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Sample records for aboard delta ii

  1. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a Roman candle, the exhaust from the Boeing Delta II rocket with the Mars Polar Lander aboard lights up the clouds as it hurtles skyward. The rocket was launched at 3:21:10 p.m. EST from Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  2. The Delta II with ACE aboard is prepared for liftoff from Pad 17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle carrying the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) undergoes final preparations for liftoff in the predawn hours of Aug. 25, 1997, at Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. This is the second Delta launch under the Boeing name and the first from Cape Canaveral. The first launch attempt on Aug. 24 was scrubbed by Air Force range safety personnel because two commercial fishing vessels were within the Delta's launch danger area. ACE with its combination of nine sensors and instruments will investigate the origin and evolution of solar phenomenon, the formation of solar corona, solar flares and acceleration of the solar wind. ACE was built for NASA by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and is managed by the Explorer Project Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The lead scientific institution is the California Institute of Technology.

  3. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Silhouetted against the gray sky, a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle with NASA's Mars Polar Lander lifts off from Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, at 3:21:10 p.m. EST. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain at the polar cap. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  4. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Amid clouds of exhaust, a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle with NASA's Mars Polar Lander clears Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, after launch at 3:21:10 p.m. EST. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain at the polar cap. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  5. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Amid clouds of exhaust and into a gray-clouded sky , a Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle lifts off with NASA's Mars Polar Lander at 3:21:10 p.m. EST from Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern- most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain at the polar cap. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  6. The Boeing Delta II rocket with Mars Polar Lander aboard lifts off at Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Boeing Delta II expendable launch vehicle lifts off with NASA's Mars Polar Lander into a cloud-covered sky at 3:21:10 p.m. EST from Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south polar cap, which consists of carbon dioxide ice. The lander will study the polar water cycle, frosts, water vapor, condensates and dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is equipped with a robotic arm to dig beneath the layered terrain at the polar cap. In addition, Deep Space 2 microprobes, developed by NASA's New Millennium Program, are installed on the lander's cruise stage. After crashing into the planet's surface, they will conduct two days of soil and water experiments up to 1 meter (3 feet) below the Martian surface, testing new technologies for future planetary descent probes. The lander is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  7. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  8. Delta II commercial space transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    1988-07-01

    Delta II is an upgraded variant of the Delta family of launch vehicles that has been in use by NASA since 1960. Among the design improvements incorporated by Delta II is a cryogenic-propellant second stage, a 2.89-m diameter satellite-protecting nose fairing, graphite/epoxy solid rocket motor cases, and 12:1 main engine expansion nozzle. The manufacturer/operator offers Delta II customers a dedicated, single satellite launch capability fully tailored to the given spacecraft's unique mission requirements.

  9. Mars Polar Lander is mated with Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers get ready to remove the protective wrapping on the Mars Polar Lander to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor'98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  10. Mars Polar Lander is mated with Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers mate the Mars Polar Lander (top) to the Boeing Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The rocket is scheduled to launch Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern- most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  11. Mars Polar Lander is mated with Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Inside the gantry at Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is lowered to mate it with the Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch it on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor'98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  12. Delta II development and flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, S. K.

    An account is given of the design modifications of the Delta launch vehicle which have resulted in its Delta II variant, together with flight results obtained with the Delta II to date. Delta II launchers feature a stretched LX tank, a larger-diameter satellite-payload fairing, and an expansion of first-stage nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1. The thrust-augmenting solid rocket boosters use graphite/epoxy composite motor cases. Both two-stage and three-stage launches are discussed, with attention to flights for the Navstar satellites.

  13. Mars Polar Lander is mated with Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    At Launch Complex 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the protective covering on the Mars Polar Lander is lifted up and out of the way. The lander, in the opening below, is being mated to the Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch it on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar- powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars Surveyor'98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, which was launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A on Dec. 11, 1998.

  14. Delta II rocket prepared for launch of Deep Space 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    - A solid rocket booster is maneuvered into place for installation on the Boeing Delta 7326 rocket that will launch Deep Space 1 at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. Delta II rockets are medium capacity expendable launch vehicles derived from the Delta family of rockets built and launched since 1960. Since then there have been more than 245 Delta launches. Delta's origins go back to the Thor intermediate-range ballistic missile, which was developed in the mid-1950s for the U.S. Air Force. The Thor -- a single-stage, liquid-fueled rocket -- later was modified to become the Delta launch vehicle. The Delta 7236 has three solid rocket boosters and a Star 37 upper stage. Delta IIs are manufactured in Huntington Beach, Calif. Rocketdyne, a division of The Boeing Company, builds Delta II's main engine in Canoga Park, Calif. Final assembly takes place at the Boeing facility in Pueblo, Colo. Deep Space 1, the first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include an ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. Deep Space 1 will complete most of its mission objectives within the first two months, but may also do a flyby of a near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, in July 1999.

  15. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander is lifted to a vertical position on Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  16. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander is lifted to the top of the gantry on Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  17. The SRBs for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrive on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a solid rocket booster is raised to a vertical position for mating with the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar- powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  18. The SRBs for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrive on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the gantry holding the solid rocket boosters is moved into place next to the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  19. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander is lowered toward the rocket waiting below. The lander, which will be launched on Jan. 3, 1999, is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern- most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  20. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander is prepared for lowering toward the rocket below. The lander, which will be launched on Jan. 3, 1999, is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern- most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  1. The SRBs for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrive on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a solid rocket booster hangs in place between two other rocket boosters waiting to be mated with the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  2. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Inside the gantry on Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander waits to be lowered into the white room. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  3. The SRBs for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrive on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers monitor the solid rocket booster before its being lifted to mate with the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  4. The fairing for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The fairing for the upper stages of the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrives at Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar-powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern- most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  5. The SRBs for the Delta II rocket carrying the Mars Polar Lander arrive on Pad 17B, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On Pad 17B, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a solid rocket booster waits for mating with the Delta II rocket (in background) carrying the Mars Polar Lander. The rocket will be used to launch the Mars Polar Lander on Jan. 3, 1999. The lander is a solar- powered spacecraft designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. It is the second spacecraft to be launched in a pair of Mars '98 missions. The first is the Mars Climate Orbiter, to be launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Complex 17A in December 1998.

  6. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  7. Boeing Delta II rocket for FUSE launch arrives at CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is moved into the tower. The rocket is targeted to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe, hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched June 23 at CCAS.

  8. The Stardust spacecraft is moved in the PHSF to mate it with the 3rd stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the spacecraft Stardust being lowered in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon- based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  9. The Stardust spacecraft is moved in the PHSF to mate it with the 3rd stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers check the mating of the spacecraft Stardust (above) with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket (below). Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  10. Boeing Delta II rocket for FUSE launch arrives at CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After its arrival at Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is raised to a vertical position. The rocket is targeted to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe, hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched June 23 at CCAS.

  11. Boeing Delta II rocket for FUSE launch arrives at CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is raised for its journey up the launch tower. The rocket is targeted to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe, hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched June 23 at CCAS.

  12. Boeing Delta II rocket for FUSE launch arrives at CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket is ready to be lifted into the tower. The rocket is targeted to launch NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe,hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched June 23 at CCAS.

  13. Deep Impact Delta II Launch Vehicle Cracked Thick Film Coating on Electronic Packages Technical Consultation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Kichak, Robert A.; Piascik, Robert S.; Leidecker, Henning W.; Wilson, Timmy R.

    2009-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft was launched on a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on January 12, 2005. Prior to the launch, the Director of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OS&MA) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) lead a team to render an independent opinion on the rationale for flight and the risk code assignments for the hazard of cracked Thick Film Assemblies (TFAs) in the E-packages of the Delta II launch vehicle for the Deep Impact Mission. The results of the evaluation are contained in this report.

  14. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  15. The Stardust spacecraft is moved in the PHSF to mate it with the 3rd stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, workers help guide the overhead crane lifting the Stardust spacecraft. Stardust is being moved in order to mate it with the third stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch Feb. 6 from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, aboard the Delta II rocket, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre- solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  16. The Biostack Experiments I and II aboard Apollo 16 and 17.

    PubMed

    Bucker, H

    1974-01-01

    The concept of the Biostack experiment has become practicable through European scientific collaboration and with help of NASA. The objectives of this experiment flown aboard Apollo 16 and 17 are to study the biological effects of individual heavy cosmic particles of high-energy loss (HZE) not available on earth; to study the influence of additional spaceflight factors; to get some knowledge on the mechanism by which HZE particles damage biological materials; to get information on the spectrum of charge and energy of the cosmic ions in the spacecraft; to estimate the radiation hazards for man in space. For this purpose the Biostack experiment comprises a widespread spectrum of biological objects, and various radiobiological end-points are under investigation. Bacterial spores, protozoa cysts, plant seeds, shrimp eggs, and insect eggs were included in the Biostack experiment packages together with different physical radiation detectors (nuclear emulsions, plastics, AgCl crystals, and LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters). By using special arrangements of biological objects and physical track detectors, individual evaluation of tracks was obtained allowing the identification of each penetrating particle in relation to the possible biological effects on its path. The response of the different biological objects to space flight and HZE ions bombardment was of different degree, presumably depending on the ability of the organism to replace the cells damaged by a hit. The results help to estimate the radiation hazard for astronauts during space missions of long duration.

  17. ISS Update: Science Aboard Kounotori3

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Pete Hasbrook, associate program scientist, about the experiments traveling to the International Space Station aboard the H-II Transfer Vehicle...

  18. Geochronology of Danube Delta sediments The PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0351 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Csaba, Begy; Andra-Rada, Iurian; (Rusu) Oana Alexandra, Dumitru; Luminita, Preoteasa; Hedvig, Simon; Alida, Timar-Gabor; Szabolcs, Kelemen

    2014-05-01

    fluxes within the Danube Delta and over the associated Danubian continental shelf, using the radiometric method of 210Pb (210Po) and 137Cs. The detailed stratigraphical survey of the deltaic sediments will provide an accurate view of the sedimentation characteristics in the last ~100 years, including the impact of the hydrotechnical works built within the Danube basin on the sedimentation rates and on the deltaic continental shelf evolution. Another important aspect of the present project is featured by the combined application of three complex radiometric and nuclear tools: alpha spectrometry (210Po), gamma-spectrometry (210Pb, 137Cs, and 226Ra) and luminescence absolute method. Acknoledgement: The financial support from the grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research CNCS-UEFISCDI, PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0351 (2013-2015) is acknoledged.

  19. MARS GLOBAL SURVEYOR ON DELTA II LAUNCHES FROM LC-17A AT CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The journey back to Mars begins with liftoff of the Mars Global Surveyor atop a Delta II 7925A expendable launch vehicle from Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, at 12:00:49.99 p.m. EST, Nov. 7, 1996. After an approximately 10-month interplanetary odyssey, the spacecraft will arrive at the Red Planet and begin a four- month aerobraking phase -- an innovative technique first demonstrated during the Magellan mission to Venus -- to achieve a mapping orbit. For a period of one Martian year or about two Earth years, the compact, 2,337-pound (1,060- kilogram) spacecraft will circle above most of the planet, its suite of sophisticated remote-sensing instruments building a comprehensive global portrait of Mars by mapping its topography, magnetism, mineral composition and atmosphere. Among the locations the Surveyor will pass over are the landing sites where the two U.S. Viking landers have stood since 1975 as silent monuments of the most recent successful U.S. mission to Mars. The Global Surveyor is the first of a trio of spacecraft being launched to the Red Planet this fall; up next is Russia's Mars '96 spacecraft followed by the United States' Mars Pathfinder. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Pathfinder missions are managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA; McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Corp. provides the Delta II launch vehicle.

  20. A video camera is mounted on the second stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker (left) runs a wire through a mounting hole on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket in order to affix an external video camera held by the worker at right. The Delta II will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  1. A carboxyl-terminal-domain kinase associated with RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1992-01-01

    We previously purified RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver and found that it has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity. In this report, we show that delta is also closely associated with a protein kinase activity that catalyzes phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Kinase activity copurifies with transcription and DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activities when delta is analyzed by anion- and cation-exchange HPLC as well as by sucrose gradient sedimentation, arguing that delta possesses all three activities. Phosphorylation of the largest subunits of both rat and yeast RNA polymerase II is stimulated by DNA, whereas phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide containing multiple copies of the carboxyl-terminal heptapeptide repeat is not. Although both ATP and GTP appear to function as phosphate donors, GTP is utilized less than 10% as well as ATP. These findings suggest that delta may exert its action in transcription at least in part through a mechanism involving phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1386928

  2. After 24-hour scrub, another tower rollback for the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As tower rollback begins, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft waits on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for the second launch attempt at 4:04 p.m. EST. The original launch was scrubbed on Feb. 6 for 24 hours. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  3. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin placing the fairing around the Stardust spacecraft and upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon- based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  4. A video camera is mounted on the second stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers finish mounting a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon- based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  5. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Stardust spacecraft waits for installation of the fairing (behind, right) that will enclose the spacecraft and the upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre- solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  6. Fairing installed around Stardust and upper stage of Boeing Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the lower fittings of the fairing installed around the Stardust spacecraft and upper stage of the Boeing Delta II rocket. Targeted for launch at 4:06:42 p.m. on Feb. 6, the spacecraft is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  7. Chiral effective-field theory in the {delta}(1232) region. II. Radiative pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the radiative pion photoproduction on the nucleon ({gamma}N{yields}{pi}N{gamma}{sup '}) in the {delta}-resonance region, with the aim to determine the magnetic dipole moment (MDM) of the {delta}{sup +}(1232). The study is done within the framework of chiral effective-field theory, where the expansion is performed (to next-to-leading order) in the {delta} power-counting scheme, an extension of chiral perturbation theory to the {delta}-resonance energy region. We present the results for the absorptive part of the {delta} MDM, as well as perform a sensitivity study of the dependence of {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N{gamma}{sup '} observables on the real part of the {delta} MDM. We find that an asymmetry for circular polarization of the photon beam may provide a model-independent way to measure the {delta} MDM.

  8. Chiral effective-field theory in the Delta(1232) region : II. radiative pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Pascalutsa; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-10-12

    We present a theoretical study of the radiative pion photoproduction on the nucleon ($\\gamma N \\rightarrow \\pi N \\gamma'$) in the $\\De$-resonance region, with the aim to determine the magnetic dipole moment (MDM) of the $\\Delta^+(1232)$. The study is done within the framework of chiral effective-field theory where the expansion is performed (to next-to-leading order) in the $\\delta$ power-counting scheme which is an extension of chiral perturbation theory to the $\\Delta$-resonance energy region. We present in detail the results for the absorptive part of the $\\Delta$ MDM, as well as a sensitivity study for the radiative pion photoproduction observables on the real part of the $\\Delta$ MDM. We find that an asymmetry for circular polarization of the photon beam may provide a model-independent way to measure the $\\Delta$ MDM.

  9. A video camera is mounted on the second stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers check the mounting on a video camera on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon- based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  10. A video camera is mounted on the second stage of a Delta II rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a worker holds the video camera to be mounted on the second stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket that will launch the Stardust spacecraft on Feb. 6. His co-worker (right) makes equipment adjustments. Looking toward Earth, the camera will record the liftoff and separation of the first stage. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a group II chaperonin delta-subunit from soybean.

    PubMed

    Nong, Van Hai; Arahira, Masaomi; Phan, Van Chi; Kim, Chan-Shick; Zhang, Deyu; Udaka, Kyoko; Fukazawa, Chikafusa

    2002-08-01

    Molecular characterization of plant group II chaperonin (CCT, c-cpn, or TriC) still remains elusive. By PCR-based cloning techniques using soybeans, we have made a successful attempt to clone a delta-subunit homologue of CCT (CCTdelta). This subunit is responsible for the binding of an in vivo substrate, alpha-actin, by assisting the correct folding of the cytoskeletal protein in mouse, and the occurrence of the subunit homologue in plant CCT was unclear. As the cloning strategy, a putative amino acid segment, NH(2)-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ala-Pro-Glu-COOH, which is tightly conserved in all known animal and yeast CCTdelta subunits, was chosen for designing a degenerate primer of the PCR-cloning. The resultant 1881-bp cDNA was found to have an open-reading frame of 533 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 57,677 Da and to share about 58-65% identity overall at the amino acid level with the corresponding subunits known to date. Using antibodies raised against Escherichia coli-produced soybean insoluble CCTdelta as a monitoring tool, we purified soybean CCT from the extract of its immature seeds. STEM images demonstrated that the molecular shape of soybean CCT is a double eight-membered ring, which resembles the known group II chaperonins. The CCT also reactivated a denatured firefly luciferase with a significant, but limited level of the native enzymic activity in an in vitro system. Northern blot analysis showed that soybean CCTdelta gene, which is intronless and composed of a small family, was only expressed at a very early stage of seed development of soybean.

  12. The human RNA polymerase II interacts with the terminal stem-loop regions of the hepatitis delta virus RNA genome

    SciTech Connect

    Greco-Stewart, Valerie S.; Miron, Paul; Abrahem, Abrahem; Pelchat, Martin . E-mail: mpelchat@uottawa.ca

    2007-01-05

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is an RNA virus that depends on DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) for its transcription and replication. While it is generally accepted that RNAP II is involved in HDV replication, its interaction with HDV RNA requires confirmation. A monoclonal antibody specific to the carboxy terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNAP II was used to establish the association of RNAP II with both polarities of HDV RNA in HeLa cells. Co-immunoprecipitations using HeLa nuclear extract revealed that RNAP II interacts with HDV-derived RNAs at sites located within the terminal stem-loop domains of both polarities of HDV RNA. Analysis of these regions revealed a strong selection to maintain a rod-like conformation and demonstrated several conserved features. These results provide the first direct evidence of an association between human RNAP II and HDV RNA and suggest two transcription start sites on both polarities of HDV RNA.

  13. STS-55 Commander Nagel uses SAREX II inside the SL-D2 module aboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Commander Steven R. Nagel, wearing headset, holds the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) transceiver during testing of the whip antenna protruding from the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) science module. Nagel is stationed in front of the SL-D2 aft end cone. The seven member crew participated in communications with students and licensed radio operators via SAREX. Attached to the aft end cone are a fire extinguisher and an STS-37 extravehicular activity (EVA) photo of Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) and Payload Commander (PLC) Jerry L. Ross (STS037-18-032).

  14. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  15. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.

  16. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  17. Delta launcher enhanced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-08-01

    The next-generation, 'Delta II' version of the Delta expendable launch vehicle will be able to launch over 4000 lbs into geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO), as required by the USAF's Navstar GPS; the current Delta 3920 configuration can loft only 2800 lbs into GEO. Three distinct growth configurations of the Delta II are planned: the 6925, whose booster propellant tanks will be extended by 12 ft; the 7925, whose improved booster engine will increase nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1; and the 'enhanced ' Delta II, with stretched graphite-epoxy solid rocket motor cases. In this final form, Delta II will boost 4010 lbs into GTO, or 11,110 lbs into LEO.

  18. Another solid rocket booster is mated with a Boeing Delta II rocket at LP17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers keep watch on the placement of the fourth and final solid rocket booster (SRB) being mated with the Boeing Delta II rocket. The rocket will be aided by four SRBs to carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999.

  19. Another solid rocket booster is mated with a Boeing Delta II rocket at LP17A, CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a fourth and final solid rocket booster (SRB) (right) is moved from the mobile tower by a crane before mating with the Delta II rocket (left). The rocket will be aided by four SRBs to carry the Stardust satellite into space for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a medium called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in a Sample Return Capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched on Feb. 6, 1999.

  20. Blood cannabinoids. II. Models for the prediction of time of marijuana exposure from plasma concentrations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH)

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A; Henningfield, J E; Cone, E J

    1992-01-01

    Two mathematical models are described for the prediction of time of marijuana use from the analysis of a single plasma sample for cannabinoids. The models were derived from cannabinoid data obtained from a controlled clinical study of acute marijuana smoking. Model I was based on plasma delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations and Model II was based on the ratio of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) to THC in plasma. The two models were validated with cannabinoid data from nine published and unpublished clinical studies. The data included plasma samples obtained from infrequent and frequent marijuana smokers and after oral marijuana administration. Cannabinoid plasma concentrations had been determined by a variety of analytical methods. The accuracy of model prediction was evaluated by comparison of the predicted time of prior drug use to the actual time of exposure. Predictions of time of exposure were generally accurate but tended to overestimate time immediately after smoking and tended to underestimate later times. A second assessment of the validity of the models was made by determining if actual time of use was within the 95% confidence interval. Model I correctly predicted the time of exposure within the 95% confidence interval for 235 of 261 samples (90.0%), and Model II was correct in 232 of 260 samples (89.2%). These prediction models may be beneficial to forensic scientists in the interpretation of cannabinoid plasma levels.

  1. Aboard the Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Florence S.

    This 32-page pamphlet contains color photographs and detailed diagrams which illustrate general descriptive comments about living conditions aboard the space shuttle. Described are details of the launch, the cabin, the condition of weightlessness, food, sleep, exercise, atmosphere, personal hygiene, medicine, going EVA (extra-vehicular activity),…

  2. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  3. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  4. Mississippi Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  The Mississippi Delta     Left: True Color Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Mississippi delta were acquired on April 26, 2000. The true color image displays the ...

  5. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  6. Studies of viomycin, an anti-tuberculosis antibiotic: copper(ii) coordination, DNA degradation and the impact on delta ribozyme cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Stokowa-Sołtys, K; Barbosa, N A; Kasprowicz, A; Wieczorek, R; Gaggelli, N; Gaggelli, E; Valensin, G; Wrzesiński, J; Ciesiołka, J; Kuliński, T; Szczepanik, W; Jeżowska-Bojczuk, M

    2016-05-17

    Viomycin is a basic peptide antibiotic, which is among the most effective agents against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. In this paper we provide the characteristics of its acid base properties, coordination preferences towards the Cu(ii) ions, as well as the reactivity of the resulting complexes against plasmid DNA and HDV ribozyme. Careful coordination studies throughout the wide pH range allow for the characterisation of all the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex species. The assignment of proton chemical shifts was achieved by NMR experiments, while the DTF level of theory was applied to support molecular structures of the studied complexes. The experiments with the plasmid DNA reveal that at the physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide the Cu(ii)-viomycin complex is more aggressive against DNA than uncomplexed metal ions. Moreover, the degradation of DNA by viomycin can be carried out without the presence of transition metal ions. In the studies of antigenomic delta ribozyme catalytic activity, viomycin and its complex are shown to modulate the ribozyme functioning. The molecular modelling approach allows the indication of two different locations of viomycin binding sites to the ribozyme. PMID:27143296

  7. Aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, F. S.

    1980-01-01

    Livability aboard the space shuttle orbiter makes it possible for men and women scientists and technicians in reasonably good health to join superbly healthy astronauts as space travelers and workers. Features of the flight deck, the mid-deck living quarters, and the subfloor life support and house-keeping equipment are illustrated as well as the provisions for food preparation, eating, sleeping, exercising, and medical care. Operation of the personal hygiene equipment and of the air revitalization system for maintaining sea level atmosphere in space is described. Capabilities of Spacelab, the purpose and use of the remote manipulator arm, and the design of a permanent space operations center assembled on-orbit by shuttle personnel are also depicted.

  8. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  9. Robots Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Ames Research Center, MIT and Johnson Space Center have two new robotics projects aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Robonaut 2, a two-armed humanoid robot with astronaut-like dexterity,...

  10. Occupational accidents aboard merchant ships

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H; Nielsen, D; Frydenberg, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of occupational accidents aboard merchant ships in international trade, and to identify risk factors for the occurrence of occupational accidents as well as dangerous working situations where possible preventive measures may be initiated. Methods: The study is a historical follow up on occupational accidents among crew aboard Danish merchant ships in the period 1993–7. Data were extracted from the Danish Maritime Authority and insurance data. Exact data on time at risk were available. Results: A total of 1993 accidents were identified during a total of 31 140 years at sea. Among these, 209 accidents resulted in permanent disability of 5% or more, and 27 were fatal. The mean risk of having an occupational accident was 6.4/100 years at sea and the risk of an accident causing a permanent disability of 5% or more was 0.67/100 years aboard. Relative risks for notified accidents and accidents causing permanent disability of 5% or more were calculated in a multivariate analysis including ship type, occupation, age, time on board, change of ship since last employment period, and nationality. Foreigners had a considerably lower recorded rate of accidents than Danish citizens. Age was a major risk factor for accidents causing permanent disability. Change of ship and the first period aboard a particular ship were identified as risk factors. Walking from one place to another aboard the ship caused serious accidents. The most serious accidents happened on deck. Conclusions: It was possible to clearly identify work situations and specific risk factors for accidents aboard merchant ships. Most accidents happened while performing daily routine duties. Preventive measures should focus on workplace instructions for all important functions aboard and also on the prevention of accidents caused by walking around aboard the ship. PMID:11850550

  11. Expedition Seven Launched Aboard Soyez Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Destined for the International Space Station (ISS), a Soyez TMA-1 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 26, 2003. Aboard are Expedition Seven crew members, cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition Seven mission commander, and Astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition Seven NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer. Expedition Six crew members returned to Earth aboard the Russian spacecraft after a 5 and 1/2 month stay aboard the ISS. Photo credit: NASA/Scott Andrews

  12. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Measurement of delta13C and delta18O Isotopic Ratios of CaCO3 by a Thermoquest Finnigan GasBench II Delta Plus XL Continous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer with Application to Devils Hole Core DH-11 Calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga M.; Landwehr, Jurate Maciunas; Keybl, Jaroslav Edward

    2001-01-01

    A new method was developed to analyze the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of small samples (400?20 ?g) of calcium carbonate. This new method streamlines the classical phosphoric acid - calcium carbonate (H3PO4 - CaCO3) reaction method by making use of a Thermoquest-Finnigan GasBench II preparation device and a Delta Plus XL continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. To obtain reproducible and accurate results, optimal conditions for the H3PO4 - CaCO3 reaction had to be determined. At the acid-carbonate reaction temperature suggested by the equipment manufacturer, the oxygen isotope ratio results were unsatisfactory (standard deviation () greater than 1.5 per mill), probably because of a secondary reaction. When the acid-carbonate reaction temperature was lowered to 26?C and the reaction time was increased to 24 hours, the precision of the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios for duplicate analyses improved to 0.1 and 0.2 per mill, respectively. The method was tested by analyzing calcite from Devils Hole, Nevada, which was formed by precipitation from ground water onto the walls of a sub-aqueous cavern during the last 500,000 years. Isotope-ratio values previously had been obtained by the classical method for Devils Hole core DH-11. The DH-11 core had been recently re-sampled, and isotope-ratio values were obtained using this new method. The results were comparable to those obtained by the classical method. The consistency of the isotopic results is such that an alignment offset could be identified in the re-sampled core material, a cutting error that was then independently confirmed. The reproducibility of the isotopic values is demonstrated by a correlation of approximately 0.96 for both isotopes, after correcting for an alignment offset. This result indicates that the new method is a viable alternative to the classical method. In particular, the new method requires less sample material permitting finer resolution and allows automation of some processes

  14. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  15. Hydrochemical water evolution in the Aral Sea Basin. Part II: Confined groundwater of the Amu Darya Delta - Evolution from the headwaters to the delta and SiO2 geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettler, Georg; Oberhänsli, Hedi; Stulina, Galina; Djumanov, Jamoljon H.

    2013-07-01

    We studied 40 artesian wells (AWs) in the Amu Darya Delta. These wells include high-salinity (∼52 g/l) and saline (5-24 g/l) waters but are mostly low-salinity waters (1.3-2.9 g/l). The low-salinity AWs cluster into three types, reflecting the variable mixing of different end member solutes: (residual) brines and solutes deriving from silicate alteration, dissolution of limestone and dissolution of gypsum. The solutes are all undersaturated in calcite and gypsum, contain a substantial cation excess against dissolved inorganic carbon and are characterised by low Ca/SO4 ratios. On the basis of the hydrochemical mass budgets of model cases, we demonstrate that Na-rich Cl-brines (45-48%) and a Na2SO4-brine (30-47%) are the dominant solute components. The solutes derived from aluminium silicate alteration are minor components (7.3-19.4%). Even less important are solutes from limestone or gypsum dissolution (0.05-3.7%). These waters are unlikely to have originated from sediments hosting gypsum. The low-salinity AWs must have acquired their dominant hydrochemical signatures under non-equilibrium conditions between their remote (unknown) seepage areas and their discharge locations. This acquisition may have begun during the early hydrochemical groundwater evolution when meteoric or surface water passed the critical zone under an arid climate regime. Warmer saline AWs (∼40 °C) hosted in deeper Cretaceous formations contain a high portion of NaCl-rich brine (85%) and some are saturated in gypsum. These waters were derived from fluids rising along faults from pre-Cretaceous strata. The high-salinity and relatively cold AWs discharge close to the retreating Aral Sea south of its western basin. These AWs are suboxic, and Si concentrations are very low. The AW hydrochemical signatures reflect the dissolution of halite and gypsum. We observed positive correlations between temperature, Br, B and Si. The temperature correlation with bromide likely documents the transformation

  16. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  17. Fan deltas and braid deltas: conceptual problems

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.G.; Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The concept of fan deltas has been widely misinterpreted in the geologic literature. A true fan delta is defined as an alluvial fan deposited into a standing body of water. Such sequences are of limited areal extent and are, as expected, uncommon in the rock record. By contrast, braid deltas (herein defined), formed by progradation of a braided fluvial system into a standing body of water, are a common geomorphic feature in many modern settings, and their deposits are common in the geologic record. Braid-delta sequences are often identified as fan deltas, on the false premise that coarse-grained deposits in a deltaic setting are always part of an alluvial fan complex. The authors find that most published examples of so called fan deltas contain no direct evidence for the presence of an alluvial fan. Even in examples where an alluvial fan could be documented, the authors found that, in many cases, the alluvial fan complex was far removed from the shoreline, separated by an extensive braid plain. The authors suggest that such systems are better classified as braid deltas. They consider that it is essential to distinguish the environmental setting of true fan deltas from that of braid deltas. Misclassification will lead to incorrect interpretations of expected facies, sandstone geometry, reservoir quality, and tectonic settings. Criteria based on geometry, vertical and lateral lithofacies associations, and paleocurrent patterns should be used to correctly identify and distinguish these depositional systems.

  18. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  19. 15-Deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} enhanced the anti-tumor activity of camptothecin against renal cell carcinoma independently of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma} pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Fujita, Megumi; Koma, Hiromi; Yamamori, Motohiro; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Okamura, Noboru; Yagami, Tatsurou

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin, exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}. {yields} The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. {yields} A PPAR{gamma} antagonist did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. {yields} The treatment of camptothecin combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. -- Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is chemoresistant cancer. Although several clinical trials were conducted to explore effective medications, the chemoresistance of RCC has not yet been conquered. An endogenous ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), induces apoptosis in RCC. Here, we examined synergistic effects of several carcinostatics on the anti-tumor activity of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} in Caki-2 cell line by MTT assay. A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin (CPT), exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}, but neither 5-fluorouracil nor cisplatin did. The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. The synergistic effect of topoisomerase-I and II inhibitors was not also detected. A PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662, did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. The treatment of CPT combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. These results suggest that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} exhibited the anti-tumor activity synergistically with CPT independent of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma}.

  20. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  1. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  2. 78 FR 67309 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...), and (d) published at 78 FR 14920 on March 8, 2013, are effective on November 12, 2013. FOR FURTHER...-161, published at 78 FR 14920, March 8, 2013. The OMB Control Number is 3060-1187. The Commission... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission....

  3. Developement of a same-side kaon tagging algorithm of B^0_s decays for measuring delta m_s at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /Heidelberg U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors developed a Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm to determine the production flavor of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. Until the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency is clearly observed the performance of the Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm can not be measured on data but has to be determined on Monte Carlo simulation. Data and Monte Carlo agreement has been evaluated for both the B{sub s}{sup 0} and the high statistics B{sup +} and B{sup 0} modes. Extensive systematic studies were performed to quantify potential discrepancies between data and Monte Carlo. The final optimized tagging algorithm exploits the particle identification capability of the CDF II detector. it achieves a tagging performance of {epsilon}D{sup 2} = 4.0{sub -1.2}{sup +0.9} on the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} sample. The Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm presented here has been applied to the ongoing B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis, and has provided a factor of 3-4 increase in the effective statistical size of the sample. This improvement results in the first direct measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency.

  4. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  5. Radon measurements aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Rosner, Stefan W.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out three (piggyback) radon-related projects aboard the KAO. The first, which was limited to upper tropospheric measurements while in level flight, revealed the systematic occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations in this region of the atmosphere. The second project was an instrument development project, which led to the installation of an automatic radon measurement system aboard the NASA ER-2 High Altitude Research Aircraft. In the third, we installed a new system capable of collecting samples during the normal climb and descent of the KAO. The results obtained in these projects have resulted in significant contributions to our knowledge of atmospheric transport processes, and are currently playing a key role in the validation of global circulation and transport models.

  6. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  7. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  8. The Delta IV launch table waits for transfer to CCAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A launch table fabricated by Jered Industries in Georgia is ready for transfer to Launch Complex 37B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, after being stabilized aboard the barge that brought it to the turn basin in KSC's Launch Complex 39 Area. In the background is the Vehicle Assembly Building. The table was built in support of the Delta Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program, known as Delta IV. It was floated on the barge down the Intercoastal Waterway, through the Barge Canal to the turn basin. The table is approximately 70 feet long, 40 feet wide and 50 feet high, and weighs about 600,000 pounds. Accompanying the launch table on the barge are flame deflectors, which are also to be erected on pad 37B.

  9. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B. PMID:3787309

  10. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  11. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  12. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  13. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  14. Man made deltas

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  15. Man made deltas.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  16. Space Radar Image of Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Mississippi River Delta where the river enters into the Gulf of Mexico along the coast of Louisiana. This multi-frequency image demonstrates the capability of the radar to distinguish different types of wetlands surfaces in river deltas. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1995. The image is centered on latitude 29.3 degrees North latitude and 89.28 degrees West longitude. The area shown is approximately 63 kilometers by 43 kilometers (39 miles by 26 miles). North is towards the upper right of the image. As the river enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid-continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil and the numerous bright spots along the outside of the delta are drilling platforms. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad red stripe running northwest to southeast down the left side of the image. The bright spots within the channel are ships. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is X-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  17. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... produce, potable water. (b) The Commissioner of Food and Drugs may base his approval or disapproval of...

  18. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... health authorities of contiguous foreign nations. (c) Overboard water treated on vessels shall be from... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs...

  19. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  20. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  1. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  2. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  3. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  4. Low energy neutron measurements aboard encounter missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmer, N.; Maksimovic, M.; Trottet, G.

    Neutrons in the MeV to GeV range are produced by interaction of flare accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. Because of their lifetime, only high energy neutrons (> 100 MeV) have a high probability to be detected at earth's orbit. So far, around fifteen solar neutron events have been observed either by high energy detectors aboard spacecrafts at 1 AU or by ground based neutron monitors. Neutrons between 10 and 100 MeV have also been detected for a few events through their proton decay. Measurements of solar neutrons closer to the Sun aboard encounter missions will allow to probe for the first time the MeV neutrons which are produced by the nuclear reactions of energetic ions with thresholds around 1 MeV/nuc and will provide information on the accelerated ion spectrum in the energy range between ˜ 1 MeV and 100 MeV/nuc in complementarity with what can be deduced from γ -ray line emission. The close proximity of the Sun would allow to measure neutron events for many more flares opening a new field of solar physics. Combined with near in-situ ion measurements and γ -ray observations, neutrons will bring information on the link between interacting and escaping ions while getting rid of most of the transport effects.

  5. Turbulent heat exchanger {Delta}T and {Delta}P

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-12-31

    Optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) in turbulent flow heat exchangers are presented in three frameworks: as quantitatively defined by fluid properties, the value of energy and the cost of heat exchange surface (with a little help from a relationship between [power/mass] and heat transfer); as the energy cost for heat recovery (with the {Delta}T cost being about equal to the heat exchanger cost and the {Delta}P cost being about 1/3 as great); and as the second law lost work inherent in heat exchange (with the {Delta}T loss being {approximately}3 times the {Delta}T loss).

  6. Ganges River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ganges River forms an extensive delta where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest known as the Sunderbans, which is home to the Royal Bengal Tiger. It is also home to most of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries. Roughly 120 million people live on the Ganges Delta under threat of repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, and due to the intense rainfall during the monsoon season. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on February 28, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using green, infrared, and blue wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  7. A Case for Hypogravity Studies Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions being contemplated by NASA and other spacefaring nations include some that would require long stays upon bodies having gravity levels much lower than that of Earth. While we have been able to quantify the physiological effects of sustained exposure to microgravity during various spaceflight programs over the past half-century, there has been no opportunity to study the physiological adaptations to gravity levels between zero-g and one-g. We know now that the microgravity environment of spaceflight drives adaptive responses of the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensorimotor systems, causing bone demineralization, muscle atrophy, reduced aerobic capacity, motion sickness, and malcoordination. All of these outcomes can affect crew health and performance, particularly after return to a one-g environment. An important question for physicians, scientists, and mission designers planning human exploration missions to Mars (3/8 g), the Moon (1/6 g), or asteroids (likely negligible g) is: What protection can be expected from gravitational levels between zero-g and one-g? Will crewmembers deconditioned by six months of microgravity exposure on their way to Mars experience continued deconditioning on the Martian surface? Or, will the 3/8 g be sufficient to arrest or even reverse these adaptive changes? The implications for countermeasure deployment, habitat accommodations, and mission design warrant further investigation into the physiological responses to hypogravity. It is not possible to fully simulate hypogravity exposure on Earth for other than transient episodes (e.g., parabolic flight). However, it would be possible to do so in low Earth orbit (LEO) using the centrifugal forces produced in a live-aboard centrifuge. As we're not likely to launch a rotating human spacecraft into LEO anytime in the near future, we could take advantage of rodent subjects aboard the ISS if we had a centrifuge that could accommodate the rodent

  8. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  9. Biological investigations aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairbekov, M. G.; Parfyonov, G. P.; Platonova, R. W.; Abramova, V. M.; Golov, V. K.; Rostopshina, A. V.; Lyubchenko, V. Yu.; Chuchkin, V. G.

    Experiments on insects, higher plants and lower fungi were carried out aboard the biological satellite Cosmos-1129, in Earth orbit, from 25 September to 14 October 1979. The main objective of these experiments was to gain more profound knowledge of the effect of weightlessness on living organisms and to study the mechanisms by which these various organisms with different life cycles can adjust and develop in weightlessness. Experiments on insects (Drosophila melanogaster) were made with a view towards understanding gravitational preference in flies, the life cycle of which took place on board the biosatellite under conditions of artificial gravity. Experiments on higher plants (Zea mays, Arabidopsis taliana, Lycopersicum esculentum) and lower fungi (Physarum polycephalum) were performed.

