown posttranslational proteolytic processing of the μ heavy chain. Our data point to mouse IgG3 as a potent diagnostic tool. PMID:27484487

  17. Lack of any association between blood groups and lung cancer, independent of histology.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Arzu; Unal, Dilek; Tasdemir, Arzu; Karahan, Samet; Aykas, Fatma; Mutlu, Hasan; Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer deaths, is divided into 2 main classes based on its biology, therapy and prognosis: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Many cases are at an advanced stage at diagnosis, which is a major obstacle to improving outcomes. It is important to define the high risk group patients for early diagnosis and chance of cure. Blood group antigens are chemical components on erythrocyte membranes but they are also expressed on a variety of epithelial cells. Links between ABO blood groups with benign or malignant diseases, such as gastric and pancreas cancers, have been observed for a long time. In this study, we aimed to investigate any possible relationship between lung cancer histological subtypes and ABO-Rh blood groups. The files of 307 pathologically confirmed lung cancer patients were were reviewed retrospectively. Cases with a serologically determined blood group and Rh factor were included and those with a history of another primary cancer were excluded, leaving a total of 221. The distribution of blood groups of the lung cancer patients were compared with the distribution of blood groups of healthy donors admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in the year 2012. There was no significant difference between patients with lung cancer of either type and the control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh factor (p: 0.073). There was also no relationship with non small cell cancer histological subtypes. In this study, we found no relationship between the ABO-Rhesus blood groups and NSCLC and SCLC groups. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of ABO blood groups in SCLC patients.

  18. [Experience of mismatched blood transfusion for an rh negative patient and reconsideration of emergency blood transfusion manual in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Aya; Hoshi, Takuo; Nishikawa, Masashi; Aya, Daisuke; Ueda, Hiroshi; Yokouchi, Takako; Tanaka, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    We report a B Rh negative patient undergoing total pelvic exenteration, who received both ABO and Rh incompatible packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. After this experience, we revised the manual of emergency blood transfusion. We defined level of severity to share information with surgeon, nurses, anesthesiologists and the member of the blood center. We changed anesthesia information management system for showing blood type including Duffy blood group system and checking out whether we can transfuse Rh positive blood to Rh negative patient in an emergency situation at the timeout of surgery.

  19. Blood groups and acute aortic dissection type III.

    PubMed

    Fatic, Nikola; Nikolic, Aleksandar; Vukmirovic, Mihailo; Radojevic, Nemanja; Zornic, Nenad; Banzic, Igor; Ilic, Nikola; Kostic, Dusan; Pajovic, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    Acute aortic type III dissection is one of the most catastrophic events, with in-hospital mortality ranging between 10% and 12%. The majority of patients are treated medically, but complicated dissections, which represent 15% to 20% of cases, require surgical or thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). For the best outcomes adequate blood transfusion support is required. Interest in the relationship between blood type and vascular disease has been established. The aim of our study is to evaluate distribution of blood groups among patients with acute aortic type III dissection and to identify any kind of relationship between blood type and patient's survival. From January 2005 to December 2014, 115 patients with acute aortic type III dissection were enrolled at the Clinic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in Belgrade, Serbia and retrospectively analyzed. Patients were separated into two groups. The examination group consisted of patients with a lethal outcome, and the control group consisted of patients who survived. The analysis of the blood groups and RhD typing between groups did not reveal a statistically significant difference ( p = 0.220). Our results indicated no difference between different blood groups and RhD typing with respect to in-hospital mortality of patients with acute aortic dissection type III.

  20. Thorough analysis of unorthodox ABO deletions called by the 1000 Genomes project.

    PubMed

    Möller, M; Hellberg, Å; Olsson, M L

    2018-02-01

    ABO remains the clinically most important blood group system, but despite earlier extensive research, significant findings are still being made. The vast majority of catalogued ABO null alleles are based on the c.261delG polymorphism. Apart from c.802G>A, other mechanisms for O alleles are rare. While analysing the data set from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project, we encountered two previously uncharacterized deletions, which needed further exploration. The Erythrogene database, complemented with bioinformatics software, was used to analyse ABO in 2504 individuals from 1000G. DNA samples from selected 1000G donors and African blood donors were examined by allele-specific PCR and Sanger sequencing to characterize predicted deletions. A 5821-bp deletion encompassing exons 5-7 was called in twenty 1000G individuals, predominantly Africans. This allele was confirmed and its exact deletion point defined by bioinformatic analyses and in vitro experiments. A PCR assay was developed, and screening of African samples revealed three donors heterozygous for this deletion, which was thereby phenotypically established as an O allele. Analysis of upstream genetic markers indicated an ancestral origin from ABO*O.01.02. We estimate this deletion as the 3rd most common mechanism behind O alleles. A 24-bp deletion was called in nine individuals and showed greater diversity regarding ethnic distribution and allelic background. It could neither be confirmed by in silico nor in vitro experiments. A previously uncharacterized ABO deletion among Africans was comprehensively mapped and a genotyping strategy devised. The false prediction of another deletion emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of NGS data and calls for strict validation routines. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. Retrofit designs for small bench-type blood cell counters.

    PubMed

    Ferris, C D

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes several retrofit designs to correct operational problems associated with small bench-type blood cell counters. Replacement electronic circuits as well as modifications to the vacuum systems are discussed.

  2. Red Blood Cell Agglutination for Blood Typing Within Passive Microfluidic Biochips.

    PubMed

    Huet, Maxime; Cubizolles, Myriam; Buhot, Arnaud

    2018-04-19

    Pre-transfusion bedside compatibility test is mandatory to check that the donor and the recipient present compatible groups before any transfusion is performed. Although blood typing devices are present on the market, they still suffer from various drawbacks, like results that are based on naked-eye observation or difficulties in blood handling and process automation. In this study, we addressed the development of a red blood cells (RBC) agglutination assay for point-of-care blood typing. An injection molded microfluidic chip that is designed to enhance capillary flow contained anti-A or anti-B dried reagents inside its microchannel. The only blood handling step in the assay protocol consisted in the deposit of a blood drop at the tip of the biochip, and imaging was then achieved. The embedded reagents were able to trigger RBC agglutination in situ, allowing for us to monitor in real time the whole process. An image processing algorithm was developed on diluted bloods to compute real-time agglutination indicator and was further validated on undiluted blood. Through this proof of concept, we achieved efficient, automated, real time, and quantitative measurement of agglutination inside a passive biochip for blood typing which could be further generalized to blood biomarker detection and quantification.

  3. Quantitative blood group typing using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Then, Whui Lyn; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Garnier, Gil

    2015-11-15

    The accurate and reliable typing of blood groups is essential prior to blood transfusion. While current blood typing methods are well established, results are subjective and heavily reliant on analysis by trained personnel. Techniques for quantifying blood group antibody-antigen interactions are also very limited. Many biosensing systems rely on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection to quantify biomolecular interactions. While SPR has been widely used for characterizing antibody-antigen interactions, measuring antibody interactions with whole cells is significantly less common. Previous studies utilized SPR for blood group antigen detection, however, showed poor regeneration causing loss of functionality after a single use. In this study, a fully regenerable, multi-functional platform for quantitative blood group typing via SPR detection is achieved by immobilizing anti-human IgG antibody to the sensor surface, which binds to the Fc region of human IgG antibodies. The surface becomes an interchangeable platform capable of quantifying the blood group interactions between red blood cells (RBCs) and IgG antibodies. As with indirect antiglobulin tests (IAT), which use IgG antibodies for detection, IgG antibodies are initially incubated with RBCs. This facilitates binding to the immobilized monolayer and allows for quantitative blood group detection. Using the D-antigen as an example, a clear distinction between positive (>500 RU) and negative (<100 RU) RBCs is achieved using anti-D IgG. Complete regeneration of the anti-human IgG surface is also successful, showing negligible degradation of the surface after more than 100 regenerations. This novel approach is validated with human-sourced whole blood samples to demonstrate an interesting alternative for quantitative blood grouping using SPR analysis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ABO-Incompatible Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Under the Desensitization Protocol With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Song, G-W; Lee, S-G; Hwang, S; Kim, K-H; Ahn, C-S; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Jung, D-H; Park, G-C; Kim, W-J; Sin, M-H; Yoon, Y-I; Kang, W-H; Kim, S-H; Tak, E-Y

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility is no longer considered a contraindication for adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT) due to various strategies to overcome the ABO blood group barrier. We report the largest single-center experience of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) ALDLT in 235 adult patients. The desensitization protocol included a single dose of rituximab and total plasma exchange. In addition, local graft infusion therapy, cyclophosphamide, or splenectomy was used for a certain time period, but these treatments were eventually discontinued due to adverse events. There were three cases (1.3%) of in-hospital mortality. The cumulative 3-year graft and patient survival rates were 89.2% and 92.3%, respectively, and were comparable to those of the ABO-compatible group (n = 1301). Despite promising survival outcomes, 17 patients (7.2%) experienced antibody-mediated rejection that manifested as diffuse intrahepatic biliary stricture; six cases required retransplantation, and three patients died. ABOi ALDLT is a feasible method for expanding a living liver donor pool, but the efficacy of the desensitization protocol in targeting B cell immunity should be optimized. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Mean Blood Pressure Difference among Adolescents Based on Dyssomnia Types.

    PubMed

    Sembiring, Krisnarta; Ramayani, Oke Rina; Lubis, Munar

    2018-02-15

    Dyssomnia is the most frequent sleep disturbance and associated with increased blood pressure. There has been no study determining the difference in mean blood pressure based on dyssomnia types among adolescents. To determine the difference in mean blood pressure among adolescents based on dyssomnia types. Cross-sectional study was conducted in SMP Negeri 1 Muara Batang Gadis in April 2016. Samples were students having sleep disturbance based on Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) questionnaire. Stature and blood pressure data were collected along with demographic data and sleep disorder questionnaire. Analyses were done with Kruskal-Wallis test and logistic regression. P - value < 0.05 was considered significant. Seventy-six samples were obtained with mean age 13.9 (SD 1.14) years - old. Dyssomnia proportion and hypertension were 72/76 and 20/76 respectively. Mean systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 111.1 (SD 16.46) mmHg and 70.3 (SD 11.98) mmHg respectively. Mean SDSC score was 49.7 (SD 8.96), and the most frequent dyssomnia type was disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep. Age and sex were not the risk factors of hypertension in dyssomnia. There was a significant difference in mean SBP (P = 0.006) and DBP (P = 0.022) based on dyssomnia types. Combination dyssomnia type had the highest mean blood pressure among dyssomnia types. There is a significant difference in mean blood pressure among adolescents based on dyssomnia types.

  6. A micro-rheological method for determination of blood type.

    PubMed

    Makulska, Sylwia; Jakiela, Slawomir; Garstecki, Piotr

    2013-07-21

    The measurement of time and distance can be used for determining agglutination in small (nL) samples of liquid. We demonstrate the use of this new scheme of detection in typing and subtyping blood in a simple microfluidic system that monitors the speed of flow of microdroplets. The system (i) accepts small samples of liquids deposited directly onto the chip, (ii) forms droplets on demand from these samples, (iii) merges the droplets, and (iv) measures their speed in a microchannel. A sequence of measurements on different combinations of blood and antibodies can thus be used to determine blood type with the estimated probability of mistyping being less than 1 in a million tests. In addition, in the agglutinated samples, red blood cells concentrate at the rear of the droplets yielding an additional vista for detection and suggesting a possible mechanism for separations.

  7. Cheiloscopy and blood groups: Aid in forensic identification.

    PubMed

    Karim, Bushra; Gupta, Devanand

    2014-10-01

    Every person has certain features that make them radically distinct from others. One such feature is lip prints. Lip prints remain the same throughout life and are uninfluenced by injuries, diseases, or environmental changes. Different individuals have specific blood groups according to the various antigen-antibody reactions in their bloodstream. To determine the distribution of different patterns of lip prints among subjects having different ABO and Rh blood groups. To determine the correlation between respective characteristics of subjects. In this study, lip prints were obtained from 122 subjects (62 males and 60 females), and associated blood-group matching was performed to determine the predominant lip print type and to determine any correlation between lip print types and blood groups. Tsuchihashi's classification of type I (complete vertical grooves), type I' (incomplete vertical grooves), type II (forking grooves), type III (intersecting grooves), type IV (reticular grooves), and type V (indeterminate grooves) was used to compare with the ABO and Rh blood grouping systems. No correlation was found between lip prints and blood groups. No significant correlation exists between blood group and lip prints. Lip prints play a vital role in identification because they are unique.

  8. Blood pressure directly correlates with blood viscosity in diabetes type 1 children but not in normals.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Vázquez, Miguel A Salazar; Jáquez, Manuel Guajardo; Huemoeller, Antonio H Bracho; Intaglietta, Marcos; Cabrales, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    To determine the relationship between mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and blood viscosity in diabetic type 1 children and healthy controls to investigate whether MAP is independent of blood viscosity in healthy children, and vice versa. Children with diabetes type 1 treated by insulin injection were studied. Controls were healthy children of both sexes. MAP was calculated from systolic and diastolic pressure measurements. Blood viscosity was determined indirectly by measuring blood hemoglobin (Hb) content. The relationship between Hb, hematocrit (Hct) and blood viscosity was determined in a subgroup of controls and diabetics selected at random. 21 (10.6+/-2.5 years) type 1 diabetic children treated with insulin and 25 healthy controls age 9.6+/-1.7 years were studied. Hb was 13.8+/-0.8 g/dl in normal children vs. 14.3+/-0.9 g/dl in the diabetic group (p<0.05). MAP was 71.4+/-8.2 in the normal vs. 82.9+/-7.2 mmHg in the diabetic group (p<0.001). Glucose was 89.3+/-10.6 vs. 202.4+/-87.4 mg/dl respectively. Diabetics had a positive MAP/Hb correlation (p=0.007), while normals showed a non significant (p=0.2) negative correlation. The blood viscosity/Hb relationship was studied in a subgroup of 8 healthy controls and 8 diabetic type 1 children. There was no significant difference in Hb and Hct between groups. Diabetics showed a trend of increasing blood viscosity (+7%, p=0.15). Normal children compensate for the increase in vascular resistance due to increased blood viscosity (increased Hb and Hct) while diabetic children do not, probably due to endothelial dysfunction.

  9. [The kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors].

    PubMed

    Goriaĭnov, V A; Kaabak, M M; Babenko, N N; Shishlo, L A; Morozova, M M; Ragimov, A A; Dashkova, N G; Salimov, É L

    2012-01-01

    The experience of 28 allotransplantations of ABO-incompatible kidneys was compared with the treatment results of 38 ABO-compatible renal transplantations. The transplanted kidney function, morphological changes of the transplanted kidney and the comparative analysis of actuary survival in both groups showed no significant difference. The results of the study prove the validity of the kidney transplantation from the ABO-incompatible donors.

  10. Red blood cell transport mechanisms in polyester thread-based blood typing devices.

    PubMed

    Nilghaz, Azadeh; Ballerini, David R; Guan, Liyun; Li, Lizi; Shen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed blood typing diagnostic based on a polyester thread substrate has shown great promise for use in medical emergencies and in impoverished regions. The device is easy to use and transport, while also being inexpensive, accurate, and rapid. This study used a fluorescent confocal microscope to delve deeper into how red blood cells were behaving within the polyester thread-based diagnostic at the cellular level, and how plasma separation could be made to visibly occur on the thread, making it possible to identify blood type in a single step. Red blood cells were stained and the plasma phase dyed with fluorescent compounds to enable them to be visualised under the confocal microscope at high magnification. The mechanisms uncovered were in surprising contrast with those found for a similar, paper-based method. Red blood cell aggregates did not flow over each other within the thread substrate as expected, but suffered from a restriction to their flow which resulted in the chromatographic separation of the RBCs from the liquid phase of the blood. It is hoped that these results will lead to the optimisation of the method to enable more accurate and sensitive detection, increasing the range of blood systems that can be detected.

  11. Machine Learning of ABO3 Crystalline Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubernatis, J. E.; Balachandran, P. V.; Lookman, T.

    We apply two advanced machine learning methods to a database of experimentally known ABO3 materials to predict the existence of possible new perovskite materials and possible new cubic perovskites. Constructing a list of 625 possible new materials from charge conserving combinations of A and B atoms in known stable ABO3 materials, we predict about 440 new perovskites. These new perovskites are predicted most likely to occur when the A and B atoms are a lanthanide or actinide, when the A atom is a alkali, alkali earth, or late transition metal, and a when the B atom is a p-block atom. These results are in basic agreement with the recent materials discovery by substitution analysis of Hautier et al. who data-mined the entire ICSD data base to develop the probability that in any crystal structure atom X could be substituted for by atom Y. The results of our analysis has several points of disagreement with a recent high throughput DFT study of ABO3 crystalline compounds by Emery et al. who predict few, if any, new perovskites whose A and B atoms are both a lanthanide. They also predict far more new cubic perovskites than we do: We predict few, if any, with a high degree of probability. This work was supported by the LDRD DR program of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. ABO3, a WRKY transcription factor, mediates plant responses to abscisic acid and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaozhi; Chen, Zhizhong; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Hairong; Zhang, Min; Liu, Qian; Hong, Xuhui; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2010-08-01

    The biological functions of WRKY transcription factors in plants have been widely studied, but their roles in abiotic stress are still not well understood. We isolated an ABA overly sensitive mutant, abo3, which is disrupted by a T-DNA insertion in At1g66600 encoding a WRKY transcription factor AtWRKY63. The mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in both seedling establishment and seedling growth. However, stomatal closure was less sensitive to ABA, and the abo3 mutant was less drought tolerant than the wild type. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABF2/AREB1 was markedly lower in the abo3 mutant than in the wild type. The abo3 mutation also reduced the expression of stress-inducible genes RD29A and COR47, especially early during ABA treatment. ABO3 is able to bind the W-box in the promoter of ABF2in vitro. These results uncover an important role for a WRKY transcription factor in plant responses to ABA and drought stress. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Disruption of SMIM1 causes the Vel− blood type

    PubMed Central

    Ballif, Bryan A; Helias, Virginie; Peyrard, Thierry; Menanteau, Cécile; Saison, Carole; Lucien, Nicole; Bourgouin, Sébastien; Le Gall, Maude; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Arnaud, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the biochemical and genetic basis of the Vel blood group antigen, which has been a vexing mystery for decades, especially as anti-Vel regularly causes severe haemolytic transfusion reactions. The protein carrying the Vel blood group antigen was biochemically purified from red blood cell membranes. Mass spectrometry-based de novo peptide sequencing identified this protein to be small integral membrane protein 1 (SMIM1), a previously uncharacterized single-pass membrane protein. Expression of SMIM1 cDNA in Vel− cultured cells generated anti-Vel cell surface reactivity, confirming that SMIM1 encoded the Vel blood group antigen. A cohort of 70 Vel− individuals was found to be uniformly homozygous for a 17 nucleotide deletion in the coding sequence of SMIM1. The genetic homogeneity of the Vel− blood type, likely having a common origin, facilitated the development of two highly specific DNA-based tests for rapid Vel genotyping, which can be easily integrated into blood group genotyping platforms. These results answer a 60-year-old riddle and provide tools of immediate assistance to all clinicians involved in the care of Vel− patients. PMID:23505126

  14. A comparative study of major histocompatibility complex and red blood cell antigen phenotypes as risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, W J; Heisey, D M; Lorentzen, D F; Uehling, D T

    1998-05-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are a significant health problem for many women, and host characteristics that increase susceptibility are not completely defined. This study evaluated data from 99 patients to examine further the question of a possible association between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or red blood cell (RBC) antigen phenotype and predisposition to RUTIs. MHC class I and II, ABO, and Lewis RBC phenotypes were determined serologically. The MHC class II phenotypes of 55 subjects were also determined by DNA polymerase chain reaction techniques. There were no significant differences in the proportions of HLA-A or -B antigen types between patients and controls, nor in the frequencies of serologically or DNA-defined HLA-DR or -DQ phenotypes. Patient ABO and Lewis RBC phenotypes were not statistically different than those for controls. Thus, the overall risk for women to develop RUTIs does not appear to be associated with any single HLA, ABO, or Lewis phenotype.

  15. Blood types of the native Americans of Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Kasprisin, D O; Crow, M; McClintock, C; Lawson, J

    1987-05-01

    Large numbers of Indians from Oklahoma were screened for a variety of red cell antigens. Sufficient numbers of Cherokees, Creeks, and Choctaws were studied to calculate gene frequencies. These tribes originated in the Southeastern United States and were forcibly moved to Oklahoma. The Creeks and Choctaws have not been studied previously. A small number of Cherokees remained in North Carolina, and their blood types have been reported. The blood types of the Oklahoma Cherokees are quite similar to those observed there but one important difference was discovered. The data previously reported concerning the Eastern Cherokees revealed the absence of the Dia antigen. The present study found that the Oklahoma Cherokees do have the Dia antigen, although in a lower percentage than the other southeastern tribes. The Creeks and Choctaws share a linguistic heritage as well as having similar red cell phenotypes.

  16. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through the...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood through...

  6. Analysis of the Results of ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation: In Comparison with ABO-Compatible Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Byung Joo; Seong, Youl Keun; Han, Bo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The number of patients waiting for kidney transplantation is incessantly increasing, but the number of cadaveric kidney transplantations or ABO-compatible donors is so insufficient that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is being performed as an alternative. There are overseas studies and research showing that the 5-year survival rate and 5-year graft survival rate of ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are not much different from those of ABO-compatible kidney transplantation. However, domestic research on the subject is rare. Therefore, we report the results of 22 ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation cases performed in our hospital. Materials and Methods This research was from 22 patients in our hospital who underwent ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from 15 February 2007 to 20 May 2010. Results As yet, there have been no donor graft losses and no deaths after transplantation. The results of the two groups were analyzed by analysis of covariance of the creatinine value of the recipients at 6 months after the operation, corrected for the preoperative value in order to statistically identify whether there were differences in renal function after the operation between ABO-compatible and ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The results of the analysis of covariance showed no statistical difference in renal function after the operation between the two groups. Conclusions Even though there were not many cases, our initial results for ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation were positive. Considering the increasing number of patients waiting for kidney transplantation, longer-term domestic research studies of ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are necessary. PMID:21221208

  7. A2 to B Blood Type Incompatible Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation in a Recipient Infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R C; DeMers, A; Concepcion, B P; Moore, D R; Schaefer, H M; Shaffer, D

    With the introduction of the Kidney Allocation System in the United States in December 2014, transplant centers can list eligible B blood type recipients for A2 organ offers. There have been no prior reports of ABO incompatible A2 to B deceased donor kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) recipients to guide clinicians on enrolling or performing A2 to B transplantations in HIV+ candidates. We are the first to report a case of A2 to B deceased donor kidney transplantation in an HIV+ recipient with good intermediate-term results. We describe an HIV+ 39-year-old African American man with end-stage renal disease who underwent A2 to B blood type incompatible deceased donor kidney transplantation. Prior to transplantation, he had an undetectable HIV viral load. The patient was unsensitized, with his most recent anti-A titer data being 1:2 IgG and 1:32 IgG/IgM. Induction therapy of basiliximab and methylprednisolone was followed by a postoperative regimen of plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab with maintenance on tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. He had delayed graft function without rejection on allograft biopsy. Nadir serum creatinine was 2.0 mg/dL. He continued to have an undetectable viral load on the same antiretroviral therapy adjusted for renal function. To our knowledge, this is the first report of A2 to B deceased donor kidney transplantation in an HIV+ recipient with good intermediate-term results, suggesting that A2 donor kidneys may be considered for transplantation into HIV+ B-blood type wait list candidates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Effect of emulin on blood glucose in type 2 diabetics.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Milton Joseph; Thompson, Daryl L

    2013-03-01

    Emulin™ is a patented blend of chlorogenic acid, myricetin, and quercetin that has shown efficacy in reducing midday and post-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) area under the curve (AUC) glucose in streptozotocin-treated rats. The purpose of this study was to determine if similar effects would be evident in type 2 diabetic humans. Forty human subjects with confirmed type 2 diabetes (10 each in 4 groups: placebo/no medication, Emulin/no medication, placebo/metformin and Emulin/metformin) were evaluated. At the end of 1 week, fasting blood glucose, 2 h postprandial, actual peak glucose, and AUC (post-50 g OGTT) were determined. The placebo-only group had a large (5%-13%) increase in all parameters. The Emulin group and those on metformin performed similarly with reductions between 1% and 5%, with Emulin slightly outperforming the medication-alone group. The most significant reduction occurred in the Emulin/metformin group, with decreases in the parameters by up to 20%. These results suggest that Emulin, if consumed regularly, could not only have the acute effect of lowering the glycemic impact of foods, but chronically lower background blood glucose levels of type 2 diabetics.

  9. Donors' blood group declaration before donation can be used as a tool for electronic crossmatching.

    PubMed

    Arslan, O

    2005-12-01

    Electronic crossmatching (E-XM) is used to detect ABO incompatibility. In developing countries, as many of the donations are from first-time donors, it is difficult to guarantee the accuracy of the ABO/Rh label on these units to use them for E-XM. This problem was overcome with a new software 'hemosoft', using donors' blood group declaration before donation as a tool for E-XM. During registration, donors either declare their blood group or give no comment. For, ABO/Rh grouping, either two results from different donations or only one in concordant with the declaration before donation is needed. If there is a conflict, second typing is performed from the unit segment. If donors give no declaration, two different technicians perform typing, one from the sample tube and the other from the unit segment. Of 18,618 donations performed, 640 (3%) were repeated and the rest were first-time donations. In 16,327, typing was performed once, as the blood group declaration and the typing results were identical. In 2407, grouping was performed twice, as donors gave no declaration or conflicts between declaration and typing results were found. No labelling or wrong unit-release errors were detected in units donated, typed and labelled in our centre. In 26,402 donations, 16,314 (61.8%) E-XMs were performed. No major haemolytic transfusion reaction was recorded. Donors' ABO/Rh declaration before donation can be used as a tool for E-XM, instead of the requirement for serological confirmation or a second donation to guarantee grouping.

  10. A systematic review of validated methods for identifying transfusion-related ABO incompatibility reactions using administrative and claims data.

