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Sample records for aboard russian space

  1. Experiment aboard Russian satellite "Foton M2" in 2005: new approaches for study on stimulating effect of space flight on cell proliferation and regeneration in Urodela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Almeida, E.; Domaratskaya, E.; Tairbekov, M.; Aleinikova, K.; Mitashov, V.

    A study on space flight effect upon processes of regeneration is due to the necessity to know their characteristics in animals and human exposed to space and earth conditions shortly after flight Several experiments on the newts performed earlier aboard Russian biosatellites showed that the rate of organ and tissue regeneration in space was greater than that on the ground Space flight effect stimulating regeneration was enduring and apparent not only just after flight but long time later as well This observation found support in studies simulated physiological weightlessness by means of fast-rotating clinostat It was shown also that the higher rate of regeneration was associated with enhanced cell proliferation For instance we found that the number of cells in S-phase in regenerating tissues was significantly greater in space-flown animals than in the ground controls However it was unclear whether cell proliferation stimulation was induced by micro- g per se or by conditions of hyper- g during launching and re-adaptation on the earth Molecular mechanisms underlying the change also remained obscure These issues were addressed by the joint Russian-USA experiment Regeneration performed on Foton-M2 in 2005 In 16- day flight we used two well-known models of regeneration lens regeneration after lensectomy and tail regeneration after amputation in adult newts Pleurodeles walt Urodela In order to evaluate cell proliferative activity in time limits of microgravity influence the original method for in-flight delivering DNA precursor BrdU

  2. Aboard the Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Florence S.

    This 32-page pamphlet contains color photographs and detailed diagrams which illustrate general descriptive comments about living conditions aboard the space shuttle. Described are details of the launch, the cabin, the condition of weightlessness, food, sleep, exercise, atmosphere, personal hygiene, medicine, going EVA (extra-vehicular activity),…

  3. Aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, F. S.

    1980-01-01

    Livability aboard the space shuttle orbiter makes it possible for men and women scientists and technicians in reasonably good health to join superbly healthy astronauts as space travelers and workers. Features of the flight deck, the mid-deck living quarters, and the subfloor life support and house-keeping equipment are illustrated as well as the provisions for food preparation, eating, sleeping, exercising, and medical care. Operation of the personal hygiene equipment and of the air revitalization system for maintaining sea level atmosphere in space is described. Capabilities of Spacelab, the purpose and use of the remote manipulator arm, and the design of a permanent space operations center assembled on-orbit by shuttle personnel are also depicted.

  4. Complex researches aboard the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhyl, Yu. A.

    Special Research and Development Bureau SRDB is a general organizer on Ukrainian part of three Ukrainian- Russian joint experiments to be implemented aboard the Russian segment of International Space Station RS-ISS Experiment Material- Friction It is proposed to carry out a series of comparative tribological research under conditions of orbital flight aboard the ISS versus those in on- ground laboratory conditions To meet these objectives there will be employed a special onboard 6-module Space- borne tribometer- facility The on- ground research will be implemented under conditions of laboratory simulation of Space environmental factors Results thus obtained would enable one to forecast a behavior of friction pairs as well as functional safety and lifetime of the space- vehicle This experiment will also enable us determine an adequacy of tribological results obtained under conditions of outer Space and on- ground simulation Experiment Penta- Fatigue It is proposed to develop fabricate and deliver aboard the RS-ISS a facility intended for studies of SEF- influence on characteristics of metallic and polymeric materials resistance to fatigue destruction Such a project to be implemented in outer Space for the first ever time would enable us to estimate the parameter of cosmic lifetime for constructional materials due to such mechanical characteristic as fatigue strength so as to enable selection of specific sorts of constructional materials appropriate to service in Space technologies At the same time

  5. Robots Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Ames Research Center, MIT and Johnson Space Center have two new robotics projects aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Robonaut 2, a two-armed humanoid robot with astronaut-like dexterity,...

  6. Welcome Aboard Starship MIR: Mission Is Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Janice

    2009-01-01

    Six years ago Project Starship MIR, the Russian language "shuttle," launched at Turnagain Elementary, one of the Anchorage School District's 65 elementary schools. The MIR "peace" mission originated with encouragement from the local business community to prepare students for Alaska's future economic, social and political ties with neighboring…

  7. All Aboard for Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kennedy Space Center, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    This book is designed as a resource for teachers and parents concerned with early childhood education. It is hoped that the ideas and activities presented herein will serve in the creation of a space science and mathematics curriculum that is both child-centered and exciting. The basic philosophy for this curriculum is that of Piaget. This…

  8. Russian Lunar Space Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Petrukovich, Anatoly; Khartov, Victor V.; Dolgopolov, Vladimir; Mitrofanov, Igor; Martunov, M.; Lukianchikov, A.; Shevchenko, Vladislav

    Russia had a great number of “firsts” in Lunar Studies (first soft landing, first pictures of the dark side of the moon, first sample return, first rover). Now after a long break the focus of Russian Space Program is again aimed to the lunar science investigations. These investigations have two aims: 1) to get answers to a principal questions of lunar formation and evolution, search for volatiles and regions with subsurface lunar permafrost, studies of lunar dust, electrostatic fields and magnetic anomalies. 2) Preparation to Lunar Exploration stage and search for most promising sites for future lunar habitable scientific stations. First stage of Russian Lunar program during this decade of 2 Lunar includes launches Landers and one Lunar orbiter, discussed in a preceding talks. Further steps during the next decade are related, first of all, with the cryogenic lunar sample return from a certain locations, hear South (or North ) poles, which according to the analysis of orbital observations are enriched by the subsurface water ice inclusions. Next steps, which are planned now are transitional to the exploration stage: delivery of a “ heavy rover“ to the specific site (thoroughly investigated during previous stages), accomplishment of technological experiments on the mitigation of lunar dust and space radiation hazards, simple initial experiments on radioastronomy and cosmic ray studies. It is a long and complicated path to go and quite naturally Russia considers that all important steps on this way will be done in international partnership.

  9. Russian Aviation and Space Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Russian Space Agency (RKA) was created on 25 February 1992 by a decree issued by the President of the Russian Federation. It was formed after the break-up of the former Soviet Union and the dissolution of the Soviet space program. The RKA uses the technology and launch sites that belonged to the former Soviet space program. This includes payment to Kazakhstan for use of the Baikonur Cosmodrom...

  10. Experiment "Regeneration" Performed Aboard the Russian Spacecraft Foton-M2 in 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryan, Elonora; Almeida, Eduardo; Domaratskaya, Elena; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Aleinikova, Karina; Tairbekov, Murad; Mitashov, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The experiments on the newts performed earlier aboard Russian biosate llites showed that the rate of lens and tail regeneration in space wa s greater than on the ground. In parallel it was found that the numbe r of cells in S-phase was greater in space-flown animals than in the ground controls. However, it was unclear whether cell proliferation stimulation was induced by micro-g per se. Molecular mechanisms under lying the change also remained obscure. These issues were addressed b y the joint Russian-American experiment "Regeneration" flown on Foton -M2 in 2005. The method for in-flight delivering DNA precursor BrdU was developed. The experiment showed that during the flight the numbe r of S-phase cells in the regenerating eyes and tails increased. Thes e data together with those obtained earlier suggest that cell prolife ration increases in response to the effects of both micro-g and 1-g a fter return to Earth. The expression of bFGF in regenerating tissues of "flown" newts and ground controls was examined using immuno-histo chemistry. Obtained results suggest that this growth factor is a part icipant of the promotional effect of space flight upon cell prolifera tion in lens and tail regenerates.

  11. Living aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The crew habitat of the Space Shuttle is briefly characterized. Subjects discussed include the overall layout of the crew quarters; the air-purification and climate-control facilities; menus and food-preparation techniques; dishwashing, laundry, toilet, bathing, and shaving procedures; and recreation and sleeping accommodations. Drawings and a photograph are provided.

  12. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  13. Safety Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Shauna M.

    2004-01-01

    As with any task that NASA takes on, safety is of utmost importaqce. There are pages of safety codes and procedures that must be followed before any idea can be brought to life. Unfortunately, the International Space Station s (ISS) safety regulations and procedures are based on lg standards rather than on Og. To aide in making this space age home away from home a less hazardous environment, I worked on several projects revolving around the dangers of flammable items in microgravity. The first task I was assigned was to track flames. This involves turning eight millimeter video recordings, of tests run in the five second drop tower, into avi format on the computer. The footage is then compressed and altered so that the flame can be seen more clearly. Using another program called Spotlight, line profiles were used to collect data describing the luminescence of the flame at different points. These raw data are saved as text files and run trough a macro so that a Matlab program can analyze it. By fitting the data to a curve and determining the areas of brightest luminescence, the behavior of the flame can be recorded numerically. After entering the data into a database, researchers can come back later and easily get information on flames resulting from different gas and liquid mixtures in microgravity. I also worked on phase two of the FATE project, which deals with safety aboard the ISS. This phase involves igniting projected droplets and determining how they react with secondary materials. Such simulations represent, on a small scale, the spread of onboard fires due to the effervescence of burning primary materials. I set up existing hardware to operate these experiments and ran tests with it, photographing the results. I also made CAD drawings of the apparatus and the area available on the (SF)2 rig for it to fit into. The experiment will later be performed on the KC-135, and the results gathered will be used to reanalyze current safety standards for the ISS

  14. The Russian experience in medical care and health maintenance of the International Space Station crews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, V. V.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-02-01

    The main purpose of the medical support system aboard International Space Station (ISS) is crew health maintenance and high level of work capability assurance prior to during and after in space flights. In the present communication the Russian point of view dealing with the problems and achievements in this branch is presented. An overview on medical operations during flight and after finalization of the space missions based on Russian data of crew health and environment state monitoring, as well as data on the inflight countermeasures (prophylaxis) jointly with data on operational problems that are specific to ISS is presented. The report summarizes results of the medical examination of Russian members of the ISS and taxi crews during and after visits to the ISS.

  15. Microgravity Science Glovebox Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS), European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain is seen working at the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). He is working with the PROMISS experiment, which will investigate the growth processes of proteins during weightless conditions. The PROMISS is one of the Cervantes program of tests (consisting of 20 commercial experiments). The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  16. Soviet/Russian-American space cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karash, Yuri Y.

    This dissertation seeks to answer two questions: (1) what are the necessary conditions for the emergence of meaningful space cooperation between Russia and the United States, and (2) might this cooperation continue developing on its own merit, contributing to the further rapprochement between the two countries, even if the conditions that originated the cooperation were to change? The study examines the entire space era up to this point, 1957 to 1997, from the first satellite launch through the joint U.S.-Russian work on the ISS project. It focuses on the analysis of three distinct periods of possible and real cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia. The first possibility for a limited Soviet-American cooperation in space emerged in the late 1950s, together with the space age, and continued until the mid-1960s. The major potential joint project of this period was a human expedition to the Moon. The global competition/confrontation between the two countries prevented actual cooperation. The second period was from the late 1960s until 1985 with consideration of experimental docking missions, including the docking of a reusable U.S. shuttle to a Soviet Salyut-type station. The global U.S.-Soviet competition still continued, but the confrontation was replaced by detente for a brief period of time lasting from the end of 1960s until mid-1970s. Detente gave the first example of U.S.-Soviet cooperation in space---the Apollo-Soyuz joint space flight (ASTP) which took place in 1975. However, the lack of interest of political leaderships in continuation of broad-scale cooperation between the two countries, and the end of detente, removed ASTP-like projects out of question at least until 1985. The third period started together with Mikhail Gorbachev's Perestroika in 1985 and continues until now. It involves almost a hundred of joint space projects both at the governmental and at the private sectors levels. The mainstream of the joint activities

  17. Russian Projects of Space Missions for Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, A. V.

    2006-08-01

    Since 1994 Institute of Astronomy of Russian Academy of Sciences is working on conception of astrometrical instrument of new generation under contract with Russian Space Agency. After HIPPARCOS mission it is obvious that necessary accuracy for modern astrometry is micro-arcseconds. The only way to approach this level is pupil interferometry outside atmosphere. The first Russian project was pair of twin Michelson interferometers with coincided bases. It consisted of 40-cm input telescopes and had baseline 4 meters long; its limiting magnitude was about 20^m and expected accuracy 2-4 mks. As this devise was proposed to be russian-american experiment for International Space Station, and NASA did not support it, the project was not move up. This is why improved conception of slightly diminished arcmeter-interferometer OSIRIS was proposed as national space project, and it is adopted to the Russian Federal Space Program for the period 2012-2015. Input optic of the OSIRIS will be of 20-cm aperture, and baseline will be 200 cm. It seems to be enough to get position accuracy of single measurement about 4-8 mks at arc range from 30 to 105 degrees, and limiting magnitude being 18^m. There are some technical invents that guarantee these parameters. The OSIRIS mission will establish referred to the ICRS inertial celestial reference frame in optic independent of epoch, that leads to new tasks of astrometry. The astrometrical instrument of new generation may be used for positioning of near-Earth probes as well as of ground objects. Using the same technology it became possible to point narrow-field telescope to any target with the same accuracy. A really desired for this aims accuracy is only milliseconds, and just for these applied experiments LIDA project was proposed last year. It will be suitable for bright sources above 12^m and it will measure instant positions with accuracy 1 mas. The LIDA will be low-mass and compact device suitable for launch by conversional rocket of

  18. Protein Crystal Growth Samples Placed Aboard Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronaut Tom Akers places a liquid nitrogen Dewar containing frozen protein solutions aboard Russia's space Station Mir during a visit by the Space Shuttle (STS-79). The protein samples were flash-frozen on Earth and will be allowed to thaw and crystallize in the microgravity environment on Mir Space Station. A later crew will return the Dewar to Earth for sample analysis. Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California at Riverside is the principal investigator. Photo credit: NASA/Johnson Space Center.

  19. Protein Crystal Growth Samples Placed Aboard Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Astronaut Michael Clifford places a liquid nitrogen Dewar containing frozen protein solutions aboard Russia's space station Mir during a visit by the Space Shuttle (STS-76). The protein samples were flash-frozen on Earth and will be allowed to thaw and crystallize in the microgravity environment on Mir Space Station. A later crew will return the Dewar to Earth for sample analysis. Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California at Riverside is the principal investigator. Photo credit: NASA/Johnson Space Center.

  20. High temperature heat pipe experiments aboard the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. ); Secary, C.J. )

    1993-01-10

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most space nuclear power systems, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation. Three SST/potassium heat pipes are being designed, fabricated, and ground tested. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will fly aboard the space shuttle in 1995. Three wick structures will be tested: homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap. Ground tests are described that simulate the space shuttle environment in every way except gravity field.

  1. Microbiology facilities aboard Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cioletti, L. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Richard, Elizabeth E.; Taylor, R.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive microbiological facility is being designed for use on board Space Station Freedom (SSF). Its purpose will be to conduct microbial surveillance of the SSF environment and to examine clinical specimens. Air, water, and internal surfaces will be periodically monitored to satisfy requirements for a safe environment. Crew health will remain a principle objective for every mission. This paper will review the Microbiology Subsystem capabilities planned for SSF application.

  2. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  3. Space science experiments aboard ATS-F.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, R.; King, W.

    1972-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Experiment (EME) package is mounted on the ATS-F spacecraft to a structure that is located on top of the 30-foot parabolic reflector hub. The eight experiments of the EME package are designed to study the environment in space at synchronous altitude and to obtain information on electromagnetic-ionospheric interactions. Six of these experiments will obtain data on charged particles of several different types. A seventh experiment is to provide magnetic field data. The eighth experiment is concerned with solar cell degradation studies.

  4. Working aboard the Mir space station.

    PubMed

    Reiter, T

    1996-11-01

    For more than ten years, the Mir station has been the World's only permanently manned laboratory in low earth orbit. With an orbital inclination of 51.6 degrees, its ground track covers more than 85% of the Earth's surface, where approximately 95% of the population lives. For the transfer of up to three crew members per trip to and from Mir, the 6.9 t Soyuz spacecraft is used. In general, the station's crew is changed every six months, with an overlap during the exchange of between one and two weeks. A Progress spacecraft (an unmanned derivative of the Soyuz vehicle) visits the station every three months to resupply it, with up to 2.1 t of payload, and to reboost it to maintain its nominal orbital altitude. The station's core module, injected into orbit in February 1986, contains the central control post for most onboard systems, the computer for attitude control, and the telemetry and communications system. It also contains the station's largest work space, which is 7.0 m long and varies in width between 1.5 and 2.5 m. PMID:11541437

  5. Multidisciplinary Russian biomedical research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, O. I.; Sychev, V. N.; Samarin, G. I.; Ilyin, E. A.; Belakovskiy, M. S.; Kussmaul, A. R.

    2014-08-01

    Research activities on a comprehensive multidisciplinary program are vital for enhancement of the system of crew's medical care, environmental health and hygiene in space missions. The primary goal of the program must be identification of patterns, intensity and dynamics of structural and functional shifts in organism induced by an aggregate of spaceflight factors including microgravity, isolation, artificial environment, space radiation, etc. Also, the program must pursue differential assessment of emerging deviations from the standpoint of adequacy to the spaceflight conditions and prospects of returning to Earth and guide the development of principles, methods and techniques necessary to maintain health and working capacity of humans during short- and long-duration missions and on return to Earth. Over 50 years, since 1963, the IBMP researchers apply systemic and innovational approaches to fundamental and exploratory studies in the fields of medical sciences, radiation biology, engineering science, biotechnology, etc. with participation of various biological specimens and human volunteers. Investigations aboard manned spacecrafts and biological satellites as well as in ground-based laboratories further enhancement of the medical care system for crews on orbital and remote space missions; they give insight into the fundamental problems of gravitational physiology and biology, psychophysiology, radiation biology, and contribute thereby to the development of knowledge, methods and technologies, as well as medical and scientific equipment.

  6. Microbial Characterization of Free Floating Condensate Aboard the Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bruce, R. J.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Three samples of humidity condensate that had accumulated behind panels aboard the Russian space station Mir were collected and returned to earth for analysis. As these floating masses of liquid come into contact with the astronauts and the engineering systems, they have the potential to affect both crew health and systems performance. Using a combination of culturing techniques, a wide variety of organisms were isolated included Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and a presumed Legionella species. In addition, microscopic analysis indicated the presence of protozoa, dust mites, and spirochetes. These findings suggest the need for more comprehensive microbial analysis of the environment through the use of new methodologies to allow a more thorough risk assessment of spacecraft. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Ovarian Tumor Cells Studied Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  8. Protein crystallization aboard the Space Shuttle and the Mir space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbaere, Louis T. J.; Vandonselaar, Margaret; Prasad, Lata; Quail, J. W.; Birnbaum, George I.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, Karen; Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Two different protein crystallizations, namely ,the free Fab fragment of the Je142 monoclonal antibody and the complex of Fab fragment/HPr with antigen, were performed aboard the Discovery Space Shuttle flights and the Mir space station, respectively. Medium sized crystals of the Je142 Fab fragment were obtained. The Je142 Fab fragment/Hpr complex produced two medium-sized crystals after two months aboard the Mir space station. Microgravity was found to eliminate the tendency of these crystals to form clusters.

  9. Expedition Seven Launched Aboard Soyez Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Destined for the International Space Station (ISS), a Soyez TMA-1 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 26, 2003. Aboard are Expedition Seven crew members, cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition Seven mission commander, and Astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition Seven NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer. Expedition Six crew members returned to Earth aboard the Russian spacecraft after a 5 and 1/2 month stay aboard the ISS. Photo credit: NASA/Scott Andrews

  10. Accomplishments in Bioastronautics Research Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 16 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crew members and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes, muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; and changes in immune function. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS . Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  11. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uri, John J.; Haven, Cynthia P.

    2005-05-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  12. Dwarf Wheat grown aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dwarf wheat were photographed aboard the International Space Station in April 2002. Lessons from on-orbit research on plants will have applications to terrestrial agriculture as well as for long-term space missions. Alternative agricultural systems that can efficiently produce greater quantities of high-quality crops in a small area are important for future space expeditions. Also regenerative life-support systems that include plants will be an important component of long-term space missions. Data from the Biomass Production System (BPS) and the Photosynthesis Experiment and System Testing and Operations (PESTO) will advance controlled-environment agricultural systems and will help farmers produce better, healthier crops in a small area. This same knowledge is critical to closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The BPS comprises a miniature environmental control system for four plant growth chambers, all in the volume of two space shuttle lockers. The experience with the BPS on orbit is providing valuable design and operational lessons that will be incorporated into the Plant Growth Units. The objective of PESTO was to flight verify the BPS hardware and to determine how the microgravity environment affects the photosynthesis and metabolic function of Super Dwarf wheat and Brassica rapa (a member of the mustard family).

  13. Carbon Dioxide Removal Troubleshooting aboard the International Space Station (ISS) during Space Shuttle (STS) Docked Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Christopher M.; Cover, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a largely closed-system habitable volume which requires active control of atmospheric constituents, including removal of exhaled Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The ISS provides a unique opportunity to observe system requirements for (CO2) removal. CO2 removal is managed by the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) aboard the US segment of ISS and by Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) aboard the Space Shuttle (STS). While the ISS and STS are docked, various methods are used to balance the CO2 levels between the two vehicles, including mechanical air handling and management of general crew locations. Over the course of ISS operation, several unexpected anomalies have occurred which have required troubleshooting, including possible compromised performance of the CDRA and LiOH systems, and possible imbalance in CO2 levels between the ISS and STS while docked. This paper will cover efforts to troubleshoot the CO2 removal systems aboard the ISS and docked STS.

  14. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrath, M.; Canfield, P. J.; Bronowicki, P. M.; Dreyer, M. E.; Weislogel, M. M.; Grah, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  15. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired. PMID:24483559

  16. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Uri, John J; Haven, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program. PMID:15835037

  17. Transfer of space technologies past and present: the Russian case.

    PubMed

    Pankova, Lyudmila

    2002-12-01

    Since the end of the 1980's transfer of government sponsored high technology space goods and services to other sectors, industry, and eventually non-government use has been a growing concern of the Russian policy makers. Today the real and functional transformation of this field is on the agenda. The paper is organized as follows. The first section analyzes the evolution of the common approach to technology transfer, looks at the main obstacles to this processes as a whole, and in the space sector in particular. The second section examines the Russian space R&D sector from the point of view of its role and place in the Russian scientific and technological base. New mechanisms of technology transfer are then considered. Here, problems of conversion, commercialization, dual-use, and internationalization are examined in the context of space technology transfer. Furthermore, issues of innovation in technology transfer are discussed. The new networks that are forming through which technologies diffuse is considered. The paper then turns to legislative and regulatory problems, including the discussion of the main principles of the Russian space transfer code, which is now being drafted. It is necessary to underline, that in the Russian case, official statistics still do not help analyze the question of technology transfer. PMID:14983845

  18. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, G.F.; Schmidt, G.L.; Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-08-01

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch.

  19. Forced Forward Smoldering Experiments Aboard The Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Bar-Ilan, A.; Rein, G.; Urban, D. L.; Torero, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Smoldering is a basic combustion problem that presents a fire risk because it is initiated at low temperatures and because the reaction can propagate slowly in the material interior and go undetected for long periods of time. It yields a higher conversion of fuel to toxic compounds than does flaming, and may undergo a transition to flaming. To date there have been a few minor incidents of overheated and charred cables and electrical components reported on Space Shuttle flights. With the establishment of the International Space Station, and the planning of a potential manned mission to Mars, there has been an increased interest in the study of smoldering in microgravity. The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a spacecraft environment. The aim of the experiment is to provide a better fundamental understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering combustion under normal- and microgravity conditions. This in turn will aid in the prevention and control of smolder originated fires, both on earth and in spacecrafts. The microgravity smoldering experiments have to be conducted in a space-based facility because smoldering is a very slow process and consequently its study in a microgravity environment requires extended periods of time. The microgravity experiments reported here were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle. The most recent tests were conducted during the STS-105 and STS-108 missions. The results of the forward smolder experiments from these flights are reported here. In forward smolder, the reaction front propagates in the same direction as the oxidizer flow. The heat released by the heterogeneous oxidation reaction is transferred ahead of the reaction heating the unreacted fuel. The resulting increase of the virgin fuel temperature leads to the onset of the smolder reaction, and propagates through the fuel. The MSC data are compared with normal gravity

  20. National Standard of the Russian Federation for Space Debris Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, S.; Yakovlev, M.; Mikhailov, M.; Popkova, L.

    2009-03-01

    Normative and technical document that define requirements for the mitigation of human-produced near-earth space pollution develops in Russian Federation.NATIONAL STANDARD of the Russian Federation GOST R 52925-2008 «SPACE TECHNOLOGY ITEMS. General Requirements on Space Systems for the Mitigation of Human-Produced near-Earth Space Pollution» was approved in 2008 and entered into force since 1st January of 2009. Requirements of this standard harmonized with requirements of «UN SPACE DEBRIS MITIGATION GUIDELINESÈ»This standard consists of six parts:- Scope;- References to Standards;- Terms & Definitions;- Abbreviations;- General Provisions;- General Requirements on Space Systems for the Mitigation of Human-Produced near-Earth Space Pollution.

  1. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  2. Dietary studies in the joint US-Russian space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, B. L.; Lane, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic experiments in the joint US-Russian space program involve analysis of food records, which include weighed foods, stable-isotope turnover, and biochemical samples collected before, during, and after the flights. This article describes the methods of monitoring dietary intake for this program.

  3. Digest of Russian Space Life Sciences, issue 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Lydia Razran (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirty-third issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 55 papers published in Russian journals. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to the following areas of space biology and medicine: biological rhythms, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, developmental biology, endocrinology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal system, genetics, hematology, human performance, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, psychology, radiobiology, and reproductive system.

  4. Analog FM/FM versus digital color TV transmission aboard space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Langley Research Center is developing an integrated fault tolerant network to support data, voice, and video communications aboard Space Station. The question of transmitting the video data via dedicated analog channels or converting it to the digital domain for consistancy with the test of the data is addressed. The recommendations in this paper are based on a comparison in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the type of video processing required aboard Space Station, the applicability to Space Station, and how they integrate into the network.

  5. Stability of Dosage Forms in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Brian J.; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick; Younker, Diane R.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf lives are essential for successful space medical operations. Stability of pharmaceuticals, therefore, is of paramount importance for assuring the health and wellness of astronauts on future space exploration missions. Unique physical and environmental factors of space missions may contribute to the instability of pharmaceuticals, e.g., radiation, humidity and temperature variations. Degradation of pharmaceutical formulations can result in inadequate efficacy and/or untoward toxic effects, which could compromise astronaut safety and health. Methods: Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms (liquid, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the International Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-121). One of the 4 kits was stored on the Shuttle and the other 3 were stored on the International Space Station (ISS) for return to Earth at 6-month interval aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit. The kit stored on the Shuttle was returned to Earth aboard STS-121 and 2 kits from ISS were returned on STS 117 and STS-122. Results: Analysis of standard physical and chemical parameters of degradation was completed for pharmaceuticals returned by STS-121 after14 days, STS - 117 after11 months and STS 122 after 19 months storage aboard ISS. Analysis of all flight samples along with ground-based matching controls was completed and results were compiled. Conclusion: Evaluation of results from the shuttle (1) and ISS increments (2) indicate that the number of formulations degraded in space increased with duration of storage in space and was higher in space compared to their ground-based counterparts. Rate of degradation for some of the formulations tested was faster in space than on Earth. Additionally, some of the formulations included in the medical kits were unstable, more so in space than on the ground. These results indicate that the

  6. A Survey of Radiation Measurements Made Aboard Russian Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate prediction of ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit is necessary in order to minimize risks to astronauts, spacecraft and instrumentation. To this end, models of the radiation environment, the AP-8 trapped proton model and the AE-8 trapped electron model, have been developed for use by spacecraft designers and mission planners. It has been widely acknowledged for some time now by the space radiation community that these models possess some major shortcomings. Both models cover only a limited trapped particle energy region and predictions at low altitudes are extrapolated from higher altitude data. With the launch of the first components of the International Space Station with numerous constellations of low-Earth orbit communications satellites now being planned and deployed, the inadequacies of these trapped particle models need to be addressed. Efforts are now underway both in the U.S. and in Europe to refine the AP-8 and AE-8 trapped particle models. This report is an attempt to collect a significant fraction of data for use in validation of trapped radiation models at low altitudes.

  7. Sol Invictus - Heliophilic Elements in Early Russian Space Flight Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkowsky, G.

    Common historiographic theory refers to the space age as an extrapolation of the Age of the Enlightenment. According to this thesis, the Copernican transformation of man's place in the universe, and the gradual divergence of science away from Judeo-Christian theology, paved the road to the application of scientific and technological methodologies to the age-old notion of space travel. As an anti-thesis to this historiographic tradition, and in particular reference to the Russian case, one can point at the influence of certain metaphysical elements alien to the Enlightenment, some of which were pagan, on the birth of the space age. At the centre of this metaphysical foundation of astronautics stands the heliophilic motif, namely - the attribution of monistic potency to the sun, and the pursuit of an anthropo-solar affinity by way of space travel.

  8. Utilizing a Russian space nuclear reactor for a United States space mission: Systems integration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, E.; Schaefer, E.; Polansky, G.; Lacy, J.; Bocharov, A.

    1993-09-30

    The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) has developed a cooperative relationship with several institutes of the former Soviet Union to evaluate Russian space hardware on a US spacecraft One component is the Topaz II Nuclear Power System; a built and flight qualified nuclear reactor that has yet to be tested in space. The access to the Topaz II reactor provides the NEPSTP with a rare opportunity; to conduct an early flight demonstration of nuclear electric propulsion at a relatively low cost. This opportunity, however, is not without challenges. Topaz II was designed to be compatible with Russian spacecraft and launch vehicles. It was manufactured and flight qualified by Russian techniques and standards and conforms to safety requirements of the former Soviet Union, not the United States. As it is desired to make minimal modifications to the Topaz II, integrating the reactor system with a United States spacecraft and launch vehicle presents an engineering challenge. This paper documents the lessons teamed regarding the integration of reactor based spacecraft and also some insight about integrating Russian hardware. It examines the planned integration flow along with specific reactor requirements that affect the spacecraft integration including American-Russian space system compatibility.

  9. Project Explorer - Student experiments aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckbee, E.; Dannenberg, K.; Driggers, G.; Orillion, A.

    1979-01-01

    Project Explorer, a program of high school student experiments in space in a Space Shuttle self-contained payload unit (Getaway Special), sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center (ASRC) in cooperation with four Alabama universities is presented. Organizations aspects of the project, which is intended to promote public awareness of the space program and encourage space research, are considered, and the proposal selection procedure is outlined. The projects selected for inclusion in the self-contained payload canister purchased in 1977 and expected to be flown on an early shuttle mission include experiments on alloy solidification, electric plating, whisker growth, chick embryo development and human blood freezing, and an amateur radio experiment. Integration support activities planned and underway are summarized, and possible uses for a second payload canister purchased by ASRC are discussed.

  10. 'Smart SPHERES' Fly High Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Dec. 12 engineers at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., and Johnson Space Center in Houston conducted an experiment using small, free-flying robotic satellites called "Smart SPH...

  11. Stability of Formulations Contained in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf life are essential for successful space medical operations in support of space exploration missions. Physical and environmental factors unique to space missions such as vibration, G forces and ionizing radiation may adversely affect stability of pharmaceuticals intended for standard care of astronauts aboard space missions. Stable pharmaceuticals, therefore, are of paramount importance for assuring health and wellness of astronauts in space. Preliminary examination of stability of formulations from Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) medical kits revealed that some of these medications showed physical and chemical degradation after flight raising concern of reduced therapeutic effectiveness with these medications in space. A research payload experiment was conducted with a select set of formulations stowed aboard a shuttle flight and on ISS. The payload consisted of four identical pharmaceutical kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms that were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the Space Shuttle, STS 121. One of the four kits was stored on the shuttle and the other three were stored on the ISS for return to Earth at six months intervals on a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit; the shuttle kit was returned to Earth on the same flight. Standard stability indicating physical and chemical parameters were measured for all pharmaceuticals returned from the shuttle and from the first ISS increment payload along with ground-based matching controls. Results were compared between shuttle, ISS and ground controls. Evaluation of data from the three paradigms indicates that some of the formulations exhibited significant degradation in space compared to respective ground controls; a few formulations were unstable both on the ground and in space. An increase in the number of pharmaceuticals from ISS failing USP standards was noticed compared to those from the shuttle

  12. Commercial combustion research aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) is planning a number of combustion experiments to be done on the International Space Station (ISS). These experiments will be conducted in two ISS facilities, the SpaceDRUMS™ Acoustic Levitation Furnace (ALF) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) portion of the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The experiments are part of ongoing commercial projects involving flame synthesis of ceramic powders, catalytic combustion, water mist fire suppression, glass-ceramics for fiber and other applications and porous ceramics for bone replacements, filters and catalyst supports. Ground- and parabolic aircraft-based experiments are currently underway to verify the scientific bases and to test prototype flight hardware. The projects have strong external support.

  13. Facilities for Biological Research Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, Kenneth A.; Yost, Bruce D.; Berry, William E.; Johnson, Catherine C.

    1996-01-01

    A centrifuge designed as part of an integrated biological facility for installation onboard the International Space Station is presented. The requirements for the 2.5 m diameter centrifuge, which is designed for the support of biological experiments are discussed. The scientific objectives of the facility are to: provide a means of conducting fundamental studies in which gravitational acceleration is a controllable variable; provide a 1g control; determine the threshold acceleration for physiological response, and determine the value of centrifugation as a potential countermeasure for the biomedical problems associated with space flight. The implementation of the facility is reported on, and the following aspects of the facility are described: the host resources systems supply requirements such as power and data control; the habitat holding rack; the life sciences glove box; the centrifuge; the different habitats for cell culture, aquatic studies, plant research and insect research; the egg incubator, and the laboratory support equipment.

  14. Microbiology operations and facilities aboard restructured Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cioletti, Louis A.; Mishra, S. K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    With the restructure and funding changes for Space Station Freedom, the Environmental Health System (EHS)/Microbiology Subsystem revised its scheduling and operational requirements for component hardware. The function of the Microbiology Subsystem is to monitor the environmental quality of air, water, and internal surfaces and, in part, crew health on board Space Station. Its critical role shall be the identification of microbial contaminants in the environment that may cause system degradation, produce unsanitary or pathogenic conditions, or reduce crew and mission effectiveness. EHS/Microbiology operations and equipment shall be introduced in concert with a phased assembly sequence, from Man Tended Capability (MTC) through Permanently Manned Capability (PMC). Effective Microbiology operations and subsystem components will assure a safe, habitable, and useful spacecraft environment for life sciences research and long-term manned exploration.

  15. Prospects for Interdisciplinary Science Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of the International Space Station was completed in early 2011, and is now embarking on its first year of the coming decade of use as a laboratory. Two key types of physical science research are enabled by ISS: studies of processes that are normally masked by gravity, and instruments that take advantage of its position as a powerful platform in orbit. The absence of buoyancy-driven convection enables experiments in diverse areas such as fluids near the critical point, Marangoni convection, combustion, and coarsening of metal alloys. The positioning of such a powerful platform in orbit with robotic transfer and instrument support also provides a unique alternative platform for astronomy and physics instruments. Some of the operating or planned instruments related to fundamental physics on the International Space Station include MAXI (Monitoring all-sky X-ray Instrument for ISS), the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, CALET (Calorimetric Electron Telescope), and ACES (Atomic Clock Experiment in Space). The presentation will conclude with an overview of pathways for funding different types of experiments from NASA funding to the ISS National Laboratory, and highlights of the streamlining of services to help scientists implement their experiments on ISS.

  16. Restraining Loose Equipment Aboard the International Space Station: The Payload Equipment Restraint System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kenneth A.; Reynolds, D. W.; Vanhooser, Teresa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the International Space Station (ISS) grows, so do the supplies and equipment needed to support its daily operations. Each day many items must be unstowed and relocated to various worksites so they are readily available to the crew. Due to the lack of gravity, these items may become loose and float away if not restrained. The Payload Equipment Restraint System was developed to meet the new and unique challenge of restrain no loose equipment aboard the ISS.

  17. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), Space Science's Past, Present and Future Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie; Spearing, Scott; Jordan, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which accommodates science and technology investigations in a "workbench' type environment. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 10,000 hours of scientific payload operations and plans to continue for the life of ISS. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume and allows researchers a controlled pristine environment for their needs. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, + 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. MSG investigations have involved research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, and plant growth technologies. Modifications to the MSG facility are currently under way to expand the capabilities and provide for investigations involving Life Science and Biological research. In addition, the MSG video system is being replaced with a state-of-the-art, digital video system with high definition/high speed capabilities, and with near real-time downlink capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, and an

  18. Microbial Diversity Aboard Spacecraft: Evaluation of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Victoria A.; Thrasher, Adrianna N.; Healy, Mimi; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of the microbial flora from air, water, and surface samples provided a baseline of microbial diversity onboard the International Space Station (ISS) to gain insight into bacterial and fungal contamination during the initial stages of construction and habitation. Using 16S genetic sequencing and rep-PeR, 63 bacterial strains were isolated for identification and fingerprinted for microbial tracking. The use of these molecular tools allowed for the identification of bacteria not previously identified using automated biochemical analysis and provided a clear indication of the source of several ISS contaminants. Fungal and bacterial data acquired during monitoring do not suggest there is a current microbial hazard to the spacecraft, nor does any trend indicate a potential health risk. Previous spacecraft environmental analysis indicated that microbial contamination will increase with time and require continued surveillance.

  19. Commercial opportunities in bioseparations and physiological testing aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Cell Research (CCR) is a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space which has as its main goal encouraging industry-driven biomedical/biotechnology space projects. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide long duration, crew-tended microgravity environments which will enhance the opportunities for commercial biomedical/biotechnology projects in bioseparations and physiological testing. The CCR bioseparations program, known as USCEPS (for United States Commercial Electrophoresis Program in Space), is developing access for American industry to continuous-flow electrophoresis aboard SSF. In space, considerable scale-up of continuous free-flow electrophoresis is possible for cells, sub cellular particles, proteins, growth factors, and other biological products. The lack of sedemination and buoyancy-driven convection flow enhances purity of separations and the amount of material processed/time. Through the CCR's physiological testing program, commercial organizations will have access aboard SSF to physiological systems experiments (PSE's); the Penn State Biomodule; and telemicroscopy. Physiological systems experiments involve the use of live animals for pharmaceutical product testing and discovery research. The Penn State Biomodule is a computer-controlled mini lab useful for projects involving live cells or tissues and macro molecular assembly studies, including protein crystallization. Telemicroscopy will enable staff on Earth to manipulate and monitor microscopic specimens on SSF for product development and discovery research or for medical diagnosis of astronaut health problems. Space-based product processing, testing, development, and discovery research using USCEPS and CCR's physiological testing program offer new routes to improved health on Earth. Direct crew involvement-in biomedical/biotechnology projects aboard SSF will enable better experimental outcomes. The current data base shows that there is reason for considerable optimism

  20. STS 129 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-129) and International Space Station (ULF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Reports on the air quality aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-129), and the International Space station (ULF3). NASA analyzed the grab sample canisters (GSCs) and the formaldehyde badges aboard both locations for carbon monoxide levels. The three surrogates: (sup 13)C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene registered 109, 101, and 109% in the space shuttle and 81, 87, and 55% in the International Space Station (ISS). From these results the atmosphere in both the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) was found to be breathable.

  1. The Evaluation of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction. As community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a health concern in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts aboard ISS or the space station itself. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis of archived ISS isolates confirmed our earlier studies indicating a transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers. In addition, this fingerprinting also indicated a transfer between crewmembers and their environment. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and the environment, phenotypic evaluations indicated minimal methicillin resistance. However, positive results for the Penicillin Binding Protein, indicative of the presence of the mecA gene, were detected in multiple isolates of archived Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Phenotypic analysis of these isolates confirmed their resistance to methicillin. While MRSA has not been isolated aboard ISS, the potential exists for the transfer of the gene, mecA, from coagulase negative environmental Staphylococcus to S. aureus creating MRSA strains. This study suggests the need to expand environmental monitoring aboard long duration exploration spacecraft to include antibiotic resistance profiling.