  10. Impact Assessment and Forecasts of Information and Telecommunications Technologies Applied to Education and Training: Volume II--Main Report and Issues Analyses. Analysis for the Orientation of the Work of Sector Actors in the Framework of DELTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This report, the second volume in a three volume set, summarizes the results of a study performed by the DELTA (Developing European Learning through Technological Advance) unit in parallel with the projects underway in the research and development Exploratory Action. The report identifies the key issues, associated requirements and options, and…

  11. Commercial investments in Combustion research aboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado School of Mines is working with a number of companies planning commercial combustion research to be done aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This research will be conducted in two major ISS facilities, SpaceDRUMS™ and the Fluids and Combustion Facility. SpaceDRUMS™, under development by Guigne Technologies, Ltd., of St. John's Newfoundland, is a containerless processing facility employing active acoustic sample positioning. It is capable of processing the large samples needed in commercial research and development with virtually complete vibration isolation from the space station. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), being developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, is a general-purpose combustion furnace designed to accommodate a wide range of scientific experiments. SpaceDRUMS™ will be the first commercial hardware to be launched to ISS. Launch is currently scheduled for UF-1 in 2001. The CCACS research to be done in SpaceDRUMS™ includes combustion synthesis of glass-ceramics and porous materials. The FCF is currently scheduled to be launched to ISS aboard UF-3 in 2002. The CCACS research to be done in the FCF includes water mist fire suppression, catalytic combustion and flame synthesis of ceramic powders. The companies currently planning to be involved in the research include Guigne International, Ltd., Technology International, Inc., Coors Ceramics Company, TDA Research, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., ADA Technologies, Inc., ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Princeton Instruments, Inc., Environmental Engineering Concepts, Inc., and Solar Turbines, Inc. Together, these companies are currently investing almost $2 million in cash and in-kind annually toward the seven commercial projects within CCACS. Total private investment in CCACS research to date is over $7 million. .

  12. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  13. The Devil's in the Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Students frequently confuse and incorrectly apply the several "deltas" that are used in chemical engineering. The deltas come in three different flavors: "out minus in", "big minus little" and "now versus then." The first applies to a change in a stream property as the stream flows through a process. For example, the "[delta]H" in an energy…

  14. Delta-ALA urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid ... This test looks for an increased level of delta-ALA. It may be used to help diagnose ... An increased level of urinary delta-ALA may indicate: Lead poisoning ... level may occur with chronic (long-term) liver disease .

  15. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  16. Understanding pesticides in California's Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Orlando, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) is the hub of California’s water system and also an important habitat for imperiled fish and wildlife. Aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of pesticides that flow through the maze of Delta water channels from sources including agricultural, landscape, and urban pest-control applications. While we do not know all of the effects pesticides have on the ecosystem, there is evidence that they cause some damage to organisms in the Delta. Decades of USGS research have provided a good understanding of when, where, and how pesticides enter the Delta. However, pesticide use is continually changing. New field studies and methods are needed so that scientists can analyze which pesticides are present in the Delta, and at what concentrations, enabling them to estimate exposure and ultimate effects on organisms. Continuing research will provide resource managers and stakeholders with crucial information to manage the Delta wisely.

  17. STS-65 Earth observation of Omo River Delta, Lake Turkana in Ethiopia / Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, is of Omo River Delta and Lake Turkana in Ethiopia / Kenya. The Omo Delta at the north end of Lake Turkana (Rudolph) is one of the long-term environmental study sites of the Space Shuttle program. The environmental interest in this instance is the documentation of the delta's extension into the lake. This delta extension, or aggradation, is felt to be the result of large-scale soil erosion in the recently deforested areas of Ethiopia in the watershed of the Omo River. Using digitized, rectified, machine-classified, and mensurated NASA photography, it has been determined that the Omo Delta has increased in area by approximately 400% to about 1,800 square kilometers since it was first photographed during the Gemini program in 1965. This photograph documents the long-term and increasing turbidity of Lake Turkana and the continuing delta extension southward by both the northwest and northeast distributaries of the Om

  18. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast.

    This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping

  19. Improved data analysis for EPHIN aboard SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasa, Christoph; Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Klassen, Andreas; Müller-Mellin, Reinhold; Heber, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The COSTEP instrument aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft consists of two separate energetic particle detectors, the Low Energy Ion and Electron Instrument (LION) and the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN). These detectors allow measurement of electrons, protons and helium of solar, interplanetary or galactic origin in the energy range of 44 keV per particle up to several tens of MeV per nucleon. The objectives of these instruments are the study of particle emissions from the Sun, the galaxy and the heliosphere. EPHIN is collecting data since the launch of the mission in December 1995 covering more than a full 11-year solar cycle. Late in 1996 one of the semiconductor detectors became noisy, affecting the quality of the data in the upper energy range. We used the energy-range empiric relation by Goulding et al. to resconstruct the energy loss of nuclei in the affected detector. New dynamic spectra and long-term quiet time spectra using these techniques are presented.

  20. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  1. Stealth life detection instruments aboard Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Gilbert V.

    2012-10-01

    NASA has often stated (e.g. MSL Science Corner1) that it's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), "Curiosity," Mission to Mars carries no life detection experiments. This is in keeping with NASA's 36-year explicit ban on such, imposed immediately after the 1976 Viking Mission to Mars. The space agency attributes the ban to the "ambiguity" of that Mission's Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment, fearing an adverse effect on the space program should a similar "inconclusive" result come from a new robotic quest. Yet, despite the NASA ban, this author, the Viking LR Experimenter, contends there are "stealth life detection instruments" aboard Curiosity. These are life detection instruments in the sense that they can free the Viking LR from the pall of ambiguity that has held it prisoner so long. Curiosity's stealth instruments are those seeking organic compounds, and the mission's high-resolution camera system. Results from any or all of these devices, coupled with the Viking LR data, can confirm the LR's life detection claim. In one possible scenario, Curiosity can, of itself, completely corroborate the finding of life on Mars. MSL has just successfully landed on Mars. Hopefully, its stealth confirmations of life will be reported shortly.

  2. Occupational lead exposure aboard a tall ship

    SciTech Connect

    Landrigan, P.J.; Straub, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate occupational exposures to lead in shipfitters cutting and riveting lead-painted iron plates aboard an iron-hulled sailing vessel, the authors conducted an environmental and medical survey. Lead exposures in seven personal (breathing zone) air samples ranged from 108 to 500 micrograms/mT (mean 257 micrograms/mT); all were above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard of 50 micrograms/mT. In two short-term air samples obtained while exhaust ventilation was temporarily disconnected, mean lead exposure rose to 547 micrograms/mT. Blood lead levels in ten shipfitters ranged from 25 to 53 micrograms/dl. Blood lead levels in shipfitters were significantly higher than in other shipyard workers. Smoking shipfitters had significantly higher lead levels than nonsmokers. Lead levels in shipfitters who wore respirators were not lower than in those who wore no protective gear. Four shipfitters had erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations above the adult upper normal limit of 50 micrograms/dl. A close correlation was found between blood lead and EP levels. Prevalence of lead-related symptoms was no higher in shipfitters than in other workers. These data indicate that serious occupational exposure to lead can occur in a relatively small boatyard.

  3. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-06-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  4. Natural processes in delta restoration: application to the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    Paola, Chris; Twilley, Robert R; Edmonds, Douglas A; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David; Parker, Gary; Viparelli, Enrica; Voller, Vaughan R

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of river deltas involves diverting sediment and water from major channels into adjoining drowned areas, where the sediment can build new land and provide a platform for regenerating wetland ecosystems. Except for local engineered structures at the points of diversion, restoration mainly relies on natural delta-building processes. Present understanding of such processes is sufficient to provide a basis for determining the feasibility of restoration projects through quantitative estimates of land-building rates and sustainable wetland area under different scenarios of sediment supply, subsidence, and sea-level rise. We are not yet to the point of being able to predict the evolution of a restored delta in detail. Predictions of delta evolution are based on field studies of active deltas, deltas in mine-tailings ponds, experimental deltas, and countless natural experiments contained in the stratigraphic record. These studies provide input for a variety of mechanistic delta models, ranging from radially averaged formulations to more detailed models that can resolve channels, topography, and ecosystem processes. Especially exciting areas for future research include understanding the mechanisms by which deltaic channel networks self-organize, grow, and distribute sediment and nutrients over the delta surface and coupling these to ecosystem processes, especially the interplay of topography, network geometry, and ecosystem dynamics. PMID:21329199

  5. Pioneer Launch on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA launches the last in the series of interplanetary Pioneer spacecraft, Pioneer 10 from Cape Kennedy, Florida. The long-tank Delta launch vehicle placed the spacecraft in a solar orbit along the path of Earth's orbit. The spacecraft then passed inside and outside Earth's orbit, alternately speeding up and slowing down relative to Earth. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta was composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  6. FRV Deleware II cruise, 30 June to 7 July 1978. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K.

    1982-05-01

    This was the last of three companion cruises designed to provide broad-scale coverage of seasonal shelf conditions occurring between the April and October investigations undertaken aboard ATLANTIS II cruises 99 and 104.

  7. Delta in Eberswalde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This HiRISE image covers a portion of a delta that partially fills Eberswalde crater in Margaritifer Sinus. The delta was first recognized and mapped using MOC images that revealed various features whose presence required sustained flow and deposition into a lake that once occupied the crater. The HiRISE image resolves meter-scale features that record the migration of channels and delta distributaries as the delta grew over time. Differences in grain-size of sediments within the environments on the delta enable differential erosion of the deposits. As a result, coarser channel deposits are slightly more resistant and stand in relief relative to finer-grained over-bank and more easily eroded distal delta deposits. Close examination of the relict channel deposits confirms the presence of some meter-size blocks that were likely too coarse to have been transported by water flowing within the channels. These blocks may be formed of the sand and gravel that more likely moved along the channels that was lithified and eroded. Numerous meter-scale polygonal structures are common on many surfaces, but mostly those associated with more quiescent depositional environments removed from the channels. The polygons could be the result of deposition of fine-grained sediments that were either exposed and desiccated (dried out), rich in clays that shrunk when the water was removed, turned into rock and then fractured and eroded, or some combination of these processes.

    Image PSP_001336_1560 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 8, 2006. The complete image is centered at -23.8 degrees latitude, 326.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 256.3 km (160.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.6 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 77 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was

  8. Final Narrative Report on Nursing Ethics at Delta College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Raymond S.

    This four-part report describes a project undertaken by Delta College to implement two required bioethics courses for nursing students: an introductory course in ethical theories and an advanced course in applications of these theories in nursing. After Part I relates how funding for the project was secured and used, Part II delineates the…

  9. Delta FUSE Fairing Installation at Launch Complex 17A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents footage of the June 19, 1999 installation of the fairing around the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spacecraft. The spacecraft was previously mated to the Boeing Delta II rocket. Installation took place on Pad A of Launch Complex 17.

  10. Shanghai Delta Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Hoffman, P.F.; Parker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional system of growth faults into an area generally 12-15 km wide, extending at least from the western edge of the Houston sale dome basin to the San Marcos arch. Within this area, the expanded Yegua trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of excellent reservoir-quality sands. Shanghai, Shanghai East, and El Campo fields are located within what the writers have labeled the ''Shanghai delta complex.'' Integration of seismic and well data in this vicinity shows a marked increase in the expansion indices of growth faults, and moderately thick progradational sand sequences have accumulated immediately downthrow. This structural-stratigraphic pattern, as well as internal bedding characteristics and other lithologic data observed, is believed typical of deltas deposited along the Yegua shelf margin.

  11. Holden Crater Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03694 Holden Crater Delta

    This fan-shaped delta deposit is located in Holden Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.3N, Longitude 324.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Design Principles of A Sigma-delta Flux-gate Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnes, W.; Valavanoglou, A.; Pierce, D.; Frank, A.; Schwingenschuh, K.

    A state-of-the-art flux-gate magnetometer is characterised by magnetic field resolution of several pT in a wide frequency range, low power consumption, low weight and high robustness. Therefore, flux-gate magnetometers are frequently used for ground-based Earth's field observation as well as for measurements aboard scientific space missions. But both traditional analogue and recently developed digital flux-gate magnetometers need low power and high-resolution analogue-to-digital converters for signal quan- tization. The disadvantage of such converters is the low radiation hardness. This fact has led to the idea of combining a traditional analogue flux-gate regulation circuit with that of a discretely realized sigma-delta converter in order to get a radiation hard and further miniaturized magnetometer. The name sigma-delta converter is derived from putting an integrator in front of a 1-bit delta modulator which forms the sigma-delta loop. It is followed by a digital decimation filter realized in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The flux-gate regulation and the sigma-delta loop are quite similar in the way of realizing the integrator and feedback circuit, which makes it easy to com- bine these two systems. The presented talk deals with the design principles and the results of a first bread board model.

  13. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    SciTech Connect

    Steven McLauchlan

    2003-01-31

    The Delta-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the delta mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the delta. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the delta resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4(pie) acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the delta mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the delta-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the delta.

  14. Safety Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Shauna M.

    2004-01-01

    As with any task that NASA takes on, safety is of utmost importaqce. There are pages of safety codes and procedures that must be followed before any idea can be brought to life. Unfortunately, the International Space Station s (ISS) safety regulations and procedures are based on lg standards rather than on Og. To aide in making this space age home away from home a less hazardous environment, I worked on several projects revolving around the dangers of flammable items in microgravity. The first task I was assigned was to track flames. This involves turning eight millimeter video recordings, of tests run in the five second drop tower, into avi format on the computer. The footage is then compressed and altered so that the flame can be seen more clearly. Using another program called Spotlight, line profiles were used to collect data describing the luminescence of the flame at different points. These raw data are saved as text files and run trough a macro so that a Matlab program can analyze it. By fitting the data to a curve and determining the areas of brightest luminescence, the behavior of the flame can be recorded numerically. After entering the data into a database, researchers can come back later and easily get information on flames resulting from different gas and liquid mixtures in microgravity. I also worked on phase two of the FATE project, which deals with safety aboard the ISS. This phase involves igniting projected droplets and determining how they react with secondary materials. Such simulations represent, on a small scale, the spread of onboard fires due to the effervescence of burning primary materials. I set up existing hardware to operate these experiments and ran tests with it, photographing the results. I also made CAD drawings of the apparatus and the area available on the (SF)2 rig for it to fit into. The experiment will later be performed on the KC-135, and the results gathered will be used to reanalyze current safety standards for the ISS

  15. Altamaha River Delta, Georgia Sea Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The history of sea islands in the Altamaha River delta on the coast of Georgia is revealed in this image produced from data acquired by the Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR), developed and operated by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The outlines of long-lost plantation rice fields, canals, dikes and other inlets are clearly defined. Salt marshes are shown in red, while dense cypress and live oak tree canopies are seen in yellow-greens.

    Agricultural development of the Altamaha delta began soon after the founding of the Georgia Colony in 1733. About 25 plantations were located on the low-lying islands and shores by the 19th century, taking advantage of the rich alluvial flow and annual inundation of water required by some crops. The first major crop was indigo; when demand for that faded, rice and cotton took its place. A major storm in 1824 destroyed much of the town of Darien (upper right) and put many of the islands under 20 feet of water. The Civil War ended the plantation system, and many of the island plantations disappeared under heavy brush and new growth pine forests. Some were used as tree farms for paper and pulp industries, while the Butler Island (center left) plantation became a wildlife conservation site growing wild sea rice for migrating ducks and other waterfowl. Margaret Mitchell is reputed to have used the former owner of the Butler Plantation as a basis for the Rhett Butler character in her novel 'Gone With The Wind,' taking the first name from Rhett's Island (lower right).

    These data were obtained during a 1994-95 campaign along the Georgia coast. AIRSAR's ability to detect vegetation canopy density, hydrological features and other topographic characteristics is a useful tool in landscape archaeology. AIRSAR flies aboard a NASA DC-8 based at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The analysis on the data shown was accomplished by Dr. Gary Mckay, Department of Archaeology and Geography, and Ian

  16. The Great Diversion: Danube Delta under Human Control (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, L.

    2009-12-01

    Many deltas around the world are suffering from sediment deficits that render them unstable to current and predicted rates of sea level rise. One solution proposed to alleviate the complete or partial drowning of such deltas is the use of river diversions to increase the quantity of sediment supplied to the delta plain to support marsh accretion. We examine the results of a half century old program of diversion in the Danube delta that led to the creation of an extensive diversion channel network akin in scope and size to a natural deltaic network. Danube’s importance as a shipping route increased after the Crimean War in the 1850s; the European Danube Commission was charged with maintaining the Sulina distributary as a shipping channel until 1940s. In the same period, several canals were dug to aid fishing in lakes and bring freshwater to brackish lagoons. After World War II, Communist authorities dramatically increased the number of canals for fishing, fish-farming and reed harvesting. New data on sedimentation rates and estimates of sediment fluxes suggest that the intensive canalization in the second half of the 20th Century led to increased sediment deposition that compensated the decreasing sediment discharge linked to damming within the internal fluvial part of the delta; however, the external marine delta has become increasingly sediment starved during the same interval. We emphasize the similarities and contrasts between the “human-controlled” and natural deltaic channel networks of the Danube delta and discuss the sustainability of the delta as a sediment budget problem within a sea level rise context.

  17. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789.

    The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  18. 29 CFR 783.35 - Employees serving as “watchmen” aboard vessels in port.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 783.35 Employees serving as “watchmen” aboard vessels in port. Various situations are presented with respect to employees rendering watchman or similar service aboard a vessel in port. Members of the crew... crew rendering watchman or similar services aboard the vessel during this period would not appear to...

  19. Psychiatric diagnoses aboard an aircraft carrier.

    PubMed

    Bohnker, B; McEwen, G; Blanco, J; Feeks, E

    1992-11-01

    A descriptive study was conducted for 150 consecutive patients with a psychiatric diagnosis evaluated over 11 months by the medical staff onboard an aircraft carrier. Patients with sole diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence were excluded. Axis II diagnoses, or personality disorders, were more common (N = 120) than Axis I diagnoses (N = 46). The most common Axis I diagnoses were adjustment disorder and major depression. Axis II diagnoses were significantly more likely (OR = 7.33, 95% CI 4.45-12.16, p = 0.000) in sailors less than 23 years of age compared to ship's population. Suicide behavior was demonstrated in 68% (102/150) of the patient population. This study emphasized the requirement for extensive psychiatric training for the clinical aerospace medicine specialists providing operational support to aircraft carrier crews.

  20. Gemini 12 crew arrives aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  1. Apollo 9 crewmen arrive aboard U.S.S. Guadelcanal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 9 crewmen arrive aboard the U.S.S. Guadelcanal as they step from a helicopter to receive a red-carpet welcome. Two of the crewmen salute the crowd of newsmen, Navy and NASA personnel gathered to greet them. Left to right are Astronauts Russell L. Schweickart, David R. Scott, and James A. McDivitt.

  2. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.217 Suppression...

  3. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.217 Suppression...

  4. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.217 Suppression...

  5. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.217 Suppression...

  6. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.217 Suppression...

  7. Predicting Airborne Particle Levels Aboard Washington State School Buses.

    PubMed

    Adar, Sara D; Davey, Mark; Sullivan, James R; Compher, Michael; Szpiro, Adam; Liu, L-J Sally

    2008-10-01

    School buses contribute substantially to childhood air pollution exposures yet they are rarely quantified in epidemiology studies. This paper characterizes fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) aboard school buses as part of a larger study examining the respiratory health impacts of emission-reducing retrofits.To assess onboard concentrations, continuous PM(2.5) data were collected during 85 trips aboard 43 school buses during normal driving routines, and aboard hybrid lead vehicles traveling in front of the monitored buses during 46 trips. Ordinary and partial least square regression models for PM(2.5) onboard buses were created with and without control for roadway concentrations, which were also modeled. Predictors examined included ambient PM(2.5) levels, ambient weather, and bus and route characteristics.Concentrations aboard school buses (21 mug/m(3)) were four and two-times higher than ambient and roadway levels, respectively. Differences in PM(2.5) levels between the buses and lead vehicles indicated an average of 7 mug/m(3) originating from the bus's own emission sources. While roadway concentrations were dominated by ambient PM(2.5), bus concentrations were influenced by bus age, diesel oxidative catalysts, and roadway concentrations. Cross validation confirmed the roadway models but the bus models were less robust.These results confirm that children are exposed to air pollution from the bus and other roadway traffic while riding school buses. In-cabin air pollution is higher than roadway concentrations and is likely influenced by bus characteristics.

  8. Artificial delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A deltaic sedimentary system has a point source; sediment is carried over the delta plain by distributary channels away from the point source and deposited at the delta front by distributary mouth bars. The established methods to describe such a sedimentary system are "bedding analysis", "facies analysis", and "basin analysis". We shall call the ambient conditions "input" and the rock record "output". There exist a number of methods to deduce input from output, e.g. "Sequence stratigraphy" (a.o. Vail et al. 1977, Catuneanu et al. 2009), "Shoreline trajectory" (a.o. Helland-Hansen & Martinsen 1996, Helland-Hansen & Hampson 2009) on the one hand and the complex use of established techniques on the other (a.o. Miall & Miall 2001, Miall & Miall 2002). None of these deductive methods seems to be sufficient. I claim that the common errors in all these attempts are the following: (1) a sedimentary system is four-dimensional (3+1) and a lesser dimensional analysis is insufficient; (2) a sedimentary system is complex and any empirical/deductive analysis is non-unique. The proper approach to the problem is therefore the theoretical/inductive analysis. To that end we performed six scenarios of a scaled version of a passive margin delta in a flume tank. The scenarios have identical stepwise tectonic subsidence and semi-cyclic sealevel, but different supply curves, i.e. supply is: constant, highly-frequent, proportional to sealevel, inversely proportional to sealevel, lagging to sealevel, ahead of sealevel. The preliminary results are indicative. Lobe-switching occurs frequently and hence locally sedimentation occurs shortly and hiatuses are substantial; therefore events in 2D (+1) cross-sections don't correlate temporally. The number of sedimentary cycles disequals the number of sealevel cycles. Lobe-switching and stepwise tectonic subsidence cause onlap/transgression. Erosional unconformities are local diachronous events, whereas maximum flooding surfaces are regional

  9. Hepatitis delta virus mutant: effect on RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Wu, T T; Bichko, V V; Ryu, W S; Lemon, S M; Taylor, J M

    1995-11-01

    During the replication cycle of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), RNA editing occurs at position 1012 on the 1679-nucleotide RNA genome. This changes an A to G in the amber termination codon, UAG, of the small form of the delta antigen (delta Ag). The resultant UGG codon, tryptophan, allows the translation of a larger form of the delta Ag with a 19-amino-acid C-terminal extension. Using HDV cDNA-transfected cells, we examined the editing potential of HDV RNA mutated from G to A at 1011 on the antigenome, adjacent to normal editing site at 1012. Four procedures were used to study not only the editing of the A at 1012, but also that of the new A at 1011: (i) nucleotide sequencing, (ii) a PCR-based RNA-editing assay, (iii) immunoblot assays, and (iv) immunofluorescence. Five findings are reported. (i) Even after the mutation at 1011, editing still occurred at 1012. (ii) Site 1011 itself now acted as a novel RNA-editing site. (iii) Sites 1011 and 1012 were edited independently. (iv) At later times, both sites became edited, thereby allowing the synthesis of the large form of the delta Ag (delta Ag-L). (v) Via immunofluorescence, such double editing became apparent as a stochastic event, in that groups of cells arose in which the changes had taken place. Evaluation of these findings and of those from previous studies of the stability of the HDV genomic sequence (H.J. Netter et al., J. Virol. 69:1687-1692, 1995) supports both the recent reevaluation of HDV RNA editing as occurring on antigenomic RNA (Casey and Gerin, personal communication) and the interpretation that editing occurs via the RNA-modifying enzyme known as DRADA.

  10. On the precipitation of delta phase in ALLVAC® 718Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, O. M.; Barnard, J. S.; Pickering, E. J.; Midgley, P. A.; Rae, C. M. F.

    2014-04-01

    ALLVAC 718Plus is a new commercial superalloy derived from Inconel 718, but possessing a higher temperature capability whilst employing the same philosophy regarding the microstructure. Many articles have been published describing various heat treatments exploiting the precipitation of intermetallic phases at grain boundaries to optimize the mechanical properties over a range of testing conditions. The requirement to further improve the mechanical properties of this alloy drives our interest in the precipitation mechanism of the delta and eta phases found in this alloy. We report the presence of finely layered structures composed of two phases, delta and eta, with distinct structures and chemistries. Possible pathways to explain this precipitation in 718Plus are considered as follows: (i) the sequential formation of the delta from eta phase and (ii) the simultaneous precipitation of both eta and delta facilitated via solute rejection. Both can result in the formation of those small delta layers observed in HRSTEM. We discuss which is most likely by comparing the relative alignment of the phases by image processing and the analysis of the HRSTEM images, and propose formation mechanisms consistent with the distinctive dislocation structures observed at the interface.

  11. Gene cloning and functional analysis of a second delta 6-fatty acid desaturase from an arachidonic acid-producing Mortierella fungus.

    PubMed

    Sakuradani, Eiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2003-04-01

    We demonstrated that Mortierella alpina 1S-4 has two delta 6-desaturases, which are involved in the desaturation of linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid. For one of the two delta 6-desaturases, designated as delta 6I, gene cloning and its heterologous expression in a fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, has previously been reported. In addition, we indicated in this paper that there is an isozyme of the two delta 6-desaturases, designated as delta 6II, in M. alpina 1S-4. The predicted amino acid sequences of the Mortierella delta 6-desaturases were similar to those of ones from other organisms, i.e. borage and Caenorhabditis elegans, and had a cytochrome b5-like domain at the N-terminus, being different from the yeast delta 9-desaturase, which has the corresponding domain at the C-terminus. The full-length delta 6II cDNA was expressed in A. oryzae, resulting in the accumulation of gamma-linolenic acid (which was not detected in the control Aspergillus) up to 37% of the total fatty acids. The analysis of real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) showed that the quantity of delta 6I RNA was 2.4-, 9-, and 17-fold higher than that of delta 6II RNA on 2, 3, and 4 days in M. alpina 1S-4, respectively. M. alpina 1S-4 is the first fungus to be confirmed to have two functional delta 6-desaturase genes. PMID:12784608

  12. 78 FR 76609 - Genesis Solar, LLC; NRG Delta LLC; Mountain View Solar, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind, LLC; Pheasant Run...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...-000; EG13-63-000; EG13-64-000; FC13-13-000] Genesis Solar, LLC; NRG Delta LLC; Mountain View Solar, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind II, LLC; Tuscola Wind II, LLC; Mountain Wind Power, LLC; Mountain Wind Power II, LLC; Summerhaven Wind, LP; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator...

  13. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  14. Crewmen of the Gemini 7 spacecraft arrive aboard aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., (left), pilot, and Frank Borman, command pilot, are shown just after they arrived aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. Greeting the astronauts are Donald Stullken (at Lovell's right), Recovery Operations Branch, Landing and Recovery Division; Dr. Howard Minners (standing beside Borman), Flight Medicine Branch, Cneter Medical Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, and Bennett James (standing behind Borman), a NASA Public Affairs Officer.

  15. Study of balloon and thermal control material degradation aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letton, Alan; Rock, Neil I.; Williams, Kevin D.; Strganac, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The initial results of analysis performed on a number of polymeric materials which were exposed aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are discussed. These materials include two typical high altitude balloon films (a polyester and a polyethylene) and silver-backed Teflon from thermal control blanket samples. The techniques used for characterizing changes in mechanical properties, chemical structure and surface morphology include Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  16. Apollo 10 crewmembers arrive aboard U.S.S. Princeton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 10 crewmembers arrive aboard the U.S.S. Princeton as they step from a helicopter to receive a red carpet welcome. Left to right, are Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot; Thomas P. Stafford, commander; and John W. Young, command module pilot. Standing in left foreground is Dr. Donald E. Stullken, Chief, Recovery Operations Branch, Landing and Recovery Division, Manned Spacecraft Center.

  17. Predicting Airborne Particle Levels Aboard Washington State School Buses

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Sara D.; Davey, Mark; Sullivan, James R.; Compher, Michael; Szpiro, Adam; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2008-01-01

    School buses contribute substantially to childhood air pollution exposures yet they are rarely quantified in epidemiology studies. This paper characterizes fine particulate matter (PM2.5) aboard school buses as part of a larger study examining the respiratory health impacts of emission-reducing retrofits. To assess onboard concentrations, continuous PM2.5 data were collected during 85 trips aboard 43 school buses during normal driving routines, and aboard hybrid lead vehicles traveling in front of the monitored buses during 46 trips. Ordinary and partial least square regression models for PM2.5 onboard buses were created with and without control for roadway concentrations, which were also modeled. Predictors examined included ambient PM2.5 levels, ambient weather, and bus and route characteristics. Concentrations aboard school buses (21 μg/m3) were four and two-times higher than ambient and roadway levels, respectively. Differences in PM2.5 levels between the buses and lead vehicles indicated an average of 7 μg/m3 originating from the bus's own emission sources. While roadway concentrations were dominated by ambient PM2.5, bus concentrations were influenced by bus age, diesel oxidative catalysts, and roadway concentrations. Cross validation confirmed the roadway models but the bus models were less robust. These results confirm that children are exposed to air pollution from the bus and other roadway traffic while riding school buses. In-cabin air pollution is higher than roadway concentrations and is likely influenced by bus characteristics. PMID:18985175

  18. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  19. AASE-2 In-Situ Tracer Correlations of Methane Nitrous Oxide and Ozone as Observed Aboard the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Anderson, B. E.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Walgea, J. G.; Ridley, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    We report in situ stratospheric measurements of CH4, N2O, and O3 obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 during the January-March 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II field campaign. These data demonstrate a strong linear correlation between N2O and CH4 in the lower stratosphere thus indicating that both species are effective tracers of stratospheric air motion. Measurements of both species on constant geometric height surfaces indicate that significant subsidence of the arctic stratospheric air mass occurred at DC-8 altitudes over the course of the AASE-II expedition. In addition, a widespread reduction in O3 mixing ratios (up to 20%) relative to these conserved tracers was also observed in the lower stratosphere in March a compared to January and February results.

  20. Delta launch vehicle inertial guidance system (DIGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, K. I.

    1973-01-01

    The Delta inertial guidance system, part of the Delta launch vehicle improvement effort, has been flown on three launches and was found to perform as expected for a variety of mission profiles and vehicle configurations.

  1. Delta nitrogen tetroxide fueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, R. B.; Cross, T. M.; Rucci, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the Delta second stage nitrogen tetroxide fueling system is briefly summarized. The nitrogen tetroxide fueling system and the equipment used to protect the spacecraft environment from the toxic nitrogen tetroxide fumes are described. Topics covered include: the nitrogen tetroxide transfer system; loading operations; safety precautions; and chemical treatment of all toxic vapors.

  2. Spongeplant Spreading in the Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive, exotic aquatic plants impact a range of important economic and ecological functions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, and the state now spends over $5 million to control water hyacinth and Brazilian waterweed. In 2007, a new exotic floating plant South American Spongeplan...

  3. Delta launch vehicle accident investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    The text of the testimony given by several witnesses during the House hearings on the Delta launch vehicle accident of May 3, 1986 is given. Pre-launch procedures, failure analysis, the possibility of sabotage, and design and testing are among the topics discussed.

  4. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  5. Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Muller-Solger, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of certain fishes and invertebrates in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have declined in abundance in recent decades and there is evidence that food supply is partly responsible. While many sources of organic matter in the Delta could be supporting fish populations indirectly through the food web (including aquatic vegetation and decaying organic matter from agricultural drainage), a careful accounting shows that phytoplankton is the dominant food source. Phytoplankton, communities of microscopic free-floating algae, are the most important food source on a Delta-wide scale when both food quantity and quality are taken into account. These microscopic algae have declined since the late 1960s. Fertilizer and pesticide runoff do not appear to be playing a direct role in long-term phytoplankton changes; rather, species invasions, increasing water transparency and fluctuations in water transport are responsible. Although the potential toxicity of herbicides and pesticides to plank- ton in the Delta is well documented, the ecological significance remains speculative. Nutrient inputs from agricultural runoff at current levels, in combination with increasing transparency, could result in harmful al- gal blooms. 

  6. Revisiting double Dirac delta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Vibhu

    2016-07-01

    We study a general double Dirac delta potential to show that this is the simplest yet still versatile solvable potential to introduce double wells, avoided crossings, resonances and perfect transmission (T = 1). Perfect transmission energies turn out to be the critical property of symmetric and anti-symmetric cases wherein these discrete energies are found to correspond to the eigenvalues of a Dirac delta potential placed symmetrically between two rigid walls. For well(s) or barrier(s), perfect transmission (or zero reflectivity, R(E)) at energy E=0 is non-intuitive. However, this has been found earlier and called the ‘threshold anomaly’. Here we show that it is a critical phenomenon and we can have 0≤slant R(0)\\lt 1 when the parameters of the double delta potential satisfy an interesting condition. We also invoke a zero-energy and zero curvature eigenstate (\\psi (x)={Ax}+B) of the delta well between two symmetric rigid walls for R(0)=0. We resolve that the resonant energies and the perfect transmission energies are different and they arise differently.

  7. Maintenance of large deltas through channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, L.; Constatinescu, S.; Filip, F.

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for delta restoration is currently taking shape using primarily Mississippi delta examples. Here we propose an alternative for delta maintenance primarily envisioned for wave-influenced deltas based on Danube delta experiences. Over the last half century, while the total sediment load of the Danube dramatically decreased due to dam construction on tributaries and its mainstem, a grand experiment was inadvertently run in the Danube delta: the construction of a dense network of canals, which almost tripled the water discharge toward the interior of the delta plain. We use core-based and chart-based sedimentation rates and patterns to explore the delta transition from the natural to an anthropogenic regime, to understand the effects of far-field damming and near-field channelization, and to construct a conceptual model for delta development as a function sediment partition between the delta plain and the delta coastal fringe. We show that sediment fluxes increased to the delta plain due to channelization, counteracting sea level rise. In turn, the delta coastal fringe was most impacted by the Danube's sediment load collapse. Furthermore, we show that morphodynamic feedbacks at the river mouth are crucial in trapping sediment near the coast and constructing wave-dominated deltas or lobes or delaying their destruction. As a general conclusion, we suggest that increased channelization that mimics and enhances natural processes may provide a simple solution for keeping delta plains above sea level and that abandonment of wave-dominated lobes may be the most long term efficient solution for protecting the internal fluvial regions of deltas and provide new coastal growth downcoast.

  8. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  9. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  10. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  11. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  12. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  13. High temperature heat pipe experiments aboard the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. ); Secary, C.J. )

    1993-01-10

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most space nuclear power systems, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation. Three SST/potassium heat pipes are being designed, fabricated, and ground tested. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will fly aboard the space shuttle in 1995. Three wick structures will be tested: homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap. Ground tests are described that simulate the space shuttle environment in every way except gravity field.

  14. Ovarian Tumor Cells Studied Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  15. [Equipment for biological experiments with snails aboard piloted orbital stations].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Korotkova, E V; Kuznetsova, E E; Mukhamedieva, L N; Begrov, V V; Pepeliaev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    To fly biological experiments aboard piloted orbital stations, research equipment was built up of an incubation container, filter system and automatic temperature controller. Investigations included analysis of the makeup and concentrations of gases produced by animals (snails) during biocycle, and emitted after death. Filters are chemisorption active fibrous materials (AFM) with high sorption rate and water receptivity (cation exchange fiber VION-KN-1 and anion exchange fiber VION-AS-1), and water-repellent carbon adsorbent SKLTS. AFM filters were effective in air cleaning and practically excluded ingress of chemical substances from the container into cabin atmosphere over more than 100 days. PMID:21033402

  16. Soyuz 25 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 25. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 76, 108 and 88%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned aboard Soyuz 25.

  17. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ..., FR Doc. 2013-04429, on page 14952, column 1, correct the DATES section to read as follows: DATES... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... Stations Aboard Aircraft. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrea Kelly, Satellite Division,...

  18. Shoreline change in 48 river deltas: towards indexing erosion as a criterion of delta vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besset, Manon; Anthony, Edward; Dussouillez, Philippe; Sabatier, François

    2016-04-01

    River deltas are considered as increasingly vulnerable to environmental modifications resulting from climate change and human activities. Delta vulnerability is associated with a number of drivers, chief among which are depleted sediment supply, changes in water discharge, and pumping of underground fluids. These activities lead to accelerated subsidence and erosion, the twin mechanisms of delta destruction. A lot of attention has been focused on vulnerability resulting from accelerated subsidence. Here, we address the problem of delta erosion based on the analysis of 48 deltas, including 30 of the world's largest deltas. Using satellite images (Landsat, Spot 5, Spot 6) and aerial photographs, we determined for each delta, the change in delta protruberance area over a 30-year period, this being defined as the area of delta protrusion relative to a straight shoreline running across the delta plain and linking the delta to the adjacent non-protruding non-deltaic shoreline. We classified the deltas in terms of net area loss, gain, or stability, the last corresponding to an uncertainty threshold of _0.3% of the delta's protruberance over the 30-year period. The results show that 25 (52%) of the studied set of deltas show area loss, 11 (23%) stability, and 12 (25%) gain. Area loss is more important in deltas with a protruberance area <500 km2 (67% of small deltas) than in the largest deltas (23%), with a protruberance area >500 km2. Besides sediment supply conditions, which are a primary factor in delta erosion, eroding deltas tend to be more commonly subjected to relatively significant levels of wave energy.

  19. Parana River Delta in Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Parana River delta is a huge forested marshland about 20 miles northeast of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The area is a very popular tour destination. Guided boat tours can be taken into this vast labyrinth of marsh and trees. The Parana River delta is one of the world's greatest bird-watching destinations. This image highlights the striking contrast between dense forest and wetland marshes, and the deep blue ribbon of the Parana River. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 26, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  20. An apparatus for preparing benthic samples aboard ship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, Phillip N.; Girard, Thomas L.; Stapanian, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a safe and effective apparatus for washing and reducing the volume of benthic samples collected by grab samplers aboard ship. The sample is transferred directly from the dredge to the apparatus and then washed with water pumped through pipes in the apparatus and from onboard hoses. Wastewater and materials smaller than 0.541 mm in diameter are washed overboard. Larger materials, including benthic organisms, collect on an upper 0.64-cm screen and on a lower 30-mm-mesh stainless steel bolt cloth. A collection jar is screwed into the bottom of the apparatus. Therefore, transfer of sample material from the apparatus to the jar is quick and easy. This apparatus has several advantages for use aboard ship over others described in the literature, especially in rough seas, in cold weather, and at night. The apparatus provides a safe and convenient platform for washing and reducing samples, and samples can be prepared while the vessel is traveling at full speed.

  1. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Aboard Command Module Yankee Clipper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is a view of astronaut Richard F. Gordon attaching a high resolution telephoto lens to a camera aboard the Apollo 12 Command Module (CM) Yankee Clipper. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  2. New aspects of the RPW instrument antennas aboard Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, Manfred; Kapper, Michael; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rucker, Helmut O.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2013-04-01

    The E-field sensors (boom antennas) of the RPW instrument aboard the Solar Orbiter spacecraft are subject to severe influence of the conducting spacecraft body and other large structures such as the solar panels in close vicinity of the antennas. In this contribution we outline our newest results in finding the true properties of the antennas with additional emphasis on the influence of the built-in heating circuit for deployment. Knowledge of the true properties of the connected antenna system and receiver hardware is an essential component in ensuring the overall performance of a scientific radio and plasma wave instrument. Compared to other spaceborne multiport scatterers, the ANT sensors aboard Solar Orbiter are more sophisticated in mechanical design with features including tubular shaped pipes with radiators along with several hinges. This combined with the challenging environment (closest proximity to Sun is about 0.29 AU) makes finding the true properties even more pressing than with previous spaceborne radio astronomy observatories. Our numerical investigations also provide an important benchmark against measured antenna characteristics using a scale model of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft in an anechoic chamber. The current calibration results are to provide useful input to goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis, direction finding and ray tracing, all of which depend crucially on the effective axes, allowing for significant improvements to the corresponding scientific data analysis.