    PubMed

    Carnahan, Ryan M; Kee, Vicki R

    2012-01-01

    This paper aimed to systematically review algorithms to identify transfusion-related ABO incompatibility reactions in administrative data, with a focus on studies that have examined the validity of the algorithms. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Iowa Drug Information Service database, and Embase. A Google Scholar search was also conducted because of the difficulty identifying relevant studies. Reviews were conducted by two investigators to identify studies using data sources from the USA or Canada because these data sources were most likely to reflect the coding practices of Mini-Sentinel data sources. One study was found that validated International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM) codes representing transfusion reactions. None of these cases were ABO incompatibility reactions. Several studies consistently used ICD-9-CM code 999.6, which represents ABO incompatibility reactions, and a technical report identified the ICD-10 code for these reactions. One study included the E-code E8760 for mismatched blood in transfusion in the algorithm. Another study reported finding no ABO incompatibility reaction codes in the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, which contains data of 2.23 million patients who received transfusions, raising questions about the sensitivity of administrative data for identifying such reactions. Two studies reported perfect specificity, with sensitivity ranging from 21% to 83%, for the code identifying allogeneic red blood cell transfusions in hospitalized patients. There is no information to assess the validity of algorithms to identify transfusion-related ABO incompatibility reactions. Further information on the validity of algorithms to identify transfusions would also be useful. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Mediation analysis reveals a sex-dependent association between ABO gene variants and TG/HDL-C ratio that is suppressed by sE-selectin level.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ming-Sheng; Hsu, Lung-An; Wu, Semon; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Chang, Chi-Jen; Sun, Yu-Zen; Juan, Shu-Hui; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2013-06-01

    Previous investigations have revealed an association between the ABO locus/blood group and total cholesterol and inflammatory biomarker levels. We aimed to test the statistical association of ABO locus variants with lipid profiles and levels of thirteen inflammatory markers in a Taiwanese population. A sample population of 617 Taiwanese subjects was enrolled. Five ABO gene region polymorphisms were selected and genotyped. After adjusting for clinical covariates and inflammatory marker levels, the genetic-inferred ABO blood group genotypes were associated with sE-selectin level (P = 3.5 × 10(-36)). Significantly higher total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were noted in individuals with blood group A (P = 7.2 × 10(-4) and P = 7.3 × 10(-4), respectively). Interestingly, after adjusting for sE-selectin level, significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level as well as higher triglyceride (TG) level and ratio of triglyceride to HDL-C (TG/HDL-C ratio) were noted in individuals with blood group A comparing to non-A individuals (P = 0.009, P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively); these associations were also observed in the group A male subjects (P = 0.027, P = 0.001, and P = 0.002, respectively). Mediation analysis further revealed a suppression effect of sE-selectin level on the association between genetic-inferred ABO blood group genotypes and TG/HDL-C ratio in total participants (P = 1.18 × 10(-6)) and in males (P = 5.99 × 10(-5)). Genetic variants at the ABO locus independently affect sE-selectin level in Taiwanese subjects, while the association of ABO locus variants with TG/HDL-C ratio is suppressed by sE-selectin level in Taiwanese males. These results provided further evidence for the mechanism in the association of ABO blood groups with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Cellular Rejection in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplant Recipients Receiving Rituximab Is Associated with Delayed-Onset Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Junji; Iwai, Tomoaki; Nishide, Shunji; Kabei, Kazuya; Kuwabara, Nobuyuki; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Naganuma, Toshihide; Kumada, Norihiko; Takemoto, Yoshiaki; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2017-07-25

    BACKGROUND Rituximab induces long-lasting B cell depletion in the peripheral blood and increases the levels of proinflammatory cytokines associated with regulatory B cell depletion. Previous reports showed that B cell-related cytokine release after administration of rituximab may induce acute cellular rejection (ACR) and delayed-onset neutropenia. The present study was conducted to investigate the correlation between acute rejection and delayed-onset neutropenia in ABO-incompatible renal transplant recipients who underwent administration of rituximab for 1 year after transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS From June 2006 to July 2015, 47 patients with chronic renal failure received ABO-incompatible renal transplant with rituximab induction at Osaka City University Hospital. All 47 patients underwent plasmapheresis due to removal of anti-A/B antibodies and administration of rituximab, and their transplants were carried out successfully. We investigated the correlation between ACR and delayed-onset neutropenia in ABO-incompatible renal transplant recipients who underwent administration of rituximab for 1 year after transplantation. RESULTS Fourteen patients (29.8%) experienced ACR (group A), and 33 recipients did not develop ACR (group B). The frequency of delayed-onset neutropenia was higher in group A than in group B (p=0.0503). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the frequency of ACR correlated significantly with the prevalence of delayed-onset neutropenia. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicated that ACR in ABO-incompatible renal transplant recipients receiving rituximab was associated with delayed-onset neutropenia.

  13. Evaluation of new indigenous "point-of-care" ABO and Rh grouping device.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Setya, Divya; Aggarwal, Geet; Arora, Dinesh; Dara, Ravi C; Ratan, Ankita; Bhardwaj, Gunjan; Acharya, Devi Prasad

    2018-01-01

    Erycard 2.0 is a "point-of-care" device that is primarily being used for patient blood grouping before transfusion. Erycard 2.0 was compared with conventional slide technology for accuracy and time taken for ABO and Rh forward grouping result with column agglutination technology (CAT) being the gold standard. Erycard 2.0 as a device was also evaluated for its stability under different storage conditions and stability of result till 48 h. In addition, grouping of hemolyzed samples was also tested with Erycard 2.0. Ease of use of Erycard 2.0 was evaluated with a survey among paramedical staff. Erycard 2.0 demonstrated 100% concordance with CAT as compared with slide technique (98.9%). Mean time taken per test by Erycard 2.0 and slide technique was 5.13 min and 1.7 min, respectively. After pretesting storage under different temperature and humidity conditions, Erycard 2.0 did not show any deviation from the result. The result did not change even after 48 h of testing and storage under room temperature. 100% concordance was recorded between pre- and post-hemolyzed blood grouping. Ease of use survey revealed that Erycard 2.0 was more acceptable to paramedical staff for its simplicity, objectivity, and performance than conventional slide technique. Erycard 2.0 can be used as "point-of-care" device for blood donor screening for ABO and Rh blood group and can possibly replace conventional slide technique.

  14. The German version of the Anorectic Behavior Observation Scale (ABOS).

    PubMed

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Klinkowski, Nora; Holzhausen, Martin; Frieler, Katja; Bohnekamp, Inga; Thiels, Cornelia; Bender, Caroline; Vandereycken, Walter

    2009-05-01

    To assess the performance of the German version of the Anorectic Behavior Observation Scale (ABOS) as a parent-report screening instrument for eating disorders (ED) in their children. Parents of 101 ED female patients (80 with Anorexia Nervosa; 21 with Bulimia Nervosa) and of 121 age- and socioeconomic status (SES)-matched female controls completed the ABOS. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the original three-factor structure model of the ABOS. Cronbach's alpha coefficients indicated good internal consistency for the three factors and the total score in the total sample. The best cut-off point (100% sensitivity and specificity) in the German version was >or=23. The ABOS may be a useful additional instrument for assessing ED.

  15. Distribution and clinal trends of the ABO and Rh genes in select Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Afshan, K; Malik, S

    2015-09-09

    An understanding of the ABO and Rh blood group systems is important for blood transfusions and is also pertinent due to their potential association with certain morbidities and susceptibilities to infections. To investigate the diversity and differentiation of the ABO and Rh loci in Middle Eastern populations, data from twelve representative Middle Eastern populations were analyzed. Six populations were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at the ABO locus. The pooled heterozygosity at both loci was calculated to be highest in the sample from Jordan and lowest in Bahrain. Heterogeneity was pronounced in the Northern compared to the Southern Middle Eastern populations. Overall, the absolute gene diversity was 0.0046 and gene differentiation was calculated to be 0.0100. Genetic diversity of the studied loci across all populations (HT) was estimated to be 0.4594, while the diversity within the populations (HS) was 0.4548. Nei's genetic distance analyses revealed highest affinities between the populations of Kuwait and Qatar, Oman and Yemen, and between Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. These results were displayed through a UGPMA dendrogram and principal component analyses, which established clustering of certain populations. Clinal trends of the allelic systems were observed by generating contour maps that allow a detailed appreciation of the distributions of alleles across the geography of the Arabian Peninsula and the Middle East. Taken together, these analyses are helpful in understanding the differentiation of blood group loci and for designing prospective studies for establishing the associations of these loci with health variables in the populations studied.

  16. Outcomes after ABO-incompatible heart transplantation in adults: A registry study.

    PubMed

    Bergenfeldt, Henrik; Andersson, Bodil; Bućin, Dragan; Stehlik, Josef; Edwards, Leah; Rådegran, Göran; Nilsson, Johan

    2015-07-01

    In the past, ABO incompatibility was considered an absolute contraindication to heart transplantation (HT) in adults. Advances in ABO-incompatible HT in pediatric patients and ABO-incompatible abdominal transplantation in adult patients have led to clinical exploration of intentional ABO-incompatible HT in adults. However, it is not well known how outcomes in ABO-incompatible adult heart transplant recipients compare with outcomes in ABO-compatible recipients. We analyzed International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation transplant registry data from heart donors and recipients ≥18 years old at the time of transplant for HT performed between 1988 and 2011. We compared baseline characteristics and post-transplant outcomes in ABO-incompatible and ABO-compatible HT. Death or retransplantation was the composite primary end-point. Among 76,663 adult patients undergoing HT between 1988 and June 30, 2011, 94 ABO-incompatible heart transplants were performed. The incidence of death or retransplantation in the ABO-incompatible group was higher than in the ABO-compatible group: 21% vs 9% at 30 days (hazard ratio = 2.38, p < 0.001) and 36% vs 19% at 1 year after transplant. However, ABO-incompatible grafts surviving past the first year after transplant had a similar incidence of failure compared with the ABO-compatible group. After 2005, the rate ABO-incompatible HT in adults increased, likely as a result of planned, intentional (rather than accidental) ABO-incompatible HT. In this group of patients, short-term and long-term incidence of death or retransplantation was similar to ABO-compatible recipients (p = 0.822): 7% at 30 days and 19% at 1 year after transplantation. We found no difference in incidence of death or retransplantation between ABO-compatible and ABO-incompatible HT in patients who underwent transplantation after 2005. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A brief history of human blood groups.

    PubMed

    Farhud, Dariush D; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of human blood groups, without doubt, has a history as old as man himself. There are at least three hypotheses about the emergence and mutation of human blood groups. Global distribution pattern of blood groups depends on various environmental factors, such as disease, climate, altitude, humidity etc. In this survey, the collection of main blood groups ABO and Rh, along with some minor groups, are presented. Several investigations of blood groups from Iran, particularly a large sampling on 291857 individuals from Iran, including the main blood groups ABO and Rh, as well as minor blood groups such as Duffy, Lutheran, Kell, KP, Kidd, and Xg, have been reviewed.

  18. [Research on blood distribution of Tibetan population in Ali area].

    PubMed

    Liu, X X; Li, D D; Li, H L; Hou, L A; Liu, Z J; Yang, H Y; Qiu, L

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To explore the distribution of ABO blood group in the healthy population in the Ali area of Tibet, and to analyze the difference of blood group distribution between the Tibetan population in Ali and the Tibet Tibetan population. Methods: The blood distribution of 509 apparent healthy volunteers of Tueti County and Gal County, Tibet, which were randomly selected from September to November in 2016; 137 Tibetan blood donors, from 2016 September to2017 July and 84 Tibetan blood donors from 2015 August to 2017 July was analyzed retrospectively. The blood type was tested by the slide method. By reviewing the Chinese and foreign language database, seven articles on Tibetan blood group distribution were obtained. And the data of the blood distribution of the Ali area population and the Tibet Tibetan population were compared. Results: The ABO phenotype frequencies of 507 apparent healthy people, 137 blood donors and 84 recipients were B>O>A>AB. The composition ratio were 36.1%, 34.5%, 21.5 %, 7.9%; 40.1%, 35.0%, 17.5%, 7.3%; 39.3%, 34.5%, 20.2%, 6.0%.There was no statistically significant difference in blood group distribution between the donors and the recipients ( P >0.05). And there was no significant difference in the blood group distribution between Ali and Shigatse, Nagqu, Lhasa, Shannan. However, the differences between Ali and Qamdo, Nyingchi areas were statistically significant. Conclusion: The geographical position of the blood from the west to east, B type shows a downward trend, O type blood composition ratio shows an upward trend.

  19. Hematology, blood typing, and immunology of the neonatal foal.

    PubMed

    Becht, J L; Semrad, S D

    1985-04-01

    Hematologic parameters change during the first 10 days of life. Erythrocytes increase in number but decrease in size and hemoglobin concentration. The PCV, hemoglobin, and platelet count also decrease. Total blood and plasma volume and, to lesser extent, erythrocyte volume decrease. Normal neonatal foals may have immature neutrophils (up to 5 per cent bands), and their early rapid rise in neutrophil numbers may be accompanied by a lymphopenia. Monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils are all absent or low initially. Infectious processes can cause rapid and variable changes in the leukogram. However, elevation of fibrinogen levels may lag behind the development of an inflammatory process, and this parameter should not be relied on for early evidence of infection. After 12 hours of life, there is generally a decrease in serum concentrations of Na, Cl, iron, creatinine, BUN, plasma protein, and possibly calcium. LDH, SAP, P, bilirubin, and glucose concentrations are all higher in foals than in mature horses. Creatinine may actually be elevated during the first 12 hours of life and then decreases. If azotemia, hypochloremia, hyponatremia, and hyperkalemia are found, ruptured bladder with uroperitoneum should be suspected. The creatinine concentration is preferable to BUN determination for diagnosis of this condition. Blood typing is useful for diagnosis of NI, determination of blood compatability between donor and transfusion recipient, and for verification of parentage for breed registries. Several techniques are available. Several tests are available for evaluation of the foal's immunoglobulin levels and confirmation of passive antibody transfer. Because foals suffering from FPT are more predisposed to infections, their immunoglobulin status should be determined as early as possible so that additional colostrum or plasma can be administered as needed. Neonatal isoerythrolysis is uncommon but is an important immunologic syndrome that often results in a fatal hemolytic

  20. Blood Pressure Management in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), the coexistence of hypertension enhances the cardiovascular risk, and the prevention of future cardiovascular disease is an important component of T2DM management. Antihypertensive therapy has been shown to be an effective method of reducing the micro- and macrovascular complications of T2DM, however, the optimal target blood pressure (BP) levels are still under debate. Most of the international guidelines have raised the target clinic BP from 130/80 to 140/90 mmHg, however, the Japanese Society of Hypertension 2014 guidelines kept the target BP level at 130/80 mmHg. However, individualized BP-lowering treatments should be considered in patients with T2DM, especially in high-risk individuals such as those with a history of stroke or retinopathy, and aggressive antihypertensive therapy below 130 mmHg should be initiated even when the initial systolic BP level is <140 mmHg. The authors performed two studies concerning the BP target levels of home BP. In the first study, the authors found that a home BP target <125/75 mmHg was effective in improving the measures of vascular stiffness and kidney damage. In the second study, when the clinic BP target was set at 130/80 mmHg, the home BP could be approximately 130/80 mmHg. More data are needed to individualize the target BP levels of T2DM patients.

  1. Relationship between Serum Iron Profile and Blood Groups among the Voluntary Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Al-Mamun, M A; Faruki, M A; Islam, K; Nandy, S

    2016-04-01

    Blood donation results in a substantial iron loss and subsequent mobilization from body stores. Chronic iron deficiency is a well-recognized complication of regular blood donation. The present study conducted to compare the level of serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and percentage transferrin saturation in different ABO and Rhesus type blood groups among the voluntary blood donors of Bangladesh. The present prospective study included 100 healthy voluntary donors attending at Department of Blood Transfusion, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka between the periods of July 2013 to Jun 2014. From each donor 10mL venous blood sample was taken and divided into heparinized and non-heparinized tubes for determination of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin by standard laboratory methods. Percentage of transferrin saturation (TS) calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data were analyzed with SPSS (version 16) software and comparisons between groups were made using student's t-test and one way ANOVA. In the present study mean±SD of age of the respondents was 27.2±6.5 years with a range of 18 to 49 years and 81.0% were male and 19.0% were female. Among the donors 18.0% had blood group A, 35.0% had blood group B, 14.0% had blood group AB and 33.0% had blood group O. Among the donors 91.0% had rhesus positive and 9.0% had rhesus negative. Donors with blood group O had lowest haemoglobin, serum iron and transferring saturation levels. Donors with blood group A had highest TIBC level. Donors with blood group B had lowest serum ferritin level. An independent samples 't' test showed statistically significant difference in serum ferritin and percentage transferrin saturation between blood group AB and blood group O and in percentage transferrin saturation between blood group B and blood group O. One way ANOVA showed that there is no significant difference in haemoglobin, serum iron, serum

  2. Donor- and recipient-derived immunity in ABO incompatible living-related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Alexandra; Fiedler, Melanie; Beckebaum, Susanne; Cicinnati, Vito R; Herzer, Kerstin; Lenz, Veronika; Witzke, Oliver; Paul, Andreas; Roggendorf, Michael; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2015-09-01

    This report describes how donor- and recipient-derived immunity was influenced by immunosuppressive treatment of ABO incompatibility (rituximab and immunoadsorption/plasmaphereses) in the long-term. We present an 8-year course of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunity, isohemagglutinins and B cell numbers. Whereas cellular HBV immunity was transferred from the HBV vaccinated donor (blood group A1) to the HBV naïve recipient (blood group 0), humoral HBV specific immune transfer was lacking. Starting at month 17 after transplantation, the recipient was vaccinated six times against HBV. Anti-HBs did not appear until the sixth vaccination at month 44. Immunoadsorption prior to transplantation reduced anti-A1 IgG titers from 256 to 2. Titers after transplantation remained low (⩽64). B cell numbers were below standard values up to month 26, then normalized and exceeded normal values from year 7 to 8 post transplantation. In conclusion, donor-derived B cell immunity was lost but recipient-derived immunity persisted after ABO incompatible transplantation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  4. How-to-Do-It: A Simulation of the Blood Type Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John D., Sr.; Smailes, Deborah L.

    1989-01-01

    Explains an activity that allows students to visualize antigen-antibody type reactions and learn about antibodies and antigens without performing blood typing tests. Provides directions for students and a comparison chart of a blood typing simulation with procedure which is based on the reactions of certain ionic solutions when mixed. (RT)

  5. Lower fasting blood glucose in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Jansen, Ann Kristine; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Matos, Camila Maria; Souza, Marcio Leandro Ribeiro; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Diniz, Leonardo Mauricio; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Riccardi, Vincent Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies indicate a lower occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level is the main criterion used to diagnose DM and glucose intolerance. Therefore, this study compared FBG level between adults with NF1 and non-NF1 controls. We selected clinical records of 57 out of 701 individuals attending the Neurofibromatosis Outpatient Reference Center of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. The selected patients with NF1 were matched to non-NF1 controls selected from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health according to sex, age (range, 35-74 years) and BMI at a ratio of 1:3. In both groups, individuals with DM were excluded. Median FBG level in the NF1 group (86 mg/dl (range, 56-127 mg/dl)) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (102 mg/dl (range, 85-146 mg/dl)) (P<0.001). Prevalence of FBG level ≥100 mg/dl in the NF1 group (16%) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (63%) (P<0.05). The chance of a high FBG level was 89% lower in the NF1 group (odds ratio, 0.112; 95% CI, 0.067-0.188) (P<0.05). In conclusion, adults with NF1 showed a lower FBG level and a lower prevalence of high FBG level compared with non-NF1 controls. © 2016 The authors.

  6. Lower fasting blood glucose in neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Jansen, Ann Kristine; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Matos, Camila Maria; Souza, Marcio Leandro Ribeiro; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Diniz, Leonardo Mauricio; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Riccardi, Vincent Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate a lower occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level is the main criterion used to diagnose DM and glucose intolerance. Therefore, this study compared FBG level between adults with NF1 and non-NF1 controls. We selected clinical records of 57 out of 701 individuals attending the Neurofibromatosis Outpatient Reference Center of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. The selected patients with NF1 were matched to non-NF1 controls selected from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health according to sex, age (range, 35–74 years) and BMI at a ratio of 1:3. In both groups, individuals with DM were excluded. Median FBG level in the NF1 group (86 mg/dl (range, 56–127 mg/dl)) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (102 mg/dl (range, 85–146 mg/dl)) (P<0.001). Prevalence of FBG level ≥100 mg/dl in the NF1 group (16%) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (63%) (P<0.05). The chance of a high FBG level was 89% lower in the NF1 group (odds ratio, 0.112; 95% CI, 0.067–0.188) (P<0.05). In conclusion, adults with NF1 showed a lower FBG level and a lower prevalence of high FBG level compared with non-NF1 controls. PMID:26631381

  7. Blood glucose monitoring skills in children with Type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perwien, A R; Johnson, S B; Dymtrow, D; Silverstein, J

    2000-06-01

    While blood glucose monitoring has become increasingly important in diabetes care, studies have yet to address the accuracy of youngsters' performance of blood glucose testing with current reflectance meters. The present study examined testing skills and predictors of accurate testing skills in a sample of 7-14-year-old children attending a summer camp for youth with diabetes (n=266). A 15-item behavior observational skill test was used to assess accuracy of blood glucose monitoring skills with reflectance meters. Accurate performance of individual skills ranged between 14.6% and 99.6% for the sample. However, a number of children made critical errors (errors that were likely to lead to inaccurate blood glucose testing results). When duration of diabetes and metabolic control were controlled, female gender, older age, experience with a particular meter, and absence of hypoglycemia at the time of testing were positively associated with accurate skill performance. Findings suggest that younger children, children using a new blood glucose testing meter, and children suspected of having hypoglycemia should be supervised and observed when testing. Although all young children should be supervised when blood glucose testing, boys may need closer supervision until an older age than girls. This study underscores the need for health care providers to periodically observe children's blood glucose monitoring techniques to assure accurate testing habits and to correct problematic testing behaviors.

  8. Sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors reduce evening home blood pressure in type 2 diabetes with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tsuneo; Kishimoto, Miyako; Ohta, Mari; Tomonaga, Osamu; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2017-05-01

    The effects of sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors on home blood pressure were examined in type 2 diabetes with nephropathy. The patients with diabetic nephropathy were screened from medical records in our hospitals. Among them, 52 patients who measured home blood pressure and started to take sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors were selected. Clinical parameters including estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria and home blood pressure for 6 months were analysed. Sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors (luseogliflozin 5 mg/day or canagliflozin 100 mg/day) reduced body weight, HbA1c, albuminuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate and office blood pressure. Although sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors did not alter morning blood pressure, it reduced evening systolic blood pressure. Regression analyses revealed that decreases in evening blood pressure predicted decrements in albuminuria. The present data suggest that sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors suppress sodium overload during daytime to reduce evening blood pressure and albuminuria.

  9. Impacts of sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors on central blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tsuneo; Ohno, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2018-03-01

    To assess the effects of sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors on central blood pressure, an important determinant of cardiovascular events. Canagliflozin, Empagliflozin or Luseogliflozin was given for 102 type 2 diabetic patients with hypertension and nephropathy. Central blood pressure was evaluated by radial tonometry. Clinical parameters were followed for 6 months. Three differing sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors similarly reduced brachial and central blood pressures, casual blood sugar, haemoglobin A1c, estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria without significant changes in pulse rate and lipid profiles. Central systolic blood pressure was associated with the decreases in albuminuria by sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors. Comparable influences of various sodium-glucose co-transporter type 2 inhibitors on central blood pressure suggest class effects.

  10. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p < 10(-4)). A weak positive relationship was found between blood glucose and breath acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  12. Evaluation of new indigenous “point-of-care” ABO and Rh grouping device

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Setya, Divya; Aggarwal, Geet; Arora, Dinesh; Dara, Ravi C.; Ratan, Ankita; Bhardwaj, Gunjan; Acharya, Devi Prasad

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Erycard 2.0 is a “point-of-care” device that is primarily being used for patient blood grouping before transfusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Erycard 2.0 was compared with conventional slide technology for accuracy and time taken for ABO and Rh forward grouping result with column agglutination technology (CAT) being the gold standard. Erycard 2.0 as a device was also evaluated for its stability under different storage conditions and stability of result till 48 h. In addition, grouping of hemolyzed samples was also tested with Erycard 2.0. Ease of use of Erycard 2.0 was evaluated with a survey among paramedical staff. RESULTS: Erycard 2.0 demonstrated 100% concordance with CAT as compared with slide technique (98.9%). Mean time taken per test by Erycard 2.0 and slide technique was 5.13 min and 1.7 min, respectively. After pretesting storage under different temperature and humidity conditions, Erycard 2.0 did not show any deviation from the result. The result did not change even after 48 h of testing and storage under room temperature. 100% concordance was recorded between pre- and post-hemolyzed blood grouping. Ease of use survey revealed that Erycard 2.0 was more acceptable to paramedical staff for its simplicity, objectivity, and performance than conventional slide technique. CONCLUSION: Erycard 2.0 can be used as “point-of-care” device for blood donor screening for ABO and Rh blood group and can possibly replace conventional slide technique. PMID:29403211

  13. 21 CFR 640.5 - Testing the blood.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... be negative to a serological test for syphilis. (b) Determination of blood group. Each container of Whole Blood shall be classified as to ABO blood group. At least two blood group tests shall be made and... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing the blood. 640.5 Section 640.5 Food and...

  14. Oral administration of Chinese herbal medicine during gestation period for preventing hemolytic disease of the newborn due to ABO incompatibility: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huijuan; Wu, Ruohan; Han, Mei; Caldwell, Patrina Ha Yuen; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    About 85.3% of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) is caused by maternal-fetal ABO blood group incompatibility. However, there is currently no recommended "best" therapy for ABO incompatibility during pregnancy. To systematically assess the safety and effectiveness of oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for preventing HDN due to ABO incompatibility. The protocol of this review was registered on the PROSPERO website (No. CRD42016038637).Six databases were searched from inception to April 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CHM for maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility were included. The primary outcome was incidence of HDN. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Risk ratios (RR) and mean differences with 95% confidence interval were used as effect measures. Meta-analyses using Revman 5.3 software were conducted if there were sufficient trials without obvious clinical or statistical heterogeneity available. Totally 28 RCTs involving3413 women were included in the review. The majority of the trials had unclear or high risk of bias. Our study found that the rate of HDN and the incidence of neonatal jaundice might be 70% lower in the herbal medicine group compared with the usual care group (RR from 0.25 to 0.30).After treatment with herbal medicine, women were twice as likely to have antibody titers lower than 1:64 compared with women who received usual care(RR from 2.15 to 3.14) and the umbilical cord blood bilirubin level in the herbal medicine group was 4umol/L lower than in those receiving usual care. There was no difference in Apgar scores or birthweights between the two groups. This review found very low-quality evidence that CHM prevented HDN caused by maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility. No firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the effectiveness or safety of CHM for this condition.