  2. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting real-time and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  3. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Luz, Paul; Smith, Guy; Spivey, Reggie; Jeter, Linda; Gillies, Donald; Hua, Fay; Anikumar, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting "real-time" and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  4. Microstructure Analysis of Directionally Solidified Aluminum Alloy Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angart, Samuel Gilbert

    This thesis entails a detailed microstructure analysis of directionally solidified (DS) Al-7Si alloys processed in microgravity aboard the International Space Station and similar duplicate ground based experiments at Cleveland State University. In recent years, the European Space Agency (ESA) has conducted experiments on alloy solidification in microgravity. NASA and ESA have collaborated for three DS experiments with Al- 7 wt. % Si alloy, aboard the International Space Station (ISS) denoted as MICAST6, MICAST7 and MICAST12. The first two experiments were processed on the ISS in 2009 and 2010. MICAST12 was processed aboard the ISS in the spring of 2014; the resulting experimental results of MICAST12 are not discussed in this thesis. The primary goal of the thesis was to understand the effect of convection in primary dendrite arm spacings (PDAS) and radial macrosegregation within DS aluminum alloys. The MICAST experiments were processed with various solidification speeds and thermal gradients to produce alloy with differences in microstructure features. PDAS and radial macrosegregation were measured in the solidified ingot that developed during the transition from one solidification speed to another. To represent PDAS in DS alloy in the presence of no convection, the Hunt-Lu model was used to represent diffusion-controlled growth. By sectioning cross-sections throughout the entire length of solidified samples, PDAS was measured and calculated. The ground-based (1-g) experiments done at Cleveland State University CSU were also analyzed for comparison to the ISS experiments (0-g). During steady state in the microgravity environment, there was a reasonable agreement between the measured and calculated PDAS. In ground-based experiments, transverse sections exhibited obvious radial macrosegregation caused by thermosolutal convection resulting in a non-agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Using a combination of image processing techniques and Electron Microprobe Analysis

  5. A prototype gas exchange monitor for exercise stress testing aboard NASA Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Joseph A.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Bauer, Anne

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an easy-to-use monitor developed to track the weightlessness deconditioning aboard the NASA Space Station, together with the results of testing of a prototype instrument. The monitor measures the O2 uptake and CO2 production, and calculates the maximum O2 uptake and anaerobic threshold during an exercise stress test. The system uses two flowmeters in series to achieve a completely automatic calibration, and uses breath-by-breath compensation for sample line-transport delay. The monitor was evaluated using two laboratory methods and was shown to be accurate. The system's block diagram and the bench test setup diagram are included.

  6. The monitoring system for vibratory disturbance detection in microgravity environment aboard the international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laster, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Scientists in the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications within the Microgravity Research Division oversee studies in important physical, chemical, and biological processes in microgravity environment. Research is conducted in microgravity environment because of the beneficial results that come about for experiments. When research is done in normal gravity, scientists are limited to results that are affected by the gravity of Earth. Microgravity provides an environment where solid, liquid, and gas can be observed in a natural state of free fall and where many different variables are eliminated. One challenge that NASA faces is that space flight opportunities need to be used effectively and efficiently in order to ensure that some of the most scientifically promising research is conducted. Different vibratory sources are continually active aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Some of the vibratory sources include crew exercise, experiment setup, machinery startup (life support fans, pumps, freezer/compressor, centrifuge), thruster firings, and some unknown events. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMs), which acts as the hardware and carefully positioned aboard the ISS, along with the Microgravity Environment Monitoring System MEMS), which acts as the software and is located here at NASA Glenn, are used to detect these vibratory sources aboard the ISS and recognize them as disturbances. The various vibratory disturbances can sometimes be harmful to the scientists different research projects. Some vibratory disturbances are recognized by the MEMS's database and some are not. Mainly, the unknown events that occur aboard the International Space Station are the ones of major concern. To better aid in the research experiments, the unknown events are identified and verified as unknown events. Features, such as frequency, acceleration level, time and date of recognition of the new patterns are stored in an Excel database. My task is to

  7. Satellite formation flight and realignment maneuver demonstration aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandy, Christophe P.; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Miller, David W.

    2007-09-01

    The Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES), developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory, enable the maturation of control, estimation, and autonomy algorithms for distributed satellite systems, including the relative control of spacecraft required for satellite formation flight. Three free-flyer microsatellites are currently on board the International Space Station (ISS). By operating under crew supervision and by using replenishable consumables, SPHERES creates a risk-tolerant environment where new high-risk yet high-payoff algorithms can be demonstrated in a microgravity environment. Through multiple test sessions aboard the ISS, the SPHERES team has incrementally demonstrated the ability to perform formation flight maneuvers with two and three satellite formations. The test sessions aboard the Space Station include evaluation of coordinated maneuvers which will be applicable to interferometric spacecraft formation missions. The satellites are deployed as a formation and required to rotate around a common center about a given axis, mimicking an interferometer. Various trajectories are then implemented to point the synthetic aperture in a different orientation by changing the common axis of revolution. Observation-time optimizing synchronization strategies and fuel balancing/fuel optimizing trajectories are discussed, compared and evaluated according to resulting mission duration and potential scientific output.

  8. The transportation of fine arts materials aboard the space shuttle Columbia. GAS payload No. 481: Vertical horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Ellery; Wishnow, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The Vertical Horizons experiment represents an initial investigation into the transportation of fine arts materials aboard a space shuttle. Within the confines of a GAS canister, artist quality fine arts materials were packaged and exposed to the rigors of space flight in an attempt to identify adverse effects.

  9. Life-cycle experiments of medaka fish aboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Fish are the most likely candidates to be the first vertebrate to live their life cycle aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In the space-shuttle experiment using medaka, the fry born in space had the same number of germ cells as the ground control fish, and these germ cells later developed to produce the offspring on the ground. Fry hatched in space did not exhibit any looping behavior regardless of their strain, visual acuity, etc. The aquatic habitat (AQH) is a space habitat designed for long-term breeding of medaka, zebrafish and Xenopus, and recent advancements in this hardware also support fish life-cycle experiments. From the crosses between two strains, fish having good eyesight and less sensitivity to gravity were obtained, and their tolerance to microgravity was tested by parabolic flight using an airplane. The fish exhibited less looping and no differences in degree of looping between light and dark conditions. These are possible candidates for the first adult medaka (parent fish) to start a life cycle aboard ISS. Embryos were treated with a three-dimensional clinostat. Such simulated microgravity caused no differences in tissue architecture or in gene expression within the retina, nor in formation of cartilage (head skeleton). Otolith formation in embryos and fry was investigated for wild-type and mutant (ha) medaka. The ha embryos could not form utricular otoliths. They formed saccular otoliths but with a delay. Fry of the mutant fish lacking the utricular otoliths are highly light-dependent at the time of hatching, showing a perfect dorsal-light response (DLR). As they grow, they eventually shift from being light dependent to gravity dependent. Continuous treatment of the fry with altered light direction suppressed this shift to gravity dependence. Being less dependent on gravity, these fish can serve as model fish in studying the differences expected for the fish that have experienced a life cycle in microgravity. PMID:14631634

  10. [Cell biology researches aboard the robotic space vehicles: preparation and performance].

    PubMed

    Tairbekov, M G

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the unique aspects of preparation and performance of cell biology experiments flown on robotic space vehicles Bion and Foton, and gives an overview of key findings in researches made under the author's leadership over the past decades. Described are the criteria of selecting test objects, and the conditions required for preparation and implementation of space and control (synchronous) experiments. The present-day status and issues of researches into cell responsivity to space microgravity and other factors are discussed. Also, potentialities of equipment designed to conduct experiments with cell cultures in vitro and populations of single-celled organisms are presented, as well as some ideas for new devices and systems. Unveiled are some circumstances inherent to the development and performance of space experiments, setting up laboratory facilities at the launch and landing site, and methods of safe transportation and storage of biosamples. In conclusion, the author puts forward his view on biospecies, equipment and areas of research aboard future space vehicles. PMID:17357620

  11. Comparison of Directionally Solidified Samples Solidified Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, S.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Grugel, R. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). Terrestrial DS-experiments have been carried out at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. As of this writing, two dendritic metrics was measured: primary dendrite arm spacings and primary dendrite trunk diameters. We have observed that these dendrite-metrics of two samples grown in the microgravity environment show good agreements with models based on diffusion controlled growth and diffusion controlled ripening, respectively. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosegregation. Dendrite trunk diameters also show differences between the earth- and space-grown samples. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, the dendritic seed crystals were partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS was carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described and have modeled.

  12. Research experiences on materials science in space aboard Salyut and Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.

    1992-01-01

    From 1980 through 1991 approximately 500 materials processing experiments were performed aboard the space stations Salyut 6, Salyut 7 and Mir. This includes work on catalysts, polymers, metals and alloys, optical materials, superconductors, electronic crystals, thin film semiconductors, super ionic crystals, ceramics, and protein crystals. Often the resulting materials were surprisingly superior to those prepared on earth. The Soviets were the first to fabricate a laser (CdS) from a crystal grown in space, the first to grow a heterostructure in space, the first super ionic crystal in space, the first crystals of CdTe and its alloys, the first zeolite crystals, the first protein crystals, the first chromium disilicide glass, etc. The results were used to optimize terrestrial materials processing operations in Soviet industry. The characteristics of these three space stations are reviewed, along with the advantages of a space station for materials research, and the problems encountered by the materials scientists who used them. For example, the stations and the materials processing equipment were designed without significant input from the scientific community that would be using them. It is pointed out that successful results have been achieved also by materials processing at high gravity in large centrifuges. This research is also continuing around the world, including at Clarkson University. It is recommended that experiments be conducted in centrifuges in space, in order to investigate the acceleration regime between earth's gravity and the microgravity achieved in orbiting space stations. One cannot expect to understand the influence of gravity on materials processing from only two data points, earth's gravity and microgravity. One must also understand the influence of fluctuations in acceleration on board space stations, the so-called 'g-jitter.' This paper is presented in outline and graphical form.

  13. Metis aboard the Solar Orbiter space mission: Doses from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, Daniele; Fabi, Michele; Grimani, Catia; Antonucci, Ester

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to calculate the dose released by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the polarimeter of the Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS) coronagraph [1] aboard the Solar Orbiter. This investigation is performed with a Monte Carlo method by considering the role of SEP events of proper intensity at a heliocentric distance from the Sun averaged along the spacecraft orbit. Our approach can be extended to other space missions reaching short distances from the Sun, such as Solar Probe Plus. This study indicates that the deposited dose on the whole set of polarimeter lenses and filters during ten years of the Solar Orbiter mission is of about 2000 Gy. For cerium treated lenses, a dose of 106 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60Co source causes a few percent transmittance loss.

  14. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Wetlab-2 - Quantitative PCR Tools for Spaceflight Studies of Gene Expression Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlab-2 is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the International Space Station. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space. Currently, gene expression analyses of space flown biospecimens must be conducted post flight after living cultures or frozen or chemically fixed samples are returned to Earth from the space station. Post-flight analysis is limited for several reasons. First, changes in gene expression can be transient, changing over a timescale of minutes. The delay between sampling on Earth can range from days to months, and RNA may degrade during this period of time, even in fixed or frozen samples. Second, living organisms that return to Earth may quickly re-adapt to terrestrial conditions. Third, forces exerted on samples during reentry and return to Earth may affect results. Lastly, follow up experiments designed in response to post-flight results must wait for a new flight opportunity to be tested.

  16. [Light microscopy of statocyst cell elements from Helix lucorum (space experiment aboard the orbital station "MIR")].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Bukiia, R D; Kalandarishvili, E L; Taktakishvili, A D; Davitashvili, M T; Gelashvili, N Sh; Madzhagaladze, N B; Galkin, V A

    2013-01-01

    Statocyst epithelial lining of terrestrial pulmonary snail Helix lucorum is a spatially arranged structure consisting of 13 cell ensembles. Each ensemble has a sensory cell surrounded by companion cells. The sensory cell on the anterior statocyst pole is star-shaped due to multiple protoplasmatic protrusions on its body. The remaining 12 polygon-shaped cells form 3 tires along the statocyst internal perimeter: anterior, middle or equatorial and posterior. There are 4 cells in each tire. Topography of every sensory cell on the statocyst internal surface was described as well as cell nuclei size and form, nucleoli number and patterns of cytoplasm vacuolization. Space free of sensory cells is occupied by supporting or intercalary cells. Exposure to space microgravity over 40, 43, 102 and 135 days aboard the orbital station MIR affected morphology of the sensory cells. Specifically, this appeared as reductions in cell height and, consequently, extension of the statocyst cavity internal diameter and volume in the space-flown snails. PMID:24490279

  17. Rapid Culture-Independent Microbial Analysis Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that most bacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive. Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2, which is below NASA in-flight requirements (<10,000 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2). Absent to low levels of endotoxin (<0.24 to 1.0 EU per 100 cm2; defined in endotoxin units, or EU) were found on 31 surface areas, including on most panels in Node 1 and the US Lab. High to moderate levels (1.01 to 14.7 EU per 100 cm2) were found on 11 surface areas, including at exercise, hygiene, sleeping, and dining facilities. Endotoxin was absent from airlock surfaces, except the Extravehicular Hatch Handle (>3.78 EU per 100 cm2). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm2) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm2).

  18. Soyuz 25 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 25. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 76, 108 and 88%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned aboard Soyuz 25.

  19. Russian system of countermeasures on board of the International Space Station (ISS): the first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.

    2004-08-01

    The system of countermeasures used by Russian cosmonauts in space flights on board of International Space Station (ISS) was based on the developed and tested in flights on board of Russian space stations. It included as primary components: physical methods aimed to maintain the distribution of fluids at levels close to those experienced on Earth; physical exercises and loading suits aimed to load the musculoskeletal and the cardiovascular systems; measures that prevent the loss of fluids, mainly, water-salt additives which aid to maintain orthostatic tolerance and endurance to gravitational overloads during the return to Earth; well-balanced diet and medications directed to correct possible negative reactions of the body to weightlessness. Fulfillment of countermeasure's protocols inflight was thoroughly controlled. Efficacy of countermeasures used were assessed both in-and postflight. The results of studies showed that degrees of alterations recorded in different physiological systems after ISS space flights in Russian cosmonauts were significantly higher than those recorded after flights on the Russian space stations. This phenomenon was caused by the failure of the ISS crews to execute fully the prescribed countermeasures' protocols which was as a rule excused by technical imperfectness of exercise facilities, treadmill TVIS particularly.

  20. Microstructural Evaluation and Comparison of Solder Samples Processed Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    Samples from the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI), conducted aboard the International Space Station (ISS), are being examined for post-solidification microstructural development and porosity distribution. In this preliminary study, the internal structures of two ISSI processed samples are compared. In one case 10cm of rosin-core solder was wrapped around a coupon wire and melted by conduction, whereas, in the other a comparable length of solder was melted directly onto the hot wire; in both cases the molten solder formed ellipsoidal blobs, a shape that was maintained during subsequent solidification. In the former case, there is clear evidence of porosity throughout the sample, and an accumulation of larger pores near the hot end that implies thermocapillary induced migration and eventual coalescence of the flux vapor bubbles. In the second context, when solder was fed onto the wire. a part of the flux constituting the solder core is introduced into and remains within the liquid solder ball, becoming entombed upon solidification. In both cases the consequential porosity, particularly at a solder/contact interface, is very undesirable. In addition to compromising the desired electrical and thermal conductivity, it promotes mechanical failure.

  1. Characterization of the Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity Aboard the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Roeber, D.; Achari, A.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to determine the equilibration rates of some major precipitants used in protein crystallography aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The solutions were placed in the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM) which mimic Cryschem sitting drop trays. The trays were placed in cylinders. These cylinders were placed inside a Single locker Thermal Enclosure System (STES), and were activated for different durations during the flight. Bumpers pressed against elastomers seal drops in a deactivated state during pre-flight and prior to transfer to the ISS. Activation occurs while in flight on the ISS by releasing the bumpers allowing the drops to be exposed to the reservoir. PCAM was flown to the ISS on STS 100, Flight 6A, on April 19, 2001. Six series of equilibration experiments were tested for each precipitant with a small amount of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Cylinder 10 was never activated, 7 was activated for 40 days, 8 was activated for 20 days, 9 was activated for 10 days, 11 was activated for 4 days and 12 was activated for 2 days. Upon the return to Earth by STS 104 on July 24,2001 the samples were transferred to Marshall Space Flight Center. The samples were then brought to the lab and the volumes of each sample were measured.

  2. Timepix-based radiation environment monitor measurements aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Kroupa, Martin; Hoang, Son; Idarraga, John; Amberboy, Clif; Rios, Ryan; Hauss, Jessica; Keller, John; Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Turecek, Daniel; Jakubek, Jan; Vykydal, Zdenek; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2015-05-01

    A number of small, single element radiation detectors, employing the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration's Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) coupled to a specially modified version of the USB-Lite interface for that ASIC provided by the Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics (IEAP) at the Czech Technical University in Prague, have been developed at the University of Houston and NASA Johnson Space Center. These detectors, officially designated by NASA as Radiation Environment Monitors (REMs), were deployed aboard the International Space Station in late 2012. Six REM units are currently operating on Station Support Computers (SSCs) and returning data on a daily basis. The associated data acquisition software on the SSCs provides both automated data collection and transfer, as well as algorithms to handle adjustment of acquisition rates and recovery and restart of the acquisition software. A suite of ground software analysis tools has been developed to allow rapid analysis of the data and provides a ROOT-based framework for extending data analysis capabilities.

  3. Submillimeter limb-emission sounder JEM/SMILES aboard the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Junji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2000-12-01

    A submillimeter limb-emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as KIBO) at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gases by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, Hcl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing the latitudes form 38 S to 65 N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid- latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weak emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  4. Overview of the Development of the Temporary Sleep Station Hygiene Liner Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of manned operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the crew had performed hygiene activities within the aisle way (the habitable volume, not including the sleep areas) of the ISS. The Crew used wet towels, re-hydrated body soap, and "no-rinse" shampoo to cleanse themselves amongst the stowage and systems hardware, referred to as "racks", even without a designated area to dry the wet items. Performing hygiene in this manner became an accepted method; no isolated location was available to the Crew. After several years of hygiene operations, some of the fabric-covered racks began to grow biological material (generically described as mold) and soon became a Crew health concern. Hygiene has one of the strongest impacts on Crew morale, and mandating changes to the Crew routine would have been met with strong resistance. The answer to the conundrum was to develop a liner to be placed within the Temporary Sleep Station (TeSS), one of the Crew s sleeping racks. This liner provided the Crew a means to perform hygiene activities within a private, enclosed area that also significantly decreased the potential to grow mold. This paper will describe the development of the TeSS Hygiene Liner, its impacts on the ISS and Crew, as well as its contribution to hygiene activities used in space today.

  5. Space-Based Reconfigurable Software Defined Radio Test Bed Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Lux, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) recently launched a new software defined radio research test bed to the International Space Station. The test bed, sponsored by the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Office within NASA is referred to as the SCaN Testbed. The SCaN Testbed is a highly capable communications system, composed of three software defined radios, integrated into a flight system, and mounted to the truss of the International Space Station. Software defined radios offer the future promise of in-flight reconfigurability, autonomy, and eventually cognitive operation. The adoption of software defined radios offers space missions a new way to develop and operate space transceivers for communications and navigation. Reconfigurable or software defined radios with communications and navigation functions implemented in software or VHDL (Very High Speed Hardware Description Language) provide the capability to change the functionality of the radio during development or after launch. The ability to change the operating characteristics of a radio through software once deployed to space offers the flexibility to adapt to new science opportunities, recover from anomalies within the science payload or communication system, and potentially reduce development cost and risk by adapting generic space platforms to meet specific mission requirements. The software defined radios on the SCaN Testbed are each compliant to NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture. The STRS Architecture is an open, non-proprietary architecture that defines interfaces for the connections between radio components. It provides an operating environment to abstract the communication waveform application from the underlying platform specific hardware such as digital-to-analog converters, analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, RF attenuators, automatic gain control circuits, FPGAs, general-purpose processors, etc. and the interconnections among

  6. LEO degradation of graphite and carbon-based composites aboard Space Shuttle Flight STS-46

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Blaine R.; Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Devries, M. J.; Woollam, John A.; Moore, Arthur W.; Lake, Max

    1995-01-01

    Six different types of carbon and carbon-boron nitride composites were exposed to low Earth orbit aboard Space Shuttle flight STS-46. The samples received a nominal atomic oxygen fluence of 2.2 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm in 42 hours of exposure. Pyrolytic graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite showed significant degradation, and the measured erosion yield was within a factor of two of published values. The erosion yield of pyrolytic boron nitride was found to be 2.6 x 10(exp 26) cu cm/atom in plasma asher exposure, over 42 times lower than that of pyrolytic graphite. This low erosion yield makes graphite plus boron nitride mixtures quite resistant to low Earth orbit exposure. Evidence suggests that the graphitic component was preferentially etched, leaving the surface boron nitride rich. Degradation resistance increases with boron nitride composition. Carbon fiber/carbon composites degraded in low Earth orbit, and the carbon pitch binder was found to etch more easily than the graphite fibers which have much higher degradation resistance.

  7. The nutritional status of astronauts is altered after long-term space flight aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R; Block, Gladys; Rice, Barbara L; Davis-Street, Janis E

    2005-03-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is critical for ensuring crew health during long-duration space exploration missions. Data pertaining to such nutrient requirements are extremely limited. The primary goal of this study was to better understand nutritional changes that occur during long-duration space flight. We examined body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals in 11 astronauts before and after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Dietary intake and limited biochemical measures were assessed during flight. Crew members consumed a mean of 80% of their recommended energy intake, and on landing day their body weight was less (P = 0.051) than before flight. Hematocrit, serum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin were decreased and serum ferritin was increased after flight (P < 0.05). The finding that other acute-phase proteins were unchanged after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism are not likely to be solely a result of an inflammatory response. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and RBC superoxide dismutase was less after flight (P < 0.05), indicating increased oxidative damage. Despite vitamin D supplement use during flight, serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol was decreased after flight (P < 0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several markers. Bone formation, assessed by several markers, did not consistently rise 1 d after landing. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage are among critical nutritional concerns for long-duration space travelers. PMID:15735075

  8. The nutritional status of astronauts is altered after long-term space flight aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Block, Gladys; Rice, Barbara L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is critical for ensuring crew health during long-duration space exploration missions. Data pertaining to such nutrient requirements are extremely limited. The primary goal of this study was to better understand nutritional changes that occur during long-duration space flight. We examined body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals in 11 astronauts before and after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Dietary intake and limited biochemical measures were assessed during flight. Crew members consumed a mean of 80% of their recommended energy intake, and on landing day their body weight was less (P = 0.051) than before flight. Hematocrit, serum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin were decreased and serum ferritin was increased after flight (P < 0.05). The finding that other acute-phase proteins were unchanged after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism are not likely to be solely a result of an inflammatory response. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and RBC superoxide dismutase was less after flight (P < 0.05), indicating increased oxidative damage. Despite vitamin D supplement use during flight, serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol was decreased after flight (P < 0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several markers. Bone formation, assessed by several markers, did not consistently rise 1 d after landing. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage are among critical nutritional concerns for long-duration space travelers.

  9. Russian and American International Space Station launch crews check equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    (Left to right) Bob Behrendsen, Mod Flight Crew Systems, astronaut Kenneth Bowersox and cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov check out equipment for the International Space Station (ISS) in the Space Station Processing Facility. Bowersox and Dezhurov are targeted on mission STS-102 which is scheduled to transport the second Multi-Purpose Logistics Module to ISS.

  10. Space flight effects on Paramecium tetraurelia flown aboard Salyut 6 in the Cytos I and Cytos M experiments.

    PubMed

    Panel, H; Tixador, R; Nefedov, Y u; Gretchko, G; Richoilley, G; Bassler, R; Monrozies, E

    1981-01-01

    Results of the Cytos M experiment and complementary results of the Cytos I experiment flown aboard the Soviet orbital station Salyut 6 are shown. Space flight of Paramecia cultures resulted in a stimulating effect on cell proliferation, in a larger cell volume, in changes in cell dry weight, cell total protein and the electrolyte content of the culture media in which the organisms were grown. The assumption of a possible effect of weightlessness on membrane permeability is discussed. PMID:11541725

  11. Ocular examination for trauma; clinical ultrasound aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, Leroy; Sharipov, Salizhan; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Melton, Shannon; Hamilton, Douglas R.; McFarlin, Kellie; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound imaging is a successful modality in a broad variety of diagnostic applications including trauma. Ultrasound has been shown to be accurate when performed by non-radiologist physicians; recent reports have suggested that non-physicians can perform limited ultrasound examinations. A multipurpose ultrasound system is installed on the International Space Station (ISS) as a component of the Human Research Facility (HRF). This report documents the first ocular ultrasound examination conducted in space, which demonstrated the capability to assess physiologic alterations or pathology including trauma during long-duration space flight. METHODS: An ISS crewmember with minimal sonography training was remotely guided by an imaging expert from Mission Control Center (MCC) through a comprehensive ultrasound examination of the eye. A multipurpose ultrasound imager was used in conjunction with a space-to-ground video downlink and two-way audio. Reference cards with topological reference points, hardware controls, and target images were used to facilitate the examination. Multiple views of the eye structures were obtained through a closed eyelid. Pupillary response to light was demonstrated by modifying the light exposure of the contralateral eye. RESULTS: A crewmember on the ISS was able to complete a comprehensive ocular examination using B- and M-mode ultrasonography with remote guidance from an expert in the MCC. Multiple anteroposterior, oblique, and coronal views of the eye clearly demonstrated the anatomic structures of both segments of the globe. The iris and pupil were readily visualized with probe manipulation. Pupillary diameter was assessed in real time in B- and M-mode displays. The anatomic detail and fidelity of ultrasound video were excellent and could be used to answer a variety of clinical and space physiologic questions. CONCLUSIONS: A comprehensive, high-quality ultrasound examination of the eye was performed with a multipurpose imager

  12. A Survey of Staphylococcus sp and its Methicillin Resistance aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Ott, C.; Healy, M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Within the past few years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, such as hospitals and nursing homes. As the International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts occupying ISS or on surfaces of the space station itself. Methods: Identification of isolates was completed using VITEK (GPI cards, BioMerieux), 16S ribosomal DNA analysis (MicroSeq 500, ABI), and Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting (Divemilab, Bacterial Barcodes). Susceptibility tests were performed using VITEK (GPS-105 cards, BioMerieux) and resistance characteristics were evaluated by testing for the presence of the mecA gene (PBP2' MRSA test kit, Oxoid). Results: Rep-PCR analysis indicated the transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers and between crewmembers and ISS surfaces. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and environment, evaluations of the microbial population indicated minimal methicillin resistance. Results of this study indicated that within the semi-closed ISS environment, transfer of bacteria between crewmembers and their environment has been occurring, although there was no indication of a high concentration of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus species. Conclusions: While this study suggests that the spread of methicillin resistant S. aureus is not currently a concern aboard ISS, the increasing incidence of Earth-based antibiotic resistance indicates a need for continued clinical and environmental monitoring.

  13. GNSS reflectometry aboard the International Space Station: phase-altimetry simulation to detect ocean topography anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Leister, Vera; Saynisch, Jan; Zus, Florian; Wickert, Jens

    2016-04-01

    An ocean altimetry experiment using Earth reflected GNSS signals has been proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA). It is part of the GNSS Reflectometry Radio Occultation Scatterometry (GEROS) mission that is planned aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Altimetric simulations are presented that examine the detection of ocean topography anomalies assuming GNSS phase delay observations. Such delay measurements are well established for positioning and are possible due to a sufficient synchronization of GNSS receiver and transmitter. For altimetric purpose delays of Earth reflected GNSS signals can be observed similar to radar altimeter signals. The advantage of GNSS is the synchronized separation of transmitter and receiver that allow a significantly increased number of observation per receiver due to more than 70 GNSS transmitters currently in orbit. The altimetric concept has already been applied successfully to flight data recorded over the Mediterranean Sea. The presented altimetric simulation considers anomalies in the Agulhas current region which are obtained from the Region Ocean Model System (ROMS). Suitable reflection events in an elevation range between 3° and 30° last about 10min with ground track's length >3000km. Typical along-track footprints (1s signal integration time) have a length of about 5km. The reflection's Fresnel zone limits the footprint of coherent observations to a major axis extention between 1 to 6km dependent on the elevation. The altimetric performance depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection. Simulation results show that precision is better than 10cm for SNR of 30dB. Whereas, it is worse than 0.5m if SNR goes down to 10dB. Precision, in general, improves towards higher elevation angles. Critical biases are introduced by atmospheric and ionospheric refraction. Corresponding correction strategies are still under investigation.

  14. The Capillary Flow Experiments Aboard the International Space Station: Increments 9-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenson, Ryan M.; Weislogel, Mark M.; Tavan, Noel T.; Chen, Yongkang; Semerjian, Ben; Bunnell, Charles T.; Collicott, Steven H.; Klatte, Jorg; dreyer, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the experimental, analytical, and numerical results of the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments were conducted in space beginning with Increment 9 through Increment 16, beginning August 2004 and ending December 2007. Both primary and extra science experiments were conducted during 19 operations performed by 7 astronauts including: M. Fincke, W. McArthur, J. Williams, S. Williams, M. Lopez-Alegria, C. Anderson, and P. Whitson. CFE consists of 6 approximately 1 to 2 kg handheld experiment units designed to investigate a selection of capillary phenomena of fundamental and applied importance, such as large length scale contact line dynamics (CFE-Contact Line), critical wetting in discontinuous structures (CFE-Vane Gap), and capillary flows and passive phase separations in complex containers (CFE-Interior Corner Flow). Highly quantitative video from the simply performed flight experiments provide data helpful in benchmarking numerical methods, confirming theoretical models, and guiding new model development. In an extensive executive summary, a brief history of the experiment is reviewed before introducing the science investigated. A selection of experimental results and comparisons with both analytic and numerical predictions is given. The subsequent chapters provide additional details of the experimental and analytical methods developed and employed. These include current presentations of the state of the data reduction which we anticipate will continue throughout the year and culminate in several more publications. An extensive appendix is used to provide support material such as an experiment history, dissemination items to date (CFE publication, etc.), detailed design drawings, and crew procedures. Despite the simple nature of the experiments and procedures, many of the experimental results may be practically employed to enhance the design of spacecraft engineering

  15. US and Russian Cooperation in Space Biology and Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C.F.; Hanson, S.I.; House, N.G.; Pestov, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the 5th volume of a joint publication that describes the cooperation between the United States and Russia in research into space biology and medicine. Each of the chapters is briefly summarized.

  16. Geostationary satellites and space debris around the Earth (on Russian)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P., P.

    Classification of artificial satellites, the history of development of the geostationary orbit (GSO). The main aim of ground-based optical, radar and other observations GSS. Methods of observation and control of the GSO. Catalogues satellites leading space country. The problem of space debris and the Kessler syndrome. Flashes from the satellites of the constellation "Iridium", and flashes from geostationary satellites. Tips, advice for amateur astronomers to observe when the flash GSS.

  17. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  18. Quantum test of the equivalence principle and space-time aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan; Müller, Holger

    2016-02-01

    We describe the Quantum Test of the Equivalence principle and Space Time (QTEST), a concept for an atom interferometry mission on the International Space Station (ISS). The primary science objective of the mission is a test of Einstein’s equivalence principle with two rubidium isotope gases at a precision of better than 10-15, a 100-fold improvement over the current limit on equivalence principle violations, and over 1,000,000 fold improvement over similar quantum experiments demonstrated in laboratories. Distinct from the classical tests is the use of quantum wave packets and their expected large spatial separation in the QTEST experiment. This dual species atom interferometer experiment will also be sensitive to time-dependent equivalence principle violations that would be signatures for ultralight dark-matter particles. In addition, QTEST will be able to perform photon recoil measurements to better than 10-11 precision. This improves upon terrestrial experiments by a factor of 100, enabling an accurate test of the standard model of particle physics and contributing to mass measurement, in the proposed new international system of units (SI), with significantly improved precision. The predicted high measurement precision of QTEST comes from the microgravity environment on ISS, offering extended free fall times in a well-controlled environment. QTEST plans to use high-flux, dual-species atom sources, and advanced cooling schemes, for N > 106 non-condensed atoms of each species at temperatures below 1 nK. Suppression of systematic errors by use of symmetric interferometer configurations and rejection of common-mode errors drives the QTEST design. It uses Bragg interferometry with a single laser beam at the ‘magic’ wavelength, where the two isotopes have the same polarizability, for mitigating sensitivities to vibrations and laser noise, imaging detection for correcting cloud initial conditions and maintaining contrast, modulation of the atomic hyperfine states

  19. Russian Activities in Space Photovoltaic Power Modules with Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, Vyacheslav M.; Rumyantsev, Valeri D.

    2004-01-01

    Space concentrator modules with point-and line-focus Fresnel lenses and with reflective parabolic troughs have been developed recently at Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute. PV receivers for these modules are based: on the single junction LPE and MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells characterized by AM0 efficiencies of 23.5 - 24% at 20 - 50 suns and 24 - 24.75 at 50 - 200 suns; on the mechanically stacked tandem AlGaAs/GaAs-GaSb cells with efficiency of 27 - 28 at 20 - 100 suns. MOCVD AlGaAs/GaAs cells with internal Bragg reflector have shown a higher radiation resistance as compared to a traditional structure. Monolithic two-terminal tandems AlGaAs (top)-GaAs (bottom) for space application and GaSb (top) - InGaAsSb (bottom) for TRV application are under development as well.

  20. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS #3, 7, and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Since the United States of America is moving into an age of reusable space vehicles, both electronic and photographic materials will continue to be an integral part of the recording techniques available. Film as a scientifically viable recording technique in astronomy is well documented. There is a real need to expose various types of films to the Shuttle environment. Thus, the main objective was to look at the subtle densitometric changes of canisters of IIaO film that was placed aboard the Space Shuttle 3 (STS-3).

  1. Launch of Russian reactor postponed

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-05

    Astronomers and weapons scientists seemed heated on a collision course a few months ago over the military's plans to send a Russian nuclear reactor into space. But an agreement reached in late January has prevented a pile-up, at least for 6 months. The astronomers, led by Donald Lamb of the University of Chicago, were objecting to plans by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) to launch Topaz 2, an experimental Russian nuclear reactor, arguing that rogue particles from it might ruin sensitive gamma ray experiments. The reactor is designed to propel itself in space with a jet of xenon ions. One worry was that leaking gamma rays and positrons, which can travel in the earth's magnetic field and pop up in the darndest places, might cause false signals in gamma ray monitors (Science, 18 December 1992, p. 1878). The worry has abated now that SDI officials will postpone choosing a rocket and mission altitutde for Topaz 2 for 6 months, while experts study how its emissions at various altitudes might affect instruments aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory and other satellites. In effect, the SDIO has agreed to an environmental impact study for space, following an unusual meeting organized by former Russian space official Roald Sagdeev at the University of Maryland on 19 January. There the Russian designers of Topaz 2, its new owners at the SDIO, and critics in the astronomy community achieved common ground: that more study was needed.

  2. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  3. [Russian oxygen generation system "Elektron-VM": hydrogen content in electrolytically produced oxygen for breathing by International Space Station crews].

    PubMed

    Proshkin, V Yu; Kurmazenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the particulars of hydrogen content in electrolysis oxygen produced aboard the ISS Russian segment by oxygen generator "Elektron-VM" (SGK) for crew breathing. Hydrogen content was estimated as in the course of SGK operation in the ISS RS, so during the ground life tests. According to the investigation of hydrogen sources, the primary path of H2 appearance in oxygen is its diffusion through the porous diaphragm separating the electrolytic-cell cathode and anode chambers. Effectiveness of hydrogen oxidation in the SGK reheating unit was evaluated. PMID:25035898

  4. Main problems of the Russian Orlan-M space suit utilization for EVAs on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, I. P.; Pozdnyakov, S. S.; Severin, G. I.; Stoklitsky, A. Yu.

    2001-03-01

    In the recent years the Russian Orlan-M space suits have been improved as applied to their operational requirements for the ISS. A special attention is paid to enhancement of EVA crew efficiency and safety. The paper considers the main problems regarding specific features of the Russian space suit operation in the ISS, and analyses measures on their solution. In particular, the problems associated with the following are considered: enhancement of the anthropometric range for the EVA crewmembers; use of some US EMU elements and unified NASA equipment elements; Orlan-M operation support in the wide range of the ISS thermal conditions; use of Simplified Aid For Extravehicular activity Rescue (SAFER) designed as a self-rescue device, which will be used for an EVA crewmember return in the event that he (she) breaks away inadvertently from the ISS surface. The paper states the main space suit differences with reference to solution of the above problems. The paper presents briefly the design of space suit arms developed for crewmembers with small anthropometric parameters, as well as peculiarities and test results for the gloves with enhanced thermal protection. Measures on further space suit development with the purpose to improve its performances are considered.

  5. A Year in Space: Early Results and Lessons Learned from the First Year-Long Expedition Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. B.; Bogomolov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Two ISS crewmembers recently completed the first year-long orbital stay in two decades. International cooperation was central to the success of Mikhail Kornienko from Russia and Scott Kelly from the United States. Their expedition leveraged current mission experience and capitalized on recent advances in health monitoring technology. This unique effort began in 2012 when the program managers of the ISS partner nations adopted two separate goals: greater multilateral cooperation to increase efficiency of inflight research and a year-long expedition to gain familiarity with in-flight durations approaching that required for a Mars mission. These goals were unified when a set of bilateral Russian and American human research investigations was assigned to the year-long mission, augmented by additional investigations from Europe and Japan. For example, Kelly was assigned 18 investigations (twice the complement on standard six-month missions) including two joint U.S.-Russian studies, and two Russian and two Japanese studies. The core set of American investigations was a repetition of six studies Kelly had done on his previous six-month ISS mission, to allow a direct comparison of physiological and behavioral responses of the longer and shorter durations in this single individual. The remainder of his assignments plus those of Kornienko were drawn from currently active national investigations documenting human adaptation to long-duration spaceflight factors or effectiveness of countermeasures against known deleterious adaptations. The two joint U.S.-Russian investigations were the flagship biomedical studies of the year-long expedition. The "Fluid Shifts" study collocated American research equipment alongside a Russian operational stressor device to document the pattern and impacts of the headward fluid shift long known to occur in weightlessness, including its role in ocular changes recently observed in some astronauts. The "Field Test" study investigated the ability of

  6. Soyuz 24 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz. This is the first time all samples were acquired with the mini-grab samplers. The toxicological assessment of 15 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C(13)-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 75, 97 and 79%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned on Soyuz 24

  7. The Rockot launch vehicle - the successful German/Russian partnership in space transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, York; Freeborn, Peter; Kinnersley, Mark

    2003-11-01

    Eurockot is a German-Russian joint venture company established to provide LEO launch services using the Russian Rockot launch vehicle. Following the successful debut of the commercial configuration of the Rockot vehicle in 2000 and the successful launches of further twelve satellites during the GRACE, Iridium and Multiple Orbit missions in 2002 and 2003, further launch contracts for Japan (SERVIS-1), Korea (KOMPSAT-2) and the European Space Agency ESA (CryoSat) have been concluded, thus establishing Eurockot as the premier provider of launch services in this segment. The Rockot launch vehicle is a three stage liquid fuelled rocket based on the former Russian SS-19 strategic missile. Rockot can place payloads of more than 2000 kilograms in low earth orbits (LEO) and has the capability to serve sun-synchronous, near polar and highly inclined orbits from its launch site. Launches are performed from state-of-the-art facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. Eurockot is also in a position to offer high altitude orbits. In particular for payloads with a mass of up to approximately 440 kg even earth escape/planetary mission with reliable, competitive and flight qualified systems can be offered by adding a solid boost stage to the Rockot launcher in co-operation with the major provider of these stages. In this paper the performance envelope, interfaces and potential design solutions will be discussed.

  8. The Soviet-Russian space suits a historical overview of the 1960's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar; Abramov, Isaac P.; Stoklitsky, Anatoly Y.; Doodnik, Michail N.

    2002-07-01

    The development of protective suits for space use started with the Vostok-suit SK-1, first used by Yu. Gagarin on April 12, 1961, and then used on all subsequent Vostok-flights. The technical background for the design of these suits was the work on full pressure protective suits for military pilots and stratospheric flights in the 1930's through 50's. The Soviet-Russian space programme contains a large number of 'firsts', and one of the most well known is the first EVA by Leonov in 1965. This event is also the starting point for a long series of space suit development for Extravehicular Activities over the last 35 years. The next step to come was the transfer in void space of crew members between the two spacecraft Soyuz 4 and 5 in 1969. As has later become known this was an essential element in the planned Soviet lunar exploration programme, which in itself required a new space suit After the termination of the lunar programme in 1972, the space suit development concentrated on suits applicable to zero-gravity work around the manned space stations Salyut 6, Salyut 7 and MIR. These suits have become known as the ORLAN-family of suits, and an advanced version of this suit (ORLAN-M) will be used on the International Space Station together with the American EMU. This paper covers the space suit development in the Soviet Union in the 1960's and the experience used from the pre-space era.