  3. Homeostatic regulation of intestinal epithelia by intraepithelial gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Fujiura, Y; Kawaguchi, M; Matsumoto, S; Hashimoto, Y; Obana, S; Mombaerts, P; Tonegawa, S; Yamamoto, H; Itohara, S

    1995-01-01

    Although T cells bearing gamma delta T-cell receptors have long been known to be present in the epithelial lining of many organs, their specificity and function remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the intestinal epithelia of T-cell-receptor mutant mice, which were deficient in either gamma delta T cells or alpha beta T cells, and of normal littermates. The absence of gamma delta T cells was associated with a reduction in epithelial cell turnover and a downregulation of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. No such effects were observed in alpha beta T-cell-deficient mice. These findings indicate that intraepithelial gamma delta T cells regulate the generation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597094

  4. Leaf and twig delta13C during growth in relation to biochemical composition and respired CO2.

    PubMed

    Eglin, Thomas; Fresneau, Chantal; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Francois, Christophe; Damesin, Claire

    2009-06-01

    In deciduous trees, the delta(13)C values of leaves are known to diverge during growth from those of woody organs. The main purpose of this study is to determine whether the divergence in delta(13)C between leaves and current-year twigs of Fagus sylvatica (L.) is influenced by changes (i) in the relative contents of organic matter fractions and (ii) in the delta(13)C of respired CO(2). The delta(13)C values of bulk matter, extractive-free matter, lignin, holocellulose, starch, soluble sugars, water-soluble fraction and respired CO(2), as well as their relative contents in bulk matter were determined. The delta(13)C values of biochemical fractions and respired CO(2) showed very similar temporal variations for both leaves and twigs. Variations in bulk matter delta(13)C during growth were, therefore, poorly explained by changes in biochemical composition or in respiratory fractionation and were attributed to the transition from (13)C-enriched reserves (mainly starch) to (13)C-depleted new photoassimilates. The divergence between leaves and twigs was related to higher values of soluble sugar delta(13)C in twigs. However, the difference between lignin and holocellulose delta(13)C varied during growth. This phenomenon was attributed to the delay between holocellulose and lignin deposition. These results may have implications for analysis of organic matter delta(13)C in trees and forest ecosystems.

  5. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, S.H.; Cheng, M.; Li, Z.X.

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  6. 77 FR 27855 - Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard America! Holdings, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard...., d/b/a All Aboard America AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice Tentatively Approving and Authorizing Transaction. SUMMARY: All Aboard America! Holdings, Inc. (AHI), Celerity AHI...

  7. Mississippi Delta, Radar Image with Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the animation

    About the animation: This simulated view of the potential effects of storm surge flooding on Lake Pontchartrain and the New Orleans area was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Although it is protected by levees and sea walls against storm surges of 18 to 20 feet, much of the city is below sea level, and flooding due to storm surges caused by major hurricanes is a concern. The animation shows regions that, if unprotected, would be inundated with water. The animation depicts flooding in one-meter increments.

    About the image: The geography of the New Orleans and Mississippi delta region is well shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. In this image, bright areas show regions of high radar reflectivity, such as from urban areas, and elevations have been coded in color using height data also from the mission. Dark green colors indicate low elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    New Orleans is situated along the southern shore of Lake Pontchartrain, the large, roughly circular lake near the center of the image. The line spanning the lake is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway, the world's longest over water highway bridge. Major portions of the city of New Orleans are below sea level, and although it is protected by levees and sea walls, flooding during storm surges associated with major hurricanes is a significant concern.

    Data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data

  8. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin; McDonald, Fiona J.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  9. Delta hepatitis agent: structural and antigenic properties of the delta-associated particle.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Hoyer, B; Shih, J W; Rizzetto, M; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1984-01-01

    Delta agent (delta) was serially passaged to a second and third hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier chimpanzee, using as inoculum the peak delta antigen (delta Ag) serum of an animal previously infected with human serum. The characteristics of serially transmitted delta Ag were similar to those described in first-passage animals. It was consistently detected before the development of anti-delta, in association with a 35- to 37-nm subpopulation of HBsAg particles and a unique low-molecular-weight (5.5 X 10(5)) RNA. RNase susceptibility of the delta-associated RNA and release of delta Ag activity upon treatment of delta-associated particles with detergent revealed that this particle is organized into a virion-like form with the RNA and delta Ag as internal components within a coat of HBsAg. Surface determinants of the delta-associated particle other than HBsAg were not detected by radioimmunoprecipitation experiments, using sera of humans and chimpanzees convalescent from delta hepatitis. The HBsAg-associated particle is the "candidate agent" of delta hepatitis. Images PMID:6698598

  10. Quaternary geology and geomorphology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California: evolution and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, E.; Maier, K. L.; Holzer, T. L.; Knudsen, K. L.; Olson, H.; Pagenknopp, M.; Ponti, D. J.; Rosa, C.; Tinsley, J. C.; Wan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (~1,400 km2) is a combination of tidal marsh, islands and agricultural lands at the confluence of the Sacramento and the San Joaquin Rivers, in northern California. Most of the Delta islands are now 3 to 8 m below sea-level and must be protected by levees from inundation. Because of the Delta's crucial role in conveying fresh water to the State, levee failures can cause substantial economic loss by disrupting this supply. Understanding the evolution of the Delta is fundamental to assess the vulnerability of the Delta islands to seismically-induced levee failure. The modern Delta is a young geological feature that began forming during the middle Holocene. Preceding versions of the Delta hosted a variety of depositional environments as sea level fluctuated, responding to climatically-controlled changes. The rising sea reached the Delta about 8,000 years ago, and modern deltaic evolution continued into Holocene time until present. More accurate stratigraphic studies incorporating depositional ages are required to i) better understand the late Quaternary evolution of the Delta, ii) trace the base of Holocene deposits, iii) identify potentially active faults, and iv) evaluate liquefaction hazard for the Delta . This study uses the large amount of data available on the Delta (collected by the California Department of Water Resources and others during the past 30 years) and merges them into a unified dataset. We have produced a database that includes historic and surficial maps, aerial photographs, boreholes, and CPT data, for the purpose of clarifying the nature of the Quaternary deposits and the evolution of the Late Quaternary Delta. Additionally, we have identified recently discovered Pleistocene tephra as the Rockland ash, ~0.575 Ma, and the Loleta ash, ~0.40-0.37 Ma, which have improved stratigraphic correlations and assessment of subsidence rates. Delta sediments include sequences of glacial and interglacial deposits. Borehole logs

  11. Delta 2 Explosion Plume Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.

    2000-01-01

    A Delta II rocket exploded seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on 17 January 1997. The cloud produced by the explosion provided an opportunity to evaluate the models which are used to track potentially toxic dispersing plumes and clouds at CCAFS. The primary goal of this project was to conduct a case study of the dispersing cloud and the models used to predict the dispersion resulting from the explosion. The case study was conducted by comparing mesoscale and dispersion model results with available meteorological and plume observations. This study was funded by KSC under Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) option hours. The models used in the study are part of the Eastern Range Dispersion Assessment System (ERDAS) and include the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), HYbrid Particle And Concentration Transport (HYPACT), and Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM). The primary observations used for explosion cloud verification of the study were from the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar 1988-Doppler (WSR-88D). Radar reflectivity measurements of the resulting cloud provided good estimates of the location and dimensions of the cloud over a four-hour period after the explosion. The results indicated that RAMS and HYPACT models performed reasonably well. Future upgrades to ERDAS are recommended.

  12. Adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ahmet; Tuzen, Mustafa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite (EP) from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in pH of solution, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature of solution. For the adsorption of both metal ions, the Langmuir isotherm model fitted to equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. Using the Langmuir model equation, the monolayer adsorption capacity of EP was found to be 8.62 and 13.39 mg/g for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model was also applied to the equilibrium data and the mean free energies of adsorption were found as 10.82 kJ/mol for Cu(II) and 9.12 kJ/mol for Pb(II) indicating that the adsorption of both metal ions onto EP was taken place by chemical ion-exchange. Thermodynamic functions, the change of free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) of adsorption were also calculated for each metal ions. These parameters showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto EP was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 20-50 degrees C. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that adsorption process for both metal ions followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  13. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  14. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired. PMID:24483559

  15. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-04-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  16. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  17. Advanced water iodinating system. [for potable water aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water stores aboard manned spacecraft must remain sterile. Suitable sterilization techniques are needed to prevent microbial growth. The development of an advanced water iodinating system for possible application to the shuttle orbiter and other advanced spacecraft, is considered. The AWIS provides a means of automatically dispensing iodine and controlling iodination levels in potable water stores. In a recirculation mode test, simulating application of the AWIS to a water management system of a long term six man capacity space mission, noniodinated feed water flowing at 32.2 cu cm min was iodinated to 5 + or - ppm concentrations after it was mixed with previously iodinated water recirculating through a potable water storage tank. Also, the AWIS was used to successfully demonstrate its capability to maintain potable water at a desired I2 concentration level while circulating through the water storage tank, but without the addition of noniodinated water.

  18. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen

    1997-01-10

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  19. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Uri, John J; Haven, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  20. New mud gas monitoring system aboard D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yusuke; Inagaki, Fumio; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Igarashi, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Mud gas logging has been commonly used in oil industry and continental scientific drilling to detect mainly hydrocarbon gases from the reservoir formation. Quick analysis of the gas provides almost real-time information which is critical to evaluate the formation and, in particular, safety of drilling operation. Furthermore, mud gas monitoring complements the lack of core or fluid samples particularly in a deep hole, and strengthen interpretations of geophysical logs. In scientific ocean drilling, on the other hand, mud gas monitoring was unavailable in riserless drilling through the history of DSDP and ODP, until riser drilling was first carried out in 2009 by D/V Chikyu. In IODP Exp 319, GFZ installed the same system with that used in continental drilling aboard Chikyu. High methane concentrations are clearly correlated with increased wood content in the cuttings. The system installation was, however, temporary and gas separator was moved during the expedition for a technical reason. In 2011, new mud gas monitoring system was installed aboard Chikyu and was used for the first time in Exp 337. The gas separator was placed on a newly branched bypass mud flow line, and the gas sample was sent to analysis unit equipped with methane carbon isotope analyzer in addition to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph. The data from the analytical instruments is converted to depth profiles by calculating the lag effects due to mud circulation. Exp 337 was carried out from July 26 to Sep 30, 2011, at offshore Shimokita peninsula, northeast Japan, targeting deep sub-seafloor biosphere in and around coal bed. Data from the hole C0020A, which was drilled to 2466 mbsf with riser drilling, provided insights into bio-geochemical process through the depth of the hole. In this presentation, we show the design of Chikyu's new mud gas monitoring system, with preliminary data from Exp 337.

  1. Accomplishments in Bioastronautics Research Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 16 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crew members and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes, muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; and changes in immune function. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS . Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  2. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uri, John J.; Haven, Cynthia P.

    2005-05-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  3. Crab allergen exposures aboard five crab-processing vessels.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Nancy; Brodkin, C Andrew; Stover, Bert; Daroowalla, Feroza; Flack, Joy; Doherty, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Aerosolized crab allergens are suspected etiologic agents for asthma among crab-processing workers. The objectives of this study were to characterize crab allergen concentrations and respiratory symptom prevalence among processing workers aboard crab-processing vessels. A cross-sectional survey of five crab-processing vessels was conducted near Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Crab allergen concentrations were quantified during specific work activities with 25 personal air samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene filters and analyzed by a competitive IgE immunoassay technique. Two standardized respiratory questionnaires were used to assess respiratory symptoms suggestive of bronchitis or asthma in 82 workers. Aerosolized crab allergen concentrations ranged from 79 ng/m3 to 21,093 ng/m3 (mean = 2797 ng/m3, SD = 4576 ng/m3). The highest concentrations were measured at butchering/degilling work stations, which were combined on the smallest vessel. A significant percentage of workers reported development of respiratory symptoms during the crab-processing season. Cough developed in 28% of workers, phlegm in 11% of workers, and wheeze and other asthma-like symptoms developed in 4% of workers. Despite variations in crab allergen levels, respiratory symptom prevalence was similar across all job categories. Substantial concentrations of crab allergen exposure were measured, as well as the potential for wide variability in exposure during crab processing aboard vessels. The high prevalence of reported respiratory symptoms across all job categories suggests potential adverse respiratory effects that should be further characterized by prospective studies using pulmonary function and serology testing, and rigorous exposure characterization.

  4. Structural Analysis of the QCM Aboard the ER-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Phyllis D.; Bainum, Peter M.; Xing, Guangqian

    1997-01-01

    As a result of recent supersonic transport (SST) studies on the effect they may have on the atmosphere, several experiments have been proposed to capture and evaluate samples of the stratosphere where SST's travel. One means to achieve this is to utilize the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) installed aboard the ER-2, formerly the U-2 reconnaissance aircraft. The QCM is a cascade impactor designed to perform in-situ, real-time measurements of aerosols and chemical vapors at an altitude of 60,000 - 70,000 feet. The ER-2 is primarily used by NASA for Earth resources to test new sensor systems before they are placed aboard satellites. One of the main reasons the ER-2 is used for this flight experiment is its capability to fly approximately twelve miles above sea level (can reach an altitude of 78,000 feet). Because the ER-2 operates at such a high altitude, it is of special interest to scientists interested in space exploration or supersonic aircraft. Some of the experiments are designed to extract data from the atmosphere around the ER-2. For the current flight experiment, the QCM is housed in a frame that is connected to an outer pod that is attached to the fuselage of the ER-2. Due to the location of the QCM within the housing frame and the location of the pod on the ER-2, the pod and its contents are subject to structural loads. In addition to structural loads, structural vibrations are also of importance because the QCM is a frequency induced instrument. Therefore, a structural analysis of the instrument within the frame is imperative to determine if resonance and/or undesirable deformations occur.

  5. From Natural to Design River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Productive and biologically diverse, deltaic lowlands attracted humans since prehistory and may have spurred the emergence of the first urban civilizations. Deltas continued to be an important nexus for economic development across the world and are currently home for over half a billion people. But recently, under the double whammy of sea level rise and inland sediment capture behind dams, they have become the most threatened coastal landscape. Here I will address several deceptively simple questions to sketch some unexpected answers using example deltas from across the world from the Arctic to the Tropics, from the Danube to the Indus, Mississippi to Godavari and Krishna, Mackenzie to Yukon. What is a river delta? What is natural and what is not in a river delta? Are the geological and human histories of a delta important for its current management? Is maintaining a delta the same to building a new one? Can we design better deltas than Nature? These answers help us see clearly that survival of deltas in the next century depends on human intervention and is neither assured nor simple to address or universally applicable. Empirical observations on the hydrology, geology, biology and biochemistry of deltas are significantly lagging behind modeling capabilities endangering the applicability of numerical-based reconstruction solutions and need to be ramped up significantly and rapidly across the world.

  6. Urinary excretion profiles of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Study III. A Delta9-THC-COOH to creatinine ratio study.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2003-11-26

    Huestis and Cone reported in [J. Anal. Toxicol. 22 (1998) 445] that serial monitoring of Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratios in paired urine specimens collected at least 24h apart could differentiate new drug use from residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH excretion following acute marijuana use in a controlled setting. The best accuracy (85.4%) for predicting new marijuana use was for a Delta(9)-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio > or = 0.5 (dividing the Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen no. 2 by the specimen no. 1 ratio). In previous studies in this laboratory [J. Anal. Toxicol. 23 (1999) 531 and Forensic Sci. Int. 133 (2003) 26], urine specimens were collected from chronic marijuana users > or = 24 h or > = 48 h apart in an uncontrolled setting. Subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use were screened for cannabinoids with the EMIT II Plus cannabinoids assay (cut-off 50 ng/ml) followed by confirmation for Delta9-THC-COOH by GC-MS (cut-off 15 ng/ml). Creatinine was analyzed as an index of dilution. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether creatinine corrected specimens could differentiate new marijuana or hashish use from the excretion of residual Delta(9)-THC-COOH in chronic marijuana users based on the Huestis 0.5 ratio. Urine specimens (N=376) were collected from 29 individuals > or = 96 h between urine collections. The mean urinary Delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 464.4 ng/ml, mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio (ng/(ml Delta9-THC-COOH mmoll creatinine)) was 36.8 and the overall mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen 2/mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratio of specimen 1 was 1.37. The Huestis ratio calculation indicated new drug use in 83% of all sequentially paired urine specimens. The data were sub-divided into three groups (Groups A-C) based on mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine values. Interindividual mean Delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine values ranged from 4.7 to 13.4 in Group A where 80% of paired specimens indicated new drug use (N=10

  7. Comments on the slip factor and the relation Delta phi = -h Delta theta

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The definition of the slip factor can be obtained from the phase equation. However, a derivation using the relation {Delta}{phi} = -h{Delta}{theta} leads to a different slip-factor definition. This apparent paradox is examined in detail and resolved. Here {Delta}{phi} is the rf phase difference and {Delta}{theta} is the azimuthal phase difference around the accelerator ring between an off-momentum particle and the synchronous particle, while h is the rf harmonic.

  8. The hepatitis delta virus and its infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzeto, M.; Gerin, J.L.; Purcell, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Replication of the Genome of Hepatitis Delta Virus; Clinical Significance of HDV RNA in HDV Disease; HBV DNA in Delta Chronic Carriers; Prevalance of HBV-DNA Among Anti-Hd Positive Patients; and Characterization of LKM/sub 1/ and LKM/sub 2/ Antigens.

  9. Wave-angle control of delta evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2011-07-01

    Wave-influenced deltas, with large-scale arcuate shapes and demarcated beach ridge complexes, often display an asymmetrical form about their river channel. Here, we use a numerical model to demonstrate that the angles from which waves approach a delta can have a first-order influence upon its plan-view morphologic evolution and sedimentary architecture. The directional spread of incoming waves plays a dominant role over fluvial sediment discharge in controlling the width of an active delta lobe, which in turn affects the characteristic rates of delta progradation. Oblique wave approach (and a consequent net alongshore sediment transport) can lead to the development of morphologic asymmetry about the river in a delta's plan-view form. This plan-form asymmetry can include the development of discrete breaks in shoreline orientation and the appearance of self-organized features arising from shoreline instability along the downdrift delta flank, such as spits and migrating shoreline sand waves—features observed on natural deltas. Somewhat surprisingly, waves approaching preferentially from one direction tend to increase sediment deposition updrift of the river. This ‘morphodynamic groin effect’ occurs when the delta's plan-form aspect ratio is sufficiently large such that the orientation of the shoreline on the downdrift flank is rotated past the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport, resulting in preferential redirection of fluvial sediment updrift of the river mouth.

  10. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  11. Delta WIND Mission Science Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The science objectives of the WIND mission are to: 1) provide complete plasma, energetic particle, and magnetic field input for magnetospheric and ionospheric studies; 2) Determine the magnetospheric output to interplanetary space in the up-stream region; 3) Investigate basic plasma processes occurring in the near-Earth solar wind; and 4) Provide baseline ecliptic plane observations to be used in heliospheric latitudes from ULYSSES. The WIND science briefing is presented by George Diller, NASA public affairs; Dr. Robert L. Carovillano, Project Scientist for the Global Geospace Science Initiative, NASA Headquarters; Dr. Mario H. Acuna, Project Scientist for the WIND Project, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC); Dr. Keith W. Ogilvie, Principle Investigator, Solar Wind Experiment at GSFC; Dr. Jean Louis Bougeret, Principle Investigator, Radio/Plasma Wave Experiment, Paris; and Dr. Eugeny Mazets, Co-Principle Investigator, Russian Gamma Ray Spectrometer Instrument, St. Pertersburg, Russia. Dr. Carovillano presents a cartoon slide of the Solar Terrestrial System and describes the Sun and the Magnetic field of the Earth. Dr. Acuna also presents a cartoon slide describing GEOTAIL, POLAR, WIND, SOHO, ULYSSES and Cluster which are the various tools used to study the complex solar terrestrial system. Dr. Ogilvie explains four particle and wave instruments on WIND. These instruments will be used to study the contributions and characteristics of plasma and plasma waves that occur in the solar wind. Dr. Bougeret explains the European participation in the WIND mission. He also shows a slide presentation of SOHO and the CLUSTER spacecraft. Dr. Mazets explains the main objective of the Transient Gamma Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) aboard the WIND spacecraft, which is to perform high resolution measurements of Gamma Ray Burst spectra and time histories, with emphasis on the search for line features in the energy spectra. The briefing ends with a question and answer period. See NONP

  12. Gemini 12 crew receive Official welcome aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, receive Official welcome as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after their splashdown at the end of the Gemini 12 mission.

  13. ISS Update: Launching Aboard the Soyuz to Live on the Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Mike Fossum, astronaut and Commander of Expedition 29, about his Soyuz launch experience and his insight into life aboard the station. Question...

  14. The determination of equilibrium constants, DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS for vapour interaction with a pharmaceutical drug, using gravimetric vapour sorption.

    PubMed

    Willson, Richard J; Beezer, Anthony E

    2003-06-01

    The application of gravimetric vapour sorption (GVS) to the characterisation of pharmaceutical drugs is often restricted to the study of gross behaviour such as a measure of hygroscopicity. Although useful in early development of a drug substance, for example, in salt selection screening exercises, such types of analysis may not contribute to a fundamental understanding of the properties of the material. This paper reports a new methodology for GVS experimentation that will allow specific sorption parameters to be calculated; equilibrium constant (K), van't Hoff enthalpy change (DeltaH(v)), Gibbs free energy for sorption (DeltaG) and the entropy change for sorption (DeltaS). Unlike other reports of such type of analysis that require the application of a specific model, this method is model free. The analysis does require that over the narrow temperature range of the study DeltaH(v) is constant and there is no change in interaction mechanism.

  15. AgCl detectors in the Biostack II experiment aboard Apollo 17.

    PubMed

    Henig, G; Schopper, E; Schott, J U; Ruther, W

    1974-01-01

    Two layers of AgCl detectors with a total surface of 90 cm2 were flown. Tracks of nuclei, from light (Z>4) up to the heaviest were recorded and could be distinguished by their geometrical trackwidths. The tracks were divided into five groups of atomic numbers, and their abundance was measured. Also the number of surviving nuclear stars was counted. 22.5 cm2 of the detector surface were covered with eggs of Artemia salina. The detectors could be developed without removing the eggs, so that the spots hit could be determined directly. The radiation effect on these eggs is being investigated.

  16. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  17. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  18. 78 FR 53127 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Date change. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory...

  19. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers.

  20. Influence of different organic fertilizers on quality parameters and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of orange fruit (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Paolo; Camin, Federica; Fabroni, Simona; Perini, Matteo; Torrisi, Biagio; Intrigliolo, Francesco

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the influence of different types of fertilizers on quality parameters, N-containing compounds, and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta (34)S, and delta(18)O values of citrus fruit, a study was performed on the orange fruit cv. 'Valencia late' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), which was harvested in four plots (three organic and one conventional) located on the same farm. The results demonstrated that different types of organic fertilizers containing the same amount of nitrogen did not effect important changes in orange fruit quality parameters. The levels of total N and N-containing compounds such as synephrine in fruit juice were not statistically different among the different treatments. The delta(15)N values of orange fruit grown under fertilizer derived from animal origin as well as from vegetable compost were statistically higher than those grown with mineral fertilizer. Therefore, delta(15)N values can be used as an indicator of citrus fertilization management (organic or conventional), because even when applied organic fertilizers are of different origins, the natural abundance of (15)N in organic citrus fruit remains higher than in conventional ones. These treatments also did not effect differences in the delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of fruit.

  1. The SAGE III's mission aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael; Thomason, Larry; Zawodny, Joseph; Flittner, David; Hill, Charles; Roell, Marilee; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) is being prepared for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015. Constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument is undergoing extensive testing and refurbishment prior to delivery to ISS. In addition, ESA is refurbishing their Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads, particularly SAGE III. The SAGE III instrument refurbishment also includes the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument performance degradation during the SAGE III mission aboard METEOR/3M mission (2002-2005). We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss SAGE III-ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing. We also will discuss potential revisions to the science measurements and the expected measurement accuracies determined in part through examination of the SAGE III-METEOR/3M measurement data quality. In addition, we will discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit. No dedicated field campaign for SAGE III validation is anticipated. Instead, validation will primarily rely on a collaborative effort with international groups making in situ and ground-based measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other SAGE III data products. A limited balloon-based effort with a yet-to-be-determined validation partner is also in the planning stages.

  2. Global map based on the FIMS observations aboard STSAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS), a dual-channel instrument with 900 - 1150 A and 1350 - 1750 A passbands, was launched aboard the Korean microsatellite STSAT-1 on 2003 September 27. FIMS, with moderate spectral and angular resolutions while maintaining large fields of view, was optimized for observations of diffuse emissions such as those from hot gases in our Galaxy. About 70 percent of the sky was covered after 18 months of survey with sufficient exposure time for the long wavelength band. The dataset has been used to study the interaction between the hot gas and the cold component as well as the molecular hydrogen fluorescence emission for a variety of targets. Furthermore, it was successfully used to determine the optical properties of dust scattering and thereby the distances for several prominent clouds from the continuum observations. In the present paper, the global distribution of ion and molecular hydrogen lines will be presented although the coverage of the sky is somewhat limited. For example, topics such as the ion lines distribution in the Galactic halo regions and correlation of molecular hydrogen with dust or CO will be discussed.

  3. New Mobile Lidar Systems Aboard Ultra-Light Aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, Patrick; Shang, Xiaoxia; Totems, Julien; Marnas, Fabien; Sanak, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Two lidar systems embedded on ultra light aircraft (ULA) flew over the Rhone valley, south-east of France, to characterize the vertical extend of pollution aerosols in this area influenced by large industrial sites. The main industrial source is the Etang de Berre (43°28' N, 5°01' E), close to Marseille city. The emissions are mainly due to metallurgy and petrochemical factories. Traffic related to Marseille's area contribute to pollution with its ~1500000 inhabitants. Note that the maritime traffic close to Marseille may play an important role due to its position as the leading French harbor . For the previous scientific purpose and for the first time on ULA, we flew a mini-N2 Raman lidar system to help the assessment of the aerosol optical properties. Another Ultra-Violet Rayleigh-Mie lidar has been integrated aboard a second ULA. The lidars are compact and eye safe instruments. They operate at the wavelength of 355 nm with a sampling along the line-of-sight of 0.75 m. Different flights plans were tested to use the two lidars in synergy. We will present the different approaches and discuss both their advantages and limitations. Acknowledgements: the lidar systems have been developed by CEA. They have been deployed with the support of FERRING France. We acknowledge the ULA pilots Franck Toussaint, François Bernard and José Coutet, and the Air Creation ULA Company for logistical help during the ULA campaign.

  4. A new small Stirling engine prototype for auxiliary employments aboard

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.

    1995-12-31

    The development of a small size Stirling engine as low power system for auxiliary employments aboard sailing boats or caravan still appears interesting. In previous papers the author presented the design, the prototype construction and the experimental tests of a monocylinder P-type configuration with the regenerator and part of the heat exchangers set on the displacer; the heat was irradiated by the head and it was removed by the water circulating through the rod of the displacer and around the cylinder. Considerable reductions in dead volume and global dimensions were obtained. At the same time, however, the weight of the heat exchanger regenerator displacer, mainly due to the cooler, kept the speed of revolution from increasing, with consequent limitation of specific power value; furthermore thermal insulation between hot and cold ends and displacer rod seals proved to be critical features as far as reliability is concerned. A new prototype has been developed adopting {gamma}-type configuration with stationary heat exchangers and with the displacer connecting rod linked to the crankshaft by means of an epicyclic train able to make its movement linear thus eliminating rod seal side loadings. The paper deals with the criteria followed with the design and the prototype construction; the adopted technical solutions are shown and discussed.

  5. The solid surface combustion experiment aboard the USML-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Sacksteder, Kurt; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Ramachandra, Prashant A.; Tang, Lin; Wolverton, M. Katherine

    1994-01-01

    AA Experimental results from the five experiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. An experiment was conducted aboard STS-50/USML-1 in the solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) hardware for flame spread over a thin cellulosic fuel in a quiescent oxidizer of 35% oxygen/65% nitrogen at 1.0 atm. pressure in microgravity. The USML-1 test was the fourth of five planned experiments for thin fuels, one performed during each of five Space Shuttle Orbiter flights. Data that were gathered include gas- and solid-phase temperatures and motion picture flame images. Observations of the flame are described and compared to theoretical predictions from steady and unsteady models that include flame radiation from CO2 and H2O. Experimental results from the five esperiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. The brightness of the flame and the visible soot radiation also increase with increasing spread rate. Steady-state numerical predictions of temperature and spread rate and flame structure trends compare well with experimental results near the flame's leading edge while gradual flame evolution is captured through the unsteady model.

  6. Dwarf Wheat grown aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dwarf wheat were photographed aboard the International Space Station in April 2002. Lessons from on-orbit research on plants will have applications to terrestrial agriculture as well as for long-term space missions. Alternative agricultural systems that can efficiently produce greater quantities of high-quality crops in a small area are important for future space expeditions. Also regenerative life-support systems that include plants will be an important component of long-term space missions. Data from the Biomass Production System (BPS) and the Photosynthesis Experiment and System Testing and Operations (PESTO) will advance controlled-environment agricultural systems and will help farmers produce better, healthier crops in a small area. This same knowledge is critical to closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The BPS comprises a miniature environmental control system for four plant growth chambers, all in the volume of two space shuttle lockers. The experience with the BPS on orbit is providing valuable design and operational lessons that will be incorporated into the Plant Growth Units. The objective of PESTO was to flight verify the BPS hardware and to determine how the microgravity environment affects the photosynthesis and metabolic function of Super Dwarf wheat and Brassica rapa (a member of the mustard family).

  7. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rosko, R.J.; Loughin, S.

    1997-01-01

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Understand {Delta}P and {Delta}T in turbulent flow heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-06-01

    This article attempts to lead the reader down a clear path to the approximate optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) for the most important class of heat exchangers--those with turbulent flow, no phase change, and fluids and flow rates that are similar on both the hot and cold sides. The optimum {Delta}P and {Delta}T are presented in two frameworks: equations for quantitatively estimating the {Delta}P and {Delta}T from fluid properties, the price of energy, the price of heat exchange surface, and the equivalent diameter; and ratios of the bills (i.e., costs) for the {Delta}P and {Delta}T in an optimized design to the bill (i.e., value) for incremental heat exchanger area. The equations can be used in heat exchanger specification. The ratios provide a guide for the designer when the process flowsheet is constructed. As discussed later, these ratios suggest that the engineer should consider the {Delta}P and {Delta}T costs as more important than the capital spent on the heat exchanger.

  9. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  10. Enhancing the understanding of earthworm feeding behaviour via the use of fatty acid delta13C values determined by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dungait, Jennifer A J; Briones, Maria J I; Bol, Roland; Evershed, Richard P

    2008-06-01

    Litter-dwelling (epigeic) Lumbricus rubellus and soil-dwelling (endogeic) Allolobophora chlorotica earthworms were observed aggregating under C(3) (delta(13)C = -31.3 per thousand; delta(15)N = 10.7 per thousand) and C(4) (delta(13)C = -12.6 per thousand; delta(15)N = 7.5 per thousand) synthetic dung pats applied to a temperate grassland (delta(13)C = -30.3 per thousand; delta(15)N = 5.7 per thousand) in an experiment carried out for 372 days. Bulk delta(13)C values of earthworms collected from beneath either C(3) or C(4) dung after 28, 56, 112 and 372 days demonstrated that (i) L. rubellus beneath C(4) dung were significantly (13)C-enriched after 56 days (delta(13)C = -23.8 per thousand) and 112 days (delta(13)C = -22.4 per thousand) compared with those from C(3) dung treatments (56 days, delta(13)C = -26.5 per thousand; 112 days, delta(13)C = -27.0 per thousand), and (ii) A. chlorotica were 2.1 per thousand (13)C-enriched (delta(13)C = -24.2 per thousand) relative to those from C(3) dung (delta(13)C = -26.3 per thousand) treatments after 372 days. Bulk delta(15)N values did not suggest significant uptake of dung N by either species beneath C(3) or C(4) dung, but showed that the endogeic species (total mean delta(15)N = 3.3 per thousand) had higher delta(15)N values than the epigeic species (total mean delta(15)N = 5.4 per thousand). Although the two species exhibited similar fatty acid profiles, individual fatty acid delta(13)C values revealed extensive routing of dietary C into body tissue of L. rubellus, but minor incorporation into A. chlorotica. In particular, the direct incorporation of microbial biomarker fatty acids (iC(17:0), aC(17:0)) from (13)C-labelled dung in situ, the routing of dung C into de novo synthesised compounds (iC(20:4)(omega)(6),C(20:5)(omega)(3), and the assimilation of essential fatty acids ((C(18:1)(omega)(9), C(18:1)(omega(7), C(18:2)(omega(6), C(18:3)(omega)(3)) derived from dung, were determined.

  11. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Akinpelu, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  12. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  13. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  14. Contemporary depositional environments of the Omo delta.

    PubMed

    Butzer, K W

    1970-05-01

    Geomorphological and sedimentological studies of depositional environments of the modern Omo River delta and floodplain are essential to an understanding of the Pliocene to Pleistocene Mursi, Nkalabong and Kibish Formations of the Lower Omo Basin (southwestern Ethiopia).

  15. Investigating the spatial distribution of water levels in the Mackenzie Delta using airborne LiDAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkinson, C.; Crasto, N.; Marsh, P.; Forbes, D.; Lesack, L.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data were used to map water level (WL) and hydraulic gradients (??H/??x) in the Mackenzie Delta. The LiDAR WL data were validated against eight independent hydrometric gauge measurements and demonstrated mean offsets from - 0??22 to + 0??04 m (??< 0??11). LiDAR-based WL gradients could be estimated with confidence over channel lengths exceeding 5-10 km where the WL change exceeded local noise levels in the LiDAR data. For the entire Delta, the LiDAR sample coverage indicated a rate of change in longitudinal gradient (??2H/??x) of 5??5 ?? 10-10 m m-2; therefore offering a potential means to estimate average flood stage hydraulic gradient for areas of the Delta not sampled or monitored. In the Outer Delta, within-channel and terrain gradient measurements all returned a consistent estimate of - 1 ?? 10-5 m m-1, suggesting that this is a typical hydraulic gradient for the downstream end of the Delta. For short reaches (<10 km) of the Peel and Middle Channels in the middle of the Delta, significant and consistent hydraulic gradient estimates of - 5 ?? 10-5 m m-1 were observed. Evidence that hydraulic gradients can vary over short distances, however, was observed in the Peel Channel immediately upstream of Aklavik. A positive elevation anomaly (bulge) of > 0??1 m was observed at a channel constriction entering a meander bend, suggesting a localized modification of the channel hydraulics. Furthermore, water levels in the anabranch channels of the Peel River were almost 1 m higher than in Middle Channel of the Mackenzie River. This suggests: (i) the channels are elevated and have shallower bank heights in this part of the delta, leading to increased cross-delta and along-channel hydraulic gradients; and/or (ii) a proportion of the Peel River flow is lost to Middle Channel due to drainage across the delta through anastamosing channels. This study has demonstrated that airborne LiDAR data contain valuable information describing

  16. delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope ratios in amphetamine synthesized from benzaldehyde and nitroethane.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael; Salouros, Helen; Cawley, Adam T; Robertson, James; Heagney, Aaron C; Arenas-Queralt, Andrea

    2010-06-15

    Previous work in these laboratories and by Butzenlechner et al. and Culp et al. has demonstrated that the delta(2)H isotope value of industrial benzaldehyde produced by the catalytic oxidation of toluene is profoundly positive, usually in the range +300 per thousand to +500 per thousand. Synthetic routes leading to amphetamine, methylamphetamine or their precursors and commencing with such benzaldehyde may be expected to exhibit unusually positive delta(2)H values. Results are presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values of 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene synthesized from an industrial source of benzaldehyde, having a positive delta(2)H isotope value, by a Knoevenagel condensation with nitroethane. Results are also presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values for amphetamine prepared from the resulting 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene. The values obtained were compared with delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values obtained for an amphetamine sample prepared using a synthetic route that did not involve benzaldehyde. Finally, results are presented for samples of benzaldehyde, 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene and amphetamine that had been seized at a clandestine amphetamine laboratory.

  17. Migration in Vulnerable Deltas: A Research Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, C.; Nicholls, R. J.; Allan, A.

    2015-12-01

    C. Hutton1, & R. J. Nicholls1, , 1 University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO17 1BJ. cwh@geodata. soton.ac.ukAbstractGlobally, deltas contain 500 million people and with rising sea levels often linked to large number of forced migrants are expected in the coming century. However, migration is already a major process in deltas, such as the growth of major cities such as Dhaka and Kolkata. Climate and environmental change interacts with a range of catchment and delta level drivers, which encompass a nexus of sea-level rise, storms, freshwater and sediment supply from the catchment, land degradation, subsidence, agricultural loss and socio-economic stresses. DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation/CARRIA) is investigating migration in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM), Mahanadi and Volta Deltas, including the influence of climate change. The research will explore migration from a range of perspectives including governance and stakeholder analysis, demographic analysis, household surveys of sending and receiving areas, macro-economic analysis, and hazards and hotspot analysis both historically and into the future. Migration under climate change will depend on other adaptation in the deltas and this will be examined. Collectively, integrated analysis will be developed to examine migration, other adaptation and development pathways with a particular focus on the implications for the poorest. This will require the development of input scenarios, including expert-derived exogenous scenarios (e.g., climate change) and endogenous scenarios of the delta developed in a participatory manner. This applied research will facilitate decision support methods for the development of deltas under climate change, with a focus on migration and other adaptation strategies.

  18. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Lisjak, I; Vekić, B; Poje, M; Planinić, J

    2008-02-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 microSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 microSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 microSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 microSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  19. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Lisjak, I; Vekić, B; Poje, M; Planinić, J

    2008-02-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 microSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 microSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 microSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 microSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data. PMID:17935999

  20. Interpopulation study of medical attendance aboard a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Nahorski, Wacław Leszek

    2008-01-01

    The study carried out aboard a cruise ship in the years 1993-1998 involved ship passengers of various nationalities including 3872 Germans aged 23-94 years and 1281 Americans aged 25-94 years. Both nationality groups were divided into two age subgroups: till 64, and 65-94 years. The German younger age subgroup (mean age 53.2 years) consisted of 59% of the passengers, whereas the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 72 years) was made up of 41% of the ships passengers. On the other hand, 73% of the Americans belonged to the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 73,4 years), whereas 27% to the younger one (mean age 52.8 years). The number of onboard consultations and their causes were determined. The occurrence of chronic illnesses in both 65-94 years subgroups was assessed by means of a questionnaire. A higher frequency of consultations was found in the Germans (24.38%) than in the Americans (14.05%) (p=0.001). The difference was particularly striking in the people over 65 years of age (30.87% of the Germans as compared with 14.22% of the Americans, p=0.001). The Germans were nearly 4-times more frequently seen than the Americans for cardio-vascular diseases and almost 3-times more often because of gastrointestinal disorders. The discrepancies in the consultation rates were mainly caused by the different insurance systems of both nations. Chronic illnesses as estimated by means of the questionnaire prevailed in the German passengers. The statistically significant differences (13.3% versus 20%, p=0.01 and 0.001) regarded the locomotor system, urinary tract diseases and a group of illnesses including neurological, ophthalmological, ear, skin, malignant diseases and diabetes.