  15. Oral administration of Chinese herbal medicine during gestation period for preventing hemolytic disease of the newborn due to ABO incompatibility: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huijuan; Wu, Ruohan; Han, Mei; Caldwell, Patrina Ha Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Background About 85.3% of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) is caused by maternal-fetal ABO blood group incompatibility. However, there is currently no recommended “best” therapy for ABO incompatibility during pregnancy. Objectives To systematically assess the safety and effectiveness of oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for preventing HDN due to ABO incompatibility. Methods The protocol of this review was registered on the PROSPERO website (No. CRD42016038637).Six databases were searched from inception to April 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CHM for maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility were included. The primary outcome was incidence of HDN. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Risk ratios (RR) and mean differences with 95% confidence interval were used as effect measures. Meta-analyses using Revman 5.3 software were conducted if there were sufficient trials without obvious clinical or statistical heterogeneity available. Results Totally 28 RCTs involving3413 women were included in the review. The majority of the trials had unclear or high risk of bias. Our study found that the rate of HDN and the incidence of neonatal jaundice might be 70% lower in the herbal medicine group compared with the usual care group (RR from 0.25 to 0.30).After treatment with herbal medicine, women were twice as likely to have antibody titers lower than 1:64 compared with women who received usual care(RR from 2.15 to 3.14) and the umbilical cord blood bilirubin level in the herbal medicine group was 4umol/L lower than in those receiving usual care. There was no difference in Apgar scores or birthweights between the two groups. Conclusions This review found very low-quality evidence that CHM prevented HDN caused by maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility. No firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the effectiveness or safety of CHM for this condition. PMID:28719639

  16. Stem Cell Physics. Laser Manipulation of Blood Types: Laser-Stripping-Away of Red Blood Cell Surface Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    A novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine[2] is proposed. The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multilaser beams with the flowing blood thin films can lead to a conversion of blood types A, B, and AB into O type.[3] The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation),[4] upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, CA.

  17. Competition between structural instabilities in strained ABO3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, E.

    2010-03-01

    In spite of their simple structure, the family of ABO3 compounds present a large variety of phase transitions involving polar and non polar distortions as well as magnetic orders. Here we will discuss the microscopic origin of these properties and how they are affected in nanostructures through the concept of structural instabilities. We will from the fact that the ferroelectric (FE) and the antiferrodistortive (AFD) instabilities are in competition at the bulk level and are strongly sensitive to pressure and strain. From these considerations we will describe the possibilities to tune this FE/AFD competition by playing with strain and interface engineering. To that end we will first consider the effect of epitaxial strain on BaTiO3, SrTiO3, PbTiO3 and CaTiO3 thin films. In all of these compounds, the epitaxial strain can strongly modify the phase diagrams giving rise to different pure or mixed FE/AFD ground states. We will also extend the discussion on magnetic perovskites like CaMnO3 and will present the different strategies to induce or tune multiferroic properties. Second we will focus on the interface effects as present in bicolor superlattices. As an example we will examine the case of PbTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice and will show that it exhibits totally unique properties arising from unexpected FE/AFD couplings at the interface between the layers. We will then investigate to which extent similar types of FE/AFD couplings can be induced in other artificially layered systems. We will consider different bicolor superlattices obtained from the combination of PbTiO3, SrTiO3, CaTiO3 and BaTiO3 and discuss how the intrinsic tendency of these compounds to favor either the FE or the AFD instabilities shifts or even suppresses the FE/AFD coupling.

  18. The use of blood-type tattoos during the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Elizabeth K; Laumann, Anne E

    2008-03-01

    We have seen a number of individuals who received blood-type tattoos on the left side of the chest as schoolchildren in northwest Indiana during the 1950s. To investigate the history of blood-type tattooing. Historical research was conducted using newspaper and journal articles found in medical libraries, online archives, American Medical Association archives, Chicago Historical Society records, local medical society documents, in addition to personal interviews. Blood-type tattoos were used during the Cold War to enable rapid transfusions as part of a "walking blood bank" in case of atomic attack. Nationwide blood-typing programs occurred to inform individuals of their own blood types and to provide local communities with lists of possible donors. The blood-type tattooing program was part of this effort, but community-wide tattooing occurred only in two parts of the United States: Lake County, Indiana, and Cache and Rich counties, Utah. In these communities, during 1951 and 1952, schoolchildren were tattooed to facilitate emergency transfusions. Events occurred more than 50 years ago, so we relied on original documents and interviews from individuals involved in the program who are still alive. The use of blood-type tattoos was short lived, lasting less than a year, and ultimately failed because physicians did not trust tattoos for medical information.

  19. Brief communication: Molecular characterization of O alleles at the ABO locus in Chilean Aymara and Huilliche Indians.

    PubMed

    Llop, Elena; Henríquez, Hugo; Moraga, Mauricio; Castro, Mario; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2006-12-01

    A molecular characterization of alleles O1, O1variant (O1v), and the mutation G542A of the ABO blood group was performed in two Amerindian populations of Chile, the Aymara (n = 84) and the Huilliche (n = 75). In addition, a sample of 82 individuals of Santiago belonging to the mixed Chilean population was typed for comparative purposes. The polymorphisms which allow for molecular differentiation of different alleles of the O blood group were studied in genomic DNA. The mutations G188, G261-, G542A, T646A, and C771T, described for alleles O1, O1v, and G542A, were determined using the PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) technique. All individuals studied were group O homozygotes for the deletion G261-, which defines the O1 alleles. Results obtained indicate that allele O1v exhibits frequencies of 0.65, 0.81, and 0.60 in Aymara, Huilliche, and Santiago populations, respectively. The frequencies of allele O1(G542A) were 0.119, 0.113, and 0.079 in the same populations. Frequencies for alleles O1 and O1v obtained in the Chilean populations studied concur with the results obtained by other authors, respecting the greater frequency of allele O1v as well as with its heterogeneous distribution in aboriginal South American populations. In Chilean populations, Allele G542A exhibits lower frequencies than those described for indigenous populations from Brazil and may be used as an Amerind admixture marker. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Testing versus guessing blood glucose values: impact on self-care behaviors in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pettus, Jeremy; Stenger, Patricia; Schachner, Holly C; Dunne, Nancy; Parkes, Joan Lee; Pardo, Scott; Edelman, Steven V

    2014-09-01

    To assess differences between estimated blood glucose values and those measured on a blood glucose meter and the impact on self-care behavior in type 2 diabetes. Subjects ≥18 years with type 2 diabetes (N = 297) attending a Taking Control of Your Diabetes conference were asked questions about diabetes management and to estimate their current blood glucose. Study staff tested subjects' blood glucose on a meter. After seeing the result, subjects were again asked questions on diabetes management. NCT01453413. The percentage of subject blood glucose estimations that were outside ISO 15197:2003 accuracy criteria (>±15 mg/dL or >±20% of meter glucose values). Nearly half (46%) of subjects estimated blood glucose values outside ISO 15197:2003 accuracy criteria. Time since last blood glucose test, time since last meal, testing frequency, and A1C did not have an effect on differences between estimated blood glucose values and meter results. In the questionnaire before blood glucose testing, most subjects strongly agreed, agreed, or neither agreed nor disagreed that 'I make decisions about my diabetes, such as my food intake or my insulin dose even when I do not test my blood sugar' (71%) and 'My body tells me without testing if my blood sugar is low or high' (77%). After blood glucose testing, 99% of subjects strongly agreed, agreed, or neither agreed nor disagreed that 'Knowing my blood sugar by checking could help me make different diabetes decisions'. Self-monitoring of blood glucose is an important component of diabetes self-management. Testing rather than guessing blood glucose values is important to obtain accurate results and inform people with type 2 diabetes to make effective, appropriate diabetes management decisions. A potential limitation of this study is that the subject population may not be representative of the general population of people with diabetes; however, the conference setting may attract a more motivated population, which could

  1. Ultraviolet and visible light spectrophotometric approach to blood typing: objective analysis by agglutination index.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, S; Orton, S; Leparc, G F; Garcia-Rubio, L H; Potter, R L

    1999-10-01

    A new blood typing technology based on ultraviolet (UV) and visible light spectroscopy (UV/visible spectroscopy) has been developed. Blood groups and types are determined by quantifying reproducible changes in the UV and visible light spectra of blood in the presence of agglutinating antibodies. Samples of red cells in the presence and absence of agglutinating antibodies were examined by UV/visible spectroscopy. Blood groups and types were determined by comparing the optical density spectra obtained between 665 and 1000 nm. These comparisons generate numbers (agglutination index) ranging from 0 to 100, with smaller numbers corresponding to lack of agglutination and larger numbers corresponding to agglutination. The optical density of agglutinated blood is dramatically different from that of unagglutinated blood. The agglutination index derived from the relative slopes of the spectra is an objective indicator of agglutination strength. An agglutination index greater than 17 consistently and accurately established blood group- and type-specific agglutination. The method accurately predicted A, B, and O blood groups, and D type in over 275 samples. Scattering theory-based calculations of relative volumes of red cells before and after agglutination show a direct correlation with the agglutination index and provide the theoretical basis of the analysis. This quantitative technique is reproducible and has the potential for automation.

  2. Determination of degree of RBC agglutination for blood typing using a small quantity of blood sample in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Ho, Ching-Yuan; Zhou, Xin-Miao; Yen, Hsiu-Rong

    2018-04-15

    Blood typing assay is a critical test to ensure the serological compatibility of a donor and an intended recipient prior to a blood transfusion. This paper presents a microfluidic blood typing system using a small quantity of blood sample to determine the degree of agglutination of red blood cell (RBC). Two measuring methods were proposed: impedimetric measurement and electroanalytical measurement. The charge transfer resistance in the impedimetric measurement and the power parameter in the electroanalytical measurement were used for the analysis of agglutination level. From the experimental results, both measuring methods provide quantitative results, and the parameters are linearly and monotonically related to the degree of RBC agglutination. However, the electroanalytical measurement is more reliable than the impedimetric technique because the impedimetric measurement may suffer from many influencing factors, such as chip conditions. Five levels from non-agglutination (level 0) to strong agglutination (level 4+) can be discriminated in this study, conforming to the clinical requirement to prevent any risks in transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

  4. Results of a multicenter prospective clinical study in Japan for evaluating efficacy and safety of desensitization protocol based on rituximab in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kota; Saito, Kazuhide; Takahara, Shiro; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Yagisawa, Takashi; Aikawa, Atsushi; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Yoshimura, Norio; Tanabe, Kazunari; Morozumi, Kunio; Shimazu, Motohide

    2017-08-01

    Deceased organ donations are rare in Japan, with most kidney transplants performed from a limited number of living donors. Researchers have thus developed highly successful ABO-incompatible transplantation procedures, emphasizing preoperative desensitization and postoperative immunosuppression. A recent open-label, single-arm, multicenter clinical study prospectively examined the efficacy and safety of rituximab/mycophenolate mofetil desensitization in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation without splenectomy. Mycophenolate mofetil and low dose steroid were started 28 days pretransplant, followed by two doses of rituximab 375 mg/m 2 at day -14 and day -1, and postoperative immunosuppression with tacrolimus or ciclosporin and basiliximab. The primary endpoint was the non-occurrence rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection. Patient survival and graft survival were monitored for 1 year posttransplant. Eighteen patients received rituximab and underwent ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. CD19-positive peripheral B cell count decreased rapidly after the first rituximab infusion and recovered gradually after week 36. The desensitization protocol was tolerable, and most rituximab-related infusion reactions were mild. No anti-A/B antibody-mediated rejection occurred with this series. One patient developed anti-HLA antibody-mediated rejection (Banff 07 type II) on day 2, which was successfully managed. Patient and graft survival were both 100 % after 1 year. Our desensitization protocol was confirmed to be clinically effective and with acceptable toxicities for ABO-I-KTx (University Hospital Medical Information Network Registration Number: UMIN000006635).

  5. Rotary piston blood pumps: past developments and future potential of a unique pump type.

    PubMed

    Wappenschmidt, Johannes; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Margreiter, Raimund; Klima, Günter; Goetzenich, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The design of implantable blood pumps is either based on displacement pumps with membranes or rotary pumps. Both pump types have limitations to meet the clinical requirements. Rotary piston blood pumps have the potential to overcome these limitations and to merge the benefits. Compared to membrane pumps, they are smaller and with no need for wear-affected membranes and valves. Compared to rotary pumps, the blood flow is pulsatile instead of a non-physiological continuous flow. Furthermore, the risk of flow-induced blood damage and platelet activation may be reduced due to low shear stress to the blood. The past developments of rotary piston blood pumps are summarized and the main problem for long-term application is identified: insufficient seals. A new approach with seal-less drives is proposed and current research on a simplified rotary piston design is presented. Expert commentary: The development of blood pumps focuses mainly on the improvement of rotary pumps. However, medical complications indicate that inherent limitations of this pump type remain and restrict the next substantial step forward in the therapy of heart failure patients. Thus, research on different pump types is reasonable. If the development of reliable drives and bearings succeeds, rotary piston blood pumps become a promising alternative.

  6. Differential interaction of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin and cholera toxin with pig intestinal brush border glycoproteins depending on their ABH and related blood group antigenic determinants.

    PubMed

    Balanzino, L E; Barra, J L; Monferran, C G; Cumar, F A

    1994-04-01

    The ability of glycoproteins from pig intestinal brush border membranes (BBM) to bind cholera toxin (CT) or heat-labile toxins from strains of Escherichia coli isolated from human (LTh) or pig (LTp) intestines was studied. Glycoproteins capable of binding the toxins are also recognized by antibodies or lectins specific for ABO(H) blood group and related antigens. Pigs expressing A, H, or I antigenic determinants were used for comparison. The toxin-binding capacity of a glycoprotein depends on the toxin type and the blood group epitope borne by the glycoprotein. LTh and LTp preferably bound to several blood group A-active glycoproteins rather than H-active glycoproteins. By contrast, CT practically did not recognize either blood group A- or blood group H-active glycoproteins, while glycoproteins from pigs expressing I antigenic determinants were able to interact with LTh, LTp, and CT. LTh, LTp, or CT glycoprotein binding was selectively inhibited by specific lectins or monosaccharides. Affinity purification of the toxin binding brush border glycoproteins on the basis of their blood group reactivity suggests that such glycoproteins are hydrolytic enzymes. BBM from A+ pigs contain about 27 times more LTh binding sites, in addition to those recognized by CT, than an equivalent membrane preparation from H+ pigs. The present findings may help clarify some previous unclear results on LTh binding to intestinal BBM glycoproteins obtained by use of animals not typed by their ABO(H) blood group phenotype.

  7. Effects of blood type and blood handling on feeding success, longevity and egg production in the body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus.

    PubMed

    Mumcuoglu, K Y; Danilevich, M; Zelig, O; Grinbaum, H; Friger, M; Meinking, T L

    2011-03-01

    The effects of feeding different types of human blood to human body lice, Pediculus humanus humanus L. (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), on feeding success, longevity and numbers of eggs laid were investigated using an artificial blood-feeding system in the laboratory. No significant differences were found between lice fed on different human blood types for any of the parameters tested. However, when lice were fed on human blood of one blood type followed immediately by a different blood type, they took significantly smaller bloodmeals, their longevity was reduced and they laid fewer eggs per female than control lice that had been fed twice on the same human blood type. When lice were fed human blood that had been stored for 1-26 weeks, the quantity of blood taken, the proportion of lice that became fully engorged and lice longevity diminished gradually as the storage time of the blood increased, but there was no effect of storage time on the mean number of eggs laid per female. However, lice would not feed on 26-week-old blood. The type of anticoagulant used had a significant effect on the proportion fed, longevity and number of eggs laid per female. Generally, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid)-treated blood reduced longevity and the number of eggs laid per female to a greater degree than heparinized or citrated blood. Lice fed on rabbit blood took significantly larger amounts of blood, lived longer and laid a higher mean number of eggs per female than lice fed on human blood. © 2010 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology © 2010 The Royal Entomological Society.

  8. Distribution of blood types in a sample of 245 New Zealand non-purebred cats.

    PubMed

    Cattin, R P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the distribution of feline blood types in a sample of non-pedigree, domestic cats in New Zealand, whether a difference exists in this distribution between domestic short haired and domestic long haired cats, and between the North and South Islands of New Zealand; and to calculate the risk of a random blood transfusion causing a severe transfusion reaction, and the risk of a random mating producing kittens susceptible to neonatal isoerythrolysis. The results of 245 blood typing tests in non-pedigree cats performed at the New Zealand Veterinary Pathology (NZVP) and Gribbles Veterinary Pathology laboratories between the beginning of 2009 and the end of 2014 were retrospectively collated and analysed. Cats that were identified as domestic short or long haired were included. For the cats tested at Gribbles Veterinary Pathology 62 were from the North Island, and 27 from the South Island. The blood type distribution differed between samples from the two laboratories (p=0.029), but not between domestic short and long haired cats (p=0.50), or between the North and South Islands (p=0.76). Of the 89 cats tested at Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, 70 (79%) were type A, 18 (20%) type B, and 1 (1%) type AB; for NZVP 139/156 (89.1%) cats were type A, 16 (10.3%) type B, and 1 (0.6%) type AB. It was estimated that 18.3-31.9% of random blood transfusions would be at risk of a transfusion reaction, and neonatal isoerythrolysis would be a risk in 9.2-16.1% of random matings between non-pedigree cats. The results from this study suggest that there is a high risk of complications for a random blood transfusion between non-purebred cats in New Zealand. Neonatal isoerythrolysis should be considered an important differential diagnosis in illness or mortality in kittens during the first days of life.

  9. Parsimonious model for blood glucose level monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Ma, Yan Fen; Wen, Jing Xiao; DU, Yan Fang; Li, Chun Lin; Li, Guang Wei

    2014-07-01

    To establish the parsimonious model for blood glucose monitoring in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving oral hypoglycemic agent treatment. One hundred and fifty-nine adult Chinese type 2 diabetes patients were randomized to receive rapid-acting or sustained-release gliclazide therapy for 12 weeks. Their blood glucose levels were measured at 10 time points in a 24 h period before and after treatment, and the 24 h mean blood glucose levels were measured. Contribution of blood glucose levels to the mean blood glucose level and HbA1c was assessed by multiple regression analysis. The correlation coefficients of blood glucose level measured at 10 time points to the daily MBG were 0.58-0.74 and 0.59-0.79, respectively, before and after treatment (P<0.0001). The multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the blood glucose levels measured at 6 of the 10 time points could explain 95% and 97% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment. The three blood glucose levels, which were measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner, of the 10 time points could explain 84% and 86% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment, but could only explain 36% and 26% of the changes in HbA1c before and after treatment, and they had a poorer correlation with the HbA1c than with the 24 h MBG. The blood glucose levels measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner truly reflected the change 24 h blood glucose level, suggesting that they are appropriate for the self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients receiving oral anti-diabetes therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of autonomic dysfunction to abnormal exercise blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Weston, Kassia S; Sacre, Julian W; Jellis, Christine L; Coombes, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the presence and severity of autonomic dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, with and without exaggerated blood pressure responses to exercise. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 98 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (aged 59±9). Both time (standard deviation of RR intervals, root-mean-square of successive RR interval differences) and frequency (total spectral power, high frequency, low frequency, very low frequency) domains of heart rate variability were analysed in a 5 min recording at rest and 20 min after a maximal treadmill test. An exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise was identified by peak blood pressure ≥190/105 mmHg (women) or ≥210/105 mmHg (men). Each group of either exaggerated exercise blood pressure response or normal blood pressure response consisted of 49 patients. At rest there were no significant differences between groups for all time and frequency domain parameters of heart rate variability. Post-exercise, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the SDNN, RMSSD and TP in the exaggerated exercise blood pressure group. Independent correlates (p<0.01) of exercise systolic blood pressure included post-exercise TP, resting systolic blood pressure, cardiac autonomic neuropathy and beta-blockers (beta=-0.28, adj. R² = 0.32, p<0.001). Reduced post-exercise heart rate variability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with an exaggerated exercise blood pressure response suggests preclinical autonomic dysfunction characterized by impaired vagal modulation. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 25 CFR 290.21 - May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision? 290.21 Section 290.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES TRIBAL REVENUE ALLOCATION PLANS § 290.21 May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision? Yes, you may appeal the...

  12. 25 CFR 290.21 - May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision? 290.21 Section 290.21 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES TRIBAL REVENUE ALLOCATION PLANS § 290.21 May an Indian tribe appeal the ABO's decision? Yes, you may appeal the...

  13. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in type 2 diabetes: a barrier to effective management?

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher E; Greaves, Colin J; Evans, Philip H; Dickens, Andy; Campbell, John L

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have identified a substantial prevalence of a blood pressure difference between arms in various populations, but not patients with type 2 diabetes. Recognition of such a difference would be important as a potential cause of underestimation of blood pressure. Aim To measure prevalence of an inter-arm blood pressure difference in patients with type 2 diabetes, and to estimate how frequently blood pressure measurements could be erroneously underestimated if an inter-arm difference is unrecognised. Design of study Cross-sectional study. Setting Five surgeries covered by three general practices, Devon, England. Method Patients with type 2 diabetes underwent bilateral simultaneous blood pressure measurements using a validated protocol. Mean blood pressures were calculated for each arm to derive mean systolic and diastolic differences, and to estimate point prevalence of predefined magnitudes of difference. Results A total of 101 participants were recruited. Mean age was 66 years (standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years); 59% were male, and mean blood pressure was 138/79 mmHg (SD = 15/10 mmHg). Ten participants (10%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4 to 16) had a systolic inter-arm difference ≥10 mmHg; 29 (29%; 95% CI = 20 to 38) had a diastolic difference ≥5 mmHg; and three (3%; 95% CI = 0 to 6) a diastolic difference ≥10 mmHg. No confounding variable was observed to account for the magnitude of an inter-arm difference. Conclusion A systolic inter-arm difference ≥10 mmHg was observed in 10% of patients with diabetes. Failure to recognise this would misclassify half of these as normotensive rather than hypertensive using the lower-reading arm. New patients with type 2 diabetes should be screened for an inter-arm blood pressure difference. PMID:19520026

  14. Inter-arm blood pressure difference in type 2 diabetes: a barrier to effective management?

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher E; Greaves, Colin J; Evans, Philip H; Dickens, Andy; Campbell, John L

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have identified a substantial prevalence of a blood pressure difference between arms in various populations, but not patients with type 2 diabetes. Recognition of such a difference would be important as a potential cause of underestimation of blood pressure. To measure prevalence of an inter-arm blood pressure difference in patients with type 2 diabetes, and to estimate how frequently blood pressure measurements could be erroneously underestimated if an inter-arm difference is unrecognised. Cross-sectional study. Five surgeries covered by three general practices, Devon, England. Patients with type 2 diabetes underwent bilateral simultaneous blood pressure measurements using a validated protocol. Mean blood pressures were calculated for each arm to derive mean systolic and diastolic differences, and to estimate point prevalence of predefined magnitudes of difference. A total of 101 participants were recruited. Mean age was 66 years (standard deviation [SD] = 13.9 years); 59% were male, and mean blood pressure was 138/79 mmHg (SD = 15/10 mmHg). Ten participants (10%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4 to 16) had a systolic inter-arm difference > or =10 mmHg; 29 (29%; 95% CI = 20 to 38) had a diastolic difference >/=5 mmHg; and three (3%; 95% CI = 0 to 6) a diastolic difference > or =10 mmHg. No confounding variable was observed to account for the magnitude of an inter-arm difference. A systolic inter-arm difference > or =10 mmHg was observed in 10% of patients with diabetes. Failure to recognise this would misclassify half of these as normotensive rather than hypertensive using the lower-reading arm. New patients with type 2 diabetes should be screened for an inter-arm blood pressure difference.