  9. Protein crystal growth on the Russian segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, E. A.; Kislitsyn, Yu. A.; Sosfenov, N. I.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Popov, A. N.; Baĭdus', A. N.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2009-09-01

    Experiments on protein crystallization on the Russian segment of the International Space Station were started in 2005. These experiments were performed in the Modul’-1 protein crystallization apparatus specially designed for crystal growth by the free-interface-diffusion method. This paper describes experiments on the crystallization of lysozyme, carboxypeptidase B, and recombinant human insulin on Earth and in microgravity using the Modul’-1 protein crystallization apparatus during the ISS-11-ISS-14 space flights. Crystals of all proteins grown in microgravity have larger sizes than those grown on Earth. Space-grown crystals of lysozyme and insulin characterized by X-ray diffraction were shown to diffract to higher resolution than the Earth-grown crystals. The three-dimensional structures of Zn-insulin crystals grown both on Earth and in microgravity were established. The conformation of the Zn-insulin hexamer in the crystalline state is described.

  10. Evaluation of the MICAST #2-12 AI-7wt%Si Sample Directionally Solidified Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, Surendra N.; Ghods, Masoud; Angart, Samuel G.; Lauer, Mark; Grugel, Richard N.; Poirier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The US team of the European led "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions" (MICAST) program recently received a third Aluminum - 7wt% silicon alloy that was processed in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. The sample, designated MICAST#2-12, was directionally solidified in the Solidification with Quench Furnace (SQF) at a constant rate of 40micometers/s through an imposed temperature gradient of 31K/cm. Procedures taken to evaluate the state of the sample prior to sectioning for metallographic analysis are reviewed and rational for measuring the microstructural constituents, in particular the primary dendrite arm spacing (Lambda (sub1)), is given. The data are presented, put in context with the earlier samples, and evaluated in view of a relevant theoretical model.

  11. Soyuz 22 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jams, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Three mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 22 because of concerns that new air pollutants were present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The toxicological assessment of 3 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of the 3 standards (as listed above) from the GSCs averaged 103, 95 and 76%, respectively. Recovery from formaldehyde control badges were 90 and 91%.

  12. Soyuz 7 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of one grab sample canister (GSC), 6 dual sorbent tubes (DSTs), and 20 formaldehyde badges returned aboard Soyuz 7 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSC were 84-89%. The recoveries of the less volatile surrogates from the DSTs were 87 to 112%; however, 13C-acetone was only recovered at 53-59%. Formaldehyde recoveries from 2 lab controls were 87 and 95%; trip controls were not returned to ground.

  13. Space Model-A New Russian Handbook on Spacecraft/Environment Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, L. S.; Panasuyk, M. L.; Voronina, E. N.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 the scientists at Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics Moscow State University in close cooperation with experts from many space industry organizations, institutes of Russian Academy of Science and universities prepared and published a two-volume scientific handbook Space Model. Nearly 180 authors from 50 different organizations have taken part in creating the Space Model handbook. The total volume of the handbook amounts to more than 2000 pages. In the 1st volume the physical conditions in the outer space are described, some computational models are considered, various reference data for computing are presented. The 2nd volume is devoted to the analysis of the space environment effects on spacecraft materials and subsystems, and of ground-based and space testing methods. The influence of spacecraft and rocket on the near-Earth space is also discussed. The handbook is intended for specialists of space industry and students. The paper deals with the content of the handbook and the possibilities of using it in solving various problems.

  14. New Crewmates Welcomed Aboard Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano joined their Expedition 36 crewmates when the hatches betwee...

  15. Experiments Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: The Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI): A Current Study of Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C> ; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments in support of the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI) were conducted aboard the International Space Station (ISS) with the goal of promoting our fundamental understanding of melting dynamics , solidification phenomena, and defect generation during materials processing in a microgravity environment. Through the course of many experiments a number of observations, expected and unexpected, have been directly made. These include gradient-driven bubble migration, thermocapillary flow, and novel microstructural development. The experimental results are presented and found to be in good agreement with models pertinent to a microgravity environment. Based on the space station results, and noting the futility of duplicating them in Earth s unit-gravity environment, attention is drawn to the role ISS experimentslhardware can play to provide insight to potential materials processing techniques and/or repair scenarios that might arise during long duration space transport and/or on the lunar/Mars surface.

  16. Simulations of space radiation interactions with materials, with application to dose estimates for lunar shelter and aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tai T.

    This research performed simulations using the state-of-art three dimensional computer codes to investigate the interactions of space radiation with materials and quantify the biological dose onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in a lunar shelter for future manned missions. High-energy space radiation of Trapped Protons, Solar Particle Events, and GCRs particles interactions are simulated using MCNPX and PHITS probabilistic codes. The energy loss and energy deposition within the shielding materials and in a phantom are calculated. The contributions of secondary particles produced by spallation reactions are identified. Recent experimental measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was simulated, and used to determine the most appropriate simulation methodology.

  17. MDD3-EMI's Upcoming Meteoroid and Space Debris Detector Experiment Onboard Russian Spektr-R Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmerohn, Martin; Schafer, Frank; Lomakin, Ilya; Willemsen, Philip

    2009-03-01

    The Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI) is currently developing its next meteoroid and space debris detector experiment, referred to as MDD3, which will be integrated onboard the Russian Spektr-R satellite. Taking this flight opportunity supported by the German Aerospace Center, MDD3 will be operated in a highly elliptical orbit, allowing for in-situ measurements of impact events in various Earth orbit particle environments. The detector system is equipped with several sensors, thus contributing to both the on-orbit verification of a robust impact detection system and the enhancement of knowledge about micrometeoroid and space debris populations. This paper addresses scientific and technical aspects of the MDD3 mission in a general overview. The status of MDD3 implementation, as well as facts on the Spektr-R mission and orbit environment are outlined for background information.

  18. Historical aspects of the early Soviet/Russian manned space program.

    PubMed

    West, J B

    2001-10-01

    Human spaceflight was one of the great physiological and engineering triumphs of the 20th century. Although the history of the United States manned space program is well known, the Soviet program was shrouded in secrecy until recently. Konstantin Edvardovich Tsiolkovsky (1857-1935) was an extraordinary Russian visionary who made remarkable predictions about space travel in the late 19th century. Sergei Pavlovich Korolev (1907-1966) was the brilliant "Chief Designer" who was responsible for many of the Soviet firsts, including the first artificial satellite and the first human being in space. The dramatic flight of Sputnik 1 was followed within a month by the launch of the dog Laika, the first living creature in space. Remarkably, the engineering work for this payload was all done in less than 4 wk. Korolev's greatest triumph was the flight of Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin (1934-1968) on April 12, 1961. Another extraordinary feat was the first extravehicular activity by Aleksei Arkhipovich Leonov (1934-) using a flexible airlock that emphasized the entrepreneurial attitude of the Soviet engineers. By the mid-1960s, the Soviet program was overtaken by the United States program and attempts to launch a manned mission to the Moon failed. However, the early Soviet manned space program has a preeminent place in the history of space physiology. PMID:11568130

  19. Soyuz 23 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 23 because of concerns that new air pollutants had been present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The TOC began to decline in late October, 2010. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of 13C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene from the GSCs averaged 73, 82, and 59%, respectively. We are working to understand the sub-optimal recovery of chlorobenzene.

  20. Development of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Takeshi

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, stratospheric ozone depletion is one of the most significant global environmental issues. it is well known that stratospheric trace gases, which include chlorine oxides and bromine oxides, play a crucial role in the process of stratospheric ozone destruction. Although the abundances of these trace gases are as low as in the order of parts par billion or less, they are quite efficient to destroy stratospheric ozone by catalytic reactions. In order to establish the techniques to monitor stratospheric Ozone and Ozone depleting molecules, CRL (Communications Research Laboratory and NASDA are collaborating to develop Superconducting Submillimeter-Limb Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station. In this paper, the outline of the JEM/SMILES project and the payload instrument is introduced.

  1. Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI): Concept, Hardware Development, and Initial Analysis of Experiments Conducted Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    Porosity in the form of "bubbles and pipes" can occur during controlled directional solidification processing of metal alloys. This is a consequence that 1) precludes obtaining any meaningful scientific results and 2) is detrimental to desired material properties. Unfortunately, several Microgravity experiments have been compromised by porosity. The intent of the PFMl investigation is to conduct a systematic effort directed towards understanding porosity formation and mobility during controlled directional solidification (DS) in a microgravity environment. PFMl uses a pure transparent material, succinonitrile (SCN), as well as SCN "alloyed" with water, in conjunction with a translating temperature gradient stage so that direct observation and recording of pore generation and mobility can be made. PFMl is investigating the role of thermocapillary forces and temperature gradients in affecting bubble dynamics as well as other solidification processes in a microgravity environment. This presentation will cover the concept, hardware development, operations, and the initial results from experiments conducted aboard the International Space Station.

  2. Evaluation of Primary Dendrite Arm Spacings from Aluminum-7wt% Silicon alloys Directionally Solidified aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, Samuel; Lauer, Mark; Poirier, David; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum – 7wt% silicon alloys were directionally solidified in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station as part of the “MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions” (MICAST) European led program. Cross-sections of the sample during periods of steady-state growth were metallographically prepared from which the primary dendrite arm spacing (lambda 1) was measured. These spacings were found to be in reasonable agreement with the Hunt-Lu model which assumes a diffusion-controlled, convectionless, environment during controlled solidification. Deviation from the model was found and is attributed to gravity-independent thermocapillary convection where, over short distances, the liquid appears to have separated from the crucible wall.

  3. Microstructure and Macrosegregation Study of Directionally Solidified Al-7Si Samples Processed Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, Samuel; Erdman, R. G.; Poirier, David R.; Tewari, S.N.; Grugel, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    This talk reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). The DS-experiments have been carried out under 1-g at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under low-g on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially-processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. We have observed that the primary dendrite arm spacings of two samples grown in the low-g environment of the ISS show good agreement with a dendrite-growth model based on diffusion controlled growth. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosgregation. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, dendritic-seed crystals have to partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS is carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described.

  4. Dose distribution in the Russian Segment of the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Fürstner, M; Vana, N; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V; Arkhangelsky, V

    2006-01-01

    Absorbed dose and average linear energy transfer (LET) were assessed by means of (7)LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700) thermoluminescent (TL) detectors for different panels on-board the Russian Segment of the International Space Station in the timeframe between March and November 2002 (233 d). A technique is presented to correct the measured absorbed dose values for TL efficiency in the radiation climate on-board the spacecraft. Average LET is determined from the high-temperature TL emission in the TLD-700 glow curve and used as a parameter in the TL efficiency correction. Depending on the shielding distribution, the efficiency-corrected absorbed dose varies between 154 +/- 5 microGy d(-1) in panel no. 327 (core block ceiling) and 191 +/- 3 microGy d(-1) in panel no. 110 (core block central axis, floor). The experimental data are compared with the model calculations by using detailed shielding distributions and orbit parameters as inputs. PMID:16606660

  5. Space Technologies for Enhancing the Resilience and Sustainability of Indigenous Reindeer Husbandry in the Russian Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.; Yurchak, Boris S.; Sleptsov, Yuri A.; Turi, Johan Mathis; Mathlesen, Svein D.

    2005-01-01

    To adapt successfully to the major changes - climate, environment, economic, social and industrial - which have taken place across the Arctic. in recent years, indigenous communities such as reindeer herders must become increasingly empowered with the best available technologies to add to their storehouse of traditional knowledge. Remotely-sensed data and observations are providing increased capabilities for monitoring, risk mapping, and surveillance of parameters critical to the characterization of pasture quality and migratory routes, such as vegetation distribution, snow cover, infrastructure development, and pasture damages due to fires. This paper describes a series of remote sensing capabilities, which are useful to reindeer husbandry, and gives the results of the first year of a project, "Reindeer Mapper", which is a remote sensing and GIs-based system to bring together space technologies with indigenous knowledge for sustainable reindeer husbandry in the Russian Arctic. In this project, reindeer herders and scientists are joining together to utilize technologies to create a system for collecting and sharing space-based and indigenous knowledge in the Russian Arctic. The "Reindeer Mapper" system will help make technologies more readily available to the herder community for observing, data collection and analysis, monitoring, sharing, communications, and dissemination of information - to be integrated with traditional, local knowledge. This paper describes some of the technologies which comprise the system including an intranet system to enable to the team members to work together and share information electronically, remote sensing data for monitoring environmental parameters important to reindeer husbandry (e.g., SAR, Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS), indigenous knowledge about important environmental parameters, acquisition of ground- based measurements, and the integration of all useful data sets for more informed decision-making.

  6. [MODERN INSTRUMENTS FOR EAR, NOSE AND THROAT RENDERING AND EVALUATION IN RESEARCHES ON RUSSIAN SEGMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION].

    PubMed

    Popova, I I; Orlov, O I; Matsnev, E I; Revyakin, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the results of testing some diagnostic video systems enabling digital rendering of TNT teeth and jaws. The authors substantiate the criteria of choosing and integration of imaging systems in future on Russian segment of the International space station kit LOR developed for examination and download of high-quality images of cosmonauts' TNT, parodentium and teeth. PMID:27344858

  7. Development of superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission sounder (JEM/SMILES) aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Junji; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2001-12-01

    A submillimeter wave limb emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as 'KIBO') at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gasses by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, HCl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32 - 626.32 GHz, and 649.12 - 650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing latitudes from 38S to 65N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid-latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weal emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  8. Aberration-corrected concave grating for the mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the Infrared Telescope in Space.

    PubMed

    Onaka, T

    1995-02-01

    A mechanically ruled aberration-corrected concave grating was developed for use in the low-resolution mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the cryogenically cooled Infrared Telescope in Space. The design and the performance testing of the grating are reported. The spectrometer requires a wide spectral range (4.5-11.7 µm) and a wide field of view (8 × 8 arcmin) with a low wavelength resolution (Δλ ≤ 0.3 µm). The aberration-corrected concave grating provides a flat focal plane with a small aberration in the spatial direction compared with those caused by the finite size of the entrance slit. It also permits a simple design for the spectrometer, which is advantageous for applications in space cryogenic instruments. The measurements of the wavelength resolution and the spatial resolution are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted performance. The diffraction efficiency of the grating is more than 80% at the blaze wavelength (6 µm) and fairly high (>30%) over the entire wavelength range in question. The grating produces polarization of less than 10% for λ < 6.4 µm and of 10-20% for 6.7 µm <λ 9.7 µm. These results indicate the potential applicability of this type of grating to the wide-field IR spectroscopic observations. PMID:20963166

  9. Burning Plastics Investigated in Space for Unique US/Russian Cooperative Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that fires in the low-gravity environment of Earth-orbiting spacecraft are different from fires on Earth. The flames lack the familiar upward plume, which is the result of gravitational buoyancy. These flames, however, are strongly influenced by minor airflow currents. A recent study conducted in low gravity (microgravity) on the Russian orbital station Mir used burning plastic rods mounted in a small chamber with a controllable fan to expose the flame to airflows of different velocities. In this unique project, a Russian scientific agency, the Keldysh Research Center, furnished the apparatus and directed the Mir tests, while the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field provided the test materials and the project management. Reference testing and calibrations in ground laboratories were conducted jointly by researchers at Keldysh and at the NASA Johnson Space Center's White Sands Test Facility. Multiple samples of three different plastics were burned in the tests: Delrin, a common material for valve bodies; PMMA, a plastic "glass"; and polyethylene, a familiar material for containers and films. Each burned with a unique spherical or egg-shaped flame that spread over the rod. The effect of varying the airflow was dramatic. At the highest airflow attainable in the combustion chamber, nearly 10 cm/sec (a typical ventilation breeze), the flames were bright and strong. As airflow velocity decreased, the flames became shorter but wider. In addition, the flames became less bright, and for PMMA and polyethylene, they showed two colors, a bright part decreasing in volume and a nearly invisible remainder (see the photographs). Finally, at a very low velocity, the flames extinguished. For the plastics tested, this minimum velocity was very low, around 0.3 to 0.5 cm/sec. This finding confirms that at least a slight airflow is required to maintain a flame in microgravity for these types of materials.

  10. Space Radiation Dosimetry to Evaluate the Effect of Polyethylene Shielding in the Russian Segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Aiko; Casolino, Marco; Larsson, Oscar; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kitajo, Keiichi; Shimada, Ken; Takeda, Kazuo; Tsuda, Shuichi; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    As a part of the Alteino Long Term Cosmic Ray measurements on board the International Space Station (ALTCRISS) project, the shielding effect of polyethylene (PE) were evaluated in the Russian segment of the ISS, using active and passive dosimeter systems covered with or without PE shielding. For the passive dosimeter system, PADLES (Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science and Experiments in Space) was used in the project, which consists of a Thermo-Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and CR-39 Plastic Nuclear Track Detectors (PNTDs) attached to a radiator. Not only CR-39 PNTD itself but also a tissue equivalent material, NAN-JAERI, were employed as the radiator in order to investigate whether CR-39 PNTD can be used as a surrogate of tissue equivalent material in space dosimetry or not. The agreements between the doses measured by PADLES with CR-39 PNTD and NAN-JAERI radiators were quite satisfactorily, indicating the tissue-equivalent dose can be measured by conventional PADLES even though CR-39 PNTD is not perfect tissue-equivalent material. It was found that the shielding effect of PE varies with location inside the spacecraft: it became less significant with an increase of the mean thickness of the wall. This tendency was also verified by Monte Carlo simulation using the PHITS code. Throughout the flight experiments, in a series of four phases in the ALTCRISS project from December 2005 to October 2007, we assessed the ability of PE to decrease radiation doses in Low Earth Orbit(LEO).

  11. Analyses of space environment effects on active fiber optic links orbited aboard the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Monarski, T. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 'Preliminary Analysis of WL Experiment no. 701, Space Environment Effects on Operating Fiber Optic Systems,' is correlated with space simulated post retrieval terrestrial studies performed on the M0004 experiment. Temperature cycling measurements were performed on the active optical data links for the purpose of assessing link signal to noise ratio and bit error rate performance some 69 months following the experiment deployment in low Earth orbit. The early results indicate a high correlation between pre-orbit, orbit, and post-orbit functionality of the first known and longest space demonstration of operating fiber optic systems.

  12. Results of the life sciences DSOs conducted aboard the space shuttle 1981-1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bungo, Michael W.; Bagian, Tandi M.; Bowman, Mark A.; Levitan, Barry M.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented for a number of life sciences investigations sponsored by the Space Biomedical Research Institute at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center and conducted as Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) on Space Shuttle flights between 1981 and 1986. An introduction and a description of the DSO program are followed by summary reports on the investigations. Reports are grouped into the following disciplines: Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Effects and Fluid Shifts, Equipment Testing and Experiment Verification, Microbiology, Space Motion Sickness, and Vision. In the appendix, the status of every medical/life science DSO is presented in graphical form, which enables the flight history, the number of subjects tested, and the experiment results to be reviewed at a glance.

  13. Neutron production in a spherical phantom aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasbaz, Azadeh

    Since the beginning of space exploration in last century, several kinds of devices from passive and active dosimeters to radiation environment monitors have been used to measure radiation levels onboard different space crafts and shuttles allowing the space community to identify and quantify space radiation. The recent construction of several laboratories on the International Space Station (ISS) has confirmed that prolonged duration space missions are now becoming standard practice and as such, the need to better understand the potential risk of space radiation to Astronaut's health, has become a priority for long mission planner. The complex internal radiation environment created within the ISS is due to high-energy particle interactions within the ISS shielded environment. As a result, a large number of secondary particles, that pose specific health risks, are created. Neutrons are one important component of this mixed radiation field due to their high LET. Therefore, the assessment of the neutron dose contribution has become an important part of the safety and monitoring program onboard the ISS. The need to determine whether neutron dose measured externally to the human body give an accurate and conservative estimate of the dose received internally is of paramount importance for long term manned space missions. This thesis presents a part of an ongoing large research program on radiation monitoring on ISS called Matroshka-R Project that was established to analyze the radiation exposure levels onboard the ISS using different radiation instruments and a spherical phantom to simulate human body. Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the interaction of high energy protons and neutrons with the spherical phantom currently onboard ISS. A Monte Carlo model of the phantom has been built, and it consists of seven spherical layers presenting different depths of the simulated tissue. The phantom has been exposed to individual proton energies and to a spectrum of

  14. [Mathematical simulation support to the dosimetric monitoring on the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    To ensure radiation safety of cosmonauts, it is necessary not only to predict, but also to reconstruct absorbed dose dynamics with the knowledge of how long cosmonauts stay in specific space vehicle compartments with different shielding properties and lacking equipment for dosimetric monitoring. In this situation, calculating is one and only way to make a correct estimate of radiation exposure of cosmonaut's organism as a whole (tissue-average dose) and of separate systems and organs. The paper addresses the issues of mathematical simulation of epy radiation environment of standard dosimetric instruments in the Russian segments of the International Space Station (ISS RS). Results of comparing the simulation and experimental data for the complement of dosimeters including ionization chamber-based radiometer R-16, DB8 dosimeters composed of semiconductor detectors, and Pille dosimeters composed of thermoluminescent detectors evidence that the current methods of simulation in support of the ISS RS radiation monitoring provide a sufficiently good agreement between the calculated and experimental data. PMID:25163341

  15. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  16. Study of industry requirements that can be fulfilled by combustion experimentation aboard space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the requirements of commercially motivated microgravity combustion experiments and the optimal way for space station to accommodate these requirements. Representatives of commercial organizations, universities and government agencies were contacted. Interest in and needs for microgravity combustion studies are identified for commercial/industrial groups involved in fire safety with terrestrial applications, fire safety with space applications, propulsion and power, industrial burners, or pollution control. From these interests and needs experiments involving: (1) no flow with solid or liquid fuels; (2) homogeneous mixtures of fuel and air; (3) low flow with solid or liquid fuels; (4) low flow with gaseous fuel; (5) high pressure combustion; and (6) special burner systems are described and space station resource requirements for each type of experiment provided. Critical technologies involving the creation of a laboratory environment and methods for combining experimental needs into one experiment in order to obtain effective use of space station are discussed. Diagnostic techniques for monitoring combustion process parameters are identified.

  17. An expert system for simulating electric loads aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukich, George; Dolce, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom will provide an infrastructure for space experimentation. This environment will feature regulated access to any resources required by an experiment. Automated systems are being developed to manage the electric power so that researchers can have the flexibility to modify their experiment plan for contingencies or for new opportunities. To define these flexible power management characteristics for Space Station Freedom, a simulation is required that captures the dynamic nature of space experimentation; namely, an investigator is allowed to restructure his experiment and to modify its execution. This changes the energy demands for the investigator's range of options. An expert system competent in the domain of cryogenic fluid management experimentation was developed. It will be used to help design and test automated power scheduling software for Freedom's electric power system. The expert system allows experiment planning and experiment simulation. The former evaluates experimental alternatives and offers advice on the details of the experiment's design. The latter provides a real-time simulation of the experiment replete with appropriate resource consumption.

  18. Speculations on future opportunities to evolve Brayton powerplants aboard the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station provides a unique, low-risk environment in which to evolve new capabilities. In this way, the Space Station will grow in capacity, in its range of capabilities, and its economy of operation as a laboratory and as a center for space operations. Although both Rankine and Brayton cycles, two concepts for solar dynamic power generation, now compete to power the station, this paper confines its attention to the Brayton cycle using a mixture of He and Xe as its working fluid. Such a Brayton powerplant to supply the station's increasing demands for both electric power and heat has the potential to gradually evolve higher and higher performance by exploiting already-evolved materials (ASTAR-811C and molten-Li heat storage), its peak cycle temperature rising ultimately to 1500 K. Adapting the station to exploit long tethers (200 to 300 km long) could yield increases in payloads to LEO, to GEO, and to distant destinations in the solar system. Such tethering of the Space Station would not only require additional power for electric propulsion but also would so increase nuclear safety that nuclear powerplants might provide this power. From an 8000-kWt SP-100 reactor, thermoelectric power generation could produce 300 kWe, or adapted solar-Brayton cycle, 2400 to 2800 kWe.

  19. Observations of comet 19P/Borrelly by the miniature integrated camera and spectrometer aboard deep space 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Becker, T.L.; Bennett, G.; Boice, D.C.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Isbell, C.; Giese, B.; Hare, T.; Hicks, M.D.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Kirk, R.L.; Lee, M.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Owen, T.C.; Rayman, M.D.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus of the Jupiter-family comet 19P/Borrelly was closely observed by the Miniature Integrated Camera and Spectrometer aboard the Deep Space 1 spacecraft on 22 September 2001. The 8-kilometer-long body is highly variegated on a scale of 200 meters, exhibiting large albedo variations (0.01 to 0.03) and complex geologic relationships. Short-wavelength infrared spectra (1.3 to 2.6 micrometers) show a slope toward the red and a hot, dry surface (???345 kelvin, with no trace of water ice or hydrated minerals), consistent with ???10% or less of the surface actively sublimating. Borrelly's coma exhibits two types of dust features: fans and highly collimated jets. At encounter, the near-nucleus coma was dominated by a prominent dust jet that resolved into at least three smaller jets emanating from a broad basin in the middle of the nucleus. Because the major dust jet remained fixed in orientation, it is evidently aligned near the rotation axis of the nucleus.

  20. Tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetry measurements utililzed aboard aircraft and in accelerator based space radiation shielding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment presents a potential hazard to the humans, electronics and materials that are exposed to it. Particle accelerator facilities such as the NASA Space Ra-diation Laboratory (NSRL) and Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) provide particle radiation of specie and energy within the range of that found in the space radiation environment. Experiments performed at these facilities determine various endpoints for bio-logical, electronic and materials exposures. A critical factor in the performance of rigorous scientific studies of this type is accurate dosimetric measurements of the exposures. A Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a microdosimeter that may be used to measure absorbed dose, average quality factor (Q) and dose equivalent of the particle beam utilized in these experiments. In this work, results from a variety of space radiation shielding studies where a TEPC was used to perform dosimetry in the particle beam will be presented. These results compare the absorbed dose and dose equivalent measured downstream of equal density thicknesses of stan-dard and multifunctional shielding materials. The standard materials chosen for these shielding studies included High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and aluminum alloy, while the multifunc-tional materials included carbon composite infused with single walled carbon nanotubes. High energy particles including proton, silicon and iron nuclei were chosen as the incident radia-tion for these studies. Further, TEPC results from measurements taken during flights aboard ER-2 and KC-135 aircraft will also be discussed. Results from these flight studies include TEPC measurements for shielded and unshielded conditions as well as the effect of vibration and electromagnetic exposures on the TEPC operation. The data selected for presentation will highlight the utility of the TEPC in space radiation studies, and in shielding studies in particular. The lineal energy response function of the

  1. Productivity of Mizuna Cultivated in the Space Greenhouse Onboard the Russian Module of the Iss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail; Moukhamedieva, Lana

    As stipulated by the science program of research into the processes of growth, development, metabolism and reproduction of higher plants in microgravity in view of their potential use in advanced life support systems, five experiments on Mizuna plants (Brassica rapa var. nipponisica) were performed using the Lada space greenhouse onboard the ISS Russian Module (RM) during Expeditions ISS-5, 17 and 20-22. One of the goals of the experiments was to evaluate the productivity of Mizuna plants grown at different levels of ISS RM air contamination. Mizuna plants were cultivated for 31 - 36 days when exposed to continuous illumination. The root growing medium was made of Turface enriched with a controlled release fertilizer Osmocote. In the course of the flight experiments major parameters of plant cultivation, total level of ISS RM air contamination and plant microbiological status were measured. The grown plants were returned to Earth as fresh or frozen samples. After the three last vegetation cycles the plants were harvested, packed and frozen at -80 0C in the MELFI freezer on the ISS U.S. Module and later returned to Earth onboard Space Shuttle. It was found that the productivity and morphometric (e.g., plant height and mass, number of leaves) parameters of the plants grown in space did not differ from those seen in ground controls. The T coefficient, which represents the total contamination level of ISS air), was 4 (ISS-5), 22 (ISS-17), 55 (ISS-20), 22 (ISS-21) and 28 (ISS-22) versus the norm of no more than 5. In summary, a significant increase in the total contamination level of the ISS RM air did not reduce the productivity of the leaf vegetable plant used in the flight experiments.

  2. Implementation of Satellite Formation Flight Algorithms Using SPHERES Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandy, Christophe P.; Sakamoto, Hiraku; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Miller, David W.

    2007-01-01

    The MIT's Space Systems Laboratory developed the Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) as a risk-tolerant spaceborne facility to develop and mature control, estimation, and autonomy algorithms for distributed satellite systems for applications such as satellite formation flight. Tests performed study interferometric mission-type formation flight maneuvers in deep space. These tests consist of having the satellites trace a coordinated trajectory under tight control that would allow simulated apertures to constructively interfere observed light and measure the resulting increase in angular resolution. This paper focuses on formation initialization (establishment of a formation using limited field of view relative sensors), formation coordination (synchronization of the different satellite s motion) and fuel-balancing among the different satellites.

  3. Speculations on future opportunities to evolve Brayton powerplants aboard the space station

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Space Station provides a unique, low-risk environment in which to evolve new capabilities. In this way, the Station will grow in capacity, in its range of capabilities, and in its economy of operation as a laboratory, as a center for materials processing, and as a center for space operations. Although both Rankine and Brayton cycles, two concepts for solar-dynamic power generation, now compete to power the Station, this paper confines its attention to the Brayton cycle using a mixture of He and Xe as its working fluid. Such a Brayton powerplant to supply the Station`s increasing demands for both electric power and heat has the potential to gradually evolve higher and higher performance by exploiting already-evolved materials (ASTAR-811C and molten-Li heat storage), its peak cycle temperature rising ultimately to 1500 K. Adapting the Station to exploit long tethers (200 to 300 km long) could yield large increases in payloads to LEO, to GEO, and to distant destinations in the solar system. Such tethering of the Space Station would not only require additional power for electric propulsion but also would so increase nuclear safety that nuclear powerplants might provide this power. From an 8000-kWt SP-100 reactor, thermoelectric power generation could produce 300 kWe, or adapted solar-Brayton cycle, 2400 to 2800 kWe.

  4. Building ISOC Status Displays for the Large AreaTelescope aboard the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Christina; /SLAC

    2006-09-01

    In September 2007 the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is scheduled to launch aboard a Delta II rocket in order to put two high-energy gamma-ray detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) into low earth orbit. The Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC) at SLAC is responsible for the LAT operations for the duration of the mission, and will therefore build an operations center including a monitoring station at SLAC to inform operations staff and visitors of the status of the LAT instrument and GLAST. This monitoring station is to include sky maps showing the location of GLAST in its orbit as well as the LAT's projected field of view on the sky containing known gamma-ray sources. The display also requires a world map showing the locations of GLAST and three Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) relative to the ground, their trail lines, and ''footprint'' circles indicating the range of communications for each satellite. The final display will also include a space view showing the orbiting and pointing information of GLAST and the TDRS satellites. In order to build the displays the astronomy programs Xephem, DS9, SatTrack, and STK were employed to model the position of GLAST and pointing information of the LAT instrument, and the programming utilities Python and Cron were used in Unix to obtain updated information from database and load them into the programs at regular intervals. Through these methods the indicated displays were created and combined to produce a monitoring display for the LAT and GLAST.

  5. Solar EUV Irradiance Measurements by the Auto-Calibrating EUV Spectrometers (SolACES) Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Nikutowski, B.; Jacobi, C.; Brunner, R.; Erhardt, C.; Knecht, S.; Scherle, J.; Schlagenhauf, J.

    2014-05-01

    SolACES is part of the ESA SOLAR ISS mission that started aboard the shuttle mission STS-122 on 7 February 2008. The instrument has recorded solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance from 16 to 150 nm during the extended solar activity minimum and the beginning solar cycle 24 with rising solar activity and increasingly changing spectral composition. The SOLAR mission has been extended from a period of 18 months to > 8 years until the end of 2016. SolACES is operating three grazing incidence planar grating spectrometers and two three-current ionization chambers. The latter ones are considered as primary radiometric detector standards. Re-filling the ionization chambers with three different gases repeatedly and using overlapping band-pass filters, the absolute EUV fluxes are derived in these spectral intervals. This way the serious problem of continuing efficiency changes in space-borne instrumentation is overcome during the mission. Evaluating the three currents of the ionization chambers, the overlapping spectral ranges of the spectrometers and of the filters plus inter-comparing the results from the EUV photon absorption in the gases with different absorption cross sections, there are manifold instrumental possibilities to cross-check the results providing a high degree of reliability to the spectral irradiance derived. During the mission a very strong up-and-down variability of the spectrometric efficiency by orders of magnitude is observed. One of the effects involved is channeltron degradation. However, there are still open questions on other effects contributing to these changes. A survey of the measurements carried out and first results of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data are presented. Inter-comparison with EUV data from other space missions shows good agreement such that the international effort has started to elaborate a complete set of EUV-SSI data taking into account all data available from 2008 to 2013.

  6. Fluid physics and transport phenomena studies aboard the international space station: Planned experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Space Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there are a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with an unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  7. Survival of pathogenic bacteria under nutrient starvation conditions. [aboard orbiting space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Michael; Ford, Tim; Mitchell, Ralph; Maki, James

    1990-01-01

    The survival of opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms in water, under nutrient-limiting conditions, has been investigated in order to ascertain whether human pathogens can survive within a water-distribution system of the kind proposed for the NASA Space Station. Cultures of a strain of pseudomonas aeruginosa and two strains of staphylococcus aureus were incubated at 10, 25, or 37 C, and samples at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and six weeks. While neither of the staphylococcus strains tested were detected after 1 week of starvation, the pseudomonas strain can survive in deionized water at all three temperatures.

  8. Science and payload options for animal and plant research accommodations aboard the early Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchey, John D.; Arno, Roger D.; Gustan, Edith; Rudiger, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    The resources to be allocated for the development of the Initial Operational Capability (IOC) Space Station Animal and Plant Research Facility and the Growth Station Animal and Plant Vivarium and Laboratory may be limited; also, IOC accommodations for animal and plant research may be limited. An approach is presented for the development of Initial Research Capability Minilabs for animal and plant studies, which in appropriate combination and sequence can meet requirements for an evolving program of research within available accommodations and anticipated budget constraints.

  9. Logistical and Analytical Approach to a Failure Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDanels, Seve; Wright, M. Clara; Salazar, Victoria; Lubas, David; Tucker, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) from the International Space Station (ISS) began exhibiting off-nominal electrical demands and vibration. Examination by spacewalking astronauts revealed metallic debris contaminating the system and damage to the outboard race of the SARJ. Samples of the contamination were returned to Earth and analyzed. Excessive friction caused the nitride region of the 15-5 PH stainless steel race to spall, generating the debris and damaging the race surface. Excessive vibration and excess power was required to operate the system as a result.

  10. The Cold Atom Laboratory: a facility for ultracold atom experiments aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveline, David; CAL Team

    2016-05-01

    Spread across the globe there are many different experiments in cold quantum gases, enabling the creation and study of novel states of matter, as well as some of the most accurate inertial sensors currently known. The Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), being built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), will be a multi-user facility that will allow the first study of ultracold quantum gases in the microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS). The microgravity environment offers a wealth of advantages for studies of cold atoms, including expansion into extremely weak traps and achieving unearthly cold temperatures. It will also enable very long interaction times with released samples, thereby enhancing the sensitivity of cold atom interferometry. We will describe the CAL mission objectives and the flight hardware architecture. We will also report our ongoing technology development for the CAL mission, including the first microwave evaporation to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) on a miniaturized atom chip system, demonstrated in JPL's CAL Ground Testbed. We will present the design, setup, and operation of two experiments that reliably generate and probe BECs and dual-species mixtures of Rb-87 and K-39 (or K-41). CAL is scheduled to launch to the ISS in 2017. The CAL mission is supported by NASA's SLPS and ISS-PO. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under Contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Ambient Optomechanical Alignment and Pupil Metrology for the Flight Instruments Aboard the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Phillip; Beaton, Alexander; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Hadjimichael, Theodore J.; Hayden, Joseph E.; Hummel, Susann; Hylan, Jason E.; Lee, David; Madison, Timothy J.; Maszkiewicz, Michael; Mclean, Kyle F.; McMann, Joseph; Melf, Markus; Miner, Linda; Ohl, Raymond G.; Redman, Kevin; Roedel, Andreas; Schweiger, Paul; Plate, Maurice T.; Wells, Martyn; Wenzel, Greg W.; Williams, Patrick K.; Young, Jerrod

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope science instruments are in the final stages of being integrated into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element. Each instrument is tied into a common coordinate system through mechanical references that are used for optical alignment and metrology within ISIM after element-level assembly. In addition, a set of ground support equipment (GSE) consisting of large, precisely calibrated, ambient, and cryogenic structures are used as alignment references and gauges during various phases of integration and test (I&T). This GSE, the flight instruments, and ISIM structure feature different types of complimentary metrology targeting. These GSE targets are used to establish and track six degrees of freedom instrument alignment during I&T in the vehicle coordinate system (VCS). This paper describes the optomechanical metrology conducted during science instrument integration and alignment in the Spacecraft Systems Development and Integration Facility (SSDIF) cleanroom at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The measurement of each instrument's ambient entrance pupil location in the telescope coordinate system is discussed. The construction of the database of target locations and the development of metrology uncertainties is also discussed.

  12. Lignification in young plant seedlings grown on earth and aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, Joe R.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.; Scheld, W. H.; Peterson, C.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle era has provided an opportunity for investigators to conduct experiments in a microgravity environment. Two Shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, each contained an experiment designed principally to determine whether young plant seedlings exposed to microgravity had reduced lignin content in comparison to seedlings grown at one gravity. Three different plant species, pine, oats, and mung beans, were exposed for eight days to the microgravity environment of the Shuttle. The lignin content of in-flight seedlings was less than the control seedlings in all seven sets of seedlings included in these two experiments. In five sets of seedlings, the reduction in lignin content in flight seedlings ranged from 6 to 24 percent and was statistically significant. In addition, the activity of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and peroxidase, were significantly reduced in pine seedlings. It was therefore concluded that microgravity, as perceived by young plant seedlings, results in reduced lignin synthesis.

  13. Ames Culture Chamber System: Enabling Model Organism Research Aboard the international Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic, physiological, and behavioral effects of spaceflight on living organisms and elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects are high priorities for NASA. Certain organisms, known as model organisms, are widely studied to help researchers better understand how all biological systems function. Small model organisms such as nem-atodes, slime mold, bacteria, green algae, yeast, and moss can be used to study the effects of micro- and reduced gravity at both the cellular and systems level over multiple generations. Many model organisms have sequenced genomes and published data sets on their transcriptomes and proteomes that enable scientific investigations of the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptations of these organisms to space flight.

  14. Fluid Physical and Transport Phenomena Studies aboard the International Space Station: Planned Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments planned for the International Spare Station. NASA's Office of Life and Microgravity Science and Applications has established a world-class research program in fluid physics and transport phenomena. This program combines the vast expertise of the world research community with NASA's unique microgravity facilities with the objectives of gaining new insight into fluid phenomena by removing the confounding effect of gravity. Due to its criticality to many terrestrial and space-based processes and phenomena, fluid physics and transport phenomena play a central role in the NASA's Microgravity Program. Through widely publicized research announcement and well established peer-reviews, the program has been able to attract a number of world-class researchers and acquired a critical mass of investigations that is now adding rapidly to this field. Currently there arc a total of 106 ground-based and 20 candidate flight principal investigators conducting research in four major thrust areas in the program: complex flows, multiphase flow and phase change, interfacial phenomena, and dynamics and instabilities. The International Space Station (ISS) to be launched in 1998, provides the microgravity research community with a unprecedented opportunity to conduct long-duration microgravity experiments which can be controlled and operated from the Principal Investigators' own laboratory. Frequent planned shuttle flights to the Station will provide opportunities to conduct many more experiments than were previously possible. NASA Lewis Research Center is in the process of designing a Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) to be located in the Laboratory Module of the ISS that will not only accommodate multiple users but, allow a broad range of fluid physics and transport phenomena experiments to be conducted in a cost effective manner.