  1. Mobilization of Arsenic in Groundwater of Holocene Delta, Indian Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, D.

    2007-12-01

    Recent incidences of high arsenic exposure from drinking water and human suffering in SE Asia notably in Bengal Delta Plain (BDP) appear to be quite different from the global scenario. The source of arsenic in groundwater of BDP is considered to be geogenic and mostly restricted to Holocene sediments. Several models (oxidation of As-rich pyrite, reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-Fe(II) systems, anion exchange of sorbed As mostly phosphate) have been put forward. However, the models have their own weakness and the paper deals with such discrepancies to focus the arsenic sourcing (primary, secondary and tertiary), release mechanism and mobilization in Holocene deltas. The paper also deals with groundwater quality and (hydro) chemistry vis-a-vis alluvial Holocene sediment. The stratigraphic profiling indicates that the shallow aquifers (< 40m) are significant contributors (~91 percent, n = 497) of high arsenic in groundwater. The major hydrochemical features are low Eh (range: - 149-37 mv; mean: - 53mv) and nitrate (range 0.001- 1.72; mean 0.13 mg/L) followed by high alkalinity (range 100 - 630 mg/L; mean 280 mg/L), iron (1.23- 38.4, mean 7.48 mg/L), phosphate (range 0.002 - 3. 99 mg/L; mean 0.56 mg/L), hardness (range 46-490 mg/L; mean 235) and sulphate (0.28 - 48.62 mg/L; mean 6.43 mg/L). Groundwater (hydro) chemistry indicates that the affected aquifers are reducing in nature. The four different local situations (sanitation, surface water bodies, land use and sanitation coupled with eco-system) are identified and most important is sanitation where groundwater arsenic concentration is highest (up to 1180 mg/L) among the different local situation. Arsenic hotspots are identified as a multi-level phenomena and unveiled greater complexities at a deeper level. Morphology and sediment profiling of BDP deltas are influencing arsenic sourcing where sandy useable aquifers are identified with overbank deposits rich in arsenic host environment. Shallow aquifers ( 5-70 m) are

  2. Lena River Delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2014-03-01

    The Lena River Delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of Delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging, but accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River Delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8-6 Ka, 4.5-4 Ka, 2.5-1.5 Ka, 0.4-0.2 Ka) and decreasing (5 Ka, 3 Ka, 0.5 Ka) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  3. Lena River delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Lena River delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging; rather, they accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases, the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8000-6000 BP (years before present), 4500-4000, 2500-1500, and 400-200 BP) and decreasing (5000, 3000, and 500 BP) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  4. Preparing Nimbus E on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Nimbus E, the sixth spacecraft in the Nimbus series, is shown preparing for launch on December 12, 1972 from the Western Test Range (WTR), Space Launch Complex SLC-2, West, by the Thrust- Augmented Delta vehicle. The satellite was placed in an 1100-kilometer run-synchronous nearly circular polar orbit. The spacecraft was designated Nimbus 5 upon confirmation that it had achieved successful orbit. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta is composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  5. Phytotaphonomy in subtropical to temperate bayhead delta

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Deltaic regimes act as sinks for hydrocarbon precursors of various organic origin. Most organic detritus incorporated into deltaic sediments is contributed by vegetation established in wetland environments. Processes that incorporate vegetational components in deltaic subenvironments vary, depending on the climate and geography of the sediment-receiving basin. Understanding the phytotaphonomy within the sedimentologic context of different deltas will help workers develop criteria to identify ancient deltaic subenvironments. Some subenvironments are richer in accumulated plant detritus than others; therefore, to plan exploration and exploitation programs, the relationships between sources and reservoirs must be understood. The Mobile delta, Alabama, is a bayhead delta that began prograding through a drowned Pleistocene river valley before 9.5 k.y.B.P. Plant detritus accumulated - and is presently accumulating - in parts of the upper and lower delta flood basins. In the upper delta, large quantities of detritus are deposited in abandoned distributary channels, whereas litter is recycled in clastic swamps. Organic detritus is concentrated in the lower delta in interdistributary bays and marshes. These latter sites contain more productive source sediments for future hydrocarbon resources.

  6. A novel mouse PKC{delta} splice variant, PKC{delta}IX, inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung D.; Seo, Kwang W.; Lee, Eun A.; Quang, Nguyen N.; Cho, Hong R.; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel PKC{delta} isoform, named PKC{delta}IX, that lacks the C1 domain and the ATP-binding site is ubiquitously expressed. {yields} PKC{delta}IX inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis. {yields} PKC{delta}IX may function as an endogenous dominant negative isoform for PKC{delta}. -- Abstract: Protein kinase C (PKC) {delta} plays an important role in cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The catalytic fragment of PKC{delta} generated by caspase-dependent cleavage is essential for the initiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis. In this study, we identified a novel mouse PKC{delta} isoform named PKC{delta}IX (Genebank Accession No. (HQ840432)). PKC{delta}IX is generated by alternative splicing and is ubiquitously expressed, as seen in its full-length PKC{delta}. PKC{delta}IX lacks the C1 domain, the caspase 3 cleavage site, and the ATP binding site but preserves an almost intact c-terminal catalytic domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The structural characteristics of PKC{delta}IX provided a possibility that this PKC{delta} isozyme functions as a novel dominant-negative form for PKC{delta} due to its lack of the ATP-binding domain that is required for the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. Indeed, overexpression of PKC{delta}IX significantly inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, an in vitro kinase assay showed that recombinant PKC{delta}IX protein could competitively inhibit the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. We conclude that PKC{delta}IX can function as a natural dominant-negative inhibitor of PKC{delta}in vivo.

  7. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  8. Delta9-THC as a discriminative cue in pigeons: effects of delta8-THC, CBD, and CBN.

    PubMed

    Järbe, T U; Henriksson, B G; Ohlin, G C

    1977-07-01

    Pigeons, trained to discriminate the effects of i.m. injections of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, 0.25 mg/kg) from the effects of the vehicle in a drug discrimination paradigm, were tested for generalization with the isomeric delta8-THC, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). When given in sufficient doses, delta8-THC and CBN were found to substitute for delta9-THC whereas CBD did not. CBD and CBN did not antagonize the stimulus effect of delta9-THC. The combination of CBN and delta9-THC rather appeared to accentuate the drug response.

  9. Cellular and molecular basis of human gamma delta T cell activation. Role of accessory molecules in alloactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Takamizawa, M; Fagnoni, F; Mehta-Damani, A; Rivas, A; Engleman, E G

    1995-01-01

    Although gamma delta T cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes (gamma delta T cells) constitute a significant minority of circulating and tissue-associated T lymphocytes, the mechanism responsible for the activation of these cells is unknown. To address this question, resting gamma delta TCR+, CD3+, CD4-, CD8- cells isolated from the blood of healthy volunteers were cultured with allogeneic dendritic cells (DC) or monocytes, and their proliferative response measured. DC alone induced gamma delta T cells to proliferate, with a peak response on the sixth day of culture. Pretreatment of DC with an anti-HLA-DR mAb, but not anti-HLA class I or anti-CD1 mAbs, inhibited the response of gamma delta T cells. Antibodies to gamma delta T cell receptor, CD2, CD3, or CD11a were also inhibitory, whereas antibodies to alpha beta T cell receptor, CD4, CD5, and CD8 had no effect. Although only 40-60% of freshly isolated gamma delta T cells expressed CD28, mAbs directed against CD28 or its ligand, CD80, were markedly inhibitory. Moreover, removal of CD28+ cells from the gamma delta T cell population nearly abrogated the response to DC. These results demonstrate that resting gamma delta T cells recognize and respond to MHC class II determinants on allogeneic DC in a manner that is highly dependent on the CD28 activation pathway as well as molecules such as CD2 and CD11a that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Images PMID:7814628

  10. Model for the {Delta}(1600) resonance and {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the {Delta}(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming {Delta}(1600) as the first radial excitation of {Delta}(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, {pi}N, {pi}{Delta}, {pi}N(1440) and {pi}{Delta}(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, G{sub M}*(Q{sup 2}), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A{sub 1/2}(Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 3/2}(Q{sup 2}). The results at Q{sup 2}=0 are compared with the existing data.

  11. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.

  12. Hemopoietic tissue in newts flown aboard Foton M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, Elena I.; Almeida, Eduardo; Butorina, Nina N.; Nikonova, Tatyana M.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Poplinskaya, Valentina A.; Souza, Kenneth; Skidmore, Mike

    The effect of 12-day spaceflight aboard the Foton-M3 biosatellite on the hematopoietic tissue of P. waltl newts was studied. These animals used at the same time in regeneration experiments after lens and tail tip amputation. In flight and synchronous groups there were performed video recording, temperature and radiation monitoring and continuous contact (via skin) with thymidine analog BrdU. We took differential blood counts and assessed histologically the liver in the flight (F), basal (BC) and synchronous (SC)control groups of animals. In the peripheral blood, we identified neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Lymphocytes (L) and neutrophils (N) prevailed, accounting for about 60 and 20% of white blood cells, respectively. The spaceflight had no apparent effect on the differential blood count in the F group: neither the L and N contents nor the maturing to mature N - ratio differed from those in the control groups. No significant differences between F, SC and BC groups were observed with respect to the structure of hematopoietic areas and the liver morphology. As in Foton-M2, BrdU labeled cells revealed in blood as well as in the hemopoietic areas of the liver. However, in previous experiments performed at satellites Bion-10 and Foton-M2 the changes in peripheral blood contents were registered in operated F newts, and we supposed it could be the result of additive effects of spaceflight factors and stimulation of reparative potency and stress due to surgical operation. Possibly, the temperature conditions also may provide some influence on blood cell content of newts that belong to poikilothermic animals. Thus, in present experiment F and SC groups were reared in the same temperature regims, whereas it was nearly 3o C differences between SC and F groups exposed on Foton-M2. At the same time as it was found in experiments on Bion-11 and Foton-M2 spaceflight factors did not affect on differential blood counts of intact non

  13. Electrochemical deposition of silver crystals aboard Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.; Johnston, M. H.; Gates, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Silver crystals were grown aboard Skylab 4 by an electro-chemical reaction and subsequently returned to earth for comparison with crystals grown at 1- and 5-g. Both the Skylab and earth-grown crystals show a variety of structures. Certain tendencies in structure dependency on gravity level, however, can be discerned. In addition, downward growing dendrite streamers; upward growing chunky crystal streamers; growth along an air/liquid interface; and ribbon, film, and fiber crystal habits were observed in experiments conducted on the ground with solutions of varying concentrations. It was also observed that the crystal structures of space and ground electro-deposited silver crystals were very similar to the structures of germanium selenide and germanium telluride crystals grown in space and on the ground by a vapor transport technique. Consideration of the data leads to the conclusions that: (1) the rate of electrochemical displacement of silver ions from a 5 percent aqueous solution by copper is predominantly diffussion controlled in space and kinetically controlled in 1- and higher-g because of augmentation of mass transport by convection; (2) downward and upward crystal streamers are the result of gravity-driven convection, the flow patterns of which can be delineated. Lateral growths along an air/liquid interface are the result of surface-tension-driven convection, the pattern of which also can be delineated; (3) electrolysis in space or low-g environments can produce either dendritic crystals with more perfect microcrystalline structures or massive, single crystals with fewer defects than those grown on ground or at higher g-levels. Ribbons or films of space-grown silicon crystals would find a ready market for electronic substrate and photocell applications. Space-grown dendritic, metal crystals present the possibility of unique catalysts. Large perfect crystals of various materials are desired for a number of electronic and optical applications; and (4) vapor

  14. 78 FR 22363 - Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-Orlando Passenger Rail Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    .... 4321 et seq.) (NEPA) and FRA's Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts (64 FR 28545, May 26... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-- Orlando... service proposed by the private company, All Aboard Florida--Operations LLC (AAF), between Miami...

  15. Holocene evolution of a wave-dominated fan-delta: Godavari delta, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Nageswara Rao, K.; Nagakumar, K.; Demudu, G.; Rajawat, A.; Kubo, S.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Godavari delta is one of the world's largest wave-dominated deltas. The Godavari River arises in the Western Ghats near the west coast of India and drains an area of about 3.1x10^5 km^2, flowing about 1465 km southeast across the Indian peninsula to the Bay of Bengal. The Godavari delta consists of a gentle seaward slope from its apex (12 m elevation) at Rajahmundry and a coastal beach-ridge plain over a distance of about 75 km and covers ~5200 km^2 as a delta plain. The river splits into two major distributary channels, the Gautami and the Vasishta, at a barrage constructed in the mid-1800s. The coastal environment of the deltaic coast is microtidal (~1 m mean tidal range) and wave-dominated (~1.5 m mean wave height in the June-September SW monsoon season, ~0.8 m in the NE monsoon season). Models of the Holocene evolution of the Godavari delta have changed from a zonal progradation model (e.g. Nageswara Rao & Sadakata, 1993) to a truncated cuspate delta model (Nageswara Rao et al., 2005, 2012). Twelve borehole cores (340 m total length), taken in the coastal delta plain during 2010-2013, yielded more than 100 C-14 dates. Sediment facies and C-14 dates from these and previous cores and remote-sensing data support a new delta evolution model. The Holocene coastal delta plain is divided into two parts by a set of linear beach ridges 12-14 km landward from the present shoreline in the central part of the delta. The location of the main depocenter (lobe) has shifted during the Holocene from 1) the center to 2) the west, 3) east, 4) center, 5) west, and 6) east. The linear beach ridges separate the first three from the last three stages. These lobe shifts are controlled by river channel shifts near the apex. Just as the current linear shoreline of the central part of the delta and the concave-up nearshore topography are the result of coastal erosion of a cuspate delta, the linear beach ridges indicate a former eroded shoreline. An unconformity within the deltaic

  16. The DELTA MONSTER: An RPV designed to investigate the aerodynamics of a delta wing platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Kristen; Flynn, Mike; Gallagher, Randy; Greek, Chris; Kozlowski, Marc; Mcdonald, Brian; Mckenna, Matt; Sellar, Rich; Shearon, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The mission requirements for the performance of aerodynamic tests on a delta wind planform posed some problems, these include aerodynamic interference; structural support; data acquisition and transmission instrumentation; aircraft stability and control; and propulsion implementation. To eliminate the problems of wall interference, free stream turbulence, and the difficulty of achieving dynamic similarity between the test and actual flight aircraft that are associated with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels, the concept of the remotely piloted vehicle which can perform a basic aerodynamic study on a delta wing was the main objective for the Green Mission - the Delta Monster. The basic aerodynamic studies were performed on a delta wing with a sweep angle greater than 45 degrees. These tests were performed at various angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The delta wing was instrumented to determine the primary leading edge vortex formation and location, using pressure measurements and/or flow visualization. A data acquisition system was provided to collect all necessary data.

  17. Putrid gums and 'Dead Men's Cloaths': James Lind aboard the Salisbury

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Graham

    2003-01-01

    18th century sailors often suffered from scurvy. In 1747 James Lind conducted his classic experiments aboard the Salisbury, in which he cured scurvy with oranges and lemons. The Royal Navy did not introduce citrus rations until 1795. The original ship's papers allow the circumstances of the experiment to be reconstructed. The relevant patrol began in March 1747, and Lind's experiment began after 8 weeks at sea. The muster roll records almost no sickness aboard until the ship returned to Plymouth in June. This is at odds with Lind's account and suggests an antisickness official culture, which may have contributed to the neglect of his work. PMID:14645616

  18. Protein crystallization aboard the Space Shuttle and the Mir space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbaere, Louis T. J.; Vandonselaar, Margaret; Prasad, Lata; Quail, J. W.; Birnbaum, George I.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, Karen; Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Two different protein crystallizations, namely ,the free Fab fragment of the Je142 monoclonal antibody and the complex of Fab fragment/HPr with antigen, were performed aboard the Discovery Space Shuttle flights and the Mir space station, respectively. Medium sized crystals of the Je142 Fab fragment were obtained. The Je142 Fab fragment/Hpr complex produced two medium-sized crystals after two months aboard the Mir space station. Microgravity was found to eliminate the tendency of these crystals to form clusters.

  19. Analog FM/FM versus digital color TV transmission aboard space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Langley Research Center is developing an integrated fault tolerant network to support data, voice, and video communications aboard Space Station. The question of transmitting the video data via dedicated analog channels or converting it to the digital domain for consistancy with the test of the data is addressed. The recommendations in this paper are based on a comparison in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the type of video processing required aboard Space Station, the applicability to Space Station, and how they integrate into the network.

  20. Putrid gums and 'dead men's cloaths': James Lind aboard the Salisbury.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Graham

    2003-12-01

    18th century sailors often suffered from scurvy. In 1747 James Lind conducted his classic experiments aboard the Salisbury, in which he cured scurvy with oranges and lemons. The Royal Navy did not introduce citrus rations until 1795. The original ship's papers allow the circumstances of the experiment to be reconstructed. The relevant patrol began in March 1747, and Lind's experiment began after 8 weeks at sea. The muster roll records almost no sickness aboard until the ship returned to Plymouth in June. This is at odds with Lind's account and suggests an antisickness official culture, which may have contributed to the neglect of his work. PMID:14645616

  1. Origin of Hepatitis Delta Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gudima, Severin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Moraleda, Gloria; Taylor, John

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is unique relative to all known animal viruses, especially in terms of its ability to redirect host RNA polymerase(s) to transcribe its 1,679-nucleotide (nt) circular RNA genome. During replication there accumulates not only more molecules of the genome but also its exact complement, the antigenome. In addition, there are relatively smaller amounts of an 800-nt RNA of antigenomic polarity that is polyadenylated and considered to act as mRNA for translation of the single and essential HDV protein, the delta antigen. Characterization of this mRNA could provide insights into the in vivo mechanism of HDV RNA-directed RNA transcription and processing. Previously, we showed that the 5′ end of this RNA was located in the majority of species, at nt 1630. The present studies show that (i) at least some of this RNA, as extracted from the liver of an HDV-infected woodchuck, behaved as if it contained a 5′-cap structure; (ii) in the infected liver there were additional polyadenylated antigenomic HDV RNA species with 5′ ends located at least 202 nt and even 335 nt beyond the nt 1630 site, (iii) the 5′ end at nt 1630 was not detected in transfected cells, following DNA-directed HDV RNA transcription, in the absence of genome replication, and (iv) nevertheless, using in vitro transcription with purified human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and genomic RNA template, we did not detect initiation of template-dependent RNA synthesis; we observed only low levels of 3′-end addition to the template. These new findings support the interpretation that the 5′ end detected at nt 1630 during HDV replication represents a specific site for the initiation of an RNA-directed RNA synthesis, which is then modified by capping. PMID:10906174

  2. How well do we know VPDB? Variability of delta13C and delta18O in CO2 generated from NBS19-calcite.

    PubMed

    Brand, Willi A; Huang, Lin; Mukai, Hitoshi; Chivulescu, Alina; Richter, Jürgen M; Rothe, Michael

    2009-03-01

    In order to generate a local daughter scale from the material defining the international delta13C and delta18O stable isotope ratio scales (NBS19-calcite),1,2 the carbon and oxygen must be liberated to the gas phase, usually as CO2, using acid digestion of the calcite with H3PO4. It is during this conversion step that systematic errors can occur, giving rise to commonly observed discrepancies in isotopic measurements between different stable isotope laboratories. Scale consistency is of particular importance for air-CO2 isotope records where very small differences in isotopic composition have to be reliably compared between different laboratories and quantified over long time periods.3 The information is vital for estimating carbon budgets on regional and global scales and for understanding their variability under the conditions of climate change. Starting from this requirement a number of CO2 preparations from NBS19 were made at Environment Canada (EC) and analyzed in our laboratories together with Narcis II, a set of well-characterized CO2 samples in sealed tubes available from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES).4,5 Narcis II is very homogeneous in delta13C and delta18O with the isotopic composition close to NBS19-CO2. Among our laboratories the results for delta13C agreed to within +/-0.004 per thousand. The same level of agreement in delta13C was obtained when CO2 was generated from NBS19-calcite using different experimental procedures and conditions in the other two laboratories. For delta18O, the corresponding data were +/-0.011 per thousand when using NBS19-CO2 produced at EC, but discrepancies were enhanced by almost one order of magnitude when NBS19-CO2 was prepared by the other laboratories using slightly different reaction conditions (range=0.13 per thousand).In a second series of experiments, larger amounts of CO2 prepared from NBS19 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie (MPI-BGC) were analyzed together with Narcis II and

  3. Turbidity and salinity affect feeding performance and physiological stress in the endangered delta smelt.

    PubMed

    Hasenbein, Matthias; Komoroske, Lisa M; Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen; Fangue, Nann A

    2013-10-01

    Coastal estuaries are among the most heavily impacted ecosystems worldwide with many keystone fauna critically endangered. The delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) is an endangered pelagic fish species endemic to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary in northern California, and is considered as an indicator species for ecosystem health. This ecosystem is characterized by tidal and seasonal gradients in water parameters (e.g., salinity, temperature, and turbidity), but is also subject to altered water-flow regimes due to water extraction. In this study, we evaluated the effects of turbidity and salinity on feeding performance and the stress response of delta smelt because both of these parameters are influenced by water flows through the San Francisco Bay Delta (SFBD) and are known to be of critical importance to the completion of the delta smelt's life cycle. Juvenile delta smelt were exposed to a matrix of turbidities and salinities ranging from 5 to 250 nephelometric turbidity units (NTUs) and 0.2 to 15 parts per thousand (ppt), respectively, for 2 h. Best statistical models using Akaike's Information Criterion supported that increasing turbidities resulted in reduced feeding rates, especially at 250 NTU. In contrast, best explanatory models for gene transcription of sodium-potassium-ATPase (Na/K-ATPase)-an indicator of osmoregulatory stress, hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin-a precursor protein to adrenocorticotropic hormone (expressed in response to biological stress), and whole-body cortisol were affected by salinity alone. Only transcription of glutathione-S-transferase, a phase II detoxification enzyme that protects cells against reactive oxygen species, was affected by both salinity and turbidity. Taken together, these data suggest that turbidity is an important determinant of feeding, whereas salinity is an important abiotic factor influencing the cellular stress response in delta smelt. Our data support habitat association studies that have shown greater

  4. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    PubMed

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Clément; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms) and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  5. {delta}-mediated pion production in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Praet, C.; Lalakulich, O.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-04-15

    We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced {delta}-mediated single-pion production in nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the {delta} interactions and quantify the uncertainties in the axial form-factor parameters by comparing with the available bubble-chamber neutrino-scattering data. To include nuclear effects, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the {sigma}-{omega} Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces results that are comparable to the RPWIA that naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects, and the Pauli exclusion principle. Including {delta} medium modifications roughly halves the RPWIA cross section. Calculations for primary (prior to undergoing final-state interactions) pion production are presented for both electron- and neutrino-induced processes, and a comparison with electron-scattering data and other theoretical approaches is included. We infer that the total {delta}-production strength is underestimated by about 20 to 25%, a fraction that is due to the pionless decay modes of the {delta} in a medium. The model presented in this work can be naturally extended to include the effect of final-state interactions in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical way.

  6. The ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, B.; Moyle, P.B. . Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes an ecosystem significantly different from other delta ecosystems in North America. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the 60 largest river deltas in the world and is the largest river delta on the west coast. As the hub of California's water system, the delta is of immense municipal, agricultural, and industrial importance. The amount of freshwater that flows through the delta controls the delta's productivity and regulates the life cycles of many of its organisms. The vast estuary of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers is one of the most highly modified and intensively managed estuaries in the world. Biological processes in the delta are obscured by the temporal dynamics of the system. Many of the most significant alterations, such as leveeing, diking, and agricultural practices, are not now recognized as such by most citizens, making conservation and protection of the delta difficult. 308 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. New isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z L; Ikebe, M

    1994-01-01

    Four novel isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) were found in rat aorta smooth muscle. Two of them were related to gamma-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (gamma-a). Differences in the primary structure of these isoforms were located in the variable region. One of them (gamma-b) contained 23 unique amino acid residues, whereas the other (gamma-c) did not contain this sequence. Both isoforms lacked the two segments (Val-316 to Gln-337 and Lys-353 to Leu-362) present in gamma-a. The DNA sequence of these gamma-isoforms except the variable region was exactly the same, suggesting that they are produced by alternative splicing. Another two isoforms were related to the delta-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (delta-a). delta-b contained a unique 11-residue sequence in the variable region whereas delta-c did not. As found for gamma-isoforms, the sequence analysis suggested that the three delta-isoforms are also produced by alternative splicing. Analysis of RNA by reverse transcription PCR confirmed the existence of specific messages for gamma-b, delta-a and delta-b. The variety of isoforms of CaM kinase II suggest that each isoform may play a specialized role in cell regulation. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8172610

  8. Delta capability for launch of communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Russell, W. A., Jr.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of capabilities and the current performance levels of the Delta launch vehicle are outlined. The first payload was the Echo I passive communications satellite, weighing 179 lb, and placed in GEO in 1960. Emphasis since then has been to use off-the-shelf hardware where feasible. The latest version in the 3924 first stage, 3920 second stage, and Pam D apogee kick motor third stage. The Delta is presently equipped to place 2800 lb in GEO, as was proven with the 2717 lb Anik-D1 satellite. The GEO payload placement performance matches the Shuttle's, and work is therefore under way to enhance the Delta performance to handle more massive payloads. Installation of the Castor-IV solid motor separation system, thereby saving mass by utilizing compressed nitrogen, rather than mechanical thrusters to remove the strap-on boosters, is indicated, together with use of a higher performance propellant and a wider nose fairing.

  9. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  10. The oil rich Niger Delta region: a framework for improved performance of the Nigerian regulatory process.

    PubMed

    Onu, N Chukemeka Hemanachi

    2003-06-01

    The adoption of this policy framework has the ability to reconcile industry, the environment and community interests, taking into account all factors that are relevant to managing developments that are both sustainable and contributory to the achievement of industrial and community stability. The management of resource development is crucial in sustaining the Niger Delta ecosystem and the human population resident in the Niger Delta region. If these separate bodies are constituted they would have the potential to reduce and discourage: i) the vulnerability of the regulatory body to influential and powerful multinational oil companies; ii) the proclivity for unaccountability to the people of the Niger Delta region, since the people of the Niger Delta would have access to the regulatory body's classified and unclassified information, and are part of the decision-making process; and iii) a reduction in conflict between the oil mining companies and the aggrieved youths of the oil rich Niger Delta region. This policy framework also has the added advantage of producing high quality decisions and more acceptable decisions than those for which the people of the Niger Delta region are excluded from the processes that concern their existence. The agency decision-making could now become a multilateral process and thus promote and enhance the accurate, impartial and rational application of legislative directives to given cases or classes of cases. Most importantly, the Minister of Petroleum Resources should be empowered by legislation to revoke any license or lease in respect of an area designated as marginal if left undeveloped for a period of 5 years and grant a lease or license for the area to a more responsible oil company.

  11. The oil rich Niger Delta region: a framework for improved performance of the Nigerian regulatory process.

    PubMed

    Onu, N Chukemeka Hemanachi

    2003-06-01

    The adoption of this policy framework has the ability to reconcile industry, the environment and community interests, taking into account all factors that are relevant to managing developments that are both sustainable and contributory to the achievement of industrial and community stability. The management of resource development is crucial in sustaining the Niger Delta ecosystem and the human population resident in the Niger Delta region. If these separate bodies are constituted they would have the potential to reduce and discourage: i) the vulnerability of the regulatory body to influential and powerful multinational oil companies; ii) the proclivity for unaccountability to the people of the Niger Delta region, since the people of the Niger Delta would have access to the regulatory body's classified and unclassified information, and are part of the decision-making process; and iii) a reduction in conflict between the oil mining companies and the aggrieved youths of the oil rich Niger Delta region. This policy framework also has the added advantage of producing high quality decisions and more acceptable decisions than those for which the people of the Niger Delta region are excluded from the processes that concern their existence. The agency decision-making could now become a multilateral process and thus promote and enhance the accurate, impartial and rational application of legislative directives to given cases or classes of cases. Most importantly, the Minister of Petroleum Resources should be empowered by legislation to revoke any license or lease in respect of an area designated as marginal if left undeveloped for a period of 5 years and grant a lease or license for the area to a more responsible oil company. PMID:12956601

  12. Mutagenesis of the borage Delta(6) fatty acid desaturase.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, O; Beaudoin, F; Libisch, B; Shewry, P; Napier, J

    2000-12-01

    The consensus sequence of the third histidine box of a range of Delta(5), Delta(6), Delta(8) and sphingolipid desaturases differs from that of the membrane-bound non-fusion Delta(12) and Delta(15) desaturases in the presence of glutamine instead of histidine. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to determine the importance of glutamine and other residues of the third histidine box and created a chimaeric enzyme to determine the ability of the Cyt b(5) fusion domain from the plant sphingolipid desaturase to substitute for the endogenous domain of the Delta(6) desaturase. PMID:11171152

  13. DNA polymerase III accessory proteins. I. holA and holB encoding delta and delta'.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z; Onrust, R; Skangalis, M; O'Donnell, M

    1993-06-01

    The genes encoding the delta and delta' subunits of the 10-subunit Escherichia coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, have been identified and sequenced. The holA gene encoding delta is located downstream of rlpB at 15.2 min and predicts a 38.7 kda protein. The holB gene encoding delta' is located at 24.3 min and predicts a 36.9-kDa protein. Hence the delta and delta' subunits are unrelated proteins encoded by separate genes. The genes have been used to express and purify delta and delta' in quantity. The predicted amino acid sequence of delta' is homologous to the sequences of the tau and gamma subunits revealing a large amount of structural redundancy within the holoenzyme.

  14. Gamma-delta t-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foppoli, Marco; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas are aggressive and rare diseases originating from gamma-delta lymphocytes. These cells, which naturally play a role in the innate, non-specific immune response, develop from thymic precursor in the bone marrow, lack the major histocompatibility complex restrictions and can be divided into two subpopulations: Vdelta1, mostly represented in the intestine, and Vdelta2, prevalently located in the skin, tonsils and lymph nodes. Chronic immunosuppression such as in solid organ transplanted subjects and prolonged antigenic exposure are probably the strongest risk factors for the triggering of lymphomagenesis. Two entities are recognised by the 2008 WHO Classification: hepatosplenic gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (HSGDTL) and primary cutaneous gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTL). The former is more common among young males, presenting with B symptoms, splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia, usually with the absence of nodal involvement. Natural behaviour of HSGDTL is characterised by low response rates, poor treatment tolerability, common early progression of disease and disappointing survival figures. PCGDTL accounts for <1% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas, occurring in adults with relevant comorbidities. Cutaneous lesions may vary, but its clinical behaviour is usually aggressive and long-term survival is anecdotal. Available literature on gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas is fractioned, mostly consisting of case reports or small cumulative series. Therefore, clinical suspicion and diagnosis are usually delayed, and therapeutic management remains to be established. This review critically analyses available evidence on diagnosis, staging and behaviour of gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas, provides recommendations for therapeutic management in routine practice and discusses relevant unmet clinical needs for future studies.

  15. NPP Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) spacecraft was launched aboard a Delta II rocket at 5:48 a.m. EDT today, on a mission to measure ...

  16. STS-39 Commander Coats on OV-103's flight deck watches SPAS-II/IBSS deploy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Commander Michael L. Coats smiles as he watches the Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) / Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) spacecraft deployment through the aft flight deck windows while aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The SPAS-II/IBSS spacecraft is visible through the overhead window W7 after its release from the remote manipulator system (RMS) end effector. The crewman optical alignment sight (COAS) is fastened to the sill of window W7. SPAS-II is a Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO).

  17. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) delta formation model, in contrast to reductionist models based on high-resolution computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (referred in this paper as "DeltaRCM") consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include flow field, water surface topography and bed topography that evolves in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able to: (1) resolve a wide range of channel dynamics, including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration; (2) in response to the changes in input parameters, produce different types of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas at experimental scale. We also identify three key areas of particular model sensitivity, even at the RCM level: (1) avulsion dynamics is sensitive to dynamic free-surface topography; (2) channel network structure is sensitive to instability at channel mouths which creates bars; and (3) out-of-channel sedimentation is sensitive to water surface slope along channel margins. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy tracking component which can display the structure of the deposit in terms of distribution of coarse and fine materials along with the age of the deposit. DeltaRCM is a useful tool for understanding the dynamics of river deltas within a relatively simple cellular representation of water and sediment transport.

  18. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  19. The sensitivity of the ESA DELTA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Walker, R.; Klinkrad, H.

    2004-01-01

    The debris environment long term analysis (DELTA) model, developed by QinetiQ for the European Space Agency (ESA), allows the future projection of the debris environment throughout Earth orbit. To ensure a sound basis for such future projections, and consequently for assessing the effectiveness of various mitigation measures, it is essential that the sensitivity of the model is examined. This paper discusses the sensitivity of the DELTA model to changes in key model parameters and assumptions. Specifically, the variation in future traffic rates, including the deployment of satellite constellations, and the variation in the break-up model and criteria used to simulate future explosion and collision events.

  20. A lectin-binding, protease-resistant mycobacterial ligand specifically activates V gamma 9+ human gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, K; Schoel, B; Plesnila, N; Lipford, G B; Kromer, S; Deusch, K; Wagner, H

    1992-01-15

    Bacterial (exogeneous) superantigens have been defined as bifunctional proteinaceous molecules. They bind to class II MHC molecules of presenting cells and engage with particular TCR-V beta gene elements, thereby activating alpha beta T cells in a V beta-oriented fashion. In previous studies we have elucidated that gamma delta T cells exhibit a propensity to vigorously respond toward mycobacterial Ag. Intrigued by this finding we now analyzed whether mycobacteria express a superantigen for a subset of human gamma delta T cells definable by the selective use of TCR-V gene elements. Here we describe that a protease-resistant, low m.w. (1 to 3 kDa) component of mycobacteria selectively activates gamma delta T cells expressing TCR-V gamma 9 gene segments. Contained in mycobacterial lysates it stimulates TCR-V gamma 9-positive gamma delta T cells at a frequency of 1/6. Stimulation is critically dependent on the presence of class II MHC-positive presenting cells, the important structure being HLA-DR molecules. The fine specificity of the V gamma 9 seeking mycobacterial ligand differs from the gamma delta T cell-stimulating structures expressed by Daudi cells. In addition, the mycobacterial, V gamma 9-seeking ligand is bound selectively to lectins such as UEAI, SBA, and DBA. We conclude that mycobacteria contain a component that acts as a superantigen for human gamma delta T cells and we believe it is this property that explains the vigorous participation of gamma delta T cells in mycobacterial infections.

  1. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrea Kelly, Satellite Division, International Bureau, FCC,...

  2. Living at Sea: Learning from Communal Life Aboard Sail Training Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers features of domestic and social life aboard sail training vessels, exploring the particular character of life at sea, and how these features contribute to the distinctive character of sail training experience as a context for learning. Methodologically, the study lies in the sociological tradition of ethnography, focusing on…

  3. Gemini 12 crew cut cake aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew slice a cake made aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  4. Gemini 9-A astronauts welcomed aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan (right) receive a warm welcome as they arrive aboard the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. John C. Stonesifer, with the Manned Spacecraft Center's Landing and Recovery Division, stands next to microphone at left. The Gemini 9 spacecraft can be seen in the right background of the view.

  5. All Aboard the "Titanic": Character Journals Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Mia Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a 7th-grade reading class used character journals to explore the sailing and the sinking of the "Titanic." Describes how the students took ownership of their research and enjoyed reading and writing about actual events as they became a passenger or crew member aboard the "Titanic," explored the ship, experienced the sinking, wrote an…

  6. Apollo 17 crew arrive aboard the U.S.S. Ticonderoga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The three Apollo 17 crewmen arrive aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Ticonderoga, to conclude the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. They are Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan (waving), Harrison H. Schmitt (on Cernan's left), and Ronald E. Evans (standing in back). VIPs, dignitaries, Officials and Navy personnel give the three crewmen a red-carpet welcome.

  7. Astronauts Cooper and Conrad arrive aboard U.S.S. Lake Champlain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A red-carpet welcome was staged for Astronauts L. Gordon Cooper Jr. and Charles Conrad Jr. as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lake Champlain. They had been recovered from the Atlantic after the splashdown of their Gemini 5 spacecraft.

  8. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  9. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  10. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  11. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  12. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  13. 78 FR 77484 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13; 44 U.S.C. 3507). DATES: Written comments...

  14. Keys to the Common Genera of Marine Plants Taken Aboard the Orange County Floating Marine Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, H. R.

    Provided is a dichotomous key to the common genera of marine algae and angiosperms which are taken aboard the Orange County Floating Marine Laboratory. It is designed primarily for use by junior and senior high school students. Drawings of representative members of the various genera are included. This work was prepared under an ESEA Title III…

  15. How Deltas Die - a Case Study of the End of Sedimentation in Two Giant Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, D.; Robinson, P.; Nicholson, U.

    2013-12-01

    Most well-studied deltas are on passive margins (e.g. Mississippi, Rhone, Ebro), where the main tectonic control on accommodation space is thermal subsidence. As long as the main river in the sediment routing system keeps flowing, there is no particular reason for sedimentation to end, and some deltas have a history extending more than 100 Ma (e.g. Niger at 130 Ma). However, some very large deltas can build out over active margins. For example, the Amur, Orinoco, and Colorado (US) deltas all straddle strike-slip plate boundaries and are much less long-lived than their passive margin counterparts. This paper looks in detail at the end of the deltaic sedimentation in the Pliocene deltas of the Amur River on the island of Sakhalin, and the Colorado River in the Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin of southern California. In both cases the deltas are sand-rich with distant provenances in East Asia and the Colorado Plateau respectively; also they both coexist with locally derived clastic sedimentation. Despite these similarities, there are significant differences between the two deltas as a direct result of the differences in plate boundary movement rates and tectonic state. On Sakhalin, the plate boundary has moved at about 1.95 mm a-1 during the Pliocene and has been in a transpressional state. Primary deltaic sedimentation ended by a three main mechanisms: uplift of the island along the transpressional plate boundary detached the delta from the trunk stream; growth of anticlines over strands of the plate boundary disrupted the consequent delta-top drainage; and late sedimentation involved reworking of the far-travelled deltaic material. In California, where the plate boundary has moved at about 50 mm a-1 in the Pliocene, deltaic sedimentation ceased by translation of the receiving basin from the river mouth. New field and mineralogical data suggest that Colorado River sedimentation waned over a period of about 1 Ma in the Late Pliocene, and was gradually overwhelmed by locally

  16. Modeling delta growth and channel geometry on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Czapiga, M. J.; Li, C.; Shaw, J. B.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model of delta growth, in which the distributary channels are assumed to have self-constructed their cross sections, is validated on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. As in previous laterally averaged models of delta growth, the delta is divided in a low slope delta top, a steep delta front and a low slope basement. The flow on the delta top is assumed steady, and a backwater formulation is implemented. Since one or more channels can actively transport water and sediment on the delta top during floods, we simplify the problem by assuming that the bed material is transported in one rectangular channel, with width and depth roughly equal to the sum of the active channel widths, and to the average depth of the active channels. The problem is characterized by one equation (i.e. the backwater equation) in two unknowns, the channel width and depth. Another equation is thus needed to close the problem. Under the assumptions that 1) the system is at bankfull flow, and 2) the Shields number in the channels is equal to its channel formative value, our closure relation is a channel-formative criterion. In particular, a recently derived relation to estimate the formative (bankfull) Shields number as a function of the friction slope is implemented. Recent field work on Wax Lake Delta shows that the distributary channels are incising into a relatively stiff basement. In our model we do not attempt to directly model channel incision, but we implicitly account for it with a modified formulation to compute the shoreline migration rate. In this formulation the bed material at the shoreline is trapped in the non-channelized portion of the delta front only. Measured and numerical shoreline migration rates, longitudinal profiles of delta elevation, and channel geometry, i.e. width and depth, are compared. In the relatively near future we plan to 1) use our model to estimate land-building potential of engineered diversions of the Mississippi River, and 2) couple the present model

  17. HYBRID {gamma} DORADUS-{delta} SCUTI PULSATORS: NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE PHYSICS OF THE OSCILLATIONS FROM KEPLER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Grigahcene, A.; Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Antoci, V.; Handler, G.; Houdek, G.; Balona, L.; Catanzaro, G.; Daszynska-Daszkiewicz, J.; Guzik, J. A.; Kurtz, D. W.; Marconi, M.; Ripepi, V.; Moya, A.; Suarez, J.-C.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Brown, T. M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gilliland, R. L.; Jenkins, J. M.