  15. Relative Risk of Various Head and Neck Cancers among Different Blood Groups: An Analytical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kote, Sunder; Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Singh, Shilpi; Kundu, Hansa; Jain, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a unique disease characterized by abnormal growth of cells which have the ability to invade the adjacent tissues and sometimes even distant organs. The limited and contrasting evidence regarding the association of ABO blood groups with the different types of head and neck cancers in the Indian population warrants the need for the present study. Aim and Objective: To assess the relative risk of various Head & Neck cancers among different blood groups. Materials and Method: Three hundred sixty two diagnosed cases of different type of head and neck cancers and 400 controls were selected from four hospitals of New Delhi, India. The information regarding the type of head and neck cancer was obtained from the case sheets of the patients regarding their socio demographic profile, dietary history using a structured performa. The information regarding type of cancer (cases only), ABO blood group was collected. Statistical Tests: The data was analysed using the SPSS 19 version. Chi square test and odd ratios were calculated. The level of significance was fixed at 5%. Results: The O blood group was found to be most prevalent followed by B, A and AB among the cases as well as the controls. Oral cancer patients showed maximum number in blood group O followed by B, A and AB. Significant pattern of distribution was seen among the patients of esophageal cancer, laryngeal cancer and salivary gland cancer as well (p= 0.003, p=0.000 p=0.112 respectively. Conclusion: The present study reveals that there is an inherited element in the susceptibility or protection against different types of head and neck cancers. Blood group A was found to be a potential risk factor for the development of oral cancers, esophageal cancers and salivary gland cancers while blood group B was found to be a potential risk factor for laryngeal cancers. PMID:24959511

  16. Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B are associated with elevated serum lipase activity in asymptomatic subjects, and an increased risk for chronic pancreatitis: a genetic association study.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Schurmann, Claudia; Guenther, Annett; Ernst, Florian; Teumer, Alexander; Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Radke, Dörte; Greinacher, Andreas; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Zenker, Martin; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg; Lerch, Markus M

    2015-04-01

    Serum lipase activities above the threefold upper reference limit indicate acute pancreatitis. We investigated whether high lipase activity-within the reference range and in the absence of pancreatitis-are associated with genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), and whether these identified SNPs are also associated with clinical pancreatitis. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on phenotypes 'serum lipase activity' and 'high serum lipase activity' were conducted including 3966 German volunteers from the population-based Study-of-Health-in-Pomerania (SHIP). Lead SNPs associated on a genome-wide significance level were replicated in two cohorts, 1444 blood donors and 1042 pancreatitis patients. Initial discovery GWAS detected SNPs within or near genes encoding the ABO blood group specifying transferases A/B (ABO), Fucosyltransferase-2 (FUT2), and Chymotrypsinogen-B2 (CTRB2), to be significantly associated with lipase activity levels in asymptomatic subjects. Replication analyses in blood donors confirmed the association of FUT-2 non-secretor status (OR=1.49; p=0.012) and ABO blood-type-B (OR=2.48; p=7.29×10(-8)) with high lipase activity levels. In pancreatitis patients, significant associations were found for FUT-2 non-secretor status (OR=1.53; p=8.56×10(-4)) and ABO-B (OR=1.69, p=1.0×10(-4)) with chronic pancreatitis, but not with acute pancreatitis. Conversely, carriers of blood group O were less frequently affected by chronic pancreatitis (OR=0.62; p=1.22×10(-05)) and less likely to have high lipase activity levels (OR=0.59; p=8.14×10(-05)). These are the first results indicating that ABO blood type-B as well as FUT2 non-secretor status are common population-wide risk factors for developing chronic pancreatitis. They also imply that, even within the reference range, elevated lipase activities may indicate subclinical pancreatic injury in asymptomatic subjects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  17. A stock-and-flow simulation model of the US blood supply.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Arianna; Forshee, Richard A; Anderson, Steven A; Walderhaug, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Lack of reporting requirements for the amount of blood stored in blood banks and hospitals poses challenges to effectively monitor the US blood supply. Effective strategies to minimize collection and donation disruptions in the supply require an understanding of the daily amount of blood available in the system. A stock-and-flow simulation model of the US blood supply was developed to obtain estimates of the daily on-hand availability of blood, with uncertainty and by ABO/Rh type. The model simulated potential impact on supply of using different blood management practices for transfusion: first in-first out (FIFO), using the oldest stored red blood cell units first; non-FIFO likely oldest, preferentially selecting older blood; and non-FIFO likely newest, preferentially selecting younger blood. Simulation results showed higher estimates of the steady-state of the blood supply level for FIFO (1,630,000 units, 95% prediction interval [PI] 1,610,000-1,650,000) than non-FIFO scenarios (likely oldest, 1,530,000 units, 95% PI 1,500,000-1,550,000; and likely newest, 1,190,000 units, 95% PI 1,160,000-1,220,000), either for overall blood or by blood types. To our knowledge, this model represents a first attempt to evaluate the impact of different blood management practices on daily availability and distribution of blood in the US blood supply. The average storage time before blood is being issued was influenced by blood management practices, for preferences of blood that is younger and also that use specific blood types. The model also suggests which practice could best approximate the current blood management system and may serve as useful tool for blood management. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Blood Glucose Monitoring Before and After Type 1 Diabetes Clinic Visits.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Wang, Yuxia; Wright, Nancy; Deeb, Larry C

    2017-12-23

    To determine patterns of blood glucose monitoring in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) before and after routine T1D clinic visits. Blood glucose monitoring data were downloaded at four consecutive routine clinic visits from children and adolescents aged 5-18 years. Linear mixed models were used to analyze patterns of blood glucose monitoring in patients who had at least 28 days of data stored in their blood glucose monitors. In general, the frequency of blood glucose monitoring decreased across visits, and younger children engaged in more frequent blood glucose monitoring. Blood glucose monitoring increased before the T1D clinic visits in younger children, but not in adolescents. It declined after the visit regardless of age. Members of the T1D care team need to consider that a T1D clinic visit may prompt an increase in blood glucose monitoring when making treatment changes and recommendations. Tailored interventions are needed to maintain that higher level of adherence across time. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Blood Typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol ... Semen Analysis Serotonin Serum Free Light Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin ... Transferrin Receptor Stool Culture Stool Elastase Strep ...

  20. Evaluation of LABType® SSO HLA Typing using the Luminex Platform: Cord Blood Registry Typing for the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun-Youn; Song, Eun-Young; Chang, Jee-Young; Yoon, Jong-Hyun; Shin, Sue

    2016-08-01

    The performance of a new intermediate-resolution method using a PCR-Luminex platform and LABType® SSO A, B DRB1 kits as an HLA typing method for the cord blood (CB) registry of the Korean population was investigated. A total of 1,413 cord blood units (CBUs) were enrolled - 1,382 from Koreans and 31 from non-Koreans or mixed-ancestry individuals. HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 typing was performed using the LABType® SSO typing kits. HLA typing with the DNA method and 2-digit results are mandatory for the public CB bank in Korea according to the "CB Act." The proportions of ambiguous results in the 2-digit assignment were 14.6% (206/1,413) and 14.8% (205/ 1,382) among the total subjects and the Korean donors, respectively. In the 2-digit resolution, 3 different HLA-A types (69 CBUs), 31 HLA-B types (124 CBUs), and 3 HLA-DRB1 types (13 CBUs) showed ambiguous results. The 'most probable type' to the ambiguous results based on the reported Korean HLA allele frequencies were able to be assigned. The most probable results were 100% consistent with the confirmed types as determined by the HD kits (DRB1) and additional PCR-SBT or PCR-SSP tests (A and B). Luminex technology is more automated and less labor intensive than the conventional SSO typing method, and the results are less affected by differences between inspectors. Although it is not satisfactory as a sole confirmation test and cannot be used as a replacement for the PCR-SBT test, the combination of Luminex technology with LABType® SSO kits and population frequency data provides a proper typing platform that can be used as a qualifying test for CB registries.

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance of Cr{sup 3+} ions in ABO{sub 3} (A = Sc, Lu, In) diamagnetic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorotynov, A. M., E-mail: sasa@iph.krasn.ru; Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Rudenko, V. V.

    2016-04-15

    A magnetic resonance method is applied to the investigation of a number of isostructural diamagnetic compounds ABO{sub 3} (A = Sc, Lu, In) with small additions of Cr{sup 3+} ions (S = 3/2) sufficient to observe single-ion spectra. It is shown that the resonance spectra for isolated Cr{sup 3+} ions can be described to a good accuracy by the ordinary axial spin Hamiltonian for 3d ions in octahedral oxygen environment. The parameters of the spin Hamiltonian are determined. It is established that Cr{sup 3+} ions in these crystals are characterized by easy-axis-type anisotropy.

  2. Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Science Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, D.; Schnase, J. L.; McInerney, M.; Webster, W. P.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.; Griffith, P. C.; Hoy, E.; Carroll, M.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of climate change are being revealed at alarming rates in the Arctic and Boreal regions of the planet. NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program has launched a major field campaign to study these effects over the next 5 to 8 years. The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) will challenge scientists to take measurements in the field, study remote observations, and even run models to better understand the impacts of a rapidly changing climate for areas of Alaska and western Canada. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has partnered with the Terrestrial Ecology Program to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud. The cloud combines traditional high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale climate analytics. The ABoVE Science Cloud utilizes (1) virtualized high-speed InfiniBand networks, (2) a combination of high-performance file systems and object storage, and (3) virtual system environments tailored for data intensive, science applications. At the center of the architecture is a large object storage environment, much like a traditional high-performance file system, that supports data proximal processing using technologies like MapReduce on a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). Surrounding the storage is a cloud of high performance compute resources with many processing cores and large memory coupled to the storage through an InfiniBand network. Virtual systems can be tailored to a specific scientist and provisioned on the compute resources with extremely high-speed network connectivity to the storage and to other virtual systems. In this talk, we will present the architectural components of the science cloud and examples of how it is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign. In our experience, the science cloud approach significantly lowers the barriers and risks to organizations

  3. Effects of Storage and Type of Blood Collection Tubes on Hepatitis C Virus Level in Whole Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Harald H.; Stelzl, Evelyn; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Haas, Josef; Kirchmeir, Franz; Hegenbarth, Karin; Daghofer, Elisabeth; Santner, Brigitte I.; Marth, Egon; Stauber, Rudolf E.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we compared serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA concentrations with HCV RNA concentrations in whole blood collection tubes, including two different types of EDTA tubes and nucleic acid stabilization tubes (NASTs). We also investigated the impact of a processing delay on HCV RNA concentration in these tubes. In NASTs, the mean HCV RNA concentration was comparable to the mean serum HCV RNA concentration at “date zero.” In EDTA tubes, mean baseline HCV RNA concentrations were higher. Storage at room temperature up to 96 h did not result in a decline of HCV RNA concentration in any of the whole blood collection tubes. In NASTs, HCV RNA concentrations remained stable during the whole study period, whereas a significant increase of HCV RNA was observed in both types of EDTA tubes at 96 h compared to date zero. We concluded that HCV RNA remains stable in NASTs at room temperature for at least 96 h, allowing greater flexibility in sample collection and transport. PMID:11325991

  4. Blood pressure targets in type 2 diabetes. Evidence against or in favour of an aggressive approach.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2018-03-01

    When associated with high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterised by a high risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) and renal outcomes. However, both can be effectively reduced by antihypertensive treatment. Current guidelines on the treatment of hypertension emphasize the need to effectively treat high blood pressure in diabetic individuals, but their recommendations differ in terms of the optimal target blood pressure value to aim for in order to maximise CV and renal protection. In some guidelines the recommended target blood pressure values are <140/90 mmHg (systolic/diastolic), whereas in others, blood pressure values close or even less than 130/80 mmHg are recommended. This paper will discuss the evidence for and against a conservative or more aggressive blood pressure target for treated diabetic hypertensive individuals based on the evidence provided by randomised trials, trial meta-analyses and large observational studies. Based on the available evidence, it appears that blood pressure targets will probably have to be lower than <140/90 mmHg, and that values approaching 130/80 mmHg should be recommended. However, evidence in favour of even lower systolic values, i.e. <130 mmHg, is limited and is definitively against a reduction to <120 mmHg.

  5. Current status of achieving blood pressure target and its clinical correlates in Japanese type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hiroki; Araki, Shin-Ichi; Kawai, Koichi; Hirao, Koichi; Kurihara, Yoshio; Seino, Hiroaki; Takamura, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Hidekatsu; Okada, Akira; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2017-07-21

    To investigate the current status of achieved blood pressure levels in association with the number of antihypertensive drug classes as of 2013, and to explore the clinical correlates with achievement of target blood pressure in a large-scale cohort of Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes. A nationwide survey was conducted including 12,811 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Subjects were divided by achieved blood pressure, <130/80 or 140/90 mmHg, and the number of drug classes taken. The percentages achieving a blood pressure of <130/80 or 140/90 mmHg were 52.0% and 86.1%, respectively. The prevalence of hypertension, if defined as ≥130/80 mmHg or treated, became 67.9%. Among subjects taking antihypertensive drugs, a blood pressure of <130/80 or <140/90 mmHg was 46.7% and 83.2%, respectively. The percentages of <130/80 mmHg were 55.9% without drugs, 47.1% on 1, 42.5% on 2, 47.2% on 3, and 56.8% on ≥4 drugs, respectively. The most prescribed drugs were renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, followed by calcium channel blockers, diuretics, and β-blockers. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that a blood pressure <130/80 mmHg was associated with lower values in age, body mass index, albuminuria, and glomerular filtration rate, higher proportions on targets for HbA 1C and lipids, and less retinopathy. In type 2 diabetes, hypertension is common and only 52% achieved <130/80 mmHg, indicating a difficulty in blood pressure lowering. This was correlated with difficulties in glycemic and lipid management, obesity, and vascular complications, implying these clustering to be a serious problem. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of cationic polyelectrolytes on the performance of paper diagnostics for blood typing.

    PubMed

    McLiesh, Heather; Sharman, Scot; Garnier, Gil

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effect that two common types of cationic polyelectrolytes used in papermaking might have on the performance of paper diagnostics using blood typing as an example. The results were analyzed in terms of red blood cells (RBC) retention and antibody-antigen specificity. Two questions were addressed: (1) can poly(amido-amine) epichlorohydrin (PAE) typically used for paper wet strength affect the diagnostic performance? (2) can high molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) employed as retention aid enhance or affect the selectivity and sensitivity of paper diagnostics? A series of paper varying in type of fibers and drying process were constructed with PAE and tested for blood typing performance. Residual PAE has no significant effect on blood typing paper diagnostics under normal conditions. Positives are unaffected with PAE, while negatives lose slight sharpness as some RBCs are unselectively retained. CPAM, the most common retention aid, can also be used to retain cells and biomolecules on paper. Paper towel was treated with CPAM solutions varying in polymer concentration and charge density and tested for blood typing. We found that CPAM dried on paper can retain RBC. CPAM affects the negative tests by retaining non-specifically individual RBC on fibers. RBC retention increases non-linearly with the CPAM charge density and concentration. As expected, wet CPAM retain RBCs at concentrations higher than 0.1wt%. As paper diagnostics are becoming a reality, more realistic papers than the Whatman filter paper will be engineered. This study provides guidance on how best use the required polymeric wet-strength and retention agents. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Absence of nocturnal fall in blood pressure in elderly persons with Alzheimer-type dementia.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, A; Mikami, H; Katahira, K; Nakamoto, Y; Minamitani, K; Imaoka, M; Nishide, M; Ogihara, T

    1990-09-01

    Circadian changes of the blood pressure and heart rate in elderly normotensive bedridden patients with severe dementia of the Alzheimer type (group D) were compared with those in elderly normotensive bedridden patients without dementia (group R), normotensive subjects with normal daily activity (group N), and hypertensive patients with normal daily activity (group H). In groups R, N, and H, the blood pressure increased in the afternoon and decreased at midnight; in group D, however, although it increased in the afternoon, it did not decrease at night. The circadian changes of the heart rate were similar in all four groups, showing maxima in the afternoon and minima at midnight. Thus, a specific alteration was found in the circadian rhythm of the blood pressure in patients with Alzheimer-type dementia.

  8. Red blood cell sedimentation of Apheresis Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lodermeier, Michelle A; Byrne, Karen M; Flegel, Willy A

    2017-10-01

    Sedimentation of Apheresis Granulocyte components removes red blood cells. It is used to increase the blood donor pool when blood group-compatible donors cannot be recruited for a patient because of a major ABO incompatibility or incompatible red blood cell antibodies in the recipient. Because granulocytes have little ABO and few other red blood cell antigens on their membrane, such incompatibility lies mostly with the contaminating red blood cells. Video Clip S1 shows the process of red blood cell sedimentation of an Apheresis Granulocyte component. This video was filmed with a single smart phone attached to a commercial tripod and was edited on a tablet computer with free software by an amateur videographer without prior video experience. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Relationship Between Retinal Blood Flow and Serum Adiponectin Concentrations in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Omae, Tsuneaki; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2015-06-01

    To study the relationship between retinal microcirculation and serum adiponectin, an important adipocytokine secreted by adipocytes, concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using a laser Doppler velocimetry system, we simultaneously measured the retinal blood flow (RBF) values and retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity in 64 consecutive Japanese patients (mean age ± SD, 59.8 ± 10.4 years) with type 2 diabetes with no or mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. We compared the values with the RBF and serum adiponectin concentrations in these patients. The patients were divided into two groups based on sex (33 males, 31 females). The plasma adiponectin concentrations were correlated positively with the retinal vessel diameter (r = 0.480; P = 0.005), retinal blood velocity (r = 0.399; P = 0.02), and RBF (r = 0.518; P = 0.002) and correlated negatively with the retinal arterial vascular resistance (r = -0.598; P = 0.0002) in males, but not females, with type 2 diabetes with early-stage diabetic retinopathy. Multiple regression analysis showed that the plasma adiponectin level was independently and positively correlated with RBF and negatively correlated with retinal arterial vascular resistance. Our results indicated that a high concentration of serum adiponectin may be associated with increased RBF, probably via the increased blood velocity and dilated vessel diameter in males with type 2 diabetes with early-phase diabetic retinopathy.

  10. The History and Challenges of Blood Donor Screening in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Ka Yi; Yan, Ke; Ou, Guojin; Li, Wenhui; Wang, Jue; Song, Ning; Tian, Li; Ji, Xin; Chen, Yongjun; Liang, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Yanyun

    2017-04-01

    Since the establishment of People's Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese government has encountered several catastrophes related to transfusion transmitted diseases. The government's increasing attention to blood safety has prompted the initiation of a series of policies and measures that have enhanced the level of safety for the blood supply and met the basic clinical demands of blood for 1.3 billion people in the country. Blood donation screening strategies in China predominantly comprise donor screening and donor testing. Donor screening includes selection of low-risk blood donors by the use of a donor history questionnaire, predonation physical examination, and initial rapid donor testing. Donor testing includes direct pathogen detection and serology tests. The year 1998 marked the most transformative change in blood donor selection and screening policies in China. Before 1998, paid donation was the predominant mode of blood donation. Donor screening and donor testing were conducted before donation, and only those who were eligible were allowed to donate. To ensure the safety of blood, donor testing was performed again after donation. After the implementation of the Blood Donation Law in 1998, to promote voluntary and unpaid donation, predonation donor testing was eliminated to reduce the amount of waiting time and to provide a more convenient donation experience for blood donors. However, it is the national requirement that donated blood should undergo 2 rounds of testing using different equipment or reagents, conducted by different personnel. Donor selection has transitioned from paid donation and obligatory donation to voluntary donation with fixed volunteer groups, as the latter mode of donation provides the lowest risks. Donations are currently screened for syphilis, hepatitis C virus, HIV, and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Units, previously typed only for ABO, are now routinely tested for both ABO and Rh(D). Innovations in testing technologies and methods

  11. Comparison of 4 different types of surgical gloves used for preventing blood contact.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Andreas; Kralj, Nenad; Köver, Jan; Gasthaus, Klaus; Lerch, Hartmut; Hofmann, Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Needlestick injuries are always associated with a risk of infection, because these types of punctures may expose healthcare workers to a patient's blood and/or body fluids. To compare the efficacy of 4 different types of surgical gloves for preventing exposure to blood as a result of needlestick injury. For simulation of needlestick injury, a circular sample of pork skin was tightened onto a bracket, and a single finger from a medical glove was stretched over the sample. First, a powder-free surgical glove with a gel coating was used to test blood contact. Second, a glove with a patented puncture indication system was used to test blood contact with a double-gloved hand. Third, 2 powder-free latex medical gloves of the same size and hand were combined for double gloving, again to test blood contact. Finally, we tested a glove with an integrated disinfectant on the inside. The punctures were carried out using diverse sharp surgical devices that were contaminated with (99)Tc-marked blood. The amount of blood contact was determined from the transmitted radioactivity. For the powder-free surgical glove with a gel coating, a mean volume of 0.048 microL of blood (standard error of the mean [SEM], 0.077 microL) was transferred in punctures with an automated lancet at a depth of 2.4 mm through 1 layer of latex. For the glove with an integrated disinfectant on the inside, the mean volume of blood transferred was 0.030 microL (SEM, 0.0056 microL) with a single glove and was 0.024 microL (SEM, 0.003 microL) with 2 gloves. For the glove with the patented puncture indication system, a mean volume of 0.024 microL (SEM, 0.003 microL) of blood was transferred. Double gloving or the use of a glove with disinfectant can result in a decrease in the volume of blood transferred. Therefore, the use of either of these gloving systems could help to minimize the risk of bloodborne infections for medical staff.

  12. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Optimal moving angle of pusher plate in occlusive-type pulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Hwansung; Choi, Jaesoon; Lee, Jung Joo; Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jun Woo; Park, Yongdoo; Sun, Kyung; Lee, Heung-Man

    2010-07-01

    Since the occlusive-type pulsatile extracorporeal blood pump (Twin-Pulse Life Support System; Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea) received the CE mark of the European Directives and Korea Food and Drug Administration approval (2004) for short-term applications as an extracorporeal life support system, the pump system has been tested for hemolysis. This pump system was recently upgraded with an ameliorated pusher plate to reduce hemolysis. In this study, numerical analysis and in vitro tests were performed to determine the optimal conditions for increasing the durability of the blood sac and pump output. During the simulation, the minimum sliding interface force (SIF) for the angle of the pusher plate movement (PPM) was calculated (40-70 degrees ). In the in vitro durability test, the angle of the PPM was increased gradually from 40 to 70 degrees in 10 degrees increments, and the mean time to failure (MTTF) of the blood sac was calculated. Fifteen tests were conducted for each case: 40, 50, 60, and 70 degrees (n = 15 each). The MTTF of the blood sac was defined as the time when a crack of the blood sac occurred. The longer lifetime of the blood sac at 60 degrees of the PPM (297.0 h) than that at 50 degrees (197.6 h) was attributed to the lower SIF value (-0.13, normalized value) at 60 degrees of the PPM.

  14. Qualitative Analysis of Primary Fingerprint Pattern in Different Blood Group and Gender in Nepalese

    PubMed Central

    Maharjan, Niroj; Adhikari, Nischita; Shrestha, Pragya

    2018-01-01

    Dermatoglyphics, the study of epidermal ridges on palm, sole, and digits, is considered as most effective and reliable evidence of identification. The fingerprints were studied in 300 Nepalese of known blood groups of different ages and classified into primary patterns and then analyzed statistically. In both sexes, incidence of loops was highest in ABO blood group and Rh +ve blood types, followed by whorls and arches, while the incidence of whorls was highest followed by loops and arches in Rh −ve blood types. Loops were higher in all blood groups except “A –ve” and “B –ve” where whorls were predominant. The fingerprint pattern in Rh blood types of blood group “A” was statistically significant while in others it was insignificant. In middle and little finger, loops were higher whereas in ring finger whorls were higher in all blood groups. Whorls were higher in thumb and index finger except in blood group “O” where loops were predominant. This study concludes that distribution of primary pattern of fingerprint is not related to gender and blood group but is related to individual digits. PMID:29593909

  15. Relationship between Food Security with Sugar Level and Blood Pressure in Diabetes Type 2 in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Seyed Amir Hossein Zehni; Javadi, Maryam; Mohammadpooral, Asghar

    2016-12-01

    Food security has been defined as the "availability, stability, access and utilization of safe foods". Diabetes has been known as one of the biggest health and medical problems throughout the world and is clearly related to lifestyle, and particularly, improper food consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between food security with sugar and blood pressure in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes who refer to diabetes centers in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on type 2 diabetes patients in Tehran, Iran. From two diabetes centers in the eastern and southern parts of Tehran, 243 type 2 diabetes patients were selected. Necessary information (demographic and food security information) about all the studied persons was collected using the standard questionnaire verified by US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, statistical comparisons were made using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Chi-square and Tukey tests and a significant level of <0.05. Most subjects were female (68.7%). There was no significant relationship between gender and food security (p=0.372). No significant relation was observed between food security and fasting blood pressure, HbA1C, and systolic blood pressure (p>0.05), but there was a significant relationship between food security and diastolic blood pressure (p= 0.030). According to the relationship between diastolic blood pressure and food security and the role of blood pressure in the irreparable diabetic complications, it is recommended to perform appropriate food advice.

  16. Influence of type of aortic valve prosthesis on coronary blood flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Jelenc, Matija; Juvan, Katja Ažman; Medvešček, Nadja Tatjana Ružič; Geršak, Borut

    2013-02-01

    Severe aortic valve stenosis is associated with high resting and reduced hyperemic coronary blood flow. Coronary blood flow increases after aortic valve replacement (AVR); however, the increase depends on the type of prosthesis used. The present study investigates the influence of type of aortic valve prosthesis on coronary blood flow velocity. The blood flow velocity in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the right coronary artery (RCA) was measured intraoperatively before and after AVR with a stentless bioprosthesis (Sorin Freedom Solo; n = 11) or a bileaflet mechanical prosthesis (St. Jude Medical Regent; n = 11). Measurements were made with an X-Plore epicardial Doppler probe (Medistim, Oslo, Norway) following induction of hyperemia with an adenosine infusion. Preoperative and postoperative echocardiography evaluations were used to assess valvular and ventricular function. Velocity time integrals (VTI) were measured from the Doppler signals and used to calculate the proportion of systolic VTI (SF), diastolic VTI (DF), and normalized systolic coronary blood flow velocities (NSF) and normalized diastolic coronary blood flow velocities (NDF). The systolic proportion of the LAD VTI increased after AVR with the St. Jude Medical Regent prosthesis, which produced higher LAD SF and NSF values than the Sorin Freedom Solo prosthesis (SF, 0.41 ± 0.09 versus 0.29 ± 0.13 [P = .04]; NSF, 0.88 ± 0.24 versus 0.55 ± 0.17 [P = .01]). No significant changes in the LAD velocity profile were noted after valve replacement with the Sorin Freedom Solo, despite a significant reduction in transvalvular gradient and an increase in the effective orifice area. AVR had no effect on the RCA flow velocity profile. The coronary flow velocity profile in the LAD was significantly influenced by the type of aortic valve prosthesis used. The differences in the LAD velocity profile probably reflect differences in valve design and the systolic transvalvular flow pattern.

  17. Effect of flaxseed gum on reduction of blood glucose and cholesterol in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Goutam; Mitra, Analava; Pal, Kunal; Rousseau, Dérick

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ingestion of flaxseed gum on blood glucose and cholesterol, particularly low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, in type 2 diabetes were evaluated. Flaxseed gum was incorporated in wheat flour chapattis. Sixty patients of type 2 diabetes were fed a daily diet for 3 months, along with six wheat flour chapattis containing flaxseed gum (5 g), as per the recommendations of the American Diabetic Association. The control group (60 individuals) consumed an identical diet but the chapattis were without gum. The blood biochemistry profiles monitored before starting the study and at monthly intervals showed fasting blood sugar in the experimental group decreased from 154 ± 8 mg/dl to 136 ± 7 mg/dl (P=0.03) while the total cholesterol reduced from 182 ± 11 mg/dl to 163 ± 9 mg/dl (P=0.03). Results showed a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol from 110 ± 8 mg/dl to 92 ± 9 mg/dl (P=0.02). The study demonstrated the efficacy of flax gum in the blood biochemistry profiles of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Association of serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savira, M.; Rusdiana; Syahputra, M.

    2018-03-01

    Uric acid is an end product of purine degradation in humans and primarily excreted through urine. In adulthood, concentrations rise steadily over time and vary with height, body weight, blood pressure, renal function, and alcohol intake. Uric acid is known as anti-oxidant, it has a beneficial role in diseases. Elevated serum uric acid associated with anincreased risk of cardiovascular disease. It has been found that elevated levels of uric acid associated with high risks of acomplication of type 2 diabetes mellitus and It has astrong association between elevated uric acid levels and obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. The aim of the study analyzed the association between serum uric acid level and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. This research is descriptive analytic research with a cross sectional design included 50 diabetic subjects aged over 40 years old. Subjects picked by consecutive sampling then we examined the weight, height, waist size, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and serum uric acid level. Statistical analysis using chi-square found that there was no significant association between serum uric acid level and systole and diastole pressure in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (p>0.005).