  15. Invited article: data analysis of the floating potential measurement unit aboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Barjatya, Aroh; Swenson, Charles M; Thompson, Donald C; Wright, Kenneth H

    2009-04-01

    We present data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) that is deployed on the starboard truss of the International Space Station. The FPMU is a suite of instruments capable of redundant measurements of various plasma parameters. The instrument suite consists of a floating potential probe, a wide-sweeping spherical Langmuir probe, a narrow-sweeping cylindrical Langmuir probe, and a plasma impedance probe. This paper gives a brief overview of the instrumentation and the received data quality, and then presents the algorithm used to reduce I-V curves to plasma parameters. Several hours of data are presented from August 5, 2006 and March 3, 2007. The FPMU derived plasma density and temperatures are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and Utah State University-Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement (USU-GAIM) models. Our results show that the derived in situ density matches the USU-GAIM model better than the IRI, and the derived in situ temperatures are comparable to the average temperatures given by the IRI. PMID:19405644

  16. Invited Article: Data analysis of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Barjatya, Aroh; Swenson, Charles M.; Thompson, Donald C.; Wright, Kenneth H. Jr.

    2009-04-15

    We present data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) that is deployed on the starboard truss of the International Space Station. The FPMU is a suite of instruments capable of redundant measurements of various plasma parameters. The instrument suite consists of a floating potential probe, a wide-sweeping spherical Langmuir probe, a narrow-sweeping cylindrical Langmuir probe, and a plasma impedance probe. This paper gives a brief overview of the instrumentation and the received data quality, and then presents the algorithm used to reduce I-V curves to plasma parameters. Several hours of data are presented from August 5, 2006 and March 3, 2007. The FPMU derived plasma density and temperatures are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and Utah State University-Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement (USU-GAIM) models. Our results show that the derived in situ density matches the USU-GAIM model better than the IRI, and the derived in situ temperatures are comparable to the average temperatures given by the IRI.

  17. Data Analysis of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barjatya, Aroh; Swenson, Charles M.; Thompson, Donald C.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    We present data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), that is deployed on the starboard (S1) truss of the International Space Station. The FPMU is a suite of instruments capable of redundant measurements of various plasma parameters. The instrument suite consists of: a Floating Potential Probe, a Wide-sweeping spherical Langmuir probe, a Narrow-sweeping cylindrical Langmuir Probe, and a Plasma Impedance Probe. This paper gives a brief overview of the instrumentation and the received data quality, and then presents the algorithm used to reduce I-V curves to plasma parameters. Several hours of data is presented from August 5th, 2006 and March 3rd, 2007. The FPMU derived plasma density and temperatures are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and USU-Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement (USU-GAIM) models. Our results show that the derived in-situ density matches the USU-GAIM model better than the IRI, and the derived in-situ temperatures are comparable to the average temperatures given by the IRI.

  18. Rapid Monitoring of Bacteria and Fungi aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Damon, M.; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; Monaco, L.

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms within spacecraft have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growth of environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies or return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. Data obtained over the past 4 decades have enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach has been limited by the following factors: i) Many microorganisms (estimated > 95%) in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags (3-5 days for incubation and up to several months to return samples to ground); iii) Condensation in contact slides hinders colony counting by crew; and iv) Growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gramnegative bacteria and fungi, respectively. The technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device, known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). LOCADPTS was launched to the ISS in December 2006, and here we present data obtained from Mach 2007 until the present day. These data include a comparative study between LOCADPTS analysis and existing culture-based methods; and an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan throughout the ISS. While a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not be expected, we will suggest new requirements for microbial monitoring based upon culture-independent parameters measured by LOCAD-PTS.

  19. Balanced Expertise Distribution in Remote Ultrasound Imaging Aboard The International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot; Dulchavsky, Scott; Hamilton, Douglas; Melton, Shannon; Martin, David

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut training for ISS operations usually ensures independent performance. With small crew size same crews also conduct all science work onboard. With diverse backgrounds, a good "match" between the existing and required skills can only be anecdotal. Furthermore, full proficiency in most of the complex tasks can be attained only through long training and practice, which may not be justified and may be impossible given the scarcity of training time. To enable a number of operational and science advancements, authors have developed a new approach to expertise distribution in time and among the space and ground personnel. Methods: As part of NASA Operational Ultrasound Project (1998-2003) and the NASA-solicited experiment "Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity-ADUM" (P.I. -S.D., ongoing), the authors have created a "Balanced Expertise Distribution" approach to perform complex ultrasound imaging tasks on ISS for both operational and science use. The four components of expertise are a) any pre-existing pertinent expertise; b) limited preflight training c) adaptive onboard proficiency enhancement tools; d) real-time ' guidance from the ground. Throughout the pre-flight training and flight time preceding the experiments, the four components are shaped in a dynamic fashion to meet in an optimum combination during the experiment sessions. Results: Procedure validation sessions and feasibility studies have given encouraging results. While several successful real-time remote guidance sessions have been conducted on ISS, Expedition 8 is the first to use an "on-orbit proficiency enhancement" tool. Conclusions: In spite of severely limited training time, daring peer-reviewed research and operational enhancements are feasible through a balanced distribution of expertise in time, as well as among the crewmembers and ground personnel. This approach shows great promise for biomedical research, but may be applicable for other areas of micro gravity-based science

  20. Initial Results from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Swenson, Charles; Thompson, Don; Barjatya, Aroh; Koontz, Steven L.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Minow, Joseph; Craven, Paul; Coffey, Victoria; Parker, Linda; Bui, Them

    2007-01-01

    The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) is a multi-probe package designed to measure the floating potential of the 1nternational Space Station (ISS) as well as the density and temperature of the local ionospheric plasma environment. The role oj the FPMU is to provide direct measurements of ISS spacecraft charging as continuing construction leads to dramatic changes in ISS size and configuration. FPMU data are used for refinement and validation of the ISS spacecraft charging models used to evaluate the severity and frequency of occurrence of ISS charging hazards. The FPMU data and the models are also used to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed hazard controls. The FPMU consists of four probes: a floating potential probe, two Langmuir probes. and a plasma impedance probe. These probes measure the floating potential of the ISS, plasma density, and electron temperature. Redundant measurements using different probes support data validation by inter-probe comparisons. The FPMU was installed by ISS crewmembers, during an ExtraVehicular Activity, on the starboard (Sl) truss of the ISS in early August 2006, when the ISS incorporated only one 160V US photovoltaic (PV) array module. The first data campaign began a few hours after installation and continued for over five days. Additional data campaigns were completed in 2007 after a second 160V US PV array module was added to the ISS. This paper discusses the general performance characteristics of the FPMU as integrated on ISS, the functional performance of each probe, the charging behavior of the ISS before and after the addition of a second 160V US PV array module, and initial results from model comparisons.

  1. ISS Update: Science Aboard Kounotori3

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Pete Hasbrook, associate program scientist, about the experiments traveling to the International Space Station aboard the H-II Transfer Vehicle...

  2. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  3. Advanced technologies demonstrated by the miniature integrated camera and spectrometer (MICAS) aboard deep space 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodgers, D.H.; Beauchamp, P.M.; Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Chen, G.-S.; Lee, M.; Sandel, B.R.; Thomas, D.A.; Benoit, R.T.; Yelle, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    MICAS is an integrated multi-channel instrument that includes an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer (80-185 nm), two high-resolution visible imagers (10-20 ??rad/pixel, 400-900 nm), and a short-wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer (1250-2600 nm). The wavelength ranges were chosen to maximize the science data that could be collected using existing semiconductor technologies and avoiding the need for multi-octave spectrometers. It was flown on DS1 to validate technologies derived from the development of PICS (Planetary Imaging Camera Spectrometer). These technologies provided a novel systems approach enabling the miniaturization and integration of four instruments into one entity, spanning a wavelength range from the UV to IR, and from ambient to cryogenic temperatures with optical performance at a fraction of a wavelength. The specific technologies incorporated were: a built-in fly-by sequence; lightweight and ultra-stable, monolithic silicon-carbide construction, which enabled room-temperature alignment for cryogenic (85-140 K) performance, and provided superb optical performance and immunity to thermal distortion; diffraction-limited, shared optics operating from 80 to 2600 nm; advanced detector technologies for the UV, visible and short-wavelength IR; high-performance thermal radiators coupled directly to the short-wave infrared (SWIR) detector optical bench, providing an instrument with a mass less than 10 kg, instrument power less than 10 W, and total instrument cost of less than ten million dollars. The design allows the wavelength range to be extended by at least an octave at the short wavelength end and to 50 microns at the long wavelength end. Testing of the completed instrument demonstrated excellent optical performance down to 77 K, which would enable a greatly reduced background for longer wavelength detectors. During the Deep Space 1 Mission, MICAS successfully collected images and spectra for asteroid 9969 Braille, Mars, and comet 19/P Borrelly. The

  4. Multilateral Biomedical Data Sharing in the One-year Joint US-Russian Mission on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Haven, C.; Johnson-Throop, K.; Van Baalen, M.; McFather, J.

    2014-01-01

    The One Year Mission (1YM) by two astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS), starting in March 2015, offers a unique opportunity to expand multilateral collaboration by sharing data and resources among the partner agencies in preparation for planned space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. Agreements and protocols will be established for the collection, distribution, analysis and reporting of both research and clinical data. Data will be shared between the agencies sponsoring the investigators, and between the research and clinical medicine communities where common interests are identified. The assignment of only two astronauts, one Russian and the other American, to the 1YM necessitated creativity in bilateral efforts to maximize the biomedical return from the opportunity. Addition of Canadian, European and Japanese investigations make the effort even more integrative. There will be three types of investigations: joint, cross-participation and data-exchange. The joint investigations have US and Russian coprincipal investigators, and the data acquired will be their common responsibility. The other two types must develop data sharing agreements and processes specific to their needs. A multilateral panel of ISS partner space agencies will develop policies for international exchange of scientific information to meet their science objectives and priorities. They will promote archiving of space flight data and will inform each other and the scientific community at large about the results obtained from space life sciences studies. Integration tasks for the 1YM are based on current experience from the ISS and previous efforts on the Russian space station Mir. Closer coordination between international partners requires more common approaches to remove barriers to multilateral resource utilization on the ISS. Greater integration in implementation should increase utilization efficiency to benefit all participants in spaceflight human research. This

  5. BRADOS - Dose determination in the Russian segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Fürstner, M.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    Absorbed dose and dose-average linear energy transfer (LET) were assessed by means of LiF: Mg, Ti thermoluminescence (TL) detectors at different locations onboard the Russian segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS) in the timeframe between February and November 2001, i.e. for 248 days. Based on calibrations of the employed detectors in a variety of heavy-ion beams, mainly at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan, the measured absorbed dose values could be corrected for the TL dose registration efficiency in the radiation climate onboard the ISS. Various strategies for efficiency correction are discussed. For the specific case the efficiency correction accounted for a reduction by nearly 20 % in dose, implying that without proper consideration of the TL efficiency behaviour the absorbed dose inside the ISS would be overestimated. The dose-average LET was derived from TLD-700 measurements evaluated according to the well-established high-temperature ratio (HTR) method which analyzes the TL emission in the temperature range between 248 and 310 C. According to the shielding distribution, the efficiency-corrected absorbed dose was found to vary between 155 μ Gy/d for panel N 457 (RS-ISS toilet) and 230 μ Gy/d for panel N 443 (RS-ISS starboard cabin). The determined LET indicated a modification of the spectral composition of the onboard radiation field for the different exposure locations. Arrangement of TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allowed also some information about the neutron component to be drawn. Experimentally determined absorbed dose values are compared with model calculations by means of a self-developed code, using as input data detailed shielding distributions and proton fluxes from AP-8 and JPL algorithms.

  6. Extreme Tele-Echocardiography: Methodology for Remote Guidance of In-flight Echocardiography Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David; Borowski, Allan; Bungo, Michael W.; Dulchavsky, Scott; Gladding, Patrick; Greenberg, Neil; Hamilton, Doug; Levine, Benjamin D.; Norwoord, Kelly; Platts, Steven H.; Poston, Sue; Roper, Matthew; Sandoz, Gwenn; Thomas, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography is ideally suited for cardiovascular imaging in remote environments, but the expertise to perform it is often lacking. In 2001, an ATL HDI5000 was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The instrument is currently being used in a study to investigate the impact of long-term microgravity on cardiovascular function. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology for remote guidance of echocardiography in space. Methods: In the year before launch of an ISS mission, potential astronaut echocardiographic operators participate in 5 sessions to train for echo acquisitions that occur roughly monthly during the mission, including one exercise echocardiogram. The focus of training is familiarity with the study protocol and remote guidance procedures. On-orbit, real-time guidance of in-flight acquisitions is provided by a sonographer in the Telescience Center of Mission Control. Physician investigators with remote access are able to relay comments on image optimization to the sonographer. Live video feed is relayed from the ISS to the ground via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System with a 2 second transmission delay. The expert sonographer uses these images along with two-way audio to provide instructions and feedback. Images are stored in non-compressed DICOM format for asynchronous relay to the ground for subsequent off-line analysis. Results: Since June, 2009, a total of 19 resting echocardiograms and 4 exercise studies have been performed in-flight. Average acquisition time has been 45 minutes, reflecting 26,000 km of ISS travel per study. Image quality has been adequate in all studies, but remote guidance has proven imperative for fine-tuning imaging and prioritizing views when communication outages limit the study duration. Typical resting studies have included 12 video loops and 21 still-frame images requiring 750 MB of storage. Conclusions: Despite limited crew training, remote guidance allows research

  7. Performance Testing of a Russian Mir Space Station Trace Contaminant Control Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, R. E.; Perry, J. L.; Abramov, L. H.

    1997-01-01

    A filter assembly which is incorporated into the Russian Trace Contaminant Control Assembly was tested for removal of airborne trace chemical contaminants in a closed loop 9 m(exp 3) system. Given contaminant loading rates and maximum allowable atmospheric concentrations, the Russian system was able to maintain system air concentrations below maximum allowable limits. This was achieved for both a new filter system and for a system where a part of it was pre-loaded to emulate 3 years of system age.

  8. Results of space experiment program "Interferon". I. Production of interferon in vitro by human lymphocytes aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 ("Interferon I") and influence of space flight on lymphocyte functions of cosmonauts ("Interferon III").

    PubMed

    Tálas, M; Bátkai, L; Stöger, I; Nagy, L; Hiros, L; Konstantinova, I; Rykova, M; Mozgovaya, I; Guseva, O; Kozharinov, V

    1983-01-01

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut crews aboard the space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported. Human lymphocytes separated from the blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditions. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin, such as virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production was observed in the space laboratory as compared to the ground control. A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer cell activity was observed in the cosmonauts' lymphocytes on the 1st day on Earth after 7 days spaceflight. PMID:6659855

  9. STS 134, 135 and 26S Return Samples: Air Quality aboard Shuttle (STS-134) and International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    This is a very limited set of samples on which to perform an air quality assessment. However, based on these samples, we have no reason to believe that nominal ISS air is unsafe to breathe. We must continue to be vigilant when dealing with nominal atmospheres in ISS. New, unmanned modules require special attention when the crew first enters. Carbon Monoxide Accumulation aboard ISS: Beginning in late 2008 the nominal concentrations of CO began increasing gradually (Figure 1). The results from samples returned on this flight indicate that the CO concentrations, after dropping in late 2009, have cycled upward and then settled back to concentrations near 2 mg/m3. In any case, these changes are well below the 180-day SMAC for CO, which is17 mg/m3. There is no threat to crew health. Carbon Dioxide: This anthropogenic compound has drawn much attention recently because of the possibility that it could contribute to the effects of intracranial hypertension experienced because of spaceflight-induced fluid shifts. From now on we will maintain a plot (Figure 2) of carbon dioxide concentrations ( SD) by averaging the values found in the 3-5 mini-GSC samples taken each month in diverse locations of the ISS. This will enable us to estimate the average exposure of crewmembers to carbon dioxide during their stay aboard the ISS. In general, concentrations are being maintained below 3.5 mmHg. Figure 1

  10. Spaceflight effects on consecutive generations of peas grown onboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychev, Vladimir N.; Levinskikh, Margarita A.; Gostimsky, Sergey A.; Bingham, Gail E.; Podolsky, Igor G.

    2007-02-01

    In the period from March 2003 to April 2005 we fulfilled five experimental cultivations of genetically marked dwarf pea species in greenhouse Lada installed in the Russian segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of this series of experiments was to make morphologic and genetic analysis of pea plants grown in successive generations. According to our results, pea growth and development over the full cycle of ontogenesis (from seed to seed) taking place in space greenhouse Lada were not different as compared with the ground control plants. In addition, four successive pea crops gathered in space flight did not loose their reproductive functions and formed viable seeds. Genetic analysis of the plants grown from the "space" and "ground" seeds produced by the first to fourth successive crops was performed using the methods of chromosomal aberrations count and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (molecular method). No genetic polymorphism was found either in the experimental or control crops. This can serve as a sound argument for the supposition that the genetic apparatus of plants is not impacted by exposure of several successive generations to the conditions of space flight.

  11. The Marshall Space Flight Center development of mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  12. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  13. Station Tour: Russian Segment

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams concludes her tour of the International Space Station with a visit to the Russian segment, which includes Zarya, the first segment of the station launched in 1...

  14. Russian Folktales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Russian folktales suggests a structured approach to introducing the characters, settings, and motifs in an elementary classroom. Highlights include beginner-level texts; connections to Russian culture; writing connections; activities; and an annotated bibliography of 32 titles. (LRW)

  15. Bubble-detector measurements in the Russian segment of the International Space Station during 2009-12.

    PubMed

    Smith, M B; Khulapko, S; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Ing, H; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Shurshakov, V

    2015-01-01

    Measurements using bubble detectors have been performed in order to characterise the neutron dose and energy spectrum in the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Experiments using bubble dosemeters and a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors with different energy thresholds that is used to determine the neutron spectrum, were performed during the ISS-22 (2009) to ISS-33 (2012) missions. The spectrometric measurements are in good agreement with earlier data, exhibiting expected features of the neutron energy spectrum in space. Experiments using a hydrogenous radiation shield show that the neutron dose can be reduced by shielding, with a reduction similar to that determined in earlier measurements using bubble detectors. The bubble-detector data are compared with measurements performed on the ISS using other instruments and are correlated with potential influencing factors such as the ISS altitude and the solar activity. Surprisingly, these influences do not seem to have a strong effect on the neutron dose or energy spectrum inside the ISS. PMID:24714114

  16. The Russian Scientific Research Institue Of Parachute Design And Production (NII Parachutostroyeniya, NIIPC)- History, Research And Collaboration In Space Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalin, V.; Ladygin, V.; Komarov, V.; Kuleshov, V.; Wong, H.; Offerman, J.; Thirkettle, A.

    2011-05-01

    NIIPC was established in 1946 for the development of paradrop equipment and is one of a few companies in the world to perform the full cycle of parachute development, including scientific research, design, manufacturing, test and modification. NIIPC produced the parachute systems for Yuri Gagarin and all of the Russian manned space missions, Vistok, Voshod and Soyuz. It produced the parachutes for unmanned missions, Almaz, Bion, Cosmos as well as the reentry modules for Mars, Venus and from the Moon. NIIPC has its own school for training of scientific personnel and large scientific and technical archive. The existing knowledge and computer codes are used for the development of prospective parachute systems. Research includes all aspects such as payload- parachute dynamics, inflation, clusters, gliding parachutes, and aeroballistic heating and strength of supersonic parachutes. International collaboration included the Ariane 5 booster parachutes with Dutch Space and development of the current supersonic parachute system for EXPERT. An Ariane 5 booster weighs 41 tonnes dry and involves a 3-stage parachute system. The EXPERT parachute deploys a drogue supersonic parachute at Mach 1.7, before extracting a main cross-shaped parachute. The test campaign for EXPERT started in 2010 and will be completed by summer 2011.

  17. Extreme Tele-Echocardiography: Methodology for Remote Guidance of In-Flight Echocardiography Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; Borowski, Allan; Bungo, Michael W.; Gladding, Patrick; Greenberg, Neil; Hamilton, Doug; Levine, Benjamin D.; Lee, Stuart M.; Norwood, Kelly; Platts, Steven H.; Matz, Timothy; Roper, Matthew; Sandoz, Gwenn; Thomas, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Methods: In the year before launch of an ISS mission, potential astronaut echocardiographic operators participate in 5 sessions to train for echo acquisitions that occur roughly monthly during the mission, including one exercise echocardiogram. The focus of training is familiarity with the study protocol and remote guidance procedures. On-orbit, real-time guidance of in-flight acquisitions is provided by a sonographer in the Telescience Center of Mission Control. Physician investigators with remote access are able to relay comments on image quality to the sonographer. Live video feed is relayed from the ISS to the ground via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System with a 2- second transmission delay. The expert sonographer uses these images, along with twoway audio, to provide instructions and feedback. Images are stored in non-compressed DICOM format for asynchronous relay to the ground for subsequent off-line analysis. Results: Since June, 2009, a total of 27 resting echocardiograms and 5 exercise studies have been performed during flight. Average acquisition time has been 45 minutes, reflecting 26,000 km of ISS travel per study. Image quality has been adequate in all studies, and remote guidance has proven imperative for fine-tuning imaging and prioritizing views when communication outages limit the study duration. Typical resting studies have included 27 video loops and 30 still-frame images requiring 750 MB of storage. Conclusions: Despite limited crew training, remote guidance allows research-quality echocardiography to be performed by non-experts aboard the ISS. Analysis is underway and additional subjects are being recruited to define the impact of microgravity on cardiac structure and systolic and diastolic function.

  18. Application of X-ray topography to USSR and Russian space materials science

    PubMed Central

    Shul’pina, I. L.; Prokhorov, I. A.; Serebryakov, Yu. A.; Bezbakh, I. Zh.

    2016-01-01

    The authors’ experience of the application of X-ray diffraction imaging in carrying out space technological experiments on semiconductor crystal growth for the former USSR and for Russia is reported, from the Apollo–Soyuz programme (1975) up to the present day. X-ray topography was applied to examine defects in crystals in order to obtain information on the crystallization conditions and also on their changes under the influence of factors of orbital flight in space vehicles. The data obtained have promoted a deeper understanding of the conditions and mechanisms of crystallization under both microgravity and terrestrial conditions, and have enabled the elaboration of terrestrial methods of highly perfect crystal growth. The use of X-ray topography in space materials science has enriched its methods in the field of digital image processing of growth striations and expanded its possibilities in investigating the inhomogeneity of crystals. PMID:27158506

  19. Application of X-ray topography to USSR and Russian space materials science.

    PubMed

    Shul'pina, I L; Prokhorov, I A; Serebryakov, Yu A; Bezbakh, I Zh

    2016-05-01

    The authors' experience of the application of X-ray diffraction imaging in carrying out space technological experiments on semiconductor crystal growth for the former USSR and for Russia is reported, from the Apollo-Soyuz programme (1975) up to the present day. X-ray topography was applied to examine defects in crystals in order to obtain information on the crystallization conditions and also on their changes under the influence of factors of orbital flight in space vehicles. The data obtained have promoted a deeper understanding of the conditions and mechanisms of crystallization under both microgravity and terrestrial conditions, and have enabled the elaboration of terrestrial methods of highly perfect crystal growth. The use of X-ray topography in space materials science has enriched its methods in the field of digital image processing of growth striations and expanded its possibilities in investigating the inhomogeneity of crystals. PMID:27158506

  20. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Passing by a palm tree, the Space Shuttle Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter makes its way to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler- transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler-transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  1. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just after departing the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Shuttle Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter wends its way to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler-transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler-transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  2. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  3. Development and swimming behavior of Medaka fry in a spaceflight aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-107).

    PubMed

    Niihori, Maki; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Baba, Shoji A

    2004-09-01

    A space experiment aimed at closely observing the development and swimming activity of medaka fry under microgravity was carried out as a part of the S*T*A*R*S Program, a space shuttle mission, in STS-107 in January 2003. Four eggs laid on earth in an artificially controlled environment were put in a container with a functionally closed ecological system and launched on the Space Shuttle Columbia. Each egg was held in place by a strip of Velcro in the container to be individually monitored by close-up CCD cameras. In the control experiment, four eggs prepared using the same experimental set-up remained on the ground. There was no appreciable difference in the time course of development between space- and ground-based embryos. In the ground experiment, embryos were observed to rotate in place enclosed with the egg membrane, whereas those in the flight unit did not rotate. One of the four eggs hatched on the 8th day after being launched into space. All four eggs hatched in the ground unit. The fry hatched in space was mostly motionless, but with occasional control of its posture with respect to references in the experimental chamber. The fry hatched on ground were observed to move actively, controlling their posture with respect to the gravity vector. These findings suggest that the absence of gravity affects the initiation process of motility of embryos and hatched fry. PMID:15459450

  4. Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Based on Samples Returned Aboard STS-110 (ISS-8A) in April 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2002-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of grab sample canisters (GSCs) returned aboard STS-110 is reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports, and surrogate standard recoveries from the GSCs were 77-121%, with one exception. Pressure tracking indicated no leaks in the canisters. Recoveries from lab and trip controls for formaldehyde analyses ranged from 87 to 96%. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). Because of the inertness of Freon 218 (octafluoropropane, OFP), its contribution to the NMVOC is subtracted and tabulated separately. Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols are also shown for each sample. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is listed separately. These five indices of air quality are summarized.

  5. Analysis of solar receiver flux distributions for US/Russian solar dynamic system demonstration on the MIR Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Fincannon, James

    1995-01-01

    The United States and Russia have agreed to jointly develop a solar dynamic (SD) system for flight demonstration on the Russian MIR space station starting in late 1997. Two important components of this SD system are the solar concentrator and heat receiver provided by Russia and the U.S., respectively. This paper describes optical analysis of the concentrator and solar flux predictions on target receiver surfaces. The optical analysis is performed using the code CIRCE2. These analyses account for finite sun size with limb darkening, concentrator surface slope and position errors, concentrator petal thermal deformation, gaps between petals, and the shading effect of the receiver support struts. The receiver spatial flux distributions are then combined with concentrator shadowing predictions. Geometric shadowing patterns are traced from the concentrator to the target receiver surfaces. These patterns vary with time depending on the chosen MIR flight attitude and orbital mechanics of the MIR spacecraft. The resulting predictions provide spatial and temporal receiver flux distributions for any specified mission profile. The impact these flux distributions have on receiver design and control of the Brayton engine are discussed.

  6. The Rebirth of the Russian Space Program: 50 Years After Sputnik, New Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Nick

    2008-07-01

    Every morning, I pass by a large poster in my stairwell of Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, who in 1961 became the first person to orbit the Earth. On the poster, which my brother found in Central Asia, Gagarin's helmeted head merges into the curve of the Earth. The poster is a powerful reminder of a time when the Soviet space program was the envy of the world, and when it would have seemed to many people quite likely that by 2008 Soviet cosmonauts would be working on the Moon or be on their way to Mars.

  7. [Protein turnover during and after extended space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Larina, I. M.; Leskiv, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    A 15N-glycine tracer technique was used to study protein turnover in four Russian cosmonauts and two U.S. astronauts who had spent long time aboard the Russian orbital station MIR. As was shown, in space flight protein synthesis falls by 46% on the average, which substantially exceeds estimations made on the basis of data about bed-rested human subjects. Reduction in protein synthesis during space flight is connected with the negative energy balance; therefore, it appears imperative to keep balance between energy intake (foodstuffs) and expenditure by cosmonauts on long-term mission.

  8. Study of industry requirements that can be fulfilled by combustion experimentation aboard space station. Final contractor report

    SciTech Connect

    Priem, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the requirements of commercially motivated microgravity combustion experiments and the optimal way for space station to accommodate these requirements. Representatives of commercial organizations, universities and government agencies were contacted. Interest in and needs for microgravity combustion studies are identified for commercial/industrial groups involved in fire safety with terrestrial applications, fire safety with space applications, propulsion and power, industrial burners, or pollution control. From these interests and needs experiments involving: (1) no flow with solid or liquid fuels; (2) homogeneous mixtures of fuel and air; (3) low flow with solid or liquid fuels; (4) low flow with gaseous fuel; (5) high pressure combustion; and (6) special burner systems are described and space station resource requirements for each type of experiment provided. Critical technologies involving the creation of a laboratory environment and methods for combining experimental needs into one experiment in order to obtain effective use of space station are discussed. Diagnostic techniques for monitoring combustion process parameters are identified.

  9. Russian Prime Minister Calls the Station Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin called the International Space Station from the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia, on Jan. 11, 2011. Putin also offered his condolences to ISS ...

  10. Meteoroid/orbital debris impact damage predictions for the Russian space station MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, E. L.; Hyde, J. L.; Lear, D.

    1997-01-01

    Components of the Mir space station have been exposed to the meteoroid/orbital debris (M/OD) environment for up to 11 years. During this period, no M/OD impact perforation of the pressure shell of the manned modules were reported. The NASA standard M/OD analysis code BUMPER was used to predict the probability of M/OD impact damage to various components of Mir. The analysis indicates a 1 in 2.2 chance that a M/OD impact would have caused a penetration resulting in a pressure leak of the Mir modules since its launch up to the February 1997. For the next five years, the estimated odds become 1 in 3. On an annual basis, penetration risks are 60 percent higher, on the average, in the next five years due to the larger size of Mir and the growth in the orbital debris population.

  11. Analysis of high-altitude planetary ion velocity space distributions detected by the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Curry, S.; Mitchell, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    We present observations of planetary ion velocity space distributions from the Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The magnetometer data from Mars Global Surveyor is used to obtain a rough estimate of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Characteristic features of the velocity space distributions will be examined and discussed for orbits aligned with the convective electric field and those in the Mars terminator plane. This study will focus on the high (keV) energy ions, as well as the relative importance of a high-altitude magnetosheath source of escaping planetary ions. Furthermore, this paper will examine various methods for converting the IMA detector counts to species-specific fluxes. After mimicking the methods previously used by researchers, we apply each of these methods of species extraction to data collected during the same time intervals. We discuss the implications for planetary ion motion around Mars, using the details of the velocity space observations to better understand the solar wind interaction with Mars. Comparisons to virtual detections using a test particle simulation will also provide insight into ion origins and trajectories.

  12. Improvement of the Russian system of medical care at the site of space crew landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukavishnikov, Ilya; Bogomolov, Valery; Polyakov, Alexey

    The crew members are delivered to ISS and return back to the Earth on the space craft "Soyuz TMA" at present time. The technical means providing the safe landing of space crews are reliable enough. In spite of that the complex of negative factors (long lasting alternating and shock overloads, effects of landing apparatus rotation on vestibular system) affects the crew during landing and can reach the extreme values under the certain conditions. According to this fact there is a possibility of appearance of bodily damages of different weight besides the traditional functional disturbances. The group of search and rescue on the landing site includes the medical specialists appropriately equipped to stop the symptoms of medical contingency (strong vestibule-vegetative reactions, traumas of different weight, etc.) Medical evacuation complex which provides the acceptable conditions for the cosmonauts including the conditions for medical care is delivered to the landing site as well. The long term experience of search and rescue assurance at the landing site have shown that the specialists successfully cope with this task. In some cases it was required to give the medical help which allowed to improve the general condition and physical capacity of crewmembers and provide their evacuation to the places of postflight rehabilitation. At the same time the solution of some of the problems from our point of view could increase the efficacy of medical care for the landing crew. The organization of the training on emergency under the field conditions for medical specialists on the regular basis (not less that once a year) is extremely important. The equipment of medical specialists requires the regular improvement and modernization due to the fast changing medical technologies and standards. Wearable medical sets must provide the first aid performing in accordance to the modern medical requirements. It is also necessary to include in the list of equipment the textbook of

  13. The development of the Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) experiment aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramall, Nathan E.; Quinn, Richard; Mattioda, Andrew; Bryson, Kathryn; Chittenden, Julie D.; Cook, Amanda; Taylor, Cindy; Minelli, Giovanni; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricco, Antonio J.; Squires, David; Santos, Orlando; Friedericks, Charles; Landis, David; Jones, Nykola C.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Hoffmann, Søren V.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) experiment is one of two scientific payloads aboard the triple-cube satellite Organism/ORganic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS). O/OREOS is the first technology demonstration mission of the NASA Astrobiology Small Payloads Program. The 1-kg, 1000-cm3 SEVO cube is investigating the chemical evolution of organic materials in interstellar space and planetary environments by exposing organic molecules under controlled conditions directly to the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particle and electromagnetic radiation environment. O/OREOS was launched on November 19, 2010 into a 650-km, 72°-inclination orbit and has a nominal operational lifetime of six months. Four classes of organic compounds, namely an amino acid, a quinone, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), and a metallo-porphyrin are being studied. Initial reaction conditions were established by hermetically sealing the thin-film organic samples in self-contained micro-environments. Chemical changes in the samples caused by direct exposure to LEO radiation and by interactions with the irradiated microenvironments are monitored in situ by ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (UV/VIS/NIR) absorption spectroscopy using a novel compact fixed-grating CCD spectrometer with the Sun as its light source. The goals of the O/OREOS mission include: (1) demonstrating key small satellite technologies that can enable future low-cost astrobiology experiments, (2) deploying a miniature UV/VIS/NIR spectrometer suitable for in-situ astrobiology and other scientific investigations, (3) testing the capability to establish a variety of experimental reaction conditions to enable the study of astrobiological processes on small satellites, and (4) measuring the chemical evolution of organic molecules in LEO under conditions that can be extrapolated to interstellar and planetary environments. In this paper, the science and technology development of the SEVO instrument payload and its

  14. STS-112 crew visits with Russian officials prior to launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-112 crew takes time out from a visit with Russian officials to pose for a portrait. From left are Mission Specialist Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Ph.D., a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency; Aslan Abashidze, President of the Autonomous Republic of Ajara in Georgia (Russia); Commander Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Sandra H. Magnus, Ph.D.; Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; Georgi Abashidze, Mayor of Batumi (Yurchikhin's hometown); and Mission Specialist Piers J. Sellers, Ph.D. Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, M.D., not pictured, is also a member of the crew. The STS-112 crew is awaiting launch to the International Space Station aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis. The launch has been postponed to no earlier than Monday, Oct. 7, so that the Mission Control Center, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, can be secured and protected from potential storm impacts from Hurricane Lili.

  15. LOCAD-PTS: Operation of a New System for Microbial Monitoring Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Danibm N,; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; Monaco, L.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms within the space stations Salyut, Mir and the International Space Station (ISS), have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growing environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies; and return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. This approach has provided a wealth of useful data and enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach is also limited by the following: i) More than 95% microorganisms in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags occur between onboard sampling and colony visualization (3-5 days) and ground-based analysis (as long as several months); iii) Colonies are often difficult to visualize due to condensation within contact slide media plates; and iv) Techniques involve growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and -1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria and fungi, respectively. This technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device. This handheld device and sampling system is known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). A poster will be presented that describes a comparative study between LOCAD-PTS analysis and existing culture-based methods onboard the ISS; together with an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin throughout the ISS. It is concluded that while a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not necessarily be expected, a combinatorial approach can be adopted where both sets of data are used together to generate a more complete story of

  16. A space maintainability experiment aboard the Ben Franklin submersible during the 30-day Gulf Stream drift mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappler, J. R.; May, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    In the summer of 1969, a deep submersible drifted for 30 days below the surface of the Gulf Stream, while operated by a six man crew. The main purpose of the mission was oceanographic research. The crew's activities and completely self-contained environment resembled those of a space station such as Skylab. Because of these similarities aspects of onboard vehicle maintenance during the actual conduct of a scientific mission were investigated. The maintainability study was accomplished in six distinct phases. Two useful plots of manpower distribution were developed. A maintenance action summary is presented in a table.

  17. Development and Performance of the Oxygen Sensor in the CSA-CP Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Beck, Steve; James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    A combustion products analyzer (CPA) was built for use on Shuttle in response to several thermodegradation incidents that had occurred during early flights. The CPA contained sensors that measured carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, and hydrogen fluoride. These marker compounds, monitored by the CPA, were selected based upon the likely products to be released in a spacecraft fire. When the Toxicology Laboratory group at Johnson Space Center (JSC) began to assess the air quality monitoring needs for the International Space Station (ISS), the CPA was the starting point for design of an instrument to monitor the atmosphere following a thermodegradation event. The final product was significantly different from the CPA and was named the compound specific analyzer-combustion products (CSA-CP). The major change from the CPA that will be the focus of this paper was the replacement of an unreliable hydrogen fluoride (HF) sensor with an oxygen sensor. A reliable HF sensor was not commercially available, but as the toxicology group reviewed the overall monitoring strategy for ISS, it appeared that a portable oxygen sensor to backup the major constituent analyzer was needed. Therefore, an oxygen sensor replaced the HF sensor in the new instrument. This paper will describe the development, deployment, and performance of the CSA-CP oxygen sensor on both Shuttle and ISS. Also, data for CSA-CP oxygen sensor accuracy at nominal and reduced pressures will be presented.

  18. Equilibrium Kinetics Studies and Crystallization Aboard the International Space Station (ISS) Using the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achari, Aniruddha; Roeber, Dana F.; Barnes, Cindy L.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM) trays have been used in Shuttle missions to crystallize proteins in a microgravity environment. The crystallization experiments are 'sitting drops' similar to that in Cryschem trays, but the reservoir solution is soaked in a wick. From early 2001, crystallization experiments are conducted on the International Space Station using mission durations of months rather than two weeks on previous shuttle missions. Experiments were set up in April 2001 on Flight 6A to characterize the time crystallization experiments will take to reach equilibrium in a microgravity environment using salts, polyethylene glycols and an organic solvent as precipitants. The experiments were set up to gather data for a series of days of activation with different droplet volumes and precipitants. The experimental set up on ISS and results of this study will be presented. These results will help future users of PCAM to choose precipitants to optimize crystallization conditions for their target macromolecules for a particular mission with known mission duration. Changes in crystal morphology and size between the ground and space grown crystals of a protein and a protein -DNA complex flown on the same mission will also be presented.

  19. Rapid culture-independent microbial analysis aboard the international space station (ISS) stage two: quantifying three microbial biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Morris, Heather C; Damon, Michael; Maule, Jake; Monaco, Lisa A; Wainwright, Norm

    2012-09-01

    Abstract A portable, rapid, microbial detection unit, the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) as a technology demonstration unit in December 2006. Results from the first series of experiments designed to detect Gram-negative bacteria on ISS surfaces by quantifying a single microbial biomarker lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were reported in a previous article. Herein, we report additional technology demonstration experiments expanding the on-orbit capabilities of the LOCAD-PTS to detecting three different microbial biomarkers on ISS surfaces. Six different astronauts on more than 20 occasions participated in these experiments, which were designed to test the new beta-glucan (fungal cell wall molecule) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA; Gram-positive bacterial cell wall component) cartridges individually and in tandem with the existing Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL; Gram-negative bacterial LPS detection) cartridges. Additionally, we conducted the sampling side by side with the standard culture-based detection method currently used on the ISS. Therefore, we present data on the distribution of three microbial biomarkers collected from various surfaces in every module present on the ISS at the time of sampling. In accordance with our previous experiments, we determined that spacecraft surfaces known to be frequently in contact with crew members demonstrated higher values of all three microbial molecules. Key Words: Planetary protection-Spaceflight-Microbiology-Biosensor. Astrobiology 12, 830-840. PMID:22984871

  20. [Comparative study of the lymphoid organs of rats aboard a space flight under weightless and artificial gravity conditions].