    2010-04-20

    Observations of the pulsations of stars can be used to infer their interior structure and test theoretical models. The main-sequence {gamma} Doradus (Dor) and {delta} Scuti (Sct) stars with masses 1.2-2.5 M {sub sun} are particularly useful for these studies. The {gamma} Dor stars pulsate in high-order g-modes with periods of order 1 day, driven by convective blocking at the base of their envelope convection zone. The {delta} Sct stars pulsate in low-order g- and p-modes with periods of order 2 hr, driven by the {kappa} mechanism operating in the He II ionization zone. Theory predicts an overlap region in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram between instability regions, where 'hybrid' stars pulsating in both types of modes should exist. The two types of modes with properties governed by different portions of the stellar interior provide complementary model constraints. Among the known {gamma} Dor and {delta} Sct stars, only four have been confirmed as hybrids. Now, analysis of combined Quarter 0 and Quarter 1 Kepler data for hundreds of variable stars shows that the frequency spectra are so rich that there are practically no pure {delta} Sct or {gamma} Dor pulsators, i.e., essentially all of the stars show frequencies in both the {delta} Sct and the {gamma} Dor frequency range. A new observational classification scheme is proposed that takes into account the amplitude as well as the frequency and is applied to categorize 234 stars as {delta} Sct, {gamma} Dor, {delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor or {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct hybrids.

  18. Follow-up of the delta4 to delta16 trans-18:1 isomer profile and content in French processed foods containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils during the period 1995-1999. Analytical and nutritional implications.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R L; Combe, N A; Destaillats, F; Boué, C; Precht, D; Molkentin, J; Entressangles, B

    2000-08-01

    America. Differences occur in the total intake of trans-18:1 acids, but most important, in individual trans-18:1 isomer intake, with a particular increase of the delta6-delta8 to delta10 isomers with increasing consumption of PHVO. It is inferred from the present and earlier data that direct GLC of fatty acids is a faulty procedure that results (i) in variable underestimates of total trans-18:1 acids, (ii) in a loss of information as regards the assessment of individual isomeric trans-18:1 acids, and (iii) in the impossibility of comparing data obtained from human tissues if the relative contribution of dietary PHVO and ruminant fats is not known.

  19. HETG observations of Delta Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. A.; Cassinelli, J. P.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2000-10-01

    We have observed δ Ori (O9.5II) using the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on board Chandra. δ Ori is among the best-studied early-type X-ray sources, with measurements from a number of satellites including ROSAT and ASCA. Our high-resolution (δ v ≈ 500 km/s) MEG spectrum shows resolved emission lines of ions ranging from helium-like silicon, to hydrogen- and helium-like magnesium, neon, and oxygen. Most of the iron lines which are present are attributable to Fe XVII. The broadening of the emission lines indicates that the X-rays are formed out in the wind, but with a broadening less than the terminal velocity of 2290 km/s. We begin with a simple isothermal expanding shell model to explain the broadening of the lines, and then apply successively more complex models. New atomic calculations by Wang Ping of Forbidden, Intercombination, and Resonance (FIR) line complexes for helium-like ions are used to constrain the density in the X-ray emitting regions. The derived densities are then compared with the range of ambient wind densities. We would like to thank NASA for support of this project under grant NAG5-9226.

  20. Stability of Dosage Forms in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Brian J.; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick; Younker, Diane R.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf lives are essential for successful space medical operations. Stability of pharmaceuticals, therefore, is of paramount importance for assuring the health and wellness of astronauts on future space exploration missions. Unique physical and environmental factors of space missions may contribute to the instability of pharmaceuticals, e.g., radiation, humidity and temperature variations. Degradation of pharmaceutical formulations can result in inadequate efficacy and/or untoward toxic effects, which could compromise astronaut safety and health. Methods: Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms (liquid, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the International Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-121). One of the 4 kits was stored on the Shuttle and the other 3 were stored on the International Space Station (ISS) for return to Earth at 6-month interval aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit. The kit stored on the Shuttle was returned to Earth aboard STS-121 and 2 kits from ISS were returned on STS 117 and STS-122. Results: Analysis of standard physical and chemical parameters of degradation was completed for pharmaceuticals returned by STS-121 after14 days, STS - 117 after11 months and STS 122 after 19 months storage aboard ISS. Analysis of all flight samples along with ground-based matching controls was completed and results were compiled. Conclusion: Evaluation of results from the shuttle (1) and ISS increments (2) indicate that the number of formulations degraded in space increased with duration of storage in space and was higher in space compared to their ground-based counterparts. Rate of degradation for some of the formulations tested was faster in space than on Earth. Additionally, some of the formulations included in the medical kits were unstable, more so in space than on the ground. These results indicate that the

  1. Susceptibility of Naegleria fowleri to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, H L; Bradley, S G; Harris, L S

    1979-01-01

    Growth of the pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri is inhibited by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). delta 9-THC is amoebostatic at 5 to 50 micrograms/ml. delta 9-THC prevents enflagellation and encystment, but does not impair amoeboid movement. Calf serum at 10 and 20% (vol/vol) reduces the antiamoeba activity of delta 9-THC. Only 1-methoxy delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol, of 17 cannabinoids tested, failed to inhibit growth of N. fowleri. Antinaeglerial activity was not markedly altered by opening the pyran ring, by converting the cyclohexyl ring to an aromatic ring, or by reversing the hydroxyl and pentyl groups on the benzene ring. delta 9-THC prevented the cytopathic effect of N. fowleri on African green monkey (Vero) cells and human epithelioma (HEp-2) cells in culture. delta 9-THC afforded modest protection to mice infected with N. fowleri. Images PMID:526010

  2. Replication of hepatitis delta virus RNA in mice after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, J M; Lim, B; Govindarajan, S; Lai, M M

    1995-01-01

    To establish a readily manipulable small-animal system for the study of human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) replication in vivo, plasmid DNAs containing head-to-tail cDNA dimers of HDV were inoculated intramuscularly into mice. Genomic-sense HDV RNA was detected in the injected muscle within 1 week and increased to substantial levels by week 7 postinjection. The intramuscular accumulation of HDV RNA was determined to be the direct result of viral RNA replication by three lines of evidence: (i) injected tissues also accumulated antigenomic-sense HDV RNA, (ii) plasmid DNA that synthesized primary transcripts of antigenomic sense also led to the accumulation of genomic-sense HDV RNA, and (iii) injection of a cDNA dimer defective in antigenomic RNA cleavage failed to produce detectable HDV RNA in muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis of injected muscle demonstrated the presence and nuclear localization of hepatitis delta antigen in myocytes. Finally, sera from DNA-injected mice contained antibodies specific for delta antigen, indicating the induction of an immunological response to the intracellularly expressed antigen. These findings demonstrated the ability of HDV RNA to replicate in skeletal muscle and provide a useful system for the study of HDV replication, delta antigen processing, and its presentation to the immune system in vivo. Furthermore, this system offers an efficiently replicating RNA as a potential vehicle for in vivo gene transfer. PMID:7609095

  3. Sedimentology and origin of source rocks in the Tertiary Niger delta

    SciTech Connect

    Bustin, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    Organic matter in Tertiary strata of the Niger delta is mainly a mixture of types II and III, has a high pristane/phytane ratio (> 1.0), and is composed of the macerals vitrinite and minor liptinite. The main palynofacies are structured woody material, cuticles, pollen, spores, and opaque and minor amorphous organic matter. The distribution and abundance of the organic matter reflects the age and sedimentology of the strata. There is a progressive decline in mean total organic carbon (TOC) content from upper Eocene (2.2% TOC) to Pliocene strata (0.90% TOC) and an associated general decrease in hydrogen index (HI) and pristane/phytane ratio. The decrease in TOC and HI in younger strata mainly reflects increased dilution of a nearly constant supply of terrestrial organic matter associated with the generally higher sedimentation rates of younger strata. The low pristane/phytane ratio of younger strata may reflect less oxidizing depositional conditions. No rich source rocks occur in the Niger delta and, as conventionally measured, the strata have little or no oil generating potential. The poor quality of the source rocks has been compensated for by their greater volume and excellent migration routes. The Niger delta type of source rock - although an end member in terms of general source rock composition - appears to be relatively typical of Tertiary deltas.

  4. Assembly of hepatitis delta virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, W S; Bayer, M; Taylor, J

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Since the RNA genome of HDV can replicate in cultured cells in the absence of HBV, it has been suggested that the only helper function of HBV is to supply HBV coat proteins in the assembly process of HDV particles. To examine the factors involved in such virion assembly, we transiently cotransfected cells with various hepadnavirus constructs and cDNAs of HDV and analyzed the particles released into the medium. We report that the HDV genomic RNA and the delta antigen can be packaged by coat proteins of either HBV or the related hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Among the three co-carboxy-terminal coat proteins of WHV, the smallest form was sufficient to package the HDV genome; even in the absence of HDV RNA, the delta antigen could be packaged by this WHV coat protein. Also, of the two co-amino-terminal forms of the delta antigen, only the larger form was essential for packaging. Images PMID:1548764

  5. Delta Scorpii unusual brightening to first magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    The Be star delta Scorpii with a range of variability between 2.35 and 1.65 in visible light is having an unusual brightening to magnitude mV=0.8, as measured on 31 Jan 2016 at 3:56 UT and 5:36 UT from Lanciano, Italy.

  6. Applications of Dirac's Delta Function in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khuri, Andre

    2004-01-01

    The Dirac delta function has been used successfully in mathematical physics for many years. The purpose of this article is to bring attention to several useful applications of this function in mathematical statistics. Some of these applications include a unified representation of the distribution of a function (or functions) of one or several…

  7. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  8. Definition of the {delta} mass and width

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, D.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2007-08-01

    In the framework of effective field theory we show that, at two-loop order, the mass and width of the {delta} resonance defined via the (relativistic) Breit-Wigner parametrization both depend on the choice of field variables. In contrast, the complex-valued position of the pole of the propagator is independent of this choice.

  9. Backwater controls of avulsion location on deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatanantavet, Phairot; Lamb, Michael P.; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    River delta complexes are built in part through repeated river-channel avulsions, which often occur about a persistent spatial node creating delta lobes that form a fan-like morphology. Predicting the location of avulsions is poorly understood, but it is essential for wetland restoration, hazard mitigation, reservoir characterization, and delta morphodynamics. Following previous work, we show that the upstream distance from the river mouth where avulsions occur is coincident with the backwater length, i.e., the upstream extent of river flow that is affected by hydrodynamic processes in the receiving basin. To explain this observation we formulate a fluvial morphodynamic model that is coupled to an offshore spreading river plume and subject it to a range of river discharges. Results show that avulsion is less likely in the downstream portion of the backwater zone because, during high-flow events, the water surface is drawn down near the river mouth to match that of the offshore plume, resulting in river-bed scour and a reduced likelihood of overbank flow. Furthermore, during low-discharge events, flow deceleration near the upstream extent of backwater causes enhanced deposition locally and a reduced channel-fill timescale there. Both mechanisms favor preferential avulsion in the upstream part of the backwater zone. These dynamics are fundamentally due to variable river discharges and a coupled offshore river plume, with implications for predicting delta response to climate and sea level change, and fluvio-deltaic stratigraphy.

  10. The Delta Team: Empowering Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Marian White

    1994-01-01

    In response to adolescent girls' concerns about teen violence, rumors, grooming, careers, and equity, four women teachers and a woman administrator at a Maryland middle school developed the Delta Program. The program provides positive learning experiences, teaches social skills and conflict management techniques, empowers girls through mentoring…

  11. Quantitative Metrics of Robustness in River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Tejedor, A.; Longjas, A.; Zaliapin, I. V.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas are landforms with channels that deliver water, sediment and nutrient fluxes from rivers to oceans or inland water bodies via multiple pathways. We conceptualize a delta channel network as a rooted acyclic directed graph where channels are modeled by edges and junctions by vertices. We use spectral graph theory - mainly the geometry of the null space of the directed weighted graph Laplacian - to establish a quantitative framework for extracting important structural and dynamics-related information from river deltas. Using this information, we introduce refined metrics of system complexity, such as entropy. Entropy has been proven to be an important measure of the amount of uncertainty in stochastic systems, and therefore a surrogate of the capacity of the system to undergo changes. Here we present an entropic approach to evaluate the robustness of deltas, showing how the two components of entropy: mutual information and conditional entropy can be interpreted in this framework. We also present other metrics that include, among others, resistance distance and number of alternative paths, which quantify the structural complexity of the system. We use these metrics to better classify deltaic systems, quantify their resilience and propose possible management scenarios.

  12. Alkoxy radicals: Delta proton hyperfine couplingsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzinski, Edwin E.; Box, Harold C.

    1985-04-01

    Single crystals of rhamnose were x irradiated at 4.2 K and the ESR and ENDOR spectra taken at 1.6 K. A component of the ESR absorption arises from an alkoxy radical exhibiting an unusual delta proton hyperfine coupling. Parallels between the radiation-induced oxidation of certain carbohydrates and that of amino acids are pointed out.

  13. Faculty Salaries at Delta College. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John W.

    In 1989, a study was conducted of faculty salaries at California's San Joaquin Delta Community College (SJDCC). Salary results were compared with community college districts in the State of California, with two specially selected subgroups of colleges comparable to SJDCC, and with all of California's major public and private four-year…

  14. San Joaquin Delta College Student Athlete Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Merrilee R.; Marcopulos, Ernest

    In spring 1988, a study was conducted of students who participated in college athletics at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) between 1983-84 and 1987-88. Data collected on each student athlete included ethnicity, sport, place of residence, initial and current reading level, total grade point average (GPA), GPA in athletics and physical education…

  15. {Delta}G and {Delta}q-bar measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kensuke; Collaboration: PHENIX Collaboration

    2011-12-14

    RHIC provides a unique opportunity to address the components of the proton spin. In comparison to deep inelastic scattering experiments, the gluon is the main player in proton-proton collisions. PHENIX has measured double spin asymmetries of various processes. Those contain the information of the gluon spin component ({Delta}G). In addition high energy collisions open the unique channel to access flavor dependent information of quark polarization through the real W boson production. Because of the feature of weak interaction, the parity violating process defines the helicity of quarks in the interaction. The single spin asymmetry is the observable. It is especially interesting to probe anti-quark components ({Delta}q-bar). In this article, we report the recent progress of {Delta}G and {Delta}q-bar measurements at PHENIX.

  16. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-15

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard {Delta} isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting {Delta}{Delta} components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} and {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channels to be similar.

  17. SDO Delta H Mode Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Starin, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    While on orbit, disturbance torques on a three axis stabilized spacecraft tend to increase the system momentum, which is stored in the reaction wheels. Upon reaching the predefined momentum capacity (or maximum wheel speed) of the reaction wheel, an external torque must be used to unload the momentum. The purpose of the Delta H mode is to manage the system momentum. This is accomplished by driving the reaction wheels to a target momentum state while the attitude thrusters, which provide an external torque, are used to maintain the attitude. The Delta H mode is designed to meet the mission requirements and implement the momentum management plan. Changes in the requirements or the momentum management plan can lead to design changes in the mode. The momentum management plan defines the expected momentum buildup trend, the desired momentum state and how often the system is driven to the desired momentum state (unloaded). The desired momentum state is chosen based on wheel capacity, wheel configuration, thruster layout and thruster sizing. For the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the predefined wheel momentum capacity is a function of the jitter requirements, power, and maximum momentum capacity. Changes in jitter requirements or power limits can lead to changes in the desired momentum state. These changes propagate into the changes in the momentum management plan and therefore the Delta H mode design. This paper presents the analysis and design performed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Delta H mode. In particular, the mode logic and processing needed to meet requirements is described along with the momentum distribution formulation. The Delta H mode design is validated using the Solar Dynamics Observatory High Fidelity simulator. Finally, a summary of the design is provided along with concluding remarks.

  18. Tracking Nile Delta Vulnerability to Holocene Change

    PubMed Central

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Clément; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the ‘monsoon pacemaker’, attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile’s deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan ‘depeopling’, reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms) and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world’s deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction. PMID:23922692

  19. What can be learned from binding energy differences about nuclear structure: The example of {delta}V{sub pn}

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.

    2011-06-15

    We perform an analysis of a binding energy difference called {delta}V{sub pn}(N,Z){identical_to}-(1/4)[E(Z,N)-E(Z,N-2)-E(Z-2,N)+E(Z-2,N-2)] in the framework of a realistic nuclear model. It has been suggested that {delta}V{sub pn} values provide a sensitive probe of nuclear structure, and it has been put forward as a primary motivation for the measurement of specific nuclear masses. Using the angular momentum and particle-number projected generator coordinate method and the Skyrme interaction SLy4, we analyze the contribution brought to {delta}V{sub pn} by static deformation and dynamic fluctuations around the mean-field ground state. Our method gives a good overall description of {delta}V{sub pn} throughout the chart of nuclei with the exception of the anomaly related to the Wigner energy along the N=Z line. The main conclusions of our analysis of {delta}V{sub pn}, which are at variance with its standard interpretation, are that (i) the structures seen in the systematics of {delta}V{sub pn} throughout the chart of nuclei can be easily explained combining a smooth background related to the symmetry energy and correlation energies due to deformation and collective fluctuations, (ii) the characteristic pattern of {delta}V{sub pn} having a much larger size for nuclei that add only particles or only holes to a doubly magic nucleus than for nuclei that add particles for one nucleon species and holes for the other is a trivial consequence of the asymmetric definition of {delta}V{sub pn} and not due to a the different structure of these nuclei, (iii) {delta}V{sub pn} does not provide a very reliable indicator for structural changes, (iv){delta}V{sub pn} does not provide a reliable measure of the proton-neutron interaction in the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) or of that between the last filled orbits or of the one summed over all orbits, and (v) {delta}V{sub pn} does not provide a conclusive benchmark for nuclear EDF methods that is superior or complementary to

  20. Genetics Home Reference: activated PI3K-delta syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions activated PI3K-delta syndrome activated PI3K-delta syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Activated PI3K-delta syndrome is a disorder that impairs the immune ...

  1. 78 FR 45592 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45 East Avenue... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  2. De-Mystifying the Dirac [delta]-Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzer, Carl V.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we discuss an alternative method of teaching students about the Dirac [delta]-function. The method provides students with the mechanical tools they need in order to work with the [delta]-function in practice, while also fostering a sense of cohesion in the calculus curriculum by presenting the [delta]-function as an evolution of…

  3. The Niger Delta petroleum system; Niger Delta Province, Nigeria, Cameroon, and equatorial Guinea, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    In the Niger Delta province, we have identified one petroleum system--the Tertiary Niger Delta (Akata-Agbada) petroleum system. The delta formed at the site of a rift triple junction related to the opening of the southern Atlantic starting in the Late Jurassic and continuing into the Cretaceous. The delta proper began developing in the Eocene, accumulating sediments that now are over 10 kilometers thick. The primary source rock is the upper Akata Formation, the marine-shale facies of the delta, with possibly contribution from interbedded marine shale of the lowermost Agbada Formation. Oil is produced from sandstone facies within the Agbada Formation, however, turbidite sand in the upper Akata Formation is a potential target in deep water offshore and possibly beneath currently producing intervals onshore. Known oil and gas resources of the Niger Delta rank the province as the twelfth largest in the world. To date, 34.5 billion barrels of recoverable oil and 93.8 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas have been discovered. In 1997, Nigeria was the fifth largest crude oil supplier to the United States, supplying 689,000 barrels/day of crude.

  4. THE 2011 PERIASTRON PASSAGE OF THE Be BINARY {delta} Scorpii

    SciTech Connect

    Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Pasechnik, A. V.; Manset, N.; Carciofi, A. C.; Rivinius, Th.; Stefl, S.; Ribeiro, J.; Fernando, A.; Garrel, T.; Knapen, J. H.; Buil, C.; Heathcote, B.; Pollmann, E.; Mauclaire, B.; Thizy, O.; Martin, J.; Zharikov, S. V.; Okazaki, A. T.; and others

    2013-04-01

    We describe the results of the world-wide observing campaign of the highly eccentric Be binary system {delta} Scorpii 2011 periastron passage which involved professional and amateur astronomers. Our spectroscopic observations provided a precise measurement of the system orbital period at 10.8092 {+-} 0.0005 yr. Fitting of the He II 4686 A line radial velocity curve determined the periastron passage time on 2011 July 3, UT 9:20 with a 0.9-day uncertainty. Both these results are in a very good agreement with recent findings from interferometry. We also derived new evolutionary masses of the binary components (13 and 8.2 M{sub Sun }) and a new distance of 136 pc from the Sun, consistent with the HIPPARCOS parallax. The radial velocity and profile variations observed in the H{alpha} line near the 2011 periastron reflected the interaction of the secondary component and the circumstellar disk around the primary component. Using these data, we estimated a disk radius of 150 R{sub Sun }. Our analysis of the radial velocity variations measured during the periastron passage time in 2000 and 2011 along with those measured during the 20th century, the high eccentricity of the system, and the presence of a bow shock-like structure around it suggest that {delta} Sco might be a runaway triple system. The third component should be external to the known binary and move on an elliptical orbit that is tilted by at least 40 Degree-Sign with respect to the binary orbital plane for such a system to be stable and responsible for the observed long-term radial velocity variations.

  5. 78 FR 22911 - Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Seatac, WA; Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call Center, Sioux City, IA... workers and former workers of Delta Air Lines, Inc., Reservation Sales and Customer Care Call...

  6. BCAS2 Regulates Delta-Notch Signaling Activity through Delta Pre-mRNA Splicing in Drosophila Wing Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Wei; Chen, Po-Han; Chan, Shih-Peng; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Wu, June-Tai; Chen, Show-Li

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that BCAS2 is essential for Drosophila viability and functions in pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we provide strong evidence that BCAS2 regulates the activity of Delta-Notch signaling via Delta pre-mRNA splicing. Depletion of dBCAS2 reduces Delta mRNA expression and leads to accumulation of Delta pre-mRNA, resulting in diminished transcriptions of Delta-Notch signaling target genes, such as cut and E(spl)m8. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human BCAS2 (hBCAS2) and Drosophila BCAS2 (dBCAS2) in a dBCAS2-deprived fly can rescue dBCAS2 depletion-induced wing damage to the normal phenotypes. These rescued phenotypes are correlated with the restoration of Delta pre-mRNA splicing, which affects Delta-Notch signaling activity. Additionally, overexpression of Delta can rescue the wing deformation by deprivation of dBCAS2; and the depletion of dBCAS2 can restore the aberrant eye associated with Delta-overexpressing retinas; providing supporting evidence for the regulation of Delta-Notch signaling by dBCAS2. Taken together, dBCAS2 participates in Delta pre-mRNA splicing that affects the regulation of Delta-Notch signaling in Drosophila wing development. PMID:26091239

  7. DELTA SCUTI, SX PHOENICIS, AND RR LYRAE STARS IN GALAXIES AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, D. H.

    2011-10-15

    The distances to four galaxies and two globular clusters which are derived with the aid of period-luminosity and period-color relations of {delta} Scuti and SX Phe stars are compared to the distances derived by other methods, in particular RR Lyrae stars. We examine the luminosities of horizontal branch or RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff I and II globular clusters. Observational data from a variety of sources indicate a discontinuous jump of {approx}0.2 mag in the luminosities of RR Lyrae variables at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.5 as we transition from Oosterhoff I to Oosterhoff II clusters. If Oosterhoff I clusters have RR Lyrae variables with average M{sub V} values of M{sub V} = 0.53 mag at [Fe/H] = -1.5, it implies that RR Lyrae stars in Oosterhoff II clusters average M{sub V} values are {approx}0.34 mag. Unlike the Oosterhoff I clusters which show an increase in the V luminosity of RR Lyrae stars as [Fe/H] becomes smaller, little or no change in the V luminosity of RR Lyrae variables is evident in Oosterhoff II clusters in the interval of [Fe/H] from -1.5 to -2.2. We find distance moduli found with RR Lyrae variables agree to {<=}0.04 mag with those found with the {delta} Scuti and/or SX Phe variables if the M{sub V} values of RR Lyrae stars above are adopted. We find evidence of recent star formation (presence of near solar-metallicity {delta} Scuti stars with ages of 150 Myr to 1 Gyr) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and the central region of the Fornax (dSph) galaxies. We also find an older population of metal-poor {delta} Scuti variables (SX Phe stars) in the LMC and Fornax galaxies. The Carina dSph is unique in that only an old population of metal-poor {delta} Scuti variables is evident. No evidence of recent {delta} Scuti star formation is found. The minimum periods observed for the SX Phe variables (blue stragglers) in the globular clusters M55 and {omega} Cen indicate that they could have been formed in a burst of metal-poor single star

  8. 78 FR 21491 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption... that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P. and DeltaPoint Capital IV (New York), L.P., 45 East Avenue, 6th Floor... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  9. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis.

  10. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  11. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  12. Comparisons of wartime and peacetime disease and non-battle injury rates aboard ships of the British Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Blood, C G; Pugh, W M; Gauker, E D; Pearsall, D M

    1992-12-01

    Disease and non-battle injury rates were computed for ships of the British Royal Navy which were deployed during wartime and peacetime operations. The wartime sick list admission rates were lower aboard carriers, battleships, and cruisers when compared with their counterparts deployed in peacetime; rate differences for battleships and cruisers were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Several categories of disease also yielded significant differences in the wartime/peacetime contrasts. Infections and parasitic disorders aboard carriers, skin diseases aboard battleships, and skin diseases, injuries, and generative system disorders occurring on cruisers were all lower during wartime than on peacetime deployments. Illness rates also varied by ship type, with the lowest rates evidenced aboard carriers. PMID:1470374

  13. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    SciTech Connect

    Widory, D.; Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G.; Bour, O.

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  14. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conflict: Strategic Insights for California's Policymakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moazezi, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta - a major water supply source in California and a unique habitat for many native and invasive species--is on the verge of collapse due to a prolonged conflict over how to manage the Delta. There is an urgent need to expedite the resolution of this conflict because the continuation of the status quo would leave irreversible environmental consequences for the entire state. In this paper a systematic technique is proposed for providing strategic insights into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta conflict. Game theory framework is chosen to systematically analyze behavioral characteristics of decision makers as well as their options in the conflict with respect to their preferences using a formal mathematical language. The Graph Model for Conflict Resolution (GMCR), a recent game-theoretic technique, is applied to model and analyze the Delta conflict in order to better understand the options, preferences, and behavioral characteristics of the major decision makers. GMCR II as a decision support system tool based on GMCR concept is used to facilitate the analysis of the problem through a range of non-cooperative game theoretic stability definitions. Furthermore, coalition analysis is conducted to analyze the potential for forming partial coalitions among decision makers, and to investigate how forming a coalition can influence the conflict resolution process. This contribution shows that involvement of the State of California is necessary for developing an environmental-friendly resolution for the Delta conflict. It also indicates that this resolution is only achievable through improving the fragile levee systems and constructing a new water export facility.

  15. On regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Bamdad; Nigam, Nilima; Stockie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we consider regularizations of the Dirac delta distribution with applications to prototypical elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). We study the convergence of a sequence of distributions SH to a singular term S as a parameter H (associated with the support size of SH) shrinks to zero. We characterize this convergence in both the weak-* topology of distributions and a weighted Sobolev norm. These notions motivate a framework for constructing regularizations of the delta distribution that includes a large class of existing methods in the literature. This framework allows different regularizations to be compared. The convergence of solutions of PDEs with these regularized source terms is then studied in various topologies such as pointwise convergence on a deleted neighborhood and weighted Sobolev norms. We also examine the lack of symmetry in tensor product regularizations and effects of dissipative error in hyperbolic problems.

  16. Measurement of OH, H2SO4, MSA, and HNO3 Aboard the P-3B Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the measurement of OH, H2SO4, MSA, and HNO3 aboard the P-3B aircraft under the following headings: 1) Performance Report; 2) Highlights of OH, H2SO4, and MSA Measurements Made Aboard the NASA P-3B During TRACE-P; 3) Development and characteristics of an airborne-based instrument used to measure nitric acid during the NASA TRACE-P field experiment.

  17. Resurveys of active mudslides, Mississippi Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, David B.; Coleman, James M.

    1981-03-01

    A survey procedure using digitally acquired, scale-corrected sidescan sonar has been applied to document active submarine landslides in the Mississippi Delta region. Periodic resurveys have been completed for a 70-km2 area in water depths of 10 to 50 m. Sufficient resurvey precision allowed short-term changes in seafloor mapping to be observed. Mudslides showed enlargement by retrogression and downslope surging within a single 5-month period.

  18. Adaptive Delta Management: cultural aspects of dealing with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, Jos; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Hermans, Leon; Kwakkel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Deltas are generally recognized as vulnerable to climate change and therefore a salient topic in adaptation science. Deltas are also highly dynamic systems viewed from physical (erosion, sedimentation, subsidence), social (demographic), economic (trade), infrastructures (transport, energy, metropolization) and cultural (multi-ethnic) perspectives. This multi-faceted dynamic character of delta areas warrants the emergence of a branch of applied adaptation science, Adaptive Delta Management, which explicitly focuses on climate adaptation of such highly dynamic and deeply uncertain systems. The application of Adaptive Delta Management in the Dutch Delta Program and its active international dissemination by Dutch professionals results in the rapid dissemination of Adaptive Delta Management to deltas worldwide. This global dissemination raises concerns among professionals in delta management on its applicability in deltas with cultural conditions and historical developments quite different from those found in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom where the practices now labelled as Adaptive Delta Management first emerged. This research develops an approach and gives a first analysis of the interaction between the characteristics of different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management and their alignment with the cultural conditions encountered in various delta's globally. In this analysis, first different management theories underlying approaches to Adaptive Delta Management as encountered in both scientific and professional publications are identified and characterized on three dimensions: The characteristics dimensions used are: orientation on today, orientation on the future, and decision making (Timmermans, 2015). The different underlying management theories encountered are policy analysis, strategic management, transition management, and adaptive management. These four management theories underlying different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management are connected to

  19. Vertical profile of delta 18000 from middle stratosphere to lower mesosphere derived by retrieval algorithm developed for SMILES spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Sato, Tomohiro; Sagawa, Hideo

    Ozone is known to have large oxygen isotopic enrichments of about 10% in the middle stratosphere, however, there have been no reports on ozone isotopic enrichments above the middle stratosphere. We derived an enrichment delta18OOO by a retrieval algorithm specified for the isotopic ratio from the stratosphere to the lower mesosphere based on observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The retrieval algorithm includes (i) an a priori covariance matrix constrained by oxygen isotopic ratios in ozone, (ii) an optimization of spectral windows for ozone isotopomers and isotopologues, and (iii) a common tangent height information for all windows. The delta18OOO obtained by averaging the SMILES measurements at the latitude range of 20N to 40N from February to March in 2010 with solar zenith angle less than 80(°) °was 15 % (at 32 km) and the systematic error was estimated to be about 5 percent. SMILES and past measurements were in good agreement with delta18OOO increasing with altitude between 30 and 40 km. The vertical profile of δ18OOO obtained in this study showed an increase and a decrease with altitude in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. Stratopause is the peak-height of the delta18OOO value, and it rose to 18 %. The delta18OOO has a positive correlation with temperature in the range of 220-255 K, indicating that temperature can be a dominant factor to control the vertical profile of delta18OOO in the stratosphere and mesosphere. This is the first report of the observation of delta18OOO over a wide range extending from the stratosphere to the mesosphere.

  20. WESTAR-V launch on delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The WESTAR-V, the second in a series of second-generation, large, 24-transponder communications satellites developed for the Space Communications Company is discussed. It is scheduled to be launched on a Delta vehicle from the Eastern Space and Missile Center no earlier than June 8, 1982. The launch support for this mission will be provided by NASA, on a reimbursable basis, to the Space Communications Company for a fixed price of $25.OM. The launch vehicle for the WESTAR-V mission will be the Delta 3910 configuration which incorporates an extended long tank Thor booster, nine Castor IV strap-on motors, a TR-201 second stage, and an 8-foot fairing. The Delta launch vehicle will place the spacecraft along a suborbital trajectory. The PAM-D stage will then thrust it to a synchronous transfer orbit. Three days after launch, the spacecraft apogee kick motor will be fired to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 19,300 NM above the equator at approxmately 75 degrees west longitude.

  1. Delta: Data Reduction for Integrated Application Workflows.

    SciTech Connect

    Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick; Jean-Baptiste, Gregory; Oldfield, Ron A.

    2015-06-01

    Integrated Application Workflows (IAWs) run multiple simulation workflow components con- currently on an HPC resource connecting these components using compute area resources and compensating for any performance or data processing rate mismatches. These IAWs require high frequency and high volume data transfers between compute nodes and staging area nodes during the lifetime of a large parallel computation. The available network band- width between the two areas may not be enough to efficiently support the data movement. As the processing power available to compute resources increases, the requirements for this data transfer will become more difficult to satisfy and perhaps will not be satisfiable at all since network capabilities are not expanding at a comparable rate. Furthermore, energy consumption in HPC environments is expected to grow by an order of magnitude as exas- cale systems become a reality. The energy cost of moving large amounts of data frequently will contribute to this issue. It is necessary to reduce the volume of data without reducing the quality of data when it is being processed and analyzed. Delta resolves the issue by addressing the lifetime data transfer operations. Delta removes subsequent identical copies of already transmitted data during transfers and restores those copies once the data has reached the destination. Delta is able to identify duplicated information and determine the most space efficient way to represent it. Initial tests show about 50% reduction in data movement while maintaining the same data quality and transmission frequency.

  2. Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} regulates interleukin-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} mRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eric; Jakinovich, Paul; Bae, Aekyung; Rebecchi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Phospholipase C-{delta}{sub 1} (PLC{delta}{sub 1}) is a widely expressed highly active PLC isoform, modulated by Ca{sup 2+} that appears to operate downstream from receptor signaling and has been linked to regulation of cytokine production. Here we investigated whether PLC{delta}{sub 1} modulated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rat C6 glioma cells. Expression of PLC{delta}{sub 1} was specifically suppressed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the effects on cytokine mRNA expression, stimulated by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were examined. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results showed that PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown enhanced expression IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) mRNA by at least 100 fold after 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA treatment. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knock down caused persistently high Nf{kappa}b levels at 4 h of LPS stimulation compared to control siRNA-treated cells. PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown was also associated with elevated nuclear levels of c-Jun after 30 min of LPS stimulation, but did not affect LPS-stimulated p38 or p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, normally associated with TLR activation of cytokine gene expression; rather, enhanced protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation of cellular proteins was observed in the absence of LPS stimulation. An inhibitor of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide II (BIM), reversed phosphorylation, prevented elevation of nuclear c-Jun levels, and inhibited LPS-induced increases of IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} mRNA's induced by PLC{delta}{sub 1} knockdown. Our results show that loss of PLC{delta}{sub 1} enhances PKC/c-Jun signaling and up-modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcription in concert with the TLR-stimulated p38MAPK/Nf{kappa}b pathway. Our findings are consistent with the idea that PLC{delta}{sub 1} is a

  3. Quantitative expression patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} (PPAR{beta}/{delta}) protein in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Girroir, Elizabeth E.; Hollingshead, Holly E.; He Pengfei; Zhu Bokai; Perdew, Gary H.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2008-07-04

    The expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta} have been described, but the majority of these data are based on mRNA data. To date, there are no reports that have quantitatively examined the expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein in mouse tissues. In the present study, a highly specific PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibody was developed, characterized, and used to examine tissue expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta}. As compared to commercially available anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies, one of six polyclonal anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies developed was significantly more effective for immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated PPAR{beta}/{delta}. This antibody was used for quantitative Western blot analysis using radioactive detection methods. Expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} was highest in colon, small intestine, liver, and keratinocytes as compared to other tissues including heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, lung, brain, and thymus. Interestingly, PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression was localized in the nucleus and RXR{alpha} can be co-immunoprecipitated with nuclear PPAR{beta}/{delta}. Results from these studies demonstrate that PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression is highest in intestinal epithelium, liver, and keratinocytes, consistent with significant biological roles in these tissues.

  4. Explanation of the {delta}{sub 5/2{sup -}}(1930) as a {rho}{delta} bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Oset, E.; Vijande, J.

    2009-02-15

    We use the {rho}{delta} interaction in the hidden gauge formalism to dynamically generate N* and {delta}* resonances. We show, through a comparison of the results from this analysis and from a quark model study with data, that the {delta}{sub 5/2{sup -}}(1930), {delta}{sub 3/2{sup -}}(1940), and {delta}{sub 1/2{sup -}}(1900) resonances can be assigned to {rho}{delta} bound states. More precisely the {delta}{sub 5/2{sup -}}(1930) can be interpreted as a {rho}{delta} bound state whereas the {delta}{sub 3/2{sup -}}(1940) and {delta}{sub 1/2{sup -}}(1900) may contain an important {rho}{delta} component. This interpretation allows for a solution of a long-standing puzzle concerning the description of these resonances in constituent quark models. In addition we also obtain degenerate J{sup P}=1/2{sup -},3/2{sup -},5/2{sup -} N* states but their assignment to experimental resonances is more uncertain.

  5. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  6. Restraining Loose Equipment Aboard the International Space Station: The Payload Equipment Restraint System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith Kenneth A.; Reynolds, David W.

    2003-01-01

    As the International Space Station (ISS) grows, so do the supplies and equipment needed to support its daily operations. Each day many items must be unstowed and moved to various worksites so that they are readily available to the crew. Due to the lack of gravity, these items ,may become loose and float away if not restrained. The Payload Equipment Restraint System (PERS) was developed to meet the new and unique challenge of restraining loose equipment aboard the ISS.

  7. Making a difference: CRNAs aboard the USNS Comfort respond to the disaster in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shervette

    2010-08-01

    The devastating earthquake in Haiti on January 12, 2010, resulted in massive destruction and human suffering that captured attention worldwide. This column details the experiences shared by the anesthesia department aboard the USNS Comfort. A total of 843 urgent and emergent surgical cases were completed. The mission included cooperation of both military and civilian anesthesia providers. The level of devastation and trauma provided an experience unparalleled by most trauma units and will forever be etched in the minds of those who responded.