  19. A vitamin, mineral, herb dietary supplement effect on blood glucose in uncontrolled type II diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    González, Michael J; Ricart, Carlos M; Miranda-Massari, Jorge

    2004-06-01

    We tested a dietary supplement formulated with a synergistic combination of vitamins, minerals, herbals in a group of 15 patients with uncontrolled diabetes type II. The supplement was given for 30 days. Fasting blood glucose was measured prior to the supplementation and at the end of the 30 days treatment period. Blood glucose was significantly reduced in all patients with no adverse effects. This orthomolecular correction of faulty glucose metabolism with a combination of nontoxic, safe and fairly inexpensive nutraceuticals needs to be further substantiated. Nervertheless the idea of correcting metabolism with micronutrients is a new concept of genetic nutritioneering that seems appealing and cost effective.

  20. Blood type analyses of creole-like cattle: a comparison with Longhorns and mixed controls.

    PubMed

    Murphey, R M; Torres Penedo, M C; Stormont, C; Bahre, C J

    1979-01-01

    Creole-like cattle blood types were compared with a mixed control group and Longhorn data using hemolytic and electrophoretic techniques. Among the hemolytic tests, the crucial B system analyses indicated that 1) the Creole-like animals were more similar to Longhorns than were the controls; 2) the three groups were different from each other; 3) the three groups were not mutually exclusive. Eleven new phenogroups were postulated. The remaining blood group systems and the electrophoretic tests raised interesting biohistorical questions but were generally less useful in discriminating among the three groups of cattle.

  1. Internet-Based Contingency Management to Improve Adherence with Blood Glucose Testing Recommendations for Teens with Type 1 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiff, Bethany R.; Dallery, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    The current study used Internet-based contingency management (CM) to increase adherence with blood glucose testing to at least 4 times daily. Four teens diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes earned vouchers for submitting blood glucose testing videos over a Web site. Participants submitted a mean of 1.7 and 3.1 blood glucose tests per day during the 2…

  2. Performance Analysis of Fuzzy-PID Controller for Blood Glucose Regulation in Type-1 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jyoti; Rani, Asha; Singh, Vijander

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents Fuzzy-PID (FPID) control scheme for a blood glucose control of type 1 diabetic subjects. A new metaheuristic Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA) is utilized to optimize the gains of FPID controller. CSA provides fast convergence and is capable of handling global optimization of continuous nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is an amalgamation of fuzzy logic and optimization which may provide an efficient solution for complex problems like blood glucose control. The task is to maintain normal glucose levels in the shortest possible time with minimum insulin dose. The glucose control is achieved by tuning the PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) and FPID controller with the help of Genetic Algorithm and CSA for comparative analysis. The designed controllers are tested on Bergman minimal model to control the blood glucose level in the facets of parameter uncertainties, meal disturbances and sensor noise. The results reveal that the performance of CSA-FPID controller is superior as compared to other designed controllers.

  3. Miltenberger blood group typing by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) melting curve analysis in Thai population.

    PubMed

    Vongsakulyanon, A; Kitpoka, P; Kunakorn, M; Srikhirin, T

    2015-12-01

    To develop reliable and convenient methods for Miltenberger (Mi(a) ) blood group typing. To apply real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) melting curve analysis to Mi(a) blood group typing. The Mi(a) blood group is the collective set of glycophorin hybrids in the MNS blood group system. Mi(a+) blood is common among East Asians and is also found in the Thai population. Incompatible Mi(a) blood transfusions pose the risk of life-threatening haemolysis; therefore, Mi(a) blood group typing is necessary in ethnicities where the Mi(a) blood group is prevalent. One hundred and forty-three blood samples from Thai blood donors were used in the study. The samples included 50 Mi(a+) samples and 93 Mi(a-) samples, which were defined by serology. The samples were typed by Mi(a) typing qPCR, and 50 Mi(a+) samples were sequenced to identify the Mi(a) subtypes. Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was performed to define GP.Mur. Both Mi(a) typing and Mi(a) subtyping were tested on a conventional PCR platform. The results of Mi(a) typing qPCR were all concordant with serology. Sequencing of the 50 Mi(a+) samples revealed 47 GP.Mur samples and 3 GP.Hop or Bun samples. Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was the supplementary test used to further define GP.Mur from other Mi(a) subtypes. Both Mi(a) typing and Mi(a) subtyping performed well using a conventional PCR platform. Mi(a) typing qPCR correctly identified Mi(a) blood groups in a Thai population with the feasibility of Mi(a) subtype discrimination, and Mi(a) subtyping qPCR was able to further define GP.Mur from other Mi(a) subtypes. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  4. Self-Control, Daily Negative Affect and Blood Glucose Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, Amy Hughes; Berg, Cynthia A.; Butner, Jonathan; Wiebe, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective For adolescents with type 1 diabetes, maintaining optimal daily blood glucose control is a complex self-regulatory process that likely requires self-control. This study examined whether higher self-control was associated with lower daily negative affect about diabetes and, in turn, better daily blood glucose control, i.e., lower mean daily blood glucose (MBG) and smaller standard deviations of daily blood glucose (SDBG), through two paths: 1) self-control maintaining lower mean level of negative affect and 2) self-control buffering the association of the number of daily diabetes problems with daily negative affect. Methods Adolescents (M age=12.87 years) with type 1 diabetes (n=180) completed an initial survey containing a self-report measure of self-control. Nightly electronic diaries were completed for 14 days where adolescents reported daily problems with and negative affect about diabetes, and used a study-provided blood glucose meter. Results Hypotheses were examined through multilevel modeling. Lower mean levels of daily negative affect partially mediated the relation between higher adolescent self-control and lower MBG. Adolescent self-control also buffered the association of the number of daily problems with daily negative affect, and smaller fluctuations in daily negative affect were associated with lower SDBG. Conclusions Adolescent self-control is associated with daily affect regulatory processes that may influence MBG. However, fluctuations in daily negative affect about diabetes may represent a unique within-person daily process associated with SDBG. These findings suggest that studies examining daily disease processes and interventions targeting daily affect regulation may be important to improving health in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26914647

  5. C-peptide does not affect ocular blood flow in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Polska, Elzbieta; Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Malec, Maria M; Simader, Christian; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Roden, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of intravenous C-peptide infusion on ocular blood flow in patients with type 1 diabetes under euglycemic conditions. The study was performed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, two-way, crossover design in 10 type 1 diabetic patients. C-peptide was intravenously administered at two different dosages (dosage 1: 25 pmol . kg(-1) . min(-1) bolus followed by 5 pmol . kg(-1) . min(-1) continuous infusion; dosage 2: six times higher than dosage 1), each for 60 min. Physiologic saline solution was used as a control for C-peptide on a different study day. On both study days, euglycemic clamps were performed. To assess retinal blood flow, laser Doppler velocimetry (blood flow velocities) and retinal vessel analyzer (vessels diameters) measurements were performed. Laser interferometric measurements of fundus pulsation were used to assess pulsatile choroidal blood flow. Blood velocities in the ophthalmic artery were measured using color Doppler imaging. Eight patients (two female and six male) completed the study according to the protocol and without adverse events. One patient developed an anaphylactic reaction to C-peptide, which resolved without sequelae. The following results originate from the remaining eight subjects. Systemic hemodynamic parameters remained stable during both study days. Infusion of C-peptide did not affect any ocular hemodynamic parameter. The data of the present study indicate that exogenous C-peptide exerts no effect on ocular hemodynamic parameters in type 1 diabetic patients under euglycemic conditions. The maximum detectable change in these parameters was <25%.

  6. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the area and help seal off the leak. Platelets survive only about 9 days in the ... Although platelets alone can plug small blood vessel leaks and temporarily stop or slow bleeding, the action ...

  7. Blood glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes – Nepalese patients’ opinions and experiences

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Blood glucose monitoring forms a vital component of diabetes care. Monitoring conducted at home using glucometers, and in laboratories by professionals, are two common methods of blood glucose monitoring in clinical practice. Objective: To investigate Nepalese patients’ perceptions and practices of blood glucose monitoring in diabetes. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 48 Nepalese participants with type 2 diabetes in Sydney and Kathmandu. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results: In Australia, most participants perceived home monitoring as useful; and both home and laboratory monitoring were conducted at fairly regular intervals. In Nepal, only a small number conducted home monitoring and the laboratory method formed the primary method of day-to-day monitoring. The laboratory method was preferred due to easy access to laboratories, lack of faith in glucometers and perceptions that home monitoring is costlier. However, overall monitoring was irregular in Nepal. In addition to the healthcare system which enabled cheaper self-monitoring in Australia, Nepalese in Australia also tended to have a better understanding about the purpose of home monitoring. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the disparity in perceptions and practices related to blood glucose monitoring. Understanding the importance of blood glucose monitoring and access to affordable resources are critical facilitators for conducting regular monitoring. Both patient and health-system factors play a key role in ensuring continued diabetes monitoring and management. PMID:28585892

  8. A Bayesian network for modelling blood glucose concentration and exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ewings, Sean M; Sahu, Sujit K; Valletta, John J; Byrne, Christopher D; Chipperfield, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    This article presents a new statistical approach to analysing the effects of everyday physical activity on blood glucose concentration in people with type 1 diabetes. A physiologically based model of blood glucose dynamics is developed to cope with frequently sampled data on food, insulin and habitual physical activity; the model is then converted to a Bayesian network to account for measurement error and variability in the physiological processes. A simulation study is conducted to determine the feasibility of using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for simultaneous estimation of all model parameters and prediction of blood glucose concentration. Although there are problems with parameter identification in a minority of cases, most parameters can be estimated without bias. Predictive performance is unaffected by parameter misspecification and is insensitive to misleading prior distributions. This article highlights important practical and theoretical issues not previously addressed in the quest for an artificial pancreas as treatment for type 1 diabetes. The proposed methods represent a new paradigm for analysis of deterministic mathematical models of blood glucose concentration. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Blood Type Transmutation Induced by Multiple Ultrashort Wavelength Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multi laser beams with the flowing blood thin films leads to the transmutation of the blood types A, B, and AB into O type. This is a novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine. Laser radiation is in resonance with the eigen-frequency modes of the antigen proteins and forces the proteins to parametrically oscillate until they get kicked out from the surface. The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation), upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. The scanning laser beam is partially reflected as long as the antigen(s) is not eliminated. The process of the protein detachment can last a few minutes. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  10. Discriminating the hemolytic risk of blood type A plasmas using the complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assay.

    PubMed

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Hair, Pamela S; Krishna, Neel K; Sass, Megan A; Enos, Clinton W; Whitley, Pamela H; Maes, Lanne Y; Goldberg, Corinne L

    2017-03-01

    The agglutination-based cross-matching method is sensitive for antibody binding to red blood cells but is only partially predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis, which is important in many acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Here, we describe complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assays that directly evaluate complement-mediated hemolysis between individual serum-plasma and red blood cell combinations. The CHUHE assay is used to evaluate correlations between agglutination titers and complement-mediated hemolysis as well as the hemolytic potential of plasma from type A blood donors. Plasma or serum from each type A blood donor was incubated with AB or B red blood cells in the CHUHE assay and measured for free hemoglobin release. CHUHE assays for serum or plasma demonstrate a wide, dynamic range and high sensitivity for complement-mediated hemolysis for individual serum/plasma and red blood cell combinations. CHUHE results suggest that agglutination assays alone are only moderately predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis. CHUHE results also suggest that plasma from particular type A blood donors produce minimal complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas plasma from other type A blood donors produce moderate to high-level complement-mediated hemolysis, depending on the red blood cell donor. The current results indicate that the CHUHE assay can be used to assess complement-mediated hemolysis for plasma or serum from a type A blood donor, providing additional risk discrimination over agglutination titers alone. © 2016 AABB.

  11. Coordinating unspecified living kidney donation and transplantation across the blood-type barrier in kidney exchange.

    PubMed

    Glorie, Kristiaan M; de Klerk, Marry; Wagelmans, Albert P M; van de Klundert, Joris J; Zuidema, Willij C; Claas, Frans H J; Weimar, Willem

    2013-11-15

    This article studies multicenter coordination of unspecified living kidney donation and transplantation across the blood-type barrier in kidney exchange. Important questions are whether such coordination should use domino paired donation or non simultaneous extended altruistic donor chains, what the length of the segments in such chains should be, when they should be terminated, and how much time should be allowed between matching rounds. Furthermore, it is controversial whether the different modalities should be coordinated centrally or locally and independently. Kidney exchange policies are simulated using actual data from the Dutch national kidney exchange program. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the composition of the population, the time unspecified and bridge donors wait before donating to the wait list, the time between matching rounds, and donor renege rates. Central coordination of unspecified donation and transplantation across the blood-type barrier can increase transplants by 10% (PG0.001). Especially highly sensitized and blood type O patients benefit. Sufficient time between matching rounds is essential: three-monthly exchanges result in 31% more transplants than weekly exchanges. Benefits of non simultaneous extended altruistic donor chains are limited in case of low numbers of highly sensitized patients and sufficient unspecified donors. Chains are best terminated when no further segment is part of an optimal exchange within 3 months. There is clear synergy in the central coordination of both unspecified donation and transplantation across the blood-type barrier in kidney exchange. The best configuration of a national program depends on the composition of the patient Y donor population.

  12. Which Measurement of Blood Pressure Is More Associated With Albuminuria in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Central Blood Pressure or Peripheral Blood Pressure?

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Okada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Muhei; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Nakano, Koji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Goji; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether central systolic blood pressure (SBP) was associated with albuminuria, defined as urinary albumin excretion (UAE) ≥30 mg/g creatinine, and, if so, whether the relationship of central SBP with albuminuria was stronger than that of peripheral SBP in patients with type 2 diabetes. The authors performed a cross-sectional study in 294 outpatients with type 2 diabetes. The relationship between peripheral SBP or central SBP and UAE using regression analysis was evaluated, and the odds ratios of peripheral SBP or central SBP were calculated to identify albuminuria using logistic regression model. Moreover, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of central SBP was compared with that of peripheral SBP to identify albuminuria. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that peripheral SBP (β=0.255, P<.0001) or central SBP (r=0.227, P<.0001) was associated with UAE. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that peripheral SBP (odds ratio, 1.029; 95% confidence interval, 1.016-1.043) or central SBP (odds ratio, 1.022; 95% confidence interval, 1.011-1.034) was associated with an increased odds of albuminuria. In addition, AUC of peripheral SBP was significantly greater than that of central SBP to identify albuminuria (P=0.035). Peripheral SBP is superior to central SBP in identifying albuminuria, although both peripheral and central SBP are associated with UAE in patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Collaboration During the NASA ABoVE Airborne SAR Campaign: Sampling Strategies Used by NGEE Arctic and Other Partners in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullschleger, S. D.; Charsley-Groffman, L.; Baltzer, J. L.; Berg, A. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Jafarov, E. E.; Marsh, P.; Miller, C. E.; Schaefer, K. M.; Siqueira, P.; Wilson, C. J.; Kasischke, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    There is considerable interest in using L- and P-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data to monitor variations in aboveground woody biomass, soil moisture, and permafrost conditions in high-latitude ecosystems. Such information is useful for quantifying spatial heterogeneity in surface and subsurface properties, and for model development and evaluation. To conduct these studies, it is desirable that field studies share a common sampling strategy so that the data from multiple sites can be combined and used to analyze variations in conditions across different landscape geomorphologies and vegetation types. In 2015, NASA launched the decade-long Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) to study the sensitivity and resilience of these ecosystems to disturbance and environmental change. NASA is able to leverage its remote sensing strengths to collect airborne and satellite observations to capture important ecosystem properties and dynamics across large spatial scales. A critical component of this effort includes collection of ground-based data that can be used to analyze, calibrate and validate remote sensing products. ABoVE researchers at a large number of sites located in important Arctic and boreal ecosystems in Alaska and western Canada are following common design protocols and strategies for measuring soil moisture, thaw depth, biomass, and wetland inundation. Here we elaborate on those sampling strategies as used in the 2017 summer SAR campaign and address the sampling design and measurement protocols for supporting the ABoVE aerial activities. Plot size, transect length, and distribution of replicates across the landscape systematically allowed investigators to optimally sample a site for soil moisture, thaw depth, and organic layer thickness. Specific examples and data sets are described for the Department of Energy's Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project field sites near Nome and Barrow, Alaska. Future airborne and satellite

  14. Effects of laser acupoint irradiation on blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui-Hui, Liu; Guo-Xin, Xiong; Li-Ping, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and physical fitness in type 2 diabetes mellitus, 44 cases of type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into a control group and a treatment group. All patients in both groups were given a drug treatment. The Hegu, Quchi and Zusanli acupoints of patients in the treatment group were then irradiated daily for 15 d with a 10 MW semiconductor laser. Before and after treatment, patients in both groups underwent a variety of tests and measurements: a two-hour postprandial blood glucose test; a glycosylated hemoglobin test and body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body fat percentage (BFP) measurements. The data detected after treatment greatly decreased in the treatment group and was significantly different from that in the control group. It is shown that the acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can improve two-hour postprandial blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and some physical fitness measurements in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  15. Impact of ABO-Identical vs ABO-Compatible Nonidentical Plasma Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    and B patients in turn could receive AB donor plasma. Few studies have examined the im- pact of compatible nonidentical plasma transfusion . In platelet ... transfusion ,19 the administration of compatible nonidenti- cal platelets to patients undergoing coro- nary artery bypass grafting or valve re...significantly different (in boldface) and for the volume of packed red blood cells, plasma, platelets , cryoprecipitate, and factor VIIa transfused . cBecause

  16. Feasible usage of ABO incompatible grafts in living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Soejima, Yuji; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of ABO incompatible (ABOi) graft in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has not been an established procedure worldwide. Methods Four hundred and eight adult LDLTs, using ABOi (n=19) and non-ABOi (n=389) grafts, were performed as a single center experience. Results In ABOi-LDLT group (n=19), median isoagglutinin titer before plasma exchange (PE) at LDLT and after LDLT (max) was ×256, ×32 and ×32, respectively. Rituximab was given at 21.8±6.1 days before LDLT and PE was performed 3.7±1.6 times. Although ABOi-LDLTs had increased rate of splenectomy (89.4% vs. 44.7%, P<0.001) and lower portal venous pressure (PVP) at the end of surgery (13.8±1.1 vs. 16.9±0.2 mmHg, P=0.003), other operative factors including graft ischemic time, operative time and blood loss were not different between the groups. Although ABOi-LDLTs had increased incidence of cytomegalovirus infection (52.6% vs. 22.9%, P=0.007), other post-transplant complications including bacterial sepsis and acute rejection were not different between the groups. The 5-year graft survival rate was 87.9% in ABOi-LDLTs and 80.3% in non-ABOi-LDLTs (P=0.373). Conclusions ABOi-LDLT could be safely performed, especially under rituximab-based protocol. PMID:27115002

  17. Feasible usage of ABO incompatible grafts in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Soejima, Yuji; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    The use of ABO incompatible (ABOi) graft in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has not been an established procedure worldwide. Four hundred and eight adult LDLTs, using ABOi (n=19) and non-ABOi (n=389) grafts, were performed as a single center experience. In ABOi-LDLT group (n=19), median isoagglutinin titer before plasma exchange (PE) at LDLT and after LDLT (max) was ×256, ×32 and ×32, respectively. Rituximab was given at 21.8±6.1 days before LDLT and PE was performed 3.7±1.6 times. Although ABOi-LDLTs had increased rate of splenectomy (89.4% vs. 44.7%, P<0.001) and lower portal venous pressure (PVP) at the end of surgery (13.8±1.1 vs. 16.9±0.2 mmHg, P=0.003), other operative factors including graft ischemic time, operative time and blood loss were not different between the groups. Although ABOi-LDLTs had increased incidence of cytomegalovirus infection (52.6% vs. 22.9%, P=0.007), other post-transplant complications including bacterial sepsis and acute rejection were not different between the groups. The 5-year graft survival rate was 87.9% in ABOi-LDLTs and 80.3% in non-ABOi-LDLTs (P=0.373). ABOi-LDLT could be safely performed, especially under rituximab-based protocol.

  18. [Analysis of Correlation between IgG Titer of Pregnant Women and Neonatal Hemolytic Complications of Different Blood Groups].

    PubMed

    Ye, Hai-Hui; Huang, Hong-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Pi, You-Jun

    2017-10-01

    To study the relationship between IgG titer of pregnant women and hemolytic disease of newborn(HDN) with different blood groups. Four hundred pregnant women, including pregnant women with type O blood, were selected from May 2014 to January 2015 in our hospital for inspection and a couple of different blood groups, the IgG titer of pregnant women were detected in the inspection process. According to neonatal HDN, newborns were divided into 2 groups: HDN group(85 cases) and non-HDN group(315 cases). The incidence of postpartum neonatal hemolytic disease was tracked and the correlation of IgG titers with HDN were systematically analyzed. In the production and inspection process, the IgG titer in pregnant women was divided into <1:64, 1:64, 1:128, 1:256 and greater than or equal to 1:512 five groups. the comparison of HDN incidence rate in 4 groups of IgG titer >64 and IgG titer <1:64 group showed that the prevalence of ABO hemolytic disease of newborn were 96.9%, 79.6%, 63, 7% and 28.8%, there was a certain correlation of pregnant women IgG titers with ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn, that is, with the increase of IgG titer, the incidence of hemolytic disease of newborns increased in certain degree (r=0.8832), the risk in 4 groups of neonatal HDN was higher than that in IgG titer <1:64 of IgG titer >64 HDN group. There is a certain corelation between prevalence of ABO-HDN and IgG titer of pregnant women. For these pregnant women, the control of the pregnant women IgG titer has a positive clinical significance to reduce the incidence of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

  19. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Villanea, Fernando A.; Safi, Kristin N.; Busch, Jeremiah W.

    2015-01-01

    The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (Ne ≤ 50) and much smaller (N e ≤ 25) for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas. PMID:25946124

  20. Sample Acquisition and Analytical Chemistry Challenges to Verifying Compliance to Aviators Breathing Oxygen (ABO) Purity Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been developing and testing two different types of oxygen separation systems. One type of oxygen separation system uses pressure swing technology, the other type uses a solid electrolyte electrochemical oxygen separation cell. Both development systems have been subjected to long term testing, and performance testing under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. Testing these two systems revealed that measuring the product purity of oxygen, and determining if an oxygen separation device meets Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) specifications is a subtle and sometimes difficult analytical chemistry job. Verifying product purity of cryogenically produced oxygen presents a different set of analytical chemistry challenges. This presentation will describe some of the sample acquisition and analytical chemistry challenges presented by verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator - and verifying oxygen produced by cryogenic separation processes. The primary contaminant that causes gas samples to fail to meet ABO requirements is water. The maximum amount of water vapor allowed is 7 ppmv. The principal challenge of verifying oxygen produced by an oxygen separator is that it is produced relatively slowly, and at comparatively low temperatures. A short term failure that occurs for just a few minutes in the course of a 1 week run could cause an entire tank to be rejected. Continuous monitoring of oxygen purity and water vapor could identify problems as soon as they occur. Long term oxygen separator tests were instrumented with an oxygen analyzer and with an hygrometer: a GE Moisture Monitor Series 35. This hygrometer uses an aluminum oxide sensor. The user's manual does not report this, but long term exposure to pure oxygen causes the aluminum oxide sensor head to bias dry. Oxygen product that exceeded the 7 ppm specification was improperly accepted, because the sensor had biased. The bias is permanent - exposure to air does not cause the sensor to

  1. Heterogeneity of the tumor vasculature: the need for new tumor blood vessel type-specific targets.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F

    2012-10-01

    Therapies directed against VEGF-A and its receptors are effective in treating many mouse tumors but have been less so in treating human cancer patients. To elucidate the reasons that might be responsible for this difference in response, we investigated the nature of the blood vessels that appear in human and mouse cancers and the tumor "surrogate" blood vessels that develop in immunodeficient mice in response to an adenovirus expressing VEGF-A(164). Both tumor and tumor surrogate blood vessels are heterogeneous and form by two distinct processes, angiogenesis and arterio-venogenesis. The first new angiogenic blood vessels to form are mother vessels (MV); MV arise from preexisting venules and capillaries and evolve over time into glomeruloid microvascular proliferations (GMP) and subsequently into capillaries and vascular malformations (VM). Arterio-venogenesis results from the remodeling and enlargement of preexisting arteries and veins, leading to the formation of feeder arteries (FA) and draining veins (DV) that supply and drain angiogenic vessels. Of these different blood vessel types, only the two that form first, MV and GMP, were highly responsive to anti-VEGF therapy, whereas "late"-formed capillaries, VM, FA and DV were relatively unresponsive. This finding may explain, at least in part, the relatively poor response of human cancers to anti-VEGF/VEGFR therapies, because human cancers, present for months or years prior to discovery, are expected to contain a large proportion of late-formed blood vessels. The future of anti-vascular cancer therapy may depend on finding new targets on "late" vessels, apart from those associated with the VEGF/VEGFR axis.

  2. Comparison electrical stimulation and passive stretching for blood glucose control type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsianti, Rika Wahyuni; Parman, Dewy Haryanti; Lesmana, Hendy

    2018-04-01

    Physical exercise is one of the cornerstones for management and treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus. But not all people are able to perform physical exercise because of their physical limitation condition. The strategy for those people in this study is electrical stimulation and passive stretching. The aim of this study is to find out the effect of electrical stimulation and passive stretching to lowering blood glucose level. 20 subjects is divided into electrical stimulation and passive stretching group. The provision of electrical stimulation on lower extremities muscles for 30 minutes for electrical stimulation group (N=10). And other underwent passive stretching for 30 minutes (N=10). The result shows that blood glucose level is decrease from 192.9 ± 10.7087 mg/dL to 165.3 ± 10.527 mg/dL for electrical stimulation intervention group while for the passive stretching group the blood glucose decrease from 153 ± 12.468 mg/dL to 136.1 ± 12.346 mg/dL. Both electrical stimulation and passive stretching are effective to lowering blood glucose level and can be proposed for those people restricted to perform exercise.