    PubMed

    Durnova, G N

    1978-11-01

    A comparative histological investigation of the thymus, spleen and inguinal lymph nodes has been performed in the rats flown for 18.5 days on board the biosatellite "Cosmos-936" under the conditions of weightlessness and artificial gravitation (acceleration 1 g) imitating terrestrial magnetism. It has been stated that in the animals that were under the conditions of weightless ness during the flight and were sacrificed 4.5--13 h after they have landed the Earth, accidental involution of lymphoid organs is noted with morphological signs in them of an acute stress in the form of massive degeneration of the thymus lymphocytes and neutrophilic infiltration of the spleen. In rats that during the flight were subjected to the effect of artificial gravitation there was noted neither involution of the lymphoid organs nor morphological signs of acute stress in them. One of the main cause of acute stress in the rats subjected to weightlessness during the space flight is supposed to be transition to the terrestrial gravitation. PMID:736799

  1. Specification list and function structure for a full-body dynamometer to be used aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Robert

    1993-01-01

    NASA has a need for a machine which can be used as an exercise device and as an instrument to measure an astronaut's muscle performance. The purpose of the exercise device is to work various muscle groups of the astronaut to prevent muscle atrophy, the loss of muscle strength and mass from prolonged exposure to a microgravity environment. The measurement part of the machine will be used to collect data on the strength and power of the astronaut's muscle groups to be used in studies examining the effects of prolonged space inhabitation. The principle device used in this machine to both exercise and measure muscle performance is the dynamometer. The dynamometer converts electrical energy to mechanical energy and mechanical energy to electrical energy or signals. The task of the designer will be to incorporate a dynamometer into a device which can meet all of the needs discussed above. This memorandum has two sections which clarify the design task of producing a full-body dynamometer. The first section is a specification list. The specification list provides the requirements that the designer must meet in his/her design. The second part is a function structure. The function structure shows graphically the flow of material, energy, and information through the machine. These two items will be used by the designer in the design process for the full-body dynamometer.

  2. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar Aboard TRMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshell; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel approach is introduced to correlating urbanization and rainfall modification. This study represents one of the first published attempts (possibly the first) to identify and quantify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Previous investigations successfully used rain gauge networks and around-based radar to investigate this phenomenon but still encountered difficulties due to limited, specialized measurements and separation of topographic and other influences. Three years of mean monthly rainfall rates derived from the first space-based rainfall radar, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of data at half-degree latitude resolution enables identification of rainfall patterns around major metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Preliminary results reveal an average increase of 5.6% in monthly rainfall rates (relative to a mean upwind CONTROL area) over the metropolis but an average increase of approx. 28%, in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis. Some portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates found in the downwind impact area exceeded the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116% and were generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are quite consistent studies of St. Louis (e.g' METROMEX) and Chicago almost two decades ago and more recent studies in the Atlanta and Mexico City areas.

  3. Using the Flow-3D General Moving Object Model to Simulate Coupled Liquid Slosh - Container Dynamics on the SPHERES Slosh Experiment: Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Richard; Kirk, Daniel; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The SPHERES Slosh Experiment (SSE) is a free floating experimental platform developed for the acquisition of long duration liquid slosh data aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The data sets collected will be used to benchmark numerical models to aid in the design of rocket and spacecraft propulsion systems. Utilizing two SPHERES Satellites, the experiment will be moved through different maneuvers designed to induce liquid slosh in the experiment's internal tank. The SSE has a total of twenty-four thrusters to move the experiment. In order to design slosh generating maneuvers, a parametric study with three maneuvers types was conducted using the General Moving Object (GMO) model in Flow-30. The three types of maneuvers are a translation maneuver, a rotation maneuver and a combined rotation translation maneuver. The effectiveness of each maneuver to generate slosh is determined by the deviation of the experiment's trajectory as compared to a dry mass trajectory. To fully capture the effect of liquid re-distribution on experiment trajectory, each thruster is modeled as an independent force point in the Flow-3D simulation. This is accomplished by modifying the total number of independent forces in the GMO model from the standard five to twenty-four. Results demonstrate that the most effective slosh generating maneuvers for all motions occurs when SSE thrusters are producing the highest changes in SSE acceleration. The results also demonstrate that several centimeters of trajectory deviation between the dry and slosh cases occur during the maneuvers; while these deviations seem small, they are measureable by SSE instrumentation.

  4. Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Based on Samples Returned Aboard STS-ll1 (UF2) in June 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of grab sample canisters (GSCs) and 2 solid sorbent air samplers (SSASs) returned aboard STS-111 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSCs were 86-106% and 62% to 136 % from the SSASs; 2 tubes with low surrogate recoveries were not reported. Pressure tracking indicated no leaks in the canisters during analysis. Recoveries from lab and trip controls for formaldehyde analyses ranged from 87 to 96%. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). Because of the inertness of Freon 218 (octafluoropropane, OFP), Its contribution to the NMVOC is subtracted and tabulated separately. Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols (including acetone) are also shown for each sample. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is listed separately. The table shows that the air quality in general was acceptable for crew respiration; however, certain values shown in bold require further explanation. The 1.05 T value on 2/28/02 was caused by an unusually high measurement ofhexamethylcyc1otrisiloxane (T value = 0.50), which is not a concern. The MPLM T value of 1.42 and the alcohol level of 7.5 mg/cu m were due to an overall polluted atmosphere, which was expected at first entry. The major T-value component was carbon monoxide at a contribution of 0.44 units. Since the crew was only exposed momentarily to the polluted atmosphere, no health effects are expected. The formaldehyde value of 0.060 mg/cu m found in the Lab sample from 3/27/02 is cause for concern because the Lab consistently shows higher concentrations of formaldehyde than the SM and occasionally the concentrations are above the acceptable guideline. Levels of OFP have remained low, suggesting

  5. OH maser observations using the Russian interferometric network ``Quasar'' in preparation for scientific observations with the space mission RadioAstron.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, I. D.; Alakoz, A. V.; Kostenko, V. I.; Lihachev, S. F.; Finkelstein, A. M.; Ipatov, A. V.

    2012-07-01

    We present results of a VLBI experiment at a wavelength of 18 cm, which simulates the ground-space interferometer with space link to RadioAstron. An array of five antennas was used, four of them are located in the Russian Federation, plus the the 32-m radio telescope in Medicine (Italy). The 22-m radio telescope in Pushchino (Moscow Region) acted in place of the space arm. It has an effective area of 100 square meters. The three other Russian 32-m antennas are operated by the Institute of Applied Astronomy RAS; they are located at Badary, Svetloe and Zelenchukskaya (interferometer network ``Quasar''). The maximum base-line, Badary-Svetloe, was about 4402 km, providing an angular resolution of about 0.009 arc seconds at a wavelength of 18 cm. The duration of the experiment was 10 hours on 02/03 February 2011. The program of observations included quasars 3C273, 3C279, 3C286 and the maser source - W3(OH). W3(OH) was observed only by the Russian telescopes and was investigated at the frequency of the 1665 MHz main line. The data were recorded on the MK5 recorder (32-m radio telescopes) and the RDR system (RadioAstron Digital Recorder) in Pushchino. The low SEFD (system equivalence of flux density) of Pushchino emulated the RadioAstron antenna. Correlation was performed with the universal software correlator of the AstroSpace Center of Lebedev Physical Institute. The correlator output format is compatible with that used by the AIPS package, which was used for data analysis. After analyzing the correlated data we obtained relative coordinates of the maser components. The main results are tabulated and presented in the figures. The data quality is sufficient for astrophysical analysis and comparison with previous observations of maser source W3(OH) on VLBI networks EVN and VLBA.

  6. The Russian-U.S. Experience with Development Joint Medical Support Procedures for Before and After Long-Duration Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgun, V. V.; Voronin, L. I.; Kaspransky, R. R.; Pool, S. L.; Barratt, M. R.; Novinkov, O. L.

    1999-01-01

    As the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and the U.S. National Aviation and Space Administration (NASA) began in the mid 1990s to plan a preliminary cooperative flight program in anticipation of the International Space Station, programmatic and philosophical differences became apparent in the technical and medical approaches of the two agencies. This paper briefly describes some of these differences and the process by which the two sides resolved differences in their approaches to the medical selection and certification of Shuttle-Mir crew members. These negotiations formed the basis for developing policies on other aspects of the medical support function for international missions, including crew training, preflight and postflight data collection, and rehabilitation protocols. The experience gained through this cooperative effort has been invaluable for developing medical care capabilities for the International Space Station.

  7. Analysis of Solar Receiver Flux Distributions for US/Russian Solar Dynamic System Demonstration on the MIR Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Analyses have been performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Systems Project Office to support the design and development of the joint U.S./Russian Solar Dynamic Flight Demonstration Project. The optical analysis of the concentrator and solar flux predictions on target receiver surfaces have an important influence on receiver design and control of the Brayton engine.

  8. Independent Review of U.S. and Russian Probabilistic Risk Assessments for the International Space Station Mini Research Module #2 Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The Mini-Research Module-2 (MRM-2), a Russian module on the International Space Station, does not meet its requirements for micrometeoroid and orbital debris probability of no penetration (PNP). To document this condition, the primary Russian Federal Space Agency ISS contractor, S.P. Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation-Energia (RSC-E), submitted an ISS non-compliance report (NCR) which was presented at the 5R Stage Operations Readiness Review (SORR) in October 2009. In the NCR, RSC-E argued for waiving the PNP requirement based on several factors, one of which was the risk of catastrophic failure was acceptably low at 1 in 11,100. However, NASA independently performed an assessment of the catastrophic risk resulting in a value of 1 in 1380 and believed that the risk at that level was unacceptable. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to evaluate the two competing catastrophic risk values and determine which was more accurate. This document contains the outcome of the assessment.

  9. Inside the Russian Soyuz Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA: Behind the Scenes, take a tour inside the Russian Soyuz, the vehicle which takes the expedition crews back and forth to the International Space Station. Astronaut Mike Finc...

  10. Imaging sprites aboard TARANIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth; Sato, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Grosjean, Olivier

    TLE (Transient Luminous Event) is the generic name for phenomena which occur over thundercloud from the troposphere to the lower thermosphere (20 to 100 km-height). They are called sprites, elves, blue jets, gigantic jets . . . Each class of phenomenon has their own properties: duration, vertical and horizontal extension, delay after their parent lightning. They are mainly observed from ground since 1990 and from space since 2004 with the ISUAL experiment. All these observations have been done pointing at the limb. We propose an experiment, to image and characterize TLEs and lightning from space, which novelty is looking at the nadir. This concept was tested by the CEA with the Lightning and Sprite Observations on board the International Space Station from 2001 to 2004. The advantage of this point of view is that other radiations (as gamma-rays, electron beams, or electrostatic field) emitted mainly vertically and simultaneously to TLE or lightning can be observed with the same satellite, but the difficulty is how the superimposed light from lightning and TLE can be differentiate. Taking account this constraint and other ones due to satellite accommodation, we define a set of sensors allowing the detection, the localisation and the characterisation of lightning and TLE. Our studies show that two cameras and four photometers are necessary to reach those objectives. This experiment, called MCP for MicroCameras and Photometers, will be aboard TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) which is a microsatellite project of the CNES Myriade program with a launch planned in 2011. The photometer set will be provided by a Japanese team joining Hokkaido and Tohoku Universities and ISAS/JAXA. In this talk, we will present the main scientific goals of MCP. Need requirement studies (particularly radiometric analysis including sensor trade-off) will be described. We will finish describing the actual development status of the sensors.

  11. Russian Translation.

    PubMed

    O'dette, R E

    1957-03-29

    This discussion has described the status of the large United States program for translation from the Russian. A partial description of what is being done or planned, and by whom, has been provided as a guide for those who wish to follow the subject further. The urge to pass on useful information has necessarily restricted the space which might also have been profitably devoted to the philosophic aspects of the problem. Although it is not said with any sense of pride in achievement-because much more remains to be done than has been done-it would seem fair to describe the current national translation activity, including all contributions to it, as a phenomenon. Phenomena in scientific communication are not common: a full appreciation of their significance requires more analysis than results from a simple listing of their outward characteristics. But a few observations might be made in conclusion. Most United States scientists probably feel that, as a nation, we are and should be world leaders in science, even though this feeling is neither nurtured nor expressed in a spirit of violent competition. If this assumption is allowed, the point which seems to remain is that the United States will not retain its position casually. Our scientists expect to maintain an awareness of the scientific achievements and failures of the other nations of the world. But we must especially become more aware of the advances of Soviet science, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The evidence points toward this last conclusion, regardless of whether one is concerned with the production of ideas or things, increase in man's knowledge of himself and his environment, conflict between idealisms, or simply the national security. PMID:17836422

  12. Hydrogen maser clocks in space for solid-Earth research and time-transfer applications: Experiment overview and evaluation of Russian miniature sapphire loaded cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, G.; Bernier, L. G.; Silvestrin, P.; Feltham, S.; Gaygerov, B. A.; Tatarenkov, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Observatoire Cantonal de Neuchatel (ON) is developing for ESTEC a compact H-maser for space use based upon a miniature sapphire loaded microwave cavity, a technique pioneered at VNIIFTRI. Various contacts between West-European parties, headed by ESA, and the Russian parties, headed by ESA, led to the proposal for flying two H-masers on Meteor 3M, a Russian meteorology satellite in low polar orbit. The experiment will include two masers, one provided by ON and the other by VNIIFTRI. T/F transfer and precise positioning will be performed by both a microwave link, using PRARE equipment, and an optical link, using LASSO-like equipment. The main objectives of the experiment are precise orbit determination and point positioning for geodetic/geophysical research, ultra-accurate time comparison and dissemination as well as in-orbit demonstration of operation and performance of H-masers. Within the scope of a preliminary space H-maser development phase performed for ESTEC at ON in preparation to the joint experiment, a Russian miniature sapphire loaded microwave cavity, on loan from VNIIFTRI, was evaluated in a full-size EFOS hydrogen maser built by ON. The experimental evaluation confirmed the theoretical expectation that with a hydrogen storage volume of only 0.65 liter an atomic quality factor of 1.5 x 10(exp 9) can be obtained for a -105 dBm output power. This represents a theoretical Allan deviation of 1.7 x 10(exp -15) averaged on a 1000 s time interval. From a full-size design to a compact one, therefore, the sacrifice in performance due to the reduction of the storage volume is very small.

  13. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.

  14. Russians Work on Aft Portion of Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this photograph, Russians are working on the aft portion of the United States-funded, Russian-built Functional Cargo Bay (FGB) also known as Zarya (Russian for sunrise). Built at Khrunichev, the FGB began pre-launch testing shortly after this photo was taken. Launched by a Russian Proton rocket from the Baikonu Cosmodrome on November 20, 1998, Zarya was the first element of the International Space Station (ISS) followed by the U.S. Unity Node. The aft docking mechanism, Pirs, on the far right with ventilation ducting rurning through it, will be docked with the third Station element, the Russian Service Module, or Zvezda.

  15. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Ins1rument Aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma (SRG) mission is a Russian-German X-ray astrophysical observatory that carries two co-aligned and complementary X-ray telescope systems. The primary instrument is the German-led extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (eROSITA), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that covers the energy range from 0.2-12 keV. The complementary instrument is the Russian-led Astronomical Roentgen Telescope -- X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC or ART), a 7-module X-ray telescope system that provides higher energy coverage, up to 30 keV (with limited sensitivity above 12 keV).

  16. Russian Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust. The test was the first test ever anywhere outside Russia of a Russian designed and built engine.

  17. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  18. Scattered light in the echelle modes of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. II - Analysis of in-flight spectroscopic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Ebbets, Dennis C.; Savage, Blair D.

    1993-01-01

    We report on an analysis of observations made with the GHRS aboard the HST for the purpose of calibrating the effects of scattered light. The data were obtained during the first 2 years of flight operations as part of the Science Verification, Science Assessment Observations, and Guaranteed Time Observations programs. Both the general level of background light near the spectra and the filling-in of the cores of saturated interstellar absorption lines have been determined as functions of grating, order, wavelength, and aperture. The behavior is in accordance with our detailed analysis of prelaunch laboratory data and validates both the observing procedures and the data reduction developed on the basis of that experience. We present and discuss the use of a background (scattered light) removal algorithm designed to produce net spectra properly corrected for the effects of grating scattered light. The coefficients of the scattered light removal algorithm have been determined, and recommended numerical values are presented.

  19. Russian Soyuz in Launch Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle is shown in the vertical position for its launch from Baikonur, carrying the first resident crew to the International Space Station. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960s until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  20. A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

  1. Relation between the Electromagnetic Processes in the Near-Earth Space and Dynamics of the Biological Resources in Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L. N.; Shirochkov, A. V.

    It is a well-established fact that the electromagnetic processes of different kind occurring in the near- Earth space produce significant effects in the Earth's atmosphere at all altitudes including the ground surface. There are some indications that these processes could influence at least indirectly the human health conditions. In this study we explore relation between perturbations in the solar wind (dynamics of its density, velocity, intensity of the interplanetary magnetic field) and long- term changes in population of some species of Arctic fauna (lemmings, polar foxes, deers, wolves, elks etc.) It was found out that the best statistical coupling between various Space Weather parameters and the changes in populations of the Arctic fauna species appears when the solar wind dynamic pressure magnitude is taken as one of these parameters. It was shown that the secular variations of the solar UV radiation expressed as the Total Solar Irradiance appears to be a space parameter, showing the best correlation with the changes in population of the Arctic fauna species. Such high correlation coefficients as 0.8 are obtained. It is premature now to discuss exact physical mechanisms, which could explain the obtained relations. A possible mutual dependence of some climatic factors and fauna population in Arctic on the Space Weather parameters is discussed in this connection. Conclusion is made that the electromagnetic fields of space origin is an important factor determining dynamics of population of the Arctic fauna species.

  2. Relation between the electromagnetic processes in the near-Earth space and dynamics of the biological resources in Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L. N.; Shirochkov, A. V.; Tumanov, I. L.

    The start of the satellite era in the Space explorations led to new and more profound knowledge of the solar physics and the sources of its activity. From these points of view, it is worthy to examine again the relations between biological processes and the solar activity. We explore the relation between dynamics of the solar activity (including the solar wind) and changes in population of some species of Arctic fauna (lemmings, polar foxes, caribous, wolves, elks, etc.). The data include statistical rows of various lengths (30 80 years). The best correlation between two data sets is found when the solar wind dynamic pressure as well as variations of the total solar irradiance (i.e., level of the solar UV radiation) is taken as the space parameters. Probably the electromagnetic fields of space origin are an important factor determining dynamics of population of the Arctic fauna species.

  3. STS-86 crew members pose in their space suits during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The seven STS-86 crew members pose for a group portrait in their space suits in front of Atlantis at Launch Complex 39A during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. They are, from left, Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield; Mission Specialist David A. Wolf; Commander James D. Wetherbee; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Vladimir Georgievich Titov of the Russian Space Agency; Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES; and Scott E. Parazynski (kneeling). STS-86 will be the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After the docking, Wolf will transfer to the Mir 24 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut C. Michael Foale, who arrived there during the last docking mission, STS-85, in May. The STS-86 launch aboard Atlantis is targeted for Sept. 25.

  4. Russians as People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wright

    This analysis of the Russian character in various aspects of Soviet society in its daily activities focuses on the cultural rather than the political. Included in the study are sections on: (1) hibernation and awakening; (2) the Russian scene; (3) being a Russian; (4) Russian society--mass and minority; (5) manners, morals, and taste; and (6)…

  5. Near-Earth space hazards and their detection (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 March 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), titled "Near-Earth space hazards and their detection", was held on 27 March 2013 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda posted on the website of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS, http://www.gpad.ac.ru, included the following reports: (1) Emel'yanenko V V, Shustov B M (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "The Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard"; (2) Chugai N N (Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) "A physical model of the Chelyabinsk event"; (3) Lipunov V M (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow) "MASTER global network of optical monitoring"; (4) Beskin G M (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Arkhyz, Karachai-Cirkassian Republic) "Wide-field optical monitoring systems with subsecond time resolution for the detection and study of cosmic threats". The expanded papers written on the base of oral reports 1 and 4 are given below. • The Chelyabinsk event and the asteroid-comet hazard, V V Emel'yanenko, B M Shustov Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 833-836 • Wide-field subsecond temporal resolution optical monitoring systems for the detection and study of cosmic hazards, G M Beskin, S V Karpov, V L Plokhotnichenko, S F Bondar, A V Perkov, E A Ivanov, E V Katkova, V V Sasyuk, A Shearer Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 8, Pages 836-842

  6. Development and analysis of control methods of the International Space Station ``ALPHA'' Russian Segment Central Two-Phase Thermal Control System parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cykhotsky, V. M.; Sementsov, A. N.; Grigoriev, Y. I.; Prokhorov, Y. M.; Gorbenko, G. A.; Malukhin, C. A.; Ganja, E. P.

    1999-01-01

    Central Two-Phase Thermal Control System (TPS) of the International Space Station ``ALPHA'' Russian Segment (ISSA RS) is a complex thermalhydraulic system aimed to collect heat from the station modules and transport it to Central Heat Exchanger-Radiator (RAD). The TPS is based on a two-phase ammonia heat transfer loop. Proper work of the TPS Parameters Control System is an important factor for ISSA reliability to be maintained. The Control System is mainly intended to provide the following characteristics of the Station: rated values of the Station thermal condition parameters, high tolerance of the Station thermal condition to instabilities caused by selfspontained deviations of the parameters, ability of the system to regain its rated operation parameters in case of failures or accidents. In particular, the Control System should provide stable ammonia evaporative temperature and pressure in Evaporative Heat Exchanger (EHEX), stable liquid coolant (antifreeze) temperature, high vapor quality and prevent the TPS elements from low temperatures. Heat Controlled Accumulator (HCA) maintains nearly constant pressure in vapor line. To control the TPS elements functioning some control methods have been suggested. Namely, how to control HCA electric heater operation, FCV operation, RAD panel rotation, turning on/off Electric Heater and bypass valves operation. Results of mathematical modeling of the TPS operation during ISSA orbital flight and experimental investigations carried out in the Center of Technical Physics of Kharkov Aviation Institute (CEP KhAI) (Ukraine) are presented. It is proved the TPS Parameters Control System designed to be reliable.

  7. Greenhouse (III): Gas-Exchange and Seed-to-Seed Experiments on the Russian Space Station MIR and Earth-grown, Ethylene-Treated Wheat Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William F.; Bingham, Gail; Carman, John; Bubenheim, David; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sytchev, Vladimir N.; Podolsky, Igor B.; Chernova, Lola; Nefodova, Yelena

    2001-01-01

    The Mir Space Station provided an outstanding opportunity to study long-term plant responses when exposed to a microgravity environment. Furthermore, if plants can be grown to maturity in a microgravity environment, they might be used in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). The primary objective of the Greenhouse experiment onboard Mir was to grow Super Dwarf and Apogee wheat through complete life cycles in microgravity; i.e., from seed-to-seed-to-seed. Additional objectives were to study chemical, biochemical, and structural changes in plant tissues as well as photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration (evaporation of water from plants). Another major objective was to evaluate the suitability clothe facilities on Mir for advanced research with plants. The Greenhouse experiment was conducted in the Russian/Bulgarian plant growth chamber, the Svet, to which the United States added instrumentation systems to monitor changes in CO2 and water vapor caused by the plants (with four infrared gas analyzers monitoring air entering and leaving two small plastic chambers). In addition, the US instrumentation also monitored O2; air, leaf (IR), cabin pressure; photon flux; and substrate temperature and substrate moisture (16 probes in the root module). Facility modifications were first performed during the summer of 1995 during Mir 19, which began after STS-72 left Mir. Plant development was monitored by daily observations and some photographs.

  8. Development of NASA's Space Communications and Navigation Test Bed Aboard ISS to Investigate SDR, On-Board Networking and Navigation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Lux, James P.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing an experimental flight payload (referred to as the Space Communication and Navigation (SCAN) Test Bed) to investigate software defined radio (SDR), networking, and navigation technologies, operationally in the space environment. The payload consists of three software defined radios each compliant to NASA s Space Telecommunications Radio System Architecture, a common software interface description standard for software defined radios. The software defined radios are new technology developments underway by NASA and industry partners. Planned for launch in early 2012, the payload will be externally mounted to the International Space Station truss and conduct experiments representative of future mission capability.

  9. Vibration isolation technology - An executive summary of systems development and demonstration. [for proposed microgravity experiments aboard STS and Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, C. M.; Logsdon, K. A.; Lubomski, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    A program was organized to develop the enabling technologies needed for the use of Space Station Freedom as a viable microgravity experimental platform. One of these development programs was the Vibration Isolation Technology (VIT). This technology development program grew because of increased awareness that the acceleration disturbances present on the Space Transportation System (STS) orbiter can and are detrimental to many microgravity experiments proposed for STS, and in the future, Space Station Freedom (SSF). Overall technological organization are covered of the VIT program. Emphasis is given to the results from development and demonstration of enabling technologies to achieve the acceleration requirements perceived as those most likely needed for a variety of microgravity science experiments. In so doing, a brief summary of general theoretical approaches to controlling the acceleration environment of an isolated space based payload and the design and/or performance of two prototype six degree of freedom active magnetic isolation systems is presented.

  10. Science and Technology Research Directions for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique and unprecedented space research facility. Never before have scientists and engineers had access to such a robust, multidisciplinary, long-duration microgravity laboratory. To date, the research community has enjoyed success aboard such platforms as Skylab, the Space Shuttle, and the Russian Mir space station. However, these platforms were and are limited in ways that the ISS is not. Encompassing four times the volume of Mir, the ISS will support dedicated research facilities for at least a dozen scientific and engineering disciplines. Unlike the Space Shuttle, which must return to Earth after less than three weeks in space, the ISS will accommodate experiments that require many weeks even months to complete. Continual access to a microgravity laboratory will allow selected scientific disciplines to progress at a rate far greater than that obtainable with current space vehicles.

  11. An overview of Korean astronaut’s space experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Kang, S. W.; Choi, G. H.; Sim, E. S.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the scientific space experiments in the Korean Astronaut Program (KAP) that were conducted on the International Space Station (ISS), beginning with launch of the Soyuz TMA-12 spacecraft with the first Korean astronaut and two Russian astronauts on April 8, 2008 and returning to Earth on April 19, 2008. During the 10 days aboard the ISS, the Korean astronaut successfully completed thirteen scientific experiments in biology, life science, material science, earth science, and system engineering, five educational space experiments, and three kinds of international collaboration experiments. These experiments were the first Korean manned space experiments and these missions were the first steps toward the manned space exploration by Korea. In this paper, we briefly discuss the descriptions, conduct, and results of the space experiments and discuss future plans. In addition, the lessons learned with respect to the performing of these manned space experiments on the ISS are presented.

  12. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the Space Shuttle 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Stobor, A.; Peters, K.

    1984-01-01

    Three canisters of IIaO film were prepared along with packets of color film from the National Geographic Society, which were placed on the Space Shuttle. The ultimate aim was to obtain reasonably accurate data concerning the background fogging effects as related to the total environment experience of the film including the groundbased packing and loading of the film from Goddard Space Flight Center to Cape Kennedy. The affects of solar wind, humidity, cosmic rays, the Van Allen Belt radiation exposure, various thermal effects, and reentry and off-loading of the film during takeoff and 8 days, 3 hour 15 minute orbit are of particular interest.

  13. Measurements of heavy-ion anisotropy and dose rates in the Russian section of the International Space Station with the Sileye-3/Alteino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, O.; Benghin, VV; Berger, T.; Casolino, M.; Di Fino, L.; Fuglesang, C.; Larosa, M.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Nagamatsu, A.; Narici Nikolaev, L., IV; Picozza, P.; Reitz, G.; De Santis, C.; Zaconte, V.

    2015-02-01

    In this work we present data on linear energy transfer (LET), dose and dose equivalent rates from different locations of the Russian part of the International Space Station (ISS) measured by the Sileye-3/Alteino detector. Data were taken as part of the ESA ALTCRISS project from late 2005 through 2007. The LET rate data shows a heavy-ion (LET \\gt 50 keV/μm) anisotropy. From the heavy-ion LET rate in the Zvezda service module we find ISS \\hat{y} (Starboard) and \\hat{z} (Nadir) to be about 10-15 times higher than in \\hat{x} (Forward). The situation is similar for dose and dose equivalent rates, ranging from 25-40 μGy d-1 in \\hat{x} to about 75 μGy d-1 in \\hat{z}, whereas for the dose equivalent the rate peaks in \\hat{y} with around 470 μSv d-1. The heavy-ion anisotropy confirms what has been reported by the ALTEA collaboration. Measurements using two sets of passive detectors, DLR-TLDs and PADLES (TLD+CR-39), have also been performed in conjunction with Alteino measurements, both shielded and unshielded. The passive detectors register a dose rate about 3-5 times as high as Alteino, 260-280 μGy d-1 for PADLES and 200-260 μGy d-1 for DLR-TLDs. For the dose equivalent PADLES measurements ranges from 560-740 μSv d-1.

  14. [Comparative study of the proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia aboard a satellite and aboard a stratospheric balloon].

    PubMed

    Tixador, R; Richoilley, G; Gasset, G; Planel, H

    1982-05-17

    A possible effect of cosmic rays on cell proliferation was investigated in cultures of Paramecium tetraurelia during a stratospheric balloon flight, with the techniques already used for the CYTOS experiments, performed aboard the orbital station Salyut 6. The results show that the stimulating effect of space on cell proliferation, reported in the CYTOS experiments, also occurs in the balloon flight. The respective roles of cosmic rays and weightlessness in the biological response are discussed. PMID:6814711

  15. Crystallization of the collagen-like polypeptide (PPG)10 aboard the International Space Station. 3. Analysis of residual acceleration-induced motion.

    PubMed

    Castagnolo, Dario; Piccolo, Chiara; Carotenuto, Luigi; Vergara, Alessandro; Zagari, Adriana

    2003-04-01

    (PPG)(10) crystallization experiments onboard the ISS using the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility have shown parallel and coherent crystal motions. The residual acceleration profiles and the History of the ISS Increment 3 mission allow a quantitative interpretation of these motions. Two events determine the observed crystal motions: the undocking of the Space Shuttle and a change in the ISS attitude required for power generation. No correlation between these motions and the crystal quality is apparent. PMID:12657808

  16. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS-3, STS-8, and STS-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, K. A.; Atkinson, P. F.

    1986-01-01

    Three canisters of IIaO film were prepared along with packets of color film from the National Geographic Society, which were then placed on the Space Shuttle #3. The ultimate goal was to obtain reasonably accurate data concerning the background fogging effects on IIaO film as it relates to the film's total environmental experience. This includes: the ground based packing, and loading of the film from Goddard Space Flight Center to Cape Kennedy; the effects of the solar wind, humidity, and cosmic rays; the Van Allen Belt radiation exposure; various thermal effect; reentry and off-loading of the film during take off, and 8 day, 3 hour 15 minutes orbits. The total densitometric change caused by all of the above factors were examined. The results of these studies have implications for the utilization of IIaO spectroscopic film on the future shuttle and space lab missions. These responses to standard photonic energy sources will have immediate application for the uneven responses of the film photographing a star field in a terrestrial or extraterrestrial environment with associated digital imaging equipment.

  17. Observation of an Aligned Gas - Solid "Eutectic" during Controlled Directional Solidification Aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Ground-based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Direct observation of the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile was conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure for eventual processing in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus in the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the ISS. Real time visualization during controlled directional melt back of the sample showed nitrogen bubbles emerging from the interface and moving through the liquid up the imposed temperature gradient. Over a period of time these bubbles disappear by dissolving into the melt. Translation is stopped after melting back of about 9 cm of the sample, with an equilibrium solid-liquid interface established. During controlled re-solidification, aligned tubes of gas were seen growing perpendicular to the planar solid/liquid interface, inferring that the nitrogen previously dissolved into the liquid SCN was now coming out at the solid/liquid interface and forming the little studied liquid = solid + gas eutectic-type reaction. The observed structure is evaluated in terms of spacing dimensions, interface undercooling, and mechanisms for spacing adjustments. Finally, the significance of processing in a microgravity environment is ascertained in view of ground-based results.

  18. Crew of Gemini 10 arrive aboard the recovery ship U.S.S. Guadalcanal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Crew of Gemini 10 space flight, Astronauts John W. Young (left) and Michael Collins (right), arrive aboard the recovery ship U.S.S. Guadalcanal. Greeting them are Ben James, Senior NASA Public Affairs Officer aboard ship and John C. Stonesifer, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Landing and Recovery Division.

  19. A Teacher's Notebook: Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Independent Schools, Boston, MA.

    Articles written by teachers of Russian for their peers in similar classroom environments are intended to aid in the development of curricular innovation. The articles, all based on practical and direct experience, include: (1) "Direct Methods for Teaching Russian," (2) "The Eclectic Approach to Teaching Russian," (3) "So-Called Linguistic…

  20. Catastrophic Failure Modes Assessment of the International Space Station Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, B. E. P.; Goodwin, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes a series of analyses to quantify the hazardous effects of meteoroid/debris penetration of Space Station Alpha manned module protective structures. These analyses concentrate on determining (a) the critical crack length associated with six manned module pressure wall designs that, if exceeded, would lead to unstopped crack propagation and rupture of manned modules, and (b) the likelihood of crew or station loss following penetration of unsymmetrical di-methyl hydrazine tanks aboard the proposed Russian FGB ('Tug') propulsion module and critical elements aboard the control moment gyro module (SPP-1). Results from these quantified safety analyses are useful in improving specific design areas, thereby reducing the overall likelihood of crew or station loss following orbital debris penetration.

  1. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company, shows Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS), with its hatch door installed. The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  2. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company, shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  3. The Node 1 (or Unity) Module for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph, taken by the Boeing Company,shows Boeing technicians preparing to install one of six hatches or doors to the Node 1 (also called Unity), the first U.S. Module for the International Space Station (ISS). The Node 1, or Unity, serves as a cornecting passageway to Space Station modules and was manufactured by the Boeing Company at the Marshall Space Flight Center from 1994 to 1997. The U.S. built Unity module was launched aboard the orbiter Endeavour (STS-88 mission) on December 4, 1998 and connected to the Zarya, the Russian-built Functional Energy Block (FGB). The Zarya was launched on a Russian proton rocket prior to the launch of the Unity. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide unprecedented undertakings in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  4. Post flight operation of a high peak power neodymium YAG laser aboard the G-449 payload flown on Space Shuttle Columbia mission 61-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckerheide, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd Yag laser flown on board the G-449 payload completed its postflight testing successfully. There was no indication that the laser had undergone any electronic or optical component failure. A postflight video was taken immediately following the return of the payload to the laboratory. Early anticipation of vibration and temperature changes contributed to the successful operation of the laser. Photographic material resulting from post flight videotape are presented. NASA safety reviews and recommendations supplied the insights which helped contribute to the successful operation of the Nd Yag laser. The safety review data is part of the technical presentation and gives some insight into why the system survived the severe environment of temperature and vibration during the flight of Space Shuttle 61-C.

  5. Post flight operation of a high peak power neodymium YAG laser aboard the G-449 payload flown on Space Shuttle Columbia mission 61-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muckerheide, M. C.

    1992-10-01

    The Nd Yag laser flown on board the G-449 payload completed its postflight testing successfully. There was no indication that the laser had undergone any electronic or optical component failure. A postflight video was taken immediately following the return of the payload to the laboratory. Early anticipation of vibration and temperature changes contributed to the successful operation of the laser. Photographic material resulting from post flight videotape are presented. NASA safety reviews and recommendations supplied the insights which helped contribute to the successful operation of the Nd Yag laser. The safety review data is part of the technical presentation and gives some insight into why the system survived the severe environment of temperature and vibration during the flight of Space Shuttle 61-C.

  6. Commercial investments in Combustion research aboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado School of Mines is working with a number of companies planning commercial combustion research to be done aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This research will be conducted in two major ISS facilities, SpaceDRUMS™ and the Fluids and Combustion Facility. SpaceDRUMS™, under development by Guigne Technologies, Ltd., of St. John's Newfoundland, is a containerless processing facility employing active acoustic sample positioning. It is capable of processing the large samples needed in commercial research and development with virtually complete vibration isolation from the space station. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), being developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, is a general-purpose combustion furnace designed to accommodate a wide range of scientific experiments. SpaceDRUMS™ will be the first commercial hardware to be launched to ISS. Launch is currently scheduled for UF-1 in 2001. The CCACS research to be done in SpaceDRUMS™ includes combustion synthesis of glass-ceramics and porous materials. The FCF is currently scheduled to be launched to ISS aboard UF-3 in 2002. The CCACS research to be done in the FCF includes water mist fire suppression, catalytic combustion and flame synthesis of ceramic powders. The companies currently planning to be involved in the research include Guigne International, Ltd., Technology International, Inc., Coors Ceramics Company, TDA Research, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., ADA Technologies, Inc., ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Princeton Instruments, Inc., Environmental Engineering Concepts, Inc., and Solar Turbines, Inc. Together, these companies are currently investing almost $2 million in cash and in-kind annually toward the seven commercial projects within CCACS. Total private investment in CCACS research to date is over $7 million. .

  7. Test measurements by a BBM of the nadir-looking SWIR FTS aboard GOSAT to monitor CO2 column density from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Tatsuya; Oguma, Hiroyuki; Morino, Isamu; Higurashi, Akiko; Aoki, Tadao; Inoue, Gen

    2004-12-01

    Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is a Japanese satellite to monitor column density of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) globally from space. GOSAT will be launched in 2008. The data measured by a GOSAT sensor and ground-based monitoring station data will be used into an atmospheric transport inverse model to identify source/sink amount of CO2 in a sub-continental scale. One of the main GOSAT sensors is a nadir-looking Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), which covers Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region to measure column density of CO2. National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) is promoting researches on CO2 and CH4 sensitivity analysis, error analysis, data retrieval algorithm study, ground-based/air-borne validation strategy, and a plan of inverse model study for the SWIR FTS. A Bread-board model (BBM) of the SWIR FTS was built and tested by ground-based and airborne measurements. Several sets of the CO2 and CH4 radiance spectra over rice fields were obtained by the test measurements, and it was confirmed that the airborne measurements with a vibration insulator are effective for onboard measurements. Moreover, several improvement items of BBM have become clear.

  8. Camera aboard 'Friendship 7' photographs John Glenn during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    A camera aboard the 'Friendship 7' Mercury spacecraft photographs Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. during the Mercury-Atlas 6 spaceflight (00302-3); Photographs Glenn as he uses a photometer to view the sun during sunsent on the MA-6 space flight (00304).

  9. A Russian cargo plane delivers French satellite after landing at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After delivering a French satellite for the EUTELSat Consortium, a Russian cargo plane, the Antonov 124, sits on the end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC. The satellite is targeted to be launched April 12 aboard an Atlas IIAS rocket from Complex 36, Cape Canaveral Air Station.

  10. A Russian cargo plane delivers French satellite after landing at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Russian cargo plane, the Antonov 124, sits on the end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at KSC after delivering a French satellite for the EUTELSat Consortium. The satellite is targeted to be launched April 12 aboard an Atlas IIAS rocket from Complex 36, Cape Canaveral Air Station.

  11. Angry Birds in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA created a video using Angry Birds Space to explain how physics works in space, including demonstrating trajectories in mic...

  12. Instrumentation for investigation of the depth-dose distribution by the Liulin-5 instrument of a human phantom on the Russian segment of ISS for estimation of the radiation risk during long term space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkova, J.; Koleva, R.; Todorova, G.; Kanchev, N.; Petrov, V.; Shurshakov, V.; Tchhernykh, I.; Kireeva, S.

    2004-01-01

    Described is the Liulin-5 experiment and instrumentation, developed for investigation of the space radiation doses depth distribution in a human phantom on the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 experiment is a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS. The experiment MATROSHKA-R is aimed to study the depth dose distribution at the sites of critical organs of the human body, using models of human body-anthropomorphic and spherical tissue-equivalent phantoms. The aim of Liulin-5 experiment is long term (4-5 years) investigation of the radiation environment dynamics inside the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom, mounted in different places of the Russian Segment of ISS. Energy deposition spectra, linear energy transfer spectra, flux and dose rates for protons and the biologically-relevant heavy ion components of the galactic cosmic radiation will be measured simultaneously with near real time resolution at different depths of the phantom by a telescope of silicon detectors. Data obtained together with data from other active and passive dosimeters will be used to estimate the radiation risk to the crewmembers, verify the models of radiation environment in low Earth orbit, validate body transport model and correlate organ level dose to skin dose. Presented are the test results of the prototype unit. The spherical phantom will be flown on the ISS in 2004 year and Liulin-5 experiment is planned for 2005 year. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Instrumentation for investigation of the depth-dose distribution by the Liulin-5 instrument of a human phantom on the Russian segment of ISS for estimation of the radiation risk during long term space flights.

    PubMed

    Semkova, J; Koleva, R; Todorova, G; Kanchev, N; Petrov, V; Shurshakov, V; Tchhernykh, I; Kireeva, S

    2004-01-01

    Described is the Liulin-5 experiment and instrumentation, developed for investigation of the space radiation doses depth distribution in a human phantom on the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Liulin-5 experiment is a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS. The experiment MATROSHKA-R is aimed to study the depth dose distribution at the sites of critical organs of the human body, using models of human body-anthropomorphic and spherical tissue-equivalent phantoms. The aim of Liulin-5 experiment is long term (4-5 years) investigation of the radiation environment dynamics inside the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom, mounted in different places of the Russian Segment of ISS. Energy deposition spectra, linear energy transfer spectra, flux and dose rates for protons and the biologically-relevant heavy ion components of the galactic cosmic radiation will be measured simultaneously with near real time resolution at different depths of the phantom by a telescope of silicon detectors. Data obtained together with data from other active and passive dosimeters will be used to estimate the radiation risk to the crewmembers, verify the models of radiation environment in low Earth orbit, validate body transport model and correlate organ level dose to skin dose. Presented are the test results of the prototype unit. The spherical phantom will be flown on the ISS in 2004 year and Liulin-5 experiment is planned for 2005 year. PMID:15880917

  14. STS-113/11A: Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Based on Samples Returned in December 2002 and in May 2003 aboard Soyuz 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of grab sample canisters (GSCs) returned aboard STS-l13 and Soyuz 5 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSCs were 79-120% except as noted in the table. One sample was returned with the valve opened. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols (including acetone) are also shown for each sample. Octafluoropropane (OFP) has leaked from heat-exchange units in large quantities, so its concentration is tracked separately. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is also listed separately. The table shows that the air quality in general was acceptable for crew respiration through the middle of December 2002. No conclusions can be made about the air quality after that date due to NASA's inability to return air samples from the ISS . Alcohols are not being controlled to the recently lowered guideline of 5 mg/m3, which was recommended to protect the water recovery systems. The airlock sample was taken during the regeneration of Met ox canisters in the adjacent Node. The trace pollutants were not increased above background; however, inspection of table 1 in the appendix shows a CO2 concentration of 17,000 mg/cu m, which is a relatively high concentration, but still below the 24-hour SMAC of23,000 mg/cu m. The control of OFP continues to be adequate at least through December 2002. Formaldehyde concentrations suggest that the high levels that were being found in the Lab atmosphere have subsided. This is probably attributable to the restoration of IMV in early February 2003 . Before the obstructing material was removed from ducts the Lab formaldehyde concentrations approached 0.06 mg/cu m, whereas

  15. Russian Soyuz Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle, which carried the first resident crew to the International Space Station, moves toward the launch pad at the Baikonur complex in Kazakhstan. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960' until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  16. Space Shuttle Discovery is launched on mission STS-96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Competing with the sunrise, the brilliant flames from the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery light up the morning sky. Mission STS- 96 lifted off at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT. The crew of seven begin a 10- day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  17. Space Shuttle Discovery is launched on mission STS-96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the early dawn, the brilliant flames from the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery light up the billows of steam below. Mission STS-96 lifted off at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT. The crew of seven begin a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  18. Russian Language Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serianni, Barbara; Rethwisch, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the result of a language analysis research project focused on the Russian Language. The study included a diverse literature review that included published materials as well as online sources in addition to an interview with a native Russian speaker residing in the United States. Areas of study include the origin and history of the…

  19. Russian Supplementary Dialogues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan).

    This manual is designed for the Russian language training of Peace Corps volunteers serving in Turkmenistan, and focuses on daily communication skills needed in that context. It consists of nine topical lessons, each containing several brief dialogues targeting specific language competencies, and exercises. Text is entirely in Russian, except for…

  20. RUSSIAN FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    THE NEW YORK STATE SYLLABUS FOR RUSSIAN IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS FOLLOWS THE SAME FORMAT AS THOSE FOR FRENCH, GERMAN, AND SPANISH, AND FOR COMPLETE TEXT, INCLUDING GENERAL SECTIONS ON TEACHING LANGUAGES, THE READER MUST REFER TO ONE OF THOSE THREE BOOKS. THIS GUIDE DELINEATES THE AIMS, TECHNIQUES, CONTENT, AND SCOPE OF RUSSIAN INSTRUCTION FOR A 6-YEAR…

  1. Russian Teaching Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Betsy

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes two Russian teaching contracts, rhetorically comparing purpose and audience, culture, gender, and the role of the individual versus the state. Uses anecdotal episodes as a framework for examining Russian culture and analyzing university teaching contracts, concluding that the contracts are not only brief and factual but also reflect a…

  2. Amphibian tail regeneration in space: effect on the pigmentation of the blastema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, S.; Foulquier, F.; Mitashov, V.; Bruchlinskaia, N.; Duprat, A. M.

    In Urodele amphibians, the tail regenerates after section. This regeneration, including tissues as different as bone (vertebrae), muscle, epidermis and central nervous system (spinal cord), was studied in adult Pleurodeles sent aboard the russian satellite Bion 10 and compared with tail regeneration in synchronous controls. Spinal cord, muscle and cartilage regeneration occurred in space animals as in synchronous controls. One of the most important differences between the two groups was the pigmentation of the blastemas: it was shown in laboratory, to be not due to a difference in light intensity.

  3. Reflectance characteristics of Russian wheat aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) stress and abundance in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia (Mordvilko)) infests wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and other small grains and grasses. Russian wheat aphid infestations are unpredictable in time and space. In favorable conditions, Russian wheat aphid feeding can result in heavy...

  4. Apollo 16 Crew Aboard Rescue Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Command Module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on April 27, 1972 after an 11-day moon exploration mission. The 3-man crew is shown here aboard the rescue ship, USS Horton. From left to right are: Mission Commander John W. Young, Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, and Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II. The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511) lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 mission continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon's crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used.

  5. Russian Grouting Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-10-15

    The final report on Russian Grouting experience provided an opportunity for international cooperation and access to Russian grouting/waste form experience. the data on radiolytic gas generation from grout mixtures was already used in evaluation of the source of hydrogen and methane generation detected in the sampling ports around the SRS high-level waste tanks in 2002. The concept of venting the radiolytic gases from a waste form by adding porous aggregate is being considered for future cement-based TRU waste forms at SRS. The objectives of this work were to document the Russian experience on grouting for waste forms and tank closures or other decommissioning applications.

  6. Astronaut Sharnon Lucid in Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this photograph, Astronaut Shannon W. Lucid, Ph.D., communicates with the ground support team inside the Core Module of the Mir Space Station. Launched aboard the STS-76, the third Shuttle/Mir docking mission, in March 1996, to join the Mir crew in the orbiting laboratory, Astronaut Lucid returned to Earth aboard STS-79 in September 1996. Astronaut Lucid made the U.S. longest record of 188 days in space. Prior to this endeavor, Astronaut Lucid served as a mission specialist on STS-51G in June 1985, STS-34 in October 1989, STS-43 in August 1991, and STS-58 in October 1993. She had logged 5,354 hours (223 days) in space and holds both an international record for the most flight hours in orbit by any non-Russian, and the record for the most flight hours in orbit by any woman in the world. In February 2002. Dr. Lucid was selected as NASA's Chief Scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., with responsibility for developing and communicating the agency's science and research objectives to the outside world.

  7. Research on Russian National Character

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Na, Zhuo

    2008-01-01

    The special geographical location Russia lies in creates the unique character of the Russian nation. Based on the dual nature of the Russian national character, the Russian geographical environment and the analysis of its social structure, this text tries to explore the reasons of the dual nature of Russian national character.

  8. Social structure and space use of Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) in Southern Russian Far East based on GPS telemetry data.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Blanco, Jose A; Naidenko, Sergei V; Chistopolova, Maria D; Lukarevskiy, Victor S; Kostyrya, Alexey; Rybin, Alexandr; Sorokin, Pavel A; Litvinov, Mikhail N; Kotlyar, Andrey K; Miquelle, Dale G; Rozhnov, Viatcheslav V

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the spatial structure of Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) at the southern edge of their range we fitted 14 tigers (6♀♀ and 8♂♂) with 15 GPS-Argos collars between 2008 and 2011 in 2 study sites: the Ussuriskii Reserve of southern Sikhote-Alin and the Land of the Leopard National Park in southwest Primorye, Russian Far East. Fixed kernel estimates of male home ranges were larger than those of female home ranges (P < 0.05 [mean 95% fixed kernel(♀) = 401 ± 205 km(2) ; mean 95% fixed kernel(♂) = 778 ± 267 km(2)]). The home range size of females varied greatly, but on average was similar to estimates derived from earlier work further north. Low overlap of adjacent home ranges suggested that females retained exclusive territories. Real core areas of females overlapped only slightly, and remained stable over multiple years. The home ranges of adult males were smaller than those of males to the north, and in contrast to previous studies, high overlap among males indicated the absence of territoriality. Nonetheless, real core areas of males did not overlap, suggesting some spatial separation. In comparison to other tiger populations and other areas of the Russian Far East, the sex ratio in our 2 study areas was highly skewed towards males. We believe this skewed sex ratio resulted in the dissolution of territoriality of males due to an inability to defend individual females, with males resorting to scramble competition for mates. Continued monitoring of these sites to determine whether shifts in the sex ratio might result in a return to male territoriality would provide confirmation of our tentative hypothesis. PMID:26037451

  9. Save Russian science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel'Man, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Despite 15 years of turbulent change, 'brain drain' and a shortage of research funds, Russian science has survived, although in a much diminished state. International investment and collaboration over the next ten years could bring it back from the brink.

  10. Russian Contract Procurement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2010-03-29

    This contract supports the enhancement of physical protection or nuclear material control and accounting systems at institutes or enterprises of the newly independent states under the material protection control and accounting (MPC&A) program. The contract is entered into pursuant to the MPC&A Program, a gratuitous technical assistance program, in accordance with the bilateral Agreements between the Russian Federation and the United States of America concerning the Safe and Secure Transportation, Storage and Destruction of Weapons and the Prevention of Weapons Proliferation of June 1992, as extended and amended by Protocol signed of June 1999, Agreement between the Government of the Russian Federation regarding Cooperation in the Area of Nuclear Materials Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of October 1999 and the Russian Federation law of May 1999 on the taxation exemption of gratuitous technical assistance with Russian Federation under registration No.DOE001000.

  11. A Case for Hypogravity Studies Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions being contemplated by NASA and other spacefaring nations include some that would require long stays upon bodies having gravity levels much lower than that of Earth. While we have been able to quantify the physiological effects of sustained exposure to microgravity during various spaceflight programs over the past half-century, there has been no opportunity to study the physiological adaptations to gravity levels between zero-g and one-g. We know now that the microgravity environment of spaceflight drives adaptive responses of the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensorimotor systems, causing bone demineralization, muscle atrophy, reduced aerobic capacity, motion sickness, and malcoordination. All of these outcomes can affect crew health and performance, particularly after return to a one-g environment. An important question for physicians, scientists, and mission designers planning human exploration missions to Mars (3/8 g), the Moon (1/6 g), or asteroids (likely negligible g) is: What protection can be expected from gravitational levels between zero-g and one-g? Will crewmembers deconditioned by six months of microgravity exposure on their way to Mars experience continued deconditioning on the Martian surface? Or, will the 3/8 g be sufficient to arrest or even reverse these adaptive changes? The implications for countermeasure deployment, habitat accommodations, and mission design warrant further investigation into the physiological responses to hypogravity. It is not possible to fully simulate hypogravity exposure on Earth for other than transient episodes (e.g., parabolic flight). However, it would be possible to do so in low Earth orbit (LEO) using the centrifugal forces produced in a live-aboard centrifuge. As we're not likely to launch a rotating human spacecraft into LEO anytime in the near future, we could take advantage of rodent subjects aboard the ISS if we had a centrifuge that could accommodate the rodent

  12. Mars Together 2001: Joint US-Russian Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, P.; Kremnev, R.; Boyce, J.; Eremenko, A.; Bourke, R.; Linkin, V.; Campbell, J.; Martynov, B.; Haynes, N.; Mitrofanov, I.; Lowry, L.; Moroz, V.; Miller, S.; Papkov, O.; Pichkhadze, K.

    1996-01-01

    While the US and USSR have collaborated in human space flight and Earth application missions, this is the first time in the cultural relations between our two countries that American and Russian specialists have been authorized to work together on a joint space science mission. A study was commissioned to investigate the possibility of a combined US/Russian mission in the 2001 opportunity. A basic option for a proposed mission (abbreviated as MT 2001) was adopted. This option is described.

  13. Measurements of SEP events during 23 and 24 solar cycles by polar low altitude Russian space missions: use for calculations of ozone layer response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkova, Irina; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.

    Powerful solar flares are the source of solar energetic particles (SEP), which strongly influence the near-Earth environment and Earth’s atmosphere. Solar particles penetrating into high latitudes in the Earth’s atmosphere during magnetically quiet periods, and into middle ones during main phase of magnetic storms, cause its ionization and transform of its chemical composition. The response of the ozone layer to additional NOx and HOx production in the middle atmosphere depends not only on SEP intensity, but also on solar particle spectrum and SEP penetration boundary, especially during periods of geomagnetic storms, when significant variations of polar caps sizes are observed. So modeling of the processes in the Earth’s atmosphere should be based on experimental data about flux and spectra of SEP and about their penetration boundary. Satellites with low altitude polar orbits (LEO) allow measurement of both dynamics of solar energetic particles and variations of penetration boundaries of the solar particles. Several Russian spacecraft were launched to low altitude polar (LEO) orbits during the second half of the 23rd solar activity cycle and at the beginning of the 24th cycle. Russian solar observatory CORONAS-F was launched to the orbit with the inclination of 82.5 (o) , initial altitude 500 km and the final one of 350 km, on July 31, 2001, and it was operated until December 12, 2005. Its orbital period was about 94.8 minutes. Protons (1-90 MeV) and electrons (0.3-12 MeV) were measured by semiconductor and plastic scintillator detectors. The "Universitetskiy-Tatiana" satellite was launched to the orbit with the inclination of 83 (o) , altitude 1000 km, on January 20, 2005, and it was operated until March 8, 2007.For the monitoring of radiation conditions near the Earth the data on protons(2-100 MeV) and electrons (0.07-0.9 MeV), obtained by the semiconductor detector and the scintillation detector were used. «METEOR-M №1» has a polar solar

  14. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  15. Russian Planetary Program: Phobos and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, E. M.; Marov, M. Ya.; Politshuk, G. M.; Zeleniy, L. M.

    2006-08-01

    Planetary exploration is a cornerstone of space science and technology development. Russia has a great legacy of the world recognized former space missions to the Moon and planets. Strategy of the Russian Federal Space Agency and the Russian Academy of Sciences planetary program for the coming decade is focused on space vehicle of new generation. The basic concept of this spacecraft development is the modern technology utilization, significant cost reduction and meeting objectives of the important science return. The bottom line is the use of middle class Soyuz-type launcher, which places the principal constraint on mass of the vehicle and mission profile. Flexibility in the design of space vehicle, including a possibility of SEP technology utilization, facilitates its adaptability for extended program of the solar system exploration. As the first step, the project is optimized around sample return mission from satellite of Mars Phobos ("Phobos-Grunt" or PSR) which is in the list of the Russian Federal Space Program for 2006 to 2015. It is to be launched in 2009 and completed in 2012. The experience gained from the former Russian "Phobos 88" serves as a clue to provide an important basis for the mission concept enabling solution of many problems of the project design and its implementation. There is a challenge to return relic matter from such small body like Phobos for the ground labs comprehensive study. The payload is also targeted for in-flight and extended remote sensing and in situ measurements using the capable instrument packages. The project is addressed as a milestone in the Russian program of the solar system study, with a potential for future ambitious missions to asteroids and comets pooling international efforts. Also endorsed by the Russian Federal Space Program is "Luna-Glob" mission to the Moon tentatively scheduled for 2011. The goal is to advance lunar science with the well instrumented orbiter, lander, and the network of penetrators. Return back

  16. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls back to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Nearing the end of its 4.2-mile trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), Space Shuttle Discovery clears the gate to begin the climb to Launch Pad 39B aboard the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. Earlier in the week, the Shuttle was rolled back to the VAB from the pad to repair hail damage on the external tank's foam insulation. Mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program, is scheduled for liftoff May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  17. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls back to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Both Space Shuttle Discovery (left) and Launch Pad 39B (right) are reflected in nearby water as the Shuttle makes its slow crawl to the pad aboard a crawler transporter. Earlier in the week, the Shuttle was rolled back from the pad to the Vehicle Assembly Building to repair hail damage on the the external tank's foam insulation. The 4.2-mile trek takes about five hours at the 1-mph speed of the crawler. Mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program, is scheduled for liftoff May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  18. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls back to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the early morning hours, Space Shuttle Discovery is returned to Launch Pad 39B aboard the crawler transporter. Earlier in the week, the Shuttle was rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building to repair hail damage to the foam insulation on the external tank. The 4.2-mile trek takes about five hours at the 1- mph speed of the crawler. Mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program, is scheduled for liftoff May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  19. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls back to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery, aboard a crawler transporter, is reflected in the waters of Banana Creek as it is returned to Launch Pad 39B. Earlier in the week, the Shuttle was rolled back to the Vehicle Assembly Building to repair hail damage to the foam insulation on the external tank. The 4.2-mile trek takes about five hours at the Space Shuttle Program, is scheduled for liftoff May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  20. Russian Docking Module is lowered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-built Docking Module (DM) is lowered for installation into the payload bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis while the spaceplane is in Orbiter Processing Facility bay 2. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles. The white structures attached to the module's sides are solar panels that will be attached to the Mir after the conclusion of the STS-74 mission.

  1. Studying Russian and Soviet History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Abraham, Ed.

    These essays were written to assist teachers in the task of making Russian history intelligible to young U.S. students. In "An Approach to Russian History," Edward Keenan proposes that students need to gain a better understanding of how Russians perceive themselves and their history. In "Pre-Petrine Russia," Andrzej S. Kaminski focuses on the…

  2. Teaching Russian Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakar, Nicholas

    1949-01-01

    Prior to World War Two, Slavic studies in America treated history, literature, and language as isolated disciplines and often neglected the study of Russian literature written after 1917. The pragmatic necessities of the war questioned the relevance of this traditional approach and specialists appeared, concentrating their efforts on the recent…

  3. Russian Librarianship after Perestroika.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Boris

    1995-01-01

    Provides historical background and describes the change in the role of Russian libraries from conduits for party propaganda to organizations designed to serve the needs of their users. Considers problems for library educators in providing librarians with the skills needed in the new political and technological environment of post-Communist Russia.…

  4. [Russian system of countermeasures: the present and future].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, I B; Yarmanova, E N; Fomina, E V

    2013-01-01

    The paper considers the fundamental principles of the Russian countermeasures system validated successfully in multiple long-term missions to the Russian space stations. The system adopted on the ISS Russian segment is detailed. In particular, it is pinpointed that physical training of cosmonauts was adjusted to the demands of the stages of ISS assembly and utilization. The locomotion training performed with departures from the flight documentation (ODFs) is described. The concluding section of the paper lays out the picture of vistas for the system of countermeasures in future exploration missions. PMID:23700612

  5. La Rusa Lingvo en la Novaj Rilatoj de Europa Spac-Agentejo (The Russian Language in the New Relations of the European Space Agency).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Wim

    1992-01-01

    In view of the opportunities made possible by the Framework Agreement between the European Space Agency and the Soviet Union, this article examines the linguistic aspects of the agreement and its implementation. Many communication problems are related to Western concepts of project management and control that are difficult to translate into…

  6. Adolescent Russian roulette deaths.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kim A

    2010-03-01

    Adolescence, between the ages of 10 and 19 years, is a unique period both physically and emotionally. During this time of life, individuals are known to experiment and engage in risky behavior, sometimes with unforeseen morbidity and mortality. We also see suicide emerge as a manner of death in this age group. The most common method is gunshot wound and sometimes in the form of Russian roulette. Few studies have looked at deaths by Russian roulette, the victims, and scenarios. In particular, no study examines the adolescent victim of Russian roulette. To better understand and classify this entity, adolescent Russian roulette autopsy cases over a 20-year period were examined looking at the victims, scenarios, autopsy findings, cause and manner of death, and the weapons. All victims were males, ages 13 to 19 years, with a Black-to-White ratio of 1:1. No victim had a previous psychiatric history. Toxicology was positive for alcohol and/or marijuana in 50% of the victims. Friends were present when the victim shot himself which occurred in the home the majority of the time. In all but 1 case, premeditation of the game was involved as the victim provided the weapon for the roulette. The cause of death was gunshot wound to the head (6 to the right side, 1 to the mouth, 1 to the forehead), and the manner of death was suicide in 6 cases and accident in 2 cases. A review of the literature discusses the adolescent victim, suicide, and Russian roulette. PMID:20010290

  7. Russian Basic Course. Naval Terminology Dictionary: Russian-English, English-Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This dictionary is a companion to "Naval Terminology," developed by the Defense Language Institute and printed in 1971. Cyrillic script is used for the Russian terminology. Two main sections define naval terms from Russian to English and from English to Russian. A list of abbreviations concludes the text. (RL)

  8. Summary of lower body negative pressure experiments during space flight.

    PubMed

    Charles, J B; Lathers, C M

    1994-06-01

    This paper summarizes the lower body negative pressure experiments performed in space, beginning with the experiments conducted on Skylab, because this program provided the most cardiovascular physiology data for United States space flight. Data obtained during studies of lower body negative pressure for use as a countermeasure after months of Russian space flight are also presented. Lower body negative pressure experiments conducted aboard Space Shuttle flights provide data about the deadaptation response of the cardiovascular system to orthostatic stress occurring during periods of zero gravity, and about protection against postflight orthostatic intolerance. Data obtained using Russian and American lower body negative pressure devices indicate that, when a crew member stands, as opposed to being supported by a seat or saddle as in the American device, there may be a slight detrimental effect in terms of the cardiovascular response to this orthostatic stress. Comparison of heart rate and blood pressure response to entry and landing of the Shuttle indicate that, although lower body negative pressure is a different stress and is applied in a different manner, the maximum heart rates during lower body negative pressure are reached at approximately the same point that the maximum heart rates are reached during entry and landing. Thus, the use of a lower body negative pressure stress in flight is a fairly good predictor of the cardiovascular response to the actual entry and landing of the Shuttle. PMID:8083388

  9. Space Station Live: Fluids and Combustion Facility

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean speaks with Robert Corban, Fluids and Combustion Facility Manager, about the research being performed aboard the International Space Station using this state...

  10. Space Station Live: ISS Communications Unit Upgrade

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters interviews International Space Station Flight Director Mike Lammers about the recent Ku communications unit upgrade work taking place aboard th...

  11. Russian Virtual Observatory: data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O.; Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Bakanas, E.; Kilpio, E.; Kniazev, A.; Kovaleva, D.; Mironov, A.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Ryabchikova, T.; Rykhlova, L.; Sachkov, M.; Sazonov, S.; Zhukov, A.

    The purpose of this review is to analyze main directions of creation and functioning of major data sources developed by Russian astronomers or with their participation and to compare them with the worldwide trends in these fields. We discuss astronomical space missions of the past, present, and future (Astron, INTEGRAL, WSO-UV, Spectrum Roentgen Gamma, Lyra-B), high-quality photometric atlases and catalogues, and spectroscopic data sources, primarily VALD and the global VAMDC framework for the maintenance and distribution of atomic and molecular data. We describe collection, analysis, and dissemination of astronomical data on minor bodies of the Solar System and on variable stars. Also described is the project joining data for all observational types of binary and multiple stars, Binary star DataBase (BDB).

  12. Russian Earth Science Research Program on ISS

    SciTech Connect

    Armand, N. A.; Tishchenko, Yu. G.

    1999-01-22

    Version of the Russian Earth Science Research Program on the Russian segment of ISS is proposed. The favorite tasks are selected, which may be solved with the use of space remote sensing methods and tools and which are worthwhile for realization. For solving these tasks the specialized device sets (submodules), corresponding to the specific of solved tasks, are working out. They would be specialized modules, transported to the ISS. Earth remote sensing research and ecological monitoring (high rates and large bodies transmitted from spaceborne information, comparatively stringent requirements to the period of its processing, etc.) cause rather high requirements to the ground segment of receiving, processing, storing, and distribution of space information in the interests of the Earth natural resources investigation. Creation of the ground segment has required the development of the interdepartmental data receiving and processing center. Main directions of works within the framework of the ISS program are determined.

  13. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls out to the launch pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The morning sun bursts through an opening between the external tank and solid booster rocket on Space Shuttle Discovery as it wends its way aboard the crawler-transporter to Launch Pad 39B. The crawler-transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 4.2 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. Liftoff of Discovery on mission STS- 96 is targeted for May 20 at 9:32 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.- built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-led experiment.

  14. Astronauts Access Web from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineers Soichi Noguchi and T.J. Creamer share their thoughts about Internet access from space and post a r...

  15. Space Station Live! Tour

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is using the Internet and smartphones to provide the public with a new inside look at what happens aboard the International Space Station and in the Mission Control Center. NASA Public Affairs...

  16. Space Flute Duet

    NASA Video Gallery

    Harmony reaches new heights as NASA Astronaut Cady Coleman, circling Earth aboard the International Space Station, and musician Ian Anderson, founder of the rock band Jethro Tull, join together for...

  17. Exobiological Investigations on Russian Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzicheva, Evgenia A.; Gontareva, Natalia B.

    2003-06-01

    To investigate the possibility of prebiotic synthesis of organic molecules in open space, conditions involved irradiating nucleosides and inorganic phosphate during five Earth-orbiting Russian space missions that included Salut-7 (13- and 16-month missions), Mir, Bion-11, and Cosmos-2044. Dry films of samples were exposed from 2 weeks up to 16 months to the entire set of factors encountered in open space during Earth-orbiting missions. After each mission, products synthesized during flight and any compounds that remained undegraded were analyzed. The analyses demonstrated that increased flight duration led to the decay of both synthesized nucleotides and initial nucleosides. Corresponding laboratory experiments indicated that infrared radiation caused the greatest amount of decay to products of prebiotic reactions. Experiments revealed that 5'-mononucleotides were the main chemical products of the major derivatives synthesized of certain nucleosides. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) C145 was more effective than UVC254 in producing a comparatively higher yield of mononucleotides, while the energy flux of the latter was one order of magnitude less (10-7 as compared with 10-6 for UVC145). In the course of the laboratory simulation experiments the heating of solid samples yielded the greatest production amount (6.34% for adenosine derivatives).

  18. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  19. SPACE MEDICINE and Medical Operations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervay, Joe

    2009-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the function of the work of the Space Medicine & Health Care Systems Office. The objective of the medical operations is to ensure the health, safety and well being of the astronaut corps and ground support team during all phases of space flight. There are many issues that impact the health of the astronauts. Some of them are physiological, and others relate to behavior, psychological issues and issues of the environment of space itself. Reviews of the medical events that have affected both Russian, and Americans while in space are included. Some views of shuttle liftoff, and ascent, the medical training aboard NASA's KC-135 and training in weightlessness, the Shuttle Orbiter Medical system (SOMS), and some of the medical equipment are included. Also included are a graphs showing Fluid loading countermeasures, and vertical pursuit tracking with head and eye. The final views are representations of the future crew exploration vehicle (CEV) approaching the International Space Station, and the moon, and a series of perspective representations of the earth in comparison to the other planets and the Sun, the Sun in relation to other stars, and a view of where in the galaxy the Sun is.

  20. Russian electrometallurgy: Achievements, problems, prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utochkin, Yu. I.; Semin, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The changes in the Russian metallurgy, in particular, electric furnace steelmaking, having occurred in the recent years are analyzed. The main increase in the steelmaking output is due to putting into operation of new electric furnaces in new miniworks and enterprises equipped earlier with open-hearth furnaces. Reaching the rated capacity of a furnace in Russia substantially lags behind foreign enterprises. Only 30-35% of the Russian market of corrosion-resistant steel are provided by Russian metal.

  1. Russian expats seek research reforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Over 170 Russian researchers working abroad have signed a letter addressed to the Russian president, Dmitry Medvedev, and prime minister Vladimir Putin raising concerns about "the catastrophic state of basic science" in the country. The letter, which appeared last month in the Moscow business paper Vedomosti, warns Russian leaders that unless urgent measures are implemented by the government, then science in the country may collapse.

  2. USF/Russian dosimetry on STS-57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The major purpose of this experiment was to conduct an international comparison of passive dosimetry methods in space. Two APD's were flown in the charged particle directional spectrometer (CPDS)/tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) locker on the space shuttle during the STS-57 mission. Due to placement, the shielding and radiation environment of the APD's were nearly the same and the dosimeters distributed in the two boxes can be considered equally exposed. The dosimeter types included plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), nuclear emulsions, and thermal/resonance neutron detectors (TRND's). The USF dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and TRND's, while the Russian dosimeters included PNTD's, TLD's, and nuclear emulsions.

  3. A Russian Proton rocket launches with the Zvezda module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Russian 3-stage Proton rocket blasts into the sky at 12:56 a.m. EDT with the Russian-built Zvezda module in a successful launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Zvezda is the primary Russian contribution to the International Space Station, serving as the early Station living quarters. It will also provide early propulsive attitude control and reboost capabilities and be the main docking port for Russian Progress cargo resupply vehicles. The third Station component, Zvezda will dock by remote control with the already orbiting Zarya and Unity modules at an altitude of about 245 by 230 statute miles. (Image taken with Nikon D1 digital camera.) Astronaut John Glenn aboard the U.S.S. Randolph after MA-6 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 space flight, relaxes aboard the carrier U.S.S. Randolph following his earth-orbital mission. Glenn was transferred to the Randolph from the U.S.S. Noa after his return from his earth-orbital mission.

  4. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Aboard Command Module Yankee Clipper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is a view of astronaut Richard F. Gordon attaching a high resolution telephoto lens to a camera aboard the Apollo 12 Command Module (CM) Yankee Clipper. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  5. Russian RSC Energia employees attach trunnions to DM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Employees of the Russian aerospace company RSC Energia attach trunnions to the Russian-built docking module in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC so that it can be mounted in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles.

  6. Preliminary Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Results from the Joint Russian and U.S. Pilot Field Test with Planning for the Full Field Test Beginning with the Year Long Intenational Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing collaborative research efforts between NASA's Neuroscience and Cardiovascular Laboratories, and the Institute of Biomedical Problems' (IBMP) Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories have been measuring functional sensorimotor, cardiovascular and strength responses following bed rest, dry immersion, short duration (Space Shuttle) and long duration (Mir and International Space Station) space flights. While the unloading paradigms associated with dry immersion and bed rest does serve as acceptable flight analogs, testing of crew responses following the long duration flights previously has not been possible until a minimum of 24 hours after landing. As a result, it is not possible to estimate the nonlinear trend of the early (<24 hr) recovery process, nor is it possible to accurately assess the full impact of the decrements associated with long duration flight. To overcome these limitations, both the Russian and U.S. sides have implemented testing at landing site. By joint agreement, this research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test (FT). For practical reasons the FT has been divided into two phases: the full FT and a preliminary pilot version (PFT) of the FT that is reduced in both length and scope. The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities in long duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible (< 2 hr) with one to three immediate follow-up measurements on the day of landing. This goal has both sensorimotor and cardiovascular elements, including evaluations of NASA's new anti-orthostatic compression garment and the Russian Kentavr garment. Functional sensorimotor measurements will include, but are not limited to, assessment of hand/eye coordination, ability to egress from a seated position, walk normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, ability to discriminate different forces generated with both the hands and legs, recovery from a fall, a coordinated walk

  7. New Crewmates Welcomed Aboard Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Engineers Kevin Ford, Oleg Novitskiy and Evgeny Tarelkin join their Expedition 33 crewmates after the hatches between the International Space Station and the Soyuz TMA-06M spacecraft opened ...

  8. Robotics Programming Competition Spheres, Russian Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Kukushkina, Natalia; Biryukova, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Spheres" such name was done to Russian part of the Zero Robotics project which is a student competition devoted to programming of SPHERES (SPHERES - Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites are the experimental robotics devices which are capable of rotation and translation in all directions, http://ssl.mit.edu/spheres/), which perform different operations on the board of International Space Station. Competition takes place online on http://zerorobotics.mit.edu. The main goal is to develop a program for SPHERES to solve an annual challenge. The end of the tournament is the real competition in microgravity on the board of ISS with a live broadcast. The Russian part of the tournament has only two years history but the problems, organization and specific are useful for the other educational projects especially for the international ones. We introduce the history of the competition, its scientific and educational goals in Russia and describe the participation of Russian teams in 2014 and 2015 tournaments. Also we discuss the organizational problems.

  9. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  10. Prospects for a Wide Field CCD Camera Aboard NGST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golimowski, D. A.; Ford, H. C.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Burrows, C. J.; Krist, J. E.; White, R. L.; Clampin, M.; Rafal, M.; Hartig, G.

    1998-05-01

    The importance of a Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) for studying the infrared universe has often overshadowed NGST's potential benefit to optical astronomy. As currently envisioned, NGST could also provide views of the visible universe with resolution and sensitivity that are unmatched by any existing ground- or space-based observatory. We discuss the scientific advantages and technical feasibility of placing a wide-field CCD camera aboard NGST. Using simulated data, we compare the imaging performance of such a camera with that achieved or expected with the Keck Telescope and the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys. Finally, we discuss the technical challenges of temperature regulation and radiation shielding for a CCD camera in the NGST environment.

  11. Comparison between Measured and Simulated Radiation Doses in the Matoroshka-R Spherical phantom Experiment#1 and Area Monitoring aboard International Space Station using PADLES from May - Sep. 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Aiko; Tolochek, Raisa; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Tawara, Hiroko; Kitajo, Keiichi; Shimada, Ken

    The measurement of radiation environmental parameters in space is essential to support radiation risk assessments for astronauts and establish a benchmark for space radiation models for present and future human space activities. Since Japanese Experiment Module ‘KIBO’ was attached to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, we have been performing continuous space radiation dosimetery using a PADLES (Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiments in Space) consisting of CR-39 PNTDs (Plastic Nuclear track detectors) and TLD-MSOs (Mg2SiO4:Tb) for various space experiments onboard the ‘KIBO’ part of the ISS. The MATROSHKA-R experiments aims to verify of dose distributions in a human body during space flight. The phantom consists of tissue equivalent material covered by a poncho jacket with 32 pockets on the surface. 20 container rods with dosimeters can be struck into the spherical phantom. Its diameter is 370 mm and it is 32 kg in weight. The first experiment onboard the KIBO at Forward No.2 area (JPM1F2 Rack2) was conducted over 114 days from 21 May to 12 September 2012 (the installation schedule inside the phantom) on the way to solar cycle 24th upward curve. 16 PADLES packages were deployed into 16 poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom. Another 12 PADLES packages were deployed inside 4 rods (3 packages per rod in the outer, middle and inner side). Area monitoring in the KIBO was conducted in the same period (Area PADLES series #8 from 15 May to 16 September, 2012). Absorbed doses were measured at 17 area monitoring points in the KIBO and 28 locations (16 packages in poncho pockets and 12 inside 4 rods) in the phantom. The maximum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the outer wall was 0.43 mGy/day and the minimum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the KIBO interior was 0.30 mGy/day. The maximum absorbed

  12. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS3, STS8, and STS7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The results of these studies have implications for the utilization of the IIaO spectroscopic film on the future shuttle and space lab missions. These responses to standard photonic energy sources will have immediate application for the uneven responses of the film photographing a star field in a terrestrial or extraterrestrial environment with associated digital imaging equipment.

  13. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  14. Russian RSC Energia employees inspect DM in SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Employees of the Russian aerospace company RSC Energia prepare to conduct final inspections of the Russian-built Docking Module in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. The module will fly as a primary payload on the second Space Shuttle/Mir space station docking mission, STS-74, which is now scheduled for liftoff in the fall of 1995. During the mission, the module will first be attached with the orbiter's robot arm to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS) in the payload bay of the orbiter Atlantis and then be docked with the Mir. When Atlantis undocks from the Mir, it will leave the new docking module permanently attached to the space station for use during future Shuttle Mir docking missions. The new module will simplify future Shuttle linkups with Mir by improving orbiter clearances when it serves as a bridge between the two space vehicles.

  15. Russian Orthography and Learning to Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerek, Eugenia; Niemi, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    The unique structure of Russian orthography may influence the organization and acquisition of reading skills in Russian. The present review examines phonemic-graphemic correspondences in Russian orthography and discusses its grain-size units and possible difficulties for beginning readers and writers. Russian orthography is governed by a…

  16. The space exposure platforms BIOPAN and EXPOSE to study living organisms in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, W.

    BIOPAN and EXPOSE are two European space exposure platforms developed for the European Space Agency by Kayser-Threde GmbH Munich Germany to offer flight opportunities to the science community of exo astrobiology research in low earth orbit Both platforms are conceived for the research on the behaviour of living organisms in the environment of space and on simulated conditions of other planets Mars The conditions for a possible transfer of life between planets can be studied Both facilities can also be used for materials and components validation and as test bed for advanced technologies envisaged for future exploration missions radio-protection miniaturized devices electronic components Since 1992 BIOPAN has flown five times aboard the Russian FOTON re-entry capsule 25 experiments in exo astrobiology radiation biology and radiation dosimetry have been conducted so far The pan-shaped experiment container BIOPAN can be installed onto the outer surface of its carrier satellite The orbital flight duration is typically two weeks The re-entry capsule with its experiments is recovered after landing and the experiment samples are returned to the ground laboratories of the scientific investigators for post-flight analysis Experiments flown so far with BIOPAN include bacterial spores mixed with Martian soil analogues to test the alleged toxicity of the Martian soil while irradiated in space by solar UV at dose and wavelength levels comparable to those on Mars experiment MARSTOX permafrost soil samples with their embedded natural ancient

  17. Earth Views From the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    In celebration of Earth Day, NASA presents images of Earth captured by cameras aboard the International Space Station. Traveling at an approximate speed of 17,500 miles per hour, the space station ...

  18. Peculiarities of lens and tail regeneration detected in newts after spaceflight aboard Foton M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Almeida, Eduardo; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Domaratskaya, Elena; Aleinikova, Karina; Souza, Kenneth; Skidmore, Mike; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.

    In September 2007 the joint, 12 day long experiment was carried out aboard Russian satellite Foton M3. The goal of the experiment was to study eye lens, tail and forelimb toe regeneration in adult 16 newts (Pl. waltl.) operated 10 days before taking-off. In spaceflight and synchronous ground control we used video recording, temperature and irradiation control, as well as constant availability of thymidine analog BrdU for its absorption via animals' skin. New techniques allowed us to analyze animals' behavior in hyperand microgravity periods of time, to take proper account of spaceflight factors, and measure accumulated pools of DNA-synthesizing cells in regenerating tissues. All tissue specimens obtained from animals were isolated in the day of landing and then prepared for morphological, immunochemical and molecular investigations. Synchronous control was shifted for two days and reproduced flight conditions except changes of gravity influence. As a result in flown animals as compared with synchronous ground control we found lens regeneration of 0.5-1 stage speeded up and an increased BrdU+ (S-phase) cell number in eye cornea, growth zone, limbus and newly forming lens. These features of regeneration were accompanied by an increase of FGF2 expression in eye growth zone and heat shock protein (HSP90) induction purely in retinal macroglial cells of regenerating eyes. Toe regeneration rate was equal and achieved the stage of accomplished healing of amputation area in both groups - "flown" and control animals. We found no essential differences in tail regeneration rate and tail regenerate sizes in the newts exposed to space and on ground. In both groups tail regeneration reached the stage IV-V when tail length and square were around 4.4 mm and 15.5 mm2, correspondingly. However we did observe remarkable changes of tail regenerate form and some of pigmentation. Computer morphometrical analysis showed that only in ground control animals the evident dorso

  19. Space Station Live: Seedling Growth

    NASA Video Gallery

    Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Carol Jacobs, payload operations director at the Marshall Space Flight Center's POIC, about the Seedling Growth experiment talking place aboard the Inte...

  1. Space Station Live: Microbiome Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Microbiome experiment Investigator Mark Ott to learn more about this research taking place aboard the International Space Station. The Microbiome e...

  2. ISS Update: Plants in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries talks with Camille Alleyne, International Space Station Program Scientist, about the plant research taking place aboard the station. Dr. Anna-Lisa Paul, ...

  3. Space Human Factors Engineering Challenges in Long Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Daniel J.; Endsley, Mica R.; Ellison, June; Caldwell, Barrett S.; Mount, Frances E.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this panel is on identifying and discussing the critical human factors challenges facing long duration space flight. Living and working aboard the International Space Station (ISS) will build on the experience humans have had to date aboard the Shuttle and MIR. More extended missions, involving lunar and planetary missions to Mars are being planned. These missions will involve many human factors challenges regarding a number of issues on which more research is needed.