  8. Soyuz 24 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz. This is the first time all samples were acquired with the mini-grab samplers. The toxicological assessment of 15 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C(13)-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 75, 97 and 79%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned on Soyuz 24

  9. Inefficiency of sanitation measures aboard commercial aircraft: environmental pollution and disease.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, R

    1977-07-01

    Recent investigations at Tokyo International Airport have proven that environmental pollution resulting from the inefficient disposal of human excretion aboard aircraft is an important problem from the standpoint of quarantine. It is, therefore, recommended that the worldwide aviation industry take immediate measures to improve conditions and eliminate this problem, which has thus far been ignored by aircraft designers, airport administration, and CAB personnel. PMID:329830

  10. Respective role of microgravity and cosmic rays on Paramecium tetraurelia cultured aboard Salyut 6.

    PubMed

    Planel, H; Tixador, R; Richoilley, G; Gasset, G; Templier, J

    1985-06-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia cultured aboard Salyut 6 have shown in increase in cell growth rate, cell volume, water content and changes in electrolyte content. Additional experiments, carried out in balloon flight and on earth, showed that the stimulating effect observed on cell proliferation is related to exposure to cosmic rays. Other changes seem to be due to a direct effect of microgravity on cell. Mechanism of gravity action on cell is discussed.

  11. Administration of mu-, kappa- or delta2-receptor agonists via osmotic minipumps suppresses murine splenic antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Rahim, R T; Meissler, J J; Cowan, A; Rogers, T J; Geller, E B; Gaughan, J; Adler, M W; Eisenstein, T K

    2001-10-01

    Previously, our laboratory has shown that morphine given by implantation of a 75-mg slow-release pellet for 48 h suppresses murine splenic antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in a plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. However, the use of slow-release pellets for such studies is limited, as these pellets are only available in fixed doses and similar pellets for kappa and delta agonists have not been developed. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of administering opioids via Alzet osmotic minipumps to assess their immunomodulatory effects. Groups of mice received minipumps dispensing morphine sulfate, which has primary activity at the mu opioid receptor; U50,488H, which is a kappa-selective agonist; deltorphin II, which is a delta2-selective agonist; or DPDPE, which has greater selectivity for delta1 than delta, receptors. Morphine, U50,488H and deltorphin II were all immunosuppressive, with biphasic dose-response curves exhibiting maximal (approximately 50%) suppression of the PFC response at doses of 0.5 to 2 mg/kg/day 48 h after pump implantation. Further, immunosuppression by morphine sulfate, U50,488H or deltorphin II was blocked by simultaneous implantation of a minipump administering the opioid receptor-selective antagonists CTAP (1 mg/kg/day), nor-binaltorphimine (5 mg/kg/day), or naltriben (3 mg/kg/day), respectively. DPDPE was inactive at doses lower than 10 mg/kg/day. We conclude that osmotic minipumps are a practical and useful way of administering opioids to study their effects on the immune system, and give further evidence that immunosuppression induced in vivo by opioid agonists is mediated not only via mu, but also via kappa and delta2 opioid receptors. PMID:11606031

  12. The Evaluation of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction. As community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a health concern in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts aboard ISS or the space station itself. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis of archived ISS isolates confirmed our earlier studies indicating a transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers. In addition, this fingerprinting also indicated a transfer between crewmembers and their environment. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and the environment, phenotypic evaluations indicated minimal methicillin resistance. However, positive results for the Penicillin Binding Protein, indicative of the presence of the mecA gene, were detected in multiple isolates of archived Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Phenotypic analysis of these isolates confirmed their resistance to methicillin. While MRSA has not been isolated aboard ISS, the potential exists for the transfer of the gene, mecA, from coagulase negative environmental Staphylococcus to S. aureus creating MRSA strains. This study suggests the need to expand environmental monitoring aboard long duration exploration spacecraft to include antibiotic resistance profiling.

  13. Peculiarities of ultrastructure of Chlorella cells growing aboard the Bion-10 during 12 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A. F.; Sytnik, K. M.

    The ultrastructure of Chlorella cells grown in darkness on a solid agar medium with organic additions aboard the Bion-1O biosatellite was studied. Certain differences in submicroscopic organization of organelles in the experimental cells were revealed compared to the Earth control. The changes are registered mainly in ultrastructure of energetic organelles - mitochondria and plastids of the experimental cells, in particular, an increase of mitochondria and their cristae size, as well as an increase of the total volume of mitochondrion per cell were established. The decrease of the starch amount in the plastid stroma and the electron density of the latter was also observed. In many experimental cells, the increase of condensed chromatin in the nuclei has been noted. Ultrastructural rearrangements in cells after laboratory experiment realized according to the thermogram registered aboard the Bion-10 were insignificant compared to the flight experiment. Data obtained are compared to results of space flight experiments carried out aboard the Bion-9 (polycomponent aquatic system) and the orbital station Mir (solid agar medium).

  14. Analysis, testing, and evaluation of faulted and unfaulted Wye, Delta, and open Delta connected electromechanical actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nehl, T. W.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Mathematical models capable of simulating the transient, steady state, and faulted performance characteristics of various brushless dc machine-PSA (power switching assembly) configurations were developed. These systems are intended for possible future use as primemovers in EMAs (electromechanical actuators) for flight control applications. These machine-PSA configurations include wye, delta, and open-delta connected systems. The research performed under this contract was initially broken down into the following six tasks: development of mathematical models for various machine-PSA configurations; experimental validation of the model for failure modes; experimental validation of the mathematical model for shorted turn-failure modes; tradeoff study; and documentation of results and methodology.

  15. Analysis, testing, and evaluation of faulted and unfaulted Wye, Delta, and open Delta connected electromechanical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehl, T. W.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1983-07-01

    Mathematical models capable of simulating the transient, steady state, and faulted performance characteristics of various brushless dc machine-PSA (power switching assembly) configurations were developed. These systems are intended for possible future use as primemovers in EMAs (electromechanical actuators) for flight control applications. These machine-PSA configurations include wye, delta, and open-delta connected systems. The research performed under this contract was initially broken down into the following six tasks: development of mathematical models for various machine-PSA configurations; experimental validation of the model for failure modes; experimental validation of the mathematical model for shorted turn-failure modes; tradeoff study; and documentation of results and methodology.

  16. Dual regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity by {delta}Np63 in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.-K.; Lee, K.-C.; Chow, S.-E.; Chen, J.-K. . E-mail: jkc508@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2006-04-21

    p63 splicing variants lacking NH{sub 2}-terminal transactivating domain, known as {delta}Np63, are thought to antagonize p53 and p63 functions and are suggested to play roles in keratinocyte differentiation. Here, we show that {delta}Np63 has a dual-regulatory effect on the activity of its own promoter in NPC-076 cell. Down-regulation of the transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is present in low levels. In contrast, up-regulation of {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity is observed when {delta}Np63 is expressed at higher levels. The down-regulation effect is abolished when the p53-binding site of the {delta}Np63 promoter is mutated. In sharp contrast, similar mutation does not affect the up-regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity under the same experimental conditions. Further study shows that the up-regulation is correlated with the activation of the STAT3, as the blockade of STAT3 nuclear translocation abolishes the up-regulation by {delta}Np63. Thus, {delta}Np63 exerts a bidirectional regulation of the {delta}Np63 transcriptional activity in NPC-076 cell.

  17. Delta channel networks: 2. Metrics of topologic and dynamic complexity for delta comparison, physical inference, and vulnerability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Zaliapin, Ilya; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2015-06-01

    Deltas are landforms that deliver water, sediment and nutrient fluxes from upstream rivers to the deltaic surface and eventually to oceans or inland water bodies via multiple pathways. Despite their importance, quantitative frameworks for their analysis lack behind those available for tributary networks. In a companion paper, delta channel networks were conceptualized as directed graphs and spectral graph theory was used to design a quantitative framework for exploring delta connectivity and flux dynamics. Here we use this framework to introduce a suite of graph-theoretic and entropy-based metrics, to quantify two components of a delta's complexity: (1) Topologic, imposed by the network connectivity and (2) Dynamic, dictated by the flux partitioning and distribution. The metrics are aimed to facilitate comparing, contrasting, and establishing connections between deltaic structure, process, and form. We illustrate the proposed analysis using seven deltas in diverse morphodynamic environments and of various degrees of channel complexity. By projecting deltas into a topo-dynamic space whose coordinates are given by topologic and dynamic delta complexity metrics, we show that this space provides a basis for delta comparison and physical insight into their dynamic behavior. The examined metrics are demonstrated to relate to the intuitive notion of vulnerability, measured by the impact of upstream flux changes to the shoreline flux, and reveal that complexity and vulnerability are inversely related. Finally, a spatially explicit metric, akin to a delta width function, is introduced to classify shapes of different delta types.

  18. Measuring Delta Progradation Using Delta Front Flow Patterns: A New Method of Remote Imagery Analysis on the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, J. D.; Shaw, J.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the progradation of the Wax Lake Delta (WLD), a sub-delta of the Mississippi River Delta, can lend valuable insight into coastal land-building patterns. Previous studies of WLD progradation have relied on subaerially-exposed land for indicating delta extent, but an inherent problem with this method lies in the high variability of exposed land due to vegetative, hydrologic, and atmospheric fluctuations. By mapping water surface films observed in remote imagery which form streaklines along flow paths in the delta, we show that the shallow delta front flow patterns are relatively unaffected by short term water level changes and can be used to evaluate WLD progradation over time. Remotely sensed imagery from multiple sources (infrared aerial photography, SPOT, UAVSAR) spanning from 1988 to 2015 was used to map streaklines from which we calculate a flow direction divergence field across the delta. Measuring the translation of this field through time, such as areas containing extreme divergence values along the delta front, quantifies the progradation over the time elapsed. Preliminary measurements of WLD progradation were subdivided into the eastern, southern, and western thirds of the delta. The eastern third prograded at 110 ±20m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 100 ±40m/yr from 1997 - 2002, and then remained relatively constant to 2015. The southern third prograded at 130 ±20m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 200 ±40m/yr from 1997 - 2002, and remained relatively constant to 2015. The western third prograded at 130 ±30m/yr from 1988 - 1997, 220 ±60 m from 1997 - 2002, and then remained relatively constant from 2002 - 2015. Also of note is the retrogradation on the average of 700 ±400m observed from January to August, 1992 which we interpret as being caused by the impact of Hurricane Andrew. The streakline methodology of evaluating WLD progradation could provide new methods for analysis of land change in other deltas around the world.

  19. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  20. Reynolds Number, Compressibility, and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects on Delta-Wing Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of Reynolds number, compressibility, and leading edge bluntness effects is presented for a 65 degree delta wing. The results of this study address both attached and vortex-flow aerodynamics and are based upon a unique data set obtained in the NASA-Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) for i) Reynolds numbers ranging from conventional wind-tunnel to flight values, ii) Mach numbers ranging from subsonic to transonic speeds, and iii) leading-edge bluntness values that span practical slender wing applications. The data were obtained so as to isolate the subject effects and they present many challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies.

  1. Tidal river dynamics: Implications for deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Jay, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Tidal rivers are a vital and little studied nexus between physical oceanography and hydrology. It is only in the last few decades that substantial research efforts have been focused on the interactions of river discharge with tidal waves and storm surges into regions beyond the limit of salinity intrusion, a realm that can extend inland hundreds of kilometers. One key phenomenon resulting from this interaction is the emergence of large fortnightly tides, which are forced long waves with amplitudes that may increase beyond the point where astronomical tides have become extinct. These can be larger than the linear tide itself at more landward locations, and they greatly influence tidal river water levels and wetland inundation. Exploration of the spectral redistribution and attenuation of tidal energy in rivers has led to new appreciation of a wide range of consequences for fluvial and coastal sedimentology, delta evolution, wetland conservation, and salinity intrusion under the influence of sea level rise and delta subsidence. Modern research aims at unifying traditional harmonic tidal analysis, nonparametric regression techniques, and the existing understanding of tidal hydrodynamics to better predict and model tidal river dynamics both in single-thread channels and in branching channel networks. In this context, this review summarizes results from field observations and modeling studies set in tidal river environments as diverse as the Amazon in Brazil, the Columbia, Fraser and Saint Lawrence in North America, the Yangtze and Pearl in China, and the Berau and Mahakam in Indonesia. A description of state-of-the-art methods for a comprehensive analysis of water levels, wave propagation, discharges, and inundation extent in tidal rivers is provided. Implications for lowland river deltas are also discussed in terms of sedimentary deposits, channel bifurcation, avulsion, and salinity intrusion, addressing contemporary research challenges.

  2. On \\delta-derivations of n-ary algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaygorodov, Ivan B.

    2012-12-01

    We give a description of \\delta-derivations of (n+1)-dimensional n-ary Filippov algebras and, as a consequence, of simple finite-dimensional Filippov algebras over an algebraically closed field of characteristic zero. We also give new examples of non-trivial \\delta-derivations of Filippov algebras and show that there are no non-trivial \\delta-derivations of the simple ternary Mal'tsev algebra M_8.

  3. Erosional furrows on continental shelf edge, Mississippi delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, James M.; Prior, David B.; Adams, Charles E.

    1981-03-01

    Erosional furrows are recognized on the seafloor off the Mississippi Delta, trending downslope over the shelf edge. They occur in water depths of 150 to 380 m seaward of presently active mudslides on the delta slope. The furrows cross an area of former mudslide deposition and part of the outer shelf. Their origin is likely to be related to cross-shelf secondary helical flows, although delta-front mass movement could cause similar erosional gouging.

  4. Delta-92 Telesat-A operations summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Telesat-A, which is the first of the Canadian Telesat satellites to be launched for the domestic satellite communications system is described. The launch vehicle, designated Delta-92 consists of a DSV 3p-11 extended long tank first stage with an MB-3 engine, augmented by low-drag Castor 2 solid motors. The spacecraft has a spin-stabilized electronic system powered by 23,000 solar cells, with sufficient on-board battery capability to provide full capacity power during eclipse of the solar cells. A 60-inch wide circular directional antenna which remains constantly aimed at Canada is included.

  5. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, J.; Koshelets, V. P.; Dmitriev, P.

    2010-02-01

    The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements on a number of delta-biased samples having different electrical and geometrical parameters.

  6. Investigation of television transmission using adaptive delta modulation principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of a study on the use of the delta modulator as a digital encoder of television signals. The computer simulation of different delta modulators was studied in order to find a satisfactory delta modulator. After finding a suitable delta modulator algorithm via computer simulation, the results were analyzed and then implemented in hardware to study its ability to encode real time motion pictures from an NTSC format television camera. The effects of channel errors on the delta modulated video signal were tested along with several error correction algorithms via computer simulation. A very high speed delta modulator was built (out of ECL logic), incorporating the most promising of the correction schemes, so that it could be tested on real time motion pictures. Delta modulators were investigated which could achieve significant bandwidth reduction without regard to complexity or speed. The first scheme investigated was a real time frame to frame encoding scheme which required the assembly of fourteen, 131,000 bit long shift registers as well as a high speed delta modulator. The other schemes involved the computer simulation of two dimensional delta modulator algorithms.

  7. Elwha River Delta: Geomorphology of a Mixed-Sediment Beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, D. A.; Warrick, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    The Elwha River drains the Olympic Peninsula of Washington and forms a mixed grain-size delta in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The Elwha River has been dammed for almost a century, and a pending dam removal project is expected to reconnect upstream sediment sources to the river mouth. Topographic and grain-size mapping of the delta during 1939-2007 is synthesized and the geomorphology and shoreline changes of this system are described. Data sources include historical aerial photographs, airborne LIDAR, semiannual RTK DGPS topographic surveys and grain-size analyses from digital photographs. The delta is divided into three geomorphic regions: west delta, river mouth and east delta. The river mouth is the most complex region due to the river channel movement, side-channels, and bars immediately offshore of the mouth. The east and west delta differ in beach profile and shoreline change rates. The west delta is steep, cuspate and lacks a low-tide terrace. Further, the west delta has exhibited little semi-annual or inter-annual shoreline change. In contrast, the east delta has a steep foreshore, flat low tide terrace that is dominated by cobble, and a consistent trend of erosion during the surveys. These observations can be used to track coastal changes following dam removal on the Elwha River..

  8. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  9. The effect of interference on delta modulation encoded video signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study on the use of the delta modulator as a digital encoder of television signals are presented. The computer simulation was studied of different delta modulators in order to find a satisfactory delta modulator. After finding a suitable delta modulator algorithm via computer simulation, the results are analyzed and then implemented in hardware to study the ability to encode real time motion pictures from an NTSC format television camera. The effects were investigated of channel errors on the delta modulated video signal and several error correction algorithms were tested via computer simulation. A very high speed delta modulator was built (out of ECL logic), incorporating the most promising of the correction schemes, so that it could be tested on real time motion pictures. The final area of investigation concerned itself with finding delta modulators which could achieve significant bandwidth reduction without regard to complexity or speed. The first such scheme to be investigated was a real time frame to frame encoding scheme which required the assembly of fourteen, 131,000 bit long shift registers as well as a high speed delta modulator. The other schemes involved two dimensional delta modulator algorithms.

  10. SAGE II aerosol validation: selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J M; Russell, P B; Pueschel, R F; Rosen, J N; Osborn, M T; Kritz, M A; Snetsinger, K G; Ferry, G V

    1989-06-20

    Correlative aerosol measurements taken at a limited number of altitudes during coordinated field experiments are used to test the validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements taken by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II Sun photometer. In particular, results are presented from correlative measurement missions that were conducted during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986. Correlative sensors included impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers aboard an U-2-airplane, an upward pointing lidar aboard a P-3 airplane, and balloon-borne optical particle counters (dustsondes). The main body of this paper focuses on the July 29, 1986, validation experiment, which minimized the many difficulties (e.g., spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, imperfect coincidences) that can complicate the validation process. On this day, correlative aerosol measurements taken at an altitude of 20.5 km agreed with each other within their respective uncertainties, and particulate extinction values calculated at SAGE II wavelengths from these measurements validated corresponding SAGE II values. Additional validation efforts on days when measurement and logistical conditions were much less favorable for validation are discussed in an appendix.

  11. Proteolytic processing of a coleopteran-specific delta-endotoxin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J; Li, J; Ellar, D J

    1989-01-01

    Insecticidal protein delta-endotoxin crystals harvested from sporulated cultures of Bacillus thuringiensis var. tenebrionis contain a major polypeptide of 67 kDa and minor polypeptides of 73, 72, 55 and 46 kDa. During sporulation, only the 73 kDa polypeptide could be detected at stage I. The 67 kDa polypeptide was first detected at stage II and increased in concentration throughout the later stages of sporulation and after crystal release, with a concomitant decrease in the 73 kDa polypeptide. This change could be blocked by the addition of proteinase inhibitors. Trypsin or insect-gut-extract treatment of the delta-endotoxin crystals after solubilization resulted in a cleavage product of 55 kDa with asparagine-159 of the deduced amino acid sequence of the toxin [Höfte, Seurinck, van Houtven & Vaeck (1987) Nucleic Acids Res. 15, 71-83; Sekar, Thompson, Maroney, Bookland & Adang (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 7036-7040; McPherson, Perlak, Fuchs, Marrone, Lavrik & Fischhoff (1988) Biotechnology 6, 61-66] at the N-terminus. This polypeptide was found to be as toxic in vivo as native delta-endotoxin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2549968

  12. Delta(18)O characteristics of lichens and their effects on evaporative processes of the subjacent soil.

    PubMed

    Hartard, Britta; Máguas, C; Lakatos, M

    2008-03-01

    The study presents first data on the delta(18)O performance of poikilohydrous lichen ground cover, and its potential impact on the isotopic composition of water fluxes arising from subjacent soil layers. As a model organism, the globally distributed lichen Cladina arbuscula was studied under laboratory conditions as well as in the field. During a desiccation experiment, delta(18)O of the lichen's thallus water and of its respired CO(2) became enriched by approximately 7 per thousand and followed a similar enrichment pattern to that expected from homoiohydrous, vascular plants. However, the observed degree of enrichment was lower in comparison to vascular plants due to (i) the lichen's inherent lower evaporative resistances; and (ii) a stronger effect of the more depleted surrounding water vapour. In lichens growing in their natural habitat, this specific pattern may show substantial variations depending on prevailing microclimatic conditions. Within a field study, thallus water delta(18)O of lichens principally proved to become more depleted when close to equilibration with the surroundings. It thereby strongly depended on the absorption of surrounding water vapour. Moreover, the results indicate that lichen mats substantially reduce evaporation rates arising from subjacent soil layers, and may alter the isotopic signal of vapour diffusing away from these layers into more depleted values. PMID:18320432

  13. Squeaking and microcracks in a delta-delta ceramic coupling: pin-on-disc study.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami; Shintani, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    There is a rising concern about squeaking in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA). In pin-on-disc testing of a delta-delta coupling, we reproduced squeaking and observed microcracks on worn surfaces. We used a pin-on-disc machine and made discs and pins by cutting delta ceramic to a diameter of 40 mm (D-D). Cross-linked polyethylene was used for a comparison disc (D-P). We performed the same test using another D-D coupling specimen to confirm reproducibility. Squeaking in the D-D specimen was reproduced in wet conditions, though it was not found in the D-P specimen. Fast Fourier transform analysis showed a peak frequency for squeaking of 2794 Hz. The noise occurred at about 6.6 km of sliding distance. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the worn surface of the pin in D-D at 10.8 km of sliding distance had some microcracks. However, there was no obvious damage to the worn surface of the pin in D-P at the same sliding distance. We confirmed the reproducibility of these findings, obtaining similar results, including squeaking, from another D-D coupling specimen. Our findings show that squeaking may occur in THA using delta ceramic bearings even if implants are placed to avoid extra-articular impingement of the femoral neck. Although the clinical relevance of microcracks is unknown, they may affect long-term outcomes in THA using delta ceramic bearings.

  14. High resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Late Miocene Abu Madi Formation, Northern Nile Delta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Mohammad Abdelfattah

    2015-12-01

    Abu Madi Formation represents the Upper Miocene Messinian age in the Nile Delta basin. It consists mainly of sandstones and shale intercalations and because of its richness in hydrocarbon, it has been subdivided by the petroleum companies into Level-I, Level-II and Level-III, respectively according to the increase in the sandstone to the shale ratio. The Miocene cycle in the northern subsurface section of the Nile Delta encompasses three main formations namely from the base; Sidi Salim formation, Qawasim Formation and Abu Madi Formation at the top. The high resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis, using gamma ray responses, has been done for the Late Miocene formation in the northern part of the Nile delta subsurface section. For this purpose, the gamma-ray logs of ten deep wells, arranged in four cross-sections trending in almost north-south direction throughout the northern region of the Nile Delta, were analyzed. The analysis has revealed that the interpreted 4th order depositional cycles within Abu Madi Formation display great variations in both number and gamma ray responses in each investigated well, and cannot be traced laterally, even in the nearest well. These variations in the interpreted 4th order depositional sequences could be attributed to the presence of normal faults buried in the inter-area laying between the investigated wells. This finding matches with the conclusion of that Abu Madi Formation represents a part of the Upper Miocene Nile Delta syn-rift megasequence, developed during the Upper Miocene rift phase of the Red Sea - Gulf of Suez province in Egypt. Accordingly, in the sequence stratigraphic approach, the depositional history of Abu Madi Formation was strongly overprinted by the tectonic controls rather than the relative sea-level changes which are assumed to be of a secondary influence. Regarding the hydrocarbon aspects of the Abu Madi Formation, the present work recommends to direct the drilling efforts into the stratigraphic traps

  15. Hydro-environmental status and soil management of the River Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elewa, H. H.; El Nahry, A. H.

    2009-04-01

    The sea level rise has its own-bearing on the coastal recession and hydro-environmental degradation of the River Nile Delta. Attempts are made here to use remote sensing to detect the coastal recession in some selected parts and delineating the chemistry of groundwater aquifers and surface water, which lie along south-mid-northern and coastal zone of the Nile Delta. Eight water samples from groundwater monitoring wells and 13 water samples from surface water were collected and analyzed for various hydrochemical parameters. The groundwater samples are classified into five hydrochemical facies on Hill-Piper trilinear diagram based on the dominance of different cations and anions: facies 1: Ca-Mg-Na-HCO3-Cl-SO4 type I; facies 2: Na-Cl-HCO3 type II; facies 3: Na-Ca-Mg-Cl type III, facies 4: Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-HCO3 type IV and facies 5: Na-Mg-Cl type V. The hydrochemical facies showed that the majority of samples were enriched in sodium, bicarbonate and chloride types and, which reflected that the sea water and tidal channel play a major role in controlling the groundwater chemical composition in the Quaternary shallow aquifers, with a severe degradation going north of Nile Delta. Also, the relationship between the dissolved chloride (Cl, mmol/l), as a variable, and other major ion combinations (in mmol/l) were considered as another criterion for chemical classification system. The low and medium chloride groundwater occurs in southern and mid Nile Delta (Classes A and B), whereas the high and very high chloride (classes D and C) almost covers the northern parts of the Nile Delta indicating the severe effect of sea water intrusion. Other facets of hydro-environmental degradation are reflected through monitoring the soil degradation process within the last two decades in the northern part of Nile Delta. Land degradation was assessed by adopting new approach through the integration of GLASOD/FAO approach and Remote Sensing/GIS techniques. The main types of human induced soil

  16. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang K. H.; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Maurer, Hansruedi; Rabenstein, Lasse; Doetsch, Joseph; Auken, Esben; Ngwisanyi, Tiyapo; Tshoso, Gomotsang; Jaba, Bashali Charles; Ntibinyane, Onkgopotse; Laletsang, Kebabonye

    2015-03-01

    Integration of information from the following sources has been used to produce a much better constrained and more complete four-unit geological/hydrological model of the Okavango Delta than previously available: (i) a 3D resistivity model determined from helicopter time-domain electromagnetic (HTEM) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta, and (iii) geological details extracted from boreholes in northeastern and southeastern parts of the delta. The upper heterogeneous unit is the modern delta, which comprises extensive dry and freshwater-saturated sand and lesser amounts of clay and salt. It is characterized by moderate to high electrical resistivities and very low to low P-wave velocities. Except for images of several buried abandoned river channels, it is non-reflective. The laterally extensive underlying unit of low resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and subhorizontal reflectors very likely contains saline-water-saturated sands and clays deposited in the huge Paleo Lake Makgadikgadi (PLM), which once covered a 90,000 km2 area that encompassed the delta, Lake Ngami, the Mababe Depression, and the Makgadikgadi Basin. Examples of PLM sediments are intersected in many boreholes. Low permeability clay within the PLM unit seems to be a barrier to the downward flow of the saline water. Below the PLM unit, freshwater-saturated sand of the Paleo Okavango Megafan (POM) unit is distinguished by moderate to high resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and numerous subhorizontal reflectors. The POM unit is interpreted to be the remnants of a megafan based on the arcuate nature of its front and the semi-conical shape of its upper surface in the HTEM resistivity model. Moderate to high resistivity subhorizontal layers are

  17. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  18. Niger delta deepwater region petroleum potential assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.

    1995-12-18

    On behalf of the Nigerian Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Resources some 23,000 km of high quality 192 channel, 96 fold seismic, and associated gravity and magnetic data were acquired by TGSI-Mabon Geophysical Co. and made available to the industry in 1991. These data were collected over all deepwater blocks in conjunction with the planned 1993 license round. Later, during 1993 and 1994 TGSI with Mabon Ltd. and Stratum Petroleum Services extended the program onto the shelf (7,000 km) and into the ultra deepwater areas (6,400 km), making possible modern studies of the entire offshore delta complex. In assessing the petroleum potential of an undrilled region, it is useful to refer to analogous basins or provinces already with histories of hydrocarbon exploration and discovery. With this in mind, and using limited data from the already drilled areas of Nigeria offshore, the adjacent West Africa salt basin and Brazil in particular, an attempt is made to discuss the hydrocarbon habitat of the undrilled Niger delta deepwater offshore sedimentary sequences.

  19. In vivo metabolism of the methyl homologues of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and abn-delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brown, N K; Harvey, D J

    1988-04-01

    Methyl-delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (methyl-delta-8-THC), methyl-delta-9-THC and abn-methyl-delta-8-THC were synthesized by condensation of orcinol and (1S)-cis-verbenol and were administered to male Charles River CD-1 mice. Extracted hepatic metabolites were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as trimethylsilyl (TMS), (2H9)TMS and methyl ester/TMS derivatives. In addition, metabolic fractions were reduced with lithium aluminium deuteride to convert carboxylic acids to alcohols for structural correlation. Metabolites from methyl-delta-8-THC were similar with respect to the positions substituted to those produced by higher homologues; the major metabolite was methyl-delta-8-THC-11-oic acid. abn-Methyl-delta-8-THC was metabolized in a different manner. The location of the aromatic methyl group at the position adjacent to ring fusion appeared to inhibit metabolism at C(11) to a considerable extent and also to reduce the amount of the resulting alcohol from being oxidized to a carboxylic acid. This caused other metabolic pathways to become dominant, with the result that a compound containing a hydroxy group at the gem-methyl position was the major metabolite. Hydroxylation at this position has not been confirmed with any other cannabinoid, although it is thought to result in trace concentrations of hydroxy metabolites from some compounds. Metabolism of methyl-delta-9-THC was also similar to that of the higher homologues, with the exception that less metabolism occurred at C(8) and a higher percentage of the total metabolic fraction was accounted for by the 11-oic acid metabolite. Minor metabolites were mainly dihydroxy compounds and hydroxylated derivatives of delta-9-THC-11-oic acid.

  20. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions.

  1. Delta13C analyses of calcium carbonate: Comparison between the GasBench and elemental analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Paul, Debajyoti

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of stable carbon isotopic composition (delta13C) of carbonates or carbonate-rich soils are seldom performed in a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) using an elemental analyzer (EA) as an online sample preparation device. Such analyses are routinely carried out with an external precision better than 0.1 per thousand using a GasBench II (GB) sample preparation device coupled online with a continuous-flow IRMS. In this paper, we report and compare delta13C analyses (86 total analyses) of calcium carbonates obtained by using both the GB and the EA. Using both techniques, the delta13C compositions of two in-house carbonate standards (MERCK carbonate and NR calcite) and ten selected carbonate-rich paleosol samples (of variable CaCO3 content) were analyzed, and data are reported in the VPDB scale calibrated against international standards, NBS 18 and 19. For the in-house standards analyzed by both techniques, a precision better than 0.08 per thousand is achieved. The analytical errors (1sigma) computed from multiple analyses of the delta13C of both the MERCK and NR obtained by the above two techniques are nearly identical. In general, the 1sigma (internal error) of paleosol analyses obtained in the GB is better than 0.06 per thousand, whereas that for the analyses in the EA (three repetitive analyses of the same sample) varies in the range 0.05-0.21 per thousand. However, for paleosols having more than 85% CaCO3, 1sigma is better than 0.15 per thousand (similar to the instrument precision), and in this case the delta13C(VPDB) of samples obtained by the GB is similar to that obtained by the EA. Our results suggest that the delta13C of pure calcium carbonate samples can also be analyzed using the EA technique.

  2. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  3. Noise and exposure of personnel aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Erlend; Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Moen, Bente E; Gjestland, Truls; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Bråtveit, Magne

    2015-03-01

    Despite awareness of noise aboard vessels at sea, few studies have reported measured noise levels aboard ships. This study aimed to describe the noise levels aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to assess the noise exposure of personnel aboard RNoN vessels. In 2012/2013 noise measurements were conducted aboard 14 RNoN vessels from four different vessel classes (frigates, coastal corvettes, mine vessels, and coast guard vessels) which were included in this study. Mean and median A-weighted noise levels (L p,A) in decibel (dB(A)) were calculated for different locations in each vessel class. The noise exposure of RNoN personnel was assessed by dosimeter measurements, and with a task-based (TB) strategy. The TB strategy used means of area measured noise levels in locations and the personnel's mean reported time spent in the respective locations to estimate the exposure. Area measurements of noise during sailing with typical operating modes, showed that for all vessel classes the noise levels were high in engine rooms with median L p,A ranging from 86.4 to 105.3 dB(A). In all the other locations the vessel class with the highest noise levels (coastal corvettes) had a median L p,A ranging from 71.7 to 95.0 dB(A), while the vessel class with the lowest noise levels (coast guard vessels) had a median L p,A ranging from 41.5 to 57.8 dB(A). For all vessel classes the engineers and electricians had amongst the highest 24-hour noise exposure (L p,A,24h), both before and after adjusting for estimated use of hearing protective devices (L p,A,24h > 67.3 dB(A)). The vessel class with the highest personnel exposure levels (coastal corvettes) had L p,A,24h ranging from 76.6 to 79.3 dB(A). The vessel class with the lowest personnel exposure levels (coast guard vessels) had an L p,A,24h ranging from 47.4 to 67.3 dB(A). In general, the dosimeter measurements gave higher exposure levels than those estimated with the TB strategy. All vessel classes, except the coast

  4. Noise and exposure of personnel aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Erlend; Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Moen, Bente E; Gjestland, Truls; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Bråtveit, Magne

    2015-03-01

    Despite awareness of noise aboard vessels at sea, few studies have reported measured noise levels aboard ships. This study aimed to describe the noise levels aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to assess the noise exposure of personnel aboard RNoN vessels. In 2012/2013 noise measurements were conducted aboard 14 RNoN vessels from four different vessel classes (frigates, coastal corvettes, mine vessels, and coast guard vessels) which were included in this study. Mean and median A-weighted noise levels (L p,A) in decibel (dB(A)) were calculated for different locations in each vessel class. The noise exposure of RNoN personnel was assessed by dosimeter measurements, and with a task-based (TB) strategy. The TB strategy used means of area measured noise levels in locations and the personnel's mean reported time spent in the respective locations to estimate the exposure. Area measurements of noise during sailing with typical operating modes, showed that for all vessel classes the noise levels were high in engine rooms with median L p,A ranging from 86.4 to 105.3 dB(A). In all the other locations the vessel class with the highest noise levels (coastal corvettes) had a median L p,A ranging from 71.7 to 95.0 dB(A), while the vessel class with the lowest noise levels (coast guard vessels) had a median L p,A ranging from 41.5 to 57.8 dB(A). For all vessel classes the engineers and electricians had amongst the highest 24-hour noise exposure (L p,A,24h), both before and after adjusting for estimated use of hearing protective devices (L p,A,24h > 67.3 dB(A)). The vessel class with the highest personnel exposure levels (coastal corvettes) had L p,A,24h ranging from 76.6 to 79.3 dB(A). The vessel class with the lowest personnel exposure levels (coast guard vessels) had an L p,A,24h ranging from 47.4 to 67.3 dB(A). In general, the dosimeter measurements gave higher exposure levels than those estimated with the TB strategy. All vessel classes, except the coast

  5. Multidecadal Fluvial Sediment Fluxes to Deltas under Environmental Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Frances; Darby, Stephen; Nicholls, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sediment delivery is vital to sustain delta environments on which over half a billion people live worldwide. Due to factors such as subsidence and sea level rise, deltas sink relative to sea level if sediment is not delivered to and retained on their surfaces. Deltas which sink relative to sea level experience flooding, land degradation and loss, which endangers anthropogenic activities and populations. The future of fluvial sediment fluxes, a key mechanism for sediment delivery to deltas, is uncertain due to complex environmental changes which are predicted to occur over the coming decades. This research investigates fluvial sediment fluxes under environmental changes in order to assess the sustainability of delta environments under potential future scenarios up to 2100. Global datasets of climate change, reservoir construction, and population and GDP as proxies for anthropogenic influence through land use changes are used to drive the catchment numerical model WBMsed, which is being used to investigate the effects of these environmental changes on fluvial sediment delivery. This process produces fluvial sediment fluxes under multiple future scenarios which will be used to assess the future sustainability of a selection of 8 vulnerable deltas, although the approach can be applied to deltas worldwide. By modelling potential future scenarios of fluvial sediment flux, this research contributes to the prognosis for delta environments. The future scenarios will inform management at multiple temporal scales, and indicate the potential consequences for deltas of various anthropogenic activities. This research will both forewarn managers of potentially unsustainable deltas and indicate those anthropogenic activities which encourage or hinder the creation of sustainable delta environments.

  6. Loss of protein kinase C delta from human HaCaT keratinocytes upon ras transfection is mediated by TGF alpha.

    PubMed

    Geiges, D; Marks, F; Gschwendt, M

    1995-07-01

    The spontaneously immortalized human skin keratinocytes HaCaT contain protein kinase C (PKC) alpha, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta. All PKC isoenzymes except PKC zeta are down-regulated by TPA as well as by bryostatin. However, with PKC delta, bryostatin but not TPA was found to be much less effective at high concentrations than at low ones. PKC delta expression at the protein and mRNA level is significantly suppressed in HaCaT cells I-7 and II-4, which are transfected with mutated c-Ha-ras. The expression of the other isoenzymes remains essentially unchanged in the ras-transfected cells compared to normal ones. PKC delta is lost when growing HaCaT cells in a medium obtained from the cultivation of ras-transfected cells ("ras-conditioned" medium). The factor secreted into the medium by the ras-transfected cells that is responsible for this effect appears to be TGF alpha, since the action of ras-conditioned medium on PKC delta expression can be overcome by the addition of an anti-TGF alpha antibody. Moreover, treatment of HaCaT cells with TGF alpha suppresses selectively the expression of the PKC isoenzyme delta.