  3. Relationship of Early Spontaneous Type V Blood Pressure Fluctuation after Thrombolysis in Acute Cerebral Infarction Patients and the Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Wan, Ting; Xu, Xiahong; Liu, Feifeng; Li, Changsong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Jing; Bao, Huan; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship between an early spontaneous type V blood pressure fluctuation and the post-thrombolysis prognosis of patients with acute cerebral infarction. Patients were admitted consecutively. All patients were categorized into the type V blood pressure fluctuation group or non-type V blood pressure group. Their blood pressure was monitored before thrombolysis and until 6 h after thrombolysis. Baseline data and clinical outcomes were compared. Of 170 patients, 43 (25.2%) had an early type V blood pressure fluctuation. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score before thrombolysis and 24 h after thrombolysis, and the modified Rankin scale score at 90 days differed significantly between the two groups (P < 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an unfavorable prognosis at 3 months was associated with the NIHSS score before thrombolysis (P = 0.000) but probably not with this blood pressure fluctuation (P = 0.058). An early spontaneous type V blood pressure fluctuation is common in patients with acute cerebral infarction who received venous thrombolysis, especially if they have a higher NIHSS score before thrombolysis. The type V blood pressure fluctuation may not influence patients’ prognosis; however, this needs to be confirmed in future trials. PMID:27278121

  4. Activity and longevity of antibody in paper-based blood typing diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Clare A.; McLiesh, Heather; Then, Whui L.; Garnier, Gil

    2018-05-01

    Paper-based diagnostics provide a low-cost, reliable and easy to use mode of blood typing. The shelf-life of such products, however, can be limited due to the reduced activity of reagent antibodies sorbed on the paper cellulose fibres. This study explores the effects of ageing on antibody activity for periods up to twelve months on paper and in solution under different ageing and drying conditions - air-dried, lyophilised and kept as a liquid. Paper kept wet with undiluted antibody is shown to have the longest shelf-life and the clearest negatives. Antibody diluted with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protects against the lyophilisation process, however, beyond nine months ageing, false positives are seen. Paper with air-dried antibodies is not suitable for use after one month ageing. These results inform preparation and storage conditions for the development of long shelf-life blood grouping paper-based diagnostics.

  5. Hemolysis and heat generation in six different types of centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Araki, K; Taenaka, Y; Masuzawa, T; Tatsumi, E; Wakisaka, Y; Watari, M; Nakatani, T; Akagi, H; Baba, Y; Anai, H

    1995-09-01

    What the most causative factor affecting hemolysis is still controversial. To resolve this problem, we investigated the relationship between hemolysis and heat generation in six types of centrifugal blood pumps (Bio-Pump, Delphin, Capiox, Nikkiso, Isoflow, and Toyobo). The analyzed parameters were index of hemolysis in fresh goat blood, pumping performance, and heat generation in a thermally isolated mock circuit. These parameters were analyzed at a flow rate of 5 L/min by changing the pressure head (100 mm Hg and 500 mm Hg). At 500 mm Hg of pressure head, the Bio-Pump needed the highest rotation number and showed the highest hemolytic rate and heat generation. The index of hemolysis is well correlated to heat generation (r2 = 0.721). Heat may originate from the motor by conduction, hydraulic energy loss, and mechanical friction between the shaft and seal. We strongly suspect that hemolysis was caused by a factor such as mechanical friction which generates heat locally.

  6. ABO incompatibility in mismatched unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia: A report from the acute leukemia working party of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Michallet, Mauricette; Craddock, Charles; Socié, Gerard; Volin, Lisa; Maertens, Johan A; Crawley, Charles; Blaise, Didier; Ljungman, Per T; Cornelissen, Jan; Russell, Nigel; Baron, Frédéric; Gorin, Norbert; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-08-01

    ABO incompatibility is commonly observed in stem cell transplantation and its impact in this setting has been extensively investigated. HLA-mismatched unrelated donors (MMURD) are often used as an alternative stem cell source but are associated with increased transplant related complications. Whether ABO incompatibility affects outcome in MMURD transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients is unknown. We evaluated 1,013 AML patients who underwent MMURD transplantation between 2005 and 2014. Engraftment rates were comparable between ABO matched and mismatched patients, as were relapse incidence [34%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 28-39; for ABO matched vs. 36%; 95% CI, 32-40; for ABO mismatched; P = .32], and nonrelapse mortality (28%; 95% CI, 23-33; for ABO matched vs. 25%; 95% CI, 21-29; for ABO mismatched; P = .2). Three year survival was 40% for ABO matched and 43% for ABO mismatched patients (P = .35), Leukemia free survival rates were also comparable between groups (37%; 95% CI, 32-43; for ABO matched vs. 38%; 95% CI, 33-42; for ABO mismatched; P = .87). Incidence of grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease was marginally lower in patients with major ABO mismatching (Hazard ratio of 0.7, 95% CI, 0.5-1; P = .049]. ABO incompatibility probably has no significant clinical implications in MMURD transplantation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Seasonal Variation in Blood Pressure in 162,135 Patients With Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Julia M; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Dost, Axel; Steigleder-Schweiger, Claudia; Kiess, Wieland; Schöfl, Christof; Holl, Reinhard W

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variation in blood pressure (BP) has been observed in different populations. However, only few studies have focused on BP seasonality in diabetic patients. This study examined the seasonal patterns in BP in 62,589 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and in 99,546 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from the German/Austrian Diabetes Follow-up Registry. Adjusted mean BP values revealed seasonal cycles of 12 months, with higher BP in colder months. Using harmonic regression models, the estimated systolic BP difference throughout the year was 2.28/2.48 mm Hg in T1DM/T2DM (both P<.001). Interestingly, seasonal variation in diastolic BP was larger in T1DM than in T2DM (1.24/0.64 mm Hg, P<.001). A sex difference was observed in T1DM only, while age differences occurred in both types of diabetes. Correlations between BP and potentially related factors such as outdoor temperature indicated that reasons underlying BP seasonality are likely to be complex and vary by subgroup. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The fluctuation of blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations before and after insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Idam; Nasir, Zulfa

    2015-09-01

    A dynamical-systems model of plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations has been developed to investigate the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon regulations in type 1 diabetic patients. Simulation results show that the normal regulation of blood glucose concentration depends on insulin and glucagon concentrations. On type 1 diabetic case, the role of insulin on regulating blood glucose is not optimal because of the destruction of β cells in pancreas. These β cells destructions cause hyperglycemic episode affecting the whole body metabolism. To get over this, type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to control the blood glucose level. This research has been done by using rapid acting insulin (lispro), long-acting insulin (glargine) and the combination between them to know the effects of insulin therapy on blood glucose, insulin and glucagon concentrations. Simulation results show that these different types of insulin have different effects on blood glucose concentration. Insulin therapy using lispro shows better blood glucose control after consumption of meals. Glargin gives better blood glucose control between meals and during sleep. Combination between lispro and glargine shows better glycemic control for whole day blood glucose level.

  9. The effect of a dietary portfolio compared to a DASH-type diet on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D J A; Jones, P J; Frohlich, J; Lamarche, B; Ireland, C; Nishi, S K; Srichaikul, K; Galange, P; Pellini, C; Faulkner, D; de Souza, R J; Sievenpiper, J L; Mirrahimi, A; Jayalath, V H; Augustin, L S; Bashyam, B; Leiter, L A; Josse, R; Couture, P; Ramprasath, V; Kendall, C W C

    2015-12-01

    Compared to a DASH-type diet, an intensively applied dietary portfolio reduced diastolic blood pressure at 24 weeks as a secondary outcome in a previous study. Due to the importance of strategies to reduce blood pressure, we performed an exploratory analysis pooling data from intensively and routinely applied portfolio treatments from the same study to assess the effect over time on systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure (MAP), and the relation to sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), and portfolio components. 241 participants with hyperlipidemia, from four academic centers across Canada were randomized and completed either a DASH-type diet (control n = 82) or a dietary portfolio that included, soy protein, viscous fibers and nuts (n = 159) for 24 weeks. Fasting measures and 7-day food records were obtained at weeks 0, 12 and 24, with 24-h urines at weeks 0 and 24. The dietary portfolio reduced systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure compared to the control by 2.1 mm Hg (95% CI, 4.2 to -0.1 mm Hg) (p = 0.056), 1.8 mm Hg (CI, 3.2 to 0.4 mm Hg) (p = 0.013) and 1.9 mm Hg (CI, 3.4 to 0.4 mm Hg) (p = 0.015), respectively. Blood pressure reductions were small at 12 weeks and only reached significance at 24 weeks. Nuts, soy and viscous fiber all related negatively to change in mean arterial pressure (ρ = -0.15 to -0.17, p ≤ 0.016) as did urinary potassium (ρ = -0.25, p = 0.001), while the Na(+)/K(+) ratio was positively associated (ρ = 0.20, p = 0.010). Consumption of a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio also decreased blood pressure by comparison with a healthy DASH-type diet. CLINICAL TRIAL REG. NO.: NCT00438425, clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Does blood transfusion type affect complication and length of stay following same-day bilateral total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Soranoglou, Vasileios G; Poultsides, Lazaros A; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Nocon, Allina A; Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Sculco, Peter K; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Sculco, Thomas P

    2018-06-01

    Same-day Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty (BTKA) safety is still controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the association of blood transfusion type (pure autologous, pure allogeneic, and combined) with complication and prolonged length of stay (PLOS) following same-day BTKA. 649 consecutive patients were retrospectively identified over a two-year period. Pure allogeneic transfusions were associated with increased odds of minor complication when compared to patients who had pure autologous transfusions. No association was found between blood transfusion type and major complication or PLOS. Our results suggest that blood transfusion type may be influential in minor complication after BTKA.

  11. Interfacing with in-Situ Data Networks during the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, M.; Griffith, P. C.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Schnase, J. L.; Sinno, S.; Thompson, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) is designed to improve understanding of the causes and impacts of ecological changes in Arctic/boreal regions, and will integrate field-based studies, modeling, and data from airborne and satellite remote sensing. ABoVE will result in a fuller understanding of ecosystem vulnerability and resilience to environmental change in the Arctic and boreal regions of western North America, and provide scientific information required to develop options for societal responses to the impacts of these changes. The studies sponsored by NASA during ABoVE will be coordinated with research and in-situ monitoring activities being sponsored by a number of national and international partners. The NASA Center for Climate Simulation at the Goddard Space Flight Center has partnered with the NASA Carbon Cycle & Ecosystems Office to create a science cloud designed for this field campaign - the ABoVE Science Cloud (ASC). The ASC combines high performance computing with emerging technologies to create an environment specifically designed for large-scale modeling, analysis of remote sensing data, copious disk storage with integrated data management, and integration of core variables from in-situ networks identified by the ABoVE Science Definition Team. In this talk, we will present the scientific requirements driving the development of the ABoVE Science Cloud, discuss the necessary interfaces, both computational and human, with in-situ monitoring networks, and show examples of how the ASC is being used to meet the needs of the ABoVE campaign.

  12. Perioperative anaesthetic management of penetrating neck injury associated with Rh blood type in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Yeting; Shi, Jiaohui; Wang, Zhichun

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a young adult patient with penetrating neck injuries (PNI) with an Rh negative blood type and discuss the perioperative anaesthetic management of single-stage surgical exploration under general anaesthesia and extracorporeal circulation in this patient. The patient had zone II PNI and he was in a haemodynamically progressive unstable state, and the knife penetrated the left internal jugular vein, superior thyroid artery and recurrent laryngeal nerve; the trachea and the oesophagus were swelling at a rapid rate. Eight weeks after operation, the patient was discharged from the hospital without any complications. PMID:23429024

  13. Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... attacks the transfused red blood cells because the donor blood type is not a good match. The attacked ... see how your body is responding to the donor blood and to check your blood counts. Some conditions ...

  14. Donating Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone you know will need a blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always ... The Red Cross estimates that 15% of all blood donors in the United States are high school or ...

  15. "Learning" Can Improve the Blood Glucose Control Performance for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youqing; Zhang, Jinping; Zeng, Fanmao; Wang, Na; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Dong; Yang, Wenying; Cobelli, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    A learning-type artificial pancreas has been proposed to exploit the repetitive nature in the blood glucose dynamics. We clinically evaluated the efficacy of the learning-type artificial pancreas. We conducted a pilot clinical study in 10 participants of mean age 36.1 years (standard deviation [SD] 12.7; range 16-58) with type 1 diabetes. Each trial was conducted for eight consecutive mornings. The first two mornings were open-loop to obtain the individualized parameters. Then, the following six mornings were closed-loop, during which a learning-type model predictive control algorithm was employed to calculate the insulin infusion rate. To evaluate the algorithm's robustness, each participant took exercise or consumed alcohol on the fourth or sixth closed-loop day and the order was determined randomly. The primary outcome was the percentage of time spent in the target glucose range of 3.9-8.0 mmol/L between 0900 and 1200 h. The percentage of time with glucose spent in target range was significantly improved from 51.6% on day 1 to 71.6% on day 3 (mean difference between groups 17.9%, confidence interval [95% CI] 3.6-32.1; P = 0.020). There were no hypoglycemic episodes developed on day 3 compared with two episodes on day 1. There was no difference in the percentage of time with glucose spent in target range between exercise day versus day 5 and alcohol day versus day 5. The learning-type artificial pancreas system achieved good glycemic regulation and provided increased effectiveness over time. It showed a satisfactory performance even when the blood glucose was challenged by exercise or alcohol.

  16. Optic cup segmentation: type-II fuzzy thresholding approach and blood vessel extraction

    PubMed Central

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Alodhayb, Sami; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    We introduce here a new technique for segmenting optic cup using two-dimensional fundus images. Cup segmentation is the most challenging part of image processing of the optic nerve head due to the complexity of its structure. Using the blood vessels to segment the cup is important. Here, we report on blood vessel extraction using first a top-hat transform and Otsu’s segmentation function to detect the curves in the blood vessels (kinks) which indicate the cup boundary. This was followed by an interval type-II fuzzy entropy procedure. Finally, the Hough transform was applied to approximate the cup boundary. The algorithm was evaluated on 550 fundus images from a large dataset, which contained three different sets of images, where the cup was manually marked by six ophthalmologists. On one side, the accuracy of the algorithm was tested on the three image sets independently. The final cup detection accuracy in terms of area and centroid was calculated to be 78.2% of 441 images. Finally, we compared the algorithm performance with manual markings done by the six ophthalmologists. The agreement was determined between the ophthalmologists as well as the algorithm. The best agreement was between ophthalmologists one, two and five in 398 of 550 images, while the algorithm agreed with them in 356 images. PMID:28515636

  17. Optic cup segmentation: type-II fuzzy thresholding approach and blood vessel extraction.

    PubMed

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Alodhayb, Sami; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2017-01-01

    We introduce here a new technique for segmenting optic cup using two-dimensional fundus images. Cup segmentation is the most challenging part of image processing of the optic nerve head due to the complexity of its structure. Using the blood vessels to segment the cup is important. Here, we report on blood vessel extraction using first a top-hat transform and Otsu's segmentation function to detect the curves in the blood vessels (kinks) which indicate the cup boundary. This was followed by an interval type-II fuzzy entropy procedure. Finally, the Hough transform was applied to approximate the cup boundary. The algorithm was evaluated on 550 fundus images from a large dataset, which contained three different sets of images, where the cup was manually marked by six ophthalmologists. On one side, the accuracy of the algorithm was tested on the three image sets independently. The final cup detection accuracy in terms of area and centroid was calculated to be 78.2% of 441 images. Finally, we compared the algorithm performance with manual markings done by the six ophthalmologists. The agreement was determined between the ophthalmologists as well as the algorithm. The best agreement was between ophthalmologists one, two and five in 398 of 550 images, while the algorithm agreed with them in 356 images.

  18. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out.

  19. An experience of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue Innova) in a regional acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk Wah; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova) in a hospital blood bank by considering the performance and workflow as compared with manual methods. The turnaround time was found to be 45% faster than the manual method. The concordance rate was found to be 100% for both ABO/Rh(D) typing and antibody screening in both of the systems and there was no significant difference in detection sensitivity for clinically significant antibodies. The Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova automated blood banking system streamlined the routine pre-transfusion testing in hospital blood bank with high throughput, equivalent sensitivity and reliability as compared with conventional manual method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Blood group typing based on recording the elastic scattering of laser radiation using the method of digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolmashkin, A. A.; Dubrovskii, V. A.; Zabenkov, I. V.

    2012-05-01

    The possibility is demonstrated to determine the human blood group by recording the scattering of laser radiation with the help of the digital imaging method. It is experimentally shown that the action of a standing ultrasound wave leads to acceleration of the agglutination reaction of red blood cells, to formation of larger immune complexes of red blood cells, and, as a consequence, to acceleration of their sedimentation. In the absence of agglutination of red blood cells the ultrasound does not enhance the relevant processes. This difference in the results of ultrasound action on the mixture of blood and serum allows a method of blood typing to be offered. Theoretical modelling of the technique of the practical blood typing, carried out on the basis of the elastic light scattering theory, agrees well with the experimental results, which made it possible to plan further improvement of the proposed method. The studies of specific features of sedimentation of red blood cells and their immune complexes were aimed at the optimisation of the sample preparation, i.e., at the search for such experimental conditions that provide the maximal resolution of the method and the device for registering the reaction of red blood cells agglutination. The results of the study may be used in designing the instrumentation for blood group assessment in humans.

  1. Endothelial C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Acts on Pericytes to Regulate Microcirculatory Flow and Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Špiranec, Katarina; Chen, Wen; Werner, Franziska; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Naruke, Takashi; Koch, Franziska; Werner, Andrea; Eder-Negrin, Petra; Diéguez-Hurtado, Rodrigo; Adams, Ralf H; Baba, Hideo A; Schmidt, Hannes; Schuh, Kai; Skryabin, Boris V; Movahedi, Kiavash; Schweda, Frank; Kuhn, Michaela

    2018-04-06

    Background -Peripheral vascular resistance has a major impact on arterial blood pressure levels. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) participates in the local regulation of vascular tone but the target cells remain controversial. The cGMP-producing guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) receptor for CNP is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). However, whereas endothelial cell-specific CNP knockout mice are hypertensive, mice with deletion of GC-B in VSMC have unaltered blood pressure. Methods -We analyzed whether the vasodilating response to CNP changes along the vascular tree, i.e. whether the GC-B receptor is expressed in microvascular types of cells. Mice with a floxed GC-B ( Npr2 ) gene were interbred with Tie2-Cre or PDGF-Rβ-Cre ERT2 lines to develop mice lacking GC-B in endothelial cells or in precapillary arteriolar SMC and capillary pericytes. Intravital microscopy, (non)invasive hemodynamics, fluorescence energy transfer studies of pericyte's cAMP levels in situ and renal physiology were combined to dissect whether and how CNP/GC-B/cGMP signaling modulates microcirculatory tone and blood pressure. Results -Intravital microscopy studies revealed that the vasodilatatory effect of CNP increases towards small-diameter arterioles and capillaries. Consistently, CNP did not prevent endothelin-1-induced acute constrictions of proximal arterioles but fully reversed endothelin effects in precapillary arterioles and capillaries. Here, the GC-B receptor is expressed both in endothelial and mural cells, i.e. in pericytes. Notably, the vasodilatatory effects of CNP were preserved in mice with endothelial GC-B deletion but abolished in mice lacking GC-B in microcirculatory SMC and pericytes. CNP, via GC-B/cGMP signaling modulates two signaling cascades in pericytes: it activates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I to phosphorylate downstream targets such as the cytoskeleton-associated vasodilator activated phosphoprotein; and it inhibits phosphodiesterase 3A

  2. The Relationship Between a Balanced Time Perspective and Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose Among People With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Baird, Harriet M; Webb, Thomas L; Martin, Jilly; Sirois, Fuschia M

    2018-05-10

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose helps people with type 1 diabetes to maintain glycemic control and reduce the risk of complications. However, adherence to blood glucose monitoring is often suboptimal. Like many health behaviors, self-monitoring of blood glucose involves exerting effort in the present to achieve future benefits. As such, the present research explored whether individual differences in time perspective-specifically, the extent to which people have a balanced time perspective-are associated with the frequency with which people with type 1 diabetes monitor their blood glucose and, thus, maintain glycemic control. Adults with type 1 diabetes completed measures of time perspective, feelings associated with monitoring, attitudes toward monitoring, and trait self-control. Objective data regarding the frequency with which participants monitored their blood glucose levels and their long-term glycemic control were extracted from their medical records. Hierarchical regression analyses and tests of indirect effects (N = 129) indicated that having a more balanced time perspective was associated with more frequent monitoring of blood glucose and, as a result, better glycemic control. Further analyses (N = 158) also indicated that there was an indirect relationship between balanced time perspective and monitoring of blood glucose via the feelings that participants associated with monitoring and their subsequent attitudes toward monitoring. These findings point to the importance and relevance of time perspective for understanding health-related behavior and may help to inform interventions designed to promote self-monitoring of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Clinical Observation of Factors in the Efficacy of Blood Component Transfusion in Patients following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Xiao, Yanni; Ran, Qian; Liu, Yao; Duan, Qianbi; Duan, Huiling; Ye, Xingde; Li, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Factors affecting the efficacy of platelet and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have not been studied extensively. We aimed to evaluate platelet and RBC transfusion efficacy by measuring the platelet corrected count increment and the hemoglobin increment, respectively, 24 h after transfusion in 105 patients who received HSCT. Methodology/Principal Findings Using retrospective analysis, we studied whether factors, including gender, time of transplantation, the compatibility of ABO group between HSC donors and recipients, and autologous or allogenic transplantation, influence the efficacy of blood component transfusion. We found that the infection rate of HSCT patients positively correlated with the transfusion amount, and the length of stay in the laminar flow room was associated with transfusion. We found that platelet transfusion performed during HSCT showed significantly better efficacy than that performed before HSCT. The effect of platelet transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly better than that in allo-transplantation. The efficacy of RBC transfusion during HSCT was significantly lower than that performed before HSCT. The efficacy of RBC transfusion in auto-transplantation was significantly higher than that in allo-transplantation. Allo-transplantation patients who received HSCs from compatible ABO groups showed significantly higher efficacy during both platelet and RBC transfusion. Conclusions We conclude that the efficacy of platelet and RBC transfusions does not correlate with the gender of patients, while it significantly correlates with the time of transplantation, type of transplantation, and ABO compatibility between HSC donors and recipients. During HSCT, the infection rate of patients positively correlates with the transfusion amount of RBCs and platelets. The total volume of RBC units transfused positively correlates with the length of the patients’ stay

  4. Estimation of size of cord blood inventory based on high-resolution typing of HLAs.

    PubMed

    Song, E Y; Huh, J Y; Kim, S Y; Kim, T G; Oh, S; Yoon, J H; Roh, E Y; Park, M H; Kang, M S; Shin, S

    2014-07-01

    Methods for estimating the cord blood (CB) inventory size required vary according to the ethnic diversity of the HLA, degree of HLA matching and HLA-typing resolution. We estimated the CB inventory size required using 7190 stored CB units (CBU) and 2450 patients who were awaiting or underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. With high-resolution typing of HLA-A, B and DRB1, 94.6% of Korean patients could find CBUs in 100 000 CBUs with a 5/6 match, and 95.7% could find CBUs in 5000 CBUs with a 4/6 match. With low-resolution typing of HLA-A and B and high-resolution typing of leukocyte antigen-DRB1, 95% of patients could find CBUs in 50 000 CBUs with a 5/6 match, and 96.7% could find CBUs in 3000 CBUs  with a 4/6 match. With additional high-resolution typing for HLA-A and B, which could improve transplantation outcome, the size of the CB inventory would need to increase twofold for Koreans.

  5. Anti-TNF levels in cord blood at birth are associated with anti-TNF type.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Shannon L; de Lima, Alison; van der Ent, Cokkie; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; van der Woude, C Janneke

    2018-05-15

    Pregnancy guidelines for women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) provide recommendations regarding anti-TNF cessation during pregnancy, in order to limit fetal exposure. Although infliximab (IFX) leads to higher anti-TNF concentrations in cord blood than adalimumab (ADA), recommendations are similar. We aimed to demonstrate the effect of anti-TNF cessation during pregnancy on fetal exposure, for IFX and ADA separately. We conducted a prospective single center cohort study. Women with IBD, using IFX or ADA, were followed-up during pregnancy. In case of sustained disease remission, anti-TNF was stopped in the third trimester. At birth, anti-TNF concentration was measured in cord blood. A linear regression model was developed to demonstrate anti-TNF concentration in cord blood at birth. In addition, outcomes such as disease activity, pregnancy outcomes and 1-year health outcomes of infants were collected. We included 131 pregnancies that resulted in a live birth (73 IFX, 58 ADA). At birth, 94 cord blood samples were obtained (52 IFX, 42 ADA), showing significantly higher levels of IFX than ADA (p<0.0001). Anti-TNF type and stop week were used in the linear regression model. During the third trimester, IFX transportation over the placenta increases exponentially, however, ADA transportation is limited and increases in a linear fashion. Overall, health outcomes were comparable. Our linear regression model shows that ADA may be continued longer during pregnancy as transportation over the placenta is lower than IFX. This may reduce relapse risk of the mother without increasing fetal anti-TNF exposure.

  6. Systolic blood pressure control among individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: A comparative effectiveness analysis of three interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Intensive lifestyle management or frequent goal-based monitoring with pharmacological management can be successful strategies for blood pressure control in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes....

  7. Blood pressure circadian rhythms and adverse outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients diagnosed with orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jing; Hou, Yuan-Ping; Wu, Jin-Ling; Fang, Xiang-Yang; Li, Sheng-Li; Liu, Miao-Bing; Sun, Qian-Mei

    2018-03-01

    Patients with diabetes frequently develop orthostatic hypotension (OH). The present study was designed to examine the relationship of blood pressure (BP) circadian rhythms and outcomes in diabetes with OH. In the present study, 173 inpatients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Patients were divided into an OH group and a non-OH group according to the BP changes detected in the supine and standing position. Then, 24-h ambulatory BP was monitored. Patients were followed up for an average of 45 ± 10 months post-discharge. Outcomes - death and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke - were recorded. There were 61 patients (35.26%) in the OH group and 112 patients (64.74%) in the non-OH group. In the OH group, the night-time systolic BP and night-time diastolic BP were higher, the blood BP rhythms were predominantly of the riser type (67.21%). OH was as an independent marker of riser type circadian rhythm (adjusted odds ratio 4.532, 95% confidence interval 2.579-7.966). In the OH group, the incidence rates of mortality, and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events were increased significantly compared with those in the non-OH group (11.48 vs 2.68%, P = 0.014; 37.70 vs 8.93%, P < 0.01). In patients who had type 2 diabetes diagnosed with OH, the BP circadian rhythm usually showed riser patterns, and they had increased rates of mortality, and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. An update on ABO incompatible hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Staley, Elizabeth M; Schwartz, Joseph; Pham, Huy P

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has long been established as the optimal treatment for many hematologic malignancies. In the setting of allogenic HLA matched HPC transplantation, greater than 50% of unrelated donors and 30% of related donors demonstrate some degree of ABO incompatibility (ABOi), which is classified in one of three ways: major, minor, or bidirectional. Major ABOi refers to the presence of recipient isoagglutinins against the donor's A and/or B antigen. Minor ABOi occurs when the HPC product contains the isoagglutinins targeting the recipient's A and/or B antigen. Bidirectional refers to the presence of both major and minor ABOi. Major adverse events associated with ABOi HPC transplantation includes acute and delayed hemolysis, pure red cell aplasia, and delayed engraftment. ABOi HPC transplantation poses a unique challenge to the clinical transplantation unit, the HPC processing lab, and the transfusion medicine service. Therefore, it is essential that these services actively communicate with one another to ensure patient safety. This review will attempt to globally address the challenges related to ABOi HPC transplantation, with an increased focus on aspects related to the laboratory and transfusion medicine services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Interfacial coupling and polarization of perovskite ABO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lijun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Bangmin; Yu, Liping; Chow, G. M.; Tao, Jing; Han, Myung-Geun; Guo, Hangwen; Chen, Lina; Plummer, E. W.; Zhang, Jiandi; Zhu, Yimei

    2017-02-01

    Interfaces with subtle difference in atomic and electronic structures in perovskite ABO3 heterostructures often yield intriguingly different properties, yet their exact roles remain elusive. In this article, we report an integrated study of unusual transport, magnetic, and structural properties of Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (PSMO) films and La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) films of various thicknesses on SrTiO3 (STO) substrate. In particular, using atomically resolved imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), we measured interface related local lattice distortion, BO6 octahedral rotation and cation-anion displacement induced polarization. In the very thin PSMO film, an unexpected interface-induced ferromagnetic polaronic insulator phase was observed during the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition of the substrate STO, due to the enhanced electron-phonon interaction and atomic disorder in the film. On the other hand, for the very thin LSMO films we observed a remarkably deep polarization in non-ferroelectric STO substrate near the interface. Combining the experimental results with first principles calculations, we propose that the observed deep polarization is induced by an electric field originating from oxygen vacancies that extend beyond a dozen unit-cells from the interface, thus providing important evidence of the role of defects in the emergent interface properties of transition metal oxides.

  10. Higher cord blood levels of fatty acids in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Djelmis, Josip; Ivaniševic, Marina; Desoye, Gernot; van Poppel, Mireille; Berberovic, Edina; Soldo, Dragan; Oreskovic, Slavko

    2018-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with a disturbance of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. To determine whether type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) alters maternal and neonatal fatty acid levels. Observational study. Academic hospital. Sixty pregnant women (30 women with T1DM with good glycemic control and 30 healthy women) were included in the study. Maternal blood, umbilical vein and artery blood samples were collected immediately upon delivery. Following lipid extraction, the fatty acid profiles of the total fatty acid pool of maternal serum and umbilical vein and artery serum were determined by gas chromatography. Total fatty acid concentration in maternal serum did not differ between the study groups; it was significantly higher in umbilical vein serum of the T1DM group compared with that in the control group, median (interquartile range), T1DM: 2126.2 (1446.4 - 3181.3), control: 1073.8 (657.5 - 2226.0); (P<0.001) and in umbilical artery vein serum T1DM: 1805.7 (1393.1 - 2125.0), control: 990.0 (643.3 - 1668.0); (P<0.001). Composition of fatty acids in umbilical vein serum fatty acids showed significantly higher concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the T1DM group than in compared with those in the control group (P=0.001). Also cord blood levels of leptin (P<0.001), C-peptide (P<0.001), and insulin resistance (P=0.015) were higher in the T1DM group compared to controls. The neonates born to T1DM mothers had higher concentrations of total fatty acids, saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids, compared to control group newborns.

  11. An integrated fiberoptic-microfluidic device for agglutination detection and blood typing.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Melur K; Alexander, Stewart P

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, an integrated fiberoptic-microfluidic device for the detection of agglutination for blood type cross-matching has been described. The device consists of a straight microfluidic channel through with a reacted RBC suspension is pumped with the help of a syringe pump. The flow intersects an optical path created by an emitter-received fiber optic pair integrated into the microfluidic device. A 650 nm laser diode is used as the light source and a silicon photodiode is used to detect the light intensity. The spacing between the tips of the two optic fibers can be adjusted. When fiber spacing is large and the concentration of the suspension is high, scattering phenomenon becomes the dominant mechanism for agglutination detection while at low concentrations and small spacing, optointerruption becomes the dominant mechanism. An agglutination strength factor (ASF) is calculated from the data. Studies with a variety of blood types indicate that the sensing method correctly identifies the agglutination reaction in all cases. A disposable integrated device can be designed for future implementation of the method for near-bedside pre-transfusion check.

  12. A study of the transport and immobilisation mechanisms of human red blood cells in a paper-based blood typing device using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lizi; Tian, Junfei; Ballerini, David; Li, Miaosi; Shen, Wei

    2013-09-07

    Recent research on the use of bioactive paper for human blood typing has led to the discovery of a new method for identifying the haemagglutination of red blood cells (RBCs). When a blood sample is introduced onto paper treated with the grouping antibodies, RBCs undergo haemagglutination with the corresponding grouping antibodies, forming agglutinated cell aggregates in the paper. A subsequent washing of the paper with saline buffer could not remove these aggregates from the paper; this phenomenon provides a new method for rapid, visual identification of the antibody-specific haemagglutination reactions and thus the determination of the blood type. This study aims to understand the mechanism of RBC immobilization inside the paper which follows haemagglutination reactions. Confocal microscopy is used to observe the morphology of the free and agglutinated RBCs that are labelled with FITC. Chromatographic elution patterns of both agglutinated and non-agglutinated RBCs are studied to gain insight into the transport behaviour of free RBCs and agglutinated aggregates. This work provides new information about RBC haemagglutination inside the fibre network of paper on a microscopic level, which is important for the future design of paper-based blood typing devices with high sensitivity and assaying speed.

  13. Effects of intensive blood-pressure control in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cushman, William C; Evans, Gregory W; Byington, Robert P; Goff, David C; Grimm, Richard H; Cutler, Jeffrey A; Simons-Morton, Denise G; Basile, Jan N; Corson, Marshall A; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Katz, Lois; Peterson, Kevin A; Friedewald, William T; Buse, John B; Bigger, J Thomas; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2010-04-29

    There is no evidence from randomized trials to support a strategy of lowering systolic blood pressure below 135 to 140 mm Hg in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether therapy targeting normal systolic pressure (i.e., <120 mm Hg) reduces major cardiovascular events in participants with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events. A total of 4733 participants with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to intensive therapy, targeting a systolic pressure of less than 120 mm Hg, or standard therapy, targeting a systolic pressure of less than 140 mm Hg. The primary composite outcome was nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes. The mean follow-up was 4.7 years. After 1 year, the mean systolic blood pressure was 119.3 mm Hg in the intensive-therapy group and 133.5 mm Hg in the standard-therapy group. The annual rate of the primary outcome was 1.87% in the intensive-therapy group and 2.09% in the standard-therapy group (hazard ratio with intensive therapy, 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73 to 1.06; P=0.20). The annual rates of death from any cause were 1.28% and 1.19% in the two groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.35; P=0.55). The annual rates of stroke, a prespecified secondary outcome, were 0.32% and 0.53% in the two groups, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.89; P=0.01). Serious adverse events attributed to antihypertensive treatment occurred in 77 of the 2362 participants in the intensive-therapy group (3.3%) and 30 of the 2371 participants in the standard-therapy group (1.3%) (P<0.001). In patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular events, targeting a systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg, as compared with less than 140 mm Hg, did not reduce the rate of a composite outcome of fatal and nonfatal major cardiovascular events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00000620.) 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society

  14. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico

    DOE PAGES

    Anez, German; Heisey, Daniel A. R.; Chancey, Caren; ...

    2016-02-12

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. Here, we used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples wasmore » determined by culture in mosquito cells. As a result, DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3–8 log 10 PCR-detectable units/ml. In conclusion, DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma.« less

  15. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Añez, Germán; Heisey, Daniel A. R.; Chancey, Caren; Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Espina, Luz M.; Souza, Kátia P. R.; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Krysztof, David E.; Foster, Gregory A.; Stramer, Susan L.; Rios, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. Methods We used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples was determined by culture in mosquito cells. Results DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3–8 log10 PCR-detectable units/ml. Conclusions DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma. PMID:26871560

  16. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Anez, German; Heisey, Daniel A. R.; Chancey, Caren

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. Here, we used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples wasmore » determined by culture in mosquito cells. As a result, DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3–8 log 10 PCR-detectable units/ml. In conclusion, DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma.« less

  17. Cerebral blood flow response to hypoglycemia is altered in patients with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kirsten M; Rooijackers, Hanne M; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether cerebral blood flow responses to hypoglycemia are altered in people with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hypoglycemia on both global and regional cerebral blood flow in type 1 diabetes patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, type 1 diabetes patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls (n = 7 per group). The subjects underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic–hypoglycemic glucose clamp in a 3 T MR system. Global and regional changes in cerebral blood flow were determined by arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, at the end of both glycemic phases. Hypoglycemia generated typical symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes and normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, but not in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. Conversely, hypoglycemia increased global cerebral blood flow in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, which was not observed in the other two groups. Regionally, hypoglycemia caused a redistribution of cerebral blood flow towards the thalamus of both patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, consistent with activation of brain regions associated with the autonomic response to hypoglycemia. No such redistribution was found in the patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. An increase in global cerebral blood flow may enhance nutrient supply to the brain, hence suppressing symptomatic awareness of hypoglycemia. Altogether these results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia contribute to impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. PMID:27389175

  18. Concept designs of nonrotating-type centrifugal blood pump and basic study on output characteristics of the oscillating disk-type centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Kabei, N; Tuichiya, K; Sakurai, Y

    1994-09-01

    When designing a turbo-type blood pump as an artificial heart, the gap between a rotating shaft and a pump housing should be perfectly sealed to prevent any leakage or contamination through a seal. In addition, blood coagulation in a blood chamber must be avoided. To overcome these problems, we proposed five different nonrotating-type turbo pumps: a caudal-fin-type axial-flow pump, a caudal-fin-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-column-type centrifugal pump, a nutating-collapsible-tube-type centrifugal pump, and an oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump. We selected and developed the oscillating-disk-type centrifugal pump that consists of a disk, a driving rod, a seal, an oscillation mechanism, and a pump housing. The disk is mounted on the end of the rod, which is connected to a high-speed DC motor through an oscillation mechanism. The rod and the disk do not rotate, but they oscillate in the pump housing. This movement of the disk generates forward fluid flow around the axis (i.e., the rotational fluid flow). Centrifugal force due to fluid rotation supports the pressure difference between the outlet and the inlet. The diameter of the disk is 39 mm, the maximum inner diameter of the pump housing is 40 mm, and the volume of the blood chamber for 25 degrees' oscillation is 16.9 ml. The performance of the pump was tested in a mock circulatory system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Twenty-four-hour variations in blood glucose level in Japanese type 2 diabetes patients based on continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hajime, Maiko; Okada, Yosuke; Mori, Hiroko; Otsuka, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Mayuko; Miyazaki, Megumi; Kuno, Fumi; Sugai, Kei; Sonoda, Satomi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kurozumi, Akira; Narisawa, Manabu; Torimoto, Keiichi; Arao, Tadashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2018-01-01

    High fluctuations in blood glucose are associated with various complications. The correlation between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level and fluctuations in blood glucose level has not been studied in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. In the present study, blood glucose profile stratified by HbA1c level was evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in Japanese type 2 diabetes patients. Our retrospective study included 294 patients with type 2 diabetes who were divided by HbA1c level into five groups (≥6.0 to <7.0%, ≥7.0 to <8.0%, ≥8.0 to <9.0%, ≥9.0 to <10.0% and ≥10%). The correlation between HbA1c level and CGM data was analyzed. The primary end-point was the difference in blood glucose fluctuations among the HbA1c groups. The mean blood glucose level increased significantly with increasing HbA1c (P trend  < 0.01). The standard deviation increased with increases in HbA1c (P trend  < 0.01). The mean amplitude of glycemic excursions did not vary significantly with HbA1c. The levels of maximum blood glucose, minimum blood glucose, each preprandial blood glucose, each postprandial maximum blood glucose, range of increase in postprandial glucose from pre-meal to after breakfast, the area under the blood concentration-time curve >180 mg/dL and percentage of the area under the blood concentration-time curve >180 mg/dL were higher with higher HbA1c. Mean glucose level and pre-breakfast blood glucose level were significant and independent determinants of HbA1c. In Japanese patients treated for type 2 diabetes, the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions did not correlate with HbA1c, making it difficult to assess blood glucose fluctuations using HbA1c. Parameters other than HbA1c are required to evaluate fluctuations in blood glucose level in patients receiving treatment for type 2 diabetes. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia

  20. Enhanced self-monitoring blood glucose in non-insulin requiring Type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brackney, Dana Elisabeth

    2018-03-31

    To contribute to both theoretical and practical understanding of the role of self-monitoring blood glucose for self-management by describing the experience of people with non-insulin requiring Type 2 diabetes in an enhanced structured self-monitoring blood glucose intervention. The complex context of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetes requires a deeper understanding of the clients' illness experience with structured self-monitoring of blood glucose. Clients' numeracy skills contribute to their response to blood glucose readings. Nurses' use of motivational interviewing to increase clients' regulatory self-efficacy is important to the theoretical perspective of the study. A qualitative descriptive study. A purposive sample of eleven adults recently (<2 years) diagnosed with non-insulin requiring Type 2 diabetes who had experienced a structured self-monitoring blood glucose intervention participated in this study. Audio recordings of semi-structured interviews and photos of logbooks were analyzed for themes using constant comparison and member checking. The illness experience states of Type 2 diabetes include 'Diagnosis', 'Behavior change', and 'Routine checking'. People check blood glucose to confirm their Type 2 diabetes diagnosis, to console their diabetes related fears, to create personal explanations of health behavior's impact on blood glucose, to activate behavior change and to congratulate their diabetes self-management efforts. These findings support the Transtheoretical model's stages of change and change processes. Blood glucose checking strengthens the relationships between theoretical concepts found in Diabetes Self-management Education-Support including: engagement, information sharing, and behavioral support. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of Maternal Rh Immunization by ABO Compatible and Incompatible Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ascari, W. Q.; Levine, P.; Pollack, W.

    1969-01-01

    The incidence of maternal Rh immunization in Rh-negative women following a single ABO compatible Rh-positive pregnancy is about 17%. This incidence was determined by following Rh-negative women through two Rh-incompatible pregnancies and analysing their sera for anti-Rh at the time of delivery of their second observed pregnancy. Maternal Rh immunization occurs almost exclusively after delivery; however, antibodies may not be detectable in the absence of further antigenic stimulation. The incidence of maternal Rh immunization when maternal-foetal ABO incompatibility is also present is 9–13% and 17% for group O and non-group O women respectively. This study emphasizes the need to offer Rh-immune prophylaxis to Rh-negative women having Rh-positive infants whether or not ABO incompatibility exists between the mother and infant. PMID:4179167

  2. Grazing system and floor type effects on blood biochemistry, growth and carcass characteristics of Nguni goats

    PubMed Central

    Chikwanda, Allen Tapiwa; Muchenje, Voster

    2017-01-01

    Objective Purpose was to determine the effects of grazing system and floor type on concentrations of blood metabolites, activity of creatine kinase, body weight and carcass characteristics of castrated Nguni goats. Methods Forty eight, 7 month old goats were randomly allocated to herding and tethering treatments from 0800 to 1300 hours and accommodated on slatted and earth floors daily. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture every fifteenth day for metabolite analysis. Slaughter was done at a commercial abattoir following 5 months of monitoring. Results Tethered goats had significantly higher concentrations of urea (5.19 mmol/L) (p< 0.001), creatinine (55.87 μmol/L) (p<0.05), total protein (64.60 g/L) (p<0.01), and globulin (49.79 g/L) (p<0.001), whereas herded goats had higher glucose (3.38 mmol/L) (p<0.001), albumin (15.33 g/L) (p<0.05), albumin/globulin ratio (0.34) (p<0.01), and body weight (24.87 kg) (p< 0.001). Slatted floors caused higher (p<0.01) albumin at 15.37 g/L. The interaction of grazing system and floor type affected creatinine, total protein, globulin at (p<0.01) and albumen/globulin ratio at (p<0.01). The least creatinine concentration and albumin/globulin ratio was in herded and tethered goats that were accommodated on earth floors, respectively. The highest total protein and globulin concentrations were in serum of tethered goats that were accommodated on earth floors. The highest (p<0.05) dressing percentage (45.26%) was in herded goats accommodated on slatted floors. Conclusion Herding of goats lowered globulin concentration, improved estimated feed intake, blood glucose and albumin concentrations, albumin globulin ratio, increased body weights and weight related carcass characteristics. Floor type had very little effects on metabolites where earth floors only reduced albumin concentration. Tethering and housing goats on earth floors resulted in double stress that increased chronic infections. PMID:28002930

  3. Cinnamon extract improves fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Sheng, Hongguang; Wu, Johnna; Cheng, Yuan; Zhu, Jianming; Chen, Yan

    2012-06-01

    For thousands of years, cinnamon has been used as a traditional treatment in China. However, there are no studies to date that investigate whether cinnamon supplements are able to aid in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Chinese subjects. We hypothesized cinnamon should be effective in improving blood glucose control in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. To address this hypothesis, we performed a randomized, double-blinded clinical study to analyze the effect of cinnamon extract on glycosylated hemoglobin A(1c) and fasting blood glucose levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 66 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited and randomly divided into 3 groups: placebo and low-dose and high-dose supplementation with cinnamon extract at 120 and 360 mg/d, respectively. Patients in all 3 groups took gliclazide during the entire 3 months of the study. Both hemoglobin A(1c) and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly reduced in patients in the low- and high-dose groups, whereas they were not changed in the placebo group. The blood triglyceride levels were also significantly reduced in the low-dose group. The blood levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver transaminase remained unchanged in the 3 groups. In conclusion, our study indicates that cinnamon supplementation is able to significantly improve blood glucose control in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative study of the concentration of salivary and blood glucose in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Carolina U; Soares, Maria Sueli M; Almeida, Paulo C; Soares, Teresa C

    2010-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to comparatively evaluate the concentrations of blood and salivary glucose as well as salivary flow and xerostomia in type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients. The mean salivary glucose level in diabetic patients was 14.03 +/-16.76 mg/dl and 6.35 +/- 6.02 mg/dl (P = 0.036) in the control group. The mean capillary blood glucose level in diabetic patients was 213 +/- 88 mg/dl, while that in non-diabetic patients was 99 +/- 14 mg/dl (P = 0.000). The mean value for resting salivary flow was 0.21 +/- 0.16 ml/min in diabetic patients and 0.33 +/- 0.20 ml/min in the control group (P = 0.002). The stimulated salivary flow was lower in the group of diabetic patients, with a mean of 0.63 +/- 0.43 ml/min, whereas the control group showed a mean of 1.20 +/- 0.70 ml/min (P = 0.000). Of the diabetic patients, 45% exhibited hyposalivation, in contrast to 2.5% of the non-diabetic patients (P = 0.000). Xerostomia was reported in 12.5% of diabetic patients and 5% of non-diabetic patients (P = 0.23). We can conclude that salivary glucose concentration was significantly higher in the experimental group and that there was no correlation between salivary and blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. The total salivary flow was significantly reduced in diabetic patients and there was no significant difference as to the presence of xerostomia in both groups.

  5. Poor procedures and quality control among non-affiliated blood centers in Burkina Faso: an argument for expanding the reach of the national blood transfusion center

    PubMed Central

    Nébié, Koumpingnin; Ouattara, Siaka; Sanou, Mahamoudou; Kientega, Youssouphe; Dahourou, Honorine; Ky, Lassina; Kienou, Kisito; Diallo, Samba; Bigirimana, Françoise; Fretz, Catherine; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the creation of national blood transfusion services. Burkina Faso has a CNTS (Centre national de transfusion sanguine - National Blood Transfusion Center) but it currently covers only 53% of the national blood supply versus 47% produced by independent hospital blood banks. Study design To evaluate blood collection, testing, preparation and prescription practices in the regions of Burkina Faso that are not covered by the CNTS, we conducted a cross-sectional survey. Methodology Data were collected by trained professionals from May to June 2009, at 42 autonomous blood centers not covered by the CNTS. Results Blood collection was supervised in all sites by laboratory technicians without specific training. There was no marketing of community blood donation nor mobile collection. Donation was restricted to replacement (family) donors in 21.4% of sites. Pre-donation screening of donors was performed in 63.4% of sites, but some did not use written questionnaires. Testing for HIV, hepatitis B virus and syphilis was universal, although some sites did not screen for hepatitis C virus. In 83.3% of the sites blood typing was performed without reverse ABO typing. In 97.6% of the sites, nurses acted alone or in conjunction with a physician to order blood transfusions. Conclusion Shortcomings in non-CNTS blood centers argue for the development of a truly national CNTS. Such a national center should coordinate and supervise all blood transfusion activities, and is the essential first step for improving and institutionalizing blood transfusion safety and efficacy in a developing country. PMID:21736582

  6. Expression profiling feline peripheral blood monocytes identifies a transcriptional signature associated with type two diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Caroline A; Sedhom, Mamdouh; Reeve-Johnson, Mia; Mallyon, John; Irvine, Katharine M

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease of cats and is similar to type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans, especially with respect to the role of obesity-induced insulin resistance, glucose toxicity, decreased number of pancreatic β-cells and pancreatic amyloid deposition. Cats have thus been proposed as a valuable translational model of T2D. In humans, inflammation associated with adipose tissue is believed to be central to T2D development, and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) are important in the inflammatory cascade which leads to insulin resistance and β-cell failure. PBM may thus provide a useful window to study the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus in cats, however feline monocytes are poorly characterised. In this study, we used the Affymetrix Feline 1.0ST array to profile peripheral blood monocytes from 3 domestic cats with T2D and 3 cats with normal glucose tolerance. Feline monocytes were enriched for genes expressed in human monocytes, and, despite heterogeneous gene expression, we identified a T2D-associated expression signature associated with cell cycle perturbations, DNA repair and the unfolded protein response, oxidative phosphorylation and inflammatory responses. Our data provide novel insights into the feline monocyte transcriptome, and support the hypothesis that inflammatory monocytes contribute to T2D pathogenesis in cats as well as in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood pressure reduction due to hemoglobin glycosylation in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Vázquez, Miguel A Salazar; Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Intaglietta, Marcos; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that glycosylation of hemoglobin constitutes a risk factor for hypertension. Methods: A total of 129 relative uniform diabetic subjects (86 women and 42 men) were enrolled in a cross sectional study. Exclusion criteria included alcohol consumption, smoking, ischemic heart disease, stroke, neoplasia, renal, hepatic, and chronic inflammatory disease. Systolic and diastolic pressures were recorded in subsequent days and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was determined. Hemoglobin glycosylation was measured by determining the percentage glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by means of the automated microparticle enzyme immunoassay test. Results: MAP was found to be independent of the concentration of HbA1c; however, correcting MAP for the variability in hematocrit, to evidence the level of vasoconstriction (or vasodilatation) showed that MAP is negatively correlated with the concentration of HbA1c (p for trend <0.05), when patients treated for hypertension are excluded from the analysis. Patients treated for hypertension showed the opposite trend with increasing MAP as HbA1c increased (p for the difference in trends <0.05). Conclusions: Glycosylation per se appears to lead to blood pressure reduction in type 2 diabetic patients untreated for hypertension. Treatment for hypertension may be associated with a level of endothelial dysfunction that interferes with the antihypertensive effect of HbA1c. PMID:19066010

  8. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles in metabolic syndrome, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grayson, B L; Wang, L; Aune, T M

    2011-07-01

    To determine if individuals with metabolic disorders possess unique gene expression profiles, we compared transcript levels in peripheral blood from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their precursor state, metabolic syndrome to those of control (CTRL) subjects and subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The gene expression profile of each metabolic state was distinguishable from CTRLs and correlated with other metabolic states more than with RA. Of note, subjects in the metabolic cohorts overexpressed gene sets that participate in the innate immune response. Genes involved in activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-κB, were overexpressed in CAD whereas genes differentially expressed in T2D have key roles in T-cell activation and signaling. Reverse transcriptase PCR validation confirmed microarray results. Furthermore, several genes differentially expressed in human metabolic disorders have been previously shown to participate in inflammatory responses in murine models of obesity and T2D. Taken together, these data demonstrate that peripheral blood from individuals with metabolic disorders display overlapping and non-overlapping patterns of gene expression indicative of unique, underlying immune processes.

  9. Impact of Type of Sport, Gender and Age on Red Blood Cell Deformability of Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Tomschi, Fabian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Grau, Marijke

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to detect possible differences in red blood cell (RBC) deformability of elite athletes performing different types of sports and being of different age and gender.182 athletes were included in this cross-sectional study. RBC deformability was measured using the laser-assisted optical rotational cell-analyzer. Maximal elongation index (EI  max ) and shear stress at half-maximum deformation (SS  1/2 ) were calculated. The ratio SS  1/2  /EI  max  (EI  Ratio ) was calculated with low values representing high RBC deformation. Hematocrit (Hct) and mean cellular volume (MCV) were determined in venous blood. Overall RBC deformability did not differ between male and female athletes but, when separated by age of the subjects, RBC deformability increased with age in male but not in female athletes. RBC deformability was lower in Combat sports compared other sport groups. Hct was higher in male compared to female athletes while no difference was observed for MCV. MCV and Hct increased with increasing age. A negative correlation was found between the EI  Ratio  and MCV and between EI  Ratio  and Hct. RBC deformability is influenced by age and endurance rate of the sport which suggests that the RBC system may adapt to changing conditions such as adolescence with the onset effects of sex hormones or physical exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Automated blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes: A review of progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertachi, Arthur; Ramkissoon, Charrise M; Bondia, Jorge; Vehí, Josep

    2018-03-01

    Since the 2000s, research teams worldwide have been working to develop closed-loop (CL) systems able to automatically control blood glucose (BG) levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. This emerging technology is known as artificial pancreas (AP), and its first commercial version just arrived in the market. The main objective of this paper is to present an extensive review of the clinical trials conducted since 2011, which tested various implementations of the AP for different durations under varying conditions. A comprehensive table that contains key information from the selected publications is provided, and the main challenges in AP development and the mitigation strategies used are discussed. The development timelines for different AP systems are also included, highlighting the main evolutions over the clinical trials for each system. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Postprandial blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes for carbohydrates with varying glycemic index foods.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shogo; Noguchi, Claudia Cecilia Yamamoto; Furutani, Eiko

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of type 1 diabetes consists of maintaining postprandial normoglycemia using the correct prandial insulin dose according to food intake. Nonetheless, it is hardly achieved in practice, which results in several diabetes-related complications. In this study we present a feedforward plus feedback blood glucose control system that considers the glycemic index of foods. It consists of a preprandial insulin bolus whose optimal bolus dose and timing are stated as a minimization problem, which is followed by a postprandial closed-loop control based on model predictive control. Simulation results show that, for a representative carbohydrate intake of 50 g, the present control system is able to maintain postprandial glycemia below 140 mg/dL while preventing postprandial hypoglycemia as well.