  4. STS-96 Rollback of the RSS from Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of the external tank is a vent hood, known as the 'beanie cap,' at the end of the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm. STS-96 is a 10- day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  5. Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure from Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back at Launch Pad 39B to reveal the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  6. Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure from Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39B reveals the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch on mission STS-96 at 6:49 a.m. EDT on May 27. Above the top of the external tank is the external tank gaseous oxygen vent arm, with a vent hood, known as the 'beanie cap,' at the outer end. Below it up against Discovery is the orbiter access arm, which allows entry into the orbiter crew compartment. through an environmental chamber or 'white room' at the outer end. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies to be stored aboard the station, for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- involved experiment. The mission will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch on May 27 at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  7. Data Acquisition System for Russian Arctic Magnetometer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzhura, A.; Troshichev, O. A.; Takahashi, K.

    2010-12-01

    Monitoring of magnetic activity in the auroral zone is very essential for space weather problem. The big part of northern auroral zone lies in the Russian sector of Arctica. The Russian auroral zone stations are located far from the proper infrastructure and communications, and getting the data from the stations is complicated and nontrivial task. To resolve this problem a new acquisition system for magnetometers was implemented and developed in last few years, with the magnetic data transmission in real time that is important for many forecasting purpose. The system, based on microprocessor modules, is very reliable in hush climatic conditions. The information from the magnetic sensors transmits to AARI data center by satellite communication system and is presented at AARI web pages. This equipment upgrading of Russian polar magnetometer network is supported by the international RapidMag program.

  8. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-04-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  9. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  10. Advanced water iodinating system. [for potable water aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water stores aboard manned spacecraft must remain sterile. Suitable sterilization techniques are needed to prevent microbial growth. The development of an advanced water iodinating system for possible application to the shuttle orbiter and other advanced spacecraft, is considered. The AWIS provides a means of automatically dispensing iodine and controlling iodination levels in potable water stores. In a recirculation mode test, simulating application of the AWIS to a water management system of a long term six man capacity space mission, noniodinated feed water flowing at 32.2 cu cm min was iodinated to 5 + or - ppm concentrations after it was mixed with previously iodinated water recirculating through a potable water storage tank. Also, the AWIS was used to successfully demonstrate its capability to maintain potable water at a desired I2 concentration level while circulating through the water storage tank, but without the addition of noniodinated water.

  11. Evaluating the Medical Kit System for the International Space Station(ISS) - A Paradigm Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey, Melinda J.; Urbina, Michelle C.; Hughlett, Jessica L.; Gilmore, Stevan; Locke, James; Reyna, Baraquiel; Smith, Gwyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Medical capabilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have been packaged to help astronaut crew medical officers (CMO) mitigate both urgent and non-urgent medical issues during their 6-month expeditions. Two ISS crewmembers are designated as CMOs for each 3-crewmember mission and are typically not physicians. In addition, the ISS may have communication gaps of up to 45 minutes during each orbit, necessitating medical equipment that can be reliably operated autonomously during flight. The retirement of the space shuttle combined with ten years of manned ISS expeditions led the Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center to reassess the current ISS Medical Kit System. This reassessment led to the system being streamlined to meet future logistical considerations with current Russian space vehicles and future NASA/commercial space vehicle systems. Methods The JSC Space Medicine Division coordinated the development of requirements, fabrication of prototypes, and conducted usability testing for the new ISS Medical Kit System in concert with implementing updated versions of the ISS Medical Check List and associated in-flight software applications. The teams constructed a medical kit system with the flexibility for use on the ISS, and resupply on the Russian Progress space vehicle and future NASA/commercial space vehicles. Results Prototype systems were developed, reviewed, and tested for implementation. Completion of Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews resulted in a streamlined ISS Medical Kit System that is being used for training by ISS crews starting with Expedition 27 (June 2011). Conclusions The team will present the process for designing, developing, , implementing, and training with this new ISS Medical Kit System.

  12. Vestibular Function Research aboard Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, R. W.; Daunton, N. G.

    1978-01-01

    NASA is planning to perform a series of Vestibular Function Research (VFR) investigations on the early STS missions to investigate those neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome. The first flight is scheduled for the 1981 Spacelab III Mission in which four frog specimens, mounted on a frog tilting/centrifuge device, will be subjected to periodic acceleration stimuli and periods of artificial gravity. The vestibular nerve firing responses of each frog specimen will be monitored through implanted neutral bouyancy microelectrodes and transmitted to the ground for quick analysis during the flight. The experimentation will be directed at investigating: (1) adaptation to weightlessness; (2) response to acceleration stimuli; (3) response to artificial gravity (in a weightlessness environment) and (4) readaptation to earth's gravity upon return.

  13. Radon measurements aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Rosner, Stefan W.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out three (piggyback) radon-related projects aboard the KAO. The first, which was limited to upper tropospheric measurements while in level flight, revealed the systematic occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations in this region of the atmosphere. The second project was an instrument development project, which led to the installation of an automatic radon measurement system aboard the NASA ER-2 High Altitude Research Aircraft. In the third, we installed a new system capable of collecting samples during the normal climb and descent of the KAO. The results obtained in these projects have resulted in significant contributions to our knowledge of atmospheric transport processes, and are currently playing a key role in the validation of global circulation and transport models.

  14. STS-87 Commander Kregel arrives at the SLF aboard a T-38 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Commander Kevin Kregel arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet for the final prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 liftoff. The other STS-87 crew members are Pilot Steven Lindsey; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Winston Scott; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite.

  15. STS-87 Pilot Lindsey arrives at the SLF aboard a T-38 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-87 Pilot Steven Lindsey arrives at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet for the final prelaunch activities leading up to the scheduled Nov. 19 liftoff. The other STS-87 crew members are Commander Kevin Kregel; Mission Specialists Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D.; Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan; and Winston Scott; and Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine. STS-87 will be the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and the Spartan-201 deployable satellite.

  16. Space Shuttle Discovery is launched on mission STS-96

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On its perfect launch today, Space Shuttle Discovery's brilliant flames illuminate the tower at left, with the lightning mast on top, and the billows of smoke and steam at right. Liftoff into a gossamer dawn sky for mission STS-96 occurred at 6:49:42 a.m. EDT. The crew of seven begin a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT.

  17. Non-Textbook Materials in Russian Civilization Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinograde, Ann C.

    1977-01-01

    Supplementary, non-textbook materials used in Russian civilization classes include "Paintings from the Russian Museum Collection," with text in Russian and English; a Russian desk calendar; "In the Russian Style," with costume photographs and poetry excerpts, and a Russian primary school book. Uses of these materials are discussed. (CHK)

  18. Mechanistic studies of polymeric samples exposed aboard STS 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava; Chung, Shirley Y.; Oda, Keri L.

    1987-01-01

    The early Shuttle flights and the attendant opportunity to deploy material samples to the near-Earth space environment, along well-defined trajectories and accompanied by detailed characterization of these samples prior to and following the flight exposure, have brought to light several novel phenomena associated with interaction of these materials with the space environment. JPL, in coordination with other NASA Centers, has carried out a research program to study the degradation and oxidation processes caused by interaction of these materials with atomic oxygen at an energy of 5 eV. In addition, energetic atomic oxygen is believed to be responsible for the shuttle glow first observed during the flight of STS-3. The shuttle glow phenomenon has been extensively studied and modeled because of its long-range potential impact on optical communication schemes and its more immediate impact on the Space Telescope. This report summarizes the results of certian material degradation and erosion experiments carried out aboard STS-8 between August 30, 1983 and September 5, 1983. Based on these data, a generic degradation model has been developed for common structural polymers.

  19. Teaching Russian Culture: Concepts of Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianne

    Russian culture is very much influenced by its huge land area, peculiar topography, and harsh climate. To understand Russian culture one must know how Russians perceive nature. This paper discusses how this concept may be conveyed to U.S. middle school students through poetry. Poems about nature can provide students an opportunity to understand…

  20. Processing of Contrastiveness by Heritage Russian Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekerina, Irina A.; Trueswell, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments in the Visual World paradigm compared how monolingual Russian (Experiment 1) and heritage Russian-English bilingual (Experiment 2) listeners process contrastiveness online in Russian. Materials were color adjective-noun phrases embedded into the split-constituent construction Krasnuju polozite zvezdovku..."Red put…

  1. Russian Loanword Adaptation in Persian; Optimal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambuziya, Aliye Kord Zafaranlu; Hashemi, Eftekhar Sadat

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed some of the phonological rules of Russian loanword adaptation in Persian, on the view of Optimal Theory (OT) (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). It is the first study of phonological process on Russian loanwords adaptation in Persian. By gathering about 50 current Russian loanwords, we selected some of them to analyze. We…

  2. An Evolutionary Sketch of Russian Kinship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Paul

    This paper presents a preliminary sketch of the evolution of Russian kinship from the reconstructed stages of Proto-Indo-European and Proto-Slavic, through old and nineteenth century Russian, to the trends of contemporary modern Russian. Linguistic, historical, and anthropological approaches have been combined. The kinship terminology is viewed as…

  3. Social and Racial Correlates of Russian Roulette

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Steven; Wasserman, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The epidemiology of a neglected form of suicidal behavior, Russian roulette, is addressed. Also tested is an explanation of racial differences based on the opportunity theory of deviant behavior related to the availability of revolvers, necessary weapons with which to play Russian roulette. Data refer to 15 cases of Russian roulette found through…

  4. Morphological Rules in Russian Conjugation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Linda Kopp

    Recent analyses of Russian (Halle 1963, Lightner 1972) have been forced by the criteria of rule "naturalness" and rule "generality" to posit highly abstract underlying forms. These underlying forms and rules are claimed to represent the speaker's competence. Such analyses are now being criticized (Derwing 1973, Hooper 1974) on the following…

  5. Oral Proficiency Testing in Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Barbara H., Comp.; Mayewski, Sandi, Comp.

    A handbook compiled for use in a one-day workshop on oral proficiency testing for teachers of Russian gives an overview of oral proficiency assessment principles and the available techniques. One section explains the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages/Educational Testing Service (ACTFL/ETS) Oral Proficiency Interview process and…

  6. Russian Honeybee Breeders Association Manual

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Honey Bee Breeding, Genetics and Physiology Laboratory has produced a stock of bees called “Russian Honey Bees”. This name recognizes the original source of the honey bee queens that were used to form the stock. Queen bees from Russia’s far-east, many o...

  7. Heavy Cosmic Ray Measurement Aboard Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Krause, J.; Fischer, E.; Enge, W.

    1985-01-01

    A stack of CR-39 plastic track detectors was exposed to cosmic radiation during the 10 days mission aboard Spacelab-1. A part of the stack was rotated one revolution within 7 days. The impact time of most of the particles was correlated with the orbit position of the shuttle and thus with geomagnetic field parameters. The analysis of heavy particles with charge Z greater than or equal to 6 in the energy range 50-150 MeV per nucleon with special emphasis on geomagnetically forbidden particles is reported.

  8. STS-106 Onboard Photograph - International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of the International Space Station (ISS) was taken when Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-106 mission) approached the ISS for docking. At the top is the Russian Progress supply ship that is linked with the Russian built Service Module or Zvezda. The Zvezda is cornected with the Russian built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The U.S. built Node 1 or Unity module is seen at the bottom.

  9. A System for Measurement of Convection Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogatyrev, Gennady P.; Gorbunov, Aleksei V; Putin, Gennady F.; Ivanov, Alexander I.; Nikitin, Sergei A.; Polezhaev, Vadim I.

    1996-01-01

    A simple device for direct measurement of buoyancy driven fluid flows in a low-gravity environment is proposed. A system connecting spacecraft accelerometers data and results of thermal convection in enclosure measurements and numerical simulations is developed. This system will permit also to evaluate the low frequency microacceleration component. The goal of the paper is to present objectives and current results of ground-based experimental and numerical modeling of this convection detector.

  10. Russian perspectives: The past shapes the present

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, R.P.

    1994-11-01

    This document contains an outline of a speech given to a group of professionals at Pacific Northwest Laboratory which was intended to give an unbiased view of Soviet perceptions. Topics discussed include: The new mission of US and Soviet labs and institutions to develop products and dedicate research to post cold war threat, historical prospectives of Russia, Russian military roles and missions, ideology of Russian politics, evils of capitalism, Russian civil war, communism, world war II, Russian losses during the war, the cold war, reasons why America should care what happens in Russia, the internal threat against a market-based economy, the US should help, and the Russian people and their attitudes.

  11. US/Russian Joint Film Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A joint U.S./Russian film test was conducted during MIR Mission 18 to evaluate the effects of radiation on photographic film during long-duration space flights. Two duplicate sets of film were flown on this MIR mission: one set was processed and evaluated by the NASA/JSC Photographic Laboratory, and the other by the RKK Energia's Photographic Laboratory in Moscow. This preliminary report includes only the results of the JSC evaluation (excluding the SN-10 film which was not available for evaluation at the time this report was written). The final report will include an evaluation by JSC of the SN-10 film and an evaluation of the test data by the RKK Energia. ISC's evaluation of the test data showed the positive film flown was damaged very little when exposed to approximately 8 rads of radiation. Two of the three negative films were significantly damaged and the third film was damaged only moderately.

  12. Morphometric and genetics properties of pea crops grown in space greenhouse Lada"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinskikh, M.; Sychev, V.; Podolsky, I.; Gostimsky, S.; Bingham, G.

    Results of the experiments with higher plants performed in greenhouse Svet aboard the MIR space station in 1996-1999 made it evident that the main biological characteristics of plants growth development reproduction and metabolism did not undergo modifications in consequence of microgravity It was shown that at least two ontogenetic cycles of plants could pass in the normal way in this environment However the initial experimental data was insufficient for fiducial conclusions on the delayed effects of cultivating a sequence of plant generations on the background of spaceflight factors Hence these investigations are given precedence in the space life sciences research programs In the period from March 2003 to April 2005 we fulfilled five experimental cultivations of genetically marked dwarf pea species in greenhouse Lada installed in the Russian segment of the International space station The purpose of this series of experiments was to make morphologic and genetic analysis of pea plants grown in successive generations According to our results pea growth and development over the full cycle of ontogenesis from seed to seed taking place in space greenhouse Lada were not different as compared with the ground control plants In addition four successive pea crops gathered in space flight did not loose their reproductive functions and formed viable seeds Genetic analysis of the plants grown from the space and ground seeds produced by the first to fourth successive crops was performed using the methods of

  13. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  14. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  15. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  16. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  17. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  18. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  19. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  20. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  1. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... treatment of water upon investigations made by representatives of State departments of health or of...

  2. [Results of measuring neutrons doses and energy spectra inside Russian segment of the International Space Station in experiment "Matryoshka-R" using bubble detectors during the ISS-24-34 missions].

    PubMed

    Khulapko, S V; Liagushin, V I; Arkhangel'skiĭ, V V; Shurshakov, V A; Smith, M; Ing, H; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I V

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating the equivalent dose from and energy spectrum of neutrons in the right-hand crewquarters in module Zvezda of the ISS Russian segment. Dose measurements were made in the period between July, 2010 and November, 2012 (ISS Missions 24-34) by research equipment including the bubble dosimeter as part of experiment "Matryoshka-R". Neutron energy spectra in the crewquarters are in good agreement with what has been calculated for the ISS USOS and, earlier, for the MIR orbital station. The neutron dose rate has been found to amount to 196 +/- 23 microSv/d on Zvezda panel-443 (crewquarters) and 179 +/- 16 microSv/d on the "Shielding shutter" surface in the crewquarters. PMID:25089327

  3. Space Station Crew Welcomes World's First Commercial Cargo Craft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 31 Flight Engineer Don Pettit of NASA, Flight Engineer Andre Kuipers of the European Space Agency and Flight Engineer Joe Acaba of NASA grappled a...

  4. STS-65 crew works inside the IML-2 spacelab module aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In the spacelab science module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, four members of the STS-65 crew busy themselves with experiments in support of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Mission Specialist (MS) Donald A. Thomas with his feet hooked on a center aisle stowage unit handrail talks with MS Leroy Chiao in the foreground while Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb takes notes at Rack 5 Biorack (BR) glovebox. Japanese Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai reviews her notes in the background. Mukai represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  5. Universal stowage module for future space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descamp, V. A.; Hussey, M. W.; Garber, P.; Mandras, W.; Mckinney, D.

    1974-01-01

    The design effort to develop, design, and fabricate a prototype Universal Stowage Module with universal restraints that are readily adaptable for most sizes and shapes of items that would be launched into space and returned aboard shuttle payloads is presented.

  6. NASA, Rockets, and the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    General overview of NASA, Launch Services Program, and the Slosh experiment aboard the International Space Station. This presentation is designed to be presented in front of university level students in hopes of inspiring them to go into STEM careers.

  7. Science off the Sphere: Space Balloonacy

    NASA Video Gallery

    In his off duty time, NASA Astronaut Don Pettit cools down with some microgravity water balloon experiments aboard the International Space Station. Through a partnership between NASA and the Americ...

  8. International Space Station Acoustics - A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to control acoustic noise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to provide a satisfactory environment for voice communications, crew productivity, alarm audibility, and restful sleep, and to minimize the risk for temporary and permanent hearing loss. Acoustic monitoring is an important part of the noise control process on ISS, providing critical data for trend analysis, noise exposure analysis, validation of acoustic analyses and predictions, and to provide strong evidence for ensuring crew health and safety, thus allowing Flight Certification. To this purpose, sound level meter (SLM) measurements and acoustic noise dosimetry are routinely performed. And since the primary noise sources on ISS include the environmental control and life support system (fans and airflow) and active thermal control system (pumps and water flow), acoustic monitoring will reveal changes in hardware noise emissions that may indicate system degradation or performance issues. This paper provides the current acoustic levels in the ISS modules and sleep stations and is an update to the status presented in 2011. Since this last status report, many payloads (science experiment hardware) have been added and a significant number of quiet ventilation fans have replaced noisier fans in the Russian Segment. Also, noise mitigation efforts are planned to reduce the noise levels of the T2 treadmill and levels in Node 3, in general. As a result, the acoustic levels on the ISS continue to improve.

  9. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  10. Biological dosimetry in Russian and Italian astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, O.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Snigiryova, G.; Obe, G.

    Large uncertainties are associated with estimates of equivalent dose and cancer risk for crews of longterm space missions. Biological dosimetry in astronauts is emerging as a useful technique to compare predictions based on quality factors and risk coefficients with actual measurements of biological damage in-flight. In the present study, chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in one Italian and eight Russian cosmonauts following missions of different duration on the MIR and the international space station (ISS). We used the technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to visualize translocations in chromosomes 1 and 2. In some cases, an increase in chromosome damage was observed after flight, but no correlation could be found between chromosome damage and flight history, in terms of number of flights at the time of sampling, duration in space and extra-vehicular activity. Blood samples from one of the cosmonauts were exposed in vitro to 6 MeV X-rays both before and after the flight. An enhancement in radiosensitivity induced by the spaceflight was observed.

  11. Russian RBMK reactor design information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received.

  12. Microgravity protein crystallisation aboard the photon satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayen, Naomi E.

    1995-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase was used as a sample protein to determine whether the optimum conditions for crystallisation in microgravity were identical to those on Earth. The degree of reproducibility of the results in microgravity was also tested. The results showed that, comparing experiments performed in identical apparatus, the conditions for obtaining the largest crystals in microgravity were different from the optimal conditions on Earth. Crystal form, size, visual quality and the reproducibility of the results were no different from those on Earth. Crystallisation took place in the vapour diffusion set-up of the Russian Kashtan apparatus which flew on a Photon satellite (4-20 October 1991).

  13. Biological investigations aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairbekov, M. G.; Parfyonov, G. P.; Platonova, R. W.; Abramova, V. M.; Golov, V. K.; Rostopshina, A. V.; Lyubchenko, V. Yu.; Chuchkin, V. G.

    Experiments on insects, higher plants and lower fungi were carried out aboard the biological satellite Cosmos-1129, in Earth orbit, from 25 September to 14 October 1979. The main objective of these experiments was to gain more profound knowledge of the effect of weightlessness on living organisms and to study the mechanisms by which these various organisms with different life cycles can adjust and develop in weightlessness. Experiments on insects (Drosophila melanogaster) were made with a view towards understanding gravitational preference in flies, the life cycle of which took place on board the biosatellite under conditions of artificial gravity. Experiments on higher plants (Zea mays, Arabidopsis taliana, Lycopersicum esculentum) and lower fungi (Physarum polycephalum) were performed.

  14. STS-103 Commander Brown arrives at SLF aboard a T-38 jet for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. is happy to arrive at Kennedy Space Center to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Also participating are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery.

  15. Space assembly methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, J. W.; Watters, H. H.

    1981-02-01

    Large space structure assembly analysis techniques are defined and simulation activities are described. The simulations included are: an extravehicular activity assembly simulation; a fabricated beam assembly series using a beam generating machine end caps, and cross beam brackets; deployment of a deployable truss, using the neutral buoyancy remote manipulator system with crewman assistance; and a series aboard the KC-135 zero g aircraft.

  16. Analysis of the ISS Russian Segment Outer Surface Materials Installed on the CKK Detachable Cassette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, S. F.; Borisov, V. A.; Plotnikov, A. D.; Sokolova, S. P.; Kurilenok, A. O.; Skurat, V. E.; Leipunsky, I. O.; Pshechenkov, P. A.; Beryozkina, N. G.; Volkov, I. O.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the effects caused by space environmental factors (SEF) and the International Space Station's (ISS) outer environment on operational parameters of the outer surface materials of the ISS Russian Segment (RS). The tests were performed using detachable container cassettes (CKK) that serve as a part of the ISS RS contamination control system.

  17. Peculiarities of ultrastructure of Chlorella cells growing aboard the Bion-10 during 12 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A. F.; Sytnik, K. M.

    The ultrastructure of Chlorella cells grown in darkness on a solid agar medium with organic additions aboard the Bion-1O biosatellite was studied. Certain differences in submicroscopic organization of organelles in the experimental cells were revealed compared to the Earth control. The changes are registered mainly in ultrastructure of energetic organelles - mitochondria and plastids of the experimental cells, in particular, an increase of mitochondria and their cristae size, as well as an increase of the total volume of mitochondrion per cell were established. The decrease of the starch amount in the plastid stroma and the electron density of the latter was also observed. In many experimental cells, the increase of condensed chromatin in the nuclei has been noted. Ultrastructural rearrangements in cells after laboratory experiment realized according to the thermogram registered aboard the Bion-10 were insignificant compared to the flight experiment. Data obtained are compared to results of space flight experiments carried out aboard the Bion-9 (polycomponent aquatic system) and the orbital station Mir (solid agar medium).

  18. Demonstration of a joint US-Russian very long baseline interferometry tracking capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroger, P. M.; Iijima, B. A.; Edwards, C. D.; Altunin, V.; Alexeev, V.; Lipatov, B.; Molotov, E.

    1992-11-01

    This article discusses results of the first very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) measurements between antennas of the NASA DSN and the Russian three-station spacecraft tracking network. The VLBI systems of the U.S. and Russian tracking networks are described, and their compatibility for joint U.S.-Russian measurements is discussed. The results of a series of VLBI measurements involving Deep Space Stations and Russian tracking antennas are presented. The purpose of these first observations is to establish the compatibility of the two VLBI recording systems and verify that data recorded on these systems can be successfully correlated. The delay and delay rate observables produced by correlation of the recorded data are then used to estimate the locations of the Russian tracking stations relative to the Deep Space Stations. These first experiments, carried out at 1.7 GHz, are precursors to a future series of observations at 2 and 8 GHz, which will provide far more accurate station location estimates. The capability of the VLBI systems for joint U.S.-Russian spacecraft navigation measurements is also discussed.

  19. Demonstration of a joint US-Russian very long baseline interferometry tracking capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroger, P. M.; Iijima, B. A.; Edwards, C. D.; Altunin, V.; Alexeev, V.; Lipatov, B.; Molotov, E.

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses results of the first very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) measurements between antennas of the NASA DSN and the Russian three-station spacecraft tracking network. The VLBI systems of the U.S. and Russian tracking networks are described, and their compatibility for joint U.S.-Russian measurements is discussed. The results of a series of VLBI measurements involving Deep Space Stations and Russian tracking antennas are presented. The purpose of these first observations is to establish the compatibility of the two VLBI recording systems and verify that data recorded on these systems can be successfully correlated. The delay and delay rate observables produced by correlation of the recorded data are then used to estimate the locations of the Russian tracking stations relative to the Deep Space Stations. These first experiments, carried out at 1.7 GHz, are precursors to a future series of observations at 2 and 8 GHz, which will provide far more accurate station location estimates. The capability of the VLBI systems for joint U.S.-Russian spacecraft navigation measurements is also discussed.

  20. ISS Update: Russian Spacesuits and Spacewalks

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Marc Ciupitu, EVA Flight and Increment Manager, about the Russian Orlan spacesuits that cosmonauts wear during spacewalks. Marc also discusses wha...

  1. Electrochemical deposition of silver crystals aboard Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.; Johnston, M. H.; Gates, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Silver crystals were grown aboard Skylab 4 by an electro-chemical reaction and subsequently returned to earth for comparison with crystals grown at 1- and 5-g. Both the Skylab and earth-grown crystals show a variety of structures. Certain tendencies in structure dependency on gravity level, however, can be discerned. In addition, downward growing dendrite streamers; upward growing chunky crystal streamers; growth along an air/liquid interface; and ribbon, film, and fiber crystal habits were observed in experiments conducted on the ground with solutions of varying concentrations. It was also observed that the crystal structures of space and ground electro-deposited silver crystals were very similar to the structures of germanium selenide and germanium telluride crystals grown in space and on the ground by a vapor transport technique. Consideration of the data leads to the conclusions that: (1) the rate of electrochemical displacement of silver ions from a 5 percent aqueous solution by copper is predominantly diffussion controlled in space and kinetically controlled in 1- and higher-g because of augmentation of mass transport by convection; (2) downward and upward crystal streamers are the result of gravity-driven convection, the flow patterns of which can be delineated. Lateral growths along an air/liquid interface are the result of surface-tension-driven convection, the pattern of which also can be delineated; (3) electrolysis in space or low-g environments can produce either dendritic crystals with more perfect microcrystalline structures or massive, single crystals with fewer defects than those grown on ground or at higher g-levels. Ribbons or films of space-grown silicon crystals would find a ready market for electronic substrate and photocell applications. Space-grown dendritic, metal crystals present the possibility of unique catalysts. Large perfect crystals of various materials are desired for a number of electronic and optical applications; and (4) vapor

  2. A tribute to Peter A. Rona: A Russian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagalevich, Anatoly; Lutz, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    In July 1985 Peter Rona led a cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Researcher as part of the NOAA Vents Program and discovered, for the first time, black smokers, massive sulfide deposits and vent biota in the Atlantic Ocean. The site of the venting phenomena was the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) Hydrothermal Field on the east wall of the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°08‧N; 44°50‧W (Rona, 1985; Rona et al., 1986). In 1986, Peter and an international research team carried out multidisciplnary investigations of both active and inactive hydrothermal zones of the TAG field using the R/V Atlantis and DSV Alvin, discovering two new species of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata and Chorocaris chacei) (Williams and Rona, 1986) and a hexagonal-shaped form (Paleodictyon nodosum) thought to be extinct (Rona et al., 2009). In 1991 a Russian crew aboard the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, with two deep-diving, human-occupied submersibles (Mir-1 and Mir-2) (Fig. 1), had the honor of having Peter Rona and a Canadian IMAX film crew from the Stephen Low Company on board to visit the TAG hydrothermal vent field. This was the first of many deep-sea interactions between Russian deep-sea scientists and their colleagues from both the U.S. and Canada. This expedition to the TAG site was part of a major Russian undersea program aimed at exploring extreme deep-sea environments; between 1988 and 2005, the Mir submersibles visited hydrothermal vents and cold seep areas in 20 deep-sea regions throughout the world's oceans (Sagalevich, 2002). Images of several of these areas (the TAG, Snake Pit, Lost City and 9°50‧N vent fields) were obtained using an IMAX camera system emplaced for the first time within the spheres of the Mir submersibles and DSV Alvin in conjunction with the filming of science documentaries (e.g., "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea") produced by the Stephen Low Company in conjunction with Emory Kristof of National Geographic and

  3. Astronaut Returns Space-Flown Flag to NRAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    Russian space station Mir. In 1999, he performed two space walks during a Discovery mission to install new instruments on Hubble. In 1991, while a senior research fellow at Caltech, Grunsfeld was the principal investigator for a series of VLA observations of a gamma-ray-emitting object, conducted at the same time the object was observed by the orbiting Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. "I still think fondly of my observations at the VLA," said Grunsfeld. During his visit to New Mexico, Grunsfeld formally presented the NRAO flag to the observatory, along with documentation of its flight aboard Columbia. He also addressed the awards ceremonies of the New Mexico State Science Fair. "We are particularly pleased that John's visit allowed him to speak to the science fair students," said Jim Ulvestad, NRAO's Assistant Director for New Mexico operations. "Those students heard from someone whose science training has literally taken him beyond the Earth," Ulvestad said. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. International Space Station Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is an unparalleled international scientific and technological cooperative venture that will usher in a new era of human space exploration and research and provide benefits to people on Earth. On-Orbit assembly began on November 20, 1998, with the launch of the first ISS component, Zarya, on a Russian Proton rocket. The Space Shuttle followed on December 4, 1998, carrying the U.S.-built Unity cornecting Module. Sixteen nations are participating in the ISS program: the United States, Canada, Japan, Russia, Brazil, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The ISS will include six laboratories and be four times larger and more capable than any previous space station. The United States provides two laboratories (United States Laboratory and Centrifuge Accommodation Module) and a habitation module. There will be two Russian research modules, one Japanese laboratory, referred to as the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), and one European Space Agency (ESA) laboratory called the Columbus Orbital Facility (COF). The station's internal volume will be roughly equivalent to the passenger cabin volume of two 747 jets. Over five years, a total of more than 40 space flights by at least three different vehicles - the Space Shuttle, the Russian Proton Rocket, and the Russian Soyuz rocket - will bring together more than 100 different station components and the ISS crew. Astronauts will perform many spacewalks and use new robotics and other technologies to assemble ISS components in space.

  5. Russian Federation. Health system review.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Larisa; Potapchik, Elena; Shishkin, Sergey; Richardson, Erica; Vacroux, Alexandra; Mathivet, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    The HiT reviews are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of a health system and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems; describe the institutional framework, process, content and implementation of health and health care policies; and highlight challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. At independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, the Russian health system inherited an extensive, centralized Semashko system, but was quick to reform health financing by adopting a mandatory health insurance (MHI) model in 1993. MHI was introduced in order to open up an earmarked stream of funding for health care in the face of severe fiscal constraints. While the health system has evolved and changed significantly since the early 1990 s, the legacy of having been a highly centralized system focused on universal access to basic care remains. High energy prices on world markets have ensured greater macroeconomic stability, a budget surplus and improvements in living standards for most of the Russian population. However, despite an overall reduction in the poverty rate, there is a marked urban rural split and rural populations have worse health and poorer access to health services than urban populations. The increase in budgetary resources available to policy-makers have led to a number of recent federal-level health programmes that have focused on the delivery of services and increasing funding for priority areas including primary care provision in rural areas. Nevertheless, public health spending in the Russian Federation remains relatively low given the resources available. However, it is also clear that, even with the current level of financing, the performance of the health system could be improved. Provider payment mechanisms are the main obstacle to improving technical efficiency in

  6. Survey Analysis of Materials Processing Experiments Aboard STS-47: Spacelab J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, R. J.; Wright, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) is a survey outline of materials processing experiments aboard Space Shuttle Mission STS-47: Spacelab J, a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The mission explored materials processing experiments including electronics and crystal growth materials, metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, and fluids. Experiments covered include Growth of Silicone Spherical Crystals and Surface Oxidation, Growth Experiment of Narrow Band-Gap Semiconductor Lead-Tin-Tellurium Crystals in Space, Study on Solidification of Immiscible Alloys, Fabrication of Very-Low-Density, High-Stiffness Carbon Fiber/Aluminum Hybridized Composites, High Temperature Behavior of Glass, and Study of Bubble Behavior. The TM underscores the historical significance of these experiments in the context of materials processing in space.

  7. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  8. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  9. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  10. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  11. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  12. Station Crew Celebrates Christmas

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the orbiting International Space Station, Expedition 34 Commander Kevin Ford, Russian Flight Engineers Oleg Novitskiy, Evgeny Tarelkin and Roman Romanenko, NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn...

  13. STS-96 Space Shuttle Discovery rolls back to Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery makes the climb to Launch Pad 39B aboard the mobile launcher platform and crawler transporter. The crawler is able to keep its cargo level during the move up the five percent grade, not varying from the vertical more than the diameter of a soccer ball. At right are the rotating and fixed service structures which will be used during prelaunch preparations at the pad. Earlier in the week, the Shuttle was rolled back to the VAB from the pad to repair hail damage on the external tank's foam insulation. Mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program, is scheduled for liftoff May 27 at 6:48 a.m. EDT. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  14. Russian Emotion Vocabulary in American Learners' Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlenko, Aneta; Driagina, Viktoria

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the uses of emotion vocabulary in narratives elicited from monolingual speakers of Russian and English and advanced American learners of Russian. Monolingual speakers differed significantly in the distribution of emotion terms across morphosyntactic categories: English speakers favored an adjectival pattern of emotion…

  15. Russian Media Education Researches: 1950-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzed the development of Russian media education researches from 1950 to 2010 years. The list of theses of the Russian authors on the subject of Media Education is about 180 titles since 1950. Nearly 70 of them have been defended for the recent 10 years. From 1950 till 1959 six theses were defended, from 1960 till 1969--15; from…

  16. Russian Literature: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    An annotated bibliography of general and specialized reference works for Russian and Soviet literature is intended for both students and researchers. English language and Russian language sources in the McGill University (Canada) libraries are included. Subject headings include guides (to the literature and to archival resources), encyclopedias,…

  17. Syllabus for Use in Russian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cernonok, Jevgenij

    This syllabus outlines a two semester course to accompany the basic textbook: THE EPIC OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE by Marc Slonim. An introduction to the guide gives a brief summary of the history of Russian literature and objectives of the course are stated, defining concepts and understandings to be developed. In addition, teaching techniques are…

  18. The Historical Self-Awareness of Russians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorshkov, M. K.; Davydova, N. M.

    2006-01-01

    In June and July 2004, the Institute for Comprehensive Social Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with the Russian Federation office of the F. Ebert Foundation, carried out a repeat survey on the topic of "Citizens of the New Russia: How Do They Feel about Themselves, and What Society Would They Like to Live In?" Use was…

  19. Russian for Trade Negotiations with the USSR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, James S.

    The primary goal of this text is to present the vocabulary and phraseology used in Soviet-American trade and to provide the student with oral facility in business Russian. In order to bring together the vocabulary of the diverse fields which play a role in such trade, the student is presented with sufficient background information in Russian to…

  20. Syllabus for Use in Imperial Russian History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husum, Carol

    This syllabus is an outline of a one semester course in Imperial Russia designed to emphasize the relationship between Russia's past and her present. Course content begins with the founding of the first Russian state and continues to the fall of the Romanovs in 1917. In addition, some topics are suggested for investigation of Russian history in…

  1. Legal Portion in Russian Inheritance Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inshina, Roza; Murzalimova, Lyudmila

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the right to inherit as one of the basic human rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The state has set rules according to which after a person's death, his or her property is inherited by other persons. The Russian civil legislation establishes the institution of legal portions that is…

  2. Predicate Adjective Usage in Standard Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Morton

    1959-01-01

    This paper describes predicate adjective usage in modern standard Russian using a corpus of written Russian derived from "Pravda" (neutral literary style) and "Krokodil" (conversational material). The short, long nominative, and instrumental forms are examined in relation to the type of adjective, copulative verb, sentence subject, and other…

  3. The Structure of the Russian Proverb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Maurice I.

    Bipartite and tripartite Russian proverbs are analyzed in terms of devices of repetition. Major attention is given to formulaic devices, including correlative, contrastive, and conjunctive formulas. Grammatical and phonetic devices are also discussed. An argument is advanced for the basic binary division of the Russian proverb, since even…

  4. Russian "Defectology": Anticipating Perestroika in the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses both the background and the current state of treatment of children with disabilities in Russia. Describes the theoretical basis of the modern Russian approach to disability, the current population's needs, and the existing system for referral and rehabilitation. Identifies merging trends and new perspectives on the Russian treatment of…

  5. Russian-American tomography experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C.; Buonsanto, M.J.; Holt, J.M.; Klobucha, J.A.; Fougere, P.

    1994-12-31

    To intercompare various techniques used in reconstructing tomographic images, and to benchmark those results with direct observations obtained by the incoherent scatter technique, an experimental campaign and subsequent analysis program, the Russian-American Tomography Experiment (RATE), was implemented in late 1993. Russian experimental teams from the Polar Geophysical Institute in Murmansk and Moscow State University joined with American investigators from the Phillips Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an array of four receiving stations was set up in the northeastern United States and in eastern Canada to obtain data for the tomographic reconstructions. Phase-difference and total-phase tomographic reconstruction techniques have been employed and are intercompared. The spatial/altitude distribution of ionospheric electron content was observed by the MIT Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar that scanned the ionosphere in a plane parallel to the satellite overflights. The authors present preliminary reconstructions of the ionospheric structure observed during a severe mid-latitude ionospheric storm that took place during the campaign. The drastic large-scale changes in the ionospheric structure that accompanied the November 1993 storm were well observed by the two diagnostic techniques.

  6. Factors fragmenting the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.

    1993-10-06

    This paper examines the factors that threaten the future of the Russian Federation (RF). The observations are based on a study that focused on eight republics: Mordova, Udmurtia, Tatarstan, Mari El, Bashkortostan, Kabardino-Balkaria, Buryatia, and Altay Republic. These republics were selected for their geographic and economic significance to the RF. Tatarstan, Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, and Mari El are located on important supply routes, such as the Volga River and the trans-Siberian railroad. Some of these republics are relatively wealthy, with natural resources such as oil (e.g., Tatarstan and Bashkortostan), and all eight republics play significant roles in the military-industrial complex. The importance of these republics to the RF contrasts to the relative insignificance of the independence-minded Northern Caucasus area. The author chose not to examine the Northern Caucasus region (except Kabardino-Balkaria) because these republics may have only a minor impact on the rest of the RF if they secede. Their impact would be minimized because they lie on the frontiers of the RF. Many Russians believe that {open_quotes}it might be best to let such a troublesome area secede.{close_quotes}

  7. Astronauts Schirra and Stafford welcomed aboard the U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (shaking hands) and Thomas P. Stafford received an Official welcome as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp following their 25 hour 52 minute mission in space. The three Navy officers greeting the astronauts are (left to right) Vice Admiral Charles E. Weakley, commander of the Antisubmarine Warfare Force of the Atlantic Fleet; Rear Admiral William E. Leonard, commander of Antisubmarine Task Group Bravo, of which the Wasp is the flagship; and Capt. G.E. Hartley, commander of the Wasp.

  8. STS-65 Payload Specialist Mukai enters IML-2 spacelab module aboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During STS-65 aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai is ready to begin one of her busy twelve hour shifts as she enters the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) spacelab science module via the spacelab tunnel (note hatch opening behind her). The tunnel connects the IML-2 module with the OV-102's crew compartment. Mounted on a rack handrail and on an forward end cone bracket are video cameras that will record the two weeks of experimenting inside the module. Mukai is a representative from the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  9. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  10. Rocket Rock: Soyuz Crew Gets a Sendoff Song from ZZ Top

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Astronaut Michael Fossum, now on his way to the International Space Station aboard the Russian Soyuz TMA-02M along with his fellow astronauts and cosmonauts aboard got a sneak preview of a tra...

  11. Radiation measurements aboard the fourth Gemini flight.

    PubMed

    Janni, J F; Schneider, M F

    1967-01-01

    Two special tissue-equivalent ionization chambers and 5 highly sensitive passive dosimetry packages were flown aboard the recent Gemini 4 flight for the purpose of obtaining precise values of instantaneous dose rate, accumulated dose. and shielding effectiveness. This experiment marked the first time that well-defined tissue dose and radiation survey measurements have been carried out in manned spaceflight operations. Since all measurements were accomplished under normal spacecraft environmental conditions, the biological dose resulted primarily from trapped inner Van Allen Belt radiation encountered by the spacecraft in the South Atlantic Anomaly. The experiment determined the particle type, ionizing and penetrating power, and variation with time and position within the Gemini spacecraft. Measured dose rates ranged from 100 mrad/hr for passes penetrating deeply into the South Atlantic Anomaly to less than 0.1 mrad/hr from lower latitude cosmic radiation. The accumulated tissue dose measured by the active ionization chambers, shielded by 0.4 gm/cm2 for the 4-day mission, was 82 mrad. Since the 5 passive dosimetry packages were each located in different positions within the spacecraft, the total mission surface dose measured by these detectors varied from 73 to 27 mrad, depending upon location and shielding. The particles within the spacecraft were recorded in nuclear emulsion, which established that over 90% of the tissue dose was attributable to penetrating protons. This experiment indicates that the radiation environment under shielded conditions at Gemini altitudes was not hazardous. PMID:11973852

  12. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-06-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  13. Occupational lead exposure aboard a tall ship

    SciTech Connect

    Landrigan, P.J.; Straub, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate occupational exposures to lead in shipfitters cutting and riveting lead-painted iron plates aboard an iron-hulled sailing vessel, the authors conducted an environmental and medical survey. Lead exposures in seven personal (breathing zone) air samples ranged from 108 to 500 micrograms/mT (mean 257 micrograms/mT); all were above the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard of 50 micrograms/mT. In two short-term air samples obtained while exhaust ventilation was temporarily disconnected, mean lead exposure rose to 547 micrograms/mT. Blood lead levels in ten shipfitters ranged from 25 to 53 micrograms/dl. Blood lead levels in shipfitters were significantly higher than in other shipyard workers. Smoking shipfitters had significantly higher lead levels than nonsmokers. Lead levels in shipfitters who wore respirators were not lower than in those who wore no protective gear. Four shipfitters had erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) concentrations above the adult upper normal limit of 50 micrograms/dl. A close correlation was found between blood lead and EP levels. Prevalence of lead-related symptoms was no higher in shipfitters than in other workers. These data indicate that serious occupational exposure to lead can occur in a relatively small boatyard.

  14. Social and racial correlates of Russian roulette.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven; Wasserman, Ira

    2008-08-01

    The epidemiology of a neglected form of suicidal behavior, Russian roulette, is addressed. Also tested is an explanation of racial differences based on the opportunity theory of deviant behavior related to the availability of revolvers, necessary weapons with which to play Russian roulette. Data refer to 15 cases of Russian roulette found through a search of the medical examiner's suicide files (N = 1,412) and 75 matched controls who suicided by a gunshot to the head. The results support an opportunity perspective: 80% of the Russian roulette victims were African American compared to 30.7% of the controls. Further, among the controls, Blacks were three times more likely than Whites to use revolvers in suicides, a pattern indicating Blacks' greater access to revolvers. Russian roulette victims were entirely male, significantly younger, and less apt to be married than the control group. PMID:18724791

  15. The Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.; Baker, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    The United States and Russia discovered a mutual interest in fuel cell development during a series of workshops designed to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian nuclear weapon scientists and engineers to aid them in converting their skill to peaceful applications. The proposal for a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium was initiated at the third workshop held in Livermore, CA, in May 1994. Representatives from U.S. fuel cell industries, U.S. research institutes, Russian institutes and ministries, and U.S. national laboratories attended, including those from GAZPROM, the Russian natural gas company. GASPROM needs to provide power for telemetry, cathodic corrosion protection of gas lines, and gas line pumping power in remote areas, and estimates that it needs approximately seventy thousand 1.5 to 15 KW plants to do so. Since the workshop, several direct working relationships have developed between the Russian Nuclear Weapon Institutes and the U.S. fuel cell industry.

  16. Russian "defectology": anticipating Perestroika in the field.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, E L

    1998-01-01

    Created as a part of the general Russian educational system, special education in Russia has mirrored all the good and bad qualities of that system. It was during the Soviet phase of its existence that Russian remedial education developed its specific and unique character, reflecting the structure and values of the global social environment. Despite the fact that Russian society realized the need to change its general educational system, remedial education remained untouched by reconstructive forces. This article discusses both the background and the current state of treatment of children with disabilities in Russia. The theoretical basis of the modern Russian approach to disability, the current needy population, and the existing system for referral and rehabilitation are described, and emerging trends and new perspectives on the Russian treatment of children with disabilities are presented. PMID:9529790

  17. GROUP-C and LITES Experiments for Ionospheric Remote Sensing aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities, also known as ionospheric bubbles, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Understanding irregularity formation, development, and evolution is vital for efforts within NASA and DoD to forecast scintillation. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the International Space Station (ISS) would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry Colocated (GROUPC) and the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are being considered for flight aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry with vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, we demonstrate that high-fidelity optical tomographic reconstruction of bubbles can be performed from the ISS. Ground-based imagery can supplement the tomography by providing all-sky images of ionospheric structures (e.g. bubbles and TIDs) and of signatures of lower atmospheric dynamics, such as gravity waves, that may play a role in irregularity formation. The optical instrumentation can be augmented with additional sensors to provide measurements of scintillation and in situ plasma density, composition, and drifts.

  18. Space station internal environmental and safety concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Matthew B.

    1987-01-01

    Space station environmental and safety concerns, especially those involving fires, are discussed. Several types of space station modules and the particular hazards associated with each are briefly surveyed. A brief history of fire detection and suppression aboard spacecraft is given. Microgravity fire behavior, spacecraft fire detector systems, space station fire suppression equipment and procedures, and fire safety in hyperbaric chambers are discussed.

  19. [Characteristic of toxic risks of air pollution by chemical admixtures aboard the piloted orbital stations].

    PubMed

    Mukhamedieva, L N; Bogomolov, V V

    2009-01-01

    Trends in the chemical composition of air revealed by the sanitary-chemical and toxicological investigations in multifactorial ground-based tests and long-term space flights aboard the Salyut- 6, 7, Mir and the International space station have been used to deduce the chemical characteristic and to substantiate methods to and criteria for evaluation of toxic risks to space crews from air chemical pollution. Of particular concern were the toxic risks and crew protection during the first ingress to modules on the stage of station assembly in orbit, in the course of long-term missions, and in the event of acute exposure in off-nominal and emergency conditions. PMID:19711857

  20. Comparison of Properties of Solid Lubricant Between Two Exposure Experiments Aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Mineo; Kimoto, Yugo

    To evaluate the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit space environment, the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiments were carried out on the International Space Station. As part of these experiments, changes in the tribological properties of a molybdenum disulfide bonded film that is used as a solid lubricant, were evaluated. The results of friction tests in a vacuum and surface analysis by XPS were compared between two exposure experiments aboard the Service Module (SM) and the Japan Experimental Module (JEM). The investigations revealed silicon and fluorine contaminations in the JEM/SEED flight sample, but with a lower amount of silicon contamination than the SM/SEED flight sample. The JEM/SEED flight sample and ground-based tested samples showed lower friction coefficients than a reference sample at the beginning of the tests. The friction behavior of the JEM/SEED flight sample was similar to those of SM/SEED flight samples.

  1. Ohio Senator John Glenn tours the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ohio Senator John Glenn, at right, enjoys a tour of the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. With Senator Glenn is Stephen Francois, director, Space Station and Shuttle Payloads, NASA. Senator Glenn arrived at KSC on Jan. 20 to tour KSC operational areas and to view the launch of STS-89. Glenn, who made history in 1962 as the first American to orbit the Earth, completing three orbits in a five-hour flight aboard Friendship 7, will fly his second space mission aboard Space Shuttle Discovery this October. Glenn is retiring from the Senate at the end of this year and will be a payload specialist aboard STS-95.

  2. STS-106 Onboard Photograph - International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of the International Space Station (ISS) was taken during the STS-106 mission. The ISS component nearest the camera is the U.S. built Node 1 or Unity module, which cornected with the Russian built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The FGB was linked with the Service Module or Zvezda. On the far end is the Russian Progress supply ship.

  3. The gamma-ray burst monitor for the Russian Mars 1996 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, K.P.; Bixler, J.; Cline, T.

    1997-08-01

    The authors describe an innovative detector designed primarily for the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts aboard interplanetary spacecraft. The experiment is a fully functional, low cost, low mass, low-power instrument, which, when combined with other similar instruments, has the capability of localizing bursts to arcminute precision. The burst monitor is based on a photomultiplier tube and a plastic/CsI(Tl) phoswich detector and records photons in the 20--150-keV energy range with time resolutions up to several milliseconds. In addition, it records photon energy spectra. Events in the plastic scintillator are distinguished by a pulse shape discrimination circuit and are used to count electrons and protons. In a planetary orbiter or fly-by mission, this capability can be used to detect the presence of a magnetosphere. The authors describe in detail a version of this instrument which was built for the Russian Mars 1996 mission.

  4. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 12; Express/T-160 Project Express A2 and A3 Sensors Operations Procedures Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg. E. and 11 deg. W respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  5. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 11; Express/T-160E Project Express A2 and A3 Data Agreement Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.; Dunning, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  6. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 5; Acquire Express-A3 SPT?100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  7. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 7; Acquire Express-A3 SPT-100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  8. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Acquire Express-A3 SPT 100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg E and 11 deg W, respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  9. Measurement of buoyancy driven convection and microaccelerations on board International Space Station with the use of convection sensor Dacon-M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putin, Gennady; Belyaev, Mikhail; Babushkin, Igor; Glukhov, Alexander; Zilberman, Evgeny; Maksimova, Marina; Ivanov, Alexander; Sazonov, Viktor; Nikitin, Sergey; Zavalishin, Denis; Polezhaev, Vadim

    The system for studying buoyancy driven convection and low-frequency microaccelerations aboard spacecraft is described. The system consists of: 1. facility for experimentation on a spaceship - the convection sensor and electronic equipment for apparatus control and for acquisition and processing of relevant information; 2. facility for ground-based laboratory modeling of various fluid motion mechanisms in application to orbital flight environment; 3. the system for computer simulations of convection processes in a fluid cell of a sensor using the data on microaccelerations obtained by accelerometers and another devices aboard the orbital station. The arrangement and functioning of the sensor and control hardware are expounded. The results of terrestrial experiments performed in order to determine the sensitivity of the sensor are described. The results of experiments carried out in 2008 - 2011 with the “DACON-M” apparatus in different modules of the Russian Segment of International Space Station and for various regimes of Station activity are reported. Experimental data recorded by “DACON-M” apparatus have been compared with the calculations of acceleration components based on the telemetry information about the orientation of the Station.

  10. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  11. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  12. Violence on the Russian & American Media Screen and Youth Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of the Russian and American experience regarding media violence, standards for rating Russian media programs, and a course of study on media violence for students will have a significant impact upon Russian society, will raise Russian societal and governmental attention to the infringement of the Rights of the Child on the Russian…

  13. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  14. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  15. 31 CFR 540.304 - Government of the Russian Federation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Government of the Russian Federation...) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.304 Government of the Russian Federation. (a) The term Government of the Russian Federation means the Government of the Russian Federation,...

  16. NASDA President Communicates With Japanese Crew Member Aboard the STS-47 Spacelab-J Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. From the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC), NASDA President, Mr. Yamano, speaks to Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, a Japanese crew member aboard the STS-47 Spacelab J mission.

  17. Space Station-based deep-space optical communication experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Schwartz, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of three experiments proposed for advanced optical deep-space communications is described. These proposed experiments would be carried out aboard the Space Station to test and evaluate the capability of optical instruments to conduct data communication and spacecraft navigation for deep-space missions. Techniques for effective data communication, precision spacecraft ranging, and accurate angular measurements will be developed and evaluated in a spaceborne environment.

  18. Fine Guidance System for the James Webb Space Telescope Delivered

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video has music in the background but no dialogue. The second of four main instruments to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) has been delivered to NASA. The Fine Guidance Sensor (F...

  19. President Obama and Family Arrive at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, arrive aboard Air Force One at the Cape Canaveral AFS near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center at approximately 2 p.m. E...

  20. Space Station Cameras Capture Views of Hurricane Irene From Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station, an Expedition 28 crew member captured views of intensifying Hurricane Irene from an altitude of 225 miles at 3:33 p.m. EDT on Aug. 22, 2011, as the tropical ...

  1. Space Station Live: Veteran Astronaut Talks Crew Orientation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters recently spoke with NASA astronaut Cady Coleman, who lived aboard the International Space Station as Expedition 27/27 crew member from December...

  2. Webb Telescope Backplane Arrives at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    Webb Telescope's Backplane arrived at Joint Base Andrews on Monday, August 24, 2015 aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5 cargo plane. The Backplane, inside the Space Telescope Transporter for Air Road and S...

  3. Analysis of Noise Exposure Measurements Made Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limardo, Jose G.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique workplace environment for U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts to conduct research and live for a period of six months or more. Noise has been an enduring environmental physical hazard that has been a challenge for the U.S. space program since before the Apollo era. Noise exposure in ISS poses significant risks to the crewmembers, such as; hearing loss (temporary or permanent), possible disruptions of crew sleep, interference with speech intelligibility and communication, possible interference with crew task performance, and possible reduction in alarm audibility. Acoustic measurements are made aboard ISS and compared to requirements in order to assess the acoustic environment to which the crewmembers are exposed. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the noise exposure monitoring program as well as an assessment of the acoustic dosimeter data collected to date. The hardware currently being used for monitoring the noise exposure onboard ISS will be discussed. Acoustic data onboard ISS has been collected since the beginning of ISS (Increment 1, November 2000). Noise exposure data analysis will include acoustic dosimetry logged data from crew-worn during work and sleep periods and also fixed-location measurements from Increment 1 to present day. Noise exposure levels (8-, 16- and 24-hr), LEQ, will also be provided and discussed in this paper. Discussions related to hearing protection will also be included. Future directions and recommendations for the noise exposure monitoring program will be highlighted. This acoustic data is used to ensure a safe and healthy working and living environment for the crewmembers aboard the ISS.

  4. International Space Station Microgravity Analytical Model Correlation And Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelBasso, Steve; Laible, Michael; OKeefe, Edmund; Scheer, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    The acceleration environment aboard the completed International Space Station (ISS) is a key resource for scientific and technological endeavors. Hardware verification activIties and early measurements indicate that the ISS is well on the way of meeting these "Assembly Complete" "microgravity" provisions, however, the simulation models that compute these accelerations have, to date, lacked the high degree of empirical validation typical of standard aerospace industry practices. Assembly stage, on-orbit measurements are used to address this shortcoming and to develop higher confidence in the simulation models. The Phase I correlation results show the analyses to be consistently conservative, producing higher than measured levels. The 25 to 30% greater quasi-steady computations are deemed acceptable for verification. Updates are made to localized structural dynamic and vibroacoustic parameters that reduce responses in selected one-third octave bands by almost 50%. These models are then used for the Assembly Complete verification analysis which concludes that the ISS vehicle meets the ISS microgravity requirements with minor reservations. Two of the sixteen rack are marginally non-compliant in the quasi-steady regime, and operational constraints are needed on the U. S. Lab and ESA APM vacuum resource vents, and the Russian Resistive Exercise Device in the structural dynamic regime.

  5. Space Shuttle Wireless Crew Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, R. W.; Doe, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The design, development, and performance characteristics of the Space Shuttle's Wireless Crew Communications System are discussed. This system allows Space Shuttle crews to interface with the onboard audio distribution system without the need for communications umbilicals, and has been designed through the adaptation of commercially available hardware in order to minimize development time. Testing aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia has revealed no failures or design deficiencies.

  6. Russian Roulette: From Sputnik to Global Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Problems in the educational system involving poor verbal and mathematics skills of students are discussed. The "back to basics" movement is advocated. The Russian instructional program at the University of Virginia is described. (SW)

  7. CHALLENGES POSED BY RETIRED RUSSIAN NUCLEAR SUBMARINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Dieter; Kroken, Ingjerd; Latyshev, Eduard; Griffith, Andrew

    2003-02-27

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the challenges posed by retired Russian nuclear submarines, review current U.S. and International efforts and provide an assessment of the success of these efforts.

  8. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  9. Russian Fires and Pakistani Floods Linked

    NASA Video Gallery

    Beginning in mid-July and stretching through mid-August, a persistent Omega-shaped blocking high over western Russian and Kazakhstan produced abnormally warm temperatures (indicated by the yellow a...

  10. Transponders For Use Aboard Distant Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Kayalar, Selahattin; Yeh, Hen-Geul; Kyriacou, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes three advanced architectures for transponders used in deep space. Offer greater reliability, faster acquisition of and better performance in tracking weak signals, and better telemetry performance on downlinks.

  11. ISS Update: Human Research Aboard Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs at the Marshall Space Flight Center’s Payload Operations Integration Center in Huntsville, Ala., recently spoke with Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries ...

  12. Recent NASA research accomplishments aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; North, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    The activation of the US Laboratory Module "Destiny" on the International Space Station (ISS) in February 2001 launched a new era in microgravity research. Destiny provides the environment to conduct long-term microgravity research utilizing human intervention to assess, report, and modify experiments real time. As the only available pressurized space platform, ISS maximizes today's scientific resources and substantially increases the opportunity to obtain much longed-for answers on the effects of microgravity and long-term exposure to space. In addition, it evokes unexpected questions and results while experiments are still being conducted, affording time for changes and further investigation. While building and outfitting the ISS is the main priority during the current ISS assembly phase, seven different space station crews have already spent more than 2000 crew hours on approximately 80 scientific investigations, technology development activities, and educational demonstrations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Genetic stock identification of Russian honey bees.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Lelania; Sheppard, Walter S; Sylvester, H Allen; Rinderer, Thomas E

    2010-06-01

    A genetic stock certification assay was developed to distinguish Russian honey bees from other European (Apis mellifera L.) stocks that are commercially produced in the United States. In total, 11 microsatellite and five single-nucleotide polymorphism loci were used. Loci were selected for relatively high levels of homogeneity within each group and for differences in allele frequencies between groups. A baseline sample consisted of the 18 lines of Russian honey bees released to the Russian Bee Breeders Association and bees from 34 queen breeders representing commercially produced European honey bee stocks. Suitability tests of the baseline sample pool showed high levels of accuracy. The probability of correct assignment was 94.2% for non-Russian bees and 93.3% for Russian bees. A neighbor-joining phenogram representing genetic distance data showed clear distinction of Russian and non-Russian honey bee stocks. Furthermore, a test of appropriate sample size showed a sample of eight bees per colony maximizes accuracy and consistency of the results. An additional 34 samples were tested as blind samples (origin unknown to those collecting data) to determine accuracy of individual assignment tests. Only one of these samples was incorrectly assigned. The 18 current breeding lines were represented among the 2009 blind sampling, demonstrating temporal stability of the genetic stock identification assay. The certification assay will be used through services provided by a service laboratory, by the Russian Bee Breeders Association to genetically certify their stock. The genetic certification will be used in conjunction with continued selection for favorable traits, such as honey production and varroa and tracheal mite resistance. PMID:20568639

  14. Surface Tension Demonstration Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Astronaut Donald R. Pettit, Expedition Six NASA ISS science officer, photographed this view of a surface tension demonstration using water that is held in place by a metal loop. The experiment took place in the Destiny laboratory on the International Space Station (ISS). The Expedition Six crew was delivered to the station via the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-113 mission which was launched on November 23, 2002.

  15. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  16. Russian-Australian Partnerships Fostering High School Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Graham

    A group of students from Knox Grammar School and Ravenswood School for Girls have just completed phase one of an exciting science project. For three years we have been working closely with the Russian Space Institute as they built, tested and finally launched a microsatellite from the shuttle Progress in March, this year. Our task was to build ground stations and test equipment so that after launch we would be able to receive telemetry and navigational data from the satellite. Sounds easy! What transpired was a three year journey through basic electronics, amateur radio and rocket science. Communication with the Russians was difficult but effective and despite many frustrations and delays, the first contact with the satellite made it all worthwhile. We spent many early morning and late nights during the school holidays listening to the ghostly sounds from 400 Km above us. Students needed to communicate by e-mail with non-English speaking rocket scientists on a daily basis to receive updated programmes, new data and new instructions. We ultimately managed to download about 50 files from the satellite and phase two of the project involving e-mail communication between Australian and Russian students is underway. I expect the project to continue for months ahead as we unravel and make sense of the reams of data about fluctuations in the magnetosphere over Europe and Australia. The scientific impact of the data, however, is secondary to the experiences that we have enjoyed. Space is suddenly relevant and much closer for these lucky students who spanned Grade 6 - Year 12.

  17. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter approaches LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, begins the climb up the ramp to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler-transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler- transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  18. The opportunities for space biology research on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of space biology research to be conducted aboard the Space Station in 1990s include long-term studies of reproduction, development, growth, physiology, behavior, and aging in both animals and plants. They also include studies of the mechanisms by which gravitational stimuli are sensed, processed, and transmitted to a responsive site, and of the effect of microgravity on each component. The Space Station configuration will include a life sciences research facility, where experiment cyles will be on a 90-day basis (since the Space Station missions planned for the 1990s call for 90-day intervals). A modular approach is taken to accomodate animal habitats, plant growth chambers, and other specimen holding facilities; the modular habitats would be transportable between the launch systems, habitat racks, a workbench, and a variable-gravity centrifuge (included for providing artificial gravity and accurately controlled acceleration levels aboard Space Station).

  19. The telemedicine spacebridge project: A joint US/Russian venture in long distance medicine via satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuzek, John E.; Cauley, Michael A.; Hollansworth, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The Telemedicine Spacebridge Demonstration Project is a joint U.S./Russian program whose purpose is to further the application of telemedicine both internationally, domestically, and in space. The system has been set up to use a Russian satellite over the Atlantic Ocean and a U.S. domestic satellite to allow physicians a two-way video and audio link between various sites of medical centers in the United States and the Central Hospital in Moscow, Russia. This paper contains a description of the project background, the Spacebridge system, the individual pieces of the system, and the operational experience gained thus far in the project.

  20. Space Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Space Rescue has been a topic of speculation for a wide community of people for decades. Astronauts, aerospace engineers, diplomats, medical and rescue professionals, inventors and science fiction writers have all speculated on this problem. Martin Caidin's 1964 novel Marooned dealt with the problems of rescuing a crew stranded in low earth orbit. Legend at the Johnson Space Center says that Caidin's portrayal of a Russian attempt to save the American crew played a pivotal role in convincing the Russians to join the real joint Apollo-Soyuz mission. Space Rescue has been a staple in science fiction television and movies portrayed in programs such as Star Trek, Stargate-SG1 and Space 1999 and movies such as Mission To Mars and Red Planet. As dramatic and as difficult as rescue appears in fictional accounts, in the real world it has even greater drama and greater difficulty. Space rescue is still in its infancy as a discipline and the purpose of this chapter is to describe the issues associated with space rescue and the work done so far in this field. For the purposes of this chapter, the term space rescue will refer to any system which allows for rescue or escape of personnel from situations which endanger human life in a spaceflight operation. This will span the period from crew ingress prior to flight through crew egress postlanding. For the purposes of this chapter, the term primary system will refer to the spacecraft system that a crew is either attempting to escape from or from which an attempt is being made to rescue the crew.

  1. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  2. STS-65 Earth observation of Lake Chad, Africa, taken aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows Lake Chad, Africa. This is another long term ecological monitoring site for NASA scientists. Lake Chad was first photographed from space in 1965. A 25-year length-of-record data set exists for this environmentally important area. A number of these scenes have been digitized, rectified, classified and results show that the lake area has been shrinking and only 15% to 20% of the surface water is visible on space images. NASA's objective in monitoring this lake is to document the intra- and interannual areal changes of the largest standing water body in the Sahelian biome of North Africa. These areal changes are an indicator of the presence or absence of drought across the arguably overpopulated, overgrazed, and over biological carrying capacity limits nations of the Sahel.

  3. Risk Assessment Update: Russian Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana; Hyde, James; Bjorkman, Michael; Hoffman, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BUMPER-II version 1.95j source code was provided to RSC-E- and Khrunichev at January 2012 MMOD TIM in Moscow. MEMCxP and ORDEM 3.0 environments implemented as external data files. NASA provided a sample ORDEM 3.0 g."key" & "daf" environment file set for demonstration and benchmarking BUMPER -II v1.95j installation at the Jan-12 TIM. ORDEM 3.0 has been completed and is currently in beta testing. NASA will provide a preliminary set of ORDEM 3.0 ".key" & ".daf" environment files for the years 2012 through 2028. Bumper output files produced using the new ORDEM 3.0 data files are intended for internal use only, not for requirements verification. Output files will contain these words ORDEM FILE DESCRIPTION = PRELIMINARY VERSION: not for production. The projectile density term in many BUMPER-II ballistic limit equations will need to be updated. Cube demo scripts and output files delivered at the Jan-12 TIM have been updated for the new ORDEM 3.0 data files. Risk assessment results based on ORDEM 3.0 and MEM will be presented for the Russian Segment (RS) of ISS.

  4. 76 FR 60853 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Aboard Private Aircraft AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security... concerning the Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft. This request for comment is being made pursuant to...: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft. OMB Number: 1651-0058. Form Number: None. Abstract:...

  5. Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consist of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution.

  6. Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K. )

    1993-01-15

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consists of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution.

  7. The Topaz-II project: A technical teaming of US and Russian scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; Wyant, F.J.; Oglobin, B.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes research efforts associated with the Topaz-II project and thermionic conversion. The Thermionic System Evaluation test is a program that is executed by Air FOrce Phillips Laboratory and involves the purchase of two Russian TOPAZ II space nuclear power reactor systems and support equipment necessary for nonuclear ground testing. The laboratory also is involved with the The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Power System that involes the evaluation of the TOPAZ II system from a safety perspective.

  8. Verbs of Motion in L1 Russian of Russian-English Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlenko, Aneta

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the motion lexicon in narratives elicited from Russian-English bilinguals. Lexical choices made by the participants are compared to those made by native speakers of Russian and English in narratives elicited by the same stimuli. The analysis of bilinguals' narratives shows that lexicalization of motion is not subject to L2…

  9. Russian Advanced Course: A Short History of the Development of Russian Language and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this volume is to acquaint the student with the historical development of the Russian language and literature. Samples of the original works with English translations and lists of recommended readings are provided. Contents include a review of Russian literature by century, samples of the short story "Samizdat," and major…

  10. ENGLISH-RUSSIAN, RUSSIAN-ENGLISH GLOSSARY OF COAL CLEANING TERMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is an English-Russian, Russian-English glossary of coal cleaning terms, compiled as a joint U.S./Soviet effort. The need for the glossary resulted from the growing number of language-specific terms used during information exchanges within the framework of the U.S./U....

  11. Reading L2 Russian: The Challenges of the Russian-English Dictionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examines when and how students use Russian-English dictionaries while reading informational texts in Russian and what success they have with word lookup. The study uses introspective verbal protocols (i.e., think-alouds) to follow how readers construct meaning from two texts while reading them for a limited time first…

  12. Russian Dialect Project. Volume III: Bibliography of Russian Dialect Studies. Preliminary Version. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankiewicz, Edward; And Others

    Volume 3 of the Russian Dialect Studies is a bibliography listing Russian dialect studies published in the 19th and 20th centuries in Russia and abroad. The selection has been oriented primarily toward phonological and morphological studies of the dialects, and secondarily toward lexical, syntactic, and other studies. The bibliography is also…

  13. Gas chromatography in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akapo, S. O.; Dimandja, J. M.; Kojiro, D. R.; Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  14. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This issue contains 42 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections of four Soviet monographs. Also included is a review of a recent Soviet congress on space gastroenterology.

  15. Gemini 12 crew arrives aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  16. Description of the TC 125 aboard the Mercury simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Two distinct phases of the TC.125 aboard the Mercury Simulator were described to pilots at a meeting in 1979. A three hour "hand on" phase, during which the pilot learns to use the system, and second; a two hour evaluation phase, during which the pilot analyzes the TC.125 and pratices making typical approaches are presented.

  17. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. 1240.90 Section 1240.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION CONTROL OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use...

  18. 78 FR 67309 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...), and (d) published at 78 FR 14920 on March 8, 2013, are effective on November 12, 2013. FOR FURTHER...-161, published at 78 FR 14920, March 8, 2013. The OMB Control Number is 3060-1187. The Commission...-Satellite Service geostationary-orbit space stations operating in the 10.95-11.2 GHz, 11.45-11.7 GHz,...

  19. Astronaut Alan Bean shaves while aboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, uses battery powered shaver while in the crew quarters of the Skylab space station's Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters. This photograph was taken with a 35mm Nikon camera held by one of Bean's fellow crewmen during the 56.5 day second manned Skylab mission in Earth orbit.

  20. Pharmaceutical experiment aboard STS-67 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot, works with a pharmaceutical experiment on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. Commercial Materials Dispersion Apparatus Instruments Technology Associates Experiments (CMIX-03) includes not only pharmaceutical, but also biotechnology, cell biology, fluids, and crystal growth investigation

  1. The use of models to predict potential contamination aboard orbital vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boraas, Martin E.; Seale, Dianne B.

    1989-01-01

    A model of fungal growth on air-exposed, nonnutritive solid surfaces, developed for utilization aboard orbital vehicles is presented. A unique feature of this testable model is that the development of a fungal mycelium can facilitate its own growth by condensation of water vapor from its environment directly onto fungal hyphae. The fungal growth rate is limited by the rate of supply of volatile nutrients and fungal biomass is limited by either the supply of nonvolatile nutrients or by metabolic loss processes. The model discussed is structurally simple, but its dynamics can be quite complex. Biofilm accumulation can vary from a simple linear increase to sustained exponential growth, depending on the values of the environmental variable and model parameters. The results of the model are consistent with data from aquatic biofilm studies, insofar as the two types of systems are comparable. It is shown that the model presented is experimentally testable and provides a platform for the interpretation of observational data that may be directly relevant to the question of growth of organisms aboard the proposed Space Station.

  2. You, Too, Can Go into Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes the Space Shuttle Student Involvement Project which attempts to stimulate high school student interest in science and technology by engaging students in a competition to develop experiments suitable for flight aboard the Space Shuttle. Also describes "Getaway Specials" which allow individuals to send up experiments in the shuttle. (DS)

  3. A decade on board America's Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Spectacular moments from a decade (1981-1991) of Space Shuttle missions, captured on film by the astronauts who flew the missions, are presented. First hand accounts of astronauts' experiences aboard the Shuttle are given. A Space Shuttle mission chronology featuring flight number, vehicle name, crew, launch and landing dates, and mission highlights is given in tabular form.

  4. [Recombination in Drosophila in space flight].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L P; Vaulina, E N; Lapteva, N Sh; Grozdova, T Ia

    1988-04-01

    An experiment with Drosophila melanogaster males was performed aboard the Artificial Satellite "Kosmos-1667". Mutagenic effects of a 7-day space flight on intergene recombination in chromosome 2 were studied. The space flight factors decreased the frequency of recombination. A model experiment on a laboratory centrifuge demonstrated insignificant increase in recombination frequency caused by acceleration. PMID:3135244

  5. Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (1784-1846) and the Russian Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichsanova, Vera N.

    In the first half of the 19th century the foundations of stellar astronomy were established thanks to the German astronomer, geodeticist and mathematician Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel. Internationally estimed and in close relationship with scientists in many countries, especially in Russia, Bessel (although not yet 30 years old) in 1814 became a foreign member of the Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Wilhelm Struve, director of the Dorpat observatory, was in close contact with him. Together they discussed problems of observational procedures and the use of instruments. In 1817 Struve bought the same Reichenbach meridian circle as Bessel used in Königsberg. Both ordered their refractors from the famous Fraunhofer workshop in Munich. %(9-inch for Dorpat). Bessel was also involved in the high precision Russian geodetic survey which started in 1816 and which succeeded in connecting the Russian and western European triangulation networks. Struve tried to measure parallaxes using the bright star Vega (α Lyrae); his results were published in 1837. Also in 1837 Bessel, using his Fraunhofer heliometer and the star 61 Cygni, found a result close to modern values, later acknowledged with the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society. In 1834 Struve was named director of the new Russian observatory in Pulkovo, St. Petersburg. Struve discussed the plans with Bessel and both acquired a Repsold meridian circle. The next aim, begun in the 1840s -- after the first determination of stellar distances -- was the distribution of stars in space (in the Milky Way). For this, catalogues with not only accurate stellar positions but also brightnesses were necessary. Thanks to Bessel's thorough reformation of measuring and reduction methods, making possible high accuracy telescopic observations, Struve was able to produce important results in stellar astronomy.

  6. Russian measurements of neutron energy spectra on the Mir orbital station.

    PubMed

    Lyagushin, V I; Dudkin, V E; Potapov, Y V; Sevastianov, V D

    2001-06-01

    Results of the experiments on neutron energy spectra measurements within broad energy range from 5 x 10(-7) to 2 x 10(2) MeV aboard the Mir orbital station and equivalent neutron dose estimation are presented. Four measurement techniques were used during the experiments. The shape of spectra and their absolute values are in good agreement. According to those experiments, an equivalent neutron dose depends upon effective shielding thickness and spacecraft mass. The neutron dose mentioned is comparable with that of ionizing radiation. Neutron flux levels measured aboard the Mir station have shown that a neutron spectrometer involving broad energy range will be used within the radiation monitoring systems in manned space flights. PMID:11855413

  7. Russian plans for lunar investiagtions. Stage 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, L.; Mitrofanov, I.; Petrukovich, A.; Khartov, V.; Martynov, M.; Lukianchikov, A.

    2014-04-01

    Lunar Race of 60-ies and 70-ies between US and Soviet Union produced outstanding results for lunar science. For many technical reasons mostly near equatorial and mid-latitude Lunar regions were investigated at this glorious time. New epoch of Lunar investigations began at the late 90-ies. It gradually shaped the image of a new wet moon at least at the vicinity of its polar regions. Strong interest to the mechanisms of the formation of a near polar volatiles deposits, their migration and their composition (including the bisotope one) became the central theme of the Russian program of lunar investigations for next 10 years. Certainly the number of other outstanding scientific topics like the properties of Lunar dust, peculiarities of regolith interaction with the supersonic solar wind flow, characteristics of the Lunar magnetic and gravitational anomalies, etc., are planned to be studied both from the orbit and from the surface. First stage of the Russian Lunar Program consists of a four missions: Lunas 25, 26, 27, 28. (The numeration follows Lunar missions of a Soviet Epoch - last successful regolith sample delivery have been accomplished by Luna 24 in 1976). Luna 25 will land to the southern polar site, which would be the most suitable for engineering reasons and also interesting for the science. Second lander Luna 27 will have more sophisticated payload with the additional instruments in comparison with Luna 25. Luna 27 should be landed to the selected landing site at the vicinity of the South Pole, which could be the most promising for installation of the future Lunar Base. It is very important that Luna 27 will be equipped by the subsurface drill to get samples from the permafrost shallow subsurface (one attractive option now is that this drill will be provided by our ESA colleagues having the experience of designing and manufacturing of a similar drill for the Exomars project). The principal difference of the drilling at Luna 27 in comparison with the early

  8. Russian collaborations on lasers and advanced optics

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, J.; Cooper, D.; Koym, V.; Salesky, E.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. There are several technological areas where the Russians appear to be well ahead of the West. Russian work in lasers and advanced optics, high power nonlinear optics, and optical phase conjugation in particular, are some of these areas. The objective of this project is to establish collaboration with key Russian scientists in this area to analytically and experimentally validate the technologies and identify potential applications. This technology has the potential to solve very important military, civil, and commercial problems. The emphasis of this project is on civil and commercial applications, but the technologies have dual-use applications.

  9. Space Rose Pleases the Senses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF), Inc., discovered a new scent by flying a miniature rose plant aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery Flight STS-95. IFF and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) partnered to fly the rose plant in the commercial plant research facility, ASTROCULTURE(TM), for reduced-gravity environment research. IFF commercialized the space rose note, which is now a fragrance ingredient in a perfume developed by Shiseido Cosmetics (America), Ltd. In addition to providing a light crisp scent, the oil from the space rose can also serve as a flavor enhancer. ASTROCULTURE(TM) is a trademark of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics.

  10. Kurs po Stilistike Russkogo Jazyka (A Course on Russian Stylistics)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vukanovich, E. P.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines basic goals, techniques, and materials for a college level course in Russian language stylistics. The use of literature readings, composition writing, stylistics levels of both spoken and written language, and synonym equivalence are discussed. (Text is in Russian.) (DH)

  11. Using SuperPILOT for Creating the Russian Characters Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamantova-Abbas, Vera

    1986-01-01

    Examines the possibility of creating the Russian character set using a "programerless" authoring language, SuperPILOT, which allows a teacher or a learner to produce and use the Russian alphabet with no programing skills. (Author/CB)

  12. Diamantane and 4-methyldiamantane in naphthalane and Russian crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Musayev, I.A.; Bagrii, Ye.I.; Kurashova, E.Kh.; Sanin, P.I.; Zaikin, V.G.

    1983-01-01

    Diamantane, 4-methyldiamantane, cyclopentano-adamantane and cyclohexanoadamantane were identified in naphthalane and Russian crude oils. The contents of these hydrocarbons identified in Russian crude oil exceeds considerably their content in naphthalane crude oil.

  13. The geology and geochemistry of Russian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Povarennych, M.Y.; Pierce, B.S.

    1999-07-01

    Russia contains some of the largest deposits of coal in the world. There are more than 5.2 trillion tons of coal contained in just two basins - the Tungus and Ob'irtysh (Golitsyn and others, 1992) - in (the former) central USSR. Despite the significant resources and mining activity in the former Soviet Union and currently in Russia, relatively little information about Russian coals has appeared in the English literature. This paper presents a brief summary of the distribution, age, rank, and quality of the major Russian coal deposits.

  14. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The second issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 39 Soviet periodical articles in 16 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the first half of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures from the original. Translated introductions and tables of contents for 14 Russian books on 11 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biospheric, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology. Two book reviews translated from Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available either in English or in Russian only are appended.

  15. Environmental assessment of the import of Russian plutonium-238

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The United States (U.S.) is proposing to purchase plutonium-238 (Pu-238) from the Russian Federation (Russia) for use in the Nations`s space program. The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, requires the assessment of environmental consequences of all major Federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Accordingly, the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to identify and evaluate the environmental consequences of importing Pu-238 fuel from Russia, and of the initial transport and processing of such fuel within the US., as necessary, to add the fuel to the existing US inventory. Since the proposed action involves ocean transport, DOE also considered the environmental consequences of this action on the global commons in accordance with Executive Order 12114 and DOE Guidelines for Compliance with Executive Order 12114. During the transportation sequence from point of origin in Russia to the US, and within the US from the port of entry to either SRS or LANL, various environments could be affected by the proposed action. These potentially affected environments include the Russian land and port environments, the marine environment, the US port locale, highway routes, LANL, and SRS. Each of these is discussed below the connection with the proposed action.

  16. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  17. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Alex; Chamberlain, Dale J.; Forsyth, Sasha W.; Hanna, David S.; Scovazzo, Paul; Horner, Michael B.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Todd, Paul; Heyenga, A. Gerard; Kliss, Mark H.; Bula, Raymond; Yetka, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support.

  18. Hardware development for the surface tension driven convection experiment aboard the USML-1 spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  19. Hardware development for the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pline, A. D.; Jacobson, T. P.; Wanhainen, J. S.; Petrarca, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission planned for March 1992. Hardware is under development to establish the experimental conditions and perform the specified measurements, for both ground based research and the flight experiment in a Spacelab single rack. Major development areas include an infrared thermal imaging system for surface temperature measurement, a CO2 laser and control system for surface heating, and for flow visualization, a He-Ne laser and optical system in conjunction with an intensified video camera. For ground based work the components of each system were purchased or designed, and tested individually. The three systems will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware and will constitute a working engineering model. A description of the three systems and examples of the component performance is given along with the plans for the development of flight hardware.

  20. STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard OV-105 taken by ESC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is documented by the Electronic Still Camera (ESC) as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography Test (With Downlink). Various elements in the PLB foretell of a busy week ahead for OV-105's crew. In the foreground is the hardware for the Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Methods (ASEM), which is a demonstration of extravehicular procedures required for the construction of Space Station Freedom (SSF). Backdropped against the aft firewall is the vertical perigee stage which EVA crewmembers will attach to the International Telcommunications Organization Satellite (INTELSAT) VI F-3 on 05-10-92. Running along the port side sill longern is the stowed remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. Electronic still photography is a new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approach