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Stability of Formulations Contained in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf life are essential for successful space medical operations in support of space exploration missions. Physical and environmental factors unique to space missions such as vibration, G forces and ionizing radiation may adversely affect stability of pharmaceuticals intended for standard care of astronauts aboard space missions. Stable pharmaceuticals, therefore, are of paramount importance for assuring health and wellness of astronauts in space. Preliminary examination of stability of formulations from Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) medical kits revealed that some of these medications showed physical and chemical degradation after flight raising concern of reduced therapeutic effectiveness with these medications in space. A research payload experiment was conducted with a select set of formulations stowed aboard a shuttle flight and on ISS. The payload consisted of four identical pharmaceutical kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms that were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the Space Shuttle, STS 121. One of the four kits was stored on the shuttle and the other three were stored on the ISS for return to Earth at six months intervals on a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit; the shuttle kit was returned to Earth on the same flight. Standard stability indicating physical and chemical parameters were measured for all pharmaceuticals returned from the shuttle and from the first ISS increment payload along with ground-based matching controls. Results were compared between shuttle, ISS and ground controls. Evaluation of data from the three paradigms indicates that some of the formulations exhibited significant degradation in space compared to respective ground controls; a few formulations were unstable both on the ground and in space. An increase in the number of pharmaceuticals from ISS failing USP standards was noticed compared to those from the shuttle

  9. Commercial opportunities in bioseparations and physiological testing aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Cell Research (CCR) is a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space which has as its main goal encouraging industry-driven biomedical/biotechnology space projects. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide long duration, crew-tended microgravity environments which will enhance the opportunities for commercial biomedical/biotechnology projects in bioseparations and physiological testing. The CCR bioseparations program, known as USCEPS (for United States Commercial Electrophoresis Program in Space), is developing access for American industry to continuous-flow electrophoresis aboard SSF. In space, considerable scale-up of continuous free-flow electrophoresis is possible for cells, sub cellular particles, proteins, growth factors, and other biological products. The lack of sedemination and buoyancy-driven convection flow enhances purity of separations and the amount of material processed/time. Through the CCR's physiological testing program, commercial organizations will have access aboard SSF to physiological systems experiments (PSE's); the Penn State Biomodule; and telemicroscopy. Physiological systems experiments involve the use of live animals for pharmaceutical product testing and discovery research. The Penn State Biomodule is a computer-controlled mini lab useful for projects involving live cells or tissues and macro molecular assembly studies, including protein crystallization. Telemicroscopy will enable staff on Earth to manipulate and monitor microscopic specimens on SSF for product development and discovery research or for medical diagnosis of astronaut health problems. Space-based product processing, testing, development, and discovery research using USCEPS and CCR's physiological testing program offer new routes to improved health on Earth. Direct crew involvement-in biomedical/biotechnology projects aboard SSF will enable better experimental outcomes. The current data base shows that there is reason for considerable optimism

  10. Microstructure Analysis of Directionally Solidified Aluminum Alloy Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angart, Samuel Gilbert

    This thesis entails a detailed microstructure analysis of directionally solidified (DS) Al-7Si alloys processed in microgravity aboard the International Space Station and similar duplicate ground based experiments at Cleveland State University. In recent years, the European Space Agency (ESA) has conducted experiments on alloy solidification in microgravity. NASA and ESA have collaborated for three DS experiments with Al- 7 wt. % Si alloy, aboard the International Space Station (ISS) denoted as MICAST6, MICAST7 and MICAST12. The first two experiments were processed on the ISS in 2009 and 2010. MICAST12 was processed aboard the ISS in the spring of 2014; the resulting experimental results of MICAST12 are not discussed in this thesis. The primary goal of the thesis was to understand the effect of convection in primary dendrite arm spacings (PDAS) and radial macrosegregation within DS aluminum alloys. The MICAST experiments were processed with various solidification speeds and thermal gradients to produce alloy with differences in microstructure features. PDAS and radial macrosegregation were measured in the solidified ingot that developed during the transition from one solidification speed to another. To represent PDAS in DS alloy in the presence of no convection, the Hunt-Lu model was used to represent diffusion-controlled growth. By sectioning cross-sections throughout the entire length of solidified samples, PDAS was measured and calculated. The ground-based (1-g) experiments done at Cleveland State University CSU were also analyzed for comparison to the ISS experiments (0-g). During steady state in the microgravity environment, there was a reasonable agreement between the measured and calculated PDAS. In ground-based experiments, transverse sections exhibited obvious radial macrosegregation caused by thermosolutal convection resulting in a non-agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Using a combination of image processing techniques and Electron Microprobe Analysis

  11. High-temperature containerless aircraft furnace experimentation in the microgravity environment aboard a KC-135 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M.; Guynes, Buddy V.; Shurney, Robert; Weeks, Jack

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a materials processing research furnace, the High-Temperature Containerless Aircraft Furnace (HITCAF), which uses an electric arc to melt and resolidify materials in the microgravity environment aboard a KC-135 aircraft. The HITCAF is designed to process almost every electrically conductive material, including such high-melting-point materials as tungsten, within a 15 to 20 sec microgravity period. It operates on tungsten/inert gas welding principles, using an adapted commercially available tube welder. The HITCAF is fully operational and available for use by researchers representing the Government agencies, as well as industry and academia.

  12. STS-65 crew works inside the IML-2 spacelab module aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In the spacelab science module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, four members of the STS-65 crew busy themselves with experiments in support of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Mission Specialist (MS) Donald A. Thomas with his feet hooked on a center aisle stowage unit handrail talks with MS Leroy Chiao in the foreground while Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb takes notes at Rack 5 Biorack (BR) glovebox. Japanese Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai reviews her notes in the background. Mukai represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  13. The monitoring system for vibratory disturbance detection in microgravity environment aboard the international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laster, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Scientists in the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications within the Microgravity Research Division oversee studies in important physical, chemical, and biological processes in microgravity environment. Research is conducted in microgravity environment because of the beneficial results that come about for experiments. When research is done in normal gravity, scientists are limited to results that are affected by the gravity of Earth. Microgravity provides an environment where solid, liquid, and gas can be observed in a natural state of free fall and where many different variables are eliminated. One challenge that NASA faces is that space flight opportunities need to be used effectively and efficiently in order to ensure that some of the most scientifically promising research is conducted. Different vibratory sources are continually active aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Some of the vibratory sources include crew exercise, experiment setup, machinery startup (life support fans, pumps, freezer/compressor, centrifuge), thruster firings, and some unknown events. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMs), which acts as the hardware and carefully positioned aboard the ISS, along with the Microgravity Environment Monitoring System MEMS), which acts as the software and is located here at NASA Glenn, are used to detect these vibratory sources aboard the ISS and recognize them as disturbances. The various vibratory disturbances can sometimes be harmful to the scientists different research projects. Some vibratory disturbances are recognized by the MEMS's database and some are not. Mainly, the unknown events that occur aboard the International Space Station are the ones of major concern. To better aid in the research experiments, the unknown events are identified and verified as unknown events. Features, such as frequency, acceleration level, time and date of recognition of the new patterns are stored in an Excel database. My task is to

  14. Calibration of the spin-scan ozone imager aboard the dynamics Explorer 1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, Walter E.; Keating, Gerald M.; Young, David F.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration technique, which contains the calibrated backscattered radiance values necessary for performing the calibrations, is presented. The calibration constants for September to October 1981 to determine total columnar ozone from the Spin-Scan Ozone Imager (SOI), which is a part of the auroral imaging instrumentation aboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 Satellite, are provided. The precision of the SOI-derived total columnar ozone is estimated to be better than 2.4 percent. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlation coefficients between total columnar ozone obtained from Dobson ground stations and SOI which indicate that the SOI total columnar ozone determination is equally accurate for clear or cloudy weather conditions.

  15. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  16. A prototype gas exchange monitor for exercise stress testing aboard NASA Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Joseph A.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Bauer, Anne

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an easy-to-use monitor developed to track the weightlessness deconditioning aboard the NASA Space Station, together with the results of testing of a prototype instrument. The monitor measures the O2 uptake and CO2 production, and calculates the maximum O2 uptake and anaerobic threshold during an exercise stress test. The system uses two flowmeters in series to achieve a completely automatic calibration, and uses breath-by-breath compensation for sample line-transport delay. The monitor was evaluated using two laboratory methods and was shown to be accurate. The system's block diagram and the bench test setup diagram are included.

  17. Astronauts Schirra and Stafford welcomed aboard the U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (shaking hands) and Thomas P. Stafford received an Official welcome as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp following their 25 hour 52 minute mission in space. The three Navy officers greeting the astronauts are (left to right) Vice Admiral Charles E. Weakley, commander of the Antisubmarine Warfare Force of the Atlantic Fleet; Rear Admiral William E. Leonard, commander of Antisubmarine Task Group Bravo, of which the Wasp is the flagship; and Capt. G.E. Hartley, commander of the Wasp.

  18. Analyses of plasma for metabolic and hormonal changes in rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Alfred H., Jr.; Wang, Elaine; Mullins, Richard E.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Popova, Irina A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasmas samples from rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044 were analyzed for the levels of key metabolites, electrolytes, enzymes, and hormones. The major differences between the flight group and the synchronous control were elevations in glucose, cholesterol, phosphate, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased levels of thyroxine. Most of these differences were not mimicked by tail suspension of ground-based rats; however, both flight and suspended rats exhibited inhibited testosterone secretion. Corticosterone, immunoreactive growth hormone, and prolactin showed inconsistent differences from the various control groups, suggesting that the levels of these hormones were not due to actual or simulated microgravity.

  19. STS-87 Commander Kregel arrives at the SLF aboard a T-38 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Commander Kevin Kregel arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet for the final prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 liftoff. The other STS-87 crew members are Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Winston Scott; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite.

  20. STS-87 Pilot Lindsey arrives at the SLF aboard a T-38 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Pilot Steven Lindsey arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet for the final prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 liftoff. The other STS-87 crew members are Commander Kevin Kregel; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Winston Scott; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite.

  1. Soyuz 7 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of one grab sample canister (GSC), 6 dual sorbent tubes (DSTs), and 20 formaldehyde badges returned aboard Soyuz 7 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSC were 84-89%. The recoveries of the less volatile surrogates from the DSTs were 87 to 112%; however, 13C-acetone was only recovered at 53-59%. Formaldehyde recoveries from 2 lab controls were 87 and 95%; trip controls were not returned to ground.

  2. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  3. Analysis of environmental issues for nursing aboard the USNS Mercy (T-AH 19).

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R T; Boren, D M

    2001-06-01

    The USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) is a unique environment for its staff and patients. Several environmental influences distinctively affect health, medical, and nursing care. Six main areas of environmental concern for operational nursing were examined. The strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to the internal environment of a hospital ship were explored. Findings indicate that the USNS Mercy meets or exceeds many environmental standards. However, there is significant room for improvement and nursing involvement in issues related to the management of infectious diseases, patient transport, care of patients with nuclear, biological, or chemical agents, and management of wastes aboard the ship. Nursing implications for research and practice are proposed.

  4. Paresev 1-C with inflatable wing testbed aboard a truck in preparation for flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aboard a truck and ready for a test flight is the Paresev 1-C on the ramp at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The half-scale version of the inflatable Gemini parawing was pre-flighted by being carried across the Rosamond dry lakebed on the back of a truck before a tow behind a International Harvester Carry-All. The inflatable center spar ran fore and aft and measured 191 inches, two other inflatable spars formed the leading edges. The three compartments were filled with nitrogen under pressure to make them rigid. The Paresev 1-C was very unstable in flight with this configuration.

  5. The Concentration Dependence of the (Delta)s Term in the Gibbs Free Energy Function: Application to Reversible Reactions in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Ronald K.

    2004-01-01

    The concentration dependence of (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy function is described in relation to its application to reversible reactions in biochemistry. An intuitive and non-mathematical argument for the concentration dependence of the (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy equation is derived and the applicability of the equation to…

  6. Late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    Interpretations of 35,000 km (21,900 mi) of single-channel, high-resolution, seismic profiles traversing the continental shelf and upper continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico indicate the existence of five late Wisconsinan shelf margin deltas, including the Rio Grande and Mississippi deltas. The deltas were recognized by geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform seismic reflections, and associated with buried river systems. Isopach patterns show that the deltas range in size up to 5000 km/sup 2/ (1900 mi/sup 2/) and reach thicknesses of over 180 m (590 ft). The deposits are elongate parallel with depositional strike, indicating subsidence of the shelf margin as a whole. Internal reflection patterns show the deltas to be fluvially dominated. Multilobate structure resulted from both short-term eustatic sea level fluctuations and delta switching. The late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas provide models for analogous deposits in the ancient record. They are primary indicators of the position of ancient shelf margins, and are important for predicting sand occurrence in that environment as well as farther downslope. As exploration moves to the shelf edge and beyond, instability hazards posed by late Wisconsin deltas, as well as older deposits, must be understood and dealt with. 20 figures.

  7. Late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Berryhill, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Interpretations of 35,000 km (21,900 mi) of single-channel, high-resolution, seismic profiles traversing the continental shelf and upper continental slope of the northwest Gulf of Mexico indicate the existence of five late Wisconsinan shelf margin deltas, including the Rio Grande and Mississippi deltas. The deltas were recognized by geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform seismic reflections, and association with buried river systems. Isopach patterns show that the deltas range in size up to 5,000 km/sup 2/ (1,900 mi/sup 2/) and reach thicknesses of over 180 m (590 ft). The deposits are elongate parallel with depositional strike, indicating subsidence of the shelf margin as a whole. Internal reflection patterns show the deltas to be fluvially dominated. Multilobate structure resulted from both short-term eustatic sea level fluctuations and delta switching. The late Quaternary shelf-margin deltas provide models for analogous deposits in the ancient record. They are primary indicators of the position of ancient shelf margins, and are important for predicting sand occurrence in that environment as well as farther downslope. As exploration moves to the shelf edge and beyond, instability hazards posed by late Wisconsinan deltas, as well as older deposits, must be understood and dealt with.

  8. Assessments of Water Quality in Mississippi Delta Lake Watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper summarizes watershed scale research by USDA-ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory scientists on the effects of conservation management on water quality and ecology in oxbow lakes of the Mississippi Delta Region, USA. The Mississippi Delta Region is located in the central portion of the U...

  9. Deborah Partridge Wolfe: Biography of a Kappa Delta Pi Laureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Hover, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    In 1988, Kappa Delta Pi selected Dr. Deborah Partridge Wolfe for membership in its Laureate Chapter. Wolfe, a prominent African-American social educator, dedicated her career in education to living and promoting the key ideals of Kappa Delta Pi's mission: scholarship, excellence, diversity, inquiry, reflection, and fellowship. This biography of…

  10. 1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole marking the hardened intersite cable system in right center, commercial power pole outside fence in left center, view towards south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  11. Delta: the First Pion Nucleon Resonance - Its Discovery and Applications

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  12. Emerging leadership from communities in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Delta NIRI (Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative) team has conducted several research studies in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region employing the community-based participatory research (CBPR) model. Our collaborative work in the LMD focuses on interventions conducted in each of our c...

  13. Women in Leadership Roles in Phi Delta Kappa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Martha B.; And Others

    The professional and personal characteristics of the men and women in Phi Delta Kappa who hold the top elected positions in local chapters were compared, and the perceptions of these leaders of the impact of allowing women to be members of Phi Delta Kappa were assessed. A 43-item questionnaire was developed and mailed to 1,340 chapter presidents…

  14. Delta: the first pion nucleon resonance - its discovery and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, D.E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  15. Antinociceptive activity of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol non-ionic microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, P; Fadda, P; Marchese, G; Casu, G L; Pani, L

    2010-06-30

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the major psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa L., has been widely studied for its potential pharmaceutical application in the treatment of various diseases and disturbs. This sparingly soluble terpeno-phenolic compound is not easy to handle and to be formulated in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this work was to develop a stable aqueous Delta(9)-THC formulation acceptable for different ways of administration, and to evaluate the therapeutic properties of the new Delta(9)-THC based preparation for pain treatment. Due to the thermodynamic stability and advantages of microemulsion based systems, the study was focused on the identification of aqueous microemulsion based systems containing Delta(9)-THC. Oil in water Delta(9)-THC microemulsions were individuated through phase diagrams construction, using the non-ionic surfactant Solutol HS15, being this surfactant acceptable for parenteral administration in human. A selected microemulsion samples containing 0.2 wt% of Delta(9)-THC, stable up to 52 degrees C, was successfully assayed on animal models of pain. Significant antinociceptive activity has been detected by both intraperitoneal and intragastric administration of the new Delta(9)-THC pharmaceutical preparation. The effect has been highlighted in shorter time if compared to a preparation of the same active principle based on previously reported conventional preparation. PMID:20399844

  16. Exploration gaps exist in Nigeria`s prolific delta

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.

    1995-10-30

    The Niger delta region of the Republic of Nigeria is Africa`s largest oil producing area. It is clear that Nigeria will continue to contribute significantly to world petroleum production well into the 21st century: with increases in recoverable oil reserves in the Niger delta onshore and offshore; the promising potential of the Niger delta deepwater region; and a lesser but not insignificant contribution from the unexplored onshore Benue trough, part of the mid-African rift system, which has already proved to hold substantial oil reserves in the Doba basin of neighboring Chad. This is the first of five parts on Nigeria`s oil and gas potential. The later articles deal with Niger delta oil reserves and production, Niger delta gas reserves, the delta`s deepwater region, and the Benue trough and onshore cretaceous rift basins. This article deals with the geologic setting of the Niger delta-Benue trough region, the synrift deposits, marine sedimentation, margin evolution, geologic strata and reservoirs, reservoir character, structure and traps, hydrocarbon types, geotemperatures, and source rock quality.

  17. California's BAY-DELTA: USGS Science Supports Decision Making

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nickles, James; Taylor, Kimberly; Fujii, Roger

    2010-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are in the forefront of the effort to understand what causes changes in the hydrology, the ecology and the water quality of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and the San Francisco Bay estuary. Their scientific findings play a crucial role in how agencies manage the Bay-Delta on a daily basis.

  18. 76 FR 23970 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  19. 75 FR 67079 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  20. 78 FR 48647 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  1. 76 FR 12017 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  2. 76 FR 17105 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  3. 77 FR 53841 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  4. Upper-Division Student Difficulties with the Dirac Delta Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool that appears repeatedly in the undergraduate physics curriculum in multiple topical areas including electrostatics, and quantum mechanics. While Dirac delta functions are often introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students still struggle to manipulate and interpret them.…

  5. 76 FR 28211 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Forest,...

  6. Delta Project Planning and Implementation in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutt, Ashok K.; Heal, Stephen

    1979-01-01

    Describes a water management project in the Netherlands which is intended to protect the people, land, and property in the Delta Region from abnormally high floods. Presents background for initiation of the Delta Project and discusses problems encountered in the project to date. (Author/DB)

  7. The evolution of a subaqueous delta in the Anthropocene: A stratigraphic investigation of the Brazos River delta, TX USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Joseph A.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, deltas are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic activities. As a result, deltas now evolve through the combined effects of natural and human-induced processes occurring throughout the fluvial-deltaic system. The Brazos River delta, located along the Texas coast in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and its watershed have been impacted by direct and indirect human activities since the late 19th century. This provides an opportunity to investigate how such alterations have shaped the evolution of a delta in the Anthropocene, a time when humans are drivers of geological change. Historic alteration to the delta and watershed include extensive agricultural activity, jetty construction at the mouth in the late 1890s, mouth diversion ~10 km to the southwest in 1929, and reservoir construction throughout the early and mid 20th Century. Three subaerial deltaic geometries provided the framework to connect subaerial deltaic responses, to the anthropogenic alterations, to the resulting stratigraphic characteristics observed in the subaqueous delta. This study utilized high-resolution geophysical data (swath bathymetry, side scan sonar, CHIRP subbottom profiling) on the subaqueous delta to investigate the subaqueous delta stratigraphy and infer the processes that shaped the deltaic record over time. The results showed distinct areas across the subaqueous delta that were dominated by erosion and deposition. Erosional areas corresponded to earlier growth phase depocenters being exposed at the surface, while the depositional areas corresponded to areas with the most recent growth phase depocenter overlying the earlier depocenters. These results highlight that the subaqueous depocenter has migrated westward over time, consistent with the observed changes to the subaerial delta. Additionally, the data showed that evidence for these past growth phases and depocenters may be preserved within the subaqueous delta, even after subaerial portions of the delta returned to pre

  8. Hydrologic Modeling of a Tropical River Delta by Applying Remote Sensing Data: the Niger Delta and its Distributaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, M. T.; Syvitski, J. P.; Kettner, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Delta regions offer rich resources to coastal human populations with their large upstream freshwater sources. Tropical deltas such as the Niger, Nigeria, whose drainage basin incorporates arid regions, receive a significant portion of their runoff from precipitation falling directly on the delta. Between 1970 and 2006, the Niger discharged (Lokoja station) 5000 ± 890 m3/s into upper delta. Here we apply Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) based precipitation estimates (SB42), with a 0.25° x 0.25° spatial resolution (~100 grid points across the Niger Delta at 3 hourly intervals 1998-2008), and MODIS evapotranspiration (ET) estimates (MOD16), to determine the impact of massive local precipitation events on the routing of water and sediment flux through the Niger Delta's distributaries. The Niger delta receives 2275 mm/y ± 264 mm/y of rainfall with the SE area exceeding 3500 mm/y. The delta's ET varies seasonally between 45 and 65 mm/mo. The in situ generated hydrological runoff is 1675 mm/y, or an equivalent of a discharge 73% the size of the river flux entering the delta. With maximum annual daily discharge from the Niger often exceeding 15,000 m3/s, in combination with the significant in situ runoff, much of the delta's surface is seasonally under floodwaters. LandSat7 imagery indicates delta distributaries that are disconnected from the Niger River, and only drain local precipitation events. This disconnection plays into the discharge and sediment fluxes of these distributaries.

  9. Photoemission Spectroscopy of Delta- Plutonium: Experimental Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, J. G.

    2002-03-01

    The electronic structure of Plutonium, particularly delta- Plutonium, remains ill defined and without direct experimental verification. Recently, we have embarked upon a program of study of alpha- and delta- Plutonium, using synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA [1]. This work is set within the context of Plutonium Aging [2] and the complexities of Plutonium Science [3]. The resonant photoemission of delta-plutonium is in partial agreement with an atomic, localized model of resonant photoemission, which would be consistent with a correlated electronic structure. The results of our synchrotron- based studies will be compared with those of recent laboratory- based works [4,5,6]. The talk will conclude with a brief discussion of our plans for the future, such as the performance of spin-resolving and dichroic photoemission measurements of Plutonium [7] and the development of single crystal ultrathin films of Plutonium. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. 1. J. Terry, R.K. Schulze, J.D. Farr, T. Zocco, K. Heinzelman, E. Rotenberg, D.K. Shuh, G. van der Laan, D.A. Arena, and J.G. Tobin, “5f Resonant Photoemission from Plutonium”, UCRL-JC-140782, Surf. Sci. Lett., accepted October 2001. 2. B.D. Wirth, A.J. Schwartz, M.J. Fluss, M.J. Caturla, M.A. Wall, and W.G. Wolfer, MRS Bulletin 26, 679 (2001). 3. S.S. Hecker, MRS Bulletin 26, 667 (2001). 4. T. Gouder, L. Havela, F. Wastin, and J. Rebizant, Europhys. Lett. 55, 705 (2001); MRS Bulletin 26, 684 (2001); Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 3378 (2000). 5. A.J. Arko, J.J. Joyce, L. Morales, J. Wills, J. Lashley, F. Wastin, and J. Rebizant, Phys. Rev. B 62, 1773 (2000). 6. L.E. Cox, O. Eriksson, and B.R. Cooper, Phys. Rev. B 46, 13571 (1992). 7. J. Tobin, D.A. Arena, B. Chung, P. Roussel, J. Terry, R.K. Schulze, J.D. Farr, T. Zocco, K. Heinzelman, E

  10. Synthesis, characterization of Ag(I), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of a triazine-3-thione and their interactions with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Shuyan; Yang, Lin; Fan, Changqing

    2007-11-01

    Ag(I), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of 5-methoxy-5,6-diphenyl-4,5-dihydro-2H-[1,2,4]triazine-3-thione (LH(2)OCH(3)) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, (1)H NMR, IR spectra, UV spectra and thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The components of the three complexes are [Ag(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)](6), Pd(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)(2) and Pt(C(15)H(10)N(3)S)(2).C(3)H(6)O.2H(2)O, respectively. All the complexes are nonelectrolyte and have high thermodynamic stability. The ligand may act as bidentate NS donor for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes, while it seems to be bidentate NS bridging via sulphur atom for Ag(I) complex. A planar quadrangular structure is proposed for Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes and Ag(I) complex may be a hexanuclear cluster. Their interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) are investigated using steady state fluorescence technology. It is observed that all of them can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through static quenching procedure. The binding constants (K(A)) at different temperatures, thermodynamic parameters enthalpy changes (DeltaH) and entropy changes (DeltaS) between BSA and the compounds are calculated. Based on the values of DeltaH and DeltaS, it is judged that the main acting force of PtL(2).C(3)H(6)O.2H(2)O with BSA may be electrostatic interaction, and for the LH(2)OCH(3), Ag(6)L(6) and PdL(2), hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions may be involved in their binding processes.

  11. The genes encoding gonadal and nongonadal forms of 3[beta]-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/[Delta][sup 5]-[Delta][sup 4] isomerase are closely linked on mouse chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, P.A.; Meisler, M.H.; Payne, A.H. ); Taylor, B.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The biosynthesis of steroid hormones in the gonads and adrenal glands requires the activities of the enzyme 3[beta]-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenanse/isomerase (3[beta]HSD) which catalyzes the NAD[sup +]-dependant dehydrogenation and subsequent [Delta][sup 5] [r arrow] [Delta][sup 4] isomerization of[Delta][sup 5]-3[beta]-hydroxysteriods to [Delta][sup 4]-3-ketosteroids. The mouse expresses four isoforms of 3[beta]HSD. 3[beta]HSD I is expressed in gonads and adrenal glands and appears to be the major steroidogenic form, 3[beta]HSDs II and III are expressed in both liver and kidneys, and 3[beta]HSD IV has been detected only in kidneys. To determine the genetic relationship between the 3[beta]HSD isoforms, the authors have mapped the chromosomal locations of the four genes by linkage analysis using gene-specific process derived from the 3[prime] untranslated regions of 3 [beta]HSD cDNA clones. The four 3[beta]HSD structural genes (Hsd3b) are closely linked within a segment of chromosome 3 that is conserved on human chromosome 1. The order of markers on Chr 3 surrounding Hsd3b is: centromere-Gba-(4.4 [+-] 2.2)-Hsd3b-(3.3 [+-] 1.9)-Tshb-(6.7 [+-] 2.7)-Amy-1. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Controls of sedimentary supply and gravity driven deformation on the eastern Niger delta (Plio-Pleistocene) from the shoreline to the deep sea plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Cécile; Guillocheau, François; Rouby, Delphine; Nalpas, Thierry; Jermannaud, Paul; Raillard, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    We studied the evolution of the gravity flow sedimentary within a large shelf-edge delta (Eastern Niger delta) over the last 2,5Myr taking into account the influence of the contemporaneous gravity driven deformation and sedimentary supply. To do this, we mapped (i) the shoreline geometry and (ii) the associated turbiditic systems for 9 intervals using a classification based on three morphological end-members: erosive, constructive and depositional modes. We characterized the depositional profile of the passive margin delta from the littoral domain to the abyssal plain and its spatial and temporal variability. We showed that, at the scale of the delta, the depositional profile varied from (i) a shelf edge delta profile with a slope break at the location of the shoreline during progradation to (ii) a ramp profile characteristic of a mid-shelf delta during retrogradation. Thus, during a stratigraphic cycle, the delta front evolved from a prograding slope break during the development of the HST, to steepening clinoforms during the development of the LST that progressively flattened out during the TST to reach a ramp profile at the MFS. The turbiditic systems (including MTC) initiate near the shoreline, at the toe of the delta front. Also, they form preferentially down slope synthetic faults or within antithetic fault relays. They are initially erosive, becoming constructive further down slope and eventually depositional. They may become erosive again as they cut through the compressional structures. We showed that the stratigraphic state (progradation/retrogradation) controls the amount of sediment reaching the platform and strongly impacts the density of gravity flow sedimentary systems (low density during progradation and high density during progradation). On the other hand, the gravity driven deformation controls the slope of the sea-floor and, in doing so, their morphology (erosive/constructive/depositional). Within this framework, lateral migrations of the delta

  13. Fluorescent Pseudomonas isolates from Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes: in vitro herbicide biotransformations.

    PubMed

    Zablotowicz, R M; Locke, M A; Hoagland, R E; Knight, S S; Cash, B

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent pseudomonads were a major component [log (10) 4.2-6.1 colony-forming units mL-1] of the culturable heterotrophic gram-negative bacterioplankton observed in three Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes in this study. Pure cultures of fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated from three Mississippi Delta oxbow lakes (18 per lake), using selective media S-1. Classical physiological tests and Biolog GN plates were used in criteria for taxonomic identification. Most isolates were identified as biotypes of Pseudomonas fluorescens 55% (II), 7% (III), and 25% (V). About 7% of the isolates were identified as P. putida and 7% as non-fluorescent Pseudomonas-like. Cell suspensions of these isolates were tested for their ability to metabolize/co-metabolize six 14C-radiolabeled herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cyanazine, fluometuron, metolachlor, propanil, and trifluralin) that are commonly used for crop production in this geographical area. Almost all (53 of 54) isolates transformed trifluralin via aromatic nitroreduction. Most isolates (70%) dechlorinated metolachlor to polar metabolites via glutathione conjugation. About 60% of the isolates hydrolyzed the amide bond of propanil (a rice herbicide) to dichloroaniline, with the highest frequency of propanil-hydrolyzing isolates observed in the lake from the watershed with rice cultivation. All propanil-hydrolyzing isolates were identified as P. fluorescens biotype II. No metabolism of cyanazine or fluometuron was observed by any isolates tested, indicating little or no potential for N-dealkylation among this group of bacterioplankton. No mineralization of 2,4-D labeled in either the carboxyl or ring position was observed. These results indicate that reductive and hydrolytic pathways for herbicide co-metabolism (aromatic nitroreduction, aryl acylamidase, and glutathione conjugation) are common in Mississippi Delta aquatic fluorescent pseudomonads; however, the potential for certain oxidative transformations (N

  14. Effect of angiotensin II on uterine and systemic vasculature in pregnant sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Naden, R P; Rosenfeld, C R

    1981-01-01

    The response of uteroplacental blood flow (UBF) to angiotensin II is controversial. Moreover, the relationship of the uterine and systemic responses to infused angiotensin II is not well understood. Thus, in eight chronically instrumented, near-term pregnant sheep, we have determined the relationships between the dose and duration of constant systemic infusions of angiotensin II ([Val5] ANG II) and changes in UBF, uterine vascular resistance (UVR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR). [Val5] ANG II caused dose-dependent increases in UVR and MAP at all doses studied (P less than 0.05). The response in UBF was bidirectional, with increases at doses less than or equal to 1.15 microgram/min and decreases at greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min (P less than 0.05). Increases in UBP occurred when the relative rise (delta) in MAP greater than delta UVR, whereas UBF was unchanged when delta MAP = delta UVR and decreased when delta MAP less than delta UVR. SVR also rose in a dose-dependent fashion (P less than 0.05); delta SVR was greater than delta UVR at doses less than or equal to 2.29 micrograms [Val5] ANG II/min (P less than 0.01). In studies of the effect of duration of [Val5] ANG II infusions, UBF increased at all doses during the 1st min, followed by stabilization at 4--5 min, with eventual decreases at doses greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min and increases at doses less than 2.29 micrograms/min. The relationship between the changes in MAP and UVR to the response of UBF was as noted above. It is evident that (a) [Val5] NAG II is uterine vasoconstrictor, (b) changes in UBF are dependent upon relative changes in perfusion pressure and UVR, which in turn are dependent upon both the dose and duration of a [Val5] ANG II infusion, and (c) the uteroplacental vasculature is relatively refractory to the vasoconstricting effects of low doses of [Val5] ANG II. PMID:7263862

  15. Future capabilities of the Delta launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Design features and payload delivery capabilities of the Delta 3920 launch vehicle are presented. The 3920 is the 14th iteration in a series that was first launched in 1960 and has in recent years surpassed a 97 percent success rate. Capacity is 2800 lb to GEO. The second stage has a propellant capacity of 13,244 lb and a specific impulse of 319.2 sec and produces 9443 lb thrust. The first mission is the Landsat-D satellite and 27 more launches are scheduled through 1985, some associated with different upper stage configurations. The 3924 configuration delivers payload to GEO at a cost of $7500/lb. A fairing has been designed to provide back-up for Shuttle payloads, although the larger size reduces the GEO payload to 2715 lb. Performance enhancements may, however, be gained through pneumatic thrusters for the Castor IV engine separation, higher Castor IV thrust levels, increased booster thrust, and a cryogenic second stage.

  16. Head orientation prediction: delta quaternions versus quaternions.

    PubMed

    Himberg, Henry; Motai, Yuichi

    2009-12-01

    Display lag in simulation environments with helmet-mounted displays causes a loss of immersion that degrades the value of virtual/augmented reality training simulators. Simulators use predictive tracking to compensate for display lag, preparing display updates based on the anticipated head motion. This paper proposes a new method for predicting head orientation using a delta quaternion (DQ)-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) and compares the performance to a quaternion EKF. The proposed framework operates on the change in quaternion between consecutive data frames (the DQ), which avoids the heavy computational burden of the quaternion motion equation. Head velocity is estimated from the DQ by an EKF and then used to predict future head orientation. We have tested the new framework with captured head motion data and compared it with the computationally expensive quaternion filter. Experimental results indicate that the proposed DQ method provides the accuracy of the quaternion method without the heavy computational burden.

  17. Actions of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis

    PubMed Central

    COOPER, ZIVA D.; HANEY, MARGARET

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis use disorders have been recently identified as a relevant clinical issue: a subset of cannabis smokers seeks treatment for their cannabis use, yet few succeed in maintaining long-term abstinence. The rewarding and positive reinforcing effects of the primary psychoactive component of smoked cannabis, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. The CB1 receptor has also been shown to mediate cannabinoid dependence and expression of withdrawal upon cessation of drug administration, a phenomenon verified across species. This paper will review findings implicating the CB1 receptor in the behavioural effects of exogenous cannabinoids with a focus on cannabinoid dependence and reinforcement, factors that contribute to the maintenance of chronic cannabis smoking despite negative consequences. Opioidergic modulation of these effects is also discussed. PMID:19367504

  18. Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Karraker, David G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 0.1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

  19. Adaptive delta modulation systems for video encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, T.-L. R.; Scheinberg, N.; Schilling, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes several adaptive delta modulators designed to encode video signals. One- and two-dimensional ADM algorithms are discussed and compared. Results are shown for bit rates of 2 bits/pixel, 1 bit/pixel and 0.5 bits/pixel. Pictures showing the difference between the encoded-decoded pictures and the original pictures are presented. Results are also presented to illustrate the effect of channel errors on the reconstructed picture. A two-dimensional ADM using interframe encoding is also presented. This system operates at the rate of 2 bits/pixel and produces excellent quality pictures when there is little motion. We also describe and illustrate the effect of large amounts of motion on the reconstructed picture.

  20. [Biological effects of weightlessness at the cellular level. Comparative study of cultures of Paramecia aboard the orbital station Salyut-6 and a stratospheric balloon].

    PubMed

    Richoilley, G; Templier, J; Bes, J C; Gasset, G; Planel, H; Tixador, R

    1984-01-01

    In order to distinguish the effects of cosmic rays from those of weightlessness at the cellular level, we performed experiments aboard stratospheric balloon, where gravity is equal to 1 g and cosmic radiation roughly equal to that aboard Salyut-6. The results suggest that the stimulation of cell proliferation is probably due to cosmic rays, metabolic changes being related to microgravity.

  1. Quantitative metrics that describe river deltas and their channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Douglas A.; Paola, Chris; Hoyal, David C. J. D.; Sheets, Ben A.

    2011-12-01

    Densely populated river deltas are losing land at an alarming rate and to successfully restore these environments we must understand the details of their morphology. Toward this end we present a set of five metrics that describe delta morphology: (1) the fractal dimension, (2) the distribution of island sizes, (3) the nearest-edge distance, (4) a synthetic distribution of sediment fluxes at the shoreline, and (5) the nourishment area. The nearest-edge distance is the shortest distance to channelized or unchannelized water from a given location on the delta and is analogous to the inverse of drainage density in tributary networks. The nourishment area is the downstream delta area supplied by the sediment coming through a given channel cross section and is analogous to catchment area in tributary networks. As a first step, we apply these metrics to four relatively simple, fluvially dominated delta networks. For all these deltas, the average nearest-edge distances are remarkably constant moving down delta suggesting that the network organizes itself to maintain a consistent distance to the nearest channel. Nourishment area distributions can be predicted from a river mouth bar model of delta growth, and also scale with the width of the channel and with the length of the longest channel, analogous to Hack's law for drainage basins. The four delta channel networks are fractal, but power laws and scale invariance appear to be less pervasive than in tributary networks. Thus, deltas may occupy an advantageous middle ground between complete similarity and complete dissimilarity, where morphologic differences indicate different behavior.

  2. Radioactive mineral springs in Delta County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert A.; Rosholt, John N.; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1976-01-01

    The system of springs in Delta County, Colo., contains geochemical clues to the nature and location of buried uranium-mineralized rock. The springs, which occur along the Gunnison River and a principal tributary between Delta and Paonia, are regarded as evidence of a still-functioning hydrothermal system. Associated with the springs are hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide gas seeps, carbon dioxide gas-powered geysers, thick travertine deposits including radioactive travertine, and a flowing warm-water (41?C) radioactive well. Geochemical study of the springs is based on surface observations, on-site water-property measurements, and sampling of water, travertine, soft precipitates, and mud. The spring deposits are mostly carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and chlorides that locally contain notable amounts of some elements, such as arsenic, barium, lithium, and radium. Samples from five localities have somewhat different trace element assemblages even though they are related to the same hydrothermal system. All the spring waters but one are dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The exception is an acid sulfate water with a pH of 2.9, which contains high concentrations of aluminum and iron. Most of the detectable radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, a uranium daughter product, but at least one spring precipitate contains abundant radium-228, a thorium daughter product. The 5:1 ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 suggests the proximity of a vein-type deposit as a source for the radium. The proposed locus of a thorium-uranium mineral deposit is believed to lie in the vicinity of Paonia, Colo. Exact direction and depth are not determinable from data now available.

  3. Honey Bee Swarms Aboard the USNS Comfort: Recommendations for Sting Prevention, Swarm Removal, and Medical Readiness on Military Ships.

    PubMed

    Dunford, James C; Kronmann, Karl C; Peet, Luke R; Stancil, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The article provides observations of multiple honey bee (Apis mellifera) swarms aboard the USNS Comfort (TAH-20) during the Continuing Promise 2015 mission. A brief overview of swarming biology is given along with control/removal recommendations to reduce sting exposures. The observations suggest that preventive medicine personnel should provide adequate risk communications about the potential occurrence of bee swarms aboard military ships, and medical department personnel should be prepared for the possibility of treating of multiple sting exposures, especially in the Southern Command Area of Operations where the Africanized genotype of A mellifera is common.

  4. Honey Bee Swarms Aboard the USNS Comfort: Recommendations for Sting Prevention, Swarm Removal, and Medical Readiness on Military Ships.

    PubMed

    Dunford, James C; Kronmann, Karl C; Peet, Luke R; Stancil, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    The article provides observations of multiple honey bee (Apis mellifera) swarms aboard the USNS Comfort (TAH-20) during the Continuing Promise 2015 mission. A brief overview of swarming biology is given along with control/removal recommendations to reduce sting exposures. The observations suggest that preventive medicine personnel should provide adequate risk communications about the potential occurrence of bee swarms aboard military ships, and medical department personnel should be prepared for the possibility of treating of multiple sting exposures, especially in the Southern Command Area of Operations where the Africanized genotype of A mellifera is common. PMID:27613207

  5. STS 129 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-129) and International Space Station (ULF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Reports on the air quality aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-129), and the International Space station (ULF3). NASA analyzed the grab sample canisters (GSCs) and the formaldehyde badges aboard both locations for carbon monoxide levels. The three surrogates: (sup 13)C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene registered 109, 101, and 109% in the space shuttle and 81, 87, and 55% in the International Space Station (ISS). From these results the atmosphere in both the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) was found to be breathable.

  6. Non-V delta 2 gamma delta T lymphocytes as effectors of cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan; Kramer, Anne-Marijn; Gustafsson, Kenth; Anderson, John

    2014-01-01

    Gamma delta T cells (γδT) are potent mediators of antitumor cytotoxicity and have shown promising efficacy in early phase clinical trials. Most is known about the tumoricidal properties of cells bearing the Vδ2 T cell receptor chain, but recent studies have demonstrated that cells with the Vδ1 chain and those with neither Vδ1 nor Vδ2 chains have properties which may make them more attractive anticancer effectors in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:25949890

  7. First results from POAM II: The dissipation of the 1993 antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, R.M.; Hoppel, K.W.; Hornstein, J.S.