  12. Examining ABO compatible donors in double lung transplants during the era of lung allocation score.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N; Furuya, Yuka; Komaroff, Eugene; Shiose, Akira; Leotta, Eros; Hisamoto, Kazuhiro; Patel, Namrata; Cordova, Francis; Criner, Gerard; Guy, T Sloane; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2014-10-01

    The short-term and long-term effect of using ABO compatible donors in the era of lung allocation score is unknown. This study determined if carefully selected ABO compatible donors could be used in double lung transplantation (DLT) with good outcomes. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was retrospectively reviewed for adult DLT from May 2005 to December 2011. Of 6,655 double lung transplants, 493 (7.4%) were with ABO compatible donors and 6,162 (92.6%) were with ABO identical donors. In multivariate analysis, use of ABO compatible donors was not associated with mortality at 30 days (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.79, p = 0.49), 1 year (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.42, p = 0.46), and 5 years (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.34, p = 0.65). Variables associated with mortality at 5 years were donor female sex, donor age 60 years or greater, prolonged ischemic time, increasing recipient creatinine, recipient age, race mismatch, and mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to transplantation. Length of stay was longer in the ABO compatible group (30.9 vs 25.9 days, p = 0.001). Acute rejection episodes on index hospitalization (8.8 vs. 8.9%, p = 1.00), peak posttransplant forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (82.7 vs 79.7%, p = 0.053), and decrement in FEV1 over time were not different (p = 0.13). Freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome was similar (1,475 vs 1,454 days, p = 0.17). The use of ABO compatible donors in the era of lung allocation score was not associated with short-term or long-term mortality and resulted in equivalent posttransplant lung function. A DLT with carefully selected ABO compatible donors can result in excellent outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computational Study of the Blood Flow in Three Types of 3D Hollow Fiber Membrane Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Chen, Xiaobing; Ding, Jun; Fraser, Katharine H.; Ertan Taskin, M.; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach to better estimate the blood flow dynamics in the bundles of the hollow fiber membrane based medical devices (i.e., blood oxygenators, artificial lungs, and hemodialyzers). Three representative types of arrays, square, diagonal, and random with the porosity value of 0.55, were studied. In addition, a 3D array with the same porosity was studied. The flow fields between the individual fibers in these arrays at selected Reynolds numbers (Re) were simulated with CFD modeling. Hemolysis is not significant in the fiber bundles but the platelet activation may be essential. For each type of array, the average wall shear stress is linearly proportional to the Re. For the same Re but different arrays, the average wall shear stress also exhibits a linear dependency on the pressure difference across arrays, while Darcy′s law prescribes a power-law relationship, therefore, underestimating the shear stress level. For the same Re, the average wall shear stress of the diagonal array is approximately 3.1, 1.8, and 2.0 times larger than that of the square, random, and 3D arrays, respectively. A coefficient C is suggested to correlate the CFD predicted data with the analytical solution, and C is 1.16, 1.51, and 2.05 for the square, random, and diagonal arrays in this paper, respectively. It is worth noting that C is strongly dependent on the array geometrical properties, whereas it is weakly dependent on the flow field. Additionally, the 3D fiber bundle simulation results show that the three-dimensional effect is not negligible. Specifically, velocity and shear stress distribution can vary significantly along the fiber axial direction. PMID:24141394

  14. Follow-up of blood-pressure lowering and glucose control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zoungas, Sophia; Chalmers, John; Neal, Bruce; Billot, Laurent; Li, Qiang; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Arima, Hisatomi; Monaghan, Helen; Joshi, Rohina; Colagiuri, Stephen; Cooper, Mark E; Glasziou, Paul; Grobbee, Diederick; Hamet, Pavel; Harrap, Stephen; Heller, Simon; Lisheng, Liu; Mancia, Giuseppe; Marre, Michel; Matthews, David R; Mogensen, Carl E; Perkovic, Vlado; Poulter, Neil; Rodgers, Anthony; Williams, Bryan; MacMahon, Stephen; Patel, Anushka; Woodward, Mark

    2014-10-09

    In the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) factorial trial, the combination of perindopril and indapamide reduced mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes, but intensive glucose control, targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 6.5%, did not. We now report results of the 6-year post-trial follow-up. We invited surviving participants, who had previously been assigned to perindopril-indapamide or placebo and to intensive or standard glucose control (with the glucose-control comparison extending for an additional 6 months), to participate in a post-trial follow-up evaluation. The primary end points were death from any cause and major macrovascular events. The baseline characteristics were similar among the 11,140 patients who originally underwent randomization and the 8494 patients who participated in the post-trial follow-up for a median of 5.9 years (blood-pressure-lowering comparison) or 5.4 years (glucose-control comparison). Between-group differences in blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin levels during the trial were no longer evident by the first post-trial visit. The reductions in the risk of death from any cause and of death from cardiovascular causes that had been observed in the group receiving active blood-pressure-lowering treatment during the trial were attenuated but significant at the end of the post-trial follow-up; the hazard ratios were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 0.99; P=0.03) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.99; P=0.04), respectively. No differences were observed during follow-up in the risk of death from any cause or major macrovascular events between the intensive-glucose-control group and the standard-glucose-control group; the hazard ratios were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.92 to 1.08) and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.92 to 1.08), respectively. The benefits with respect to mortality that had been observed among patients originally assigned to blood

  15. Exercise-induced albuminuria vs circadian variations in blood pressure in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tadida Meli, Isabelle Hota; Tankeu, Aurel T; Dehayem, Mesmin Y; Chelo, David; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2017-02-15

    To investigated the relationship between exercise-induced ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) abnormalities in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adolescents. We conducted a case-control at the National Obesity Center of the Yaoundé Central Hospital, Cameroon. We compared 24 h ABPM and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and after a standardized treadmill exercise between 20 Cameroonian T1DM patients and 20 matched controls. T1DM adolescents were aged 12-18 years, with diabetes for at least one year, without proteinuria, with normal office blood pressure (BP) and renal function according to the general reference population. Non-diabetic controls were adolescents of general population matched for sex, age and BMI. Mean duration of diabetes was 4.2 ± 2.8 years. The mean 24 h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were respectively 116 ± 9 mmHg in the diabetic group vs 111 ± 8 mmHg in the non-diabetic ( P = 0.06), and 69 ± 7 mm Hg vs 66 ± 5 mm Hg ( P = 0.19). There was no difference in the diurnal pattern of BP in diabetes patients and non-diabetic controls (SBP: 118 ± 10 mmHg vs 114 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.11; DBP: 71 ± 7 mmHg vs 68 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.22). Nighttime BP was higher in the diabetic group with respect to SBP (112 ± 11 mmHg vs 106 ± 7 mmHg, P = 0.06) and to the mean arterial pressure (MAP) (89 ± 9 mmHg vs 81 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.06). ACR at rest was similar in both groups (5.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.74), but significantly higher in diabetes patients after exercise (10.5 mg/g vs 5.5 mg/g, P = 0.03). SBP was higher in patients having exercise-induced albuminuria (116 ± 10 mmHg vs 108 ± 10 mmHg, P = 0.09). Exercise-induced albuminuria could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney damage in adolescents with T1DM.

  16. Heterogeneous Effects of Fructose on Blood Lipids in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sievenpiper, John L.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Chatha, Sheena; Jiang, Henry Y.; de Souza, Russell J.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of blood lipid concerns, diabetes associations discourage fructose at high intakes. To quantify the effect of fructose on blood lipids in diabetes, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of experimental clinical trials investigating the effect of isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate on triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol in type 1 and 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials of ≥7 days. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as standardized mean differences with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed by χ2 tests and quantified by I2. Meta-regression models identified dose threshold and independent predictors of effects. RESULTS Sixteen trials (236 subjects) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate raised triglycerides and lowered total cholesterol under specific conditions without affecting LDL cholesterol or HDL cholesterol. A triglyceride-raising effect without heterogeneity was seen only in type 2 diabetes when the reference carbohydrate was starch (mean difference 0.24 [95% CI 0.05–0.44]), dose was >60 g/day (0.18 [0.00–0.37]), or follow-up was ≤4 weeks (0.18 [0.00–0.35]). Piecewise meta-regression confirmed a dose threshold of 60 g/day (R2 = 0.13)/10% energy (R2 = 0.36). A total cholesterol–lowering effect without heterogeneity was seen only in type 2 diabetes under the following conditions: no randomization and poor study quality (−0.19 [−0.34 to −0.05]), dietary fat >30% energy (−0.33 [−0.52 to −0.15]), or crystalline fructose (−0.28 [−0.47 to −0.09]). Multivariate meta-regression analyses were largely in agreement. CONCLUSIONS Pooled analyses demonstrated conditional triglyceride-raising and total cholesterol–lowering effects of isocaloric fructose exchange for carbohydrate in type 2 diabetes. Recommendations

  17. The Association Between Food Prices and the Blood Glucose Level of US Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anekwe, Tobenna D.; Rahkovsky, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the association between the price of healthy and less-healthy food groups and blood sugar among US adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods. We linked 1999–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey health information to food prices contained in the Quarterly Food-at-Home Price Database. We regressed blood sugar levels on food prices from the previous calendar quarter, controlling for market region and a range of other covariates. We also examined whether the association between food prices and blood sugar varies among different income groups. Results. The prices of produce and low-fat dairy foods were associated with blood sugar levels of people with type 2 diabetes. Specifically, higher prices for produce and low-fat dairy foods were associated with higher levels of glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose 3 months later. Food prices had a greater association with blood sugar for low-income people than for higher-income people, and in the expected direction. Conclusions. Higher prices of healthy foods were associated with increased blood sugar among people with type 2 diabetes. The association was especially pronounced among low-income people with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24524504

  18. The association between food prices and the blood glucose level of US adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anekwe, Tobenna D; Rahkovsky, Ilya

    2014-04-01

    We estimated the association between the price of healthy and less-healthy food groups and blood sugar among US adults with type 2 diabetes. We linked 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey health information to food prices contained in the Quarterly Food-at-Home Price Database. We regressed blood sugar levels on food prices from the previous calendar quarter, controlling for market region and a range of other covariates. We also examined whether the association between food prices and blood sugar varies among different income groups. The prices of produce and low-fat dairy foods were associated with blood sugar levels of people with type 2 diabetes. Specifically, higher prices for produce and low-fat dairy foods were associated with higher levels of glycated hemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose 3 months later. Food prices had a greater association with blood sugar for low-income people than for higher-income people, and in the expected direction. Higher prices of healthy foods were associated with increased blood sugar among people with type 2 diabetes. The association was especially pronounced among low-income people with type 2 diabetes.

  19. [Relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetes patients].

    PubMed

    Elkafri, I H; Mashlah, A; Shaqifa, A

    2014-03-13

    This study was evaluated the relationship between blood glucose levels and salivary pH and buffering capacity in type II diabetic patients. The sample comprised 210 participants (age ranged 40-60 years). Based on fasting blood glucose levels the participants were divided into 3 groups: controls with normal blood glucose levels; diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL; and diabetic patients with levels > 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH and buffering capacity were determined in a sample of resting (non-stimulated) saliva taken from each participant. Salivary pH levels in diabetic patients with blood glucose levels > 200 mg/dL were lower than in the controls and diabetic patients with levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary pH levels were comparable in controls and diabetic patients with blood glucose levels ≤ 200 mg/dL. Salivary buffering capacity in the 3 groups was comparable.

  20. Safety and feasibility of achieving lower systolic blood pressure goals in persons with type 2 diabetes: the SANDS trial.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Yeh, Fawn; Silverman, Angela; Devereux, Richard B; Galloway, James M; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Howard, William J; Russell, Marie; Wilson, Charlton; Ratner, Robert; Sorkin, John; Umans, Jason G; Fleg, Jerome L; Stylianou, Mario; Lee, Elisa; Howard, Barbara V

    2009-10-01

    The Stop Atherosclerosis in Native Diabetics Study (SANDS) was a randomized open-label clinical trial in type 2 diabetics designed to examine the effects of intensive reduction of blood pressure, aggressive vs standard goals (< or =115/75 mm Hg vs < or =130/80 mm Hg), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol on the composite outcome of change in carotid intimal-medial thickness and cardiovascular events. The study demonstrated that in conjunction with a lower LDL cholesterol target of 70 mg/dL, aggressive systolic blood pressure-lowering resulted in a reduction in carotid intimal-medial thickness and left ventricular mass without measurable differences in cardiovascular events. The blood pressure treatment algorithm included renin-angiotensin system blockade, with other agents added if necessary. The authors conclude that both standard and more aggressive systolic blood pressure reduction can be achieved with excellent safety and good tolerability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Efficacy of sitagliptin on blood glucose fluctuation in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients with basal-supported oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Kaneto, Hideaki; Katakami, Naoto; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the effect of adding dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor and tapering sulfonylurea on blood glucose fluctuation in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under basal-supported oral therapy (BOT). We recruited twenty-two consecutive Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had blood glucose fluctuation under the combination therapy of insulin glargine and glimepiride and had sitagliptin initiated with glimepiride tapared. Their hemoglobin A1c levels and mean blood glucose profiles of seven points in self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) were 7.4 ± 0.6% and 8.6 ± 2.0 mmol/L, respectively. Sitagliptin was initiated with the dose of 50 mg per day and titrated up to 100 mg per day when necessary. Glimepiride was withdrawn if possible. Blood glucose fluctuation was evaluated with SMBG by calculating M-value, its range (the difference of maximum and minimum blood glucose levels), and its coefficient of variation (CV). Two months after sitagliptin add-on, M-value was decreased from 19 ± 13 to 13 ± 8 (p = 0.04). Blood glucose range and CV were also improved from 9.6 ± 2.9 mmol/L to 7.9 ± 2.6 mmol/L (p = 0.01), and from 33 ± 8% to 29 ± 8% (p < 0.01), respectively. Hemoglobin A1c levels and mean blood glucose profiles were unchanged (p = 0.93 and 0.47). In conclusion, blood glucose fluctuation was significantly improved two months after adding sitagliptin and tapering glimepiride in type 2 diabetic Japanese patients who were treated by BOT with insulin glargine and glimepiride.

  2. Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose in Noninsulin-Using Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of glycemic control in the development of diabetes complications, the plethora of tools now available to monitor the day-to-day trends in glycemia is remarkable. In this regard, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) has been considered a key component of patient management. Arguably, there remains almost universal agreement that SMBG should be available to all diabetic patients regardless of current treatment strategy. However, recently there have been reports that have challenged the current paradigm that all patients should use SMBG and concluded that SMBG for type 2 diabetic patients not on insulin may not be beneficial on glycemic control and must be weighed against the expense and inconvenience. In the counterpoint narrative following the contribution by Malanda et al., Drs. Polonsky and Fisher provide a compelling argument suggesting that while it is evident that implementing SMBG in unstructured ways without training patients and clinicians is likely to be a waste of resources, there are effective and powerful ways to use structured SMBG in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetic patients. —William T. Cefalu, md Editor in Chief, Diabetes Care PMID:23264290

  3. New biodiagnostics based on optical tweezers: typing red blood cells, and identification of drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-Wen; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Wang, Shyang-Guang; Lee, Yi-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Han; Huang, Min-Hui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Vitrant, Guy; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Lee, Horng-Mo; Liu, Yi-Jui; Baldeck, Patrice L.; Lin, Chih-Lang

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of optical tweezers forces on biological micro-objects can be used to develop innovative biodiagnostics methods. In the first part of this report, we present a new sensitive method to determine A, B, D types of red blood cells. Target antibodies are coated on glass surfaces. Optical forces needed to pull away RBC from the glass surface increase when RBC antigens interact with their corresponding antibodies. In this work, measurements of stripping optical forces are used to distinguish the major RBC types: group O Rh(+), group A Rh(+) and group B Rh(+). The sensitivity of the method is found to be at least 16-folds higher than the conventional agglutination method. In the second part of this report, we present an original way to measure in real time the wall thickness of bacteria that is one of the most important diagnostic parameters of bacteria drug resistance in hospital diagnostics. The optical tweezers force on a shell bacterium is proportional to its wall thickness. Experimentally, we determine the optical tweezers force applied on each bacteria family by measuring their escape velocity. Then, the wall thickness of shell bacteria can be obtained after calibrating with known bacteria parameters. The method has been successfully applied to indentify, from blind tests, Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including VSSA (NCTC 10442), VISA (Mu 50), and heto-VISA (Mu 3)

  4. Exposure to Racial Discrimination and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Women with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Tennen, Howard; Finan, Patrick; Feinn, Richard; Burg, Matthew M; Seawell, Asani; White, William B

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is the only disorder in which women's risk for heart disease exceeds men's. Elevated blood pressure (BP) increases cardiovascular risk in people with type 2 diabetes. Racial discrimination and neuroticism are both associated with BP levels but have not been examined in concert. This study investigated self-reported racial discrimination, neuroticism and ambulatory BP in women with type 2 diabetes. Thirty-nine Black and 38 White women completed a race-neutral version of the Schedule of Racist Events; BP was evaluated using ambulatory monitoring devices. Actigraphy and diaries were used to document times of sleep and wakefulness. Racial discrimination interacted with neuroticism to predict systolic and diastolic BP both while awake and during sleep, after adjustment for covariates. For each, the influence of racist events was stronger at lower levels of neuroticism. Racial discrimination is associated with higher levels of 24-h BP in diabetic women who are low in neuroticism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Retinal blood flow in type 1 diabetic patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy during euglycemic clamp.

    PubMed

    Pemp, Berthold; Polska, Elzbieta; Garhofer, Gerhard; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2010-09-01

    To compare total retinal blood flow in diabetic patients with no or mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and healthy control subjects and to investigate in patients whether there is a difference between retinal blood flow before morning insulin and under normoglycemic conditions using a glucose clamp. Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes with no or mild diabetic retinopathy were included in this open parallel-group study, and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were included as control subjects. Retinal blood flow was assessed by combining velocity measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry and diameter measurements using a commercially available dynamic vessel analyzer. Measurements were performed before and during a euglycemic clamp. Total retinal blood flow was higher in diabetic patients (53 +/- 16 microl/min) than in healthy subjects (43 +/- 16 microl/min; P = 0.034 between groups). When plasma glucose in diabetic patients was reduced from 9.3 +/- 1.7 to 5.3 +/- 0.5 mmol/l (P < 0.001) retinal blood flow decreased to 49 +/- 15 microl/min (P = 0.0003 vs. baseline). Total retinal blood flow during the glucose clamp was not significantly different from blood flow in normal control subjects (P = 0.161). Type 1 diabetic patients with no or only mild diabetic retinopathy have increased retinal blood flow before their morning insulin dosage. Blood flow is reduced toward normal during euglycemic conditions. Retinal blood flow may fluctuate significantly with fluctuating plasma glucose levels, which may contribute to the microvascular changes seen in diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Retinal Blood Flow in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With No or Mild Diabetic Retinopathy During Euglycemic Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Pemp, Berthold; Polska, Elżbieta; Garhofer, Gerhard; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare total retinal blood flow in diabetic patients with no or mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and healthy control subjects and to investigate in patients whether there is a difference between retinal blood flow before morning insulin and under normoglycemic conditions using a glucose clamp. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes with no or mild diabetic retinopathy were included in this open parallel-group study, and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were included as control subjects. Retinal blood flow was assessed by combining velocity measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry and diameter measurements using a commercially available dynamic vessel analyzer. Measurements were performed before and during a euglycemic clamp. RESULTS Total retinal blood flow was higher in diabetic patients (53 ± 16 μl/min) than in healthy subjects (43 ± 16 μl/min; P = 0.034 between groups). When plasma glucose in diabetic patients was reduced from 9.3 ± 1.7 to 5.3 ± 0.5 mmol/l (P < 0.001) retinal blood flow decreased to 49 ± 15 μl/min (P = 0.0003 vs. baseline). Total retinal blood flow during the glucose clamp was not significantly different from blood flow in normal control subjects (P = 0.161). CONCLUSIONS Type 1 diabetic patients with no or only mild diabetic retinopathy have increased retinal blood flow before their morning insulin dosage. Blood flow is reduced toward normal during euglycemic conditions. Retinal blood flow may fluctuate significantly with fluctuating plasma glucose levels, which may contribute to the microvascular changes seen in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:20585003

  7. Desensitization with plasmapheresis and anti-Cd20 for ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from living donor: experience of a single center in Italy.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, C; Furian, L; Marson, P; Tison, T; Valente, M; Marchini, F; Rossi, B; Bonfante, L; Valerio, F; Cozzi, E; Rigotti, P

    2014-09-01

    Blood group incompatibility in kidney transplants from a living donor can be successfully overcome by using various desensitization protocols: intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis (PP), immunoadsorption, and double filtration PP. From July 2010 to October 2013, we performed 10 ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (KT) procedures from a living donor. The desensitization protocol was based on rituximab and PP+cytomegalovirus immune globulin. All patients received induction with basiliximab, except 1 case treated with Thymoglobuline® (ATG) for the simultaneous presence of donor-specific antibody. Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were initiated at the time of desensitization and continued after the transplant. After a mean follow-up of 11.6±10.4 months, all patients are alive with a functioning graft. The mean serum creatinine concentration at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was 1.48±0.29, 1.47±0.18, 1.47±0.27, and 1.5±0.27 mg/dl. Three episodes of acute cellular rejection occurred in 2 patients. There was only 1 case of BK virus infection, treated with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy. The protocol biopsy specimens at 1, 3, and 6 months were C4d positive in the absence of acute rejection. Desensitization with rituximab, PP, and anti-cytomegalovirus immune globulin allowed us to perform transplants from living donors to ABO incompatible recipients with excellent results and reduced costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Long term effects of guar gum on metabolic control, serum cholesterol and blood pressure levels in type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Uusitupa, M; Tuomilehto, J; Karttunen, P; Wolf, E

    1984-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out in 17 Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, treated with diet therapy alone to study the effects of guar gum on metabolic control, serum lipids, and blood pressure levels. Thirteen of the patients had drug treatment for hypertension. Guar gum was taken with meals three times a day, and the dose was gradually increased to 21 g per day. A slight, but not significant improvement was found in the metabolic control of the patients after the guar gum treatment compared to the placebo. Serum total cholesterol was 11% (p greater than 0.01) lower after the guar gum but no significant differences were found in HDL-cholesterol or serum triglycerides during the guar gum treatment compared to the placebo. Diastolic blood pressure level was significantly lower during the guar gum treatment compared to placebo. No difference was observed in systolic blood pressure levels between the guar gum and placebo treatments. The reduction of diastolic blood pressure was independent of changes in fasting blood glucose level or body weight, but could in part be due to simultaneous reduction in serum cholesterol concentration. The changes associated with guar gum supplementation suggest a reduction in the risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients.

  9. Repaglinide improves blood glucose control in sulphonylurea-naive type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Van Gaal, L F; Van Acker, K L; De Leeuw, I H

    2001-09-01

    The prandial glucose regulator repaglinide has a rapid onset of action, a short half-life and is metabolised mainly by the liver. Here we report the findings of a 10-week, double-blind, parallel, placebo controlled, randomised trial with repaglinide in 25 diet-treated, sulphonylurea-naïve patients with Type 2 diabetes. Repaglinide was titrated, based on capillary blood glucose, from 0.5 mg to a maximum of 4 mg, preprandially with breakfast and dinner. After 10 weeks, repaglinide was associated with a decrease in HbA(1c) of 2.3%Hb relative to the placebo group (P=0.018). This reflected a 30% decrease within the repaglinide group from a mean HbA(1c) of 7.0 to 4.9%Hb (P<0.002). Repaglinide was also associated with a decrease in fructosamine, by 0.88 mmol/l, relative to placebo (P<0.001), with a 20% decrease (from 3.80 to 3.04 mmol/l) within the repaglinide group (P<0.001). Fasting and postprandial blood glucose concentrations decreased in association with repaglinide by 3.6 and 6.4 mmol/l, respectively, relative to placebo (P<0.001 in each case). Within the repaglinide group fasting and postprandial blood glucose decreased by 3.9 and 6.2 mmol/l, respectively (P<0.001 in each case). The number of patients reporting hypoglycaemia in the repaglinide group was similar to placebo (15 vs. 20, respectively; NS). Test meal assessments confirmed that repaglinide effectively controls glucose levels by stimulating mealtime insulin secretion. Fasting serum insulin concentration was not raised compared to baseline or placebo during repaglinide therapy, albeit that fasting glucose levels were decreased by repaglinide. Twice-daily meal-related insulin secretagogue therapy with repaglinide, a new short and rapid-acting prandial glucose regulator, is capable of improving all measures of glycaemic control without increased hypoglycaemia or fasting hyperinsulinaemia.

  10. Clinical use of the ABO-Scoring Index: reliability and subtraction frequency.

    PubMed

    Lieber, William S; Carlson, Sean K; Baumrind, Sheldon; Poulton, Donald R

    2003-10-01

    This study tested the reliability and subtraction frequency of the study model-scoring system of the American Board of Orthodontists (ABO). We used a sample of 36 posttreatment study models that were selected randomly from six different orthodontic offices. Intrajudge and interjudge reliability was calculated using nonparametric statistics (Spearman rank coefficient, Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests). We found differences ranging from 3 to 6 subtraction points (total score) for intrajudge scoring between two sessions. For overall total ABO score, the average correlation was .77. Intrajudge correlation was greatest for occlusal relationships and least for interproximal contacts. Interjudge correlation for ABO score averaged r = .85. Correlation was greatest for buccolingual inclination and least for overjet. The data show that some judges, on average, were much more lenient than others and that this resulted in a range of total scores between 19.7 and 27.5. Most of the deductions were found in the buccal segments and most were related to the second molars. We present these findings in the context of clinicians preparing for the ABO phase III examination and for orthodontists in their ongoing evaluation of clinical results.

  11. Position of human blood group O(H) and phenotype-determining enzymes in growth and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Arend, Peter

    2018-05-12

    The human ABO(H) <