    1995-04-15

    POAM II is a space-borne instrument which uses the solar occultation technique to measure the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds, and other properties of the stratosphere and mesosphere. POAM II was launched aboard the SPOT 3 satellite in time to observe the dissipation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole. POAM data indicated that the Antarctic ozone hole dissipates from the top downward. It also supports the hypothesis that the Antarctic vortex is an effective containment vessel. However the strength of the containment appears to decrease markedly at altitudes below 18 km. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

  9. GROUP-C and LITES Experiments for Ionospheric Remote Sensing aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities, also known as ionospheric bubbles, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Understanding irregularity formation, development, and evolution is vital for efforts within NASA and DoD to forecast scintillation. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the International Space Station (ISS) would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry Colocated (GROUPC) and the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are being considered for flight aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry with vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, we demonstrate that high-fidelity optical tomographic reconstruction of bubbles can be performed from the ISS. Ground-based imagery can supplement the tomography by providing all-sky images of ionospheric structures (e.g. bubbles and TIDs) and of signatures of lower atmospheric dynamics, such as gravity waves, that may play a role in irregularity formation. The optical instrumentation can be augmented with additional sensors to provide measurements of scintillation and in situ plasma density, composition, and drifts.

  10. NASDA President Communicates With Japanese Crew Member Aboard the STS-47 Spacelab-J Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. From the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC), NASDA President, Mr. Yamano, speaks to Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, a Japanese crew member aboard the STS-47 Spacelab J mission.

  11. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  12. Potential exposure of larval and juvenile delta smelt to dissolved pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, K.M.; Moon, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Estuary is critical habitat for delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, a fish whose abundance has declined greatly since 1983 and is now listed as threatened. In addition, the estuary receives drainage from the Central Valley, an urban and agricultural region with intense and diverse pesticide usage. One possible factor of the delta smelt population decline is pesticide toxicity during vulnerable larval and juvenile stages, but pesticide concentrations are not well characterized in delta smelt spawning and nursery habitat. The objective of this study was to estimate the potential exposure of delta smelt during their early life stages to dissolved pesticides. For 3 years (1998-2000), water samples from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta were collected during April-June in coordination with the California Department of Fish and Game's delta smelt early life stage monitoring program. Samples were analyzed for pesticides using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Water samples contained multiple pesticides, ranging from 2 to 14 pesticides in each sample. In both 1999 and 2000, elevated concentrations of pesticides overlapped in time and space with peak densities of larval and juvenile delta smelt. In contrast, high spring outflows in 1998 transported delta smelt away from the pesticide sampling sites so that exposure could not be estimated. During 2 years, larval and juvenile delta smelt were potentially exposed to a complex mixture of pesticides for a minimum of 2-3 weeks. Although the measured concentrations were well below short-term (96-h) LC50 values for individual pesticides, the combination of multiple pesticides and lengthy exposure duration could potentially have lethal or sublethal effects on delta smelt, especially during early larval development.

  13. Water and Sand Transport Pathways Through the Delta Front, Wax Lake delta, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. B.; Mohrig, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Wax Lake delta (WLD) is considered a type example of the river dominated delta due to its fan-like shape and network of bifurcating channels. We investigate the formative processes of the WLD's morphology using water and sediment data collected during the 2011 spring flood. Our study focuses on the delta front; the ~4 km wide region seaward of the subaerial delta that is characterized by (a) sub-aqueous extensions of the sub-aerial channels, and (b) broad, shallow, unchannelized zones positioned between the sub-aqueous channels. We find that while water flux is widely distributed between the channelized and non-channelized zones, the sand flux is focused in the sub-aqueous channels of the delta front. Flow is faster in the channels than non-channelized areas (0.7 versus 0.15 m/s), but the large width discrepancy (200 m wide channels vs 3500 m wide non-channelized zones) permits large water discharges in the non-channelized zones. In one measured case, we calculate that 70% of discharge (670 m3/s) bled from neighboring channels into a non-channelized zone over 3 km of sub-aqueous channel length. In contrast, sand flux distribution is focused in sub-aqueous channels and extends no further than 200 m from the channel margin. Fine sand is transported in suspension because of sufficiently high shear velocities (u* = 2-5 cm/s). Sand is not transported through unchannelized zones due to insufficient shear (u* <1.4 cm/s). Levees on either side of a sub-aqueous channel define this strong lateral convergence of sand flux. Factors controlling cross-channel flux from channels to non-channelized zones are likely to be the velocity differential, the ratio of channel depth to levee depth and change in width of the unchannelized area with downstream distance (0.75 m/m). We hypothesize that under certain conditions, lateral transport of water and sand out of channels may initiate a channel bifurcation, more in the manner of an avulsion than of flow splitting by mouth bar

  14. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    1991-01-01

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  15. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  16. The Mississippi Delta Region: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Michael D.; Roberts, Harry H.

    2012-05-01

    The Mississippi delta region of south Louisiana houses a wealth of resources within a dynamic, subsiding landscape. Foundations for the delta region reflect Neogene evolution of the depocenter, whereas details of the modern landscape reflect late Pleistocene to Holocene evolution of the alluvial-deltaic plain. The Holocene delta plain was constructed by cyclical growth of deltaic headlands, followed by avulsion and relocation of the fluvial sediment source. Abandoned headlands were then submerged and reworked while a new headland was created at the site of active fluvial sediment input. Historic-period levees have decoupled the delta plain from its fluvial sediment source at the same time global sea-level rise was accelerating, which has accelerated delta-plain submergence. Diversions of Mississippi River water and sediment are necessary to achieve delta plain sustainability, but upstream dams trap ˜50% of the total sediment load, and there is not enough supply to keep pace with subsidence and accelerated sea-level rise. The future delta region will not resemble the recent past, and significant drowning is inevitable.

  17. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  18. Ancient deltas on Mars: outstanding targets for martian habitability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Fawdon, P.; Grindrod, P. M.; Balme, M. R.; Hauber, E.; Warner, N. H.; Muller, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The identification of putative ancient deltaic sedimentary systems on Mars has been both exciting and controversial. Our excitement is elicted by the potential provided by deltas as evidence for standing bodies of water associated with the deltas, and the resulting implications for both the ancient climate of Mars and ancient habitability. The controversy stems from how confident can we be in the identification of ancient deltaic systems from orbital data, and how robust are our assertions about the habitability potential of such settings. Delta systems in particular are key astrobiological targets because at their distal toes fine-grained sediment (ie., clays) settle from suspension in a lower energy setting and they are commonly characterised by high rates of sedimentation. This leads to high preservation potential of biosignatures. Targeting of future Mars rovers to investigate deltaic landing sites requires better understanding of these issues to reduce exploration risk. In this presentation, we describe the key criteria that enable us to make robust interpretations of deltaic stratigraphy and constrain delta evolution for martian systems. In particular, the past 10 years has seen in a revolution in our process understanding of terrestrial delta systems through a combination of field, experimental and numerical modelling studies. Analysis of martian deltas has much to gain from these results. We go on to consider why deltaic systems offer potential as astrobiological target paleoenvironments. We use the exhumed delta system (Hypanis delta system) at the termination of Hypanis Vallis, 11.8°N, 314.96°E as a case example. This system, situated in Xanthe Terra, comprises layered sedimentary rocks with an overall multi-lobate geometry and associated inverted channel networks. The Hypanis 'delta' is a proposed landing site for the ExoMars rover and also for the NASA 2020 mission.

  19. Delta-conotoxin structure/function through a cladistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bulaj, G; DeLaCruz, R; Azimi-Zonooz, A; West, P; Watkins, M; Yoshikami, D; Olivera, B M

    2001-11-01

    Delta-conotoxins are Conus peptides that inhibit inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. The suggestion that delta-conotoxins might be an essential component of the venoms of fish-hunting cone snails which rapidly immobilize their prey [Terlau, H., Shon, K., Grilley, M., Stocker, M., Stühmer, W., and Olivera, B. M. (1996) Nature 381, 148-151] has not been tested. On the basis of cDNA cloning, all of the fish-hunting Conus analyzed yielded at least one delta-conotoxin sequence. In addition, one delta-conotoxin isolated from the venom of Conus striatus had an amino acid sequence identical to that predicted from cDNA cloning. This new peptide exhibited properties of delta-conotoxins: it targeted sodium channels and potentiated action potentials by slowing channel inactivation. Homologous sequences of delta-conotoxins from two groups (clades) of related fish-hunting Conus species share consensus features but differ significantly from the two known delta-conotoxins from mollusc-hunting Conus venoms. Three large hydrophobic amino acids were conserved; analogues of the previously described delta-conotoxin PVIA with alanine substituted for the conserved amino acids F9 and I12 lost substantial biological activity. In contrast, both the T8A and K13A delta-conotoxin PVIA analogues, where substitutions were at nonconserved loci, proved to be biologically active. Taken together, our results indicate that a cladistic approach can identify amino acids critical for the activity of conotoxins and provide extensive information as to which amino acid substitutions can be made without significant functional consequences.

  20. Including the {delta}(1232) resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.; Wies, N.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-11-01

    Baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit {delta}(1232) degrees of freedom is considered. The most general interactions of pions, nucleons, and {delta} consistent with all underlying symmetries as well as with the constraint structure of higher-spin fields are constructed. By use of the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme, a manifestly Lorentz-invariant effective-field theory with a systematic power counting is obtained. As applications, we discuss the mass of the nucleon, the pion-nucleon {sigma} term, and the pole of the {delta} propagator.

  1. Holocene evolution of the western Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aslan, A.; White, W.A.; Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.

    2003-01-01

    The pristine nature of the Orinoco Delta of eastern Venezuela provides unique opportunities to study the geologic processes and environments of a major tropical delta. Remote-sensing images, shallow cores, and radiocarbon-dating of organic remains form the basis for describing deltaic environments and interpreting the Holocene history of the delta. The Orinoco Delta can be subdivided into two major sectors. The southeast sector is dominated by the Rio Grande-the principal distributary-and complex networks of anastomosing fluvial and tidal channels. The abundance of siliciclastic deposits suggests that fluvial processes such as over-bank flooding strongly influence this part of the delta. In contrast, the northwest sector is represented by few major distributaries, and overbank sedimentation is less widespread relative to the southeast sector. Peat is abundant and occurs in herbaceous and forested swamps that are individually up to 200 km2 in area. Northwest-directed littoral currents transport large volumes of suspended sediment and produce prominent mudcapes along the northwest coast. Mapping of surface sediments, vegetation, and major landforms identified four principal geomorphic systems within the western delta plain: (1) distributary channels, (2) interdistributary flood basins, (3) fluvial-marine transitional environments, and (4) marine-influenced coastal environments. Coring and radiocarbon dating of deltaic deposits show that the northern delta shoreline has prograded 20-30 km during the late Holocene sea-level highstand. Progradation has been accomplished by a combination of distributary avulsion and mudcape progradation. This style of deltaic progradation differs markedly from other deltas such as the Mississippi where distributary avulsion leads to coastal land loss, rather than shoreline progradation. The key difference is that the Orinoco Delta coastal zone receives prodigious amounts of sediment from northwest-moving littoral currents that transport

  2. Late quaternary evolution of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.; Aslan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The modern Orinoco Delta is the latest of a series of stacked deltas that have infilled the Eastern Venezuelan Basin (EVB) since the Oligocene. During the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand (20,000 to 16,000 yrs BP), bedrock control points at the position of the present delta apex prevented the river channel from incising as deeply as many other major river systems. Shallow seismic data indicate that the late Pleistocene Orinoco incised into the present continental shelf, where it formed a braided-river complex that transported sediment to a series of shelf-edge deltas. As sea level rose from 16,000 to 9,500 yrs BP, the Orinoco shoreline shifted rapidly landward, causing shallow-marine waves and currents to form a widespread transgressive sand unit. Decelerating sea-level rise and a warmer, wetter climate during the early Holocene (9,500 to 6,000 yrs BP) induced delta development within the relatively quiet-water environment of the EVB embayment. Sea level approached its present stand in the middle Holocene (6,000 to 3,000 yrs BP), and the Orinoco coast prograded, broadening the delta plain and infilling the EVB embayment. Significant quantities of Amazon sediment began to be transported to the Orinoco coast by littoral currents. Continued progradation in the late Holocene caused the constriction at Boca de Serpientes to alter nearshore and shelf hydrodynamics and subdivide the submarine delta into two distinct areas: the Atlantic shelf and the Gulf of Paria. The increased influence of littoral currents along the coast promoted mudcape development. Because most of the water and sediment were transported across the delta plain through the Rio Grande distributary in the southern delta, much of the central and northwestern delta plain became sediment starved, promoting widespread accumulation of peat deposits. Human impacts on the delta are mostly associated with the Volca??n Dam on Can??o Manamo. However, human activities have had relatively little effect on the

  3. Verification of Software Product Lines with Delta-Oriented Slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Daniel; Klebanov, Vladimir; Schaefer, Ina

    Software product line (SPL) engineering is a well-known approach to develop industry-size adaptable software systems. SPL are often used in domains where high-quality software is desirable; the overwhelming product diversity, however, remains a challenge for assuring correctness. In this paper, we present delta-oriented slicing, an approach to reduce the deductive verification effort across an SPL where individual products are Java programs and their relations are described by deltas. On the specification side, we extend the delta language to deal with formal specifications. On the verification side, we combine proof slicing and similarity-guided proof reuse to ease the verification process.

  4. Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Russia's Volga River is the largest river system in Europe, draining over 1.3 million square kilometers of catchment area into the Caspian Sea. The brackish Caspian is Earth's largest landlocked water body, and its isolation from the world's oceans has enabled the preservation of several unique animal and plant species. The Volga provides most of the Caspian's fresh water and nutrients, and also discharges large amounts of sediment and industrial waste into the relatively shallow northern part of the sea. These images of the region were captured by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on October 5, 2001, during Terra orbit 9567. Each image represents an area of approximately 275 kilometers x 376 kilometers.

    The left-hand image is from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera, and shows how light is reflected at red, green, and blue wavelengths. The right-hand image is a false color composite of red-band imagery from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir, and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras, displayed as red, green, and blue, respectively. Here, color variations indicate how light is reflected at different angles of view. Water appears blue in the right-hand image, for example, because sun glitter makes smooth, wet surfaces look brighter at the forward camera's view angle. The rougher-textured vegetated wetlands near the coast exhibit preferential backscattering, and consequently appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax associated with its elevation above the surface.

    Other notable features within the images include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping channels, dredged to depths of at least 2 meters. The crescent-shaped Kulaly Island, also known as Seal Island, is visible near the right-hand edge of the images.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  5. The transportation of fine arts materials aboard the space shuttle Columbia. GAS payload No. 481: Vertical horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Ellery; Wishnow, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The Vertical Horizons experiment represents an initial investigation into the transportation of fine arts materials aboard a space shuttle. Within the confines of a GAS canister, artist quality fine arts materials were packaged and exposed to the rigors of space flight in an attempt to identify adverse effects.

  6. 78 FR 64596 - Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard America! Holdings, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Surface Transportation Board Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard... America! Holdings, Inc. (AHI), Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC (Celerity Holdings), and Celerity Partners IV, LLC (Celerity Partners) (collectively, Applicants) have filed an application under 49...

  7. Automated system for measurement, collection and processing of hydrometeorological data aboard scientific research vessels of the GUGMS (SIGMA-s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisenkov, Y. P.; Fedorov, O. M.

    1974-01-01

    A report is made on the automated system known as SIGMA-s for the measurement, collection, and processing of hydrometeorological data aboard scientific research vessels of the Hydrometeorological Service. The various components of the system and the interfacing between them are described, as well as the projects that the system is equipped to handle.

  8. STS-55 MS2 Precourt changes LiOH canister in SL-D2 module aboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt changes lithium hydroxide (LiOH) canister in the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) module aboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Precourt lifts one LiOH canister from its subfloor location while holding the replacement canister and the access panel open with his left hand.

  9. Birds' tails do act like delta wings but delta-wing theory does not always predict the forces they generate.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R

    2003-01-01

    Delta-wing theory, which predicts the aerodynamics of aircraft like the Concorde, is the conventional explanation for the way in which a bird's tail operates in flight. Recently, doubt has been cast on the validity of applying a theory devised for supersonic aircraft to the small tails of slow-flying birds. By testing delta-wing models and birds' tails behind bodies with wings, I empirically show that the tails of birds produce lift in a very similar way to conventional delta-wing models. Both Perspex and birds' tail models produce lift similar to that predicted by delta-wing theory when narrowly spread and at low angles of attack. However, when widely spread and at high angles of attack, both tails and Perspex models produce much less lift than predicted, owing to vortex breakdown after which the assumptions of delta-wing theory are violated. These results indicate that birds' tails can be regarded as delta wings but that the theory predicting the forces produced by delta wings can only be applied within acceptable limits (i.e. tails spread less than 60 degrees and at angles of attack of less than 20 degrees). PMID:12965029

  10. Upper critical field of high temperature Y(1.2)Ba(0.8)CuO(4-delta) superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Huang, J. Z.; Chu, C. W.; Huang, C. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A 20-T high-field magnet is used to measure electrical resistance as a function of temperature in the Y(1.2)Ba(0.8)CuO(4-delta) superconductor. The temperature dependence of the critical field, Hc2(T), is obtained from the superconduction transition. A Hc2(O) value of 166T is determined which is the highest critical field yet reported. Results show Y(1.2)Ba(0.8)CuO(4-delta) to be a 90K Type-II superconductor, with a lower critical field Hc1(O) of about 0.2T and a penetration depth of about 290 A.

  11. IRVE-II Post-Flight Trajectory Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, Stephen A.; Bose, David M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) II successfully demonstrated an inflatable aerodynamic decelerator after being launched aboard a sounding rocket from Wallops Flight Facility (WFF). Preliminary day of flight data compared well with pre-flight Monte Carlo analysis, and a more complete trajectory reconstruction performed with an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) approach followed. The reconstructed trajectory and comparisons to an attitude solution provided by NASA Sounding Rocket Operations Contract (NSROC) personnel at WFF are presented. Additional comparisons are made between the reconstructed trajectory and pre and post-flight Monte Carlo trajectory predictions. Alternative observations of the trajectory are summarized which leverage flight accelerometer measurements, the pre-flight aerodynamic database, and on-board flight video. Finally, analysis of the payload separation and aeroshell deployment events are presented. The flight trajectory is reconstructed to fidelity sufficient to assess overall project objectives related to flight dynamics and overall, IRVE-II flight dynamics are in line with expectations

  12. Towards up-scaling restored wetland CO2 and CH4 exchange in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, C. S.; Knox, S. H.; Koteen, L. E.; Matthes, J. H.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Returning agricultural land to wetlands in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta of northern California (hereafter, the Delta) can help reverse the land subsidence that is currently threatening a large proportion of California's water supply. Wetland restoration maintains plant productivity while drastically reducing the rapid peat decomposition that has occurred since this region was drained for agricultural use in the 1850s. Rebuilding the peat soils i) protects California's water supply by reducing pressure on levies, and ii) mitigates globally rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The more anaerobic soil environment of wetlands, however, promotes methane (CH4) production, a 25x more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. It is therefore important to understand the impact of wetland restoration on both these gases to evaluate both subsidence reversal and climate change mitigation goals. To this end, we are conducting eddy covariance measurements of gas exchange in restored Delta wetlands to quantify ecosystem-scale sequestration/emission of CO2 and CH4. The ultimate goal of these measurements is to be able to predict the effects of wetland restoration on Delta-wide fluxes of these important greenhouse gases. Wetlands, however, are spatially variable ecosystems, varying in substrate, plant species, plant density, and open water fraction, to name a few. Extending site-level measurements to other areas therefore requires attributing spatial variability in CO2 and CH4 exchange to respective sources and identifying spatially available indicators of this change. This poster presents preliminary results evaluating the spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in two restored Delta wetlands and how this variability can be up-scaled to region-wide estimates using remotely sensed indicators.

  13. The ISAS Synchrotron Microprobe at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlen, Alex von; Kraemer, Markus; Hergenroeder, Roland; Berges, Ulf

    2007-01-19

    Since 2004 ISAS operates a dipole beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility DELTA at University of Dortmund. Synchrotron radiation is used at this beamline as an excellent excitation source for X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Among others, the high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation in contrast to conventional X-ray tubes, the strong polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the low divergence of the electron beam can be applied to XRF offering several advantages for spectroscopy. These outstanding features encouraged us to develop and operate a synchrotron radiation induced X-ray micro fluorescence probe connected to a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (SR-WDXRF). A relevant characteristic of such a device, namely, good lateral resolution at high spectral resolution can be applied for single spot-, line-scan and area map analyses of a variety of objects. The instrumentation of the SR-WDXRF and the performed experiments will be presented. Main task is the detection of light elements by their fluorescence K-lines and the specification of element compounds.

  14. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  15. Theoretical studies on flapped delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, S.; Tavella, D.; Roberts, L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of leading edge flaps on the aerodynamic characteristics of a low aspect-ratio delta wing are studied theoretically. As an extension of the classical crossflow plane analysis and in order to include separated shear layers, an analogy between three dimensional steady conical and two dimensional unsteady self-similar flows is explored. This analogy provides a simple steady-unsteady relationship. The criteria for the validity of the steady-unsteady analogy are also examined. Two different theoretical techniques are used to represent the separated shear layers based on the steady-unsteady analogy, neglecting the trailing edge effect. In the first approach, each vortex system is represented by a pair of concentrated vortices connected to the separation points by straight feeding sheets. In the second approach, the vortex cloud method is adopted for simulating the flow field in the crossflow plane. The separated shear layers are replaced with a cloud of discrete vortices and the boundary element method is employed to represent the wing trace by a vorticity distribution. A simple merging scheme is used to model the core region of the vortical flow as a single vortex by imposing a restriction on the shear layer rotation angle. The results are compared with experiments and with results from 3-D panel calculations.

  16. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  17. BSM Delta Qualification 2, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report, presented in three volumes, provides the results of a two-motor Delta Qualification 2 program conducted in 1993 to certify the following enhancements for incorporation into booster separation motor (BSM) flight hardware: vulcanized-in-place nozzle aft closure insulation; new iso-static ATJ bulk graphite throat insert material; adhesive EA 9394 for bonding the nozzle throat, igniter grain rod/centering insert/igniter case; deletion of the igniter adapter insulator ring; deletion of the igniter adapter/igniter case interface RTV; and deletion of loctite from igniter retainer plate threads. The enhancements above directly resulted from (1) the BSM total quality management (TQM) team initiatives to enhance the BSM producibility, and (2) the necessity to qualify new throat insert and adhesive systems to replace existing materials that will not be available. Testing was completed at both the component and motor levels. Component testing was accomplished to screen candidate materials (e.g., throat materials, adhesive systems) and to optimize processes (e.g., aft closure insulator vulcanization approach) prior to their incorporation into the test motors. Motor tests -- consisting of two motors, randomly selected by USBI's on-site quality personnel from production lot AAY, which were modified to accept the enhancements -- were completed to provide the final qualification of the enhancements for incorporation into flight hardware. Volume 2 details the environmental testing (vibration and shock) conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to which the motors were subjected prior to static tests.

  18. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas

    PubMed Central

    Tanentzap, Andrew J.; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J.; Kielstra, Brian W.; Arts, Michael T.; Yan, Norman D.; Gunn, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  19. BSM Delta qualification 2, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report, presented in three volumes, provides the results of a two-motor Delta Qualification 2 program conducted in 1993 to certify the following enhancements for incorporation into Booster Separation Motor (BSM) flight hardware: (1) vulcanized-in-place nozzle aft closure insulation; (2) new isostatic ATJ bulk graphite throat insert material; (3) adhesive EA 9394 for bonding the nozzle throat, igniter grain rod/centering insert/igniter case; (4) deletion of the igniter adapter insulator ring; (5) deletion of igniter adapter/igniter case interface RTV; and (6) deletion of Loctite from igniter retainer plate threads. The enhancements above directly resulted from (1) the BSM Total Quality Management (TQM) Team initiatives to enhance the BSM producibility, and (2) the necessity to qualify new throat insert and adhesive systems to replace existing materials that will not be available. Testing was completed at both the component and motor levels. Component testing was accomplished to screen candidate materials (e.g., throat materials, adhesive systems) and to optimize processes (e.g., aft closure insulator vulcanization approach) prior to their incorporation into the test motors. Motor testing - consisting of two motors, randomly selected by USBI's onsite quality personnel from production lot AAY, which were modified to accept the enhancements - were completed to provide the final qualification of the enhancements for incorporation into flight hardware. It is concluded that all of the enhancements herein tested are qualified to be incorporated into flight hardware for the BSM.

  20. Forests fuel fish growth in freshwater deltas.

    PubMed

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Szkokan-Emilson, Erik J; Kielstra, Brian W; Arts, Michael T; Yan, Norman D; Gunn, John M

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are fuelled by biogeochemical inputs from surrounding lands and within-lake primary production. Disturbances that change these inputs may affect how aquatic ecosystems function and deliver services vital to humans. Here we test, using a forest cover gradient across eight separate catchments, whether disturbances that remove terrestrial biomass lower organic matter inputs into freshwater lakes, thereby reducing food web productivity. We focus on deltas formed at the stream-lake interface where terrestrial-derived particulate material is deposited. We find that organic matter export increases from more forested catchments, enhancing bacterial biomass. This transfers energy upwards through communities of heavier zooplankton, leading to a fourfold increase in weights of planktivorous young-of-the-year fish. At least 34% of fish biomass is supported by terrestrial primary production, increasing to 66% with greater forest cover. Habitat tracers confirm fish were closely associated with individual catchments, demonstrating that watershed protection and restoration increase biomass in critical life-stages of fish. PMID:24915965

  1. The DELTA 181 lithium thionyl chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ralph M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Leigh, A. P.

    In 1986, the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) undertook the development of a sensor module for the DELTA 181 spacecraft, a low earth orbit (LEO) mission of less than two months duration. A large lithium thionyl chloride battery was developed as the spacecraft's primary power source, the first known such use for this technology. The exceptionally high energy density of the lithium thionyl chloride cell was the primary driver for its use, resulting in a completed battery with a specific energy density of 120 Wh/lb. Safety requirements became the primary driver shaping all aspects of the power system design and development due to concerns about the potential hazards of this relatively new, high-energy technology. However, the program was completed without incident. The spacecraft was launched on February 8, 1988, from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with over 60,000 Wh of battery energy. It reentered on April 2, 1988, still operating after 55 days, providing a successful, practical, and visible demonstration of the use of this technology for spacecraft applications.

  2. BSM Delta qualification 2, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    This report, presented in three volumes, provides the results of a two-motor Delta Qualification 2 program conducted in 1993 to certify the following enhancements for incorporation into Booster Separation Motor (BSM) flight hardware: (1) vulcanized-in-place nozzle aft closure insulation; (2) new isostatic ATJ bulk graphite throat insert material; (3) adhesive EA 9394 for bonding the nozzle throat, igniter grain rod/centering insert/igniter case; (4) deletion of the igniter adapter insulator ring; (5) deletion of igniter adapter/igniter case interface RTV; and (6) deletion of Loctite from igniter retainer plate threads. The enhancements above directly resulted from (1) the BSM Total Quality Management (TQM) Team initiatives to enhance the BSM producibility, and (2) the necessity to qualify new throat insert and adhesive systems to replace existing materials that will not be available. Testing was completed at both the component and motor levels. Component testing was accomplished to screen candidate materials (e.g., throat materials, adhesive systems) and to optimize processes (e.g., aft closure insulator vulcanization approach) prior to their incorporation into the test motors. Motor testing - consisting of two motors, randomly selected by USBI's onsite quality personnel from production lot AAY, which were modified to accept the enhancements - were completed to provide the final qualification of the enhancements for incorporation into flight hardware. It is concluded that all of the enhancements herein tested are qualified to be incorporated into flight hardware for the BSM.

  3. BSM Delta Qualification 2, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    This report, presented in three volumes, provides the results of a two-motor Delta Qualification 2 program conducted in 1993 to certify the following enhancements for incorporation into booster separation motor (BSM) flight hardware: vulcanized-in-place nozzle aft closure insulation; new iso-static ATJ bulk graphite throat insert material; adhesive EA 9394 for bonding the nozzle throat, igniter grain rod/centering insert/igniter case; deletion of the igniter adapter insulator ring; deletion of the igniter adapter/igniter case interface RTV; and deletion of loctite from igniter retainer plate threads. The enhancements above directly resulted from (1) the BSM total quality management (TQM) team initiatives to enhance the BSM producibility, and (2) the necessity to qualify new throat insert and adhesive systems to replace existing materials that will not be available. Testing was completed at both the component and motor levels. Component testing was accomplished to screen candidate materials (e.g., throat materials, adhesive systems) and to optimize processes (e.g., aft closure insulator vulcanization approach) prior to their incorporation into the test motors. Motor tests -- consisting of two motors, randomly selected by USBI's on-site quality personnel from production lot AAY, which were modified to accept the enhancements -- were completed to provide the final qualification of the enhancements for incorporation into flight hardware. Volume 2 details the environmental testing (vibration and shock) conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to which the motors were subjected prior to static tests.

  4. Delta Morphodynamics Matters! Ecosystem Services, Poverty and Morphodynamic Change in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Mega-Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Adger, N.; Allan, A.; Darby, S. E.; Hutton, C.; Matthews, Z.; Rahman, M.; Whitehead, P. G.; Wolf, J.

    2013-12-01

    The world's deltas are probably the most vulnerable type of coastal environment, and they face multiple stresses in the coming decades. These stresses include, amongst others, local drivers due to land subsidence, population growth and urbanisation within the deltas, regional drivers due to changes in catchment management (e.g. upstream land use and dam construction), as well as global climate change impacts such as sea-level rise. At the same time, the ecosystem services of river deltas support high population densities, with around 14% of the global population inhabiting deltas. A large proportion of these people experience extremes of poverty and they are therefore severely exposed to vulnerability from environmental and ecological stress and degradation. In areas close to or below the poverty boundary, both subsistence and cash elements of the economy tend to rely disproportionately heavily on ecosystem services which underpin livelihoods. Therefore, to sustainably manage delta environments they must be viewed as complex social-environmental systems where change is only partially driven by physical drivers such as sea level rise and climate change, and human-induced development activities are also critical. Here we outline a new conceptual framework for the development of methods to understand and characterise the key drivers of change in ecosystem services that affect the environment and economic status of populous deltas, focusing specifically on the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) mega-delta. The GBM delta is characterised by densely populated coastal lowlands with significant poverty, with livelihoods supported to a large extent by natural ecosystems such as the Sunderbahns (the largest mangrove forest in the world). However, the GBM delta is under severe development pressure due to many growing cities. At present the importance of ecosystems services to poverty and livelihoods is poorly understood. This is due to due to the complexity of interactions

  5. Three members of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase gene family are direct targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Tatjana; Saramäki, Anna; Malinen, Marjo; Rieck, Markus; Väisänen, Sami; Huotari, Anne; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Müller, Rolf; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-09-14

    The nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that they are direct regulators of the family of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) genes, whose products act as metabolic homeostats in sensing hunger and satiety levels in key metabolic tissues by modulating the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Mis-regulation of this tightly controlled network may lead to hyperglycemia. In human embryonal kidney cells we found the mRNA expression of PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 to be under direct primary control of PPAR ligands, and in normal mouse kidney tissue Pdk2 and Pdk4 are PPAR targets. Both, treatment of HEK cells with PPARbeta/delta-specific siRNA and the genetic disruption of the Pparbeta/delta gene in mouse fibroblasts resulted in reduced expression of Pdk genes and abolition of induction by PPARbeta/delta ligands. These findings suggest that PPARbeta/delta is a key regulator of PDK genes, in particular the PDK4/Pdk4 gene. In silico analysis of the human PDK genes revealed two candidate PPAR response elements in the PDK2 gene, five in the PDK3 gene and two in the PDK4 gene, but none in the PDK1 gene. For seven of these sites we could demonstrate both PPARbeta/delta ligand responsiveness in context of their chromatin region and simultaneous association of PPARbeta/delta with its functional partner proteins, such as retinoidXreceptor, co-activator and mediator proteins and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 are primary PPARbeta/delta target genes in humans underlining the importance of the receptor in the control of metabolism. PMID:17669420

  6. The late-Holocene progradation of the Mahakam Delta, Indonesia - A case study of tidal, tropical deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalman, R.; Ranawijaya, D.; Missiaen, T.; Kroonenberg, S.; Storms, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Mahakam Delta is an oft-cited example of a mixed fluvial-tidally influenced delta. Yet the distinct separation of the tide-dominated delta plain and the fluvial distributaries make the delta unique amongst tidally influenced deltas. The delta prograded an average of 60 km over the last 5000 years. Most sediment transport is induced by tidal currents and fluvial discharge, which resulted in a distinct, dense network of distributary and tidal channels. In order to characterize the Holocene sedimentary architecture we describe a dataset of 10 new cores and a large survey of very high-resolution, shallow seismics. The seismics are recorded using an echosounder with a novel parametric source, allowing subsurface penetration in excess of 15 m while achieving a vertical resolution of 0.2 m. Distinct sedimentary facies are described in detail for delta plain, delta front, distributary and mouthbar deposits. A notable difference in stratal pattern has been observed between the inner and outer tide-dominated delta plain facies. The inner tidal channels cut deeply into the underlying deltafront deposits and form a distinct heterogenic laterally accreting and intercutting facies. Whereas the outer tide-dominated delta plain deposits accrete conformably on the marine deltafront facies and show a much more homogenous sedimentary architecture. The continual reworking of the inner tide-dominated delta plain results in a patchwork of deposits greatly varying in thickness and age albeit with a similar silty clay lithology. The area of the present-day delta was largely flooded after the early to mid-Holocene transgression, our data indicate that a small branch of fluvial distributaries was active on the current delta plain around 5 ka. Subsequently, the northernmost fluvial distributary built out rapidly over a period of 3 kyrs. The southern distributaries built out later, from 2 ka to the present. The mouthbar deposits in the south are significantly thicker than in the northern

  7. Morphologic and stratigraphic evolution of muddy ebb-tidal deltas along a subsiding coast: Barataria Bay, Mississippi River delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    FitzGerald, D.M.; Kulp, M.; Penland, S.; Flocks, J.; Kindinger, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Barataria barrier coast formed between two major distributaries of the Mississippi River delta: the Plaquemines deltaic headland to the east and the Lafourche deltaic headland to the west. Rapid relative sea-level rise (1??03 cm year-1) and other erosional processes within Barataria Bay have led to substantial increases in the area of open water (> 775 km2 since 1956) and the attendant bay tidal prism. Historically, the increase in tidal discharge at inlets has produced larger channel cross-sections and prograding ebb-tidal deltas. For example, the ebb delta at Barataria Pass has built seaward > 2??2 km since the 1880s. Shoreline erosion and an increasing bay tidal prism also facilitated the formation of new inlets. Four major lithofacies characterize the Barataria coast ebb-tidal deltas and associated sedimentary environments. These include a proximal delta facies composed of massive to laminated, fine grey-brown to pale yellow sand and a distal delta facies consisting of thinly laminated, grey to pale yellow sand and silty sand with mud layers. The higher energy proximal delta deposits contain a greater percentage of sand (75-100%) compared with the distal delta sediments (60-80%). Associated sedimentary units include a nearshore facies consisting of horizontally laminated, fine to very fine grey sand with mud layers and an offshore facies that is composed of grey to dark grey, laminated sandy silt to silty clay. All facies coarsen upwards except the offshore facies, which fines upwards. An evolutionary model is presented for the stratigraphic development of the ebb-tidal deltas in a regime of increasing tidal energy resulting from coastal land loss and tidal prism growth. Ebb-tidal delta facies prograde over nearshore sediments, which interfinger with offshore facies. The seaward decrease in tidal current velocity of the ebb discharge produces a gradational contact between proximal and distal tidal delta facies. As the tidal discharge increases and the inlet

  8. Analysis and design for delta operator systems with actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjiu; Shi, Peng; Li, Zhiwei; Hua, Changchun

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the problem of estimating the domain of attraction for delta operator systems under a pre-designed saturated linear feedback. Ellipsoids are used as the estimates of domain of attraction for delta operator systems. A condition is derived in terms of an auxiliary feedback matrix for determining if a given ellipsoid is contractive invariant. Moreover, some necessary and sufficient conditions are given for single input delta operator systems. The results are also further extended to determine the invariant sets for delta operator systems with persistent disturbances. Linear matrix inequalities based on the methods are developed for constructing feedback laws that achieve disturbance rejection with guaranteed stability requirements. Some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the developed techniques.

  9. 23. OWENS RIVER DELTA JUST NORTH OF CROWLEY LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. OWENS RIVER DELTA JUST NORTH OF CROWLEY LAKE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. A variable-step-size robust delta modulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, C. L.; Garodnick, J.; Schilling, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    Description of an analytically obtained optimum adaptive delta modulator-demodulator configuration. The device utilizes two past samples to obtain a step size which minimizes the mean square error for a Markov-Gaussian source. The optimum system is compared, using computer simulations, with a linear delta modulator and an enhanced Abate delta modulator. In addition, the performance is compared to the rate distortion bound for a Markov source. It is shown that the optimum delta modulator is neither quantization nor slope-overload limited. The highly nonlinear equations obtained for the optimum transmitter and receiver are approximated by piecewise-linear equations in order to obtain system equations which can be transformed into hardware. The derivation of the experimental system is presented.

  11. Delta-doped imagers for UV and EUV applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, S.; Jones, T. J.; Cunningham, T. J.; Deelman, P. W.; Elliot, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss performance of delta-doped CCDs in UV and EUV, our in-house thinning capability, bonding approaches for producing flat focal plane arrays, and in-house capabilities of directly applied antireflection coatings.

  12. Alternative Interpretation for the Eberswalde Delta, Holden NE Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedo, C. M.; Finkelstein, D. B.; Moersch, J. E.

    2008-03-01

    Examination of HiRISE images from the Eberswalde Delta reveal that it is hard to identify sedimentologic and stratigraphic components of a fluvio-deltaic system, leaving open alternative interpretations for the origin of the strata and geomorphpology.

  13. Aberrant accumulation of phospholipase C-delta in Alzheimer brains.

    PubMed Central

    Shimohama, S.; Homma, Y.; Suenaga, T.; Fujimoto, S.; Taniguchi, T.; Araki, W.; Yamaoka, Y.; Takenawa, T.; Kimura, J.

    1991-01-01

    Since phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) is one of the key molecules in signal transduction, the authors assessed its involvement in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immunostaining of a specific antibody against the PLC isozyme, PLC-delta, demonstrated that this enzyme was abnormally accumulated in neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), the neurites surrounding senile plaque (SP) cores, and neuropil threads in AD brains. Western blot analysis confirmed that PLC-delta was concentrated in the paired helical filament (PHF)-rich fraction of AD brains. Antibodies to other PLC isozymes did not produce positive immunostaining of these pathologic structures. Moreover, diffuse and amorphous deposits of PLC-delta were found to precede the accumulation of fibrillary deposits. These results suggest that PLC-delta accumulation is a crucial event that ultimately may contribute to the formation of PHF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1928298

  14. Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C.; McKee, W.H. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.

  15. Ecosystem Services Assessment of the Nemunas River Delta

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of ecosystem services recognizes the services, and benefits, provided to people by ecosystems. The Nemunas River Delta, in Lithuania, provides many ecosystem services to the people of the area, including food, fuel, transportation, climate regulation, water purificati...

  16. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  17. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  18. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  19. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  20. STS-103 MS Nicollier arrives at SLF aboard a T-38 jet for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, smiles after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Also participating are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery.