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Sample records for aboard ulysses measures

  1. Low Energy Particle Oscillations and Correlations with Hydromagnetic Waves in the Jovian Magnetosphere: Ulysses Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupp, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report on measurements of energetic particle modulations observed by the HI-SCALE instrument aboard the Ulysses Spacecraft that were associated with the only hydromagnetic wave event measured inside the Jovian magnetosphere by the Ulysses magnetometer investigation.

  2. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains.

  3. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, Eberhard; Zook, Herbert A.; Baguhl, Michael; Fechtig, Hugo; Hanner, Martha S.; Kissel, Jochen; Lindblad, Bertil A.; Linkert, Dietmar; Linkert, Gudrun; Mann, Ingrid B.

    1992-01-01

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of greater than 5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains.

  4. Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, W.; Beech, F.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for Ulysses are summarized. The primary goal of the Ulysses mission is to explore the Sun, its environment, and possible links between solar variability and terrestrial weather and climate. The Ulysses spacecraft will be injected into an interplanetary orbit toward Jupiter after which the spacecraft travels in a heliocentric, out-of-ecliptic orbit with high heliographic inclination. The Ulysses mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  5. Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Marsden, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    Within the last two years, in 1994-95, a spacecraft called Ulysses transited the Sun's polar regions for the first time. This accomplishment is comparable to the reaching of the Earth's poles within this century which brought the exploration of the Earth's surface to its conclusion.

  6. Solar Implications of ULYSSES Interplanetary Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Recent observations by the Ulysses magnetometer team have shown that the strength of the radial interplanetary field component, |Br| , is essentially independent of latitude, a result which implies that the heliospheric currents are confined entirely to thin sheets. Using such a current sheet model, we extrapolate the observed photospheric field to 1 AU and compare the predicted magnitude and sign of Br with spacecraft measurements during 1970--1993. Approximate agreement can be obtained if the solar magnetograph measurements in the Fe I lambda 5250 line are scaled upward by a latitude-dependent factor, similar to that derived by Ulrich from a study of magnetic saturation effects. The correction factor implies sharply peaked polar fields near sunspot minimum, with each polar coronal hole having a mean field strength of 10 G.

  7. The ULYSSES energetic particle composition experiment EPAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, E.; Blake, J. B.; Hovestadt, D.; Korth, A.; Quenby, J.; Umlauft, G.; Woch, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe the EPAC investigation aboard the Ulysses spacecraft. The EPAC sensor will measure the fluxes, angular distributions, energy spectra, and composition of ions in the energy range from 300 keV/nucleon to 25 MeV/nucleon. Some measurements will be shown obtained after turn-on in interplanetary space.

  8. Ulysses Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Ulysses is a joint mission between the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) to explore the heliosphere over the full range of solar latitudes, especially in the polar regions. The goal of the Ulysses mission is to provide an accurate assessment of our total solar environment. This collaborative ESA/NASA mission will, for the first time, explore the heliosphere -- the region of space that is dominated by the Sun-- within a few astronomical units of the Sun over the full range of heliographic latitudes. The path followed by the spacecraft, using a Jupiter gravity-assist to achieve a trajectory extending to high solar latitudes, will enable the highly sophisticated scientific instruments on board to make measurements in the uncharted third dimension of the heliosphere. The Ulysses spacecraft will carry nine scientific instruments to measure the properties of the solar corona, the solar wind, the Sun/wind interface, the heliospheric magnetic field, solar radio bursts, plasma waves, solar X-rays, solar and galactic cosmic rays, and the interplanetary/interstellar neutral gas and dust. Scientists will take advantage of the enormous distance between the spacecraft and the Earth to perform astrophysical measurements and to search for gravitational waves. In conjunction with instrumentation on Earth-orbiting spacecraft, Ulysses will help to precisely locate the mysterious sources of cosmic gamma bursts. The results obtained will help to solve outstanding problems in solar and heliospheric physics, while undoubtedly revealing new and unanticipated phenomena.

  9. Detection of Low-Lattitude Plumes in the Outer Corona by Ulysses Radio Ranging Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard; Bird, Michael K.; Pold, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Plumes have been detected beyond the field of view of coronagraphs in the range of 23-42 R(sub o) in an equatorial coronal hole by Ulysses radio ranging measurements conducted in 1991 at 13 and 3.6 cm wavelengths. These results show that plumes are not exclusive to polar regions, but appear to be intrinsic to open magnetic field regions at any latitude.

  10. Solar wind composition measurements by the Ulysses SWICS experiment during transient solar wind flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Shafer, C. M.; Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K.

    1993-01-01

    For the March/April 1991 time period, the alpha/proton abundance ratio, the proton kinetic temperature and speed distributions, and the relative abundance of O(+7) to O(+6) is determined over each 13-minute duty cycle of the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICs) experiment on Ulysses. The ratio O(+7)/O(+6) (as a relative measure of ionization temperature) is shown to be useful in identifying possible coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We report measurements of silicon/oxygen abundance ratios and silicon and oxygen charge state distributions in the solar wind during a CME event and compare these compositions to a 'normal' solar wind time period.

  11. STS-41 Ulysses: Ulysses - The Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Footage shows animation of the planned activities of the Ulysses mission. These activities range from Ulysses' deployment from the spacecraft to the orbits around the red giant. The Ulysses spacecraft mission is to explore the polar regions of the Sun.

  12. Radon measurements aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritz, Mark A.; Rosner, Stefan W.

    1995-01-01

    We have carried out three (piggyback) radon-related projects aboard the KAO. The first, which was limited to upper tropospheric measurements while in level flight, revealed the systematic occurrence of unexpectedly high radon concentrations in this region of the atmosphere. The second project was an instrument development project, which led to the installation of an automatic radon measurement system aboard the NASA ER-2 High Altitude Research Aircraft. In the third, we installed a new system capable of collecting samples during the normal climb and descent of the KAO. The results obtained in these projects have resulted in significant contributions to our knowledge of atmospheric transport processes, and are currently playing a key role in the validation of global circulation and transport models.

  13. Ulysses: UVCS Coordinated Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Corti, G.; Simnett, G.; Noci, G.; Romoli, M.; Kohl, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from coordinated observations in which instruments on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Ulysses were used to measure the density and flow speed of plasma at the Sun and to again measure the same properties of essentially the same plasma in the solar wind. Plasma was sampled by Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) at 3.5 and 4.5 solar radii and by Ulysses/SWOOPS at 5 AU. Data were acquired during a nearly 2 week period in May-June 1997 at a latitude of 9-10 degrees north of the equator, on the east limb and, hence, in the streamer belt and the source location of slow wind. Density and outflow speed are compared, in order to check for preservation of the near Sun characteristics in the interplanetary medium. By chance, Ulysses was at the very northern edge of the visible streamer belt. Nevertheless, no evidence of fast wind, or mixing with fast wind coming from the northern polar coronal hole, was evident at Ulysses. The morphology of the streamer belt was similar at the beginning and end of the observation period, but was markedly different during the middle of the period. A corresponding change in density (but not flow speed) was noted at Ulysses.

  14. SIXTEEN YEARS OF ULYSSES INTERSTELLAR DUST MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM. II. FLUCTUATIONS IN THE DUST FLOW FROM THE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Strub, Peter; Krüger, Harald; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2015-10-20

    The Ulysses spacecraft provided the first opportunity to identify and study interstellar dust (ISD) in situ in the solar system between 1992 and 2007. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the ISD component in the entire Ulysses dust data set. We analyzed several parameters of the ISD flow in a time-resolved fashion: flux, flow direction, mass index, and flow width. The general picture is in agreement with a time-dependent focusing/defocusing of the charged dust particles due to long-term variations of the solar magnetic field throughout a solar magnetic cycle of 22 years. In addition, we confirm a shift in dust direction of 50° ± 7° in 2005, along with a steep, size-dependent increase in flux by a factor of 4 within 8 months. To date, this is difficult to interpret and has to be examined in more detail by new dynamical simulations. This work is part of a series of three papers. This paper concentrates on the time-dependent flux and direction of the ISD. In a companion paper we analyze the overall mass distribution of the ISD measured by Ulysses, and a third paper discusses the results of modeling the flow of the ISD as seen by Ulysses.

  15. Skindeep Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Ariela

    2008-01-01

    This essay is about Joyce as an epidermist and Joyce as a chronicler and cataloguer of the "skindeep" surfaces of Dublin in Ulysses. The book is crowded with skins: tanned skins, blushing skins, skins enhanced by makeup and creams, skins marked by race or religion, skins legible and visible, skins imagined and inaccessible and associated with both authenticity and disguise. Skin in Joyce becomes, in Steven Connor's terms, in The Book of Skin, "a place of minglings; a mingling of places," a space where medical, cultural, and aesthetic meanings jostle and intersect and are inscribed and projected on the surface that both expresses and conceals the subject. A skin-deep analysis of Ulysses can reveal to us the entanglement of surface and depth that characterizes Joyce's novel.

  16. The Ulysses mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, K.-P.; Marsden, R. G.; Page, D. E.; Smith, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Ulysses mission is unique in the history of the exploration of solar system by spacecraft. The path followed by Ulysses will make it possible, for the first time, to explore the heliosphere within a few astronomical units of the sun over the full range of heliographic latitudes, thereby providing the first characterization of the uncharted third heliospheric dimension. Advanced scientific instrumentation carried on board the spacecraft is designed to measure the properties of the heliospheric magnetic field, the solar wind, the sun/wind interface, solar radio bursts and plasma waves, solar energetic particles and galactic cosmic rays, solar X-rays, and interplanetary/interstellar neutral gas and dust. Ulysses will also be used to detect cosmic gamma-ray bursts and search for gravitational waves. The mission, a collaboration between ESA and NASA, was launched in October 1990 and employs a Jupiter gravity-assist to achieve the trajectory extending to high solar latitudes. The paper describes the characteristics of the Ulysses mission in order to establish a framework within which to better understand the objectives and goals of the scientific investigations.

  17. Ulysses breaks latitude record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    Ulysses is gathering important new information concerning the Sun and its environment. Its prime mission objective is to carry out the first systematic exploration of the inner part of the heliosphere - the region of space carved out of the interstellar medium by the solar wind - at all latitudes from the solar equator to the poles. The spacecraft, launched by the space shuttle Discovery on 6 October 1990 in the framework of an ESA-NASA collaborative venture, underwent a gravity assist manoeuvre at Jupiter in February 1992 and is now in a highly inclined solar orbit that will bring it over the south pole of the Sun in September 1994. At that time, Ulysses will establish a new record as it climbs to its maximum latitude of just over 80 degrees. The spacecraft and its scientific instruments are in excellent condition and the data coverage since launch has been consistently close to 100% thanks to the dedicated efforts of the joint ESA-NASA Mission Operations Team and NASA's Deep Space Network. Although the most exciting phase of the mission - the study of the Sun's polar regions - will only begin in mid-1994, Ulysses has already produced a wealth of new scientific results. These include : * - The first direct detection of neutral helium atoms arriving from interstellar space. * - The measurement of micron-sized dust grains arriving from interstellar space. * - The first measurement of singly-charged H, N, O and Ne ions which entered the heliosphere as interstellar neutral atoms and were then ionised. * - The highest-resolution measurements to date of the isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei (e.g. C, N, O, Ne, Si and Mg). In addition to the above, the traversal of Jupiter's magnetosphere at the time of the fly-by enabled the Ulysses investigators to acquire new and highly valuable data concerning this very complex and dynamic plasma environment. Among the more exciting results to emerge are the possible entry into the polar cap of Jupiter's magnetosphere near the

  18. Pickup Protons: Comparisons using the Three-Dimensional MHD HHMS-PI model and Ulysses SWICS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Detman, Thomas; Gloecker, George; Gloeckler, Christine; Dryer, Murray; Sun, Wei; Intriligator, James; Deehr, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We report the first comparisons of pickup proton simulation results with in situ measurements of pickup protons obtained by the SWICS instrument on Ulysses. Simulations were run using the three dimensional (3D) time-dependent Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons (HHMS-PI). HHMS-PI is an MHD solar wind model, expanded to include the basic physics of pickup protons from neutral hydrogen that drifts into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium. We use the same model and input data developed by Detman et al. (2011) to now investigate the pickup protons. The simulated interval of 82 days in 2003 2004, includes both quiet solar wind (SW) and also the October November 2003 solar events (the Halloween 2003 solar storms). The HHMS-PI pickup proton simulations generally agree with the SWICS measurements and the HHMS-PI simulated solar wind generally agrees with SWOOPS (also on Ulysses) measurements. Many specific features in the observations are well represented by the model. We simulated twenty specific solar events associated with the Halloween 2003 storm. We give the specific values of the solar input parameters for the HHMS-PI simulations that provide the best combined agreement in the times of arrival of the solar-generated shocks at both ACE and Ulysses. We show graphical comparisons of simulated and observed parameters, and we give quantitative measures of the agreement of simulated with observed parameters. We suggest that some of the variations in the pickup proton density during the Halloween 2003 solar events may be attributed to depletion of the inflowing local interstellar medium (LISM) neutral hydrogen (H) caused by its increased conversion to pickup protons in the immediately preceding shock.

  19. Ulysses Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 18 July 2002) It is helpful to look at the context for this THEMIS image, which covers a large area over the summit of Ulysses Patera. Ulysses Patera is one of the many volcanoes that make up the giant Tharsis volcanic province, although Ulysses itself is fairly small in comparison to the other volcanoes in this area. In the context image, there are 3 circular features near the top of the volcano. The large, central feature is called a 'caldera', and is the result of volcanic activity at Ulysses. The other two circular features are impact craters. The THEMIS image primarily spans across the central caldera, but also covers a portion of the northernmost impact crater. We know that the large central caldera must have formed earlier than the two craters, because its circular form has been cut by the smaller crater rims. In the THEMIS image, there are stair-stepping plateaus in the northern portion of the image. These are part of the rim of the northern crater, and are caused by collapse or subsidence after the impact event. Just to the south of this crater, 'rayed' patterns can be seen on part of the caldera floor. The rayed pattern is most likely due to a landslide of material down the crater rim slope. Another possibility is that the impact that formed the northern crater caused material to be ejected radially, and then parts of the ejecta have either been buried or eroded away. Other signs of mass movement events in this image are dark streaks, caused by dust avalanches, visible in the caldera's northern wall. In the central portion of the image, there are two lobe-shaped features-one overlaps the other-that appear to have flowed westward. It is likely that these features are ejecta lobes, because they are located adjacent to the southeastern crater (see context image). The fluidized appearance of these ejecta lobes is probably due to a significant amount of ice or water being present in the soil at the time

  20. Self-similar evolution of interplanetary magnetic clouds and Ulysses measurements of the polytropic index inside the cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Berdichevsky, D.

    1997-01-01

    A self similar model for the expanding flux rope is developed for a magnetohydrodynamic model of interplanetary magnetic clouds. It is suggested that the dependence of the maximum magnetic field on the distance from the sun and the polytropic index gamma has the form B = r exp (-1/gamma), and that the ratio of the electron temperature to the proton temperature increases with distance from the sun. It is deduced that ion acoustic waves should be observed in the cloud. Both predictions were confirmed by Ulysses observations of a 1993 magnetic cloud. Measurements of gamma inside the cloud demonstrate sensitivity to the internal topology of the magnetic field in the cloud.

  1. The local interstellar medium based on ISN He observations with Ulysses and IBEX and future IMAP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Schwadron, N.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Direct sampling is an efficient and effective method for studying the local neutral interstellar matter. With first measurements performed in the 1990s by GAS experiment onboard Ulysses, followed by IBEX observations since 2009, we have now a ~20 year long coverage. These observations provide a unique sample of interstellar matter from a spatial region with the dimensions close to the mean free path for atom-ion and atom-atom collisions in the local interstellar medium. Recent analyses of available GAS and IBEX data have resulted in a consolidation of the flow velocity vector and gas temperature of ISN He ahead of the heliosphere. The present GAS and IBEX velocity vectors are in agreement with the determination based on the first two Ulysses ISN observation seasons, but the temperature is markedly higher, by at least 1000 K, than the original determination. In addition, IBEX observations revealed the existence of an additional population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, which is likely the secondary population of He produced in the outer heliosheath. We will briefly present the analysis of GAS observations from all three Ulysses orbits and focus on a detailed analysis of IBEX observations from the first six ISN He observation seasons. The velocity vector and temperature obtained from individual IBEX observation seasons vary around the global best-fit values, which is most likely due to statistical fluctuations in the data. An important aspect of the ISN gas studies is the Warm Breeze, which partly overlaps with the ISN population on the sky. Therefore it must be studied in parallel with the ISN gas. Observations of ISN He could provide insight into various hypothetical departures of ISN He from the ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, but a significant portion of the sky most interesting in this respect is blocked by the local magnetospheric signal, which will not interfere with the observations planned for the IMAP mission.

  2. Ulysses charged particle measurements between 1 and 5 AU from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, D. E.; Smith, E. J.; Wenzel, K. -P

    1994-01-01

    Proton fluxes obtained by two instruments carried on the European Space Agency (ESA)/NASA Ulysses spacecraft are reported for the period from launch in October 1990 till Jupiter encounter in February 1992. Proton energy ranges are 24-59, 71-99, 130-320, 320-2100 and greater than 2100 MeV. The Sun was very active during this period, the events of March 1991 being some of the largest of the solar cycle. The relationship between events on the Sun and the observed proton flux is discussed.

  3. An Overview of Energetic Particle Measurements in the Jovian Magnetosphere with the EPAC Sensor on Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Keppler, E; Blake, J B; Fränz, M; Korth, A; Krupp, N; Quenby, J J; Witte, M; Woch, J

    1992-09-11

    Observations of ions and electrons of probable Jovian origin upstream of Jupiter were observed after a corotating interplanetary particle event. During the passage of Ulysses through the Jovian bow shock, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere, the fluxes of energetic particles were surprisingly low. During the passage through the "middle magnetosphere," corotating fluxes were observed within the current sheet near the jovimagnetic equato. During the outbound pass, fluxes were variably directed; in the later part of the flyby, they were probably related to high-latitude phenomena.

  4. Sulfur abundances in the solar wind measured by SWICS on Ulysses. [Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, C. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Geiss, J.; Von Steiger, R.; Ogilvie, K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the nine experiments on Ulysses (launched October, 1990), the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer, utilizes an energy per charge deflection system along with time of flight technology to uniquely determine the mass and mass per charge of solar wind particles. Thus the composition of various solar wind types can be analyzed. Using the SWICS data accumulated during the in-ecliptic phase of the mission, we have determined the sulfur abundance, relative to silicon, in two different types of solar wind: transient and coronal hole associated flows. Sulfur is of extreme interest because it is one of the few elements that lies in the transitional region of the FIP-dependent relative abundance enrichment function, observed for solar energetic particles and some types of solar wind flows.

  5. Ulysses: A Solar Odyssey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This is a film to film transfer of a Media Four production by Charles Finance about the Ulysses Mission to the Sun. The prelaunch production uses graphics, animation, and live footage to describe how Ulysses will use the gravity of Jupiter to lift it out of the ecliptic plane into polar orbit around the Sun.

  6. Ulysses log 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Raul Garcia

    1993-01-01

    The Ulysses Log tells the story of some intriguing problems that we (=The Spacecraft Team) have encountered. Ulysses was launched on 6 Oct. 1990, and it made the fastest trip to Jupiter (8 Feb. 1992). It is presently going out of the ecliptic. This paper presents log entries from the following areas: (1) ingenious maneuvers; (2) telecommunication problems; and (3) surprises.

  7. Sixteen Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System. I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-dust Mass Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Strub, Peter; Grün, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2015-10-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the interstellar dust stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses interstellar dust data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of a population of “big” interstellar grains (up to 10-13 kg). The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of interstellar dust in the very local ISM. In this paper we analyze the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses interstellar dust measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of interstellar dust. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses interstellar dust data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modeling of the interstellar dust flow applied to Ulysses. We use the latest values for the interstellar hydrogen and helium densities, the interstellar helium flow speed of {v}{ISM∞ }=23.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and the ratio of radiation pressure to gravity, β, calculated for astronomical silicates. We find a gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud of {R}{{g}/{{d}}}={193}-57+85, and a dust density of (2.1 ± 0.6) × 10-24 kg m-3. For a higher inflow speed of 26 {km} {{{s}}}-1, the gas-to-dust mass ratio is 20% higher, and, accordingly, the dust density is lower by the same amount. The gas-to-dust mass ratio derived from our new analysis is compatible with the value most recently determined from astronomical observations. We confirm earlier results that the very local ISM contains “big” (i.e., ≈1 μm sized) interstellar grains. We find a dust density in the local ISM that is a

  8. Properties of the solar wind electrons between 1 and 3.3 AU from Ulysses thermal noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Hoang, S.; Bougeret, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to describe the distribution function f(v) of the solar wind electrons, the simplest model which is commonly used consists of the sum of two Maxwellians representing two distinct populations: a core (density n(sub c), temperature T(sub c)) and a halo (density n(sub h), temperature T(sub h)). It is possible, with the latter assumptions on the electron f(v), to determine the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) induced on an antenna by the motion of the ambient electrons in the solar wind. Using this distribution and the spectroscopy of thermal noise measurements from the radio receiver on Ulysses in the ecliptic plane, we deduce the total electron density N(sub e), the core temperature T(sub c), and the core and halo kinetic pressures N(sub c)T(sub c) and N(sub h)T(sub h). From these electron parameters, we can define a 'global' electron temperature as T(sub e) = (N(sub c)T(sub c) + N(sub h)T(sub h))/N(sub e). Here we present different radial gradients of T(sub e), between 1 and 3.3 AU, as a function of three classes of N(sub e) at 1 AU: low, intermediate, and high densities. In general all these gradients are found to be positive with different polytrope power law indexes between N(sub e) and T(sub e), which are in general lower than unity. We also show different behaviors of the ratio N(sub h)T(sub h)/N(sub c)T(sub c) for each density class considered. Some possible interpretations for these observations are discussed.

  9. Magellan, Galileo, and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A combination of sophisticated computer animation and shuttle footage describe the missions of Ulysses, Galileo, and Magellan satellites to the solar system. Ulysses, launched in October 1990 by the European Space Agency, will study the sun. Galileo, launched in October 1989, will probe the Jovian system by releasing a probe that will descend into Jupiter's atmosphere and by using 12 instruments which will study Jupiter's 16 moons, its atmosphere, and its radiation and magnetic fields. Magellan, released from Space Shuttle Atlantis in May 1989, uses a synthetic aperture radar to probe through Venus' dense atmosphere to map its planetary surface. A computer animation simulates flying over the surface of Venus.

  10. The Ulysses mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Smith, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Ulysses mission to explore the heliosphere within a few astronomical units of the sun over the full range of heliographic latitudes, thereby providing the first characterization of the uncharted third heliospheric dimension, is discussed. The scientific objectives of the mission are reviewed, and the nine flight experiments which make up the spacecraft payload are summarized. The Ulysses trajectory and mission timeline are described, as are the spacecraft itself and the mission operations. The timing of the mission with the solar cycle is discussed.

  11. Discovery of Jovian dust streams and interstellar grains by the ULYSSES spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, E.; Zook, H. A.; Baguhl, M.; Balogh, A.; Bame, S. J.; Fechtig, H.; Forsyth, R.; Hanner, M. S.; Horanyi, M.; Kissel, J.; Lindblad, B.-A.; Linkert, D.; Linkert, G.; Mann, I.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Phillips, J. L.; Polanskey, C.; Schwehm, G.; Siddique, N.; Staubach, P.; Svestka, J.; Taylor, A.

    1993-04-01

    Within 1 AU from Jupiter, the dust detector aboard the Ulysses spacecraft during the flyby on February 8, 1992 recorded periodic bursts of submicron dust particles with durations ranging from several hours to two days and occurring at about monthly intervals. These particles arrived at Ulysses in collimate streams radiating from close to the line-of-sight direction to Jupiter, suggesting a Jovian origin for the periodic bursts. Ulysses also detected a flux of micron-sized dust particles moving in high-velocity retrograde orbits. These grains are identified here as being of interstellar origin.

  12. Measurement of low energy cosmic rays aboard Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaujean, R.; Oschlies, K.; Enge, W.

    1985-01-01

    In December 1983 the first Spacelab mission was launched for a duration of 10 days. Aboard was the Kiel experiment Isotopic Stack designed for measurement of heavy cosmic ray nuclei with nuclear charge equal to or greater than 3 and energies up to some 100MeV/nuc. One part of the stack was rotated in well defined steps registered by an angle encoder to receive information on impact times of the nuclei. Using this time resolving system geomagnetically forbidden particles can be detected. The chemical composition and energy spectra of mainly CNO particles are examined using a rotated 300 microns m thick CR-39 foil beneath a fixed 100 microns m thick Kodak-Cellulose Nitrate foil. About 600 sq cm have been scanned yielding nearly 100 nuclear tracks within an energy range of approximately 8 to 30 MeV/nuc. The calibration is done by means of a postflight irradiation with 410 MeV/nuc Fe-56 at Berkeley Laboratory, California, USA. Relative abundances and energy spectra are presented.

  13. Some cosmic radiation dose measurements aboard flights connecting Zagreb Airport.

    PubMed

    Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Lisjak, I; Vekić, B; Poje, M; Planinić, J

    2008-02-01

    When primary particles from space, mainly protons, enter the atmosphere, they produce interactions with air nuclei, and cosmic-ray showers are induced. The radiation field at aircraft altitude is complex, with different types of particles, mainly photons, electrons, positrons and neutrons, with a large energy range. The non-neutron component of cosmic radiation dose aboard A320 and ATR40 aircraft was measured with TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) detectors and the Mini 6100 semiconductor dosimeter; the neutron dose was measured with the neutron dosimeter consisted of LR-115 track detector and boron foil BN-1 or 10B converter. The estimated occupational effective dose for the aircraft crew (A320) working 500 h per year was 1.64 mSv. Another experiment was performed at the flights Zagreb-Paris-Buenos Aires and reversely, when one measured non-neutron cosmic radiation dose; for 26.7 h of flight, the MINI 6100 dosimeter gave an average dose rate of 2.3 microSv/h and the TLD dosimeter registered the dose equivalent of 75 microSv or the average dose rate of 2.7 microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.4 microSv/h. In the same month, February 2005, a traveling to Japan (24-h-flight: Zagreb-Frankfurt-Tokyo and reversely) and the TLD-100 measurement showed the average dose rate of 2.4microSv/h; the neutron dosimeter gave the dose rate of 2.5 microSv/h. Comparing dose rates of the non-neutron component (low LET) and the neutron one (high LET) of the radiation field at the aircraft flight level, we could conclude that the neutron component carried about 50% of the total dose, that was near other known data.

  14. Passive dosimetry aboard the Mir Orbital Station: internal measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    2002-01-01

    Passive radiation dosimeters were exposed aboard the Mir Orbital Station over a substantial portion of the solar cycle in order to measure the change in dose and dose equivalent rates as a function of time. During solar minimum, simultaneous measurements of the radiation environment throughout the habitable volume of the Mir were made using passive dosimeters in order to investigate the effect of localized shielding on dose and dose equivalent. The passive dosimeters consisted of a combination of thermoluminescent detectors to measure absorbed dose and CR-39 PNTDs to measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum from charged particles of LET infinity H2O > or = 5 keV/micrometers. Results from the two detector types were then combined to yield mean total dose rate, mean dose equivalent rate, and average quality factor. Contrary to expectations, both dose and dose equivalent rates measured during May-October 1991 near solar maximum were higher than similar measurements carried out in 1996-1997 during solar minimum. The elevated dose and dose equivalent rates measured in 1991 were probably due to a combination of intense solar activity, including a large solar particle event on 9 June 1991, and the temporary trapped radiation belt created in the slot region by the solar particle event and ensuing magnetic storm of 24 March 1991. During solar minimum, mean dose and dose equivalent rates were found to vary by factors of 1.55 and 1.37, respectively, between different locations through the interior of Mir. More heavily shielded locations tended to yield lower total dose and dose equivalent rates, but higher average quality factor than did more lightly shielding locations. However, other factors such as changes in the immediate shielding environment surrounding a given detector location, changes in the orientation of the Mir relative to its velocity vector, and changes in the altitude of the station also contributed to the variation. Proton and neutron-induced target

  15. Spatial gradients of GCR protons in the inner heliosphere derived from Ulysses COSPIN/KET and PAMELA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseler, J.; Heber, B.

    2016-05-01

    Context. During the transition from solar cycle 23 to 24 from 2006 to 2009, the Sun was in an unusual solar minimum with very low activity over a long period. These exceptional conditions included a very low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) strength and a high tilt angle, which both play an important role in the modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the heliosphere. Thus, the radial and latitudinal gradients of GCRs are very much expected to depend not only on the solar magnetic epoch, but also on the overall modulation level. Aims: We determine the non-local radial and the latitudinal gradients of protons in the rigidity range from ~0.45 to 2 GV. Methods: This was accomplished by using data from the satellite-borne experiment Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) at Earth and the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) onboard Ulysses on its highly inclined Keplerian orbit around the Sun with the aphelion at Jupiter's orbit. Results: In comparison to the previous A> 0 solar magnetic epoch, we find that the absolute value of the latitudinal gradient is lower at higher and higher at lower rigidities. This energy dependence is therefore a crucial test for models that describe the cosmic ray transport in the inner heliosphere.

  16. Ions with low charges in the solar wind as measured by SWICS on board Ulysses. [Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Von Steiger, R.; Mall, U.; Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F.; Wilken, B.; Gliem, F.

    1992-01-01

    We present new data on rare ions in the solar wind. Using the Ulysses-SWICS instrument with its very low background we have searched for low-charge ions during a 6-d period of low-speed solar wind and established sensitive upper limits for many species. In the solar wind, we found He(1+)/He(2+) of less than 5 x 10 exp -4. This result and the charge state distributions of heavier elements indicate that all components of the investigated ion population went through a regular coronal expansion and experienced the typical electron temperatures of 1 to 2 million Kelvin. We argue that the virtual absence of low-charge ions demonstrates a very low level of nonsolar contamination in the source region of the solar wind sample we studied. Since this sample showed the FlP effect typical for low-speed solar wind, i.e., an enhancement in the abundances of elements with low first ionization potential, we conclude that this enhancement was caused by an ion-atom separation mechanism operating near the solar surface and not by foreign material in the corona.

  17. Ulysses News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    The focus of this lecture is to discuss the purpose of the Ulysses mission. The mission objective is to study magnetic fields, cosmic rays and the solar winds from both the equator and the (North and South) poles of the Sun. The moderator of this lecture is Dr. Steve Maran, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and panel members include Dr. Richard Marsden, ESA (European Space Agency) Project Scientist, Dr. Edward J. Smith, JPL/NASA Project Scientist, Dr. Antoinette Galvin, University of Maryland College Park, Dr. Randy Jokipii, University of Arizona, and Dr. John Phillips, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Each panel member contributes to the informative nature of this live video coverage. Topics discussed are the direction of the magnetic fields, solar winds, and cosmic rays. Visual aids of this lecture consist of various slides and computerized simulations.

  18. Ulysses News Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The focus of this lecture is to discuss the purpose of the Ulysses mission. The mission objective is to study magnetic fields, cosmic rays and the solar winds from both the equator and the (North and South) poles of the Sun. The moderator of this lecture is Dr. Steve Maran, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and panel members include Dr. Richard Marsden, ESA (European Space Agency) Project Scientist, Dr. Edward J. Smith, JPL/NASA Project Scientist, Dr. Antoinette Galvin, University of Maryland College Park, Dr. Randy Jokipii, University of Arizona, and Dr. John Phillips, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Each panel member contributes to the informative nature of this live video coverage. Topics discussed are the direction of the magnetic fields, solar winds, and cosmic rays. Visual aids of this lecture consist of various slides and computerized simulations.

  19. Study of Interplanetary Dust from ULYSSES and SOHO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I.; Hillebrand, P.; Wehry, A.

    The Ulysses spacecraft has for the first time performed in situ measurements in the out of ecliptic regions of the solar system. The dust experiment on-board Ulysses has detected the high latitude flux of interplanetary dust particles (cf. Grun et al. 1994). With the SOHO satellite, on the other hand, the measurements of the LASCO coronagraph (cf. Bruckner et al. 1995) provide data of the brightness of the white light corona, which includes a component of light from scattering at interplanetary dust particles, i.e., the F-coronal brightness. Although Ulysses provides data about local dust fluxes from 1 AU outward and white light observations give the integrated line of sight brightness from 1 AU inward, we show, that some comparison of the different results is possible. We will discuss namely the dynamics and orbital distribution in the dust cloud, as well as its size distribution.

  20. EXPLORING THE POSSIBILITY OF O AND Ne CONTAMINATION IN ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR HELIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Bzowski, Maciej; Sokół, Justyna M.; Möbius, Eberhard; Witte, Manfred; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-15

    We explore the possibility that interstellar O and Ne may be contributing to the particle signal from the GAS instrument on Ulysses, which is generally assumed to be entirely He. Motivating this study is the recognition that an interstellar temperature higher than any previously estimated from Ulysses data could potentially resolve a discrepancy between Ulysses He measurements and those from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Contamination by O and Ne could lead to Ulysses temperature measurements that are too low. We estimate the degree of O and Ne contamination necessary to increase the inferred Ulysses temperature to 8500 K, which would be consistent with both the Ulysses and IBEX data given the same interstellar flow speed. We find that producing the desired effect requires a heavy element contamination level of ∼9% of the total Ulysses/GAS signal. However, this degree of heavy element contribution is about an order of magnitude higher than expected based on our best estimates of detection efficiencies, ISM abundances, and heliospheric survival probabilities, making it unlikely that heavy element contamination is significantly affecting temperatures derived from Ulysses data.

  1. Sixteen Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System. III. Simulations and Data Unveil New Insights into Local Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle J.; Strub, Peter; Krüger, Harald; von Steiger, Rudolf; Frisch, Priscilla

    2015-10-01

    Interstellar dust (ISD) in the solar system was detected in situ for the first time in 1993 by the Ulysses dust detector. The study of ISD is important for understanding its role in star and solar system formation. The goal of this paper is to understand the variability in the ISD observations from the Ulysses mission by using a Monte Carlo simulation of ISD trajectories, with the final aim to constrain the ISD particle properties from simulations and the data. The paper is part of a series of three: Strub et al. describe the variations of the ISD flow from the Ulysses data set, and Krüger et al. focus on its ISD mass distribution. We describe and interpret the simulations of the ISD flow at Ulysses orbit for a wide range of particle properties and discuss four open issues in ISD research: the existence of very big ISD particles, the lack of smaller ISD particles, the shift in dust flow direction in 2005, and particle properties. We conclude that the shift in the dust flow direction in 2005 can best be explained by Lorentz force in the inner heliosphere, but that an extra filtering mechanism is needed to fit the fluxes. A time-dependent filtering in the outer regions of the heliosphere is proposed for this. Also, the high charge-to-mass ratio values found for the heavier particles after 2003 indicate that these particles are lower in density than previously assumed. This method gives new insights into the ISD properties and paves the way toward getting a complete view on the ISD from the local interstellar cloud. We conclude that in combination with the data and simulations, also impact ionization experiments are necessary using low-density dust, in order to constrain the density of the particles.

  2. The Ulysses spacecraft control and monitoring concepts and realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, Paul; Angold, Nigel

    1993-01-01

    Ulysses is a joint ESA-NASA mission, the primary purpose of the mission is to make scientific measurements of the Sun outside the plane of the ecliptic. The delay in launching Ulysses, due to the Challenger disaster, meant that the hardware on which the Spacecraft Control and Monitoring System (SCMS) resides was becoming obsolete, and it was decided to convert SCMS to run on a DEC/VAX machine under VMS. The paper will cover the spacecraft, the conversion, the converted SCMS, problems found, and the upgrades implemented for solutions. It will also discuss the future for and enhancements already made to the converted SCMS.

  3. Measurement of OH, H2SO4, MSA, and HNO3 Aboard the P-3B Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the measurement of OH, H2SO4, MSA, and HNO3 aboard the P-3B aircraft under the following headings: 1) Performance Report; 2) Highlights of OH, H2SO4, and MSA Measurements Made Aboard the NASA P-3B During TRACE-P; 3) Development and characteristics of an airborne-based instrument used to measure nitric acid during the NASA TRACE-P field experiment.

  4. Passive dosimetry aboard the Mir Orbital Station: external measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports results from the first measurements made on the exterior of a LEO spacecraft of mean dose equivalent rate and average quality factor as functions of shielding depth for shielding less than 1 g/cm2 Al equivalent. Two sets of measurements were made on the outside of the Mir Orbital Station; one near solar maximum in June 1991 and one near solar minimum in 1997. Absorbed dose was measured using stacks of TLDs. LET spectrum from charged particles of LET infinity H2O > o r= 5keV/micrometers was measured using stacks of CR-39 PNTDs. Results from the TLD and PNTD measurements at a given shielding depth were combined to yield mean total dose rate, mean dose equivalent rate, and average quality factor. Measurements made near solar maximum tend to be greater than those made during solar minimum. Both mean dose rate and mean dose equivalent rate decrease by nearly four orders of magnitude within the first g/cm2 shielding illustrating the attenuation of both trapped electrons and low-energy trapped protons. In order to overcome problems with detector saturation after standard chemical processing, measurement of LET spectrum in the least shielded CR-39 PNTD layer (0.005 g/cm2 Al) was carried out using an atomic force microscope. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A System for Measurement of Convection Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogatyrev, Gennady P.; Gorbunov, Aleksei V; Putin, Gennady F.; Ivanov, Alexander I.; Nikitin, Sergei A.; Polezhaev, Vadim I.

    1996-01-01

    A simple device for direct measurement of buoyancy driven fluid flows in a low-gravity environment is proposed. A system connecting spacecraft accelerometers data and results of thermal convection in enclosure measurements and numerical simulations is developed. This system will permit also to evaluate the low frequency microacceleration component. The goal of the paper is to present objectives and current results of ground-based experimental and numerical modeling of this convection detector.

  6. The scientific mission of Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, K.-P.; Marsden, R. G.; Page, D. E.; Smith, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    The major aims of the Ulysses' scientific investigations of the heliosphere at all latitudes are described. Missions goals include the assessment of the global three-dimensional properties of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind, the study of the composition of the solar wind plasma at different heliographic latitudes, and the study of the acceleration of energetic particles in solar flares. Waves, shocks and other discontinuities in the solar wind will be investigated through sampling of various plasma conditions, and interplanetary dust and cosmic rays will be analyzed. Other important goals include the search for gamma-ray-burst sources and for low-frequency gravitational waves by using the spacecraft's radio communication link. Achievement of the Ulysses' solar pole trajectory, which will utilize both launch vehicle thrust and gravitational pull, is also described.

  7. Ulysses, the end of an extraordinary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Ulysses, a pioneering ESA/NASA mission, was launched in October 1990 to explore uncharted territories - the regions above and below the Sun’s poles - and study our star’s sphere of influence, or heliosphere, in the four dimensions of space and time. Originally designed for a lifetime of five years, the mission has surpassed all expectations. The reams of data Ulysses has returned have forever changed the way scientists view the Sun and its effect on the space surrounding it. Media representatives interested in attending the press conference are invited to register using the attached form. Those not able to attend will have the opportunity to follow the press conference using the following phone number: +33 1 56785733 (listening-mode only). The programme of the event is as follows: The Ulysses Legacy Press Conference 12 June 2008, 15:30, Room 137, ESA Headquarters, 8-10 rue Mario-Nikis, Paris Event programme 15:30 Welcome, by David Southwood, ESA Director of Science and Robotic Exploration (with a joint ESA/NASA statement) 15:40 Ulysses: a modern-day Odyssey, by Richard Marsden, ESA Ulysses Project Scientist and Mission Manager 15:50 The Ulysses scientific legacy: Inside the heliosphere, by Richard Marsden,ESA Ulysses Project Scientist and Mission Manager 16:00 The Ulysses scientific legacy: Outside the heliosphere, by Ed Smith, NASA Ulysses Project Scientist 16:10 Ulysses, the over-achiever: challenges and successes of a 17-year-old mission, by Nigel Angold, ESA Ulysses Mission Operations Manager 16:20 Questions and Answers, Panelists: David Southwood, Richard Marsden, Ed Smith, Nigel Angold and Ed Massey (NASA Ulysses Project Manager) 16:40 Interview opportunities 17:30 End of event

  8. Numerical simulation of Ulysses nutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marirrodriga, C. Garcia; Zeischka, J.; Boslooper, E. C.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical simulation has been performed on the in-orbit instability of the Ulysses Spacecraft. The thermal excitation from the solar flux, the flexible axial boom and its deployment mechanism have been modeled and analyzed. The simulation shows that the nutation build-up has been originated by the solar input on the axial boom coupled with the system nutation frequency of the spacecraft. The results agree with the observed behavior.

  9. Langmuir probe measurements aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, B.; Asenovski, S.; Bachvarov, D.; Boneva, A.; Grushin, V.; Georgieva, K.; Klimov, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    In the current work we describe the Langmuir Probe (LP) and its operation on board the International Space Station. This instrument is a part of the scientific complex "Ostonovka". The main goal of the complex is to establish, on one hand how such big body as the International Space Station affects the ambient plasma and on the other how Space Weather factors influence the Station. The LP was designed and developed at BAS-SRTI. With this instrument we measure the thermal plasma parameters-electron temperature Te, electron and ion concentration, respectively Ne and Ni, and also the potential at the Station's surface. The instrument is positioned at around 1.5 meters from the surface of the Station, at the Russian module "Zvezda", located at the farthermost point of the Space Station, considering the velocity vector. The Multi- Purpose Laboratory (MLM) module is providing additional shielding for our instrument, from the oncoming plasma flow (with respect to the velocity vector). Measurements show that in this area, the plasma concentration is two orders of magnitude lower, in comparison with the unperturbed areas. The surface potential fluctuates between-3 and-25 volts with respect to the ambient plasma. Fast upsurges in the surface potential are detected when passing over the twilight zone and the Equatorial anomaly.

  10. Measurement of cabin air quality aboard commercial airliners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagda, Niren L.; Koontz, Michael D.; Konheim, Arnold G.; Katharine Hammond, S.

    Between April and June 1989, 92 randomly selected flights were monitored to determine prevailing levels of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and other pollutants in the airliner cabin environment. The monitored flights included 69 smoking flights, 8 of which were international, and 23 nonsmoking flights, all of which were domestic. Selected ETS contaminants (nicotine, respirable suspended particles and carbon monoxide), as well as ozone, microbial aerosols, carbon dioxide and other environmental variables were measured in different parts of airliner cabins. Particle and nicotine concentrations were highest in the smoking section and were somewhat higher in the boundary region near smoking than in other no-smoking sections or on nonsmoking flights. Levels of these ETS tracers were correlated with smoking rates observed by field technicians, and their levels in the boundary section were higher when more proximate to the smoking section. CO 2 levels were sufficiently high and humidity levels were sufficiently low to pose potential comfort problems for aircraft occupants. Ozone levels were well within existing standards for airliner environments, and levels of microbial aerosols were below those in residential environments that have been characterized through cross-sectional studies.

  11. Preliminary Results from Coordinated UVCS-CDS-Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parenti, S.; Bromage, B. J.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Raymond, J. C.; Noci, G.; Bromage, G. E.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The June 2000 quadrature between the Sun, Earth, and Ulysses took place with Ulysses at a distance of 3.35 AU from the Sun and at heliocentric latitude 58.2 deg south, in the southeast quadrant. This provided an opportunity to observe the corona close to the Sun with Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS) and, subsequently, to sample the same plasma when it reached Ulysses. Here we focus on simultaneous observations of UVCS and CDS made on June 12, 13, 16 and 17. The UVCS data were acquired at heliocentric altitudes ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 solar radii, using different grating positions, in order to get a wide wavelength range. CDS data consisted of Normal Incidence Spectrometer (NIS) full wavelength rasters of 120" x 150" centered at altitudes up to 1.18 solar radii, together with Grazing Incidence Spectrometer (GIS) 4" x 4" rasters within the same field of view, out to 1.2 solar radii. The radial direction to Ulysses passed through a high latitude streamer, throughout the 4 days of observations, Analysis of the spectra taken by UVCS shows a variation of the element abundances in the streamer over our observing interval: however, because the observations were in slightly different parts of the streamer on different days, the variation could be ascribed either to a temporal or spatial effect. The oxygen abundance, however, seems to increase at the edge of the streamer, as indicated by previous analyses. This suggests the variation may be a function of position within the streamer, rather than a temporal effect. Oxygen abundances measured by SWICS on Ulysses are compared with the CDS and UVCS results to see whether changes measured in situ follow the same pattern.

  12. Measurements of OH, H2SO4, and MSA Aboard the NCAR C-130 During TOSPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C.; Zondlo, M.; Kosciuch, E.; Eisele, F.; Eisele, F.

    2001-05-01

    The unique environments encountered during the TOPSE mission afforded the opportunity to obtain measurements in varying photochemical regimes. Measurements of OH, H2SO4, and MSA (methane sulfonic acid) performed aboard the NCAR C-130 are presented. The above species were measured using a four channel Selected-Ion Chemical-Ionization Mass-Spectrometer. Low values (<4 x 105 molecule cm-3) of each species were predominately observed at the beginning of the mission as would be expected for areas with low photochemical activity. Towards the end of the mission, as solar activity increased, [OH] rose to levels of 1-2 x 106 molecule cm-3. Encounters with ozone depleted air-masses and photo stationary model simulations will be discussed.

  13. Uncertainty analysis for Ulysses safety evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the effort to review the Ulysses Final Safety Analysis Report and to understand the risk of plutonium release from the Ulysses spacecraft General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermal Generator, the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) performed an integrated, quantitative analysis of the uncertainties of the calculated risk of plutonium release from Ulysses. Using state-of-art probabilistic risk assessment technology, the uncertainty analysis accounted for both variability and uncertainty of the key parameters of the risk analysis. The results show that INSRP had high confidence that risk of fatal cancers from potential plutonium release associated with calculated launch and deployment accident scenarios is low.

  14. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scime, Earl; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, J. L.; Corniileau-Wehrlin, N.; Solomon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The electron heat flux in the solar wind has been measured by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment in the ecliptic from 1 to 5 AU and out of the ecliptic during the recently completed pass over the solar south pole and the ongoing pass over the solar north pole. Although the electron heat flux contains only a fraction of the kinetic energy of the solar wind. the available energy is sufficient to account for the non-adiabatic expansion of the solar wind electrons. The Ulysses measurements indicate that the electron heat flux is actively dissipated in the solar wind. The exact mechanism or mechanisms is unknown. but a model based on the whistler heat flux instability predicts radial gradients for the electron heat flux in good agreement with the data. We will present measurements of the correlation between wave activity measured by the unified radio and plasma experiment (URAP) and the electron heat flux throughout the Ulysses mission. The goal is to determine if whistler waves are a good candidate for the observed electron heat flux dissipation. The latitudinal gradients of the electron heat flux. wave activity. and electron pressure will be discussed in light of the changes in the magnetic field geometry from equator to poles.

  15. Listen to Data: Video 3 Ulysses

    NASA Video Gallery

    This clip contains audified data from the joint European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA Ulysses satellite gathered on October 26, 1995. The participant in Alexander's study was able to detect artifici...

  16. Modeling of Jovian Hectometric Radiation Source Locations: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Reiner, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on Ulysses has provided unique high latitude measurements of Jovian hectometric radiation (HOM) during its encounter with Jupiter in February 1992. URAP was the first radio instrument in the Jovian environment with radio direction-finding capability, which was previously used to determine the HOM source locations in the Jovian magnetosphere. These initial source location determinations were based on several assumptions, including the neglect of refractive effects, which may be tested. We have, for the first time, combined the measured incident ray-direction at the spacecraft with a model magnetosphere to directly trace the rays back to the HOM source. We concentrate on the observations of HOM from high northern latitudes when Ulysses was at distances less than 15 R(sub j). The three- dimensional ray-tracing calculations presented here indicate that the HOM sources probably lie on L shells in the range 3 less than or approximately equal to L less than 7 (tilted dipole magnetic field model) consistent with previous determinations that ignored the effects of refraction. The ray-tracing results, however, indicate that wave refraction due to the Io torus and the magnetic field can significantly influence the precise source location. We show that constraints on the locations imposed by the gyroemission mechanism suggest that the lo torus density may have experienced temporal and/or spatial fluctuations during the Ulysses observations of HOM. Finally, in the cold plasma approximation we demonstrate that even if the emission were nearly linearly polarized near the source region, almost circular polarization will be observed at Ulysses, in agreement with observations.

  17. Five years of Ulysses dust data: 2000 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, H.; Altobelli, N.; Anweiler, B.; Dermott, S. F.; Dikarev, V.; Graps, A. L.; Grün, E.; Gustafson, B. A.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hanner, M. S.; Horányi, M.; Kissel, J.; Landgraf, M.; Lindblad, B. A.; Linkert, D.; Linkert, G.; Mann, I.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Polanskey, C.; Schwehm, G.; Srama, R.; Zook, H. A.

    2006-08-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been orbiting the Sun on a highly inclined ellipse ( i=79∘, perihelion distance 1.3 AU, aphelion distance 5.4 AU) since it encountered Jupiter in 1992. Between January 2000 and December 2004, the spacecraft completed almost an entire revolution about the Sun, passing through perihelion in May 2001 and aphelion in July 2004. In this five-year period the dust detector on board recorded 4415 dust impacts. We publish and analyse the complete data set of both raw and reduced data for particles with masses 10-16g⩽m⩽10-7g. Together with 1695 dust impacts recorded between launch of Ulysses and the end of 1999 published earlier (Grün, E., Baguhl, M., Divine, N., Fechtig, H., Hamilton, D.P, Hanner, M.S., Kissel, J., Lindblad, B.A., Linkert, D., Linkert, G., Mann, I., McDonnell, J.A.M., Morfill, G.E., Polanskey, C., Riemann, R., Schwehm, G.H., Siddique, N., Staubach, P., Zook, H.A., 1995a. Two years of Ulysses dust data. Planetary Space Sci. 43, 971-999, Paper III; Krüger, H., Grün, E., Landgraf, M., Baguhl, M., Dermott, S.F., Fechtig, H., Gustafson, B.A., Hamilton, D.P., Hanner, M.S., Horányi, M., Kissel, J., Lindblad, B., Linkert, D., Linkert, G., Mann, I., McDonnell, J.A.M., Morfill, G.E., Polanskey, C., Schwehm, G.H., Srama, R., Zook, H.A., 1995. Three years of Ulysses dust data: 1993 to 1995. Planetary and Space Sci. 47, 363-383, Paper V; Krüger, H., Grün, E., Landgraf, M., Dermott, S.F., Fechtig, H., Gustafson, B.A., Hamilton, D.P., Hanner, M.S., Horányi, M., Kissel, J., Lindblad, B., Linkert, D., Linkert, G., Mann, I., McDonnell, J.A.M., Morfill, G.E., Polanskey, C., Schwehm, G.H., Srama, R., Zook, H.A., 2001b. Four years of Ulysses dust data: 1996 to 1999. Planetary Space Sci. 49, 1303-1324, Paper VII), a data set of 6110 dust impacts detected with the Ulysses sensor between October 1990 and December 2004 is now available. The impact rate measured between 2000 and 2002 was relatively constant with about 0.3 impacts per day

  18. The May 1997 SOHO-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven T.; Poletto, G.; Romoli, M.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Simnett, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present results from the May 1997 SOHO-Ulysses quadrature, near sunspot minimum. Ulysses was at 5.1 AU, 100 north of the solar equator, and off the east limb. It was, by chance, also at the very northern edge of the streamer belt. Nevertheless, SWOOPS detected only slow, relatively smooth wind and there was no direct evidence of fast wind from the northern polar coronal hole or of mixing with fast wind. LASCO images show that the streamer belt at 10 N was narrow and sharp at the beginning and end of the two week observation interval, but broadened in the middle. A corresponding change in density, but not flow speed, occurred at Ulysses. Coronal densities derived from UVCS show that physical parameters in the lower corona are closely related to those in the solar wind, both over quiet intervals and in transient events on the limb. One small transient observed by both LASCO and UVCS is analyzed in detail.

  19. Photolysis frequency measurements aboard Zeppelin NT during PEGASOS 2012/13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Insa; Bohn, Birger; Bachner, Mathias; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Airborne measurements of the solar spectral actinic flux densities for the determination of photolysis frequencies in the atmosphere were performed as part of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS). We present the instrumentation and characterisation of the spectroradiometer systems operated aboard the Zeppelin NT airship and photolysis frequency data obtained in field campaigns in 2012 and 2013. Separate measurements of the upwelling and downwelling components of the actinic flux densities were performed with two instruments covering together a 4π-sr field of view. Since deviations from the ideal 2π-sr angular response of each actinic flux receiver can lead to over- or underestimations of the measured photolysis frequencies, detailed angular sensitivities of the two optical receivers were determined in the laboratory. The influence of the non-ideal behaviour on the photolysis frequency measurements was investigated using radiative transfer calculations of atmospheric radiance distributions under various atmospheric conditions and different ground albedos. Corresponding correction factor were derived. This method is also applicable for other research aircraft operating at higher altitudes. Measurements of the solar actinic flux densities were performed in the wavelength range from 280 - 650 nm with a spectral resolution of about 2 nm and averaged over 3 s. An overview is shown of photolysis frequency data (O3, HNO3, HCHO, H2O2, HNO2, NO2 and NO3) obtained in the atmospheric boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns in the Netherlands, Italy 2012 and Finland 2013. Dependencies of photolysis frequencies on cloud cover, flight altitude and wavelength range of the photolysis process are investigated as well as their influence on the photochemical processing of trace gases. Moreover the instrumentation allows for estimations of height depending spectral albedos. Acknowledgement: Funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within the

  20. Full-Waveform Inversion Method for Data Measured by the CONSERT Instrument aboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statz, C.; Plettemeier, D.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    The primary scientific objective of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is to perform a dielectric characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's nucleus by means of a bi-static sounding between the lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and the orbiter Rosetta. For the sounding the lander part of CONSERT will receive and process the radio signal emitted by the orbiter part of the instrument and transmit a signal to the orbiter to be received by CONSERT. With data measured during the first science phase, a three-dimensional model of the material distribution with regard to the complex dielectric permittivity of the comet's nucleus is to be reconstructed. In order to perform the 3D characterization of the nucleus we employ a full-waveform least-squares based inversion in time-domain. The reconstruction is performed on the envelope of the received signal. The direct problem of simulating the wave-propagation inside the comet's nucleus is modelled using a wideband nonstandard finite-differences in time-domain approach and a compensation method to account for the differences in free-space path-loss due to the removal of the carrier in the simulation. This approach will yield an approximation of the permittivity distribution including features large compared to the bandwith of the sounding signal. In order to account for restrictions on the measurement positions by the orbitography and limitations on the instrument dynamic range we employ a regularization technique where the permittivity distribution and the gradient with regard to the permittivity is projected in a domain defined by a viable model of the spatial material distribution. The least-squares optimization step of the reconstruction is performed in such domain on a reduced set of parameters. To demonstrate the viability of the proposed approaches we provide reconstruction results based on simulation data and scale-model laboratory

  1. The Ulysses Project. Integrating the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan Swenton

    2001-01-01

    Offers a project developed as an outgrowth of sixth-grade students' study of ancient Greece in history, English, drama, and art classes. Explains that the students created sculptures inspired by Greek sculpture that represented student perceptions of the activities and emotions found in the Ulysses myth. (CMK)

  2. Energetic particles and coronal mass ejections in the high latitude heliosphere: Ulysses-LET observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothmer, V.; Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The COSPIN Low Energy Telescope (LET) onboard the Ulysses spacecraft measures protons, alphas and heavier ions at energies of approximately 1 to 50 MeV/n. Ulysses measurements offer favorable opportunities to study the effects of solar activity in the out-of-ecliptic regions of the heliosphere. Using LET data, we have investigated the properties of transient energetic ions at high heliographic latitudes when Ulysses was permanently immersed in high speed solar wind and magnetically connected to the Sun on open magnetic field lines. Recurrent increases in the fluxes of energetic ions at high heliographic latitudes at frequencies related to the solar rotation period were found to occur in association with co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs). Here we investigate fluxes of energetic particles that showed no relationship to ClRs. From the investigation of plasma and magnetic held data it is found that all of the transient high latitude particle events were associated with the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) over Ulysses. Enhancements in particle fluxes several days prior to the arrival of a CME, but with a significant time delay with respect to the estimated CME-onset at the Sun, were most probably associated with interplanetary shocks driven by fast CMEs. These particle events exhibit unusually high rho/alpha-ratios and are not observed for CMEs not driving a shock. However, not all CMEs that passed Ulysses were associated with a particle event. We find evidence that at high solar latitudes, solar flare particles cannot reach Ulysses on open magnetic field lines, but can reach the spacecraft if particles are injected into magnetic flux-ropes (CMEs) at the Sun. These findings are supported by soft X-ray observations from the Japanese Yohkoh-satellite.

  3. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  4. He abundance variations in the solar wind: Observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.; McComas, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Ulysses mission is providing the first opportunity to observe variations in solar wind plasma parameters at heliographic latitudes far removed from the ecliptic plane. We present an overview of the solar wind speed and the variability in helium abundance, [He] data on [He] in six high latitude coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and a superposed epoch analysis of [He] variations at the seven heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings made during the rapid-latitude-scan portion of the mission. The differences in the variability of the solar wind speed and [He] in high latitude and equatorial regions are quite striking. Solar wind speed is generally low but highly variable near the solar equator, while at higher latitudes the average speed is quite high with little variability. [He] can vary over nearly two decades at low solar latitudes, while at high latitudes it varies only slightly. In contrast to the high [He] that is commonly associated with CMEs observed in the ecliptic, none of the six high-speed CMEs encountered at high southern heliographic latitudes showed any significant variation in helium content. A superposed epoch analysis of the [He] during all seven HCS crossings made as Ulysses passed from the southern to northern solar hemisphere shows the expected [He] minimum near the crossing and a broad region of low [He] around the crossing time. We discuss how our solar wind [He] observations may provide an accurate measure of the helium composition for the entire convective zone of the Sun.

  5. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-10

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

  6. Jupiter's Magnetosphere: Plasma Description from the Ulysses Flyby.

    PubMed

    Bame, S J; Barraclough, B L; Feldman, W C; Gisler, G R; Gosling, J T; McComas, D J; Phillips, J L; Thomsen, M F; Goldstein, B E; Neugebauer, M

    1992-09-11

    Plasma observations at Jupiter show that the outer regions of the Jovian magnetosphere are remarkably similar to those of Earth. Bow-shock precursor electrons and ions were detected in the upstream solar wind, as at Earth. Plasma changes across the bow shock and properties of the magnetosheath electrons were much like those at Earth, indicating that similar processes are operating. A boundary layer populated by a varying mixture of solar wind and magnetospheric plasmas was found inside the magnetopause, again as at Earth. In the middle magnetosphere, large electron density excursions were detected with a 10-hour periodicity as planetary rotation carried the tilted plasma sheet past Ulysses. Deep in the magnetosphere, Ulysses crossed a region, tentatively described as magnetically connected to the Jovian polar cap on one end and to the interplanetary magnetic field on the other. In the inner magnetosphere and lo torus, where corotation plays a dominant role, measurements could not be made because of extreme background rates from penetrating radiation belt particles.

  7. Low-Latitude Solar Wind During the Fall 1998 SOHO-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, G.; Suess, Steven T.; Biesecker, D.; Esser, R.; Gloeckler, G.; Zurbuchen, T.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Fall 1998 SOlar-Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) - Ulysses quadrature occurred when Ulysses was at 5.2 AU, 17.4 deg South of the equator, and off the West line of the Sun. SOHO coronal observations, at heliocentric distances of a few solar radii, showed that the line through the solar center and Ulysses crossed, over the first days of observations, a dark, weakly emitting area and through the northern edge of a streamer complex during the second half of the quadrature campaign. Ulysses in situ observations showed this transition to correspond to a decrease from higher speed wind typical of coronal hole flow to low speed wind. Physical parameters (density, temperature, flow speed) of the low latitude coronal plasma sampled over the campaign are determined using constraints from what is the same plasma measured later in situ and simulating the intensities of the Hydrogen Lyman-alpha and OVI 1032 and 1037 Angstrom lines, measured by the Ultra Violet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The densities, temperatures and outflow speed are compared with the same characteristic flow parameters for high-latitude fast wind streams and typical slow solar wind.

  8. Solar wind thermal electrons in the ecliptic plane between 1 and 4 AU - Preliminary results from the Ulysses radio receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Harvey, C. C.; Lacombe, C.; Mangeney, A.; Moncuquet, M.; Perche, C.; Steinberg, J.-L.; Macdowall, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The radio receiver of the Unified Radio and Plasma experiment aboard the Ulysses spacecraft records spectra of the quasi-thermal plasma noise. The interpretation of these spectra allows the determination of the total electron density Ne and of the cold (core) electron temperature Tc in the solar wind. A single power law does not fit the variations of Ne which result from the contribution from different solar wind structures. The distribution of the values of Tc suggests that, on the average, the solar wind is nearly isothermal.

  9. Thwarting the Diseased Will: Ulysses Contracts, the Self and Addiction.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kirsten

    2015-09-01

    Ulysses contracts are a particular type of advance directive that has been advocated for use in mental health settings and addictions treatment. Taking their name from the legend of Ulysses, such contracts are distinctive insofar as they are designed to thwart certain anticipated future wishes rather than realize them. In this paper, I consider what Ulysses contracts reveal about contemporary conceptions of addiction and the self. Drawing on discussions of Ulysses contracts in the psychiatric and addictions literature, as well as historical and contemporary examples of such, I show that Ulysses contracts are premised on a split between the present 'rational' self and the future 'irrational' self, thereby reproducing a very particular notion of addiction--one that serves to naturalize certain ways of thinking about freedom, choice, coercion, and the self.

  10. Design of an experiment to measure the fire exposure of radioactive materials packages aboard container cargo ships

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    The test described in this paper is intended to measure the typical accident environment for a radioactive materials package in a fire aboard a container cargo ship. A stack of nine used standard cargo containers will be variously loaded with empty packages, simulated packages and combustible cargo and placed over a large hydrocarbon pool fire of one hour duration. Both internal and external fire container fire environments typical of on-deck stowage will be measured as well as the potential for container to container fire spread. With the use of the inverse heat conduction calculations, the local heat transfer to the simulated packages can be estimated from thermocouple data. Data recorded will also provide information on fire durations in each container, fire intensity and container to container fire spread characteristics.

  11. The hot plasma environment at jupiter: ulysses results.

    PubMed

    Lanzerotti, L J; Armstrong, T P; Gold, R E; Anderson, K A; Krimigis, S M; Lin, R P; Pick, M; Roelof, E C; Sarris, E T; Simnett, G M; Maclennan, C G; Choo, H T; Tappin, S J

    1992-09-11

    Measurements of the hot plasma environment during the Ulysses flyby of Jupiter have revealed several new discoveries related to this large rotating astrophysical system. The Jovian magnetosphere was found by Ulysses to be very extended, with the day-side magnetopause located at approximately 105 Jupiter radii. The heavy ion (sulfur, oxygen, and sodium) population in the day-side magnetosphere increased sharply at approximately 86 Jupiter radii. This is somewhat more extended than the "inner" magnetosphere boundary region identified by the Voyager hot plasma measurements. In the day-side magnetosphere, the ion fluxes have the anisotropy direction expected for corotation with the planet, with the magnitude of the anisotropy increasing when the spacecraft becomes more immersed in the hot plasma sheet. The relative abundances of sulfur, oxygen, and sodium to helium decreased somewhat with decreasing radial distance from the planet on the day-side, which suggests that the abundances of the Jupiter-derived species are dependent on latitude. In the dusk-side, high-latitude region, intense fluxes of counter-streaming ions and electrons were discovered from the edge of the plasma sheet to the dusk-side magnetopause. These beams of electrons and ions were found to be very tightly aligned with the magnetic field and to be superimposed on a time- and space-variable isotropic hot plasma background. The currents carried by the measured hot plasma particles are typically approximately 1.6 x 10(-4) microamperes per square meter or approximately 8 x 10(5) amperes per squared Jupiter radius throughout the high-latitude magnetosphere volume. It is likely that the intense particle beams discovered at high Jovian latitudes produce auroras in the polar caps of the planet.

  12. Ulysses - The first high-latitude heliospheric mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, K.-P.; Marsden, R. G.; Page, D. E.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ulysses mission will, for the first time, explore the heliosphere within a few astronomical units of the sun over the full range of heliographic latitudes, thereby providing the first characterization of the uncharted third dimension. Highly sophisticated scientific instrumentation carried on board the spacecraft is designed to measure the properties of the solar wind, the sun/wind interface, the heliospheric magnetic field, solar radio bursts and plasma waves, solar X-rays, solar and galactic cosmic rays, and interplanetary/interstellar neutral gas and dust. This collaborative ESA/NASA mission, scheduled for launch in October 1990, will use a Jupiter gravity-assist to achieve a trajectory extending to high solar latitudes /1,2/.

  13. The charge spectrum of heavy cosmic ray nuclei measured in the Biostack experiment aboard Apollo 16 using plastic detectors.

    PubMed

    Enge, W; Beaujean, R; Bartholoma, K P; Fukui, K

    1974-01-01

    In the Biostack experiment flown aboard Apollo 16 plastic detectors were used to select those individual biological objects which were hit by single heavy cosmic-ray nuclei during the 266 hours of space flight. The energy loss deposited in the biological object can be determined. This method needs a separate calibration in every experiment, i.e. an individual track etching rate as function of the energy loss. This calibration is given. An area of 36 cm2 of eight cellulose nitrate sheets was scanned for tracks of heavy cosmic-ray particles that stopped in the sheets. About 200 particles could be evaluated. Calibration was achieved using the oxygen isotope 16O of the cosmic-ray ions and the charge spectrum of all measured particles (Z=5-16) could be obtained.

  14. Timepix-based radiation environment monitor measurements aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Kroupa, Martin; Hoang, Son; Idarraga, John; Amberboy, Clif; Rios, Ryan; Hauss, Jessica; Keller, John; Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Turecek, Daniel; Jakubek, Jan; Vykydal, Zdenek; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2015-05-01

    A number of small, single element radiation detectors, employing the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration's Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) coupled to a specially modified version of the USB-Lite interface for that ASIC provided by the Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics (IEAP) at the Czech Technical University in Prague, have been developed at the University of Houston and NASA Johnson Space Center. These detectors, officially designated by NASA as Radiation Environment Monitors (REMs), were deployed aboard the International Space Station in late 2012. Six REM units are currently operating on Station Support Computers (SSCs) and returning data on a daily basis. The associated data acquisition software on the SSCs provides both automated data collection and transfer, as well as algorithms to handle adjustment of acquisition rates and recovery and restart of the acquisition software. A suite of ground software analysis tools has been developed to allow rapid analysis of the data and provides a ROOT-based framework for extending data analysis capabilities.

  15. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-LO observations: What are the reasons for the differences?

    SciTech Connect

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Wood, B. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  16. Making a clean break: addiction and Ulysses contracts.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Chrisoula

    2008-01-01

    I examine current models of self-destructive addictive behaviour, and argue that there is an important place for Ulysses contracts in coping with addictive behaviour that stems from certain problematic preference structures. Given the relevant preference structures, interference based on a Ulysses contract need not involve questionably favouring an agent's past preferences over her current preferences, but can actually be justified in terms of the agent's current concerns and commitments.

  17. SOHO-Ulysses Spring 2000 Quadrature: Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer and SUMER Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, S.; Landi, E.; Bromage, B. J. I.

    2003-06-01

    We present results from SOHO/CDS and SOHO/SUMER coordinated observations of coronal streamers made during the spring 2000 quadrature of SOHO, the Sun, and Ulysses. These observations form part of the JOP 112, which is primarily aimed at investigating the composition of the regions of the corona and the solar wind observed by both SOHO and Ulysses. SUMER and CDS observed the low corona from the limb up to about 1.3 Rsolar from the Sun center. The physical parameters of the plasma, such as electron density, temperature, emission measure, and composition, are measured along the radial direction, toward Ulysses. The variation in these parameters over the 6 day series of observations was examined, and no significant change was seen. The dependence of these parameters on the solar latitude was also investigated. The results indicate that the observed streamers are homogeneous, of coronal composition, and nearly in hydrostatic equilibrium. The structures remained almost stable during the whole period of the observations.

  18. Measurements of total odd nitrogen (NOy) aboard MOZAIC in-service aircraft: instrument design, operation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volz-Thomas, A.; Berg, M.; Heil, T.; Houben, N.; Lerner, A.; Petrick, W.; Raak, D.; Pätz, H.-W.

    2005-02-01

    A small system for the unattended measurement of total odd nitrogen (NOy, i.e., the sum of NO and its atmospheric oxidation products) aboard civil in-service aircraft in the framework of MOZAIC is described. The instrument employs the detection of NO by its chemiluminescence with O3 in combination with catalytic conversion of the other NOy compounds to NO at 300°C on a gold surface in the presence of H2. The instrument has a sensitivity of 0.4-0.7cps/ppt and is designed for unattended operation during 1-2 service cycles of the aircraft (400-800 flight hours). The total weight is 50kg, including calibration system, compressed gases, mounting, and safety measures. The layout and inlet configuration are governed by requirements due to the certification for passenger aircraft. Laboratory tests are described regarding the conversion efficiency for NO2 and HNO3 (both >98%). Interference by non-NOy species is <1% for CH3CN and NH3, <5x10-5% for N2O (corresponding to <0.2ppt fake NOy from ambient N2O) and 100% for HCN. The time response of the instrument is <1s (90% change) for NO2. The response for HNO3 is nonlinear: 20s for 67%, 60s for 80%, and 150s for 90% response, respectively.

  19. Studies of the structure of the plasmasphere as seen by radiosounder measurements aboard the Alovetti-satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The structure of the plasmasphere was studied as seen by radiosounder measurements aboard the Alovetti-2 satellite. Magnetic tape data files were obtained from the NASA Ames Research Center to give a reasonably complete set of high latitude electron density profiles. Considerable effort was expended to develop models of ion flow in the topside ionosphere. These models took both H(+) and O(+) into account and permitted various parameter studies to be made of the various factors which affect H(+) escape in polar wind flows. The results of these studies are included. Extensive computer programs were written to display the measured electron density profiles in ways useful to geophysical analysis. The expected mid-latitude trough was easily discernable in the nightime ionosphere at locations expected from similar observations of the plasmapause. In the dayside ionosphere, however, it proved extremely difficult to find any trough-like phenomena. Using the previously developed computer models, it was possible to study the region where the plasmapause appeared to be absent. It was found that over much of the dayside, large fluxes were computed well inside the plasmapause extending down to L-shells as low as 2.5.

  20. Deployment of a Fast-GCMS System to Measure C2 to C5 Carbonyls, Methanol and Ethanol Aboard Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apel, Eric C.

    2004-01-01

    Through funding of this proposal, a fast response gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (FGCMS) instrument to measure less than or equal to C4 carbonyl compounds and methanol was developed for the NASA GTE TRACE-P (Global Tropospheric Experiment, Transport And Chemical Evolution Over The Pacific) mission. The system consists of four major components: sample inlet, preconcentration system, gas chromatograph (GC), and detector. The preconcentration system is a custom-built cryogen-conservative system. The GC is a compact, custom-built unit that can be temperature programmed and rapidly cooled. Detection is accomplished with an Agilent Technologies 5973 mass spectrometer. The FGCMS instrument provides positive identification because the compounds are chromatographically separated and mass selected. During TRACE-P, a sample was analyzed every 5 minutes. The FGCMS limit of detection was between 5 and 75 pptv, depending on the compound. The entire instrument package is contained in a standard NASA instrument rack (106 cm x 61 cm x 135 cm), consumes less than 1200 watts and is fully automated with LabViEW 6i. Methods were developed or producing highly accurate gas phase standards for the target compounds and for testing the system in the presence of potential interferents. This report presents data on these tests and on the general overall performance of the system in the laboratory and aboard the DC-8 aircraft during the mission. Vertical profiles for acetaldehyde, methanol, acetone, propanal, methyl ethyl ketone, and butanal from FGCMS data collected over the entire mission are also presented.

  1. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2014-03-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne operation. It was characterised in the laboratory with respect to instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation, a calibration strategy is described that utilises CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppb for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppb. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately determined and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppb. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppb at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  2. Tunable diode laser in-situ CH4 measurements aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft: instrument performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyroff, C.; Zahn, A.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schuck, T. J.

    2013-10-01

    A laser spectrometer for automated monthly measurements of methane (CH4) mixing ratios aboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft is presented. The instrument is based on a commercial Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA, Los Gatos Res.), which was adapted to meet the requirements imposed by unattended airborne employment. The modified instrument is described. A laboratory characterization was performed to determine the instrument stability, precision, cross sensitivity to H2O, and accuracy. For airborne operation a calibration strategy is described, that utilizes CH4 measurements obtained from flask samples taken during the same flights. The precision of airborne measurements is 2 ppbv for 10 s averages. The accuracy at aircraft cruising altitude is 3.85 ppbv. During aircraft ascent and descent, where no flask samples were obtained, instrumental drifts can be less accurately considered and the uncertainty is estimated to be 12.4 ppbv. A linear humidity bias correction was applied to the CH4 measurements, which was most important in the lower troposphere. On average, the correction bias was around 6.5 ppbv at an altitude of 2 km, and negligible at cruising flight level. Observations from 103 long-distance flights are presented that span a large part of the northern hemispheric upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS), with occasional crossing of the tropics on flights to southern Africa. These accurate data mark the largest UT/LMS in-situ CH4 dataset worldwide. An example of a tracer-tracer correlation study with ozone is given, highlighting the possibility for accurate cross-tropopause transport analyses.

  3. Ulysses orbit determination at high declinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelrath, Timothy P.; Lewis, George D.

    1995-01-01

    The trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft caused its geocentric declination to exceed 60 deg South for over two months during the Fall of 1994, permitting continuous tracking from a single site. During this time, spacecraft operations constraints allowed only Doppler tracking data to be collected, and imposed a high radial acceleration uncertainty on the orbit determination process. The unusual aspects of this situation have motivated a re-examination of the Hamilton-Melbourne results, which have been used before to estimate the information content of Doppler tracking for trajectories closer to the ecliptic. The addition of an acceleration term to this equation is found to significantly increase the declination uncertainty for symmetric passes. In addition, a simple means is described to transform the symmetric results when the tracking pass is non-symmetric. The analytical results are then compared against numerical studies of this tracking geometry and found to be in good agreement for the angular uncertainties. The results of this analysis are applicable to the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission and to any other missions with high declination trajectories, as well as to missions using short tracking passes and/or one-way Doppler data.

  4. A Detection of the Same Hot Plasma in the Corona: During a CME and Later at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2004-01-01

    We show direct evidence for the same very hot plasma being detected remotely from SOHO in the corona and subsequently, at Ulysses in the solar wind. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that such an unambiguous identification has been made in the case of hot plasma. This detection complements studies correlating other plasma and field properties observed to the properties measured at the source in the corona. This observation takes advantage of a SOHO-Sun-Ulysses quadrature, during which the Sun-Ulysses included angle is $90^\\circ$ and it is possible to observe with Ulysses instruments the same plasma that has previously been remotely observed with SOHO instruments in the corona on the limb of the Sun. The identification builds on an existing base of separate SOHO and interplanetary detections of hot plasma. SOHO/UVCS has found evidence for very hot coronal plasma in current sheets in the aftermath of CMEs in the [Fe XVIII] $\\lambda$ \\AA\\ line, implying a temperature on the order of $6\\times 10(exp 6)$ K. This temperature is unusually high even for active regions, but is compatible with the high temperature predicted in current sheets. In the solar wind, ACE data from early 1998 to middle 2000 revealed high frozen-in Fe charge state in many cases to be present in interplanetary plasma.

  5. Neutral air density and temperature measurements by the TOTAL instrument aboard the ROSE payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friker, A.; Luebken, F.-J.

    1992-06-01

    Four ROSE payloads, launched from November 1988 to February 1989 from northern Scandinavia, carried ionization gauges ('TOTAL' instruments) for neutral air density measurements in the altitude range 90-105 km. Temperature profiles are derived by integrating the number density profiles. Density and temperature data are presented. The limitations of the measurement technique as well as instrumental errors are discussed. In one of the flights (F1) a significant temperature enhancement was observed at an altitude where plasma instabilities were detected by independent measurements.

  6. Ulysses observations of latitude gradients in the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Neugebauer, M.; Phillips, J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    Several parameters measured by Ulysses as it traveled southward to heliographic latitudes of -50 deg are presented and analyzed. The radial component of the magnetic field, averaged over 5 deg latitude increments and extrapolated back to 1 AU, is found to agree with baseline measurements provided by IMP-8. There is little, if any, evidence of a latitude gradient, a result consistent with the dominance of the magnetic field associated with the heliospheric current sheet and with recent models which include the effect of the current sheet as well as of source surface fields. Thus far, the spiral angle agrees with the Parker spiral assuming a rate of rotation of the field lines at the Sun equal to the equatorial value. No evidence is seen of either a change in rotation rate with latitude or an unwinding of the spiral as suggested by a recent analysis. Hourly variances in the field magnitude and in the sum of the variances in the components, normalized to the square of the observed field strenght, show the former to be independent of latitude while the latter shows a strong increase with latitude. These two observations are shown to be associated with Alfven waves that are continuously present at high latitudes. The waves have large amplitudes, extend to long periods, and have important implications for galactic cosmic rays and the solar wind.

  7. A Comparison of Measurements from ATMOS and Instruments Aboard the ER-2 Aircraft: Halogenated Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. Y.; Salawitch, R. J.; Michelsen, H. A.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Volk, C. M.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Loewenstein, M.

    1996-01-01

    We compare volume mixing ratio profiles of N2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, CCl4, SF6, and HCl in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere measured by the ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer on the ATLAS-3 Space Shuttle Mission with in situ measurements acquired from the NASA ER-2 aircraft during Nov. 1994. Good agreement is found between ATMOS and in situ correlations of [CFC-11], [CFC-12], and [SF6] with [N2O]. ATMOS measurements of [CCl4] are 15% high compared to ER-2 data, but agree within the systematic uncertainties. ATMOS observations of [HCl] vs [N2O] are within approximately 10% of ER-2 data for [HCl] > 1 ppbv, but exceed in situ measurements by larger fractional amounts for smaller [HCl]. ATMOS measurements of [ClONO2] agree well with values inferred from in situ observations of [ClO], [NO], and [O3]. The sum of [HCl] and [ClONO2] observed by ATMOS, supplemented by a minor contribution from [ClO] estimated with a photochemical model, is consistent with the levels of inorganic chlorine inferred from in situ measurements of chlorine source gases.

  8. A Slow Streamer Blowout at the Sun and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seuss, S. T.; Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.

    2004-01-01

    On 10 June 2000 a streamer on the southeast limb slowly disappeared from LASCO/C2 over approximately 10 hours. A small CME was reported in C2. A substantial interplanetary CME (ICME) was later detected at Ulysses, which was at quadrature with the Sun and SOHO at the time. This detection illustrates the properties of an ICME for a known solar source and demonstrates that the identification can be done even beyond 3 AU. Slow streamer blowouts such as this have long been known but are little studied. We report on the SOHO observation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the solar limb and the subsequent in situ detection at Ulysses, which was near quadrature at the time, above the location of the CME. SOHO-Ulysses quadrature was 13 June, when Ulysses was 3.36 AU from the Sun and 58.2 degrees south of the equator off the east limb. The slow streamer blowout was on 10 June, when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses angle was 87 degrees.

  9. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    From its unique perspective, Ulysses has provided scientists with the very first all-round map of the heliosphere, the huge bubble in space filled by the Sun's wind. The Earth swims deep inside the heliosphere, and gusts and shocks in the solar wind can harm satellites, power supplies and ommunications. They may also affect our planet's weather. A better grasp of the solar weather in the heliosphere is therefore one of the major aims of ESA's science programme. In a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA, Ulysses was launched towards Jupiter in October 1990 by the US space shuttle Discovery. Arriving in February 1992, Ulysses stole energy from the giant planet in a slingshot manoeuvre and was propelled back towards the Sun in an elongated orbit almost at right angles to the ecliptic plane, where the Earth and other planets circle the Sun. "This month Ulysses returns to the point in space where its out-of-ecliptic journey began, but Jupiter isn't there," explains Richard Marsden, ESA's project scientist for Ulysses. "Following its own inexorable path around the Sun, Jupiter is far away on the opposite side of the Solar System. So Ulysses' course will not be changed a second time. The spacecraft is now in effect a man-made comet, forever bound into a 6-year polar orbit around the Sun." Ulysses now starts its second orbit. It will travel over the poles of the Sun in 2000-2001 just as the count of dark sunspots is expected to reach a maximum. With its operational life extended for the Ulysses Solar Maximum Mission, the spacecraft will find the heliosphere much stormier than during its first orbit. Discoveries so far Like its mythical namesake, Ulysses has already had an eventful voyage of discovery. Its unique trajectory has provided the scientific teams with a new perspective, from far out in space and especially in the previously unknown regions of the heliosphere over the Sun's poles. Passing within 9.8 degrees of the polar axis, the highly

  10. Feasibility of a nuclear gauge for fuel quantity measurement aboard aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Sprinkle, D. R.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Capacitance fuel gauges have served as the basis for fuel quantity indicating systems in aircraft for several decades. However, there have been persistent reports by the airlines that these gauges often give faulty indications due to microbial growth and other contaminants in the fuel tanks. This report describes the results of a feasibility study of using gamma ray attenuation as the basis for measuring fuel quantity in the tanks. Studies with a weak Am-241 59.5-keV radiation source indicate that it is possible to continuously monitor the fuel quantity in the tanks to an accuracy of better than 1 percent. These measurements also indicate that there are easily measurable differences in the physical properties and resultant attenuation characteristics of JP-4, JP-5, and Jet A fuels. The experimental results, along with a suggested source-detector geometrical configuration are described.

  11. Reconstructing the Surface Permittivity Distribution from Data Measured by the CONSERT Instrument aboard Rosetta: Method and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettemeier, D.; Statz, C.; Hegler, S.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main scientific objectives of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is to perform a dielectric characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's nucleus by means of a bi-static sounding between the lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and the orbiter Rosetta. For the sounding, the lander part of CONSERT will receive and process the radio signal emitted by the orbiter part of the instrument and transmit a signal to the orbiter to be received by CONSERT. CONSERT will also be operated as bi-static RADAR during the descent of the lander Philae onto the comet's surface. From data measured during the descent, we aim at reconstructing a surface permittivity map of the comet at the landing site and along the path below the descent trajectory. This surface permittivity map will give information on the bulk material right below and around the landing site and the surface roughness in areas covered by the instrument along the descent. The proposed method to estimate the surface permittivity distribution is based on a least-squares based inversion approach in frequency domain. The direct problem of simulating the wave-propagation between lander and orbiter at line-of-sight and the signal reflected on the comet's surface is modelled using a dielectric physical optics approximation. Restrictions on the measurement positions by the descent orbitography and limitations on the instrument dynamic range will be dealt with by application of a regularization technique where the surface permittivity distribution and the gradient with regard to the permittivity is projected in a domain defined by a viable model of the spatial material and roughness distribution. The least-squares optimization step of the reconstruction is performed in such domain on a reduced set of parameters yielding stable results. The viability of the proposed method is demonstrated by reconstruction results based on simulated data.

  12. Initial Results from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Swenson, Charles; Thompson, Don; Barjatya, Aroh; Koontz, Steven L.; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Minow, Joseph; Craven, Paul; Coffey, Victoria; Parker, Linda; Bui, Them

    2007-01-01

    The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) is a multi-probe package designed to measure the floating potential of the 1nternational Space Station (ISS) as well as the density and temperature of the local ionospheric plasma environment. The role oj the FPMU is to provide direct measurements of ISS spacecraft charging as continuing construction leads to dramatic changes in ISS size and configuration. FPMU data are used for refinement and validation of the ISS spacecraft charging models used to evaluate the severity and frequency of occurrence of ISS charging hazards. The FPMU data and the models are also used to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed hazard controls. The FPMU consists of four probes: a floating potential probe, two Langmuir probes. and a plasma impedance probe. These probes measure the floating potential of the ISS, plasma density, and electron temperature. Redundant measurements using different probes support data validation by inter-probe comparisons. The FPMU was installed by ISS crewmembers, during an ExtraVehicular Activity, on the starboard (Sl) truss of the ISS in early August 2006, when the ISS incorporated only one 160V US photovoltaic (PV) array module. The first data campaign began a few hours after installation and continued for over five days. Additional data campaigns were completed in 2007 after a second 160V US PV array module was added to the ISS. This paper discusses the general performance characteristics of the FPMU as integrated on ISS, the functional performance of each probe, the charging behavior of the ISS before and after the addition of a second 160V US PV array module, and initial results from model comparisons.

  13. In situ measurements of IO and reactive iodine aboard the RV Sonne during SHIVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Dwayne; Walker, Hannah; Ingham, Trevor; Huang, Ru-Jin; Wittrock, Folker

    2013-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are emitted from the oceans by marine species such as macroalgae and phytoplankton and contribute to halogen loading in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project combined ship-borne, aircraft-based and ground-based measurements in and over the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea, and around the coast of Malaysian Borneo. In this paper we present measurements of IO radicals in coastal and open ocean regions made onboard the German research vessel RV Sonne in November 2011 between Singapore and Manila, via the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo (South China Sea) and the Sulu Sea. In situ measurements of IO were made on 12 days by the University of Leeds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument, with a detection limit of 0.3 pptv for a 30 minute averaging period. The cruise average IO concentration was found to be 1.2 pptv, with a maximum concentration of 2.4 pptv in the middle of the Sulu Sea, an area known for high biological activity. Only a weak diurnal profile was observed, with IO detected above the detection limit on 10 out of the 11 nights when the LIF instrument was operational. Measurements of IO at night in the open ocean have not previously been reported and indicate the presence of gas phase or heterogeneous mechanisms that recycle iodine species without requiring light. There was reasonable agreement for IO concentrations measured by the University of Leeds LIF and the University of Bremen MAX-DOAS instruments, for which a comparison will be presented. I2, ICl and HOI were measured by the University of Mainz using a coupled diffusion denuder system followed by analysis using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectroscopy, with a detection of 0.17 pptv for 30 mins (I2). The cruise average I2 concentration was found to be 2.0 pptv, with a maximum concentration observed during one night of 12.7 pptv on the northern coast

  14. Invited Article: Data analysis of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Barjatya, Aroh; Swenson, Charles M.; Thompson, Donald C.; Wright, Kenneth H. Jr.

    2009-04-15

    We present data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) that is deployed on the starboard truss of the International Space Station. The FPMU is a suite of instruments capable of redundant measurements of various plasma parameters. The instrument suite consists of a floating potential probe, a wide-sweeping spherical Langmuir probe, a narrow-sweeping cylindrical Langmuir probe, and a plasma impedance probe. This paper gives a brief overview of the instrumentation and the received data quality, and then presents the algorithm used to reduce I-V curves to plasma parameters. Several hours of data are presented from August 5, 2006 and March 3, 2007. The FPMU derived plasma density and temperatures are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and Utah State University-Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement (USU-GAIM) models. Our results show that the derived in situ density matches the USU-GAIM model better than the IRI, and the derived in situ temperatures are comparable to the average temperatures given by the IRI.

  15. Data Analysis of the Floating Potential Measurement Unit aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barjatya, Aroh; Swenson, Charles M.; Thompson, Donald C.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    We present data from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), that is deployed on the starboard (S1) truss of the International Space Station. The FPMU is a suite of instruments capable of redundant measurements of various plasma parameters. The instrument suite consists of: a Floating Potential Probe, a Wide-sweeping spherical Langmuir probe, a Narrow-sweeping cylindrical Langmuir Probe, and a Plasma Impedance Probe. This paper gives a brief overview of the instrumentation and the received data quality, and then presents the algorithm used to reduce I-V curves to plasma parameters. Several hours of data is presented from August 5th, 2006 and March 3rd, 2007. The FPMU derived plasma density and temperatures are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) and USU-Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurement (USU-GAIM) models. Our results show that the derived in-situ density matches the USU-GAIM model better than the IRI, and the derived in-situ temperatures are comparable to the average temperatures given by the IRI.

  16. Development and Use of the Galileo and Ulysses Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Gary L; Hemler, Richard J; Schock, Alfred

    1994-10-01

    Paper presented at the 45th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, October 1994. The Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Ulysses mission to explore the polar regions of the Sun required a new power source: the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generator (GPHS-RTG), the most powerful RTG yet flow. Four flight-qualified GPHS-RTGs were fabricated with one that is being used on Ulysses, two that are being used on Galileo and one that was a common spare (and is now available for the Cassini mission to Saturn). In addition, and Engineering Unit and a Qualification Unit were fabricated to qualify the design for space through rigorous ground tests. This paper summarizes the ground testing and performance predictions showing that the GPHS-RTGs have met and will continue to meet or exceed the performance requirements of the ongoing Galileo and Ulysses missions. There are two copies in the file.

  17. Extended Measurement Capabilities of the Electron Proton Helium INstrument aboard SOHO - Understanding single detector count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, P.; Banjac, S.; Heber, B.; Labrenz, J.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Terasa, C.

    Forbush (1937) was the first to observe intensity decreases lasting for a few days utilizing ionization chambers. A number of studies on Forbush decreases (FDs) have been performed since then utilizing neutron monitors and space instrumentation. The amplitude of these variations can be as low as a few permil. Therefore intensity measurements need to be of high statistical accuracy. Richardson et al. (1996) suggested therefore to utilize the single counter measurements of the guard counters of the IMP 8 and Helios E6 instruments. Like the above mentioned instruments the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) provides single counting rates. During the extended solar minimum in 2009 its guard detector counted about 25000~counts/minute, allowing to determine intensity variations of less than 2 permil using 30 minute averages. We performed a GEANT 4 simulation of the instrument in order to determine the energy response of all single detectors. It is shown here that their energy thresholds are much lower than the ones of neutron monitors and therefore we developed a criterion that allows to investigate FDs during quiet time periods.

  18. Spatial evolution of 26-day recurrent galactic cosmic ray decreases: Correlated Ulysses COSPIN/KET and SOHO COSTEP observations

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, B.; Bothmer, V.; Droege, W.

    1998-12-31

    In December 1995 the Ulysses spacecraft was at a radial distance of 3 AU from the Sun and 60{degree} northern heliographic latitude. To that time the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) started its mission. On board of both spacecraft particle sensors are measuring electrons, protons and helium nuclei in the MeV to GeV energy range. In early 1996 the counting rates of several hundred MeV galactic cosmic rays at Ulysses and at SOHO (Earth orbit) were modulated by recurrent cosmic ray decreases (RCRDs). The RCRDs at SOHO were found to be associated with a corotating interaction region (CIRs). A Lomb (spectral) analysis was performed on the galactic cosmic ray flux from February 1996 to June 1996. Surprisingly, the most probable frequency is {approximately} 28 days and not 26 or 27 days, corresponding to one solar rotation. The amplitude of the RCRDs is {approximately} 2.3% on both spacecraft. The variation in the solar wind speed shows the same periodicities and is anticorrelated to the variation in the cosmic ray flux. In contrast to the RCRDs the amplitude found in the solar wind speed is four times larger at WIND (120 km/s) than at Ulysses (32 km/s). The solar wind proton density and magnetic field strength yielded no significant periodicities, neither at Ulysses nor at WIND. Comparing the RCRDs with coronal hole structures observed in the FE XIV line, they found that a single coronal hole close to the heliographic equation can account for the RCRDs observed simultaneously at Ulysses and SOHO. The coronal hole boundaries changed towards lower Carrington longitudes and vanished slowly. The changes of the boundaries during the investigated period could explain a 28 day periodicity.

  19. Tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetry measurements utililzed aboard aircraft and in accelerator based space radiation shielding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard

    The space radiation environment presents a potential hazard to the humans, electronics and materials that are exposed to it. Particle accelerator facilities such as the NASA Space Ra-diation Laboratory (NSRL) and Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) provide particle radiation of specie and energy within the range of that found in the space radiation environment. Experiments performed at these facilities determine various endpoints for bio-logical, electronic and materials exposures. A critical factor in the performance of rigorous scientific studies of this type is accurate dosimetric measurements of the exposures. A Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a microdosimeter that may be used to measure absorbed dose, average quality factor (Q) and dose equivalent of the particle beam utilized in these experiments. In this work, results from a variety of space radiation shielding studies where a TEPC was used to perform dosimetry in the particle beam will be presented. These results compare the absorbed dose and dose equivalent measured downstream of equal density thicknesses of stan-dard and multifunctional shielding materials. The standard materials chosen for these shielding studies included High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and aluminum alloy, while the multifunc-tional materials included carbon composite infused with single walled carbon nanotubes. High energy particles including proton, silicon and iron nuclei were chosen as the incident radia-tion for these studies. Further, TEPC results from measurements taken during flights aboard ER-2 and KC-135 aircraft will also be discussed. Results from these flight studies include TEPC measurements for shielded and unshielded conditions as well as the effect of vibration and electromagnetic exposures on the TEPC operation. The data selected for presentation will highlight the utility of the TEPC in space radiation studies, and in shielding studies in particular. The lineal energy response function of the

  20. Ulysses at high latitudes: An overview of recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, R. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    After its fly-by of the planet Jupiter in February 1992, the Ulysses spacecraft is now in a highly inclined heliocentric orbit that will bring it above the south polar regions of the Sun in September 1994. The high-latitude phenomena observed to date have been strongly influenced by the near-minimum solar activity conditions encountered during this phase of the mission. In late April 1993, when Ulysses was at approximately 29 deg S heliographic latitude, the recurrent high speed solar wind stream that had been observed at the location of the spacecraft for 11 consecutive solar rotation underwent a dramatic change. The wind speed in the valleys between successive peaks increased in a single step from approximately 420 km/s to aopproximately 560 km/s. This change in solar wind flow was accompanied by the disappearance at the spacecraft of the magnetic sector structure that had been observed until then. Both these finding are consistent with Ulysses having climbed beyond the latitude of the coronal streamer belt in which is embedded the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). In its subsequent poleward journey, no further evidence for an encounter with the HCS has been seen at Ulysses. Other phenomena observed include the evolution with latitude of corotating interaction region (CIRs) and their influence on the acceleration of energetic particles, and the characteristics of the solar wind flows emanating from the south polar coronal hole. In this paper, we present details of the above observations. Finally, while the polar passes of the prime mission will take place near solar minimum, an extended mission will bring Ulysses back over the poles near the maximum of the next cycle. A summary of scientific goals for Ulysses at solar maximum is given.

  1. A Treatment of Measurements of Heptane Droplet Combustion Aboard MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, M. D.; Colantonio, R. O.; Crouch, R. K.; Dryer, F. L.; Haggard, J. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Marchese, A. J.; Nayagam, V.; Voss, J. E.; Williams, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Results of measurements on the burning of free n-heptane droplets (that is, droplets without fiber supports) performed in Spacelab during the flights of the first Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) are presented. The droplet combustion occurred in oxidizing atmospheres which were at an ambient temperature within a few degrees of 300 K. A total of 34 droplets were burned in helium-oxygen atmospheres having oxygen mole fractions ranging from 20 to 50 percent, at pressures from 0.25 to 1.00 bar. In addition, four droplets were burned in air at 1.00 bar, bringing the total number of droplets for which combustion data were secured to 38; two of these four air tests were fiber-supported to facilitate comparisons with other fiber-support experiments, results of which also are given here. Initial diameters of free droplets ranged from about 1 to 4 mm. The primary data obtained were histories of droplet diameters, recorded in backlight on 35 mm film at 80 frames per second, and histories of flame diameters, inferred from emissions through a narrow-band interference filter centered at the 310 micron OH chemiluminescent ultraviolet band, recorded at 30 frames per second by a intensified-array camera. These data are reported here both in raw form and in a smoothed form with estimated error bars. In addition, summaries are presented of measured burning-rate constants, final droplet diameters, and final flame diameters. Both diffusive and radiative extinctions were exhibited under different conditions. Although some interpretations are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the combustion mechanisms, the principal intent of this report is to provide a complete, documented data set for future analysis.

  2. Galileo and Ulysses missions safety analysis and launch readiness status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cork, M. Joseph; Turi, James A.

    1989-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft, which will release probes to explore the Jupiter system, was launched in October, 1989 as the payload on STS-34, and the Ulysses spacecraft, which will fly by Jupiter en route to a polar orbit of the sun, is presently entering system-test activity in preparation for an October, 1990 launch. This paper reviews the Galileo and Ulysses mission objectives and design approaches and presents details of the missions' safety analysis. The processes used to develop the safety analysis are described and the results of safety tests are presented.

  3. The Galileo/Mars Observer/Ulysses Coincidence Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    From March 21 to April 11, 1993 the Galileo, Mars Observer and Ulysses spacecraft were tracked in a coincidence experiment, searching for low-frequency (millihertz) gravitational radiation. In the spacecraft Doppler technique, the earth and a distant spacecraft act as separated test masses.

  4. Ozone sonde measurements aboard long-range boundary-layer pressurized balloons over the western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheusi, François; Barret, Brice; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Jambert, Corinne

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electro-chemical cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (due to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPBs. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electro-chemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is left at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Therefore, the typical measurement sequence is composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a two-minute acquisition period. (Note that the time intervals given here are indicative. All can be adjusted before and during the flight.) Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 will be first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then, we will illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during the three summer field campaings of the coordinated project

  5. Ulysses and WIND simultaneous observations of the radio emission associated with the 6-7 January 1997 coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Maksimovic, M.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    The three dimensional source location of interplanetary type 2 radio bursts is intended to be determined from two spacecraft observations, performed by the radio receivers onboard the WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and associated with the interplanetary coronal mass ejection detected by the large advanced spectrometer coronagraph (LASCO) from the SOHO spacecraft. The intensity time profiles recorded by WIND and Ulysses were compared and their directivity is found to vary from one component of radio emission to another. The three dimensional location was obtained by radio triangulation and was deduced from the direction measured at WIND and the difference of the arrival times measured at both spacecraft. The sensitivity of both determination methods to wave scattering and refraction was discussed.

  6. Electron impact ionization rates for interstellar neutral H and He atoms near interplanetary shocks: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Phillips, J. L.; Gosling, J. T.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    During average solar wind flow conditions at 1 AU, ionization rates of interstellar neutrals that penetrate into the inner heliosphere are dominated by charge exchange with solar wind protons for H atoms, and by photoionization for He atoms. During occurrences of strong, coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven interplanetary shock waves near 1 AU, electron impact ionization can make substantial, if not dominating, contributions to interstellar neutral ionization rates in the regions downstream of the shocks. However, electron impact ionization is expected to be relatively less important with increasing heliocentric distance because of the decrease in electron temperature. Ulysses encountered many CME-driven shocks during its journey to and beyond Jupiter, and in addition, encountered a number of strong corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks. These shocks generally occur only beyond approximately 2 AU. Many of the CIR shocks were very strong rivalling the Earth's bow shock in electron heating. We have compared electron impact ionization rates calculated from electron velocity distributions measured downstream from CIR shocks using the Ulysses SWOOPS experiment to charge-exchange rates calculated from measured proton number fluxes and the photoionization rate estimated from an assumed solar photon spectrum typical of solar maximum conditions. We find that, although normally the ratio of electron-impact ionization rates to charge-exchange (for H) and to photoionization (for He) rates amounts to only about one and a few tens of percent, respectively, downstream of some of the stronger CIR shocks they amount to more than 10% and greater than 100%, respectively.

  7. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  8. RTGs - The powering of Ulysses. [Radio-isotope Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastal, E. F.; Campbell, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The radio-isotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) for Ulysses' electronic supply is described noting that lack of sufficient sunlight renders usual solar cell power generation ineffective due to increased distance from sun. The history of the RTG in the U.S.A. is reviewed citing the first RTG launch in 1961 with an electrical output of 2.7 W and the improved Ulysses RTG, which provides 285 W at mission beginning and 250 W at mission end. The RTG concept is discussed including the most recent RTG technology developed by the DOE, the General Purpose Heat Source RTG (GPHS-RTG). The system relies upon heat generated by radioactive decay using radioactive plutonium-238, which is converted directly to energy using the Seebeck method.

  9. Children’s understanding of the Ulysses conflict

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Katherine S.; Keil, Frank C.; Bloom, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Two studies explored children’s understanding of how the presence of conflicting mental states in a single mind can lead people to act so as to subvert their own desires. Study 1 analyzed explanations by children (4–7 years) and adults of behaviors arising from this sort of ‘Ulysses conflict’ and compared them with their understanding of conflicting desires in different minds, as well as with changes of mind within an individual across time. The data revealed that only the adults were able to adequately explain the Ulysses conflict. Study 2 asked children (4–7 years) and adults to choose among three explicitly presented competing explanations for self-subverting behaviors. The results suggest that an understanding of the influence of conflicting mental states on behaviors does not occur until at least 7 years of age. PMID:16048510

  10. Dynamical Evolution of the Inner Heliosphere Approaching Solar Activity Maximum: Interpreting Ulysses Observations Using a Global MHD Model. Appendix 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we describe a series of MHD simulations covering the time period from 12 January 1999 to 19 September 2001 (Carrington Rotation 1945 to 1980). This interval coincided with: (1) the Sun s approach toward solar maximum; and (2) Ulysses second descent to the southern polar regions, rapid latitude scan, and arrival into the northern polar regions. We focus on the evolution of several key parameters during this time, including the photospheric magnetic field, the computed coronal hole boundaries, the computed velocity profile near the Sun, and the plasma and magnetic field parameters at the location of Ulysses. The model results provide a global context for interpreting the often complex in situ measurements. We also present a heuristic explanation of stream dynamics to describe the morphology of interaction regions at solar maximum and contrast it with the picture that resulted from Ulysses first orbit, which occurred during more quiescent solar conditions. The simulation results described here are available at: http://sun.saic.com.

  11. Relation Between Polar Plumes and Fine Structure in the Solar Wind from Ulysses High-Latitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ulysses observations showed that pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude and high-speed solar winds near the solar minimum. On the other hand, coronal plumes are common in polar coronal holes. PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and to be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere from previous studies. This suggests that information on the magnetic structure of PBSs would help to confirm the relation between PBSs and polar plumes We have investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs by applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data and by examining the pitch-angle distribution of energetic electrons measured with Ulysses/SWOOPS. We have found that PBSs have relatively more tangential discontinuities rather than rotational from the minimum variance analysis. Further, most PBSs also show bi-directional electron flux or isotropic pitch-angle distribution or the distribution expected in association with current-sheet structures from the analysis of high-energy electron data. In this, we find further evidence that PBSs are generated due by network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures are like current sheets or plasmoids.

  12. Solar identification of solar-wind disturbances observed at Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemen, J. R.; Acton, L. W.; Alexander, D.; Galvin, A. B.; Harvey, K. L.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Zhao, X.; Hudson, H. S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ulysses polar passages are producing a unique set of observations of solar-wind disturbances at high heliographic latitudes. In this paper we use the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) to locate some of these events, as defined by the Ulysses/SWICS data, in the solar corona. Of 8 events, we identify two with flares, three with front-side large arcade events, two with far-side events, and one was not seen in the Ulysses data. The arcade events generally resemble long-duration flares seen in active regions, but are larger, slower, and cooler. We present Yohkoh images of each of these events. In the large arcade events (see Alexander et al., 1996, for a detailed look at one of them) the magnetic morphology at the location of the Yohkoh arcade is generally consistent with the development of a large system of loops. Some of the identifications are ambiguous, and we summarize the reasons for this. From the SWICS data we have obtained ionization temperatures for several events, and find that they have no obvious pattern in relation to the X-ray temperatures; this may be expected on the basis that the interplanetary plasma cloud is physically distinct from the plasma trapped in the corona. Soft X-ray observations of the solar corona show occasional occurrences of large-scale brightenings in the form of arcades of loops. Such structures have been known since Skylab (e.g., Sturrock, 1980), and have a clear relationship with coronal mass ejections (e.g., Kahler, 1977). We now may study this phenomenon statistically with the much more comprehensive Yohkoh observations; with Yohkoh movies we can also begin to extend our knowledge to the three-dimensional development of the structures. At the same time Ulysses has sampled the latitude dependence of the interplanetary effects. With this paper we introduce this subject and provide a preliminary listing of events from the passage of Ulysses through high heliographic latitudes. The starting point of the present survey is a list

  13. Ulysses(*) reaches the South Pole of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    One of the many investigations being carried out is a search for the Sun's south magnetic pole. As in the case of the Earth, the magnetic pole is offset from the rotation axis, and at some time in September it should sweep directly into line with Ulysses. Just as the polar regions of the Earth were the last to be explored, so it is with the Sun. For more than thirty years spacecraft have investigated the stream of electric particles know as the solar wind. Ulysses, developed by ESA, built by European Industry and flown in collaboration with NASA, is the first to fly through the solar wind coming from the poles. As Ulysses reaches its highest solar latitude of 80.2 degrees on 13 September, European and American researchers will gather at the ESA/ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, for a scientific workshop at which they will assess the results from the nine experiments carried by the spacecraft. For the week of the workshop, the ESA/ESTEC conference centre will be transformed into a busy scientific laboratory. The large meeting rooms will be divided into 24 working areas, where the Ulysses experiment teams will take up temporary residence. Bringing a variety of computing equipment with them, the scientists will be able to retrieve the latest data from the spacecraft and perform detailed analyses. The emphasis will be on informality, with exchange of scientific ideas - and data - the key ingredient, leading ultimately to a better understanding of the fascinating information being gathered by Ulysses on its unique exploratory journey. Presentations to the media at ESA/ESTEC will start at 10h00 on 16 September. Media representatives wishing to attend are kindly requested to fill out the attached form and return it - preferably by fax (+33.1.42.73.76.90) - to : ESA Public Relations Division, 8/10, rue Mario Nikis - 75015-PARIS. Note to Television Editors : A video index, containing extensive background material on the

  14. SOHO-Ulysses Coordinated Studies During the Two Extended Quadratures and the Radial Alignment of 2007-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2007-01-01

    During quadrature, plasma seen on the limb of the Sun, along the radi al direction to Ulysses, by SOHO or STEREO can be sampled in situ as lt later passes Ulysses. A figure shows a coronagraph image, the rad ial towards Ulysses at 58 deg. S. and the SOHO/UVCS slit positions d uring one set of observations. A CME subsequently occurred and passed Ulysses (at 3/4 AU) 15 days later.

  15. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: ULYSSES observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  16. Ulysses Data Analysis: Magnetic Topology of Heliospheric Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    In this final technical report on research funded by a NASA grant, a project overview is given by way of summaries on nine published papers. Research has included: 1) Using suprathermal electron data to study heliospheric magnetic structures; 2) Analysis of magnetic clouds, coronal mass ejections (CME), and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS); 3) Analysis of the corotating interaction region (CIR) which develop from interactions between solar wind streams of different velocities; 4) Use of Ulysses data in the interpretation of heliospheric events and phenomena.

  17. Null fields in the outer Jovian magnetosphere: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, P. L.; Balogh, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Fazakerley, A.; Smith, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on a magnetic field phenomenon, hereafter referred to as null fields, which were discovered during the inbound pass of the recent flyby of Jupiter by the Ulysses spacecraft. These null fields which were observed in the outer dayside magnetosphere are characterised by brief but sharp decreases of the field magnitude to values less than 1 nT. The nulls are distinguished from the current sheet signatures characteristic of the middle magnetosphere by the fact that the field does not reverse across the event. A field configuration is suggested that accounts for the observed features of the events.

  18. Ulysses contracts for the doctor and for the patient.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Mats G; Hakama, Matti

    2010-05-01

    Research subjects participating in randomised clinical trials have a right to drop out of a study without specifying any reason for this. However, leaving a trial may be contradictory to their own general interests in medical research since drop outs may lead to biased conclusions and loss of valuable medical information. We suggest in this paper that self-binding "Ulysses contracts" that are non-exploitative and based on autonomous decisions by research subjects as well as by investigating doctors should be implemented with stopping rules adjusted to the needs of different kinds of randomised clinical trials.

  19. Ulysses above the sun's south pole: an introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Marsden, R. G.; Page, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses has explored the field and particle environment of the sun's polar region. The solar wind speed was fast and nearly constant above -50 degrees latitude. Compositional differences were observed in slow (low-latitude) solar wind and in fast (high-latitude) solar wind. The radial magnetic field did not change with latitude, implying that polar cap magnetic fields are transported toward the equator. The intensity of galactic cosmic rays was nearly independent of latitude. Their access to the polar region is opposed by outward-traveling, large amplitude waves in the magnetic field.

  20. Jovian bremsstrahlung X-rays - A Ulysses prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Boice, D. C.; Hurley, K. C.; Stern, S. A.; Sommer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling results reported here show that precipitating auroral electrons with sufficient energy to be consistent with the Voyager UVS observations produce bremsstrahlung X-rays with sufficient energy and intensity to be detected by the Solar Flare X-ray and Cosmic-Ray-Burst Instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft. The detection of such bremsstrahlung X-rays at Jupiter would provide strong evidence for the electron-precipitation mechanism, although it does not rule out the possibility of some heavy ion involvement, and thus makes a significant contribution toward solving the mystery of the Jovian aurora.

  1. A Slow Streamer Blowout at the Sun and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.

    2003-01-01

    On 10 June 2000 a streamer on the southeast limb slowly disappeared from LASCO/C2 over a period of 17 hours. Within this interval, a small CME was reported in C2. Nothing was reported in C3. The ejecta was later detected at Ulysses, which was at quadrature with the Sun and SOHO at the time. The interplanetary CME (ICME) displayed all the properties of a typical ICME. Slow streamer blowouts such as this have long been known but are little studied.

  2. In-situ measurements of chlorine activation, nitric acid redistribution and ozone depletion in the Antarctic lower vortex aboard the German research aircraft HALO during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk; Ziereis, Helmut; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Müller, Stefan; Zahn, Andreas; Schlager, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurements of stratospheric chlorine compounds are rare and exhibit the potential to gain insight into small scale mixing processes where stratospheric air masses of different origin and history interact. In addition, the relationship with chemically stable trace gases helps to identify regions that have been modified by chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds. To this end, in-situ measurements of ClONO2, HCl, HNO3, NOy, N2O and O3 have been performed in the Antarctic Polar Vortex in September 2012 aboard the German research aircraft HALO (High Altitude and Long Rang research aircraft) during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition in the UTLS/Earth System Model Validation) mission. With take-off and landing in Capetown, HALO sampled vortex air with latitudes down to 65°S, at altitudes between 8 and 14.3 km and potential temperatures between 340 and 390 K. Before intering the vortex at 350 K potential temperature, HALO additionally sampled mid-latitude stratospheric air. The trace gas distributions at the edge of the Antarctic polar vortex show distinct signatures of processed upper stratospheric vortex air and chemically different lower stratospheric / upper tropospheric air. Diabatic descend of the vortex transports processed air into the lower stratosphere. Here small scale filaments of only a few kilometers extension form at the lower vortex boundary due to shear stress, ultimately leading to transport and irreversible mixing. Comparison of trace gas relationships with those at the beginning of the polar winter reveals substantial chlorine activation, ozone depletion de- and renitrification with high resolution. Furthermore, the measurements are compared to the chemistry climate models EMAC and supported by ECMWF analysis. Finally, we compare the Antarctic measurements with new measurements of ClONO2, HCl and HNO3 aboard HALO obtained during the Arctic mission POLSTRACC (POLar STratosphere in a Changing Climate) based in Kiruna (Sveden

  3. Analysis of shipboard aerosol optical thickness measurements from multiple sunphotometers aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark A.; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Frouin, Robert; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Reynolds, R. Michael; Pietras, Christophe; Fargion, Giulietta; Quinn, Patricia; Thieuleux, Francois

    2005-06-20

    Marine sunphotometer measurements collected aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia (ACE-Asia) are used to evaluate the ability of complementary instrumentation to obtain the best possible estimates of aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent from ships at sea. A wide range of aerosol conditions, including clean maritime conditions and highly polluted coastal environments, were encountered during the ACE-Asia cruise. The results of this study suggest that shipboard hand-held sunphotometers and fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) yield similar measurements and uncertainties if proper measurement protocols are used and if the instruments are properly calibrated. The automated FRSR has significantly better temporal resolution (2 min) than the hand-held sunphotometers when standard measurement protocols are used, so it more faithfully represents the variability of the local aerosol structure in polluted regions. Conversely, results suggest that the hand-held sunphotometers may perform better in clean, maritime air masses for unknown reasons. Results also show that the statistical distribution of the Angstrom exponent measurements is different when the distributions from hand-held sunphotometers are compared with those from the FRSR and that the differences may arise from a combination of factors.

  4. Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  5. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  6. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  7. Management experience of an international venture in space The Ulysses mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Ronald Y.; Meeks, Willis G.

    1986-01-01

    The management of the Ulysses project, a probe which will fly a solar polar orbit, is described. The 5-yr mission will feature a flyby of Jupiter to deflect the spacecraft into a high-inclination orbit. Data on the solar corona, solar wind, the sun-wind interface, the heliospheric magnetic field, solar and nonsolar cosmic rays, etc., will be gathered as a function of the solar latitude. NASA will track and control the probe with the Deep Space Network. JPL provides project management for NASA while the Directorate of Scientific Programs performs ESA management functions. The DOE will provide a radioisotope thermoelectric generator while NASA and ESA each supply half the scientific payload. A NASA-ESA Joint Working Group meets about twice per year to monitor the project and discuss the technical and scientific requirements. Safety issues and measures which are being addressed due to the presence of the Pu-238 heat source for the RTG are discussed.

  8. Ulysses radio occultation observations of the Io plasma torus during the Jupiter encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, M. K.; Asmar, S. W.; Brenkle, J. P.; Edenhofer, P.; Funke, O.; Paetzold, M.; Volland, H.

    1992-01-01

    Radio signals from Ulysses were used to probe the Io plasma torus (IPT) shortly after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The frequencies of the two downlinks at S-band (2.3 gigahertz) and X-band (8.4 gigahertz) were recorded, differenced, and integrated in order to derive the columnar electron density of the IPT. The measurements agree qualitatively with contemporary models of the IPT based on Voyager data, but significant differences are apparent as well. The overall level of the IPT electron density is approximately the same as the prediction, implying that the amount of gas (or plasma) injected from Io is similar to that observed during the Voyager era. On the other hand, the IPT seems to be less extended out of the centrifugal equator, implying a smaller plasma temperature than predicted.

  9. Encounter of the Ulysses Spacecraft with the Ion Tail of Comet McNaught

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gosling, J. T.; Rees, A.; Skoug, R.; Goldstein, B. E.; Armstrong, T. P.; Combi, M. R.; Makinen, T.; McComas, D. J.; VonSteiger, R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Smith, E. J.; Geiss, J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Comet McNaught was the brightest comet observed from Earth in the last 40 years. For a period of five days in early 2007 February, four instruments on the Ulysses spacecraft directly measured cometary ions and key properties of the interaction of the comet's ion tail with the high-speed solar wind from the polar regions of the Sun. Because of the record-breaking duration of the encounter, the data are unusually comprehensive. O3(+) ions were detected for the first time in a comet tail, coexisting with singly charged molecular ions with masses in the range 28-35 amu. The presence of magnetic turbulence and of ions with energies up to approximately 200 keV indicate that at a distance of approximately 1.6 AU from the comet nucleus, the ion tail McNaught had not yet reached equilibrium with the surrounding solar wind.

  10. Galactic and anomalous cosmic rays through the solar cycle: New insights from Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, B.; Potgieter, M. S.

    Cosmic ray research began in 1912 when Victor Hess measured the intensity of the then unknown ionizing radiation with an electroscope in a balloon up to an altitude of about 5,000 m. He discovered that this very penetrating radiation, later called cosmic rays, was coming from outside the atmosphere (for a historic review, see Simpson, 2001).The systematic experimental study of cosmic rays began in the 1930s, using ground-based and balloon-borne ionization chambers. In the 1950s it expanded on a much larger scale with neutron monitors, coordinated world-wide during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957 (Simpson, 2000). When Parker (1958) described the solar wind, the theoretical research of cosmic rays began, stimulated by the beginning of in situ space observations that have led over four decades to important space missions, including the Ulysses mission to high heliolatitudes.

  11. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  12. Ulysses particle observations of the March 1991 solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Heras, A. M.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Anglin, J. D.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of energetic ions from the COSPIN instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft at 2.5 AU during the March 1991 series of solar flare events arae presented. The intensity profiles observed during this sequence of events were affected both by the presence of interplanetary shocks and large-scale discontinuities in the magnetic field, the low-energy (about 1 MeV) protons being influenced mainly by the shocks and the discontinuities, and the high-energy (about 100 MeV) protons by the discontinuities. The first shock observed at Ulysses was followed by several discontinuities and a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) which were probably moving with the shock. Particles following this shock were prevented from propagating freely into the heliosphere by the structure moving with the shock, and were carried along with it. A second shock was followed by a region containing bi-directional particle anisotropies. A subsequent enhancement of low-energy particles suggests the passage of another shock. This was followed by a slow intensity decay which coincided with a second CME and where bi-directional particle anisotropies were again observed.

  13. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ulysses Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Final (Tier 2) Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by implementation of the Ulysses mission, a space flight mission to observe the polar regions of the Sun. The proposed action is completion of preparation and operation of the Ulysses spacecraft, including its planned launch at the earliest available launch opportunity on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle in October 1990 or in the backup opportunity in November 1991. The alternative is canceling further work on the mission. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. This alternative was further evaluated and eliminated from consideration when, in November 1988, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4, notified that it could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The Titan 4 launch vehicle is no longer a feasible alternative to the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special (PAM-S) for the November 1991 launch opportunity. The only expected environment effects of the proposed action are associated with normal launch vehicle operation and are treated elsewhere. The environmental impacts of normal Shuttle launches were addressed in existing NEPA documentation and are briefly summarized. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects were judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. There could also be environmental impacts associated with the accidental release of radiological material during launch, deployment, or interplanetary trajectory injection of the Ulysses spacecraft. Intensive analysis indicates that the probability of release is small. There are no environmental

  14. Status of Knowledge after Ulysses and SOHO: Session 2: Investigate the Links between the Solar Surface, Corona, and Inner Heliosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven

    2006-01-01

    As spacecraft observations of the heliosphere have moved from exploration into studies of physical processes, we are learning about the linkages that exist between different parts of the system. The past fifteen years have led to new ideas for how the heliospheric magnetic field connects back to the Sun and to how that connection plays a role in the origin of the solar wind. A growing understanding these connections, in turn, has led to the ability to use composition, ionization state, the microscopic state of the in situ plasma, and energetic particles as tools to further analyze the linkages and the underlying physical processes. Many missions have contributed to these investigations of the heliosphere as an integrated system. Two of the most important are Ulysses and SOHO, because of the types of measurements they make, their specific orbits, and how they have worked to complement each other. I will review and summarize the status of knowledge about these linkages, with emphasis on results from the Ulysses and SOHO missions. Some of the topics will be the global heliosphere at sunspot maximum and minimum, the physics and morphology of coronal holes, the origin(s) of slow wind, SOHO-Ulysses quadrature observations, mysteries in the propagation of energetic particles, and the physics of eruptive events and their associated current sheets. These specific topics are selected because they point towards the investigations that will be carried out with Solar Orbiter (SO) and the opportunity will be used to illustrate how SO will uniquely contribute to our knowledge of the underlying physical processes.

  15. GPHS-RTG launch accident analysis for Galileo and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, C. Thomas

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the safety program conducted to determine the response of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to potential launch accidents of the Space Shuttle for the Galileo and Ulysses missions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provided definition of the Shuttle potential accidents and characterized the environments. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program (LASEP) was developed by GE to analyze the RTG response to these accidents. RTG detailed response to Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragment impacts, as well as to other types of impact, was obtained from an extensive series of hydrocode analyses. A comprehensive test program was conducted also to determine RTG response to the accident environments. The hydrocode response analyses coupled with the test data base provided the broad range response capability which was implemented in LASEP.

  16. The Ulysses mission in the high latitude heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, D. E.; Marsden, R. G.; Smith, E. J.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1990-01-01

    Ulysses, a joint ESA/NASA mission launched in October 1990, will be the first to explore the high latitude heliosphere. Launch will be from the Shuttle and a Jupiter gravity assist will be used to send the spacecraft first over the southern solar pole approximately three and one half years after launch and then over the northern solar pole one year later. Instruments will be carried to study the solar wind, the heliospheric magnetic field, energetic solar particles, galactic cosmic rays, solar X-rays, cosmic gamma rays, cosmic dust and interstellar neutral helium. The radio signals used to track and transmit spacecraft data will be used also to sound the corona and to search for gravitational waves.

  17. Inflight performance of the Ulysses reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGarry, Andrew; Berry, William; Parker, David

    1997-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been exploring the heliosphere since October 1990 in a six-year polar orbit. Despite varying operational demands, the pressure-fed monopropellant hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) has experienced few problems. The observed anomalies, having minimal operational impact, include plume impingement effects, electrical power overload effects and hydrazine gas generation effects. These anomalies are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the first observation of gas in the hydrazine propellant. The relatively low gas generation rate is attributed to: the use of high purity hydrazine; the configuration of the spin-stabilized spacecraft; the extensive use of titanium alloys; and the efficiency of the thermal control of the propellant tank which maintains a temperature of 21 C.

  18. Coronal hole differential rotation rate observed with SWICS/Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Th.; Bochsler, P.; von Steiger, R.

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the latitude variation of the coronal hole differential rotation investigating persistent structures in high speed streams as observed from SWICS Ulysses during its first passage of the southern polar hole in 1993-1994. We find a slower rotation rate near the ecliptic than what is inferred from averaged photospheric features, e.g. from sunspots. At intermediate latitudes we find a rate similar to the equatorial rotation rate indicating a quasi-rigid rotation of the polar coronal hole. At latitudes >65° no persistent structures to determine the polar rotation have been observed. For the passage of the southern heliosphere in 1993/94 we find a latitudinal dependence of the sidereal rotation rate of the coronal hole which can be approximated by ωSW=[13.13+1.94 sin2(Θ)]°/day, where Θ denotes the solar latitude.

  19. ULYSSES plasma parameters: latitudinal, radial, and temporal variations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D.; Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Suess, S. T.

    1996-12-01

    Observations by the Ulysses SWOOPS plasma experiment are used to investigate spatial and temporal gradients during the mission, with emphasis on more recent high latitude observations including the recent South Pole to North Pole passage during solar minimum. Compared to lower latitudes, the high latitude solar wind had higher average speed, proton temperature, and momentum flux, and lower number flux density. As the average momentum flux observed in the high speed wind was 21% greater than at the equator, during solar minimum the distance to the heliopause will be comparatively less in the solar equatorial plane than over the poles. The long term temporal gradients of momentum flux over the life of the mission are considerably larger than the latitudinal gradient observed by Ulysses during solar minimum. A modest North-South high latitude asymmetry is observed in the plasma parameters; the velocity is on the average 13km/s to 24km/s greater at Northern latitudes than at Southern, and temperature is also higher. The North-South temperature asymmetry is greater than can be explained by the North-South velocity difference and the dependence of solar wind temperature upon speed. The power law dependence of temperature on heliocentric distance, r, at high latitudes is in range r^-0.81^ to r^-1.03^, where r^-0.81^ is the Southern latitude result and r^-1.03^ the Northern. The parameter T/n^1/2^, where T is temperature and n is proton number density, can be better predicted from speed than can temperature alone. Comparison with calculations based on source models and magnetograph data indicate that the expansion of open coronal field lines close to the Sun was greater in the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern; this anticorrelation with the expansion factor is consistent with previous observational and theoretical work.

  20. Ulysses-ARTEMIS radio observation of energetic flare electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Poquerusse, M.

    1995-01-01

    Type 3 radio bursts allow us to follow energetic electrons ejected by solar flares into the interplanetary medium, even when the observer is far away from the electrons. The emission frequency f(sub p) is related to the ambient density n(sub e) by f(sub p) varies as the square root of n(sub e), and as a function of the distance r to the sun we have approximately n(sub e) varies as r(exp -2); as a consequence, on a 1/f - t dynamic spectrum type 3 bursts appear as nearly straight traces, whose slope gives an estimation of the source speed. We used the data of the URAP radio receiver on Ulysses (1-1000 kHz), observing sources in the solar wind, and the ground data of the ARTEMIS spectrograph (100-500 MHz), observing sources of the corona, over the years 1991-1994. We found a surprisingly large number of excellent high-frequency - low-frequency associations. A type 3 burst group on ARTEMIS (10 to 100 bursts over 1 to 10 minutes) typically gives rise to one isolated burst on Ulysses. As bursts often start in high frequencies during the maximum phase of flares, this demonstrates in a very convincing manner that some of the flare electrons themselves make it all the way to the interplanetary medium. We discuss decorrelation cases in the context of geometrical configuration between the active region and the two observing sites. We also study how apparent electron speeds vary with the distance to the sun.

  1. (abstract) ARGOS: a System to Monitor Ulysses Nutation and Thruster Firings from Variations of the Spacecraft Radio Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElrath, T. P.; Cangahuala, L. A.; Miller, K. J.; Stravert, L. R.; Garcia-Perez, Raul

    1995-01-01

    Ulysses is a spin-stabilized spacecraft that experienced significant nutation after its launch in October 1990. This was due to the Sun-spacecraft-Earth geometry, and a study of the phenomenon predicted that the nutation would again be a problem during 1994-95. The difficulty of obtaining nutation estimates in real time from the spacecraft telemetry forced the ESA/NASA Ulysses Team to explore alternative information sources. The work performed by the ESA Operations Team provided a model for a system that uses the radio signal strength measurements to monitor the spacecraft dynamics. These measurements (referred to as AGC) are provided once per second by the tracking stations of the DSN. The system was named ARGOS (Attitude Reckoning from Ground Observable Signals) after the ever-vigilant, hundred-eyed giant of Greek Mythology. The ARGOS design also included Doppler processing, because Doppler shifts indicate thruster firings commanded by the active nutation control carried out onboard the spacecraft. While there is some visibility into thruster activity from telemetry, careful processing of the high-sample-rate Doppler data provides an accurate means of detecting the presence and time of thruster firings. DSN Doppler measurements are available at a ten-per-second rate in the same tracking data block as the AGC data.

  2. Measurement of OH, H2SO4, MSA, NH3 and DMSO Aboard the NASA P-3B Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, Fred

    2001-01-01

    This project involved the installation of a downsized multichannel mass spectrometer instrument on the NASA P-3B aircraft and its subsequent use on the PEM-Tropics B mission. The new instrument performed well, measuring a number of difficult-to-measure compounds and providing much new photochemical and sulfur data as well as possibly uncovering a new nighttime DMSO source. The details of this effort are discussed.

  3. A Comparison of Measurements from ATMOS and Instruments Aboard the ER-2 Aircraft: Tracers of Atmospheric Transport and Halogenated Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. Y.; Salawitch, R. J.; Michelsen, H. A.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Proffitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Kelly, K. K.; Elkins, J. W.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Chan, K. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Goldman, A.

    1996-01-01

    We compare volume mixing ratio profiles of N2O, O3, NO(y), H2O, CH4, and CO in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere measured by the ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer on the ATLAS-3 Space Shuttle Mission with in situ measurements acquired from the NASA ER-2 aircraft during Nov 1994. ATMOS and ER-2 observations of (N2O) show good agreement, as do measured correlations of (O3), (NO(y)), (H2O), and (CH4) with (N2O). Thus a consistent measure of the hydrogen (H2O, CH4) content of the lower stratosphere is provided by the two platforms. The similarity of (NO(y)) determined by detection of individual species by ATMOS and the total (NOy) measurement on the ER-2 provides strong corroboration for the accuracy of both techniques. A 25% discrepancy in lower stratospheric (CO) observed by ATMOS and the ER-2 remains unexplained. Otherwise, the agreement for measurements of long-lived tracers demonstrates the ability to combine ATMOS data with in situ observations for quantifying atmospheric transport.

  4. A Comparison of Measurements from ATMOS and Instruments Aboard the ER-2 Aircraft: Tracers of Atmospheric Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. Y.; Salawitch, R. J.; Michelsen, H. A.; Gunson, M. R.; Abrams, M. C.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Proffitt, M. H.; Margitan, J. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Kelly, K. K.; Elkins, J. W.; Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Chan, K. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Goldman, A.

    1996-01-01

    We compare volume mixing ratio profiles of N2O, O3, NO(y) H2O, CH4, and CO in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere measured by the ATMOS Fourier transform spectrometer on the ATLAS-3 Space Shuttle Mission with in situ measurements acquired from the NASA ER-2 aircraft during Nov 1994. ATMOS and ER-2 observations of [N2O] show good agreement, as do measured correlations of [O3], [NO(y)], [H2O], and [CH4] with [N2O]. Thus a consistent measure of the hydrogen (H2O, CH4) content of the lower stratosphere is provided by the two platforms. The similarity of [NO(y)] determined by detection of individual species by ATMOS and the total [NO(y)] measurement on the ER-2 provides strong corroboration for the accuracy of both techniques. A 25% discrepancy in lower stratospheric [CO] observed by ATMOS and the ER-2 remains unexplained. Otherwise, the agreement for measurements of long-lived tracers demonstrates the ability to combine ATMOS data with in situ observations for quantifying atmospheric transport.

  5. Aboard the Space Shuttle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Florence S.

    This 32-page pamphlet contains color photographs and detailed diagrams which illustrate general descriptive comments about living conditions aboard the space shuttle. Described are details of the launch, the cabin, the condition of weightlessness, food, sleep, exercise, atmosphere, personal hygiene, medicine, going EVA (extra-vehicular activity),…

  6. LIF measurements of HOx radicals in the lower troposphere aboard the Zeppelin NT during the PEGASOS campaign 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomm, Sebastian; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Bohn, Birger; Häseler, Rolf; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Li, Xin; Lohse, Insa; Lu, Keding; Mentel, Thomas; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key compounds for the degradation of pollutants in the atmosphere. Therefore, accurate and precise measurements of HOx radicals (= OH + HO2) at different altitudes and in different regions are necessary to test our understanding of atmospheric chemical processes. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is of special interest as it is chemically the most active part of the atmosphere. Until today there is a general lack of measurements investigating the distribution of radicals, trace gases, and aerosols in the PBL with high spatial resolution. Here, we present results of two measurement campaigns performed from May - July 2012 in the metropolitan area of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and in the Po valley region in Italy as part of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS). We used the Zeppelin NT as an airborne platform for measurements of HOx radical concentrations and total OH reactivity applying a remotely controlled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument. In addition a comprehensive set of other trace gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2, HCHO, HONO), photolysis frequencies, particle number concentration, and meteorological parameters were measured. The airship Zeppelin NT allowed us to perform unique flight patterns, including localized height profiles up to 900 m above ground and transect flights at low flight speeds. We present measured data for the HOx radical concentrations and the total OH reactivity along with a model analysis of the radical chemistry. Maximum daytime concentrations were 2.0 × 107cm-3 for OH and 1.5 × 109cm-3 for HO2. Typical values for the total OH reactivity were smaller than 10 s-1. During the morning hours, vertical gradients in radical and trace gas concentrations were observed indicating a layered atmospheric structure. The vertical gradients vanished after sunrise due to enhanced convective mixing of the PBL.

  7. Measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles with the MAST instrument aboard the SAMPEX spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Daniel Leroy

    We report measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles (SEP) as observed in two gradual solar energetic particle events which began on 30 October and 2 November of 1992. These measurements were taken by the Mass Spectrometer Telescope (MAST), a charged-particle telescope on board the SAMPEX satellite in a polar, low-Earth orbit. The elements measured are carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium and silicon, which are observed over an energy interval of ~15 to 70 MeV per nucleon. These are the first isotopic measurements of silicon, and only the second measurements of the other elements in individual SEP events.SAMPEX has access to interplanetary fluxes of energetic particles during the high latitude portions of its orbit. This access depends on the rigidity of the particles and therefore on their charge to mass ratio. Fortunately, the polar orbit of SAMPEX allows measurement of SEP charge states using the geomagnetic filtering technique, and a previous study reported measurements of the ionic charge states in the same two SEP events studied in this work. This was the first time that charge states of SEPs at these high energies have been measured, and it allows rigidity-dependent biases in the elemental and isotopic composition to be investigated in the present study. This is particularly important since acceleration/transport processes depend on rigidity, and because the observed composition is also affected by the Earth's magnetic field.The MAST instrument measures both elemental and isotopic composition using the [...] technique, which resulted in a typical mass resolution of ~0.24 amu. It was found that during times of high counting rates, the measured mass distributions exhibited high-mass tails. Through computer simulation of the instrument and its particle environment, it was found that these tails are caused by [...] MeV protons which hit the instrument hodoscope in coincidence with the heavy ions of interest. By choosing only data

  8. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane.

    PubMed

    Goldhagen, P; Reginatto, M; Kniss, T; Wilson, J W; Singleterry, R C; Jones, I W; Van Steveninck, W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  9. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  10. Effects of shuttle bay environment on UV sensitive photographic film results of measurements aboard STS-7 and STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreplin, R. W.; Dohne, B.; Feldman, U.; Neupert, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Schumann emulsions, having low gelatin content and no protective gelatin overcoating, are extremely sensitive to environmental conditions and handling. Experiments using this emulsion are to be flown on the space shuttle within the cargo-bay. Because the environment of the cargo-bay is unknown, a Get-Away-Special payload was designed to expose Kodak-type SO 652 Schumann emulsion to the residual atmosphere of the cargo-bay. The experiment was programmed to make exposures for various time periods to determine the maximum length of time the film could be exposed in making a measurement and what precautions would be required to preserve the film during ascent into orbit and reentry. The results of the STS-7 and STS-8 flights indicated that long exposures in the shuttle bay do not produce high fog levels in orbit. Observations of severe bleaching of the latent image makes protection of the emulsion during reentry manditory and increase of fog levels with time set a limit of four weeks (preferably less than three) between installation and recovery of the emulsion for processing.

  11. Measurements of Acidic Gases and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the Pacific Exploratory Mission in the Tropics (PEM-Tropics A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    We received funding to provide measurements of nitric acid (HNO3), formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and the chemical composition of aerosols aboard the NASA Ames DC-8 research aircraft during the PEM-Tropics A mission. These measurements were successfully completed and the final data resides in the electronic archive (ftp-gte.larc.nasa.gov) at NASA Langley Research Center. For the PEM-Tropics A mission the University of New Hampshire group was first author of four different manuscripts. Three of these have now appeared in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, included in the two section sections on PEM-Tropics A. The fourth manuscript has just recently been submitted to this same journal as a stand alone paper. All four of these papers are included in this report. The first paper (Influence of biomass combustion emissions on the distribution of acidic trace gases over the Southern Pacific basin during austral springtime) describes the large-scale distributions of HNO3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH. Arguments were presented to show, particularly in the middle tropospheric region, that biomass burning emissions from South America and Africa were a major source of acidic gases over the South Pacific basin. The second paper (Aerosol chemical composition and distribution during the Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM) Tropics) covers the aerosol aspects of our measurement package. Compared to acidic gases, O3, and selected hydrocarbons, the aerosol chemistry showed little influence from biomass burning emissions. The data collected in the marine boundary layer showed a possible marine source of NH3 to the troposphere in equatorial areas. This source had been speculated on previously, but our data was the first collected from an airborne platform to show its large-scale features. The third paper (Constraints on the age and dilution of Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics biomass burning plumes from the natural radionuclide tracer Pb-210) utilized the unexpectedly

  12. Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a photo of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  13. ULF waves in the Io torus: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Naiguo; Kellogg, P. J.; Macdowell, R. J.; Mei, Y.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Canu, P.; De Villedary, C.; Rezeau, L.; Balogh, L.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the Io torus, Ulysses has observed intense ultralow frequency (ULF) wave activity in both electric and magnetic components. Such ULF waves have been previously suggested as the source of ion precipitation leading to Jovian aurorae. The peaks of the wave spectra are closely related to the ion cyclotron frequencies, which is evidence of the waves being ion cyclotron waves (ICWs). Analysis of the dispersion relation using a multicomponent density model shows that at high latitudes (approximately 30 deg), peak frequencies of the waves fall into L mode branches of guided or unguided ICWs. Near the equator, in addition to the ICWs below f(sub cO(2+)), there are strong signals at approximately 10 Hz which require an unexpectedly large energetic ion temperature anistropy to be explained by the excitation of either convective or nonconvective ion cyclotron instabilities. Their generation mechanism remains open for the future study. Evaluation of the Poynting vector and the dispersion relation analysis suggest that the waves near the equator had a small wave angle relative to the magnetic field, while those observed at high latitudes were more oblique. The polarization of the waves below f(sub cH(+)) is more random than that of the whistler mode waves, but left-hand-polarized components of the waves can still be seen. The intensity of the ICWs both near the equator and at high latitudes are strong enough to meet the requirement for producing strong pitch angle scattering of energetic ions.

  14. Alfvenic fluctuations in the solar wind observed by Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Neugebauer, M; Tsurutani, B. T.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    One of the striking results of the Sun's south polar pass by Ulysses was the discovery of large amplitude, long period Alfvenic fluctuations that were continuously present in the solar wind flow from the polar coronal hole. The fluctuations dominate the variances and power spectra at periods greater than or equal to 1 hour and are evident as correlated fluctuations in the magnetic field and solar wind velocity components. Various properties of the fluctuations in the magnetic field, in the velocity, and in the electric field have been established. The waves appear to have important implications for galactic cosmic rays and for the solar wind, topics which have continued to be investigated. Their origin is also under study, specifically whether or not they represent motions of the ends of the field lines at the Sun. The resolution of these issues has benefited from the more recent observations as the spacecraft traveled northward toward the ecliptic and passed into the northern solar hemisphere. All these observations will be presented and their implications will be discussed.

  15. Radial Evolution of the Three Dimensional Structure in CIRs between Earth and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broiles, T. W.; Desai, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    The radial alignment of Earth and Ulysses in February of 2004 and August of 2007 provided us with unprecedented opportunities to study the radial evolution of planar magnetic structures in 3 corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that were observed at both ACE and Ulysses and compare with projections based on an analytical model of CIRs [Lee, 2000]. Our results are: 1) All 3 CIRs' meridional tilt retained its North/South orientation at ACE and Ulysses; but the evolution was not systematic. Further, the projection of meridional tilt does not agree with observations at Ulysses. 2) All 3 CIRs rotated azimuthally with the Parker spiral as expected, however projections based on Lee's model describes this behavior quantitatively for only 1 CIR. We suggest that the evolution of meridional tilt from ACE to Ulysses did not agree with projections because the parent coronal holes were highly structured. We also suggest that observations of azimuthal tilt do not agree with projections because Lee's model assumes that the bulk solar wind flow is purely radial, whereas in reality, transverse flows could also affect the observed azimuthal tilt of the CIR.

  16. Detectability of electrostatic decay products in Ulysses and Galileo observations of type 3 solar radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Recent in situ Ulysses and Galileo observations of the source regions of type 3 solar radio bursts appear to show an absence of ion acoustic waves S produced by nonlinear Langmuir wave processes such as the electrostatic (ES) decay, in contradiction with earlier ISEE 3 observations and analytic theory. This letter resolves these apparent contradictions. Refined analyses of the maximum S-wave electric fields produced by ES decay and of the characteristics of the Ulysses Wave Form Analyzer (WFA) instrument show that the bursty S waves observed by the ISEE 3 should be essentially undetectable by the Ulysses WFA. It is also shown that the maximum S-wave levels predicted for the Galileo event are approximately less than the instrumental noise level, thereby confirming an earlier suggestion. Thus, no contradictions exist between the ISEE 3 and Ulysses/Galileo observation, and no evidence exists against ES decay in the published Ulysses and Galileo data. All available data are consistent with, or at worst not inconsistent with, the ES decay proceeding and being the dominant nonlinear process in type 3 bursts.

  17. Observations of Suprathermal Power Law Tails with ACE, Ulysses, MESSENGER, and Voyager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2007-12-01

    Observations of ubiquitous, suprathermal power law tails with the unique spectral index of -5 on the velocity distributions of solar wind and pickup ions raise important questions and have far reaching consequences. The question of how these tails are formed during quiet times, when no shocks are present, was previously addressed and is briefly reviewed here. One consequence of the existence of these tails during quiet times is that sufficiently energetic particles are always readily available for further acceleration by shocks. To study the evolution of suprathermal tails over a large range of heliocentric distances, we will use proton spectra measured with ACE, Ulysses and Voyager during quiet times as well as upstream and downstream of quasi-stationary and traveling shocks. To look for the first time at suprathermal tails at distances closer to the Sun than 1 AU, we will present our preliminary results from the FIPS instrument on the Mercury MESSENGER Mission. Applying thermodynamic constraints on non-adiabatic heating of upstream particles by a shock, we obtain the downstream -5 power law spectra that are observed and derive an expression for the tail pressure jump across the shock.

  18. Energetic charged-particle phenomena in the Jovian magnetosphere - First results from the Ulysses COSPIN collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Anglin, J. D.; Balogh, A.; Burrows, J. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ferrando, P.; Heber, B.; Hynds, R. J.; Kunow, H.; Marsden, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of about 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium; high-energy electron bursts on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions; persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron 'clock' phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere; on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail; and consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  19. Energetic Charged-Particle Phenomena in the Jovian Magnetosphere: First Results from the Ulysses COSPIN Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J A; Anglin, J D; Balogh, A; Burrows, J R; Cowley, S W; Ferrando, P; Heber, B; Hynds, R J; Kunow, H; Marsden, R G; McKibben, R B; Müller-Mellin, R; Page, D E; Raviart, A; Sanderson, T R; Staines, K; Wenzel, K P; Wilson, M D; Zhang, M

    1992-09-11

    The Ulysses spacecraft made the first exploration of the region of Jupiter's magnetosphere at high Jovigraphic latitudes ( approximately 37 degrees south) on the dusk side and reached higher magnetic latitudes ( approximately 49 degrees north) on the day side than any previous mission to Jupiter. The cosmic and solar particle investigations (COSPIN) instrumentation achieved a remarkably well integrated set of observations of energetic charged particles in the energy ranges of approximately 1 to 170 megaelectron volts for electrons and 0.3 to 20 megaelectron volts for protons and heavier nuclei. The new findings include (i) an apparent polar cap region in the northern hemisphere in which energetic charged particles following Jovian magnetic field lines may have direct access to the interplanetary medium, (ii) high-energy electron bursts (rise times approximately 17 megaelectron volts) on the dusk side that are apparently associated with field-aligned currents and radio burst emissions, (iii) persistence of the global 10-hour relativistic electron "clock" phenomenon throughout Jupiter's magnetosphere, (iv) on the basis of charged-particle measurements, apparent dragging of magnetic field lines at large radii in the dusk sector toward the tail, and (v) consistent outflow of megaelectron volt electrons and large-scale departures from corotation for nucleons.

  20. Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at Ulysses Using Multiple Solar Wind Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have discussed the identification of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near the Earth based on various solar wind signatures. In particular, methods have been developed of identifying regions of anomalously low solar wind proton temperatures ( T p) and plasma compositional anomalies relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind that are frequently indicative of ICMEs. In this study, similar methods are applied to observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that was launched in 1990 and placed in a heliocentric orbit over the poles of the Sun. Some 279 probable ICMEs are identified during the spacecraft mission, which ended in 2009. The identifications complement those found independently in other studies of the Ulysses data, but a number of additional events are identified. The properties of the ICMEs detected at Ulysses and those observed near the Earth and in the inner heliosphere are compared.

  1. Hydrazine Operations at Near-Freezing Temperatures During the Ulysses Extended Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, A.; Castro, F.; Hodges, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Ulysses mission was recently extended for the third time to March 2008. This extension will require Ulysses to operate far beyond its intended design lifetime at very low power and thermal margins. As a result, it will enter the coldest part of its orbit, as it returns from aphelion at Jupiter distance, with parts of the Reaction Control System (RCS) pipework containing the hydrazine propellant already at near-freezing temperatures. With limited telemetry, no simulator and only a thermal model optimized for the prime mission case, the operations team faces many challenges to avoid freezing of propellant in the RCS, and the hazardous consequences which would result. This paper gives an overview and operational history of the Ulysses monopropellant pressurized hydrazine RCS, describes techniques for detecting possible indications of hydrazine freezing, and potential contingency strategies should partial freezing occur.

  2. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Ulysses Mission (Tier 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) addresses the environmental impacts which may be caused by the preparation and operation of the Ulysses spacecraft, including its planned launch on the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle and the alternative of canceling further work on the mission. The launch configuration will use the STS/Inertial Upper Stage (IUS)/Payload Assist Module-Special(PAM-S) combination. The Tier 1 EIS included a delay alternative which considered the Titan 4 launch vehicle as an alternative booster stage for launch in 1991 or later. However, the U.S. Air Force, which procures the Titan 4 for NASA, could not provide a Titan 4 vehicle for the 1991 launch opportunity because of high priority Department of Defense requirements. The only expected environmental effects of the proposed action are associated with normal Shuttle launch operations. These impacts are limited largely to the near-field at the launch pad, except for temporary stratospheric ozone effects during launch and occasional sonic boom effects near the landing site. These effects have been judged insufficient to preclude Shuttle launches. In the event of (1) an accident during launch, or (2) reentry of the spacecraft from earth orbit, there are potential adverse health and environmental effects associated with the possible release of plutonium dioxide from the spacecraft's radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). The potential effects considered in this EIS include risks of air and water quality impacts, local land area contamination, adverse health and safety impacts, the disturbance of biotic resources, impacts on wetland areas or areas containing historical sites, and socioeconomic impacts. Intensive analysis of the possible accidents associated with the proposed action are underway and preliminary results indicate small health or environmental risks. The results of a Final Safety Analysis Report will be available for inclusion into the final EIS.

  3. Interstellar He Parameters in Front of the Heliosphere: View from Ibex and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaczyna, P.; Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Moebius, E.; Leonard, T.; Heirtzler, D.; Hlond, M.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Witte, M.; Wurz, P.; Rodriguez, D.; Schwadron, N.; Fuselier, S.; McComas, D. J.; Kucharek, H.

    2014-12-01

    The initial analyses of the Ulysses and IBEX interstellar neutral (ISN) gas observations showed small but significant differences in the ISN flow parameters. In particular, the IBEX observations have defined a narrow and tightly coupled tube in the 4-dimensional ISN parameter space (temperature and inflow speed, longitude, and latitude), which extended to the original Ulysses flow vector but with a somewhat different optimum set of values. However, adopting the Ulysses velocity vector resulted in a significantly higher temperature. Interestingly, the optimum flow vector obtained with IBEX resulted in the same temperature obtained from the Ulysses GAS analysis. These intriguing results were the starting point for a hypothesis that then was tested with a literature study from the past four decades, i.e., that the flow direction of interstellar He may be changing over time. Here, we analyze the data from both experiments using the Warsaw Test Particle Model, i.e., same simulation program and ionization rate model. For Ulysses GAS, we use the original data set and, in addition, the same set reprocessed with improved information on the instrument pointing in the sky. For IBEX, we model a subtle, previously unaccounted for data throughput issue for the first two observation seasons, and we analyze, for the first time, data from the two most recent seasons, when the data throughput issue was eliminated through a mode change and when the IBEX pointing strategy was changed to improve the sensitivity of the observations to tighten the possible range of the ISN flow parameters. In addition, we have refined the data uncertainty system, improved the analysis of the IBEX pointing information, and we now explicitly take into account the newly discovered Warm Breeze. In combination, we present the ISN velocity vector relative to the Sun and the He temperature for the entire Ulysses GAS observations and the past two IBEX-Lo observation seasons as a time series from 1994 until 2014.

  4. Effects of the 5 October 1996 CME at 4.4 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, R.G.; Desai, M.I.; Sanderson, T.R.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The authors present observations from Ulysses associated with a large coronal mass ejection (CME) that lifted off the west limb of the Sun on 5 October, 1996. The study focuses on the effects of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME on the energetic particle populations at the location of Ulysses, in particular the effect on the sequence of corotating enhancements that had been observed prior to its arrival. They conclude that, despite its large spatial extent, the CME caused no permanent deformation of the heliospheric current sheet.

  5. X-ray bright points and high-speed wind streams: A preliminary analysis from Yohkoh and Ulysses data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poletto, Giannina; Suess, Steven T.; Khan, J. I.; Uchida, Y.; Hiei, E.; Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Strong, K. T.; Harvey, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The following aspect of the solar wind mass flux, and of its variation, is examined: whether coronal plumes might be responsible for the long-term variability of the mass flux in high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes. The assumption that plumes are rooted in coronal bright points (BP's) is made. The behavior of X-ray BP's, imaged by the Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT), during a seven month period when Ulysses experiments observed a series of recurrent high-speed streams, is analyzed. If plumes/BP's are sources of the wind mass flux, changes in the coronal hole BP density to mimic changes of the mass flux in high-speed streams are expected. SOHO will have the capability of measuring the solar wind speed/density at small heliocentric distances while simultaneously observing coronal BP's and coronal plumes.

  6. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data, Ulysses observations and a two-fluid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Using the empirical constraints provided by observations in the inner corona and in interplanetary space. we derive the flow properties of the solar wind using a two fluid model. Density and scale height temperatures are derived from White Light coronagraph observations on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa, from 1.16 to 5.5 R, in the two polar coronal holes on 11-12 Apr. 1993. Interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux are taken from the Ulysses south polar passage. By comparing the results of the model computations that fit the empirical constraints in the two coronal hole regions, we show how the effects of the line of sight influence the empirical inferences and subsequently the corresponding numerical results.

  7. Aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, F. S.

    1980-01-01

    Livability aboard the space shuttle orbiter makes it possible for men and women scientists and technicians in reasonably good health to join superbly healthy astronauts as space travelers and workers. Features of the flight deck, the mid-deck living quarters, and the subfloor life support and house-keeping equipment are illustrated as well as the provisions for food preparation, eating, sleeping, exercising, and medical care. Operation of the personal hygiene equipment and of the air revitalization system for maintaining sea level atmosphere in space is described. Capabilities of Spacelab, the purpose and use of the remote manipulator arm, and the design of a permanent space operations center assembled on-orbit by shuttle personnel are also depicted.

  8. Robots Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Ames Research Center, MIT and Johnson Space Center have two new robotics projects aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Robonaut 2, a two-armed humanoid robot with astronaut-like dexterity,...

  9. Suprathermal electron loss cone distributions in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Hammond, C.M.; Forsyth, R.J.

    1995-09-01

    We present observations by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment of a new class of suprathermal electron signatures. At low solar latitudes and heliocentric distances beyond 3.37 AU Ulysses encountered seven intervals, ranging in duration from 1 hour to 22 hours, in which the suprathermal distributions included an antisunward field-aligned beam and a return population with a flux dropout typically spanning {plus_minus}60 ft from the sunward field-aligned direction. All events occurred between the forward and reverse shocks or waves bounding corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The observations support a scenario in which the sunward-moving electrons result from reflection of the prevailing antisunward field-aligned beam at magnetic field compressions downstream from the spacecraft, with wide loss cones caused by the relatively weak mirror ratio. This hypothesis requires that the field magnitude within the CIRs actually increased locally with increasing field-aligned distance from the Sun.

  10. Final (Tier 1) environmental impact statement for the Galileo and Ulysses Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Presented here is a Final (Tier 1) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addressing the potential environmental consequences associated with continuing the modifications of the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft for launch using a booster/upper stage combination that is different from the one planned for use prior to the Challenger accident, while conducting the detailed safety and environmental analysis in order to preserve the October 1989 launch opportunity for Galileo and an October 1990 launch opportunity for Ulysses. While detailed safety and environmental analyses associated with the missions are underway, they currently are not complete. Nevertheless, sufficient information is available to enable a choice among the reconfiguration alternatives presented. Relevant assessments of the potential for environmental impacts are presented.

  11. Imaging Obsearvations of Jupiter's Sodium Magneto-Nebula During the Ulysses Encounter.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, M; Flynn, B; Baumgardner, J

    1992-09-11

    Jupiter's great sodium nebula represents the largest visible structure traversed by the Ulysses spacecraft during its encounter with the planet in February 1992. Ground-based imaging conducted on Mount Haleakala, Hawaii, revealed a nebula that extended to at least +/-300 Jovian radii (spanning approximately 50 million kilometers); it was somewhat smaller in scale and less bright than previously observed. Analysis of observations and results of modeling studies suggest reduced volcanic activity on the moon lo, higher ion temperatures in the plasma torus, lower total plasma content in the torus, and fast neutral atomic clouds along the Ulysses inbound trajectory through the magnetosphere. Far fewer neutrals were encountered by the spacecraft along its postencounter, out-of-ecliptic trajectory.

  12. The Ulysses Supplement to the BATSE 4B Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, Michael S.; Kippen, Richard M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Cline, T. L.; Boer, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network Localization information for 150 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment(BATSE) between the end of the 3rd BATSE catalog and the end of the 4th BATSE catalog obtained by analyzing the arrival times of these bursts at the Ulysses and Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) spacecraft. For any given burst observed by these two spacecraft, arrival time analysis (triangulation) results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose width varies between 7 arcseconds and 2.3 degrees, depending on the intensity and time history of the burst, and the distance of the Ulysses spacecraft from Earth. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in an average reduction of the error box area by a factor of 25.

  13. The Ulysses contract in obstetrics: a woman's choices before and during labour.

    PubMed

    Burcher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Women recognise that labour represents a mind-altering event that may affect their ability to make and communicate decisions and choices. For this reason, birth plans and other pre-labour directives can represent a form of Ulysses contract: an attempt to make binding choices before the sometimes overwhelming circumstances of labour. These choices need to be respected during labour, but despite the reduced decisional and communicative capacity of a labouring woman, her choices, when clear, should supersede decisions made before labour.

  14. The Decisive General : Ulysses S. Grant and the American Civil War in 1864

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    in the American Civil War in 1865. iv Preface The American Civil War remains a monumental conflict in military history . The war itself...defining conflict in American history . Like many, I find Ulysses S. Grant to be among the more fascinating figures in the American Civil War. He...possible without the support of my MMS mentor, Dr. Bradford A. Wineman. Thank you for your insight, persistence, and passion for military history and

  15. Generation and reduction of the data for the Ulysses gravitational wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, R.; Bonifazi, P.; Iess, L.; Trager, G. B.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for the generation and reduction of the radiometric data known as REGRES is described. The software is implemented on a HP-1000F computer and was tested on REGRES data relative to the Voyager I spacecraft. The REGRES data are a current output of NASA's Orbit Determination Program. The software package was developed in view of the data analysis of the gravitational wave experiment planned for the European spacecraft Ulysses.

  16. Synoptic Solar Radio Burst Source Directions Derived by the Ulysses URAP Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Hess, R. A.; Reiner, M. J.; Hoang, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) investigation is one of 10 instruments on the Ulysses spacecraft. Ulysses, with its highly inclined orbit around the sun, provides URAP with a unique perspective on solar radio bursts, which are usually emitted at low heliolatitudes as the electron sources move outward from the sun. These radio bursts provide positional information relating to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (type II radio bursts), the initiation of CMEs (type III-L bursts), and solar flares (type III bursts). In this presentation, we use the routine radio direction-finding data from URAP to track radio bursts and locate their sources when Ulysses is near perihelion. Plots of these data are available on the URAP Goddard Space Flight Center web site (for example, http://urap.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi/giffer?date=20070726&PLOT_TYPE= DIRFIND), as are ASCII data files. The results shown are derived from fitting the spin-plane antenna data only; we compare the source directions so derived to the more accurate determinations made by fitting to both URAP antennas. The accuracy of the radio source directions to identify flare locations, determine solar wind densities remotely, etc., will be compared to previously published determinations. Applications to Wind Waves and STEREO Waves data, for which the spacecraft are in-ecliptic, will be addressed briefly.

  17. Latitudinal structure of a Coronal Mass Ejection inferred from Ulysses and Geotail observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, C. M.; Crawford, G. K.; Gosling, J. T.; Kojima, H.; Phillips, J. L.; Matsumoto, H.; Balogh, A.; Frank, L. A.; Kokubun, S.; Yamamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first observations of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) by two spacecraft separated substantially in heliographic latitude. Ulysses and Geotail both see similar features in the plasma and magnetic field parameters during an interval in which Geotail is located in the deep magnetosheath (greater than 150 Earth radii) and Ulysses is located in the solar wind at 5 AU, approximately 20 S of Geotail, and approximately 51 W (in the direction of solar rotation) of Geotail. Based on the similarity in plasma and magnetic field parameters and similar inferred ejection times from the Sun for both features we argue that the same CME is observed by both spacecraft. The portion of the CME observed by Ulysses is traveling much faster than the portion observed by Geotail. Thus the CME has significant latitudinal structure since at any given time the high latitude portion of the CME extends much further out in radial distance. Furthermore, this implies that a simple calculation of the arrival time of a CME at the Earth may not be done if the observing spacecraft is located substantially away from the ecliptic plane.

  18. Ulysses high-latitude observations of ions accelerated by co-rotating interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of energetic ions (E approximately 1 MeV) from the Ulysses spacecraft during its first pass from the ecliptic plane to the southern high-latitude regions of the heliosphere. At latitudes less than approximately 13 deg S Ulysses was completely immersed in the heliomagnetic streamer belt, and observed a approximately 1 MeV proton intensity which showed little evidence of a periodic structure. Between approximately 13 deg S and approximately 29 deg S Ulysses observed one dominant recurrent co-rotating interaction region, its reverse shocks being mainly responsible for accelerating the approximately 1 MeV protons. At approximately 29 deg S the spacecraft left this region and entered the solar wind flow from the polar coronal hole. From approximately 29 deg up to approximately 45 deg S, reverse shocks from this and other interaction regions were still being observed. Accelerated energetic ions, with proton-to-alpha ratio signatures consistent with having been accelerated by the reverse shocks of these co-rotating interacting regions, were still being observed up to latitudes of approximately 50 deg S.

  19. 78 FR 67309 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... collection associated with the Commission's Earth Station Aboard Aircraft, Report and Order (Order), which adopted licensing and service rules for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA) communicating with...

  20. Measurements of HNO3, SO2 High Resolution Aerosol SO4 (sup 2-), and Selected Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft: During the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Airborne Mission (TRACE-P)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    2004-01-01

    The UNH investigation during TRACE-P provided measurements of selected acidic gases and aerosol species aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. Our investigation focused on measuring HNO3, SO2, and fine (less than 2 microns) aerosol SO4(sup 2-) with two minute time resolution in near-real-time. We also quantified mixing ratios of aerosol ionic species, and aerosol (210)Pb and (7)Be collected onto bulk filters at better than 10 minute resolution. This suite of measurements contributed extensively to achieving the principal objectives of TRACE-P. In the context of the full data set collected by experimental teams on the DC-8, our observations provide a solid basis for assessing decadal changes in the chemical composition and source strength of Asian continental outflow. This region of the Pacific should be impacted profoundly by Asian emissions at this time with significant degradation of air quality over the next few decades. Atmospheric measurements in the western Pacific region will provide a valuable time series to help quantify the impact of Asian anthropogenic activities. Our data also provide important insight into the chemical and physical processes transforming Asian outflow during transport over the Pacific, particularly uptake and reactions of soluble gases on aerosol particles. In addition, the TRACE-P data set provide strong constraints for assessing and improving the chemical fields simulated by chemical transport models.

  1. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  2. Radial evolution of the three-dimensional structure in CIRs between Earth and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broiles, T. W.; Desai, M. I.; Lee, C. O.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2013-08-01

    The radial alignment of ACE and Ulysses in February 2004 and August 2007 provided us with unprecedented opportunities to study the radial evolution of planar magnetic structures (PMSs) in three corotating interaction regions (CIRs). The in situ observations are compared with results from an analytical and a numerical model of CIRs. We find that (1) all three CIRs' meridional tilt retained its North/South orientation at ACE and Ulysses, but the evolution was not systematic. Further, the model results of CIR meridional tilt do not agree with observations. (2) All three CIRs rotated azimuthally with the Parker spiral as expected; however, model results only describe this behavior quantitatively for one CIR. (3) For all three CIRs, the solar wind deflection angles were predicted by the coupled solar corona-solar wind models, Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil and MHD Around a Sphere (MAS)-Enlil, but neither model reproduced the observed planar magnetic structures. (4) The WSA-Enlil results of azimuthal magnetic field orientation are in better agreement with observations than those based on the MAS-Enlil. We suggest that the evolution of meridional tilt from ACE to Ulysses does not agree with projections because the parent coronal holes were highly structured. We also suggest that observations of azimuthal tilt do not agree with the model results because the models may underestimate transverse flows, whereas in reality, these flows could affect the observed azimuthal tilt of the CIR. The local orientation of PMSs within CIRs may also be distorted by transients, but their effect is unclear.

  3. Constraints on Solar Wind Acceleration Mechanisms from Ulysses Plasma Observations: The First Polar Pass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Aaron; Gazis, Paul R.; Phillips, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The mass flux density and velocity of the solar wind at polar latitudes can provide strong constraints on solar wind acceleration mechanisms. We use plasma observations from the first polar passage of the Ulysses spacecraft to investigate this question. We find that the mass flux density and velocity are too high to reconcile with acceleration of the solar wind by classical thermal conduction alone. Therefore acceleration of the high-speed must involve extended deposition of energy by some other mechanism, either as heat or as a direct effective pressure, due possibly to waves and/or turbulence, or completely non-classical heat transport.

  4. Volcanic Activity on lo at the Time of the Ulysses Encounter.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J R; Howell, R R; Clark, B E; Klassen, D R; O'connor, D

    1992-09-11

    The population of heavy ions in lo's torus is ultimately derived from lo volcanism. Groundbased infrared observations of lo between October 1991 and March 1992, contemporaneous with the 8 February 1992 Ulysses observations of the lo torus, show that volcanic thermal emission was at the low end of the normal range at all lo longitudes during this period. In particular, the dominant hot spot Loki was quiescent. Resolved images show that there were at least four hot spots on lo's Jupiter-facing hemisphere, including Loki and a long-lived spot on the leading hemisphere (Kanehekili), of comparable 3.5-micrometer brightness but higher temperature.

  5. Volcanic activity on Io at the time of the Ulysses encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Howell, Robert R.; Clark, Beth E.; Klassen, David R.; O'Connor, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The population of heavy ions in Io's torus is ultimately derived from Io volcanism. Ground-based infrared observations of Io between October 1991 and March 1992, contemporaneous with the 8 February 1992 Ulysses observations of the Io torus, show that volcanic thermal emission was at the low end of the normal range at all Io longitudes during this period. In particular, the dominant hot spot Loki was quiescent. Resolved images show that there were at least four hot spots on Io's Jupiter-facing hemisphere, including Loki and a long-lived spot on the leading hemisphere (Kanehekili), of comparable 3.5-micrometer brightness but higher temperature.

  6. Inconsistency of Ulysses Millisecond Langmuir Spikes with Wave Collapse in Type 3 Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent Ulysses observations of millisecond spikes superposed on broader Langmuir wave packets in type 3 radio sources are compared quantitatively with constraints from the theory of wave collapse. It is found that both the millisecond spikes and the wave packets have fields at least 10 times too small to be consistent with collapse, contrary to previous interpretations in terms of this process. Several alternative explanations are considered and it is argued that the spikes should be interpreted as either non-collapse phenomena or observational artifacts. To the extent the observations are representative, this rules out theories for type 3 bursts at approx. 1 - 4 AU that rely on collapse.

  7. Expedition Seven Launched Aboard Soyez Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Destined for the International Space Station (ISS), a Soyez TMA-1 spacecraft launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 26, 2003. Aboard are Expedition Seven crew members, cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, Expedition Seven mission commander, and Astronaut Edward T. Lu, Expedition Seven NASA ISS science officer and flight engineer. Expedition Six crew members returned to Earth aboard the Russian spacecraft after a 5 and 1/2 month stay aboard the ISS. Photo credit: NASA/Scott Andrews

  8. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the Jupiter environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; De Villedary, C.; Fainberg, J.; Farrell, W. M.; Goetz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of auroral-like hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the Io plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the Io torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  9. ISS Update: Science Aboard Kounotori3

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Pete Hasbrook, associate program scientist, about the experiments traveling to the International Space Station aboard the H-II Transfer Vehicle...

  10. SOHO-Ulysses Coordinated Studies During the Two Extended Quadratures and the Alignment of 2007-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2007-01-01

    During SOHO-Sun-Ulysses quadratures the geometry of the configuration makes it possible to sample "in situ" the plasma parcels that are remotely observed in the corona. Although the quadrature position occurs at a well defined instant in time, we typically take data while Ulysses is within +/- 5 degrees of the limb, with the understanding that plasma sampled by Ulysses over this time interval can all be traced to its source in the corona. The relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses in winter 2007 (19 Dec 2006-28 May 2007) are unusual: the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is always between 85 and 95 degrees - the quadrature lasts for 5 months! This provides an opportunity for extended observations of specific observing objectives. In addition, in summer 2007, Ulysses (at 1.34 AU) is in near-radial alignment with Earth/ACE/Wind and SOHO, allowing us to analyze radial gradients and propagation in the solar wind and inner heliosphere. Our own quadrature campaigns rely heavily on LASCO and UVCS coronal observations: LASCO giving the overall context above 2 solar radii while the UVCS spectrograph acquired data from - 1.5 to, typically, 4-5 solar radii. In the past, coronal parameters have been derived from data acquired by these two experiments and compared with "in situ" data of Ulysses' SWOOPS and SWICS. Data from other experiments like EIT, CDS, SUMER, Sac Peak Fe XIV maps, magnetic field maps from the Wilcox solar magnetograph, MLSO, from MDI, and from the Ulysses magnetograph experiment have been, and will be, used to complement LASCO/UVCS/SWOOPS and SWICS data. We anticipate that observations by ACE/WIND/STEREO/Hinode and other missions will be relevant as well. During the IHY campaigns, Ulysses will be 52-80 degrees south in winter 2007, near sunspot minimum. Hence, our own scientific objective will be to sample high speed wind or regions of transition between slow and fast wind. This might be a very interesting situation - not met in previous quadratures - allowing

  11. (abstract) Ulysses Observations of Magnetic Nulls in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, D.; Murphy, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.

    1993-01-01

    High time resolution magnetic field measurements (1 vector/s) at radial distances out to 5.3 AU and heliographic latitudes from 0(deg) to > 35(deg) S reveal the presence of solitary pulses lasting tens of seconds in which the field magnitude approaches or reaches zero. The properties of these nulls, their spatial distribution and relation to solar wind structures and to similar-apppearing interplanetary and magnetospheric impulses will be discussed.

  12. The "Ulysses syndrome": An eponym identifies a psychosomatic disorder in modern migrants.

    PubMed

    Bianucci, Raffaella; Charlier, Philippe; Perciaccante, Antonio; Lippi, Donatella; Appenzeller, Otto

    2017-04-01

    Due to civil wars, violence and persecutions, between 2015 and 2016, more than 1.4 million people, from the Middle East and Africa, fled their counties and migrated to Europe. The vast majority of migrants, who have already experienced enormous level of stressors, are faced with dangerous, often lethal, migratory journeys. Those who survive are exposed to adaptation stressors such as different languages, isolation, lack of work opportunities, diminished social status and a sense of failure in the new countries of residence. These are stressors that go far beyond the usual adaptation stresses to new cultures and migrants experience permanent crises with an imminent risk of developing the "Ulysses syndrome". As a consequence, many individuals often develop symptoms such as irritability, nervousness, migraine, tension headache, insomnia, tiredness, fear, loss of appetite and generalized ill-defined discomfort. If left untreated these symptoms, originally described by Hofer in the 17th century, may degenerate into a severe psychosomatic disorder leading to reactive depression. Here we expand the concept of Ulysses' syndrome and illustrate new initiatives aimed at reducing the level of stressors in migrants and at promoting their successful integration in their new countries.

  13. Suprathermal electron loss cone distributions in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Hammond, C. M.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind suprathermal electron distributions in the solar wind generally carry a field-aligned antisunward heat flux. Within coronal mass ejections and upstream of strong shocks driven by corotating interaction regions (CIRs), counterstreaming electron beams are observed. We present observations by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment of a new class of suprathermal electron signatures. At low solar latitudes and heliocentric distances beyond 3.5 AU Ulysses encountered several intervals, ranging in duration from 1 hour to 22 hours, in which the suprathermal distributions included an antisunward field-aligned beam and a return population with a flux dropout typically spanning +/- 60 deg from the sunward field-aligned direction. All events occurred within CIRs, downstream of the forward and reverse shocks or waves bounding the interaction regions. We evaluate the hypothesis that the sunward-moving electrons result from reflection of the antisunward beams at magnetic field compressions downstream from the observations, with wide loss cones caused by the relatively weak compression ratio. This hypothesis requires that field magnitude within the CIRs actually increase with increasing field-aligned distance from the Sun. Details of the electron distributions and ramifications for CIR and shock geometry will be presented.

  14. [Rethinking the challenges of Ulysses and Faust: health, the individual and history].

    PubMed

    Melo-Filho, D A

    1995-01-01

    Concentrating on two historical synecdoches, Ulysses and Faust, this article takes up the etymology of the Latin term salute as a unit lying somewhere between "existential needs" and "especially human needs", leading to the challenge of satisfying the need for "conservation of life" and at the same time to "surpass it, go beyond it". Both meanings are present in Ulysses attitude of not succumbing to the siren s melody and in Faust s desire to rise above everyday life. Some aspects of the Marxist conception of the philosophy of history and Althusser s Structuralist Marxism are criticized. Also, in light of Marxist-Hellerian theory, the article analyzes the hypothesis that the target of the final reports of the VIII National Health Conference was "particular man" and not the individual, since health is treated only as "an existential need", and does not envisage the generic human. As a theoretical challenge, the text, in search of the unfolding individual, finally recommends the construction of "epistemological sutures" between nature and society, everyday life and universality, and the young and old Marx.

  15. Measurements of HOx radicals and the total OH reactivity (kOH) in the planetary boundary layer over southern Finland aboard the Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broch, Sebastian; Gomm, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Bachner, Mathias; Bohn, Birger; Häseler, Rolf; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank; Li, Xin; Lohse, Insa; Rohrer, Franz; Thayer, Mitchell; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The concentration of hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals (also named HOx) and the total OH reactivity were measured over southern Finland and during transfer flights over Germany, Denmark and Sweden aboard the Zeppelin NT airship within the framework of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) field campaign in 2013. The measurements were performed with a remotely controlled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument which was installed on top of the airship. Together with a comprehensive set of trace gas (O3, CO, NO, NO2, HCHO, HONO, VOCs), photolysis frequencies and aerosol measurements as well as the measurement of meteorological parameters, these data provide the possibility to test the current understanding of the chemical processes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over different landscapes and in different chemical regimes. The unique flight performance of the Zeppelin NT allowed us to measure transects at a constant altitude as well as vertical profiles within the range of 80 m to 1000 m above ground. The transect flights show changes in the HOx distribution and kOH while crossing different chemical regimes on the way from Friedrichshafen, Germany to Jämijärvi, Finland over Germany, Denmark and Sweden. Vertical profile flights over the boreal forest close to Jämijärvi and Hyytiälä (both Finland) gave the opportunity to investigate the layering of the PBL and with that the vertical distribution of HOx and kOH with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Gradients in the HOx concentration and kOH were measured between the different layers during the early morning hours. The maximum radical concentrations found during the campaign were 1.0 x 107 cm-3 for OH and 1.0 x 109 cm-3 for HO2. The total OH reactivity measured in Finland was much lower than what was reported before in the literature from ground based measurements and ranged from 1 s-1 to 6 s-1. Acknowledgement: PEGASOS project funded by the European

  16. Measurements of Nitric Acid and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the SASS OZone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    The SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment (SONEX) over the north Atlantic during October/November 1997 offered an excellent opportunity to examine the budget of total reactive nitrogen (NO(y)) in the upper troposphere (8 - 12 km altitude). The median measured NO(y) mixing ratio was 425 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Two different methods were used to measure HNO3: (1) the mist chamber technique and, (2) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Two merged data sets using these HNO3 measurements were used to calculate NO(y) by summing the reactive nitrogen species (a combination of measured plus modeled results) and comparing the resultant values to measured NO(y) (gold catalytic reduction method). Both comparisons showed good agreement in the two quantities (slope greater than 0.9 and r(sup 2) greater than 0.9). Thus, the total reactive nitrogen budget in the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic can be explained in a general manner as a simple mixture of NO(x). (NO + NO2), HNO3, and PAN. Median values of NO(x)/NO(y) were approx. = 0.25, HNO3/NO(y) approx. = 0.35 and PAN/NO(y) approx. = 0.17. Particulate NO3 and alkyl nitrates together composed less than 10% of NO(y), while model estimated HNO4 averaged 12%.

  17. Measurements of Nitric Acid and Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft During the SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    1999-01-01

    The SASS Ozone and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment (SONEX) over the North Atlantic during October/November 1997 offered an excellent opportunity to examine the budget of total reactive nitrogen (NO(sub y)) in the upper troposphere (8 - 12 km altitude). The median measured NO(sub y) mixing ratio was 425 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). Two different methods were used to measure HNO3: (1) the mist chamber technique and, (2) chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Two merged data sets using these HNO3 measurements were used to calculate NO(sub y) by summing the reactive nitrogen species (a combination of measured plus modeled results) and comparing the resultant values to measured NO(sub y) (gold catalytic reduction method). Both comparisons showed good agreement in the two quantities (slope > 0.9 and r(exp 2) > 0.9). Thus, the total reactive nitrogen budget in the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic can be explained in a general manner as a simple mixture of NO(sub x). (NO + NO2), HNO3, and PAN. Median values of NO(sub x)/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0.25, HNO3/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0.35 and Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN)/NO(sub y) were approximately equal to 0. 17. Particulate NO3 and alkyl nitrates together composed <10 % of NO(sub y), while model estimated HNO4 averaged 12%.

  18. The hot plasma environment at Jupiter - Ulysses results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Armstrong, T. P.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lin, R. P.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Initial results obtained from measurements made by the HI-SCALE (heliosphere instrument for spectra, composition, and anisotropy at low energies) experiment are reported. Data revealed that the Jovian magnetosphere is very extended, with the day-side magnetopause located at about 105 Jupiter radii. The relative abundances of sulfur, oxygen, and sodium to helium decreased with the decreasing radial distance from the planet on the day-side, which suggests that the abundances of Jupiter-derived species are dependent on latitude. Intense fluxes of counter-streaming ions and electrons were discovered in the dusk-side, high-latitude region from the edge of the plasma sheet to the dusk-side magnetopause. These beams of ions and electrons appeared to be very tightly aligned with the magnetic field and to be superimposed on a time- and space variable isotropic hot plasma background. The current carried by measured hot plasma particles are about 1.6 x 10 exp -4 microamps per sq m.

  19. A Primary Source to Supplement High School History Textbooks in a Character Study of Ulysses S. Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Donna A.

    This paper discusses the use of General Horace Porter, President Ulysses S. Grant's personal friend and closest adviser through the latter stages of the U.S. Civil War and into Grant's presidency. During the Civil War, Porter made field observations, suggested strategy, and relayed orders among commanders. As adviser to the president, Porter wrote…

  20. Evidence, from Pioneer 10/11, Galileo, and Ulysses Data, for an Anomalous, Weak, Long-Range Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Laing, P. A.; Lau, E. L.; Liu, A. S.; Nieto, M. M.; Turyshev, S. G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio metric data from the Pioneer 10/11, Galileo, and Ulysses Spacecraft indicate an apparent anomalous, constant, acceleration acting on the spacecraft with a magnitude 8.5 x 10(sup -8) cm/s(sup 2), directed towards the Sun.

  1. Wide and Narrow CMEs and Their Source Explosions Observed at the Spring 2003 SOHO-Sun-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven; Corti, G.; Poletto, G.; Sterling, A.; Moore, R.

    2006-01-01

    At the time of the spring 2003 Ulysses-SOHO-Sun quadrature, Ulysses was off the East limb of the Sun at 14.5 degrees north latitude and 4.91 AU. LASCO/C2 images show small transient events that originated from near the limb on May 25, 26 and 27 in the north-east quadrant, along with a large Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) that originated from an active region near disk center on May 26. Ulysses data bear clear signatures of the large CME, specifically including an enhanced abundance of highly ionized Fe. SOHO/UVCS spectra at 1.75 solar radii, near the radial direction to Ulysses, give no evidence of emission from high temperature lines, even for the large CME: instead, for the small events, occasional transient high emission in cool lines was observed, such as the CIII 977 Angstrom line usually absent at coronal levels. Each of these events lasted ca. 1 hour or less and never affected lines from ions forming above ca. 106K. Compact eruptions in Helium 304 Angstrom EIT images, related to the small UVCS transients, were observed at the limb of the Sun over the same period. At least one of these surge events produced a narrow CME observed in LASCO/C2. Most probably all these events are compact magnetic explosions (surges/jets, from around a small island of included polarity) which ejected cool material from lower levels. Ulysses data have been analyzed to find evidence of the cool, narrow CME events, but none or little was found. This puzzling scenario, where events seen by UVCS have no in situ counterparts and vice versa, can be partially explained once the region where the large CME originated is recognized as being at the center of the solar disk so that the CME material was actually much further from the Sun than the 1.7 Rsun height of the UVCS slit off the limb. Conversely, the narrow events may simply have missed Ulysses or been too brief for reliable signatures in composition and ionization state. A basic feature demonstrated by these observations is that large

  2. A Compact Airborne System for SO2 and DMS Measurements for Use on Future GTE Missions Aboard the P-3 or DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Eric S.; DeBruyn, Warren J.

    2000-01-01

    This project involved the design and construction of a new instrument for airborne measurement of DMS and SO2. The instrument is intended for use on field missions to study the global atmospheric sulfur cycle. The ultimate scientific goal is to provide insight into the mechanisms of atmospheric transport and transformations impacting both natural and anthropogenic sulfur emissions. This report summarizes the progress made to date and the goals for future work on the project. The PI's for this project have recently relocated from the University of Miami to the University of California, Irvine, and a request has been made to transfer remaining funds to UCI. All equipment associated with this project has been transferred to UCI. The instrument design goal was to develop an instrument roughly one quarter the size and weight of currently available airborne instrumentation used for DMS and S02 measurements. Another goal was full automation, to allow unattended operation for the duration of a P-3 or DC-8 flight. The original performance design specifications for the instrument are given.

  3. Jovian electron propagation in three dimensions of the heliosphere: The Ulysses investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Smith, D. A.; Zhang, M.

    1993-01-01

    We report investigations of Jovian relativistic electrons in the interplanetary medium that provide new insights into both the physical processes by which the Jovian magnetosphere releases its trapped, relativistic electrons into the interplanetary medium, and the modes of their interplanetary propagation. These studies were dependent on the unique postencounter trajectory for Ulysses. The spacecraft remained close to the radial distance of Jupiter (approximately 5.2 AU) and moved southward on the duskside by only approximately 12 deg in heliographic latitude and less than 8 deg in the heliographic azimuth relative to Jupiter for the period of approximately 100 deg days of this study. During this period the nominal Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field with its alternating polarities sector structure established direct magnetic field line connections frequently between Jupiter and the spacecraft. These unique conditions made it possible to investigate in detail, for approximately four solar rotations, both the Jovian electron burst phenomenon and the continuous, diffusive interplanetary propagation of Jovian electrons.

  4. Ulysses Observations of the Magnetic Connectivity between CMEs and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Gosling, J. T.; Crooker, N. U.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic connectivity of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Sun using Ulysses observations of suprathermal electrons at various distances between 1 AU and 5.2 AU. Drawing on ideas concerning the eruption and evolution of CMEs, we had anticipated that there might be a tendency for CMEs to contain progressively more open field lines, as reconnection back at the Sun either opened or completely disconnected previously closed field lines threading the CMEs. Our results, however, did not yield any discernible trend. By combining the potential contribution of CMEs to the heliospheric flux with the observed build-up of flux during the course of the solar cycle we also derive a lower limit for the reconnection rate of CMEs that is sufficient to avoid the "flux catastrophe" paradox. This rate is well below our threshold of detectability.

  5. ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC CONNECTIVITY BETWEEN CORONAL, MASS EJECTIONS AND THE SUN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Goslin, J. T.; Crooker, . U.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic connectivity of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Sun using Ulysses observations of suprathermal electrons at various distances between 1 and 5.2 AU. Drawing on ideas concerning the eruption and evolution of CMEs, we had anticipated that there might be a tendency for CMEs to contain progressively more open field lines, as reconnection back at the Sun either opened or completely disconnected previously closed field lines threading the CMEs. Our results, however, did not yield any discernible trend. By combining the potential contribution of CMEs to the heliospheric flux with the observed buildup of flux during the course of the solar cycle, we also derive a lower limit for the reconnection rate of CMEs that is sufficient to avoid the "flux catastrophe" paradox. This rate is well below our threshold of detectability. Subject headings: solar wind - Sun: activity - Sun: corona - Sun: coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - On-line material: color figure Sun: magnetic fields

  6. Facial nerve palsy aboard a commercial aircraft.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Ulanovski, David; Barenboim, Erez; Azaria, Bella; Goldstein, Liav

    2004-12-01

    Facial baroparesis is facial nerve palsy secondary to barotrauma. This phenomenon is frequently seen in divers, but is under-reported there and has rarely been described in aviators or passengers aboard commercial aircraft. We describe a 24-yr-old healthy aviator who experienced an episode of facial nerve palsy during ascent while traveling as a passenger aboard a commercial flight. The probable pathogenesis of this phenomenon in this case is described.

  7. Modeling the Solar Wind at the Ulysses, Voyager, and New Horizons Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    The outer heliosphere is a dynamic region shaped largely by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. While interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations by the Voyager spacecraft have significantly improved our understanding of this vast region, modeling the outer heliosphere still remains a challenge. We simulate the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind flow from 1 to 80 astronomical units (au), where the solar wind is assumed to be supersonic, using a two-fluid model in which protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as separate fluids. We use 1 day averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set as inner boundary conditions to reproduce time-dependent effects in a simplified manner which involves interpolation in both space and time. Our model generally agrees with Ulysses data in the inner heliosphere and Voyager data in the outer heliosphere. Ultimately, we present the model solar wind parameters extracted along the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft. We compare our results with in situ plasma data taken between 11 and 33 au and at the closest approach to Pluto on 2015 July 14.

  8. Ulysses observations of energetic ions over the south pole of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, T. R.; Marsden, R. G.; Bothmer, V.; Trattner, K. J.; Wenzel, K.P.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Goldstein, B. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft began its journey out-of-the-ecliptic in February of 1992, when it encountered the planet Jupiter. In April of 1993, the spacecraft had reached 29 deg S, and from then on was completely immersed in the flow from the southern polar coronal hole. Accelerated ions were observed, recurring with a main peak once per solar rotation, with the intensity at the peak slowly decreasing with increasing latitude. This decrease continued to the end of 1993, when the spacecraft was at approximately 50 deg S. During the first three months of 1994 the intensity of the accelerated ions rose again, due either to an increase in magnetic activity on the sun or a reconfiguration of the heliospheric magnetic field. Recurrent accelerated ions were still being seen at the beginning of July 1994, when the spacecraft was at a latitude of 70 deg S, although with reduced intensity. The accelerated ions were no longer seen at latitudes higher than 70 deg S, the ion intensity staying constant at around the cosmic ray background level. This continued on until the highest latitude reached, 80.2 deg S, on 13 September 1994. The spacecraft then began its journey back towards lower latitudes, a small increase in the particle intensity being observed at the end of October whilst at approximately 72 deg S, and thereafter no more increases until the end of 1994, when the spacecraft was at approximately 45 deg S. We present interpretations for this asymmetry in latitude dependence.

  9. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  10. The Giant Flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14. I. An Interpretive Study of BeppoSAX and Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroci, M.; Hurley, K.; Duncan, R. C.; Thompson, C.

    2001-03-01

    The giant flare of 1998 August 27 from SGR 1900+14 was extraordinary in many ways: it was the most intense flux of gamma rays ever detected from a source outside our solar system; it was longer than any previously detected burst from a soft gamma repeater (SGR) in our Galaxy by more than an order of magnitude; and it showed a remarkable four-peaked, periodic pattern in hard X-rays with the same rotation period that was found modulating soft X-rays from the star in quiescence. The event was detected by several gamma-ray experiments in space, including the Ulysses gamma-ray burst detector and the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor. These instruments operate in different energy ranges, and comparisons of their measurements reveal complex patterns of spectral evolution as the intensity varies. In this paper, we present a joint analysis of the BeppoSAX and Ulysses data and discuss some implications of these results for the SGRs. We also present newly analyzed Venera/SIGNE and ISEE-3 data on the 1979 March 5 giant flare from an SGR in the Large Magellanic Cloud (SGR 0526-66) and compare them with the August 27 event. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that giant flares are due to catastrophic magnetic instabilities in highly magnetized neutron stars, or ``magnetars.'' In particular, observations indicate that the initial hard spike involved a relativistic outflow of pairs and hard gamma rays, plausibly triggered by a large propagating fracture in the crust of a neutron star with a field exceeding 1014 G. Later stages in the light curve are accurately fitted by a model for emission from the envelope of a magnetically confined pair-photon fireball, anchored to the surface of the rotating star, which contracts as it emits X-rays and then evaporates completely in a finite time. The complex four-peaked shape of the light curve likely provides the most direct evidence known for a multipolar geometry in the magnetic field of a neutron star.

  11. Acceleration of interstellar pickup ions in the disturbed solar wind observed on Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Geiss, J.; Roelof, E. C.; Fisk, L. A.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Von Steiger, R.; Wilken, B.

    1994-01-01

    Acceleration of interstellar pickup H(+) and He(+) as well as of solar wind protons and alpha particles has been observed on Ulysses during the passage of a corotating interaction region (CIR) at approximately 4.5 AU. Injection efficiencies for both the high thermal speed interstellar pickup ions (H(+) and He(+)) and the low thermal speed solar wind ions (H(+) and He(++) are derived using velocity distribution functions of protons, pickup He(+) and alpha particles from less than 1 to 60 keV/e and of ions (principally protons) above approximately 60 keV. The observed spatial variations of the few keV and the few hundred keV accelerated pickup protons across the forward shock of CIR indicate a two stage acceleration mechanism. Thermal ions are first accelerated to speeds of 3 to 4 times the solar wind speed inside the CIR, presumably by some statistical mechanism, before reaching higher energies by a shock acceleration process. Our results also indicate that (1) the injection efficiencies for pickup ions are almost 100 times higher than they are for solar wind ions, (2) pickup H(+) and He(+) are the two most abundant suprathermal ion species and they carry a large fraction of the particle thermal pressure, (3) the injection efficiency is highest for protons, lowest for He(+), and intermediate for alpha particles, (4) both H(+) and He(+) have identical spectral shapes above the cutoff speed for pickup ions, and (5) the solar wind frame velocity distribution function of protons has the form F(w) = F(sub o)w(sup -4) for 1 is less than w is less than approximately 5, where w is the ion speed divided by the solar wind speed. Above w approximately 5-10 the proton spectrum becomes steeper. These results have important implications concerning acceleration of ions by shocks and CIRs, acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays, and particle dynamics in the outer heliosphere.

  12. Large Amplitude IMF Fluctuations in Corotating Interaction Regions: Ulysses at Midlatitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Ho, Christian M.; Arballo, John K.; Goldstein, Bruce E.; Balogh, Andre

    1995-01-01

    Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs), formed by high-speed corotating streams interacting with slow speed streams, have been examined from -20 deg to -36 deg heliolatitudes. The high-speed streams emanate from a polar coronal hole that Ulysses eventually becomes fully embedded in as it travels towards the south pole. We find that the trailing portion of the CIR, from the interface surface (IF) to the reverse shock (RS), contains both large amplitude transverse fluctuations and magnitude fluctuations. Similar fluctuations have been previously noted to exist within CIRs detected in the ecliptic plane, but their existence has not been explained. The normalized magnetic field component variances within this portion of the CIR and in the trailing high-speed stream are approximately the same, indicating that the fluctuations in the CIR are compressed Alfven waves. Mirror mode structures with lower intensities are also observed in the trailing portion of the CIR, presumably generated from a local instability driven by free energy associated with compression of the high-speed solar wind plasma. The mixture of these two modes (compressed Alfven waves and mirror modes) plus other modes generated by three wave processes (wave-shock interactions) lead to a lower Alfvenicity within the trailing portion of the CfR than in the high-speed stream proper. The results presented in this paper suggest a mechanism for generation of large amplitude B(sub z) fluctuations within CIRS. Such phenomena have been noted to be responsible for the generation of moderate geomagnetic storms during the declining phase of the solar cycle.

  13. The relationship of the large-scale solar field to the interplanetary magnetic field - What will Ulysses find?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Using photospheric magnetic field observations obtained at the Stanford Wilcox Solar Observatory, results from a potential field model for the present solar cycle are given, and qualitative predictions of the IMF that Ulysses may encounter are presented. Results indicate that the IMF consists of large regions of opposite polarity separated by a neutral sheet (NS) (extended to at least 50 deg) and a four-sector structure near solar minimum (produced by small quadripolar NS warps). The latitudinal extent of the NS increases following minimum and the structure near maximum includes multiple NSs, while a simplified IMF is found during the declining phase.

  14. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  15. Autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using “PNEUMOCARD”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Funtova, I. I.; Diedrich, A.; Chernikova, A. G.; Drescher, J.; Baranov, V. M.; Tank, J.

    2009-10-01

    Investigations of blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) during long term space flights on board the "ISS" have shown characteristic changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Therefore, alterations of the autonomic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for in- and post-flight disturbances. The device "Pneumocard" was developed to further investigate autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory function aboard the ISS. The hard-software diagnostic complex "Pneumocard" was used during in-flight experiment aboard ISS for autonomic function testing. ECG, photoplethysmography, respiration, transthoracic bioimpedance and seismocardiography were assessed in one male cosmonaut (flight lengths six month). Recordings were made prior to the flight, late during flight, and post-flight during spontaneous respiration and controlled respiration at different rates. HR remained stable during flight. The values were comparable to supine measurements on earth. Respiratory frequency and blood pressure decreased during flight. Post flight HR and BP values increased compared to in-flight data exceeding pre-flight values. Cardiac time intervals did not change dramatically during flight. Pulse wave transit time decreased during flight. The maximum of the first time derivative of the impedance cardiogram, which is highly correlated with stroke volume was not reduced in-flight. Our results demonstrate that autonomic function testing aboard the ISS using "Pneumocard" is feasible and generates data of good quality. Despite the decrease in BP, pulse wave transit time was found reduced in space as shown earlier. However, cardiac output did not decrease profoundly in the investigated cosmonaut. Autonomic testing during space flight detects individual changes in cardiovascular control and may add important information to standard medical control. The recent plans to support a flight to Mars, makes these kinds of observations all the more relevant

  16. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Mars Observer, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1992 October 4 and 1993 August 1, concurrent coverage by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Mars Observer (MO), and Ulysses spacecraft was obtained for 78 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the MO and Ulysses thresholds, nine were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to approximately 2 deg accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We computed arrival-time error boxes with larger dimensions ranging from a few arcminutes to the diameters of the BATSE-only boxes and with smaller dimensions in the arcminute range. Three events are of particular interest: GB 930704 (BATSE 2428) has been described as a possible repeater. The arrival-time information is consistent with that hypothesis, but only just so. The GB 930706 (2431) box, at approximately 1 min x 4 min, is the only one this small obtained since Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) entered the Venusian atmosphere in 1992 October. Sensitive radio and optical observations of this location were made within 8 and 9 days of the burst, but no counterpart candidates were identified. GB 930801 (2477) is the first GRB that had its localization improved by taking into account BATSE Earth occultation.

  17. New aspects of the RPW instrument antennas aboard Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, Manfred; Kapper, Michael; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rucker, Helmut O.; Maksimovic, Milan

    2013-04-01

    The E-field sensors (boom antennas) of the RPW instrument aboard the Solar Orbiter spacecraft are subject to severe influence of the conducting spacecraft body and other large structures such as the solar panels in close vicinity of the antennas. In this contribution we outline our newest results in finding the true properties of the antennas with additional emphasis on the influence of the built-in heating circuit for deployment. Knowledge of the true properties of the connected antenna system and receiver hardware is an essential component in ensuring the overall performance of a scientific radio and plasma wave instrument. Compared to other spaceborne multiport scatterers, the ANT sensors aboard Solar Orbiter are more sophisticated in mechanical design with features including tubular shaped pipes with radiators along with several hinges. This combined with the challenging environment (closest proximity to Sun is about 0.29 AU) makes finding the true properties even more pressing than with previous spaceborne radio astronomy observatories. Our numerical investigations also provide an important benchmark against measured antenna characteristics using a scale model of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft in an anechoic chamber. The current calibration results are to provide useful input to goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis, direction finding and ray tracing, all of which depend crucially on the effective axes, allowing for significant improvements to the corresponding scientific data analysis.

  18. Astronaut Whitson Displays Soybean Growth Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crewmember and flight engineer Peggy Whitson displays the progress of soybeans growing in the Advanced Astroculture (ADVASC) Experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The ADVASC experiment was one of the several new experiments and science facilities delivered to the ISS by Expedition Five aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavor STS-111 mission. An agricultural seed company will grow soybeans in the ADVASC hardware to determine whether soybean plants can produce seeds in a microgravity environment. Secondary objectives include determination of the chemical characteristics of the seed in space and any microgravity impact on the plant growth cycle. Station science will also be conducted by the ever-present ground crew, with a new cadre of controllers for Expedition Five in the ISS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Controllers work in three shifts around the clock, 7 days a week, in the POCC, the world's primary science command post for the Space Station. The POCC links Earth-bound researchers around the world with their experiments and crew aboard the Space Station.

  19. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Marvin; Hoover, Mark D.; Nelson, Robert C.; Templeton, William; Bollinger, Lance; Anspaugh, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later time after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  20. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. ); Nelson, R.C. ); Bollinger, L. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. ); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

    1990-11-02

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

  1. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  2. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  3. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  4. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  5. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  6. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  7. 47 CFR 97.11 - Stations aboard ships or aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stations aboard ships or aircraft. 97.11... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE General Provisions § 97.11 Stations aboard ships or aircraft. (a) The installation and operation of an amateur station on a ship or aircraft must be approved by the master of...

  8. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  9. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  10. 47 CFR 80.217 - Suppression of interference aboard ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Suppression of interference aboard ships. 80.217 Section 80.217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL... interference aboard ships. (a) A voluntarily equipped ship station receiver must not cause harmful...

  11. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if the apparatus used is of such design and is so operated as to be capable of producing and in fact...

  12. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if the apparatus used is of such design and is so operated as to be capable of producing and in fact...

  13. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if the apparatus used is of such design and is so operated as to be capable of producing and in fact...

  14. Structural Analysis of the QCM Aboard the ER-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Phyllis D.; Bainum, Peter M.; Xing, Guangqian

    1997-01-01

    As a result of recent supersonic transport (SST) studies on the effect they may have on the atmosphere, several experiments have been proposed to capture and evaluate samples of the stratosphere where SST's travel. One means to achieve this is to utilize the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) installed aboard the ER-2, formerly the U-2 reconnaissance aircraft. The QCM is a cascade impactor designed to perform in-situ, real-time measurements of aerosols and chemical vapors at an altitude of 60,000 - 70,000 feet. The ER-2 is primarily used by NASA for Earth resources to test new sensor systems before they are placed aboard satellites. One of the main reasons the ER-2 is used for this flight experiment is its capability to fly approximately twelve miles above sea level (can reach an altitude of 78,000 feet). Because the ER-2 operates at such a high altitude, it is of special interest to scientists interested in space exploration or supersonic aircraft. Some of the experiments are designed to extract data from the atmosphere around the ER-2. For the current flight experiment, the QCM is housed in a frame that is connected to an outer pod that is attached to the fuselage of the ER-2. Due to the location of the QCM within the housing frame and the location of the pod on the ER-2, the pod and its contents are subject to structural loads. In addition to structural loads, structural vibrations are also of importance because the QCM is a frequency induced instrument. Therefore, a structural analysis of the instrument within the frame is imperative to determine if resonance and/or undesirable deformations occur.

  15. Low-energy solar electrons and ions observed at Ulysses February-April, 1991 - The inner heliosphere as a particle reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.; Simnett, G. M.; Tappin, S. J.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Ulysses observations at 2.5 AU of 38-315 keV electrons and 61-4752 keV ions during February-April 1991 suggest in several ways that, during periods of sustained high solar activity, the inner heliosphere serves as a 'reservoir' for low-energy solar particles. Particle increases were not associated one-to-one with large X-ray flares because of their poor magnetic connection, yet intensities in March-April remained well above their February levels. The rise phase of the particle event associated with the great flare of 2245UT March 22 lasted most of two days, while throughout the one-week decay phase, the lowest-energy ion fluxes were nearly equal at Ulysses and earth (IMP-8).

  16. A Case for Hypogravity Studies Aboard ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions being contemplated by NASA and other spacefaring nations include some that would require long stays upon bodies having gravity levels much lower than that of Earth. While we have been able to quantify the physiological effects of sustained exposure to microgravity during various spaceflight programs over the past half-century, there has been no opportunity to study the physiological adaptations to gravity levels between zero-g and one-g. We know now that the microgravity environment of spaceflight drives adaptive responses of the bone, muscle, cardiovascular, and sensorimotor systems, causing bone demineralization, muscle atrophy, reduced aerobic capacity, motion sickness, and malcoordination. All of these outcomes can affect crew health and performance, particularly after return to a one-g environment. An important question for physicians, scientists, and mission designers planning human exploration missions to Mars (3/8 g), the Moon (1/6 g), or asteroids (likely negligible g) is: What protection can be expected from gravitational levels between zero-g and one-g? Will crewmembers deconditioned by six months of microgravity exposure on their way to Mars experience continued deconditioning on the Martian surface? Or, will the 3/8 g be sufficient to arrest or even reverse these adaptive changes? The implications for countermeasure deployment, habitat accommodations, and mission design warrant further investigation into the physiological responses to hypogravity. It is not possible to fully simulate hypogravity exposure on Earth for other than transient episodes (e.g., parabolic flight). However, it would be possible to do so in low Earth orbit (LEO) using the centrifugal forces produced in a live-aboard centrifuge. As we're not likely to launch a rotating human spacecraft into LEO anytime in the near future, we could take advantage of rodent subjects aboard the ISS if we had a centrifuge that could accommodate the rodent

  17. Perceived Life Quality and Health-Related Correlates among Men Aboard Navy Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-31

    recent experience with upper respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal , and psychosomatic symptoms. In addition, a measure of overall fitness was... fitness score. The test assessed four components of physical fitness (see OPNAVINST 6110.1B or Conway & Dutton, 1985): (a) cardiorespiratory endurance...and fitness as well as enhance Navy members’ perceptions of well-being. -\\ (2 ? -- > Approach Participants were 430 men stationed aboard nine Navy

  18. Biological investigations aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tairbekov, M. G.; Parfyonov, G. P.; Platonova, R. W.; Abramova, V. M.; Golov, V. K.; Rostopshina, A. V.; Lyubchenko, V. Yu.; Chuchkin, V. G.

    Experiments on insects, higher plants and lower fungi were carried out aboard the biological satellite Cosmos-1129, in Earth orbit, from 25 September to 14 October 1979. The main objective of these experiments was to gain more profound knowledge of the effect of weightlessness on living organisms and to study the mechanisms by which these various organisms with different life cycles can adjust and develop in weightlessness. Experiments on insects (Drosophila melanogaster) were made with a view towards understanding gravitational preference in flies, the life cycle of which took place on board the biosatellite under conditions of artificial gravity. Experiments on higher plants (Zea mays, Arabidopsis taliana, Lycopersicum esculentum) and lower fungi (Physarum polycephalum) were performed.

  19. Commercial investments in Combustion research aboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado School of Mines is working with a number of companies planning commercial combustion research to be done aboard the International Space Station (ISS). This research will be conducted in two major ISS facilities, SpaceDRUMS™ and the Fluids and Combustion Facility. SpaceDRUMS™, under development by Guigne Technologies, Ltd., of St. John's Newfoundland, is a containerless processing facility employing active acoustic sample positioning. It is capable of processing the large samples needed in commercial research and development with virtually complete vibration isolation from the space station. The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), being developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, is a general-purpose combustion furnace designed to accommodate a wide range of scientific experiments. SpaceDRUMS™ will be the first commercial hardware to be launched to ISS. Launch is currently scheduled for UF-1 in 2001. The CCACS research to be done in SpaceDRUMS™ includes combustion synthesis of glass-ceramics and porous materials. The FCF is currently scheduled to be launched to ISS aboard UF-3 in 2002. The CCACS research to be done in the FCF includes water mist fire suppression, catalytic combustion and flame synthesis of ceramic powders. The companies currently planning to be involved in the research include Guigne International, Ltd., Technology International, Inc., Coors Ceramics Company, TDA Research, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc., ADA Technologies, Inc., ITN Energy Systems, Inc., Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., Princeton Instruments, Inc., Environmental Engineering Concepts, Inc., and Solar Turbines, Inc. Together, these companies are currently investing almost $2 million in cash and in-kind annually toward the seven commercial projects within CCACS. Total private investment in CCACS research to date is over $7 million. .

  20. The SAGE III's mission aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Michael; Thomason, Larry; Zawodny, Joseph; Flittner, David; Hill, Charles; Roell, Marilee; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) is being prepared for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2015. Constructed in the early 2000s, the instrument is undergoing extensive testing and refurbishment prior to delivery to ISS. In addition, ESA is refurbishing their Hexapod which is a high-accuracy pointing system developed to support ISS external payloads, particularly SAGE III. The SAGE III instrument refurbishment also includes the replacement of the neutral density filter that has been associated with some instrument performance degradation during the SAGE III mission aboard METEOR/3M mission (2002-2005). We are also exploring options for expanding the science targets to include additional gas species including IO, BrO, and other solar, lunar, and limb-scatter species. In this presentation, we will discuss SAGE III-ISS refurbishment including results from Sun-look testing. We also will discuss potential revisions to the science measurements and the expected measurement accuracies determined in part through examination of the SAGE III-METEOR/3M measurement data quality. In addition, we will discuss potential mission science goals enabled by the mid-inclination ISS orbit. No dedicated field campaign for SAGE III validation is anticipated. Instead, validation will primarily rely on a collaborative effort with international groups making in situ and ground-based measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other SAGE III data products. A limited balloon-based effort with a yet-to-be-determined validation partner is also in the planning stages.

  1. Comparison of interplanetary type 2 radio burst observations by ISEE-3, Ulysses, and WIND with applications to space weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Klimas, A. J.; Lengyel-Frey, D.; Stone, R. G.; Thejappa, G.

    1997-01-01

    Interplanetary (IP) type 2 radio bursts are produced by IP shocks driven by solar ejecta, presumably involving shock acceleration of electrons that leads to radio emission. These radio bursts, which can be detected remotely by a sensitive spacecraft radio receiver, provide a method of tracking the leading edge of solar ejecta moving outward from the sun. Consequently, observations of these bursts sometimes provide advance warning of one or more days prior to the onset of geomagnetic activity induced by the solar ejecta. A robust lower limit on the fraction of intense geomagnetic storms, that are preceded by IP type 2 bursts, is provided. It is shown that 41 percent of the geomagnetic storms occurring during the interval September 1978 to February 1983 were preceded by type 2 events in this catalog, and reasons why the fraction is not larger are addressed. Differences in the observing capabilities of the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3, Ulysses, and WIND, to explain why each of these similar spacecraft radio investigations provides a different perspective of IP type 2 emissions are reviewed.

  2. Comparison between Measured and Simulated Radiation Doses in the Matoroshka-R Spherical phantom Experiment#1 and Area Monitoring aboard International Space Station using PADLES from May - Sep. 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Aiko; Tolochek, Raisa; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Tawara, Hiroko; Kitajo, Keiichi; Shimada, Ken

    The measurement of radiation environmental parameters in space is essential to support radiation risk assessments for astronauts and establish a benchmark for space radiation models for present and future human space activities. Since Japanese Experiment Module ‘KIBO’ was attached to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, we have been performing continuous space radiation dosimetery using a PADLES (Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiments in Space) consisting of CR-39 PNTDs (Plastic Nuclear track detectors) and TLD-MSOs (Mg2SiO4:Tb) for various space experiments onboard the ‘KIBO’ part of the ISS. The MATROSHKA-R experiments aims to verify of dose distributions in a human body during space flight. The phantom consists of tissue equivalent material covered by a poncho jacket with 32 pockets on the surface. 20 container rods with dosimeters can be struck into the spherical phantom. Its diameter is 370 mm and it is 32 kg in weight. The first experiment onboard the KIBO at Forward No.2 area (JPM1F2 Rack2) was conducted over 114 days from 21 May to 12 September 2012 (the installation schedule inside the phantom) on the way to solar cycle 24th upward curve. 16 PADLES packages were deployed into 16 poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom. Another 12 PADLES packages were deployed inside 4 rods (3 packages per rod in the outer, middle and inner side). Area monitoring in the KIBO was conducted in the same period (Area PADLES series #8 from 15 May to 16 September, 2012). Absorbed doses were measured at 17 area monitoring points in the KIBO and 28 locations (16 packages in poncho pockets and 12 inside 4 rods) in the phantom. The maximum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the outer wall was 0.43 mGy/day and the minimum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the KIBO interior was 0.30 mGy/day. The maximum absorbed

  3. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-06-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard.

  4. Properties and Radial Trends of Coronal Mass Ejecta and Their Associated Shocks Observed by Ulysses in the Ecliptic Plane. Appendix 2; Repr. from Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 105, 2000 p 12,617-12,626

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, magnetic and plasma measurements are used to analyze 17 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) identified by Ulysses during its in-ecliptic passage to Jupiter. We focus on the expansion characteristics of these CMEs (as inferred from the time rate of change of the velocity profiles through the CMEs) and the properties of 14 forward shocks unambiguously associated with these CMEs. We highlight radial trends from 1 to 5.4 AU. Our results indicate that the CMEs are generally expanding at all heliocentric distances. With regard to the shocks preceding these ejecta, we note the following: (1) There is a clear tendency for the shock speed (in the upstream frame of reference) to decrease with increasing heliocentric distance as the CMEs transfer momentum to the ambient solar wind and slow down; (2) 86% of the shock fronts are oriented in the ecliptic plane such that their normals point westward (i.e., in the direction of planetary motion about the Sun), (3) 86% of the shocks are propagating toward the heliographic equator; and (4) no clear trend was found in the strength of the shocks versus heliocentric distance. These results are interpreted using simple dynamical arguments and are supported by fluid and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations.

  5. Noise and exposure of personnel aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Erlend; Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Moen, Bente E; Gjestland, Truls; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Bråtveit, Magne

    2015-03-01

    Despite awareness of noise aboard vessels at sea, few studies have reported measured noise levels aboard ships. This study aimed to describe the noise levels aboard vessels in the Royal Norwegian Navy (RNoN), and to assess the noise exposure of personnel aboard RNoN vessels. In 2012/2013 noise measurements were conducted aboard 14 RNoN vessels from four different vessel classes (frigates, coastal corvettes, mine vessels, and coast guard vessels) which were included in this study. Mean and median A-weighted noise levels (L p,A) in decibel (dB(A)) were calculated for different locations in each vessel class. The noise exposure of RNoN personnel was assessed by dosimeter measurements, and with a task-based (TB) strategy. The TB strategy used means of area measured noise levels in locations and the personnel's mean reported time spent in the respective locations to estimate the exposure. Area measurements of noise during sailing with typical operating modes, showed that for all vessel classes the noise levels were high in engine rooms with median L p,A ranging from 86.4 to 105.3 dB(A). In all the other locations the vessel class with the highest noise levels (coastal corvettes) had a median L p,A ranging from 71.7 to 95.0 dB(A), while the vessel class with the lowest noise levels (coast guard vessels) had a median L p,A ranging from 41.5 to 57.8 dB(A). For all vessel classes the engineers and electricians had amongst the highest 24-hour noise exposure (L p,A,24h), both before and after adjusting for estimated use of hearing protective devices (L p,A,24h > 67.3 dB(A)). The vessel class with the highest personnel exposure levels (coastal corvettes) had L p,A,24h ranging from 76.6 to 79.3 dB(A). The vessel class with the lowest personnel exposure levels (coast guard vessels) had an L p,A,24h ranging from 47.4 to 67.3 dB(A). In general, the dosimeter measurements gave higher exposure levels than those estimated with the TB strategy. All vessel classes, except the coast

  6. The southern high-speed stream: results from the SWICS instrument on Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Geiss, J; Gloeckler, G; von Steiger, R; Balsiger, H; Fisk, L A; Galvin, A B; Ipavich, F M; Livi, S; McKenzie, J F; Ogilvie, K W

    1995-05-19

    The high-speed solar wind streaming from the southern coronal hole was remarkably uniform and steady and was confined by a sharp boundary that extended to the corona and chromosphere. Charge state measurements indicate that the electron temperature in this coronal hole reached a maximum of about 1.5 million kelvin within 3 solar radii of the sun. This result, combined with the observed lack of depletion of heavy elements, suggests that an additional source of momentum is required to accelerate the polar wind.

  7. Microstructure Analysis of Directionally Solidified Aluminum Alloy Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angart, Samuel Gilbert

    This thesis entails a detailed microstructure analysis of directionally solidified (DS) Al-7Si alloys processed in microgravity aboard the International Space Station and similar duplicate ground based experiments at Cleveland State University. In recent years, the European Space Agency (ESA) has conducted experiments on alloy solidification in microgravity. NASA and ESA have collaborated for three DS experiments with Al- 7 wt. % Si alloy, aboard the International Space Station (ISS) denoted as MICAST6, MICAST7 and MICAST12. The first two experiments were processed on the ISS in 2009 and 2010. MICAST12 was processed aboard the ISS in the spring of 2014; the resulting experimental results of MICAST12 are not discussed in this thesis. The primary goal of the thesis was to understand the effect of convection in primary dendrite arm spacings (PDAS) and radial macrosegregation within DS aluminum alloys. The MICAST experiments were processed with various solidification speeds and thermal gradients to produce alloy with differences in microstructure features. PDAS and radial macrosegregation were measured in the solidified ingot that developed during the transition from one solidification speed to another. To represent PDAS in DS alloy in the presence of no convection, the Hunt-Lu model was used to represent diffusion-controlled growth. By sectioning cross-sections throughout the entire length of solidified samples, PDAS was measured and calculated. The ground-based (1-g) experiments done at Cleveland State University CSU were also analyzed for comparison to the ISS experiments (0-g). During steady state in the microgravity environment, there was a reasonable agreement between the measured and calculated PDAS. In ground-based experiments, transverse sections exhibited obvious radial macrosegregation caused by thermosolutal convection resulting in a non-agreement with the Hunt-Lu model. Using a combination of image processing techniques and Electron Microprobe Analysis

  8. Gemini 4 astronauts relax aboard Navy helicopter after recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Gemini 4 astronauts, James A. McDivitt (right), command pilot, and Edward H. White II, (left), pilot, relax aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter on their way to the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after recovery from the Gemini 4 spacecraft. They had been picked up out of the Atlantic Ocean following a successful splashdown (33532); White (left) and McDivitt listen to the voice of President Lyndon B. Johnson as he congratulated them by telephone on the successful mission. They are shown aboard the carrier U.S.S. Wasp just after their recovery (33533).

  9. Safety Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Shauna M.

    2004-01-01

    As with any task that NASA takes on, safety is of utmost importaqce. There are pages of safety codes and procedures that must be followed before any idea can be brought to life. Unfortunately, the International Space Station s (ISS) safety regulations and procedures are based on lg standards rather than on Og. To aide in making this space age home away from home a less hazardous environment, I worked on several projects revolving around the dangers of flammable items in microgravity. The first task I was assigned was to track flames. This involves turning eight millimeter video recordings, of tests run in the five second drop tower, into avi format on the computer. The footage is then compressed and altered so that the flame can be seen more clearly. Using another program called Spotlight, line profiles were used to collect data describing the luminescence of the flame at different points. These raw data are saved as text files and run trough a macro so that a Matlab program can analyze it. By fitting the data to a curve and determining the areas of brightest luminescence, the behavior of the flame can be recorded numerically. After entering the data into a database, researchers can come back later and easily get information on flames resulting from different gas and liquid mixtures in microgravity. I also worked on phase two of the FATE project, which deals with safety aboard the ISS. This phase involves igniting projected droplets and determining how they react with secondary materials. Such simulations represent, on a small scale, the spread of onboard fires due to the effervescence of burning primary materials. I set up existing hardware to operate these experiments and ran tests with it, photographing the results. I also made CAD drawings of the apparatus and the area available on the (SF)2 rig for it to fit into. The experiment will later be performed on the KC-135, and the results gathered will be used to reanalyze current safety standards for the ISS

  10. Paresev 1-C with inflatable wing testbed aboard a truck in preparation for flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Aboard a truck and ready for a test flight is the Paresev 1-C on the ramp at the NASA Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The half-scale version of the inflatable Gemini parawing was pre-flighted by being carried across the Rosamond dry lakebed on the back of a truck before a tow behind a International Harvester Carry-All. The inflatable center spar ran fore and aft and measured 191 inches, two other inflatable spars formed the leading edges. The three compartments were filled with nitrogen under pressure to make them rigid. The Paresev 1-C was very unstable in flight with this configuration.

  11. A prototype gas exchange monitor for exercise stress testing aboard NASA Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Joseph A.; Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Bauer, Anne

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an easy-to-use monitor developed to track the weightlessness deconditioning aboard the NASA Space Station, together with the results of testing of a prototype instrument. The monitor measures the O2 uptake and CO2 production, and calculates the maximum O2 uptake and anaerobic threshold during an exercise stress test. The system uses two flowmeters in series to achieve a completely automatic calibration, and uses breath-by-breath compensation for sample line-transport delay. The monitor was evaluated using two laboratory methods and was shown to be accurate. The system's block diagram and the bench test setup diagram are included.

  12. Astronaut Harrison Schmitt participates in simulation aboard KC-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission, simulates preparing to deploy the Surface Electrical Properties Experiment during lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation training under one-sixth gravity conditions aboard a U.S. Air Force KC-135 aircraft.

  13. Gemini 12 crew arrives aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew arrives aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  14. Camera aboard 'Friendship 7' photographs John Glenn during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    A camera aboard the 'Friendship 7' Mercury spacecraft photographs Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. during the Mercury-Atlas 6 spaceflight (00302-3); Photographs Glenn as he uses a photometer to view the sun during sunsent on the MA-6 space flight (00304).

  15. Environmental Factors in the Onset of Illness Aboard Navy Ships.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    this paper are those of the authors. No endorsement by the Department of the Navy has been given or should be inferred. •* Environmental & Social ... Medicine Department, Naval Health Research Center, P.O. Box 85122, San Diego, CA 92138-9174. Environmental Factors in the Onset of Illness Aboard Navy Ships

  16. Stability of Formulations Contained in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf life are essential for successful space medical operations in support of space exploration missions. Physical and environmental factors unique to space missions such as vibration, G forces and ionizing radiation may adversely affect stability of pharmaceuticals intended for standard care of astronauts aboard space missions. Stable pharmaceuticals, therefore, are of paramount importance for assuring health and wellness of astronauts in space. Preliminary examination of stability of formulations from Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) medical kits revealed that some of these medications showed physical and chemical degradation after flight raising concern of reduced therapeutic effectiveness with these medications in space. A research payload experiment was conducted with a select set of formulations stowed aboard a shuttle flight and on ISS. The payload consisted of four identical pharmaceutical kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms that were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the Space Shuttle, STS 121. One of the four kits was stored on the shuttle and the other three were stored on the ISS for return to Earth at six months intervals on a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit; the shuttle kit was returned to Earth on the same flight. Standard stability indicating physical and chemical parameters were measured for all pharmaceuticals returned from the shuttle and from the first ISS increment payload along with ground-based matching controls. Results were compared between shuttle, ISS and ground controls. Evaluation of data from the three paradigms indicates that some of the formulations exhibited significant degradation in space compared to respective ground controls; a few formulations were unstable both on the ground and in space. An increase in the number of pharmaceuticals from ISS failing USP standards was noticed compared to those from the shuttle

  17. The monitoring system for vibratory disturbance detection in microgravity environment aboard the international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laster, Rachel M.

    2004-01-01

    Scientists in the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications within the Microgravity Research Division oversee studies in important physical, chemical, and biological processes in microgravity environment. Research is conducted in microgravity environment because of the beneficial results that come about for experiments. When research is done in normal gravity, scientists are limited to results that are affected by the gravity of Earth. Microgravity provides an environment where solid, liquid, and gas can be observed in a natural state of free fall and where many different variables are eliminated. One challenge that NASA faces is that space flight opportunities need to be used effectively and efficiently in order to ensure that some of the most scientifically promising research is conducted. Different vibratory sources are continually active aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Some of the vibratory sources include crew exercise, experiment setup, machinery startup (life support fans, pumps, freezer/compressor, centrifuge), thruster firings, and some unknown events. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMs), which acts as the hardware and carefully positioned aboard the ISS, along with the Microgravity Environment Monitoring System MEMS), which acts as the software and is located here at NASA Glenn, are used to detect these vibratory sources aboard the ISS and recognize them as disturbances. The various vibratory disturbances can sometimes be harmful to the scientists different research projects. Some vibratory disturbances are recognized by the MEMS's database and some are not. Mainly, the unknown events that occur aboard the International Space Station are the ones of major concern. To better aid in the research experiments, the unknown events are identified and verified as unknown events. Features, such as frequency, acceleration level, time and date of recognition of the new patterns are stored in an Excel database. My task is to

  18. Effect of current sheets on the solar wind magnetic field power spectrum from the Ulysses observation: from Kraichnan to Kolmogorov scaling.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Miao, B; Hu, Q; Qin, G

    2011-03-25

    The MHD turbulence theory developed by Iroshnikov and Kraichnan predicts a k(-1.5) power spectrum. Solar wind observations, however, often show a k(-5/3) Kolmogorov scaling. Based on 3 years worth of Ulysses magnetic field data where over 28,000 current sheets are identified, we propose that the current sheet is the cause of the Kolmogorov scaling. We show that for 5 longest current-sheet-free periods the magnetic field power spectra are all described by the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling. In comparison, for 5 periods that have the most number of current sheets, the power spectra all exhibit Kolmogorov scaling. The implication of our results is discussed.

  19. Validation for Global Solar Wind Prediction Using Ulysses Comparison: Multiple Coronal and Heliospheric Models Installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, wehave quantitatively assessed the models capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs.The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  20. Validation for global solar wind prediction using Ulysses comparison: Multiple coronal and heliospheric models installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, we have quantitatively assessed the models' capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs. The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  1. Shigellosis at sea: an outbreak aboard a passenger cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Merson, M H; Tenney, J H; Meyers, J D; Wood, B T; Wells, J G; Rymzo, W; Cline, B; DeWitt, W E; Skaliy, P; Mallison, F

    1975-02-01

    Between June 23 and June 30, 1973, 90% of 650 passengers and at least 35% of 299 crew members experienced a diarrheal illness during a 7-day Caribbean cruise aboard a passenger cruise liner. Symptoms were consistent with shigellosis, and Shigella flexneri 6, Boyd 88 biotype, was isolated from rectal swabs taken from 8 to 35 ill passengers and 33 of 294 crew members. Epidemiologic evidence incriminated the ship's water, including ice, as the probable vehicle of transmission, and elevated coliform counts were found in potable water samples obtained aboard the vessel at the peak of the outbreak. Potential sources of contamination of the vessel's potable water supply were investigated, and improvements in the loading and chlorination of potable water were recommended.

  2. NASDA President Communicates With Japanese Crew Member Aboard the STS-47 Spacelab-J Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. From the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC), NASDA President, Mr. Yamano, speaks to Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri, a Japanese crew member aboard the STS-47 Spacelab J mission.

  3. Commander Bowersox Tends to Zeolite Crystal Samples Aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox spins Zeolite Crystal Growth sample tubes to eliminate bubbles that could affect crystal formation in preparation of a 15 day experiment aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Zeolites are hard as rock, yet are able to absorb liquids and gases like a sponge. By using the ISS microgravity environment to grow better, larger crystals, NASA and its commercial partners hope to improve petroleum manufacturing and other processes.

  4. Crewmen of the Gemini 7 spacecraft arrive aboard aircraft carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., (left), pilot, and Frank Borman, command pilot, are shown just after they arrived aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. Greeting the astronauts are Donald Stullken (at Lovell's right), Recovery Operations Branch, Landing and Recovery Division; Dr. Howard Minners (standing beside Borman), Flight Medicine Branch, Cneter Medical Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, and Bennett James (standing behind Borman), a NASA Public Affairs Officer.

  5. Predicting Airborne Particle Levels Aboard Washington State School Buses

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Sara D.; Davey, Mark; Sullivan, James R.; Compher, Michael; Szpiro, Adam; Liu, L.-J. Sally

    2008-01-01

    School buses contribute substantially to childhood air pollution exposures yet they are rarely quantified in epidemiology studies. This paper characterizes fine particulate matter (PM2.5) aboard school buses as part of a larger study examining the respiratory health impacts of emission-reducing retrofits. To assess onboard concentrations, continuous PM2.5 data were collected during 85 trips aboard 43 school buses during normal driving routines, and aboard hybrid lead vehicles traveling in front of the monitored buses during 46 trips. Ordinary and partial least square regression models for PM2.5 onboard buses were created with and without control for roadway concentrations, which were also modeled. Predictors examined included ambient PM2.5 levels, ambient weather, and bus and route characteristics. Concentrations aboard school buses (21 μg/m3) were four and two-times higher than ambient and roadway levels, respectively. Differences in PM2.5 levels between the buses and lead vehicles indicated an average of 7 μg/m3 originating from the bus's own emission sources. While roadway concentrations were dominated by ambient PM2.5, bus concentrations were influenced by bus age, diesel oxidative catalysts, and roadway concentrations. Cross validation confirmed the roadway models but the bus models were less robust. These results confirm that children are exposed to air pollution from the bus and other roadway traffic while riding school buses. In-cabin air pollution is higher than roadway concentrations and is likely influenced by bus characteristics. PMID:18985175

  6. Nutrition Education And Diet Modification Aboard Submarines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Measurements of cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol ( HDL ), low density lipoprotein cholesterol ( LDL ), triglycerides (TG), Ratio (TC/ HDL ...patrol one of the three control crews demonstrated statistically and clinically significant decreases in TC, HDL , LDL , and ratio and another crew...3 crews), LDL and HDL declined (2 crews), ratio declined (one crew), and TG declined (2 crews). All six crews demonstrated a statistically

  7. Space science experiments aboard ATS-F.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, R.; King, W.

    1972-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Experiment (EME) package is mounted on the ATS-F spacecraft to a structure that is located on top of the 30-foot parabolic reflector hub. The eight experiments of the EME package are designed to study the environment in space at synchronous altitude and to obtain information on electromagnetic-ionospheric interactions. Six of these experiments will obtain data on charged particles of several different types. A seventh experiment is to provide magnetic field data. The eighth experiment is concerned with solar cell degradation studies.

  8. The Influence of Pickup Protons, from Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen, on the Propagation of Interplanetary Shocks from the Halloween 2003 Solar Events to ACE and Ulysses: A 3-D MHD Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe our 3-D, time ]dependent, MHD solar wind model that we recently modified to include the physics of pickup protons from interstellar neutral hydrogen. The model has a time-dependent lower boundary condition, at 0.1 AU, that is driven by source surface map files through an empirical interface module. We describe the empirical interface and its parameter tuning to maximize model agreement with background (quiet) solar wind observations at ACE. We then give results of a simulation study of the famous Halloween 2003 series of solar events. We began with shock inputs from the Fearless Forecast real ]time shock arrival prediction study, and then we iteratively adjusted input shock speeds to obtain agreement between observed and simulated shock arrival times at ACE. We then extended the model grid to 5.5 AU and compared those simulation results with Ulysses observations at 5.2 AU. Next we undertook the more difficult tuning of shock speeds and locations to get matching shock arrival times at both ACE and Ulysses. Then we ran this last case again with neutral hydrogen density set to zero, to identify the effect of pickup ions. We show that the speed of interplanetary shocks propagating from the Sun to Ulysses is reduced by the effects of pickup protons. We plan to make further improvements to the model as we continue our benchmarking process to 10 AU, comparing our results with Cassini observations, and eventually on to 100 AU, comparing our results with Voyager 1 and 2 observations.

  9. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  10. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Re-measurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low earth orbital environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, LED's, filter, mirrors, and black paints will be presented. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens. We find plastics and multi-layer dielectric coatings to be potentially unstable. Semiconductor devices, metal, and glass are more likely to be stable.

  11. On the evening time exosphere of Mars: Result from MENCA aboard Mars Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Thampi, Smitha V.; Das, Tirtha Pratim; Dhanya, M. B.; Naik, Neha; Vajja, Dinakar Prasad; Pradeepkumar, P.; Sreelatha, P.; Supriya, G.; Abhishek J., K.; Mohankumar, S. V.; Thampi, R. Satheesh; Yadav, Vipin K.; Sundar, B.; Nandi, Amarnath; Padmanabhan, G. Padma; Aliyas, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    The Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA) aboard the Indian Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) is a quadrupole mass spectrometer which provides in situ measurement of the composition of the low-latitude Martian neutral exosphere. The altitude profiles of the three major constituents, i.e., amu 44 (CO2), amu 28 (N2 + CO), and amu 16 (O) in the Martian exosphere during evening (close to sunset terminator) hours are reported using MENCA observations from four orbits of MOM during late December 2014, when MOM's periapsis altitude was the lowest. The altitude range of the observation encompasses the diffusively separated region much above the well-mixed atmosphere. The transition from CO2 to O-dominated region is observed near 270 km. The mean exospheric temperature derived using these three mass numbers is 271 ± 5 K. These first observations corresponding to the Martian evening hours would help to provide constraints to the thermal escape models.

  12. Ovarian Tumor Cells Studied Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  13. [Equipment for biological experiments with snails aboard piloted orbital stations].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Korotkova, E V; Kuznetsova, E E; Mukhamedieva, L N; Begrov, V V; Pepeliaev, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    To fly biological experiments aboard piloted orbital stations, research equipment was built up of an incubation container, filter system and automatic temperature controller. Investigations included analysis of the makeup and concentrations of gases produced by animals (snails) during biocycle, and emitted after death. Filters are chemisorption active fibrous materials (AFM) with high sorption rate and water receptivity (cation exchange fiber VION-KN-1 and anion exchange fiber VION-AS-1), and water-repellent carbon adsorbent SKLTS. AFM filters were effective in air cleaning and practically excluded ingress of chemical substances from the container into cabin atmosphere over more than 100 days.

  14. Application of SSNTDs in radiobiological investigations aboard recoverable satellites.

    PubMed

    Huang, R Q; Gu, R Q; Li, Q

    1997-01-01

    In recent years some Biostack experiments including a wide spectrum of biological objects have been devoted to study of the radiobiological effects on dry seeds aboard recoverable satellites. Some impressive phenomena have been observed. Clearly, the large amount of energy deposited by the highly ionizing heavy nuclei of cosmic rays is the principal reason for the induced aberrations of the chromosomes of wheat root tip cells. A methodical description of the experimental arrangement and procedure of handling and evaluation of given. The preliminary physical and biological results from the experimental "wheat seeds" are presented.

  15. High temperature heat pipe experiments aboard the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. ); Secary, C.J. )

    1993-01-10

    Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most space nuclear power systems, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation. Three SST/potassium heat pipes are being designed, fabricated, and ground tested. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will fly aboard the space shuttle in 1995. Three wick structures will be tested: homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap. Ground tests are described that simulate the space shuttle environment in every way except gravity field.

  16. Soyuz 25 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 25. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C-13-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 76, 108 and 88%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned aboard Soyuz 25.

  17. Group 12 ASCANs Davis and Jemison during zero gravity training aboard KC-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Group 12, 1987 Astronaut Class, candidates (ASCANs) N. Jan Davis (left) and Mae C. Jemison freefloat during the seconds of microgravity created aboard the KC-135 NASA 930 aircraft's parabolic flight. Davis and Jemison two of the recently-named ASCANs take a familiarization flight aboard the KC-135 'zero gravity' aircraft.

  18. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... of Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA) in the 14.0-14.5 GHz band from secondary to primary and... stations of the FSS on a primary basis in the 11.7-12.2 GHz band (space-to-Earth), on an unprotected...

  19. 78 FR 14920 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service... technical and licensing rules for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAA), i.e., earth stations on aircraft...-11.2 GHz, 11.45-11.7 GHz, 11.7-12.2 GHz (space-to-Earth or downlink) and 14.0-14.5 GHz...

  20. First results from the GPS atmospheric remote sensing experiment TOR aboard TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, G.; Grunwaldt, L.; Heise, S.; Köhler, W.; Schmidt, T.; Choi, K.-R.; Michalak, G.; König, R.; Rothacher, M.; Wickert, J.

    2009-04-01

    The TerraSAR-X satellite was launched on 15 June 2007 into a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of about 514 km and about 98 ° orbit inclination. In addition to synthetic aperture radar and laser communication payloads, TerraSAR-X accommodates the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) experiment. TOR's hardware consists of the Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) and a laser retro-reflector for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). IGOR, a dual frequency, geodetic-grade GPS receiver instrument, provides signal-to-noise ratios, pseudorange and carrier phase observations of an occulting and a reference satellite at sampling rates of up to 50 Hz for remote sensing of atmospheric refractivity using the radio occultation (RO) technique. For precise orbit determination pseudorange and carrier phase data from all satellites in view are sampled at 0.1 Hz. Three brief RO tests were conducted with TOR in 2007; a 32-day campaign was performed in January/February 2008 and from 25 July to 17 November 2008 occultation events were recorded continuously for 117 days. We describe first results from an analysis of about 19.000 setting radio occultation events observed during that last campaign. Atmospheric refractivity profiles derived from TOR data are intercompared with ECMWF analyses; ECMWF analysis data are interpolated to the time and location of the RO measurement. At altitudes of about 2-25 km the mean fractional refractivity bias with respect to ECMWF is less than ±0.5%, its standard deviation varies between 0.5% and 1% in the altitude range 5-20 km increasing to about 2% at altitudes below 5 km and above 20 km. Unlike the RO receivers aboard the CHAMP and GRACE satellites the IGOR aboard TerraSAR-X employs an open-loop tracking technique to improve L1 carrier phase tracking at altitudes below 5 to 6 km. Consistent with earlier findings from the COSMIC constellation, open-loop tracking significantly reduces the 50%-altitude, the tangent point altitude which is

  1. An apparatus for preparing benthic samples aboard ship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, Phillip N.; Girard, Thomas L.; Stapanian, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a safe and effective apparatus for washing and reducing the volume of benthic samples collected by grab samplers aboard ship. The sample is transferred directly from the dredge to the apparatus and then washed with water pumped through pipes in the apparatus and from onboard hoses. Wastewater and materials smaller than 0.541 mm in diameter are washed overboard. Larger materials, including benthic organisms, collect on an upper 0.64-cm screen and on a lower 30-mm-mesh stainless steel bolt cloth. A collection jar is screwed into the bottom of the apparatus. Therefore, transfer of sample material from the apparatus to the jar is quick and easy. This apparatus has several advantages for use aboard ship over others described in the literature, especially in rough seas, in cold weather, and at night. The apparatus provides a safe and convenient platform for washing and reducing samples, and samples can be prepared while the vessel is traveling at full speed.

  2. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Aboard Command Module Yankee Clipper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is a view of astronaut Richard F. Gordon attaching a high resolution telephoto lens to a camera aboard the Apollo 12 Command Module (CM) Yankee Clipper. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  3. 77 FR 27855 - Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard America! Holdings, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Celerity Partners IV, LLC, Celerity AHI Holdings SPV, LLC, and All Aboard...., d/b/a All Aboard America AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice Tentatively Approving and Authorizing Transaction. SUMMARY: All Aboard America! Holdings, Inc. (AHI), Celerity AHI...

  4. Airglow-solar spectrometer instrument (20-700 nm) aboard the San Marco D/L satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Seidl, P.; Wita, C.

    1985-10-01

    The ASSI experiment aboard the San Marco D/L aeronomy satellite will monitor the airglow, solar, and interplanetary radiations from the EUV through the visible spectral regions. Four spectrometers with solar pointing control cover this broad region using channels with eighteen overlapping wavelength ranges with spectral resolutions from 0.8 to 3.0 nm, which are adequate for aeronomy. Large dynamic ranges up to 1:10 to the 11th permit the measurement of faint airglow or interplanetary radiation and intense solar emissions with one and the same instrument. Instrumental details such as the special optical design and calibration procedures are presented in detail.

  5. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  6. On-Orbit Spatial Characterization of MODIS with ASTER Aboard the Terra Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Yong; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    This letter presents a novel approach for on-orbit characterization of MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) band-to-band registration (BBR) using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard the Terra spacecraft. The spatial resolution of ASTER spectral bands is much higher than that of MODIS, making it feasible to characterize MODIS on-orbit BBR using their simultaneous observations. The ground target selected for on-orbit MODIS BBR characterization in this letter is a water body, which is a uniform scene with high signal contrast relative to its neighbor areas. A key step of this approach is to accurately localize the measurements of each MODIS band in an ASTER measurement plane coordinate (AMPC). The ASTER measurements are first interpolated and aggregated to simulate the measurements of each MODIS band. The best measurement match between ASTER and each MODIS band is obtained when the measurement difference reaches its weighted minimum. The position of each MODIS band in the AMPC is then used to calculate the BBR. The results are compared with those derived from MODIS onboard Spectro-Radiometric Calibration Assembly. They are in good agreement, generally less than 0.1 MODIS pixel. This approach is useful for other sensors without onboard spatial characterization capability. Index Terms Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), band-to-band registration (BBR), MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), spatial characterization.

  7. Degradation of electro-optic components aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    Remeasurement of the properties of a set of electro-optic components exposed to the low-earth environment aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) indicates that most components survived quite well. Typical components showed some effects related to the space environment unless well protected. The effects were often small but significant. Results for semiconductor infrared detectors, lasers, and LED's, as well as filters, mirrors, and black paints are described. Semiconductor detectors and emitters were scarred but reproduced their original characteristics. Spectral characteristics of multi-layer dielectric filters and mirrors were found to be altered and degraded. Increased absorption in black paints indicates an increase in absorption sites, giving rise to enhanced performance as coatings for baffles and sunscreens.

  8. Advanced water iodinating system. [for potable water aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Potable water stores aboard manned spacecraft must remain sterile. Suitable sterilization techniques are needed to prevent microbial growth. The development of an advanced water iodinating system for possible application to the shuttle orbiter and other advanced spacecraft, is considered. The AWIS provides a means of automatically dispensing iodine and controlling iodination levels in potable water stores. In a recirculation mode test, simulating application of the AWIS to a water management system of a long term six man capacity space mission, noniodinated feed water flowing at 32.2 cu cm min was iodinated to 5 + or - ppm concentrations after it was mixed with previously iodinated water recirculating through a potable water storage tank. Also, the AWIS was used to successfully demonstrate its capability to maintain potable water at a desired I2 concentration level while circulating through the water storage tank, but without the addition of noniodinated water.

  9. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  10. In-orbit performance of SXT aboard AstroSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kulinder Pal; Stewart, Gordon C.; Chandra, Sunil; Mukerjee, Kallol; Kotak, Sanket; Beardmore, Andy P.; Chitnis, Varsha; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Mirza, Irfan; Kamble, Nilima; Navalkar, Vinita; Shah, Harshit; Vishwakarma, S.; Koyande, J.

    2016-07-01

    A soft X-ray focusing Telescope (SXT) was launched in a near Earth, near equatorial orbit aboard the AstroSat on September 28th, 2015. The SXT electronics was switched on within 3 days of the launch and the first light was seen on October 26th, 2015 after a sequence of operations involving venting of the camera, cooling of the CCD, opening of the telescope door followed by the opening of the camera door. Several cosmic X-ray sources have been observed since then during the Performance Verification phase. A few near-simultaneous observations have also been carried out with the Swift observatory. The in-orbit performance of the SXT based on these observations is presented here.

  11. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrath, M.; Canfield, P. J.; Bronowicki, P. M.; Dreyer, M. E.; Weislogel, M. M.; Grah, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  12. In-situ observation of Martian neutral exosphere: Results from MENCA aboard Indian Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Pratim Das, Tirtha; Dhanya, M. B.; Thampi, Smitha V.

    2016-07-01

    Till very recently, the only in situ measurements of the Martian upper atmospheric composition was from the mass spectrometer experiments aboard the two Viking landers, which covered the altitude region from 120 to 200 km. Hence, the exploration by the Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA) aboard the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft of ISRO and the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) experiment aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile ENvironment (MAVEN) mission of NASA are significant steps to further understand the Martian neutral exosphere and its variability. MENCA is a quadrupole based neutral mass spectrometer which observes the radial distribution of the Martian neutral exosphere. The analysis of the data from MENCA has revealed unambiguous detection of the three major constituents, which are amu 44 (CO2), amu 28 (contributions from CO and N2) and amu 16 (atomic O), as well as a few minor species. Since MOM is in a highly elliptical orbit, the MENCA observations pertain to different local times, in the low-latitude region. Examples of such observations would be presented, and compared with NGIMS results. Emphasis would be given to the observations pertaining to high solar zenith angles and close to perihelion period. During the evening hours, the transition from CO2 to O dominated region is observed near 270 km, which is significantly different from the previous observations corresponding to sub-solar point and SZA of ~45°. The mean evening time exospheric temperature derived using these observations is 271±5 K. These are the first observations corresponding to the Martian evening hours, which would help to provide constraints to the thermal escape models.

  13. Accomplishments in Bioastronautics Research Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 16 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crew members and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes, muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; and changes in immune function. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS . Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  14. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Uri, John J; Haven, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  15. New mud gas monitoring system aboard D/V Chikyu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Yusuke; Inagaki, Fumio; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Igarashi, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Mud gas logging has been commonly used in oil industry and continental scientific drilling to detect mainly hydrocarbon gases from the reservoir formation. Quick analysis of the gas provides almost real-time information which is critical to evaluate the formation and, in particular, safety of drilling operation. Furthermore, mud gas monitoring complements the lack of core or fluid samples particularly in a deep hole, and strengthen interpretations of geophysical logs. In scientific ocean drilling, on the other hand, mud gas monitoring was unavailable in riserless drilling through the history of DSDP and ODP, until riser drilling was first carried out in 2009 by D/V Chikyu. In IODP Exp 319, GFZ installed the same system with that used in continental drilling aboard Chikyu. High methane concentrations are clearly correlated with increased wood content in the cuttings. The system installation was, however, temporary and gas separator was moved during the expedition for a technical reason. In 2011, new mud gas monitoring system was installed aboard Chikyu and was used for the first time in Exp 337. The gas separator was placed on a newly branched bypass mud flow line, and the gas sample was sent to analysis unit equipped with methane carbon isotope analyzer in addition to mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph. The data from the analytical instruments is converted to depth profiles by calculating the lag effects due to mud circulation. Exp 337 was carried out from July 26 to Sep 30, 2011, at offshore Shimokita peninsula, northeast Japan, targeting deep sub-seafloor biosphere in and around coal bed. Data from the hole C0020A, which was drilled to 2466 mbsf with riser drilling, provided insights into bio-geochemical process through the depth of the hole. In this presentation, we show the design of Chikyu's new mud gas monitoring system, with preliminary data from Exp 337.

  16. Accomplishments in bioastronautics research aboard International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uri, John J.; Haven, Cynthia P.

    2005-05-01

    The tenth long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard International Space Station (ISS), continuing a permanent human presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, expedition crews have been operators and subjects for 18 Human Life Sciences investigations, to gain a better understanding of the effects of long-duration space flight on the crewmembers and of the environment in which they live. Investigations have been conducted to study: the radiation environment in the station as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA); bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning; changes in neuromuscular reflexes; muscle forces and postflight mobility; causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance; risk of developing kidney stones; changes in pulmonary function caused by long-duration flight as well as EVA; crew and crew-ground interactions; changes in immune function, and evaluation of imaging techniques. The experiment mix has included some conducted in flight aboard ISS as well as several which collected data only pre- and postflight. The conduct of these investigations has been facilitated by the Human Research Facility (HRF). HRF Rack 1 became the first research rack on ISS when it was installed in the US laboratory module Destiny in March 2001. The rack provides a core set of experiment hardware to support investigations, as well as power, data and commanding capability, and stowage. The second HRF rack, to complement the first with additional hardware and stowage capability, will be launched once Shuttle flights resume. Future years will see additional capability to conduct human research on ISS as International Partner modules and facility racks are added to ISS. Crew availability, both as a subject count and time, will remain a major challenge to maximizing the science return from the bioastronautics research program.

  17. Gemini 12 crew receive Official welcome aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, receive Official welcome as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp after their splashdown at the end of the Gemini 12 mission.

  18. ISS Update: Launching Aboard the Soyuz to Live on the Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Mike Fossum, astronaut and Commander of Expedition 29, about his Soyuz launch experience and his insight into life aboard the station. Question...

  19. Apollo 11 spacecraft Command Module hoisted aboard U.S.S. Hornet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 spacecraft Command Module is photographed being hoisted aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic lunar landing mission. Note the flotation ring attached by Navy divers is still attached to the capsule.

  20. Apollo 11 Command Module and Mobile Quarantine Facility aboard U.S.S. Hornet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 Spacecraft Command Module (foreground) and the Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) (background) are photographed aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic lunar landing mission. The three crewmen are already in the MQF.

  1. Advanced Ionospheric Sensing using GROUP-C and LITES aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.; Finn, S. C.; Cook, T.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Bishop, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) and Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are manifested for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload. The two experiments provide technical development and risk-reduction for future DoD space weather sensors suitable for ionospheric specification, space situational awareness, and data products for global ionosphere assimilative models. In addition, the combined instrument complement of these two experiments offers a unique opportunity to study structures of the nighttime ionosphere. GROUP-C includes an advanced GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles and scintillation measurements and a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal ionospheric gradients. LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain high-cadence limb profiles of the ionosphere and thermosphere from 150-350 km altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that can be used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional plasma distribution in the orbital plane below ISS altitudes. Ionospheric irregularities, such as plasma bubbles and blobs, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry, vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and recent advancements in UV tomography, high-fidelity tomographic reconstruction of

  2. The point spread function of the soft X-ray telescope aboard Yohkoh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Acton, Loren W.; Lemen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The point spread function of the SXT telescope aboard Yohkoh has been measured in flight configuration in three different X-ray lines at White Sands Missile Range. We have fitted these data with an elliptical generalization of the Moffat function. Our fitting method consists of chi squared minimization in Fourier space, especially designed for matching of sharply peaked functions. We find excellent fits with a reduced chi squared of order unity or less for single exposure point spread functions over most of the CCD. Near the edges of the CCD the fits are less accurate due to vignetting. From fitting results with summation of multiple exposures we find a systematic error in the fitting function of the order of 3% near the peak of the point spread function, which is close to the photon noise for typical SXT images in orbit. We find that the full width to half maximum and fitting parameters vary significantly with CCD location. However, we also find that point spread functions measured at the same location are consistent to one another within the limit determined by photon noise. A 'best' analytical fit to the PSF as function of position on the CCD is derived for use in SXT image enhancemnent routines. As an aside result we have found that SXT can determine the location of point sources to about a quarter of a 2.54 arc sec pixel.

  3. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by {ital Pioneer} {ital V}{ital enus} {ital Orbiter}, {ital Compton} {ital Gamma}-{ital Ray} {ital Observatory}, and {ital Ulysses}

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, J.G.; Hurley, K.C.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Briggs, M.S.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M.L.

    1998-10-01

    Between the {ital Compton} {ital Gamma} {ital Ray} {ital Observatory} ({ital CGRO}) launch in 1991 April and the {ital Pioneer} {ital V}{ital enus} {ital Orbiter} ({ital PVO}) demise in 1992 October, concurrent coverage by {ital CGRO}, {ital PVO}, and {ital Ulysses} was obtained for several hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the {ital PVO} and {ital Ulysses} thresholds, 37 were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to {approximately}2{degree} accuracy by the {ital CGRO} Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), and three were also localized by COMPTEL. We computed arrival-time error boxes, whose larger dimensions range from about 2{prime} to several degrees and whose smaller dimensions are in the arcminute range. Twelve have areas less than 10 arcmin{sup 2}, and only four have areas greater than 1 deg{sup 2}. The area of the smallest box is 0.44 arcmin{sup 2}. We find that the overall BATSE localization accuracy for these events is consistent with the most recent stated uncertainties. This work indicates that the {ital ROSAT} soft X-ray source found within a preliminary IPN error box for GB920501 (Trig 1576) (Hurley et al.) is less likely to be the GRB counterpart than previously reported. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  4. Dwarf Wheat grown aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dwarf wheat were photographed aboard the International Space Station in April 2002. Lessons from on-orbit research on plants will have applications to terrestrial agriculture as well as for long-term space missions. Alternative agricultural systems that can efficiently produce greater quantities of high-quality crops in a small area are important for future space expeditions. Also regenerative life-support systems that include plants will be an important component of long-term space missions. Data from the Biomass Production System (BPS) and the Photosynthesis Experiment and System Testing and Operations (PESTO) will advance controlled-environment agricultural systems and will help farmers produce better, healthier crops in a small area. This same knowledge is critical to closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The BPS comprises a miniature environmental control system for four plant growth chambers, all in the volume of two space shuttle lockers. The experience with the BPS on orbit is providing valuable design and operational lessons that will be incorporated into the Plant Growth Units. The objective of PESTO was to flight verify the BPS hardware and to determine how the microgravity environment affects the photosynthesis and metabolic function of Super Dwarf wheat and Brassica rapa (a member of the mustard family).

  5. Mechanistic studies of polymeric samples exposed aboard STS 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava; Chung, Shirley Y.; Oda, Keri L.

    1987-01-01

    The early Shuttle flights and the attendant opportunity to deploy material samples to the near-Earth space environment, along well-defined trajectories and accompanied by detailed characterization of these samples prior to and following the flight exposure, have brought to light several novel phenomena associated with interaction of these materials with the space environment. JPL, in coordination with other NASA Centers, has carried out a research program to study the degradation and oxidation processes caused by interaction of these materials with atomic oxygen at an energy of 5 eV. In addition, energetic atomic oxygen is believed to be responsible for the shuttle glow first observed during the flight of STS-3. The shuttle glow phenomenon has been extensively studied and modeled because of its long-range potential impact on optical communication schemes and its more immediate impact on the Space Telescope. This report summarizes the results of certian material degradation and erosion experiments carried out aboard STS-8 between August 30, 1983 and September 5, 1983. Based on these data, a generic degradation model has been developed for common structural polymers.

  6. The capillary flow experiments aboard the International Space Station: Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.; Jenson, Ryan; Chen, Yongkang; Collicott, Steven H.; Klatte, Jörg; Dreyer, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This paper provides a current overview of the in-flight operations and experimental results of the capillary flow experiment (CFE) performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) beginning August 2004 to present, with at least 16 operations to date by five astronauts. CFE consists of six approximately 1-2 kg experiment units designed to probe certain capillary phenomena of fundamental and applied importance, such as capillary flow in complex containers, critical wetting in discontinuous structures, and large length scale contact line dynamics. Highly quantitative video images from the simply performed experiments provide direct confirmation of the usefulness of current analytical design tools as well as provide guidance to the development of new ones. A description of the experiments, crew procedures, performances and status of the data collection and reduction is provided for the project. The specific experimental objectives are briefly introduced by way of the crew procedures and a sample of the verified theoretical predictions of the fluid behavior is provided. The potential impact of the flight experiments on the design of spacecraft fluid systems is discussed in passing.

  7. Global map based on the FIMS observations aboard STSAT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FIMS), a dual-channel instrument with 900 - 1150 A and 1350 - 1750 A passbands, was launched aboard the Korean microsatellite STSAT-1 on 2003 September 27. FIMS, with moderate spectral and angular resolutions while maintaining large fields of view, was optimized for observations of diffuse emissions such as those from hot gases in our Galaxy. About 70 percent of the sky was covered after 18 months of survey with sufficient exposure time for the long wavelength band. The dataset has been used to study the interaction between the hot gas and the cold component as well as the molecular hydrogen fluorescence emission for a variety of targets. Furthermore, it was successfully used to determine the optical properties of dust scattering and thereby the distances for several prominent clouds from the continuum observations. In the present paper, the global distribution of ion and molecular hydrogen lines will be presented although the coverage of the sky is somewhat limited. For example, topics such as the ion lines distribution in the Galactic halo regions and correlation of molecular hydrogen with dust or CO will be discussed.

  8. The solid surface combustion experiment aboard the USML-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Sacksteder, Kurt; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Ramachandra, Prashant A.; Tang, Lin; Wolverton, M. Katherine

    1994-01-01

    AA Experimental results from the five experiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. An experiment was conducted aboard STS-50/USML-1 in the solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) hardware for flame spread over a thin cellulosic fuel in a quiescent oxidizer of 35% oxygen/65% nitrogen at 1.0 atm. pressure in microgravity. The USML-1 test was the fourth of five planned experiments for thin fuels, one performed during each of five Space Shuttle Orbiter flights. Data that were gathered include gas- and solid-phase temperatures and motion picture flame images. Observations of the flame are described and compared to theoretical predictions from steady and unsteady models that include flame radiation from CO2 and H2O. Experimental results from the five esperiments indicate that flame spread rate increases with increasing ambient oxygen content and pressure. The brightness of the flame and the visible soot radiation also increase with increasing spread rate. Steady-state numerical predictions of temperature and spread rate and flame structure trends compare well with experimental results near the flame's leading edge while gradual flame evolution is captured through the unsteady model.

  9. Observations and physical interpretations of the solar wind flow properties as obtained from white light coronagraph aboard SPARTAN 201-01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard; Ofman, Leon

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona was observed with an externally occulted White Light Coronagraph (WLC) carried on the SPARTAN 201-1 spacecraft on 11-12 Apr. 1993. With observations from WLC and the ground based Mauna Loa White Light Coronagraph, a large number of polar plumes both in the north and south polar holes were traced from 1.16 to 5.5 Rs. Flow properties of the solar wind in coronal holes have been determined (Habbal et al., 1995) by using a two fluid model constrained by density profiles and scale height temperatures from the white light observations, and interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux from Ulysses' south polar passage. Provisions for acceleration by Alfven waves, as well as electron and proton heating, are included in the momentum and the energy equations respectively. The model computations fit remarkably well the empirical constraints of the two different density structures (plumes and coronal holes) for a range of input parameters. In this study we investigate the physical nature of the heating function used in the two-fluid model. Alfven waves have been suggested as the possible source of heating that accelerates the solar wind (Ofman and Davila, 1995). We utilize the density contrast observed in WLC data in the plume and ambient coronal hole region to estimate the Alfven wave frequencies responsible for heating these structures. The source heating function utilized in the two fluid model of the solar wind acceleration will be compared with the resonant Alfven wave heating function.

  10. AASE-2 in-situ tracer correlations of methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone as observed aboard the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Anderson, B. E.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Walega, J. G.; Ridley, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    We report in situ stratospheric measurements of CH4, N2O, and O3 obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 during the January-March 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition 2 field campaign. These data demonstrate a strong linear correlation between N2O and CH4 in the lower stratosphere thus indicating that both species are effective tracers of stratospheric air motion. Measurements of both species on constant geometric height surfaces indicate that significant subsidence of the arctic stratospheric air mass occurred at DC-8 altitudes over the course of the AASE-2 expedition. In addition, a widespread reduction in O3 mixing ratios (up to 20%) relative to these conserved tracers was also observed in the lower stratosphere in March as compared to January and February results.

  11. AASE-2 In-Situ Tracer Correlations of Methane Nitrous Oxide and Ozone as Observed Aboard the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Anderson, B. E.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Walgea, J. G.; Ridley, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    We report in situ stratospheric measurements of CH4, N2O, and O3 obtained aboard the NASA DC-8 during the January-March 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II field campaign. These data demonstrate a strong linear correlation between N2O and CH4 in the lower stratosphere thus indicating that both species are effective tracers of stratospheric air motion. Measurements of both species on constant geometric height surfaces indicate that significant subsidence of the arctic stratospheric air mass occurred at DC-8 altitudes over the course of the AASE-II expedition. In addition, a widespread reduction in O3 mixing ratios (up to 20%) relative to these conserved tracers was also observed in the lower stratosphere in March a compared to January and February results.

  12. Characterization of the Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity Aboard the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Roeber, D.; Achari, A.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to determine the equilibration rates of some major precipitants used in protein crystallography aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The solutions were placed in the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM) which mimic Cryschem sitting drop trays. The trays were placed in cylinders. These cylinders were placed inside a Single locker Thermal Enclosure System (STES), and were activated for different durations during the flight. Bumpers pressed against elastomers seal drops in a deactivated state during pre-flight and prior to transfer to the ISS. Activation occurs while in flight on the ISS by releasing the bumpers allowing the drops to be exposed to the reservoir. PCAM was flown to the ISS on STS 100, Flight 6A, on April 19, 2001. Six series of equilibration experiments were tested for each precipitant with a small amount of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Cylinder 10 was never activated, 7 was activated for 40 days, 8 was activated for 20 days, 9 was activated for 10 days, 11 was activated for 4 days and 12 was activated for 2 days. Upon the return to Earth by STS 104 on July 24,2001 the samples were transferred to Marshall Space Flight Center. The samples were then brought to the lab and the volumes of each sample were measured.

  13. LEO Flight Testing of GaAs on Si Solar Cells Aboard MISSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Clark, Eric B.; Ringel, Steven A.; Andre, Carrie L.; Smith, Mark A.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Maurer, William F.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Walters, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Previous research efforts have demonstrated small area (0.04 cm) GaAs on Si (GaAs/Si) solar cells with AM0 efficiencies in excess of 17%. These results were achieved on Si substrates coated with a step graded buffer of Si(x),Ge(1-x) alloys graded to 100% Ge. Recently, a 100-fold increase in device area was accomplished for these devices in preparation for on-orbit testing of this technology aboard Materials International Space Station Experiment number 5 (MISSE5). The GaAs/Si MISSE5 experiment contains five (5) GaAs/Si test devices with areas of lcm(exp 2) and 4cm(exp 4) as well as two (2) GaAs on GaAs control devices. Electrical performance data, measured on-orbit for three (3) of the test devices and one (1) of the control devices, will be telemetered to ground stations daily. After approximately one year on orbit, the MISSE5 payload will be returned to Earth for post flight evaluation. This paper will discuss the development of the GaAs/Si devices for the MISSE5 flight experiment and will present recent ground and on-orbit performance data.

  14. Pineal physiology in microgravity - Relation to rat gonadal function aboard Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Markley, Carol L.; Soliman, Magdi R. I.; Kaddis, Farida; Krasnov, Igor'

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from an analysis of pineal glands obtained for five male rats flown aboard an orbiting satellite for their melatonin, serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIA), and calcium content. Plasma 5-HT and 5-HIAA were measured. These parameters were compared to indicators of gonadal function: plasma testosterone concentration and spermatogonia development. Plasma melotonin was found to be low at the time of euthanasia and was not different among the experimental groups. Pineal calcium of flight animals was not different from ground controls. Pineal 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the flight group were significantly higher than those in ground controls. These findings suggest a possible increase in pineal 5-HT turnover in flight animals which may result in increased melatonin secretion. It is argued that the alteration of pinal 5-HT turnover and its expected effects on melatonin secretion may partially explain the lower plasma testosterone levels and 4-11 percent fewer spermatogonia cells observed in flight animals.

  15. Comparison of Directionally Solidified Samples Solidified Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, S.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Grugel, R. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). Terrestrial DS-experiments have been carried out at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. As of this writing, two dendritic metrics was measured: primary dendrite arm spacings and primary dendrite trunk diameters. We have observed that these dendrite-metrics of two samples grown in the microgravity environment show good agreements with models based on diffusion controlled growth and diffusion controlled ripening, respectively. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosegregation. Dendrite trunk diameters also show differences between the earth- and space-grown samples. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, the dendritic seed crystals were partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS was carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described and have modeled.

  16. The RTE inversion on FPGA aboard the solar orbiter PHI instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos Carrascosa, J. P.; Aparicio del Moral, B.; Ramos Mas, J. L.; Balaguer, M.; López Jiménez, A. C.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we propose a multiprocessor architecture to reach high performance in floating point operations by using radiation tolerant FPGA devices, and under narrow time and power constraints. This architecture is used in the PHI instrument that carries out the scientific analysis aboard the ESA's Solar Orbiter mission. The proposed architecture, in a SIMD flavor, is aimed to be an accelerator within the Data Processing Unit (it is composed by a main Leon processor and two FPGAs) for carrying out the RTE inversion on board the spacecraft using a relatively slow FPGA device - Xilinx XQR4VSX55-. The proposed architecture squeezes the FPGA resources in order to reach the computational requirements and improves the ground-based system performance based on commercial CPUs regarding time and power consumption. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of using this FPGA devices embedded in the SO/PHI instrument. With that goal in mind, we perform tests to evaluate the scientific results and to measure the processing time and power consumption for carrying out the RTE inversion.

  17. LEO degradation of graphite and carbon-based composites aboard Space Shuttle Flight STS-46

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Blaine R.; Synowicki, R. A.; Hale, Jeffrey S.; Devries, M. J.; Woollam, John A.; Moore, Arthur W.; Lake, Max

    1995-01-01

    Six different types of carbon and carbon-boron nitride composites were exposed to low Earth orbit aboard Space Shuttle flight STS-46. The samples received a nominal atomic oxygen fluence of 2.2 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm in 42 hours of exposure. Pyrolytic graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite showed significant degradation, and the measured erosion yield was within a factor of two of published values. The erosion yield of pyrolytic boron nitride was found to be 2.6 x 10(exp 26) cu cm/atom in plasma asher exposure, over 42 times lower than that of pyrolytic graphite. This low erosion yield makes graphite plus boron nitride mixtures quite resistant to low Earth orbit exposure. Evidence suggests that the graphitic component was preferentially etched, leaving the surface boron nitride rich. Degradation resistance increases with boron nitride composition. Carbon fiber/carbon composites degraded in low Earth orbit, and the carbon pitch binder was found to etch more easily than the graphite fibers which have much higher degradation resistance.

  18. GNSS-Reflectometry aboard ISS with GEROS: Investigation of atmospheric propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, F.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Semmling, M.

    2015-12-01

    GEROS-ISS (GNSS rEflectometry Radio Occultation and Scatterometry) is an ESA mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main mission goals are the determination of the sea surface height and surface winds. Secondary goals are monitoring of land surface parameters and atmosphere sounding using GNSS radio occultation measurements. The international scientific study GARCA (GNSS-Reflectometry Assessment of Requirements and Consolidation of Retrieval Algorithms), funded by ESA, is part of the preparations for GEROS-ISS. Major goals of GARCA are the development of an end2end Simulator for the GEROS-ISS measurements (GEROS-SIM) and the evaluation of the error budget of the GNSS reflectometry measurements. In this presentation we introduce some of the GARCA activities to quantify the influence of the ionized and neutral atmosphere on the altimetric measurements, which is a major error source for GEROS-ISS. At first, we analyse, to which extend the standard linear combination of interferometric paths at different carrier frequencies can be used to correct for the ionospheric propagation effects. Second, we make use of the tangent-linear version of our ray-trace algorithm to propagate the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile into the uncertainty of the interferometric path. For comparison the sensitivity of the interferometric path with respect to the sea surface height is computed. Though our calculations are based on a number of simplifying assumptions (the Earth is a sphere, the atmosphere is spherically layered and the ISS and GNSS satellite orbits are circular) some general conclusions can be drawn. In essence, for elevation angles above -5° at the ISS the higher-order ionospheric errors and the uncertaintiy of the inteferometric path due to the uncertainty of the underlying refractivity profile are small enough to distinguish a sea surface height of ± 0.5 m.

  19. Forced Forward Smoldering Experiments Aboard The Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Bar-Ilan, A.; Rein, G.; Urban, D. L.; Torero, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Smoldering is a basic combustion problem that presents a fire risk because it is initiated at low temperatures and because the reaction can propagate slowly in the material interior and go undetected for long periods of time. It yields a higher conversion of fuel to toxic compounds than does flaming, and may undergo a transition to flaming. To date there have been a few minor incidents of overheated and charred cables and electrical components reported on Space Shuttle flights. With the establishment of the International Space Station, and the planning of a potential manned mission to Mars, there has been an increased interest in the study of smoldering in microgravity. The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a spacecraft environment. The aim of the experiment is to provide a better fundamental understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering combustion under normal- and microgravity conditions. This in turn will aid in the prevention and control of smolder originated fires, both on earth and in spacecrafts. The microgravity smoldering experiments have to be conducted in a space-based facility because smoldering is a very slow process and consequently its study in a microgravity environment requires extended periods of time. The microgravity experiments reported here were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle. The most recent tests were conducted during the STS-105 and STS-108 missions. The results of the forward smolder experiments from these flights are reported here. In forward smolder, the reaction front propagates in the same direction as the oxidizer flow. The heat released by the heterogeneous oxidation reaction is transferred ahead of the reaction heating the unreacted fuel. The resulting increase of the virgin fuel temperature leads to the onset of the smolder reaction, and propagates through the fuel. The MSC data are compared with normal gravity

  20. Interpopulation study of medical attendance aboard a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Nahorski, Wacław Leszek

    2008-01-01

    The study carried out aboard a cruise ship in the years 1993-1998 involved ship passengers of various nationalities including 3872 Germans aged 23-94 years and 1281 Americans aged 25-94 years. Both nationality groups were divided into two age subgroups: till 64, and 65-94 years. The German younger age subgroup (mean age 53.2 years) consisted of 59% of the passengers, whereas the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 72 years) was made up of 41% of the ships passengers. On the other hand, 73% of the Americans belonged to the 65-94 years subgroup (mean age 73,4 years), whereas 27% to the younger one (mean age 52.8 years). The number of onboard consultations and their causes were determined. The occurrence of chronic illnesses in both 65-94 years subgroups was assessed by means of a questionnaire. A higher frequency of consultations was found in the Germans (24.38%) than in the Americans (14.05%) (p=0.001). The difference was particularly striking in the people over 65 years of age (30.87% of the Germans as compared with 14.22% of the Americans, p=0.001). The Germans were nearly 4-times more frequently seen than the Americans for cardio-vascular diseases and almost 3-times more often because of gastrointestinal disorders. The discrepancies in the consultation rates were mainly caused by the different insurance systems of both nations. Chronic illnesses as estimated by means of the questionnaire prevailed in the German passengers. The statistically significant differences (13.3% versus 20%, p=0.01 and 0.001) regarded the locomotor system, urinary tract diseases and a group of illnesses including neurological, ophthalmological, ear, skin, malignant diseases and diabetes.

  1. Evaluation of the MICAST #2-12 AI-7wt%Si Sample Directionally Solidified Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, Surendra N.; Ghods, Masoud; Angart, Samuel G.; Lauer, Mark; Grugel, Richard N.; Poirier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The US team of the European led "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions" (MICAST) program recently received a third Aluminum - 7wt% silicon alloy that was processed in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. The sample, designated MICAST#2-12, was directionally solidified in the Solidification with Quench Furnace (SQF) at a constant rate of 40micometers/s through an imposed temperature gradient of 31K/cm. Procedures taken to evaluate the state of the sample prior to sectioning for metallographic analysis are reviewed and rational for measuring the microstructural constituents, in particular the primary dendrite arm spacing (Lambda (sub1)), is given. The data are presented, put in context with the earlier samples, and evaluated in view of a relevant theoretical model.

  2. 78 FR 22363 - Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-Orlando Passenger Rail Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-- Orlando... service proposed by the private company, All Aboard Florida--Operations LLC (AAF), between Miami and... and its representatives will be considered in the preparation of the EIS. To ensure all...

  3. A map of D/H on Mars in the thermal infrared using EXES aboard SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; DeWitt, C.; Richter, M. J.; Greathouse, T. K.; Fouchet, T.; Montmessin, F.; Lefèvre, F.; Forget, F.; Bézard, B.; Atreya, S. K.; Case, M.; Ryde, N.

    2016-02-01

    On a planetary scale, the D/H ratio on Mars is a key diagnostic for understanding the past history of water on the planet; locally, it can help to constrain the sources and sinks of water vapor through the monitoring of condensation and sublimation processes. To obtain simultaneous measurements of H2O and HDO lines, we have used the Echelle Cross Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) instrument aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) facility to map the abundances of these two species over the Martian disk. High-resolution spectra (R = 6 × 104) were recorded in the 1383-1390 cm-1 range (7.2 μm) on April 08, 2014. Mars was very close to opposition and near northern summer solstice (Ls = 113°). Maps of the H2O and HDO mixing ratios were retrieved from the line depth ratios of weak H2O and HDO transitions divided by a weak CO2 line. As expected for this season, the H2O and HDO maps show a distinct enhancement toward polar regions, and their mixing ratios are consistent with previous measurements and with predictions by the global climate models, except at the north pole where the EXES values are weaker. We derive a disk-integrated D/H ratio of 6.8 (+1.6, -1.0) × 10-4. It is higher than the value in Earth's oceans by a factor 4.4 (+1.0, -0.6). The D/H map also shows an enhancement from southern to northern latitudes, with values ranging from about 3.5 times to 6.0 times the VSMOW (Vienna standard mean ocean water) value. The D/H distribution shows a depletion over the Tharsis mountains and is consistent with observed latitudinal variations. The variations in D/H with latitude and altitude agree with the models and with the isotope fractionation expected from condensation and sublimation processes.

  4. The X-ray spectrum of δ Orionis observed by LETGS aboard Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raassen, A. J. J.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We analyze the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the supergiant O-star δ Orionis (O9.5II) with line ratios of He-like ions and a thermal plasma model, and we examine its variability. Methods: The O-supergiant δ Ori was observed in the wavelength range 5-175 Å by the X-ray detector HRC-S in combination with the grating LETG aboard Chandra. We studied the He-like ions in combination with the UV-radiation field to determine local plasma temperatures and to establish the distance of the X-ray emitting ions to the stellar surface. We measured individual lines by means of Gaussian profiles, folded through the response matrix, to obtain wavelengths, line fluxes, half widths at half maximum (HWHM) and line shifts to characterize the plasma. We consider multitemperature models in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) to determine temperatures, emission measures, and abundances. Results: Analysis of the He-like triplets extended to N vi and C v implies ionization stratification with the hottest plasma to be found within a few stellar radii 3 R∗ (Mg xi) and the coolest farther out, far beyond the acceleration zone, up to 49 R∗ (N vi) and 75 R∗ (C v). The observed temperatures cover a range from about 0.1 to 0.7 keV, i.e., 1-8 MK. The X-ray luminosity (Lx) is ~1.5 × 1032 erg/s in the range from 0.07 to 3 keV covered by LETGS. Velocity widths of about 1040 km s-1 have been determined.

  5. Putrid gums and 'Dead Men's Cloaths': James Lind aboard the Salisbury

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Graham

    2003-01-01

    18th century sailors often suffered from scurvy. In 1747 James Lind conducted his classic experiments aboard the Salisbury, in which he cured scurvy with oranges and lemons. The Royal Navy did not introduce citrus rations until 1795. The original ship's papers allow the circumstances of the experiment to be reconstructed. The relevant patrol began in March 1747, and Lind's experiment began after 8 weeks at sea. The muster roll records almost no sickness aboard until the ship returned to Plymouth in June. This is at odds with Lind's account and suggests an antisickness official culture, which may have contributed to the neglect of his work. PMID:14645616

  6. Protein crystallization aboard the Space Shuttle and the Mir space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delbaere, Louis T. J.; Vandonselaar, Margaret; Prasad, Lata; Quail, J. W.; Birnbaum, George I.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, Karen; Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Two different protein crystallizations, namely ,the free Fab fragment of the Je142 monoclonal antibody and the complex of Fab fragment/HPr with antigen, were performed aboard the Discovery Space Shuttle flights and the Mir space station, respectively. Medium sized crystals of the Je142 Fab fragment were obtained. The Je142 Fab fragment/Hpr complex produced two medium-sized crystals after two months aboard the Mir space station. Microgravity was found to eliminate the tendency of these crystals to form clusters.

  7. Electrochemical deposition of silver crystals aboard Skylab 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.; Johnston, M. H.; Gates, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Silver crystals were grown aboard Skylab 4 by an electro-chemical reaction and subsequently returned to earth for comparison with crystals grown at 1- and 5-g. Both the Skylab and earth-grown crystals show a variety of structures. Certain tendencies in structure dependency on gravity level, however, can be discerned. In addition, downward growing dendrite streamers; upward growing chunky crystal streamers; growth along an air/liquid interface; and ribbon, film, and fiber crystal habits were observed in experiments conducted on the ground with solutions of varying concentrations. It was also observed that the crystal structures of space and ground electro-deposited silver crystals were very similar to the structures of germanium selenide and germanium telluride crystals grown in space and on the ground by a vapor transport technique. Consideration of the data leads to the conclusions that: (1) the rate of electrochemical displacement of silver ions from a 5 percent aqueous solution by copper is predominantly diffussion controlled in space and kinetically controlled in 1- and higher-g because of augmentation of mass transport by convection; (2) downward and upward crystal streamers are the result of gravity-driven convection, the flow patterns of which can be delineated. Lateral growths along an air/liquid interface are the result of surface-tension-driven convection, the pattern of which also can be delineated; (3) electrolysis in space or low-g environments can produce either dendritic crystals with more perfect microcrystalline structures or massive, single crystals with fewer defects than those grown on ground or at higher g-levels. Ribbons or films of space-grown silicon crystals would find a ready market for electronic substrate and photocell applications. Space-grown dendritic, metal crystals present the possibility of unique catalysts. Large perfect crystals of various materials are desired for a number of electronic and optical applications; and (4) vapor

  8. Hemopoietic tissue in newts flown aboard Foton M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, Elena I.; Almeida, Eduardo; Butorina, Nina N.; Nikonova, Tatyana M.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Poplinskaya, Valentina A.; Souza, Kenneth; Skidmore, Mike

    The effect of 12-day spaceflight aboard the Foton-M3 biosatellite on the hematopoietic tissue of P. waltl newts was studied. These animals used at the same time in regeneration experiments after lens and tail tip amputation. In flight and synchronous groups there were performed video recording, temperature and radiation monitoring and continuous contact (via skin) with thymidine analog BrdU. We took differential blood counts and assessed histologically the liver in the flight (F), basal (BC) and synchronous (SC)control groups of animals. In the peripheral blood, we identified neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes. Lymphocytes (L) and neutrophils (N) prevailed, accounting for about 60 and 20% of white blood cells, respectively. The spaceflight had no apparent effect on the differential blood count in the F group: neither the L and N contents nor the maturing to mature N - ratio differed from those in the control groups. No significant differences between F, SC and BC groups were observed with respect to the structure of hematopoietic areas and the liver morphology. As in Foton-M2, BrdU labeled cells revealed in blood as well as in the hemopoietic areas of the liver. However, in previous experiments performed at satellites Bion-10 and Foton-M2 the changes in peripheral blood contents were registered in operated F newts, and we supposed it could be the result of additive effects of spaceflight factors and stimulation of reparative potency and stress due to surgical operation. Possibly, the temperature conditions also may provide some influence on blood cell content of newts that belong to poikilothermic animals. Thus, in present experiment F and SC groups were reared in the same temperature regims, whereas it was nearly 3o C differences between SC and F groups exposed on Foton-M2. At the same time as it was found in experiments on Bion-11 and Foton-M2 spaceflight factors did not affect on differential blood counts of intact non

  9. Modified ECC ozone sonde for long-duration flights aboard isopicnic drifting balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheusi, Francois; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clénet, Antoine; Fontaine, Alain; Jambert, Corinne; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2015-04-01

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPB) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (owing to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPB. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electrochemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, a strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Consequently, the measurement sequence is typically composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a one- to two-minute acquisition period. All time intervals can be adjusted before and during the flight. Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 are first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during summer field campaings in 2012 and 2013 (TRAQA and ChArMEx programmes). BLPB drifting

  10. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  11. Atmospheric and precipitation sounding with polarimetric radio-occultations aboard PAZ LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padulles, Ramon; Cardellach, Estel; Tomás, Sergio; Oliveras, Santi; Rius, Antonio; de la Torre, Manuel; Turk, Joseph; Ao, Chi; Kursinski, Robert; Shreiner, Bill; Ector, Dave; Cucurull, Lidia; Wickert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation experiment aboard the PAZ Low Earth Orbiter (ROHP-PAZ) is a mission of opportunity: The Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICINN) approved in 2009 a proposal to include a polarimetric Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio-Occultation (RO) payload on board of the Spanish Earth Observation satellite PAZ. This will be a new technique that has never been tested before, that aims to improve the knowledge of the precipitation through simultaneous thermodynamic and vertical rain profiles. The concept is similar to that used in some polarimetric weather radars: to measure the differential phase shift between the two polarimetric antennas, although here we will use the forward scattering geometry instead of the backscattering.The depolarization effect increases as the propagation line aligns with the plane of the drops' flattening (nominally perpendicular to the local gravity, i.e., parallel to the local horizon). The RO signals cross the lower troposphere tangentially, i.e., along the local horizon, which should maximize the depolarization effect. The satellite launch is scheduled for March 2015, and it will be followed by a 6-month commissioning phase period and has an expected life of 7 years, with a goal of 10 years. A sensitivity analysis have been performed, showing that we should be able to detect the 90% of all the events with along-ray averaged rain rate higher than 5 mm/h. Also, a ground field campaign has been conducted prior to the launch of the satellite. Results from the campaign also show a good correlation between phase shifts increases and heavy rain events. We will present here the status of the mission, which will have been launched few weeks before the EGU, together with some preliminary data analysis from both the actual satellite data and the prior-to-launch work.

  12. Results from the first five years of radiation exposure monitoring aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golightly, M.; Semones, E.; Shelfer, T.; Johnson, S.; Zapp, N.; Weyland, M.

    NASA uses a variety of radiation monitoring devices aboard the International Space Station as part of its space flight radiation health program. This operational monitoring system consists of passive dosimeters, internal and external charged particle telescopes, and a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Sixteen passive dosimeters, each consisting of TLD-100, TLD-300, TLD-600, and TLD-700 chips in a small acrylic holder, are placed throughout the habitable volume of the ISS. The TEPC and internal charged particle telescopes are portable and can be relocated to multiple locations in the Lab Module or Service Module. The external charged particle telescopes are mounted to a fixed boom attached to the starboard truss. Passive dosimeters were used in eleven monitoring periods over the period 20 May 1999 to 04 May 2003. Over this period exposure rates from TLD-100 measurements ranged from 0.120-0.300 mGy/d. Exposure rates inside the habitable volume are non-uniform: exposures vary by a factor of ˜ 1.7 from minimum to maximum, with the greatest non-uniformity occurring in the Lab Module. Highest daily exposure rates are near the window in the Lab Module, inside the Joint Airlock, and the sleep stations inside the Service Module, while the lowest rates occur inside the polyethylene-lined Temporary Sleep Station in the Lab Module, adjacent to the port ``arm'' of Node 1, and the aft end of the Service Module. The minimum exposure rates as measured by the passive dosimeters occurred in the spring of 2002, very close to the solar F10.7 emission maximum (Feb 2002), and two years after the sunspot maximum (Apr 2000). Exposure rates have since gradually increased as the sun's activity transitions towards solar minimum conditions. Since 01 Jun 2002, dose rates measured by the IV-CPDS, estimated from the count rate in first detector of the telescope's stack, ranged from ˜ 0.170-0.390 mGy/d. The maximum measured dose rate occurred 28 Oct 2003 during the ``Halloween

  13. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  14. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  15. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  16. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  17. 8 CFR 286.2 - Fee for arrival of passengers aboard commercial aircraft or commercial vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS IMMIGRATION USER FEE § 286.2 Fee for arrival of passengers aboard..., per individual is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection of each... Act, per individual, is charged and collected by the Commissioner for the immigration inspection at...

  18. Gemini 12 crew cut cake aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    A happy Gemini 12 prime crew slice a cake made aboard the aircraft carrier, U.S.S. Wasp. Astronauts James A. Lovell Jr. (left), command pilot, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., pilot, had just been picked up from the splashdown area by helicopter.

  19. Gemini 9-A astronauts welcomed aboard U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan (right) receive a warm welcome as they arrive aboard the prime recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. John C. Stonesifer, with the Manned Spacecraft Center's Landing and Recovery Division, stands next to microphone at left. The Gemini 9 spacecraft can be seen in the right background of the view.

  20. Keys to the Common Genera of Marine Plants Taken Aboard the Orange County Floating Marine Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, H. R.

    Provided is a dichotomous key to the common genera of marine algae and angiosperms which are taken aboard the Orange County Floating Marine Laboratory. It is designed primarily for use by junior and senior high school students. Drawings of representative members of the various genera are included. This work was prepared under an ESEA Title III…

  1. STS-47 MS Davis and MS Jemison with LBNP device in SLJ module aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (left) and MS Mae C. Jemison prepare the lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device for the LBNP experiment in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Displayed on the aft end cone in the background is an Auburn University banner.

  2. Living at Sea: Learning from Communal Life Aboard Sail Training Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers features of domestic and social life aboard sail training vessels, exploring the particular character of life at sea, and how these features contribute to the distinctive character of sail training experience as a context for learning. Methodologically, the study lies in the sociological tradition of ethnography, focusing on…

  3. 78 FR 77484 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-13; 44 U.S.C. 3507). DATES: Written comments...

  4. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service... proposed rule that appeared in the Federal Register of March 8, 2013. The document proposed rules for...

  5. All Aboard the "Titanic": Character Journals Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Mia Lynn

    1999-01-01

    Describes how a 7th-grade reading class used character journals to explore the sailing and the sinking of the "Titanic." Describes how the students took ownership of their research and enjoyed reading and writing about actual events as they became a passenger or crew member aboard the "Titanic," explored the ship, experienced…

  6. 76 FR 76430 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Documents Required Aboard Private Aircraft AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security...-0058. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland Security will...

  7. Return and Reunion: A Psychoeducational Program Aboard U.S. Navy Ships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisure, Karen R.; Arnold-Mann, Jeanne

    1992-01-01

    Notes that since 1980 Navy Family Services Centers have provided deployment programs to Naval personnel and families to prepare for separation and reunion. Highlights Return and Reunion program given aboard U.S. Navy ships returning from deployments and designed to increase resources to respond effectively to normative and stressful event of…

  8. Apollo 11 crewmen arrive aboard U.S.S. Hornet during recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 crewmen, wearing biological isolation garments, arrive aboard the U.S.S. Hornet during recovery operations in the central Pacific. They are walking toward the Mobile Quarantine Facility, in which they will be confined until they arrive at the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory. southwest of Hawaii.

  9. President Nixon welcomes the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon welcomes the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. Already confined to the Mobile Quarantine Facility are (left to right) Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot.

  10. Astronaut John Glenn aboard the U.S.S. Randolph after MA-6 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 space flight, relaxes aboard the carrier U.S.S. Randolph following his earth-orbital mission. Glenn was transferred to the Randolph from the U.S.S. Noa after his return from his earth-orbital mission.

  11. Assessing the impact of public health interventions on the transmission of pandemic H1N1 influenza a virus aboard a Peruvian navy ship

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Delphis M; Hora, Ricardo A; Murillo, Anarina; Wong, Juan F; Torre, Armando J; Wang, David; Boulay, Darbi; Hancock, Kathy; Katz, Jacqueline M; Ramos, Mariana; Loayza, Luis; Quispe, Jose; Reaves, Erik J; Bausch, Daniel G; Chowell, Gerardo; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited data exist on transmission dynamics and effectiveness of control measures for influenza in confined settings. Objectives To investigate the transmission dynamics of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A outbreak aboard a Peruvian Navy ship and quantify the effectiveness of the implemented control measures. Methods We used surveillance data and a simple stochastic epidemic model to characterize and evaluate the effectiveness of control interventions implemented during an outbreak of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A aboard a Peruvian Navy ship. Results The serological attack rate for the outbreak was 49·1%, with younger cadets and low-ranking officers at greater risk of infection than older, higher-ranking officers. Our transmission model yielded a good fit to the daily time series of new influenza cases by date of symptom onset. We estimated a reduction of 54·4% in the reproduction number during the period of intense control interventions. Conclusion Our results indicate that the patient isolation strategy and other control measures put in place during the outbreak reduced the infectiousness of isolated individuals by 86·7%. Our findings support that early implementation of control interventions can limit the spread of influenza epidemics in confined settings. PMID:24506160

  12. Stability of Dosage Forms in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Brian J.; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick; Younker, Diane R.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf lives are essential for successful space medical operations. Stability of pharmaceuticals, therefore, is of paramount importance for assuring the health and wellness of astronauts on future space exploration missions. Unique physical and environmental factors of space missions may contribute to the instability of pharmaceuticals, e.g., radiation, humidity and temperature variations. Degradation of pharmaceutical formulations can result in inadequate efficacy and/or untoward toxic effects, which could compromise astronaut safety and health. Methods: Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms (liquid, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the International Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-121). One of the 4 kits was stored on the Shuttle and the other 3 were stored on the International Space Station (ISS) for return to Earth at 6-month interval aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit. The kit stored on the Shuttle was returned to Earth aboard STS-121 and 2 kits from ISS were returned on STS 117 and STS-122. Results: Analysis of standard physical and chemical parameters of degradation was completed for pharmaceuticals returned by STS-121 after14 days, STS - 117 after11 months and STS 122 after 19 months storage aboard ISS. Analysis of all flight samples along with ground-based matching controls was completed and results were compiled. Conclusion: Evaluation of results from the shuttle (1) and ISS increments (2) indicate that the number of formulations degraded in space increased with duration of storage in space and was higher in space compared to their ground-based counterparts. Rate of degradation for some of the formulations tested was faster in space than on Earth. Additionally, some of the formulations included in the medical kits were unstable, more so in space than on the ground. These results indicate that the

  13. Testing a polarimetric cloud imager aboard research vessel Polarstern: comparison of color-based and polarimetric cloud detection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Barta, András; Horváth, Gábor; Horváth, Ákos; Egri, Ádám; Blahó, Miklós; Barta, Pál; Bumke, Karl; Macke, Andreas

    2015-02-10

    Cloud cover estimation is an important part of routine meteorological observations. Cloudiness measurements are used in climate model evaluation, nowcasting solar radiation, parameterizing the fluctuations of sea surface insolation, and building energy transfer models of the atmosphere. Currently, the most widespread ground-based method to measure cloudiness is based on analyzing the unpolarized intensity and color distribution of the sky obtained by digital cameras. As a new approach, we propose that cloud detection can be aided by the additional use of skylight polarization measured by 180° field-of-view imaging polarimetry. In the fall of 2010, we tested such a novel polarimetric cloud detector aboard the research vessel Polarstern during expedition ANT-XXVII/1. One of our goals was to test the durability of the measurement hardware under the extreme conditions of a trans-Atlantic cruise. Here, we describe the instrument and compare the results of several different cloud detection algorithms, some conventional and some newly developed. We also discuss the weaknesses of our design and its possible improvements. The comparison with cloud detection algorithms developed for traditional nonpolarimetric full-sky imagers allowed us to evaluate the added value of polarimetric quantities. We found that (1) neural-network-based algorithms perform the best among the investigated schemes and (2) global information (the mean and variance of intensity), nonoptical information (e.g., sun-view geometry), and polarimetric information (e.g., the degree of polarization) improve the accuracy of cloud detection, albeit slightly.

  14. Measurement of direct current electric fields and plasma flow speeds in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, K.; Howard, R. L.; Monson, S. J.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    During the encounter of Ulysses with Jupiter, we have measured two components of the dc electric field and deduced from them the flow speed in the Io toms, as well as the presence of a polar cap region end what we interpret as a cleft region. Within the toms the flow speed is approximately equal to the speed of a plasma corotating with Jupiter but has significant deviations. The dominant deviations have an apparent period of the order of Jupiter's rotation period, but this might be a latitudinal effect. Other important periods are about 40 min and less than 25 min.

  15. STS-55 MS3 Harris conducts HOLOP experiment at SL-D2 Rack 11 aboard OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-55 Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr works at Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) Rack 11 with the Holographic Optics Laboratory (HOLOP) aboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  16. Comparisons of wartime and peacetime disease and non-battle injury rates aboard ships of the British Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Blood, C G; Pugh, W M; Gauker, E D; Pearsall, D M

    1992-12-01

    Disease and non-battle injury rates were computed for ships of the British Royal Navy which were deployed during wartime and peacetime operations. The wartime sick list admission rates were lower aboard carriers, battleships, and cruisers when compared with their counterparts deployed in peacetime; rate differences for battleships and cruisers were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Several categories of disease also yielded significant differences in the wartime/peacetime contrasts. Infections and parasitic disorders aboard carriers, skin diseases aboard battleships, and skin diseases, injuries, and generative system disorders occurring on cruisers were all lower during wartime than on peacetime deployments. Illness rates also varied by ship type, with the lowest rates evidenced aboard carriers.

  17. STS-56 Earth observation of a Canadian sunrise taken aboard Discovery, OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    STS-56 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, is of a Canadian sunrise. Low clouds on the eastern horizon are blocking most of the direct sunlight as the sun climbs over the northern Atlantic in this Canadian sunrise scene. Bright yellow colors are sun rays which penetrate through the cloud-free areas while the reds in the scene are primarily illuminated clouds in the troposphere.

  18. Soyuz 24 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz. This is the first time all samples were acquired with the mini-grab samplers. The toxicological assessment of 15 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown. The recoveries of the 3 internal standards, C(13)-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene, from the GSCs averaged 75, 97 and 79%, respectively. Formaldehyde badges were not returned on Soyuz 24

  19. STS-47 MS Jemison works in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison appears to be clicking her heels in zero gravity in the center aisle of the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Making her first flight in space, Dr. Jemison was joined by five other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for eight days of research in support of the SLJ mission, a joint effort between Japan and United States.

  20. STS-47 crew in SLJ module make notes during shift changeover aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    During STS-47 aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, six of the seven crewmembers supporting the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) mission share this shift changeover scene in the spacelab science module. From the foreground, are Mission Specialist (MS) Mae C. Jemison, MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee, Commander Robert L. Gibson, MS N. Jan Davis, Pilot Curtis L. Brown, Jr, and Payload Specialist Mamoru Mohri. Mohri represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). Photo was taken by MS Jerome Apt.

  1. Apollo 15 prime crew aboard NASA Motor Vessel Retriever water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The prime crewmen of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission, aboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever, talk with the assigned lead underwater demolition team (UDT) swimmer for recovery operations of the mission. The crewmen were in the Gulf of Mexico to take part in water egress training. From left to right are U.S. Navy Lt. Fred W. Schmidt, Astronauts Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot; James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot; and David R. Scott, commander.

  2. Sex Differences in Health Care Requirements Aboard U.S. Navy Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-20

    some frequency, the number of cases assigned this diagnosis was somewhat inflated because sick call records often lacked sufficient information for a...health care provider seen, the type of diagnosis substantially affected whether the patient was seen by the medical officer or a hospital corpsman [W...allowance list. Given the importance of accurate pregnancy test results, particularly in the diagnosis of female abdominal or pelvic symptoms aboard

  3. System-level Analysis of Chilled Water Systems Aboard Naval Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-24

    System-level Analysis of Chilled Water Systems Aboard Naval Ships Hessam Babaee, Julie Chalfant, Chryssostomos Chryssostomidis MIT Sea Grant...Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA Email: babaee@mit.edu Amiel B. Sanfiorenzo † Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance ... water cooling systems using first principles. We begin with a short list of required inputs appropriate to the early stages of design: 1) Basic ship

  4. Video- Making a Film of Water Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Saturday Morning Science, the science of opportunity series of applied experiments and demonstrations, performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by Expedition 6 astronaut Dr. Don Pettit, revealed some remarkable findings. In this video, Dr. Pettit demonstrates how to make films of pure water. Watch the video to see how he does it, see his two-dimensional beaker, and marvel along with him at how tenacious the films are.

  5. Apollo 12 crew welcomed aboard U.S.S. Hornet by Rear Admiral Donald David

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Rear Admiral Donald C. David, Commander, Manned Spacecraft Recovery Force, Pacific, welcomes the crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery vessel for the mission. A color guard was also on hand for the welcoming ceremonies. Inside the Mobile Quarantine Facility are (left to right) Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot.

  6. Remote sensing of XCO2 and XCH4 above the Atlantic from aboard the research vessel Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klappenbach, F.; Bertleff, M.; Julian, K.; Hase, F.; Gisi, M.; Butz, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global measurements of the column average dry air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (XCO2) and methane (XCH4) are of great interest for inferring information on sources and sinks of these two major anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Satellite remote sensing of XCO2 and XCH4 is an emerging tool which promises to supplement the traditional ground-based in-situ sampling approach by vast data coverage. The usefulness of XCO2 and XCH4measured by satellites such as GOSAT and OCO-2, however, crucially depends on precision and accuracy. Therefore, validation by ground-based remote sensing observations is of major importance. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) has been designed to meet these validation needs. It covers a few tens of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers operating at very high spectral resolution. Most of these instruments are located on continental regions especially in the northern hemisphere. However, oceanic regions are sparsely validated. In the framework of the development of a robust, small and versatile spectrometer for harsh environments, we operated two instruments, a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EM27/SUN by Bruker) and a custom-built grating spectrometer aboard the German research vessel Polarstern. Here, we will present and discuss instrument performance as well as the retrieved XCO2 and XCH4 mixing ratios along the ship track from Capetown (SA) to Bremerhaven (GER) during the 5-week cruise in March 2014. We assess the usefulness of the dataset for validating GOSAT ocean glint observations.

  7. The Evaluation of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction. As community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a health concern in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts aboard ISS or the space station itself. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis of archived ISS isolates confirmed our earlier studies indicating a transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers. In addition, this fingerprinting also indicated a transfer between crewmembers and their environment. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and the environment, phenotypic evaluations indicated minimal methicillin resistance. However, positive results for the Penicillin Binding Protein, indicative of the presence of the mecA gene, were detected in multiple isolates of archived Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Phenotypic analysis of these isolates confirmed their resistance to methicillin. While MRSA has not been isolated aboard ISS, the potential exists for the transfer of the gene, mecA, from coagulase negative environmental Staphylococcus to S. aureus creating MRSA strains. This study suggests the need to expand environmental monitoring aboard long duration exploration spacecraft to include antibiotic resistance profiling.

  8. A Survey of Radiation Measurements Made Aboard Russian Spacecraft in Low-Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Benton, E. V.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate prediction of ionizing radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit is necessary in order to minimize risks to astronauts, spacecraft and instrumentation. To this end, models of the radiation environment, the AP-8 trapped proton model and the AE-8 trapped electron model, have been developed for use by spacecraft designers and mission planners. It has been widely acknowledged for some time now by the space radiation community that these models possess some major shortcomings. Both models cover only a limited trapped particle energy region and predictions at low altitudes are extrapolated from higher altitude data. With the launch of the first components of the International Space Station with numerous constellations of low-Earth orbit communications satellites now being planned and deployed, the inadequacies of these trapped particle models need to be addressed. Efforts are now underway both in the U.S. and in Europe to refine the AP-8 and AE-8 trapped particle models. This report is an attempt to collect a significant fraction of data for use in validation of trapped radiation models at low altitudes.

  9. Transmittance measurements of ultra violet and visible wavelength interference filters flown aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Thomas A.; Smajkiewicz, Ali

    1991-01-01

    A set of ten interference filters for the UV and VIS spectral region were flown on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Tray B-8 along with earth radiation budget (ERB) components from the Eppley Laboratory. Transmittance changes and other degradation observed after the return of the filters to Barr are reported. Substrates, coatings, and (where applicable) cement materials are identified. In general, all filters except those containing lead compounds survived well. Metal dielectric filters for the UV developed large numbers of pinholes which caused an increase in transmittance. Band shapes and spectral positioning, however, did not change.

  10. Measurements of Optical Turbulence Parameters Aboard the Aircraft Carrier USS LEXINGTON.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-30

    EFFECTS ON SHIP-TO-SHIP TRACKER PERFORMANCE ...... 10 E. FREQUENCY SPECTRA OF MICROTHERMAL FLUCTUATIONS ............. 13 9. CONCLUSIONS...in Fig. 2. It consisted of a Contel model MT-2 microthermal unit with modified probe system as discussed below, a RMS log amplifier, a HP 59313A 2 oI...probe system provided with the Contel system(4 ) was replaced with the probe assembly built for use in the Harris microthermal probe system(5 ). The

  11. The Body Burden of Organic Vapors in Artificial Air Trial Measurements Aboard a Moored Submarine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-19

    of organic vapors from exposure to submarines. Uhei absorpt ion ot organic vap~r)rs ourin11" soy -or joo patrol is analogous S to inna in~j op...L TABLE 4. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPONENTS IDENTIFIED IN BREATH SAMPLE FROM SAILOR ON BOARD USS GATO [SAMPLE FILE SUEAO4.DAT...SAMPLE FROM SAILOR ON BOARD USS GATO [SAMIPLE FILE SUEAO4.DATJ (continued) Spec Relative No. MW Formula 1denti f ication Peak Area (X104) 562 100 CH62

  12. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at approximately 2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (10-10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (<1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an 'apple'-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a

  13. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Wing C.; Singh, Nagendra; Moore, Thomas E.; Craven, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the POLAR satellite is studied by using a 3-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 4050Volts due to the photoelectrons emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, an ion-rich Xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at about 2Volts. Accordingly, in our 3-dimensional PIC simulation, we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2Volts as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the Xenon plasma in the sheath (approx. 10 - 10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (less than 1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations, the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an "Apple" shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission, a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Detection Experiment (TIDE) detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations, it takes about a hundred electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi-steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. Using the steady state sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a highly supersonic polar wind flow. The detected ions' velocity distribution shows significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian in the

  14. Peculiarities of lens and tail regeneration detected in newts after spaceflight aboard Foton M3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Almeida, Eduardo; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Domaratskaya, Elena; Aleinikova, Karina; Souza, Kenneth; Skidmore, Mike; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.

    In September 2007 the joint, 12 day long experiment was carried out aboard Russian satellite Foton M3. The goal of the experiment was to study eye lens, tail and forelimb toe regeneration in adult 16 newts (Pl. waltl.) operated 10 days before taking-off. In spaceflight and synchronous ground control we used video recording, temperature and irradiation control, as well as constant availability of thymidine analog BrdU for its absorption via animals' skin. New techniques allowed us to analyze animals' behavior in hyperand microgravity periods of time, to take proper account of spaceflight factors, and measure accumulated pools of DNA-synthesizing cells in regenerating tissues. All tissue specimens obtained from animals were isolated in the day of landing and then prepared for morphological, immunochemical and molecular investigations. Synchronous control was shifted for two days and reproduced flight conditions except changes of gravity influence. As a result in flown animals as compared with synchronous ground control we found lens regeneration of 0.5-1 stage speeded up and an increased BrdU+ (S-phase) cell number in eye cornea, growth zone, limbus and newly forming lens. These features of regeneration were accompanied by an increase of FGF2 expression in eye growth zone and heat shock protein (HSP90) induction purely in retinal macroglial cells of regenerating eyes. Toe regeneration rate was equal and achieved the stage of accomplished healing of amputation area in both groups - "flown" and control animals. We found no essential differences in tail regeneration rate and tail regenerate sizes in the newts exposed to space and on ground. In both groups tail regeneration reached the stage IV-V when tail length and square were around 4.4 mm and 15.5 mm2, correspondingly. However we did observe remarkable changes of tail regenerate form and some of pigmentation. Computer morphometrical analysis showed that only in ground control animals the evident dorso

  15. Measuring $\

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  16. Crop evapotranspiration calculation using infrared thermometers aboard center pivots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling using remotely sensed surface temperature can result in equal or greater crop yield and crop water use efficiency compared with irrigation scheduling using in-situ soil water profile measurements. Crop evapotranspiration (ETc) is useful for irrigation scheduling, and can be cal...

  17. Mid-Pacific Ground-Truth Data For Validation of the CrIMSS Sensor Suite Aboard Suomi-NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollner, A. K.; Wessel, J.; Gaab, K. M.; Cardoza, D. M.; LaLumondiere, S. D.; Karuza, P.; Caponi, D.; Lotshaw, W. T.; Nalli, N. R.; Reale, T.; Divakarla, M.; Gambacorta, A.; Barnet, C.; Maddy, E. S.; Tan, C.; Xiong, X.; Porter, O.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerospace Transportable Lidar System 2 (ATLS-2) provides ground truth humidity and temperature data for the testing and evaluation of instruments aboard environmental satellites. The Aerospace ground-truth data consist of collocated state-of-the art lidar and radiosonde observations (RAOBs). The lidar system consists of a pulsed UV transmitter, 36-inch collection telescope, and detection channels for water Raman, nitrogen Raman, and Rayleigh/Mie scattering. All channels are separated into two altitude bins to improve the dynamic range of the system. Dedicated balloon-borne radiosondes are Vaisala RS-92, processed with the current version of the Digicora-III software. The synergy between the Raman lidar data and radiosonde data produce high accuracy, quality-controlled vertical profiles of humidity (0 - 20 km) and temperature (0 - 60 km). Starting in May 2012, The Aerospace Corporation has exercised ATLS-2 to collect dedicated ground truth data sets in support of calibration and validation (cal/val) efforts for the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) aboard the Suomi-National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Data sets are collected from the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on the west coast of Kauai and are timed to be coincident with S-NPP overpasses. The Aerospace PMRF datasets complement the ensemble of similar datasets collected from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and NOAA Aerosols and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) sites, which are compared to CrIMSS Environmental Data Records (EDRs) by the NOAA/NESDIS/STAR cal/val team for validation of algorithm performance and algorithm improvement. In addition to providing the only dedicated CrIMSS data in the mid-pacific, The Aerospace Corporation was the first site to provide ground truth data to the EDR cal/val team. As a result, ATLS-2 data sets served as the initial benchmarks for EDR performance testing. Details of the ATLS-2 system and data products as well

  18. Microscale packed bed reactor for controlled hydrogen peroxide decomposition as a fuel cell oxidant aboard unmanned undersea vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, E.; Burke, A. A.; Ocampo, M.; Besser, R. S.

    The multiphase catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen is notoriously susceptible to thermal runaway (heat of reaction: -98 kJ mol -1). The high surface area to volume ratio (S/ V) in a microscale packed bed (MPB) reactor (radius 0.5 mm) was investigated for reducing the risk of thermal runaway during hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen intended as a fuel cell oxidant aboard an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV). A microscale reactor channel with a S/ V of ∼2 × 10 3 m 2 m -3 simulated under convective cooling generated a significant heat rise (T rise ∼ 100 K), whereas a microreactor with a higher S/ V (∼200 × 10 3 m 2 m -3) achieved thermal control (T rise < 10 K) over the simulated reaction zone. Although thermal management was successfully accomplished using the higher S/ V, experimental conversions of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen (5-18%) measured from the outlet were lower than simulated conversions (38-63%). Simulation assumptions, such as homogeneously dispersed flow and perfect catalyst interaction among other factors, contributed to the discrepancies between the simulated and experimental degrees of peroxide conversion to oxygen. Even though thermal control of the MPB was achieved, this work indicates that mass transfer limitations are a factor in the MPB reactor during a multiphase reaction, like decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, and suggests means to overcome them even on the microscale level.

  19. Clear Sky Column Closure Studies of Urban-Marine and Mineral-Dust Aerosols Using Aircraft, Ship, Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements in ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Oestroem, Elisabeth; Noone, Kevin J.; Durkee, Philip A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gordon, Howard R.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Bates, Timothy S.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), European urban-marine and African mineral-dust aerosols were measured aboard the Pelican aircraft, the Research Vessel Vodyanitskiy from the ground and from satellites.

  20. Characterization of the RPW Electric Antenna System aboard Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettemeier, D.; Rucker, H. O.; Oswald, T.; Sampl, M.; Fischer, G.; Macher, W.; Maksimovic, M.

    2009-12-01

    Radio and Plasma Waves Experiment The Radio and Plasma Waves experiment (RPW) is unique amongst the Solar Orbiter instruments in that it makes both important in situ and remote-sensing measurements. It is of prime importance for the Solar Orbiter mission. RPW will perform measurements to determine the properties, dynamics and interactions of plasma, fields and particles in the near-Sun heliosphere. It will participate in the investigation of the links between the solar surface, corona and inner heliosphere. RPW will explore, at all latitudes, the energetics, dynamics and fine-scale structure of the Sun’s magnetized atmosphere. More specifically, RPW will measure magnetic and electric fields in high time resolution using a number of sensors, to determine the characteristics of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in the solar wind from almost DC to 20 MHz. Electric Antenna System A novel electric antenna design is proposed for the RPW experiment. It consists of a set of three identical monopoles, each of a total length of more than 6 meters, deployed from the corners of the spacecraft and perpendicular to the spacecraft-Sun axis. Each of the three antennas rods has a length of 5m and is mounted on a boom. The antennas are equally spaced, so the angles between the antennas are 120°. Simulation of the Antenna System Performance The electromagnetic wave reception properties of the spacecraft antenna system are influenced by the currents flowing on the conductive surface of the spacecraft body and the impedances at the foot points of the antenna rods. In the specific case of Solar Orbiter the spacecraft body and the antenna system structure is not yet finally defined, however the preliminary known schematics enable a first estimate of the effective length vectors. The foot point voltages for all antenna elements are calculated for linear polarized waves, incident from different directions. Applying the reciprocity theorem a full polarimetric characterization of

  1. Multi-Antenna Radar Systems for Doppler Rain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen; Tanelli, Simone; Siqueira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Use of multiple-antenna radar systems aboard moving high-altitude platforms has been proposed for measuring rainfall. The basic principle of the proposed systems is a variant of that of along-track interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems used previously to measure ocean waves and currents.

  2. Studies of soundings and imagings measurements from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suomi, V. E.

    1973-01-01

    Soundings and imaging measurements from geostationary satellites are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) meteorological data processing techniques, (2) sun glitter, (3) cloud growth rate study, satellite stability characteristics, and (4) high resolution optics. The use of perturbation technique to obtain the motion of sensors aboard a satellite is described. The most conditions, and measurement errors. Several performance evaluation parameters are proposed.

  3. Droplet Combustion Experiments Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Nayagam, Vedha; Hicks, Michael C.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Dryer, Frederick L.; Farouk, Tanvir; Shaw, Benjamin D.; Suh, Hyun Kyu; Choi, Mun Y.; Liu, Yu Cheng; Avedisian, C. Thomas; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-10-01

    This paper summarizes the first results from isolated droplet combustion experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS). The long durations of microgravity provided in the ISS enable the measurement of droplet and flame histories over an unprecedented range of conditions. The first experiments were with heptane and methanol as fuels, initial droplet droplet diameters between 1.5 and 5.0 m m, ambient oxygen mole fractions between 0.1 and 0.4, ambient pressures between 0.7 and 3.0 a t m and ambient environments containing oxygen and nitrogen diluted with both carbon dioxide and helium. The experiments show both radiative and diffusive extinction. For both fuels, the flames exhibited pre-extinction flame oscillations during radiative extinction with a frequency of approximately 1 H z. The results revealed that as the ambient oxygen mole fraction was reduced, the diffusive-extinction droplet diameter increased and the radiative-extinction droplet diameter decreased. In between these two limiting extinction conditions, quasi-steady combustion was observed. Another important measurement that is related to spacecraft fire safety is the limiting oxygen index (LOI), the oxygen concentration below which quasi-steady combustion cannot be supported. This is also the ambient oxygen mole fraction for which the radiative and diffusive extinction diameters become equal. For oxygen/nitrogen mixtures, the LOI is 0.12 and 0.15 for methanol and heptane, respectively. The LOI increases to approximately 0.14 (0.14 O 2/0.56 N 2/0.30 C O 2) and 0.17 (0.17 O 2/0.63 N 2/0.20 C O 2) for methanol and heptane, respectively, for ambient environments that simulated dispersing an inert-gas suppressant (carbon dioxide) into a nominally air (1.0 a t m) ambient environment. The LOI is approximately 0.14 and 0.15 for methanol and heptane, respectively, when helium is dispersed into air at 1 atm. The experiments also showed unique burning behavior for large heptane droplets. After the

  4. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, I D; Akatov YuA; Vaulina, E N; Kostina, L N; Marenny, A M; Portman, A I; Rusin, S V; Benton, E V

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  5. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  6. Commercial opportunities in bioseparations and physiological testing aboard Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Cell Research (CCR) is a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space which has as its main goal encouraging industry-driven biomedical/biotechnology space projects. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will provide long duration, crew-tended microgravity environments which will enhance the opportunities for commercial biomedical/biotechnology projects in bioseparations and physiological testing. The CCR bioseparations program, known as USCEPS (for United States Commercial Electrophoresis Program in Space), is developing access for American industry to continuous-flow electrophoresis aboard SSF. In space, considerable scale-up of continuous free-flow electrophoresis is possible for cells, sub cellular particles, proteins, growth factors, and other biological products. The lack of sedemination and buoyancy-driven convection flow enhances purity of separations and the amount of material processed/time. Through the CCR's physiological testing program, commercial organizations will have access aboard SSF to physiological systems experiments (PSE's); the Penn State Biomodule; and telemicroscopy. Physiological systems experiments involve the use of live animals for pharmaceutical product testing and discovery research. The Penn State Biomodule is a computer-controlled mini lab useful for projects involving live cells or tissues and macro molecular assembly studies, including protein crystallization. Telemicroscopy will enable staff on Earth to manipulate and monitor microscopic specimens on SSF for product development and discovery research or for medical diagnosis of astronaut health problems. Space-based product processing, testing, development, and discovery research using USCEPS and CCR's physiological testing program offer new routes to improved health on Earth. Direct crew involvement-in biomedical/biotechnology projects aboard SSF will enable better experimental outcomes. The current data base shows that there is reason for considerable optimism

  7. Simulations of space radiation interactions with materials, with application to dose estimates for lunar shelter and aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tai T.

    This research performed simulations using the state-of-art three dimensional computer codes to investigate the interactions of space radiation with materials and quantify the biological dose onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in a lunar shelter for future manned missions. High-energy space radiation of Trapped Protons, Solar Particle Events, and GCRs particles interactions are simulated using MCNPX and PHITS probabilistic codes. The energy loss and energy deposition within the shielding materials and in a phantom are calculated. The contributions of secondary particles produced by spallation reactions are identified. Recent experimental measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was simulated, and used to determine the most appropriate simulation methodology.

  8. Evaluation of Primary Dendrite Arm Spacings from Aluminum-7wt% Silicon alloys Directionally Solidified aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, Samuel; Lauer, Mark; Poirier, David; Tewari, Surendra; Rajamure, Ravi; Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum – 7wt% silicon alloys were directionally solidified in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station as part of the “MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys under Diffusive and Magnetically Controlled Convective Conditions” (MICAST) European led program. Cross-sections of the sample during periods of steady-state growth were metallographically prepared from which the primary dendrite arm spacing (lambda 1) was measured. These spacings were found to be in reasonable agreement with the Hunt-Lu model which assumes a diffusion-controlled, convectionless, environment during controlled solidification. Deviation from the model was found and is attributed to gravity-independent thermocapillary convection where, over short distances, the liquid appears to have separated from the crucible wall.

  9. Analyses of plasma for metabolic and hormonal changes in rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Alfred H., Jr.; Wang, Elaine; Mullins, Richard E.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Popova, Irina A.

    1992-01-01

    Plasmas samples from rats flown aboard Cosmos 2044 were analyzed for the levels of key metabolites, electrolytes, enzymes, and hormones. The major differences between the flight group and the synchronous control were elevations in glucose, cholesterol, phosphate, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase and decreased levels of thyroxine. Most of these differences were not mimicked by tail suspension of ground-based rats; however, both flight and suspended rats exhibited inhibited testosterone secretion. Corticosterone, immunoreactive growth hormone, and prolactin showed inconsistent differences from the various control groups, suggesting that the levels of these hormones were not due to actual or simulated microgravity.

  10. Feasibility study to conduct windblown sediment experiments aboard a space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Iversen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A feasibility study was undertaken to determine if a suitable apparatus could be designed to analyze aeolian processes for operation in space and to assess the feasibility of conducting meaningful experiments to address key aspects of aeolian processes. To meet this objective a prototype apparatus was fabricated and some limited experiments were run to determine its suitability for this application. At least three general types of experiments were devised that could be carried out aboard a space station: threshold studies, swirl (dust devil) experiments, and analyses of windblown particle trajectories. How experiments in a zero-g environment could advance knowledge of aeolian processes was studied.

  11. Soyuz 22 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jams, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Three mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 22 because of concerns that new air pollutants were present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The toxicological assessment of 3 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of the 3 standards (as listed above) from the GSCs averaged 103, 95 and 76%, respectively. Recovery from formaldehyde control badges were 90 and 91%.

  12. Astronauts Schirra and Stafford welcomed aboard the U.S.S. Wasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr. (shaking hands) and Thomas P. Stafford received an Official welcome as they arrive aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp following their 25 hour 52 minute mission in space. The three Navy officers greeting the astronauts are (left to right) Vice Admiral Charles E. Weakley, commander of the Antisubmarine Warfare Force of the Atlantic Fleet; Rear Admiral William E. Leonard, commander of Antisubmarine Task Group Bravo, of which the Wasp is the flagship; and Capt. G.E. Hartley, commander of the Wasp.

  13. Soyuz 7 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of one grab sample canister (GSC), 6 dual sorbent tubes (DSTs), and 20 formaldehyde badges returned aboard Soyuz 7 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSC were 84-89%. The recoveries of the less volatile surrogates from the DSTs were 87 to 112%; however, 13C-acetone was only recovered at 53-59%. Formaldehyde recoveries from 2 lab controls were 87 and 95%; trip controls were not returned to ground.

  14. STS-47 crewmembers work in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) module aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) Jerome Apt responds to a crewmate's query during a shift changeover in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Apt, positioned in front of Rack 3's general purpose workstation (GPWS), talks to MS and Payload Commander (PLC) Mark C. Lee (foreground, partially out of frame). Behind Apt and in front of the spacelab tunnel hatch are MS Mae C. Jemison (left) and MS N. Jan Davis. Note that Commander Robert L. Gibson freefloats above the GPWS during the discussion.

  15. Superconducting properties of Pb-Sn-In alloys directionally solidified aboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. T., Jr.; Reger, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Superconducting alloys of Pb-Sn-In were directionally solidified in the absence of gravity-induced convection and segregation by processing in a near weightless condition aboard Skylab. Lead-rich and tin-rich lamellar structures were obtained with both high and low G/R (temperature gradient/solidification rate) samples processed at 0-g and at 1-g in a ground-based laboratory. Thinner, higher density lamellae were found with the 0-g specimens. Magnetization curves at 4.2 K showed hysteresis effects with large areas under the curves indicating magnetic flux pinning by the normal state tin-rich phase.

  16. Calibration of the spin-scan ozone imager aboard the dynamics Explorer 1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, Walter E.; Keating, Gerald M.; Young, David F.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration technique, which contains the calibrated backscattered radiance values necessary for performing the calibrations, is presented. The calibration constants for September to October 1981 to determine total columnar ozone from the Spin-Scan Ozone Imager (SOI), which is a part of the auroral imaging instrumentation aboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 Satellite, are provided. The precision of the SOI-derived total columnar ozone is estimated to be better than 2.4 percent. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlation coefficients between total columnar ozone obtained from Dobson ground stations and SOI which indicate that the SOI total columnar ozone determination is equally accurate for clear or cloudy weather conditions.

  17. Skylab 3 crewmen aboard prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three crewmen of the Skylab 3 mission are seen aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. New Orleans, following their successful 59-day visit to the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. They are, left to right, Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander. They are seated atop a platform of a fork-lift dolly. Recovery support personnel are wearing face masks to prevent exposing the crewmen to disease.

  18. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Luz, Paul; Smith, Guy; Spivey, Reggie; Jeter, Linda; Gillies, Donald; Hua, Fay; Anikumar, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting "real-time" and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  19. Materials Research Conducted Aboard the International Space Station: Facilities Overview, Operational Procedures, and Experimental Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Luz, P.; Smith, G. A.; Spivey, R.; Jeter, L.; Gillies, D. C.; Hua, F.; Anilkumar, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) and Maintenance Work Area (MWA) are facilities aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that were used to successfully conduct experiments in support of, respectively, the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) and the In-Space Soldering Investigation (ISSI). The capabilities of these facilities are briefly discussed and then demonstrated by presenting real-time and subsequently down-linked video-taped examples from the abovementioned experiments. Data interpretation, ISS telescience, some lessons learned, and the need of such facilities for conducting work in support of understanding materials behavior, particularly fluid processing and transport scenarios, in low-gravity environments is discussed.

  20. STS-65 crew works inside the IML-2 spacelab module aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In the spacelab science module aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, four members of the STS-65 crew busy themselves with experiments in support of the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) mission. Mission Specialist (MS) Donald A. Thomas with his feet hooked on a center aisle stowage unit handrail talks with MS Leroy Chiao in the foreground while Payload Commander (PLC) Richard J. Hieb takes notes at Rack 5 Biorack (BR) glovebox. Japanese Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai reviews her notes in the background. Mukai represents the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan.

  1. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  2. Occupational Safety and Health Conditions Aboard Small- and Medium-Size Fishing Vessels: Differences among Age Groups.

    PubMed

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Basahel, Abdulrahman M

    2017-02-24

    Although marine fishing is one of the most hazardous occupations, research on the occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions aboard marine fishing vessels is scarce. For instance, little is known about the working conditions of vulnerable groups such as young and aging fishermen. The objective of the current paper is to study the OSH conditions of young and aging fishermen compared to middle-aged fishermen in the small- and medium-size (SM) marine fishing sector. A cross-sectional study was designed, and 686 fishermen working aboard SM fishing vessels were interviewed to collect information about their safety and health. The associations of physical and psychosocial work conditions with safety and health outcomes, e.g., injuries, illnesses and job satisfaction, are presented. The results of the current study can be utilized in the design of effective accident prevention and OSH training programs for the three age groups and in the regulation of working conditions aboard fishing vessels.

  3. Occupational Safety and Health Conditions Aboard Small- and Medium-Size Fishing Vessels: Differences among Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zytoon, Mohamed A.; Basahel, Abdulrahman M.

    2017-01-01

    Although marine fishing is one of the most hazardous occupations, research on the occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions aboard marine fishing vessels is scarce. For instance, little is known about the working conditions of vulnerable groups such as young and aging fishermen. The objective of the current paper is to study the OSH conditions of young and aging fishermen compared to middle-aged fishermen in the small- and medium-size (SM) marine fishing sector. A cross-sectional study was designed, and 686 fishermen working aboard SM fishing vessels were interviewed to collect information about their safety and health. The associations of physical and psychosocial work conditions with safety and health outcomes, e.g., injuries, illnesses and job satisfaction, are presented. The results of the current study can be utilized in the design of effective accident prevention and OSH training programs for the three age groups and in the regulation of working conditions aboard fishing vessels. PMID:28245578

  4. Remote sensing of XCO2 and XCH4 above the Atlantic from aboard the research vessel Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kostinek, Julian; Bertleff, Marco; Hase, Frank; Butz, Andrè

    2015-04-01

    Global measurements of the column average dry air mole fractions of carbon dioxide (XCO2) and methane (XCH4) are of great interest for inferring information on sources and sinks of these two major anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Satellite remote sensing of XCO2 and XCH4 is an emerging tool which promises to supplement the traditional ground-based in-situ sampling approach by vast data coverage. The usefulness of XCO2 and XCH4 measured by satellites such as GOSAT and OCO-2, however, crucially depends on precision and accuracy. Therefore, validation by ground-based remote sensing observations is of major importance. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) has been designed to meet these validation needs. It covers a few tens of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers operating at very high spectral resolution. Most of these instruments are located on continental regions especially in the northern hemisphere. However, oceanic regions are sparsely validated. In the framework of the development of a robust, small and versatile spectrometer for harsh environments and mobile applications, we operated two instruments, a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EM27/SUN by Bruker) and a custom-built grating spectrometer aboard the German research vessel Polarstern. Both instruments are modified such, that the solar tracking system can compensate for the ships movement. Here, we will present and discuss instrument performance of the EM27/SUN instrument and the solar tracking device. The retrieved north to south gradient of XCO2 and XCH4 mixing ratios along the ship track from Capetown (SA) to Bremerhaven (GER) during the 5-week cruise in March 2014 will be presented and discussed. We assess the usefulness of the dataset for validating GOSAT ocean glint observations as well as an comparison with the global CO2 and CH4 model data.

  5. STS 129 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality aboard the Shuttle (STS-129) and International Space Station (ULF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Reports on the air quality aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-129), and the International Space station (ULF3). NASA analyzed the grab sample canisters (GSCs) and the formaldehyde badges aboard both locations for carbon monoxide levels. The three surrogates: (sup 13)C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene registered 109, 101, and 109% in the space shuttle and 81, 87, and 55% in the International Space Station (ISS). From these results the atmosphere in both the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) was found to be breathable.

  6. First results from the GPS atmosphere sounding experiment TOR aboard the TerraSAR-X satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, G.; Grunwaldt, L.; Heise, S.; Köhler, W.; König, R.; Michalak, G.; Rothacher, M.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.; Tapley, B. D.; Giesinger, B.

    2010-11-01

    GPS radio occultation events observed between 24 July and 17 November 2008 by the IGOR occultation receiver aboard the TerraSAR-X satellite are processed and analyzed. The comparison of 16 262 refractivity profiles with collocated ECMWF data yield a mean bias of -0.60% to +0.02% at altitudes between 5 and 30 km. Standard deviations decrease from about 0.8% to 1.8% at 5 km to about 0.5% to 0.8% at about 10 km altitude. At low latitudes mean biases and standard deviations are larger, in particular in the lower troposphere. The results are consistent with 15 159 refractivity observations collected during the same time period by the BlackJack receiver aboard GRACE-A and processed by GFZ's operational processing system. The main difference between the two occultation instruments is the implementation of open-loop signal tracking in the IGOR (TerraSAR-X) receiver which improves the tropospheric penetration depth in terms of ray height by about 2 km compared to the conventional closed-loop data acquired by BlackJack (GRACE-A).

  7. First results from the GPS atmosphere sounding experiment TOR aboard the TerraSAR-X satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, G.; Grunwaldt, L.; Heise, S.; Köhler, W.; König, R.; Michalak, G.; Rothacher, M.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.; Tapley, B. D.; Giesinger, B.

    2011-07-01

    GPS radio occultation events observed between 24 July and 17 November 2008 by the IGOR occultation receiver aboard the TerraSAR-X satellite are processed and analyzed. The comparison of 15 327 refractivity profiles with collocated ECMWF data yield a mean bias between zero and -0.30 % at altitudes between 5 and 30 km. Standard deviations decrease from about 1.4 % at 5 km to about 0.6 % at 10 km altitude, however, increase significantly in the upper stratosphere. At low latitudes mean biases and standard deviations are larger, in particular in the lower troposphere. The results are consistent with 15 159 refractivity observations collected during the same time period by the BlackJack receiver aboard GRACE-A and processed by GFZ's operational processing system. The main difference between the two occultation instruments is the implementation of open-loop signal tracking in the IGOR (TerraSAR-X) receiver which improves the tropospheric penetration depth in terms of ray height by about 2 km compared to the conventional closed-loop data acquired by BlackJack (GRACE-A).

  8. The nutritional status of astronauts is altered after long-term space flight aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Block, Gladys; Rice, Barbara L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.

    2005-01-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is critical for ensuring crew health during long-duration space exploration missions. Data pertaining to such nutrient requirements are extremely limited. The primary goal of this study was to better understand nutritional changes that occur during long-duration space flight. We examined body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals in 11 astronauts before and after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Dietary intake and limited biochemical measures were assessed during flight. Crew members consumed a mean of 80% of their recommended energy intake, and on landing day their body weight was less (P = 0.051) than before flight. Hematocrit, serum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin were decreased and serum ferritin was increased after flight (P < 0.05). The finding that other acute-phase proteins were unchanged after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism are not likely to be solely a result of an inflammatory response. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and RBC superoxide dismutase was less after flight (P < 0.05), indicating increased oxidative damage. Despite vitamin D supplement use during flight, serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol was decreased after flight (P < 0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several markers. Bone formation, assessed by several markers, did not consistently rise 1 d after landing. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage are among critical nutritional concerns for long-duration space travelers.

  9. The nutritional status of astronauts is altered after long-term space flight aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Zwart, Sara R; Block, Gladys; Rice, Barbara L; Davis-Street, Janis E

    2005-03-01

    Defining optimal nutrient requirements is critical for ensuring crew health during long-duration space exploration missions. Data pertaining to such nutrient requirements are extremely limited. The primary goal of this study was to better understand nutritional changes that occur during long-duration space flight. We examined body composition, bone metabolism, hematology, general blood chemistry, and blood levels of selected vitamins and minerals in 11 astronauts before and after long-duration (128-195 d) space flight aboard the International Space Station. Dietary intake and limited biochemical measures were assessed during flight. Crew members consumed a mean of 80% of their recommended energy intake, and on landing day their body weight was less (P = 0.051) than before flight. Hematocrit, serum iron, ferritin saturation, and transferrin were decreased and serum ferritin was increased after flight (P < 0.05). The finding that other acute-phase proteins were unchanged after flight suggests that the changes in iron metabolism are not likely to be solely a result of an inflammatory response. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine concentration was greater and RBC superoxide dismutase was less after flight (P < 0.05), indicating increased oxidative damage. Despite vitamin D supplement use during flight, serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol was decreased after flight (P < 0.01). Bone resorption was increased after flight, as indicated by several markers. Bone formation, assessed by several markers, did not consistently rise 1 d after landing. These data provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin D status, and oxidative damage are among critical nutritional concerns for long-duration space travelers.

  10. The transportation of fine arts materials aboard the space shuttle Columbia. GAS payload No. 481: Vertical horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Ellery; Wishnow, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The Vertical Horizons experiment represents an initial investigation into the transportation of fine arts materials aboard a space shuttle. Within the confines of a GAS canister, artist quality fine arts materials were packaged and exposed to the rigors of space flight in an attempt to identify adverse effects.

  11. A Symmetry Breaking Experiment Aboard Mir and the Stability of Rotating Liquid Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Gomes, D.; McCuan, J.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results from two parts of our study on the behavior of liquids under low-gravity conditions. The first concerns the Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) aboard the Space Station Mir on the Mir-21/NASA-2 mission; for a certain 'exotic' container, distinct asymmetric liquid configurations are found as locally stable ones, even though the container itself is rotationally symmetric, in confirmation of mathematical results and numerical computations. The second investigation concerns the behavior of slowly rotating liquids; it is found that a rotating film instability observed previously in a physical experiment in 1-g, scaled to render gravity effects small, does not correspond to mathematical and computational results obtained for low gravity. These latter results are based on the classical equilibrium theory enhanced with a van der Waals potential of adhesion.

  12. Comparison of Properties of Solid Lubricant Between Two Exposure Experiments Aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Mineo; Kimoto, Yugo

    To evaluate the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit space environment, the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiments were carried out on the International Space Station. As part of these experiments, changes in the tribological properties of a molybdenum disulfide bonded film that is used as a solid lubricant, were evaluated. The results of friction tests in a vacuum and surface analysis by XPS were compared between two exposure experiments aboard the Service Module (SM) and the Japan Experimental Module (JEM). The investigations revealed silicon and fluorine contaminations in the JEM/SEED flight sample, but with a lower amount of silicon contamination than the SM/SEED flight sample. The JEM/SEED flight sample and ground-based tested samples showed lower friction coefficients than a reference sample at the beginning of the tests. The friction behavior of the JEM/SEED flight sample was similar to those of SM/SEED flight samples.

  13. [Light microscopy of statocyst cell elements from Helix lucorum (space experiment aboard the orbital station "MIR")].

    PubMed

    Gorgiladze, G I; Bukiia, R D; Kalandarishvili, E L; Taktakishvili, A D; Davitashvili, M T; Gelashvili, N Sh; Madzhagaladze, N B; Galkin, V A

    2013-01-01

    Statocyst epithelial lining of terrestrial pulmonary snail Helix lucorum is a spatially arranged structure consisting of 13 cell ensembles. Each ensemble has a sensory cell surrounded by companion cells. The sensory cell on the anterior statocyst pole is star-shaped due to multiple protoplasmatic protrusions on its body. The remaining 12 polygon-shaped cells form 3 tires along the statocyst internal perimeter: anterior, middle or equatorial and posterior. There are 4 cells in each tire. Topography of every sensory cell on the statocyst internal surface was described as well as cell nuclei size and form, nucleoli number and patterns of cytoplasm vacuolization. Space free of sensory cells is occupied by supporting or intercalary cells. Exposure to space microgravity over 40, 43, 102 and 135 days aboard the orbital station MIR affected morphology of the sensory cells. Specifically, this appeared as reductions in cell height and, consequently, extension of the statocyst cavity internal diameter and volume in the space-flown snails.

  14. Microbial Characterization of Free Floating Condensate Aboard the Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. M.; Bruce, R. J.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Three samples of humidity condensate that had accumulated behind panels aboard the Russian space station Mir were collected and returned to earth for analysis. As these floating masses of liquid come into contact with the astronauts and the engineering systems, they have the potential to affect both crew health and systems performance. Using a combination of culturing techniques, a wide variety of organisms were isolated included Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and a presumed Legionella species. In addition, microscopic analysis indicated the presence of protozoa, dust mites, and spirochetes. These findings suggest the need for more comprehensive microbial analysis of the environment through the use of new methodologies to allow a more thorough risk assessment of spacecraft. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Soyuz 23 Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Six mini-grab sample containers (m-GSCs) were returned aboard Soyuz 23 because of concerns that new air pollutants had been present in the air and these were getting into the water recovery system. The Total Organic Carbon Analyzer had been giving increasing readings of total organic carbon (TOC) in the potable water, and it was postulated that an increased load into the system was responsible. The TOC began to decline in late October, 2010. The toxicological assessment of 6 m-GSCs from the ISS is shown in Table 1. The recoveries of 13C-acetone, fluorobenzene, and chlorobenzene from the GSCs averaged 73, 82, and 59%, respectively. We are working to understand the sub-optimal recovery of chlorobenzene.

  16. STS-65 Earth observation of Lake Chad, Africa, taken aboard Columbia, OV-102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Earth observation taken aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows Lake Chad, Africa. This is another long term ecological monitoring site for NASA scientists. Lake Chad was first photographed from space in 1965. A 25-year length-of-record data set exists for this environmentally important area. A number of these scenes have been digitized, rectified, classified and results show that the lake area has been shrinking and only 15% to 20% of the surface water is visible on space images. NASA's objective in monitoring this lake is to document the intra- and interannual areal changes of the largest standing water body in the Sahelian biome of North Africa. These areal changes are an indicator of the presence or absence of drought across the arguably overpopulated, overgrazed, and over biological carrying capacity limits nations of the Sahel.

  17. STS-47 MS Jemison works with FTS equipment in SLJ module aboard OV-105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist Mae C. Jemison injects a fluid into a mannequin's hand during research in the Spacelab Japan (SLJ) science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105. Working at Rack 9, Jemison conducts this Fluid Therapy System (FTS) experiment procedure. FTS will examine the effect of low gravity on the administration of intravenous (IV) fluids in space. Since gravity assists in the delivery and flow of IV fluids on Earth, researchers want to determine what problems the absence of gravity would cause if an IV had to be administrated to an astronaut in space. A new device that converts contaminated water into a sterile solution that can be used in IVs is part of the experiment. MS and Payload Commander Mark C. Lee is partially visible at lower right.

  18. STS-103 Commander Brown arrives at SLF aboard a T-38 jet for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. is happy to arrive at Kennedy Space Center to begin Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Also participating are Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, with the European Space Agency, and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, also with the European Space Agency. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Discovery.

  19. Survey Analysis of Materials Processing Experiments Aboard STS-47: Spacelab J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, R. J.; Wright, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) is a survey outline of materials processing experiments aboard Space Shuttle Mission STS-47: Spacelab J, a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The mission explored materials processing experiments including electronics and crystal growth materials, metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, and fluids. Experiments covered include Growth of Silicone Spherical Crystals and Surface Oxidation, Growth Experiment of Narrow Band-Gap Semiconductor Lead-Tin-Tellurium Crystals in Space, Study on Solidification of Immiscible Alloys, Fabrication of Very-Low-Density, High-Stiffness Carbon Fiber/Aluminum Hybridized Composites, High Temperature Behavior of Glass, and Study of Bubble Behavior. The TM underscores the historical significance of these experiments in the context of materials processing in space.

  20. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on the swimming pattern of fish aboard Skylab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Baumgarten, R. J.; Simmonds, R. C.; Boyd, J. F.; Garriott, O. K.

    1975-01-01

    Looping behavior of minnows aboard Skylab 3 is analyzed. Extensive looping patterns were observed at first look on the third day of weightlessness; thereafter, the frequency of the looping episodes diminished until complete adaptation on the twenty-first day, at which time the fish oriented themselves with their backs to the light. The swimming anomaly could be due to (1) absence of continuous bending of sense hairs to a certain extent by gravity, causing the fish to tilt forward in an attempt to increase leverage on the hairs - in the absence of all gravity, tilting is continued into looping (this hypothesis is supported by parabolic flight experiments with partial gravity, in which only tilting was seen); or (2) an attempt by the fish to create a gravitoinertial stimulus by 'centrifuging' its otoliths by looping.

  1. A linear accelerator in the space: The beam experiment aboard rocket

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P.G.; Butler, T.A.; Lynch, M.T.; McKenna, K.F.; Pongratz, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    On July 13, 1989 the BEAM experiment Aboard Rocket (BEAR) linear accelerator was successfully launched and operated in space. The flight demonstrated that a neutral hydrogen beam could be successfully propagated in an exoatmospheric environment. The accelerator, which was the result of an extensive collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and industrial partners, was designed to produce a 10 mA (equivalent), 1 MeV neutral hydrogen beam in 50 {mu}s pulses at 5 Hz. The major components were a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} injector a 1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, two 425 Mhz RF amplifiers, a gas cell neutralizer, beam optics, vacuum system and controls. The design was strongly constrained by the need for a lightweight rugged system that would survive the rigors of launch and operate autonomously. Following the flight the accelerator was recovered and operated again on the laboratory. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Design progress of the solar UV-Vis-IR telescope (SUVIT) aboard SOLAR-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.; Suematsu, Y.; Hara, H.; Kano, R.; Shimizu, T.; Matsuzaki, K.

    2013-09-01

    We present a design progress of the Solar UV-Vis-IR Telescope (SUVIT) aboard the next Japanese solar mission SOLAR-C. SUVIT has an aperture diameter of ~1.4 m for achieving spectro-polarimetric observations with spatial and temporal resolution exceeding the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). We have studied structural and thermal designs of the optical telescope as well as the optical interface between the telescope and the focal plane instruments. The focal plane instruments are installed into two packages, filtergraph and spectrograph packages. The spectropolarimeter is the instrument dedicated to accurate polarimetry in the three spectrum windows at 525 nm, 854 nm, and 1083 nm for observing magnetic fields at both the photospheric and chromospheric layers. We made optical design of the spectrograph accommodating the conventional slit spectrograph and the integral field unit (IFU) for two-dimensional coverage. We are running feasibility study of the IFU using fiber arrays consisting of rectangular cores.

  3. Seafarers and passengers who disappear without a trace from aboard ships.

    PubMed

    Low, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    It is a fact that not only ships, but also seafarers and passengers vanish without a trace at sea, be it in the past or in present times. Several examples for this phenomenon are given. A scheme of the ship conditions found after discovering that single persons or even whole crews had disappeared from board is provided as an orientation, before describing in detail the more than 18 reasons for vanishing from ships for good, giving examples where appropriate. These reasons are in their majority logical, but strange and bizarre reasons also exist. Causes may e.g. be the sea state, crimes, suicide, alcohol, piracy. A chapter concerning passengers lost from large modem cruise ships, especially in the Caribbean, follows. Finally, suggestions are made, for instance psychological aptitude tests, as regards how to maybe help decrease the number of disappearing persons, especially young seafarers, from aboard ships on the high seas.

  4. STS-101 Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter on way to LC-39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Passing by a palm tree, the Space Shuttle Atlantis aboard the crawler-transporter makes its way to Launch Pad 39A. The crawler- transporter carries its cargo at 1 mph, taking about five hours to cover the 3.4 miles from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. A leveling system on the crawler-transporter keeps the top of the Space Shuttle vertical, especially negotiating the ramp leading to the launch pads and when it is raised and lowered on pedestals at the pad. Liftoff of Atlantis on mission STS-101 is scheduled for April 17 at 7:03 p.m. EDT. STS-101 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, to restore full redundancy to the International Space Station power system in preparation for the arrival of the next pressurized module, the Russian-built Zvezda.

  5. STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard OV-105 taken by ESC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-49 onorbit payload bay (PLB) configuration aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is documented by the Electronic Still Camera (ESC) as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 648, Electronic Still Photography Test (With Downlink). Various elements in the PLB foretell of a busy week ahead for OV-105's crew. In the foreground is the hardware for the Assembly of Station by Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Methods (ASEM), which is a demonstration of extravehicular procedures required for the construction of Space Station Freedom (SSF). Backdropped against the aft firewall is the vertical perigee stage which EVA crewmembers will attach to the International Telcommunications Organization Satellite (INTELSAT) VI F-3 on 05-10-92. Running along the port side sill longern is the stowed remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. Electronic still photography is a new technology which provides the means for a handheld camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approach

  6. Life-cycle experiments of medaka fish aboard the international space station.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Fish are the most likely candidates to be the first vertebrate to live their life cycle aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In the space-shuttle experiment using medaka, the fry born in space had the same number of germ cells as the ground control fish, and these germ cells later developed to produce the offspring on the ground. Fry hatched in space did not exhibit any looping behavior regardless of their strain, visual acuity, etc. The aquatic habitat (AQH) is a space habitat designed for long-term breeding of medaka, zebrafish and Xenopus, and recent advancements in this hardware also support fish life-cycle experiments. From the crosses between two strains, fish having good eyesight and less sensitivity to gravity were obtained, and their tolerance to microgravity was tested by parabolic flight using an airplane. The fish exhibited less looping and no differences in degree of looping between light and dark conditions. These are possible candidates for the first adult medaka (parent fish) to start a life cycle aboard ISS. Embryos were treated with a three-dimensional clinostat. Such simulated microgravity caused no differences in tissue architecture or in gene expression within the retina, nor in formation of cartilage (head skeleton). Otolith formation in embryos and fry was investigated for wild-type and mutant (ha) medaka. The ha embryos could not form utricular otoliths. They formed saccular otoliths but with a delay. Fry of the mutant fish lacking the utricular otoliths are highly light-dependent at the time of hatching, showing a perfect dorsal-light response (DLR). As they grow, they eventually shift from being light dependent to gravity dependent. Continuous treatment of the fry with altered light direction suppressed this shift to gravity dependence. Being less dependent on gravity, these fish can serve as model fish in studying the differences expected for the fish that have experienced a life cycle in microgravity.

  7. End-To-END Performance of the Future MOMA Instrument Aboard the ExoMars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, V. T.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Grand, N.; Danell, R.; Grubisic, A.; van Amerom, F. H. W.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Coll, P. J.; Stalport, F.; Humeau, O.; Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Steininger, H.; Goesmann, F.; Raulin, F.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Following the SAM experiment aboard the Curiosity rover, the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment aboard the 2018 ExoMars mission will be the continuation of the search for organic matter on the Mars surface. One advancement with the ExoMars mission is that the sample will be extracted as deep as 2 meters below the Martian surface to minimize effects of radiation and oxidation on organic materials. To analyze the wide range of organic composition (volatile and non-volatile compounds) of the Martian soil, MOMA is equipped with a dual ion source ion trap mass spectrometer utilizing UV laser desorption / ionization (LDI) and pyrolysis gas chromatography (pyr-GC). In order to analyze refractory organic compounds and chiral molecules during GC-ITMS analysis, samples may be submitted to a derivatization process, consisting of the reaction of the sample components with specific reactants (MTBSTFA [1], DMF-DMA [2] or TMAH [3]). Previous experimental reports have focused on coupling campaigns between the breadboard versions of the GC, provided by the French team (LISA, LATMOS, CentraleSupelec), and the MS, provided by the US team (NASA-GSFC). This work focuses on the performance verification and optimization of the GC-ITMS experiment using the Engineering Test Unit (ETU) models which are representative of the form, fit and function of the flight instrument including a flight-like pyrolysis oven and tapping station providing by the German team (MPS). The results obtained demonstrate the current status of the end-to-end performance of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry mode of operation. References: [1] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J Chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [2] Freissinet et al. (2011) J Chrom A, 1306, 59-71. [3] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459.

  8. Simulation of Radar-Backscattering from Phobos - A Contribution to the Experiment MARSIS aboard MarsExpress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettemeier, D.; Hahnel, R.; Hegler, S.; Safaeinili, A.; Orosei, R.; Cicchetti, A.; Plaut, J.; Picardi, G.

    2009-04-01

    MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding) on board MarsExpress is the first and so far the only space borne radar that observed the Martian moon Phobos. Radar echoes were measured for different flyby trajectories. The primary aim of the low frequency sounding of Phobos is to prove the feasibility of deep sounding, into the crust of Phobos. In this poster we present a numerical method that allows a very precise computation of radar echoes backscattered from the surface of large objects. The software is based on a combination of physical optics calculation of surface scattering of the radar target, and Method of Moments to calculate the radiation pattern of the whole space borne radar system. The calculation of the frequency dependent radiation pattern takes into account all relevant gain variations and coupling effects aboard the space craft. Based on very precise digital elevation models of Phobos, patch models in the resolution of lambda/10 were generated. Simulation techniques will be explained and a comparison of simulations and measurements will be shown. SURFACE BACKSCATTERING SIMULATOR FOR LARGE OBJECTS The computation of surface scattering of the electromagnetic wave incident on Phobos is based on the Physical Optics method. The scattered field can be expressed by the induced equivalent surface currents on the target. The Algorithm: The simulation program itself is split into three phases. In the first phase, an illumination test checks whether a patch will be visible from the position of the space craft. If this is not the case, the patch will be excluded from the simulation. The second phase serves as a preparation stage for the third phase. Amongst other tasks, the dyadic products for the Js and Ms surface currents are calculated. This is a time-memory trade-off: the simulation will need additional 144 bytes of RAM for every patch that passes phase one. However, the calculation of the dyads is expensive, so that considerable

  9. The Nimbus 7 LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, Ellis E.; Russell, James M., III

    Earth orbital instruments, designed to measure the vertical and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor is discussed. Specifically, the operation of the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment is examined. The LIMS is a six channel limb scanning radiometer that was launched aboard Nimbus 7 in 1978. Profiles of stratospheric and mesospheric temperature, water vapor, and various other constituents were obtained by inverting the LIMS radiance measurements. This same technique was used in 1981 to analyze the data returned from another limb scanning radiometer aboard the Solar Mesosphere Explorer.

  10. 2010 Joint United States-Canadian Program to explore the limits of the Extended Continental Shelf aboard U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy--Cruise HLY1002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Brian D.; Childs, Jonathan R.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Danforth, William W.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    In August and September 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada, conducted bathymetric and geophysical surveys in the Beaufort Sea and eastern Arctic Ocean aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy. The principal objective of this mission to the high Arctic was to acquire data in support of a delineation of the outer limits of the U.S. and Canadian Extended Continental Shelf in the Arctic Ocean, in accordance with the provisions of Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The Healy was accompanied by the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St-Laurent. The scientific parties on board the two vessels consisted principally of staff from the U.S. Geological Survey (Healy), and the Geological Survey of Canada and the Canadian Hydrographic Service (Louis). The crew also included marine-mammal observers, Native-community observers, ice observers, and biologists conducting research of opportunity in the Arctic Ocean. Despite interruptions necessitated by three medical emergencies, the joint survey proved largely successful. The Healy collected 7,201 trackline-kilometers of swath (multibeam) bathymetry (47,663 square kilometers) and CHIRP subbottom data, with accompanying marine gravity measurements, and expendable bathythermograph data. The Louis acquired 3,673 trackline-kilometers of multichannel seismic (airgun) deep-penetration reflection data along 25 continuous profiles, as well as 34 sonobuoy refraction stations and 9,500 trackline-kilometers of single-beam bathymetry. The coordinated efforts of the two vessels resulted in seismic-reflection-profile data that were of much higher quality and continuity than if the data had been acquired with a single vessel alone. The equipment-failure rate of the seismic equipment aboard the Louis was greatly reduced when the Healy led as the ice breaker. When ice conditions proved too severe to deploy the seismic system, the Louis led

  11. Controlled Directional Solidification of Aluminum - 7 wt Percent Silicon Alloys: Comparison Between Samples Processed on Earth and in the Microgravity Environment Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Tewari, Surendra N.; Erdman, Robert G.; Poirier, David R.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the international "MIcrostructure Formation in CASTing of Technical Alloys" (MICAST) program is given. Directional solidification processing of metals and alloys is described, and why experiments conducted in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are expected to promote our understanding of this commercially relevant practice. Microstructural differences observed when comparing the aluminum - 7 wt% silicon alloys directionally solidified on Earth to those aboard the ISS are presented and discussed.

  12. Mathesis: The Mathematical Foundation of Ulysses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Martin -l,6f’s theory of types3 , and gener- alized type assignment in the style of [1IS861 Chapter 16. The theory of constructions ’ is a forln of...is a part of the type theory of Martin -Li’f, and is, in fact, one of the most important parts; see the references list(d under his an. At the same...by rule (Vi)in TAP because U U does not hold. 4 There are several ways one might, extend this system. One might follow Martin -l,6f himself by

  13. These six astronauts have been named to fly aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in support of the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 CREW PORTRAIT --- These six astronauts have been named to fly aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in support of the Spacehab-04 mission, scheduled for launch in May of this year. On the front row are astronauts John H. Casper (right), mission commander; and Curtis L. Brown Jr., pilot. In the rear, from the left, are astronauts Daniel W. Bursch, Mario Runco Jr., Marc Garneau and Andrew S. W. Thomas, all mission specialists. Garneau represents the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).

  14. Rapid culture-independent microbial analysis aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

    PubMed

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that mostbacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive [corrected].Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm(2), which is below NASA in-flight requirements (<10,000 bacterial cfu per 100 cm(2)). Absent to low levels of endotoxin (<0.24 to 1.0 EU per 100 cm(2); defined in endotoxin units, or EU) were found on 31 surface areas, including on most panels in Node 1 and the US Lab. High to moderate levels (1.01 to 14.7 EU per 100 cm(2)) were found on 11 surface areas, including at exercise, hygiene, sleeping, and dining facilities. Endotoxin was absent from airlock surfaces, except the Extravehicular Hatch Handle (>3.78 EU per 100 cm(2)). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm(2)) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm(2)).

  15. Rapid Culture-Independent Microbial Analysis Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Monaco, Lisa; Morris, Heather; Gunter, Daniel; Damon, Michael; Wells, Mark

    2009-10-01

    A new culture-independent system for microbial monitoring, called the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS), was operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). LOCAD-PTS was launched to the ISS aboard Space Shuttle STS-116 on December 9, 2006, and has since been used by ISS crews to monitor endotoxin on cabin surfaces. Quantitative analysis was performed within 15 minutes, and sample return to Earth was not required. Endotoxin (a marker of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi) was distributed throughout the ISS, despite previous indications that most bacteria on ISS surfaces were Gram-positive. Endotoxin was detected at 24 out of 42 surface areas tested and at every surface site where colony-forming units (cfu) were observed, even at levels of 4-120 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2, which is below NASA in-flight requirements (<10,000 bacterial cfu per 100 cm2). Absent to low levels of endotoxin (<0.24 to 1.0 EU per 100 cm2; defined in endotoxin units, or EU) were found on 31 surface areas, including on most panels in Node 1 and the US Lab. High to moderate levels (1.01 to 14.7 EU per 100 cm2) were found on 11 surface areas, including at exercise, hygiene, sleeping, and dining facilities. Endotoxin was absent from airlock surfaces, except the Extravehicular Hatch Handle (>3.78 EU per 100 cm2). Based upon data collected from the ISS so far, new culture-independent requirements (defined in EU) are suggested, which are verifiable in flight with LOCAD-PTS yet high enough to avoid false alarms. The suggested requirements are intended to supplement current ISS requirements (defined in cfu) and would serve a dual purpose of safeguarding crew health (internal spacecraft surfaces <20 EU per 100 cm2) and monitoring forward contamination during Constellation missions (surfaces periodically exposed to the external environment, including the airlock and space suits, <0.24 EU per 100 cm2).

  16. ``Out To Sea: Life as a Crew Member Aboard a Geologic Research Ship'' - Production of a Video and Teachers Guide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, F. R.; Tauxe, K.

    2004-12-01

    In May 2002, Joint Oceanographic Institutions (JOI) received a proposal entitled "Motivating Middle School Students with the JOIDES Resolution", from a middle school teacher in New Mexico named Katie Tauxe. Katie was a former Marine Technician who has worked aboard the R/V JOIDES Resolution in the early years of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). She proposed to engage the interest of middle school students using the ODP drillship as the centerpiece of a presentation focused on the lives of the people who work aboard the ship and the excitement of science communicated through an active shipboard experience. The proposal asked for travel funds to and from the ship, the loan of video camera equipment from JOI, and a small amount of funding to cover expendable supplies, video editing, and production at the local Public Broadcasting Station in Los Alamos, NM. Katie sailed on the transit of the JOIDES Resolution through the Panama Canal, following the completion of ODP Leg 206 in late 2002. This presentation will focus on the outcome of this video production effort, which is a 19 minute-long video entitled "Out to Sea: Life as a Crew Member Aboard a Geologic Research Ship", and a teacher's guide that can be found online.

  17. A higher risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring of personnel who served aboard a Norwegian missile torpedo boat

    PubMed Central

    Mageroy, N; Mollerlokken, O J; Riise, T; Koefoed, V; Moen, B E

    2006-01-01

    Background In the 1990s, congenital anomalies were reported among children whose fathers had served aboard a Norwegian missile torpedo boat (MTB). The Royal Norwegian Navy asked the University of Bergen to look into this problem as one part of a general health and work environment surveillance. Aims To estimate any increased risk of having children with congenital anomalies and having stillborn children among the offspring of workers that had served aboard the MTB and to investigate possible differences in exposure and other risk factors between these groups. Methods Data from a cross‐sectional study among all current employees of the Norwegian Navy (n = 2265, response rate 58%) were analysed. Results The prevalence ratio of having a child with congenital malformations associated with working on the ship was 4.0 (95% CI 1.9 to 8.6). The prevalence ratio of having a child who was stillborn or died within one week was 4.1 (95% CI 1.7 to 9.9). Conclusion Service aboard the MTB was associated with an increased risk of having children with congenital birth defects and having children that were stillborn. The causes of these findings are unknown. PMID:16421386

  18. Airborne Measurements of atmospheric PAH's across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, B.; Jaward, F.; Jones, K.; Lee, R.

    2003-04-01

    Atmospheric measurements of PAHs were taken aboard the DRL Falcon 20 during May 2001. A sampling system was designed to work aboard this aircraft platform. Particulate PAHs were collected on a glass fiber filter (GFF) with their gaseous component concentrated on a polyurethane foam sheets located behind the filter. Typically sampling volumes of between 20-50m^3 were collected which equated to a collection time of about 30minutes. In this way the distance travelled was kept within an acceptable level, about 60 nautical miles. The average concentrations of the data set for phenanthrene was 450 pg m-3 while values for many of the heavier PAH marker compounds used in the UK such as benzo(a)pyrene, diben(ah)anthracene were below the detection limits on all flights. The results will be discussed with consideration of location, altitude and airmass trajectory.

  19. [Cell biology researches aboard the robotic space vehicles: preparation and performance].

    PubMed

    Tairbekov, M G

    2006-01-01

    The article reviews the unique aspects of preparation and performance of cell biology experiments flown on robotic space vehicles Bion and Foton, and gives an overview of key findings in researches made under the author's leadership over the past decades. Described are the criteria of selecting test objects, and the conditions required for preparation and implementation of space and control (synchronous) experiments. The present-day status and issues of researches into cell responsivity to space microgravity and other factors are discussed. Also, potentialities of equipment designed to conduct experiments with cell cultures in vitro and populations of single-celled organisms are presented, as well as some ideas for new devices and systems. Unveiled are some circumstances inherent to the development and performance of space experiments, setting up laboratory facilities at the launch and landing site, and methods of safe transportation and storage of biosamples. In conclusion, the author puts forward his view on biospecies, equipment and areas of research aboard future space vehicles.

  20. Numerical simulation of iodine speciation in relation to water disinfection aboard manned spacecraft I. Equilibria.

    PubMed

    Atwater, J E; Sauer, R L; Schultz, J R

    1996-09-01

    Elemental iodine (I2) is currently used as the drinking water disinfectant aboard the Shuttle Orbiter and will also be incorporated into the water recovery and distribution system for the International Space Station Alpha. Controlled release of I2 is achieved using the Microbial Check Valve (MCV), a flow-through device containing an iodinated polymer which imparts a bacteriostatic residual concentration of approximately 2mg/L to the aqueous stream. During regeneration of MCV canisters, I2 concentrations of approximately 300 mg/L are used. Dissolved iodine undergoes a series of hydrolytic disproportionation and related reactions which result in the formation of an array of inorganic species including: I-, I3-, HOI, OI-, IO3-, HIO3, I2OH-, I2O(-2), and H2OI+. Numerical estimation of the steady-state distribution of inorganic iodine containing species in pure water at 25 degrees C has been achieved by simultaneous solution of the multiple equilibrium expressions as a function of pH. The results are reported herein.

  1. Soft gamma-ray galactic ridge emission as unveiled by SPI aboard INTEGRAL

    SciTech Connect

    Knoedlseder, J.; Weidenspointner, G.; Jean, P.; Strong, A.; Diehl, R.; Cordier, B.; Schanne, S.

    2007-07-12

    The origin of the soft gamma-ray (200 keV - 1 MeV) galactic ridge emission is one of the long-standing mysteries in the field of high-energy astrophysics. Population studies at lower energies have shown that emission from accreting compact objects gradually recedes in this domain, leaving place to another source of gamma-ray emission that is characterised by a hard power-law spectrum extending from 100 keV up to 100 MeV The nature of this hard component has remained so far elusive, partly due to the lack of sufficiently sensitive imaging telescopes that would be able to unveil the spatial distribution of the emission. The SPI telescope aboard INTEGRAL allows now for the first time the simultaneous imaging of diffuse and point-like emission in the soft gamma-ray regime. We present here all-sky images of the soft gamma-ray continuum emission that clearly reveal the morphology of the different emission components. We discuss the implications of our results on the nature of underlying emission processes and we put our results in perspective of GLAST studies of diffuse galactic continuum emission.

  2. Numerical simulation of iodine speciation in relation to water disinfection aboard manned spacecraft I. Equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, J. E.; Sauer, R. L.; Schultz, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Elemental iodine (I2) is currently used as the drinking water disinfectant aboard the Shuttle Orbiter and will also be incorporated into the water recovery and distribution system for the International Space Station Alpha. Controlled release of I2 is achieved using the Microbial Check Valve (MCV), a flow-through device containing an iodinated polymer which imparts a bacteriostatic residual concentration of approximately 2mg/L to the aqueous stream. During regeneration of MCV canisters, I2 concentrations of approximately 300 mg/L are used. Dissolved iodine undergoes a series of hydrolytic disproportionation and related reactions which result in the formation of an array of inorganic species including: I-, I3-, HOI, OI-, IO3-, HIO3, I2OH-, I2O(-2), and H2OI+. Numerical estimation of the steady-state distribution of inorganic iodine containing species in pure water at 25 degrees C has been achieved by simultaneous solution of the multiple equilibrium expressions as a function of pH. The results are reported herein.

  3. Experiment "Regeneration" Performed Aboard the Russian Spacecraft Foton-M2 in 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryan, Elonora; Almeida, Eduardo; Domaratskaya, Elena; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Aleinikova, Karina; Tairbekov, Murad; Mitashov, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The experiments on the newts performed earlier aboard Russian biosate llites showed that the rate of lens and tail regeneration in space wa s greater than on the ground. In parallel it was found that the numbe r of cells in S-phase was greater in space-flown animals than in the ground controls. However, it was unclear whether cell proliferation stimulation was induced by micro-g per se. Molecular mechanisms under lying the change also remained obscure. These issues were addressed b y the joint Russian-American experiment "Regeneration" flown on Foton -M2 in 2005. The method for in-flight delivering DNA precursor BrdU was developed. The experiment showed that during the flight the numbe r of S-phase cells in the regenerating eyes and tails increased. Thes e data together with those obtained earlier suggest that cell prolife ration increases in response to the effects of both micro-g and 1-g a fter return to Earth. The expression of bFGF in regenerating tissues of "flown" newts and ground controls was examined using immuno-histo chemistry. Obtained results suggest that this growth factor is a part icipant of the promotional effect of space flight upon cell prolifera tion in lens and tail regenerates.

  4. Overview of the Development of the Temporary Sleep Station Hygiene Liner Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of manned operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the crew had performed hygiene activities within the aisle way (the habitable volume, not including the sleep areas) of the ISS. The Crew used wet towels, re-hydrated body soap, and "no-rinse" shampoo to cleanse themselves amongst the stowage and systems hardware, referred to as "racks", even without a designated area to dry the wet items. Performing hygiene in this manner became an accepted method; no isolated location was available to the Crew. After several years of hygiene operations, some of the fabric-covered racks began to grow biological material (generically described as mold) and soon became a Crew health concern. Hygiene has one of the strongest impacts on Crew morale, and mandating changes to the Crew routine would have been met with strong resistance. The answer to the conundrum was to develop a liner to be placed within the Temporary Sleep Station (TeSS), one of the Crew s sleeping racks. This liner provided the Crew a means to perform hygiene activities within a private, enclosed area that also significantly decreased the potential to grow mold. This paper will describe the development of the TeSS Hygiene Liner, its impacts on the ISS and Crew, as well as its contribution to hygiene activities used in space today.

  5. The Biostack Experiments I and II aboard Apollo 16 and 17.

    PubMed

    Bucker, H

    1974-01-01

    The concept of the Biostack experiment has become practicable through European scientific collaboration and with help of NASA. The objectives of this experiment flown aboard Apollo 16 and 17 are to study the biological effects of individual heavy cosmic particles of high-energy loss (HZE) not available on earth; to study the influence of additional spaceflight factors; to get some knowledge on the mechanism by which HZE particles damage biological materials; to get information on the spectrum of charge and energy of the cosmic ions in the spacecraft; to estimate the radiation hazards for man in space. For this purpose the Biostack experiment comprises a widespread spectrum of biological objects, and various radiobiological end-points are under investigation. Bacterial spores, protozoa cysts, plant seeds, shrimp eggs, and insect eggs were included in the Biostack experiment packages together with different physical radiation detectors (nuclear emulsions, plastics, AgCl crystals, and LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters). By using special arrangements of biological objects and physical track detectors, individual evaluation of tracks was obtained allowing the identification of each penetrating particle in relation to the possible biological effects on its path. The response of the different biological objects to space flight and HZE ions bombardment was of different degree, presumably depending on the ability of the organism to replace the cells damaged by a hit. The results help to estimate the radiation hazard for astronauts during space missions of long duration.

  6. Variations in digestive physiology of rats after short duration flights aboard the US space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Rabot, S; Szylit, O; Nugon-Baudon, L; Meslin, J C; Vaissade, P; Popot, F; Viso, M

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of microgravity on several endogenous and microbial parameters of digestive physiology. On the occasion of two Spacelab Life Sciences missions, SLS-1 (a 9-day space flight) and SLS-2 (a 14-day space flight), Sprague-Dawley rats flown aboard the US space shuttle were compared to age-matched ground-based controls. In both flights, exposure to microgravity modified cecal fermentation: concentration and profile of short-chain fatty acids were altered, whereas urea and ammonia remained unchanged. Only in SLS-1 was there an induction of intestinal glutathione-S-transferase. Additional analyses in SLS-2 showed a decrease of hepatic CYP450 and of colonic goblet cells containing neutral mucin. After a postflight recovery period equal to the mission length, only modifications of the hepatic and intestinal xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes still persisted. These findings should help to predict the alterations of digestive physiology and detoxification potential likely to occur in astronauts. Their possible influence on health is discussed.

  7. A study of the Martian water vapor over Hellas using OMEGA and PFS aboard Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Melchiorri, R.; Drossart, P.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.; Bibring, J.-P.; Forget, F.; Maltagliati, L.; Titov, D.; Formisano, V.

    2008-06-01

    We used the OMEGA imaging spectrometer aboard Mars Express to study the evolution of the water vapor abundance over the Hellas basin, as a function of the seasonal cycle. The H2O column density is found to range from very low values (between southern fall and winter) up to more than 15 pr-μm during southern spring and summer. The general behavior is consistent with the expected seasonal cycle of water vapor on Mars, as previously observed by TES and modeled. In particular, the maximum water vapor content is observed around the southern solstice, and is significantly less than its northern couterpart. However, there is a noticeable discrepancy around the northern spring equinox (Ls = 330-60°), where the observed H2O column densities are significantly lower than the values predicted by the GCM. Our data show an abrupt enhancement of the water vapor column density (from 3 to 16 pr-μm) on a timescale of 3 days, for Ls = 251-254°. Such an increase, not predicted by the GCM, was also occasionally observed by TES over Hellas during previous martian years at the same season; however, its origin remains to be understood.

  8. AllAboard: Visual Exploration of Cellphone Mobility Data to Optimise Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Sbodio, M; Calabrese, F; Berlingerio, M; Pinelli, F; Nair, R

    2016-02-01

    The deep penetration of mobile phones offers cities the ability to opportunistically monitor citizens' mobility and use data-driven insights to better plan and manage services. With large scale data on mobility patterns, operators can move away from the costly, mostly survey based, transportation planning processes, to a more data-centric view, that places the instrumented user at the center of development. In this framework, using mobile phone data to perform transit analysis and optimization represents a new frontier with significant societal impact, especially in developing countries. In this paper we present AllAboard, an intelligent tool that analyses cellphone data to help city authorities in visually exploring urban mobility and optimizing public transport. This is performed within a self contained tool, as opposed to the current solutions which rely on a combination of several distinct tools for analysis, reporting, optimisation and planning. An interactive user interface allows transit operators to visually explore the travel demand in both space and time, correlate it with the transit network, and evaluate the quality of service that a transit network provides to the citizens at very fine grain. Operators can visually test scenarios for transit network improvements, and compare the expected impact on the travellers' experience. The system has been tested using real telecommunication data for the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and evaluated from a data mining, optimisation and user prospective.

  9. Five-Channel Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Combustion Product Monitoring Aboard Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Borgentun, Carl E.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous combustion product monitoring aboard manned spacecraft can prevent chronic exposure to hazardous compounds and also provides early detection of combustion events. As future missions extend beyond low-Earth orbit, analysis of returned environmental samples becomes impractical and safety monitoring should be performed in situ. Here, we describe initial designs of a five-channel tunable laser absorption spectrometer to continuously monitor combustion products with the goal of minimal maintenance and calibration over long-duration missions. The instrument incorporates dedicated laser channels to simultaneously target strong mid-infrared absorption lines of CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2. The availability of low-power-consumption semiconductor lasers operating in the 2 to 5 micron wavelength range affords the flexibility to select absorption lines for each gas with maximum interaction strength and minimal interference from other gases, which enables the design of a compact and mechanically robust spectrometer with low-level sensitivity. In this paper, we focus primarily on absorption line selection based on the availability of low-power single-mode semiconductor laser sources designed specifically for the target wavelength range.

  10. Wetlab-2 - Quantitative PCR Tools for Spaceflight Studies of Gene Expression Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Wetlab-2 is a research platform for conducting real-time quantitative gene expression analysis aboard the International Space Station. The system enables spaceflight genomic studies involving a wide variety of biospecimen types in the unique microgravity environment of space. Currently, gene expression analyses of space flown biospecimens must be conducted post flight after living cultures or frozen or chemically fixed samples are returned to Earth from the space station. Post-flight analysis is limited for several reasons. First, changes in gene expression can be transient, changing over a timescale of minutes. The delay between sampling on Earth can range from days to months, and RNA may degrade during this period of time, even in fixed or frozen samples. Second, living organisms that return to Earth may quickly re-adapt to terrestrial conditions. Third, forces exerted on samples during reentry and return to Earth may affect results. Lastly, follow up experiments designed in response to post-flight results must wait for a new flight opportunity to be tested.

  11. On the Use of Low-Cost Radar Networks for Collision Warning Systems Aboard Dumpers

    PubMed Central

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; León-Infante, Francisco; Blázquez-García, Rodrigo; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2014-01-01

    The use of dumpers is one of the main causes of accidents in construction sites, many of them with fatal consequences. These kinds of work machines have many blind angles that complicate the driving task due to their large size and volume. To guarantee safety conditions is necessary to use automatic aid systems that can detect and locate the different objects and people in a work area. One promising solution is a radar network based on low-cost radar transceivers aboard the dumper. The complete system is specified to operate with a very low false alarm rate to avoid unnecessary stops of the dumper that reduce its productivity. The main sources of false alarm are the heavy ground clutter, and the interferences between the radars of the network. This article analyses the clutter for LFM signaling and proposes the use of Offset Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (OLFM-CW) as radar signal. This kind of waveform can be optimized to reject clutter and self-interferences. Jointly, a data fusion chain could be used to reduce the false alarm rate of the complete radar network. A real experiment is shown to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system. PMID:24577521

  12. On the use of low-cost radar networks for collision warning systems aboard dumpers.

    PubMed

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; León-Infante, Francisco; Blázquez-García, Rodrigo; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2014-02-26

    The use of dumpers is one of the main causes of accidents in construction sites, many of them with fatal consequences. These kinds of work machines have many blind angles that complicate the driving task due to their large size and volume. To guarantee safety conditions is necessary to use automatic aid systems that can detect and locate the different objects and people in a work area. One promising solution is a radar network based on low-cost radar transceivers aboard the dumper. The complete system is specified to operate with a very low false alarm rate to avoid unnecessary stops of the dumper that reduce its productivity. The main sources of false alarm are the heavy ground clutter, and the interferences between the radars of the network. This article analyses the clutter for LFM signaling and proposes the use of Offset Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (OLFM-CW) as radar signal. This kind of waveform can be optimized to reject clutter and self-interferences. Jointly, a data fusion chain could be used to reduce the false alarm rate of the complete radar network. A real experiment is shown to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system.

  13. Dome Degradation Characterization of Wide-Field-of-View Nonscanner Aboard ERBE and Its Reprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Alok K.; Kato, Seiji; Wong, Takmeng; Su, Wenying; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Rose, Fred; Miller, Walter F.; Bush, Kathryn; Rutan, David A.; Minnis, Patrick; Doelling, David R.; Smith, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) wide-field-of-view (WFOV) nonscanners aboard ERBS and NOAA- 9/NOAA-10 provided broadband shortwave and longwave irradiances from 1985 to 1999. The previous analysis showed dome degradation in the shortwave nonscanner instruments. The correction was performed with a constant spectral (gray assumption) degradation. We suspect that the gray assumption affected daytime longwave irradiance and led to a day-minus-night longwave flux differences (little change in night time longwave) increase over time. Based on knowledge from the CERES process, we will reprocess entire ERBE nonscanner radiation dataset by characterizing shortwave dome transmissivity with spectral dependent degradation using the solar data observed by these instruments. Once spectral dependent degradation is derived, imager derived cloud fraction and the cloud phase as well as surface type over the FOV of nonscanner instruments will be used to model unfiltering coefficients. This poster primarily explains the reprocessing techniques and includes initial comparison of several months of data processed with existing and our recent methods.

  14. Space acceleration measurement system triaxial sensor head error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John E.; Peters, Rex B.; Finley, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is to measure and record the microgravity environment for a given experiment aboard the Space Shuttle. To accomplish this, SAMS uses remote triaxial sensor heads (TSH) that can be mounted directly on or near an experiment. The errors of the TSH are reduced by calibrating it before and after each flight. The associated error budget for the calibration procedure is discussed here.

  15. A Survey of Staphylococcus sp and its Methicillin Resistance aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassinger, V. J.; Fontenot, S. L.; Castro, V. A.; Ott, C.; Healy, M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Within the past few years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged in environments with susceptible hosts in close proximity, such as hospitals and nursing homes. As the International Space Station (ISS) represents a semi-closed environment with a high level of crewmember interaction, an evaluation of isolates of clinical and environmental Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was performed to determine if this trend was also present in astronauts occupying ISS or on surfaces of the space station itself. Methods: Identification of isolates was completed using VITEK (GPI cards, BioMerieux), 16S ribosomal DNA analysis (MicroSeq 500, ABI), and Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting (Divemilab, Bacterial Barcodes). Susceptibility tests were performed using VITEK (GPS-105 cards, BioMerieux) and resistance characteristics were evaluated by testing for the presence of the mecA gene (PBP2' MRSA test kit, Oxoid). Results: Rep-PCR analysis indicated the transfer of S. aureus between crewmembers and between crewmembers and ISS surfaces. While a variety of S. aureus were identified from both the crewmembers and environment, evaluations of the microbial population indicated minimal methicillin resistance. Results of this study indicated that within the semi-closed ISS environment, transfer of bacteria between crewmembers and their environment has been occurring, although there was no indication of a high concentration of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus species. Conclusions: While this study suggests that the spread of methicillin resistant S. aureus is not currently a concern aboard ISS, the increasing incidence of Earth-based antibiotic resistance indicates a need for continued clinical and environmental monitoring.

  16. Retrieval and Validation of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from SAPHIR aboard Megha-Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Nizy; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Raju C, Suresh; Pillai Renju, Ramachandran; Oommen John, Viju

    Upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) has been derived from brightness temperature of SAPHIR payload aboard Megha-Tropiques (MT) mission. The channels of SAPHIR are very close to the water vapor absorption peak at 183.31GHz. First three channels at 183.31±0.2 GHz, 183.31±1.1 GHz and 183.31±2.8 are used for upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) studies. The channel at 183.31±0.2 GHz enables retrieval of humidity up to the highest altitude possible with the present nadir looking microwave humidity sounders. Transformation coefficients for the first three channels for all the incidence angles have been derived using the simulated brightness temperatures and Jocobians with Chevellier data set as input to the radiative transfer model ARTS. These coefficients are used to convert brightness temperatures to upper tropospheric humidity from different channels. A stringent deep convective cloud screeing has been done using the brightness temperatures of SAPHIR itself. The retrieved UTH has been validated with the Jacobian weighted UTH derived from collocated radiosonde observations and also with the humidity profiles derived from ground based microwave radiometer data. UTH variation over the inter-tropical region on global basis has been studied for one year, taking the advantage of the first humidity product with high spatial and temporal resolution over the tropical belt, unbiased with specific local times of the satellite pass. These data set have been used to adress the seasonal and spatial variability of humidity in the tropical upper tropospheric region and humidity variability during Indian monsoon. The details of the MT-SAPHIR characteristics, methodology and results will be presented. begin{enumerate} begin{center}

  17. A brief description of observational results from the supersoft X-ray detector aboard Shenzhou-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Heng-rong; Zhang, Nan; Yu, Min

    2003-10-01

    Observational results from the supersoft X-ray detector (SD) aboard the spacecraft Shenzhou-2 are briefly described. The resultspertain to cosmic γ-ray bursts solar x-ray bursts, high-energy charged particles and soft X-ray background radiation. The detector is a proportional counter with a polypropylene thin-film window of 50 mm diameter, it operates in the energy range 0.23-3.0keV covered by six energy channels. Two grades of time resolution are used: 40 ms for recording burst events and 520 ms when there is no triggering signal resulted from a burst event. Figures 1 and 2 show the light curves and energy spectra of two cosmic γ-ray bursts (starting time 2001 Jan 17, 09:37:25.21 UT and 2001 Mar 9, 12:33:55.692 UT), and Figures 3 and 4, the results on two solar X-ray burst (2001 Apr 6, 19:14:09.11 UT, and 2001 May 20, 06:02:12.58 UT). The detector records the ambient high-energy charged particles when there is no burst event and the shutter of the window is closed. 110 data sets of high-energy charged particles along the spacecraft orbit have been collected. As examples, the variations of the particle counting rate along the orbit are shown in Figs. 6a, 6b, 8e, 8f and 7. More than 10 events of particle precipitation induced by solar proton events have also been recorded, some of which are displayed in Figs.6c-6f and 7. Some of the data of soft X-ray background radiation shown in Fig. 8 were obtained when the shutter was open, and they are important for the data processing of the burst events.

  18. Exploration of the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas Aboard E/V Nautilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. L.; Ballard, R. D.; Brennan, M. L.; Raineault, N. A.; Shank, T. M.; Mayer, L. A.; Roman, C.; Mitchell, G. A.; Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus undertook a two-month expedition to the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas. The primary goal of the Nautilus is to create a focus of international leadership for the development and integration of leading-edge technologies, educational programs, field operations, and public outreach programs for ocean exploration, in partnership with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research, and corporate partners. To do so, the program uses a complement of deep submergence vehicle systems and telepresence technologies to engage scientists, educators and the public, both at sea and ashore, allowing them to become integral members of the on-board exploration team. When discoveries are made, experts ashore are notified and brought aboard virtually within a short period of time to help guide shipboard response before the ship moves on. The 2012 expedition is comprised of four areas of interest. Extensive sidescan mapping took place off the Turkish coasts of the southern Black Sea and eastern Aegean Sea, and was followed by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives on targets of archaeological, geological, and biological interest. In the Black Sea, additional work was done on the porewater chemistry of the sediments in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. Nautilus returned to the Anaximander Seamounts, including Kazan, Amserdam, Thessaloniki, and Athina, to further explore active and formerly active seep sites located in 2010. Finally, based on biological and geological discoveries made on Eratosthenes Seamount in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, we returned to further study chemosynthetic vent communities and tectonic processes.;

  19. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), Space Science's Past, Present and Future Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivey, Reggie; Spearing, Scott; Jordan, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which accommodates science and technology investigations in a "workbench' type environment. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 10,000 hours of scientific payload operations and plans to continue for the life of ISS. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume and allows researchers a controlled pristine environment for their needs. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, + 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. MSG investigations have involved research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, and plant growth technologies. Modifications to the MSG facility are currently under way to expand the capabilities and provide for investigations involving Life Science and Biological research. In addition, the MSG video system is being replaced with a state-of-the-art, digital video system with high definition/high speed capabilities, and with near real-time downlink capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, and an

  20. The Capillary Flow Experiments Aboard the International Space Station: Increments 9-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenson, Ryan M.; Weislogel, Mark M.; Tavan, Noel T.; Chen, Yongkang; Semerjian, Ben; Bunnell, Charles T.; Collicott, Steven H.; Klatte, Jorg; dreyer, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the experimental, analytical, and numerical results of the Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE) performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments were conducted in space beginning with Increment 9 through Increment 16, beginning August 2004 and ending December 2007. Both primary and extra science experiments were conducted during 19 operations performed by 7 astronauts including: M. Fincke, W. McArthur, J. Williams, S. Williams, M. Lopez-Alegria, C. Anderson, and P. Whitson. CFE consists of 6 approximately 1 to 2 kg handheld experiment units designed to investigate a selection of capillary phenomena of fundamental and applied importance, such as large length scale contact line dynamics (CFE-Contact Line), critical wetting in discontinuous structures (CFE-Vane Gap), and capillary flows and passive phase separations in complex containers (CFE-Interior Corner Flow). Highly quantitative video from the simply performed flight experiments provide data helpful in benchmarking numerical methods, confirming theoretical models, and guiding new model development. In an extensive executive summary, a brief history of the experiment is reviewed before introducing the science investigated. A selection of experimental results and comparisons with both analytic and numerical predictions is given. The subsequent chapters provide additional details of the experimental and analytical methods developed and employed. These include current presentations of the state of the data reduction which we anticipate will continue throughout the year and culminate in several more publications. An extensive appendix is used to provide support material such as an experiment history, dissemination items to date (CFE publication, etc.), detailed design drawings, and crew procedures. Despite the simple nature of the experiments and procedures, many of the experimental results may be practically employed to enhance the design of spacecraft engineering

  1. ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) PVS (Propagation Validation System) Field Strength Measurements, March 1977.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-03

    field-strength measurements were taken in Connecticut and aboard three submarines located in the North-Atlantic/Norwegian- Sea area. The daytime...Develco, Inc., 404 Tasman Dr. Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Dr. Eivind Trane, NDRE, P.O. Box 25, 2007 Kjeller, Norway RCA David Sarnoff Research Center (K

  2. Energy deposition rates by charged particles measured during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, A.; Torkar, K. M.; Bjordal, J.; Lundblad, J. A.; Soraas, F.; Grandal, B.; Smith, L. G.; Ulwick, J. C.; Vancour, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the precipitation of electrons and positive ions (in the keV to MeV range) detected aboard eight rockets launched from Northern Scandinavia are reported together with corresponding satellite data. The downgoing integral fluxes indicate the temporal fluctuations during each flight. Height profiles of the energy deposition into the atmosphere at different levels of geomagnetic disturbance are given.

  3. U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon Arrives Aboard U.S.S. Hornet for Apollo 11 Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (center), is saluted by the honor guard of flight deck crewmen when he arrives aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 11 mission, to watch recovery operations and welcome the astronauts home. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days following the mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun.

  4. Knowledge Value Added (KVA) Methodology as a Tool for Measuring the Utilization of Knowledge Assets Aboard Marine Corps Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    1996 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT from...Value Added Methodologies. Masters Thesis, Information Technology Management Department, Naval Postgraduate School, Jun 2003. Bourazanis...Management Techniques and Their Impact on the Marine Corps in a Navy Marine Corps Intranet Environment. Masters Thesis, Information Technology Management Department

  5. Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter Microdosimetry Measurements Utilized Aboard Aircraft and in Accelerator Based Space Radiation Shielding Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad B.; Wilkins, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), a description of the spatially restricted LET Model, high energy proton TEPC and the results of modeling, the study of shielding and the results from the flight exposures with the TEPC.

  6. Water and carbon dioxide sources on comet 67P nucleus as measured from the VIRTIS-H instrument aboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, D.; . Debout, V.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Drossart, P.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M.; Arnold, G.; Biver, N.; Crovisier, J.; Encrenaz, T.; Schmitt, B.; Virtis Team

    2015-10-01

    Using the high spectral-resolution channel of the Visible InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS-H) onboard Rosetta, we observed the n3 vibrational bands of H2O and CO2 at 2.67 and 4.27 μm in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [1]. Observations were undertaken in limb viewing geometry with various line-of-sight (LOS) orientations in the body-fixed frame. A geometry tool is used to characterize the position of the LOS with respect to geomorphologic regions [6] and the illumination properties of these regions. We will present the heliocentric evolution, diurnal variations and distribution of H2O and CO2 production. Inhomogeneities in the CO2/H2O relative production rates will be discussed

  7. Changes in developmental capacity of artemia cyst and chromosomal aberrations in lettuce seeds flown aboard Salyut-7 (Biobloc III experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzgodina, V.; Kovalev, E. E.; Maximova, E. N.; Gaubin, Y.; Planel, H.; Gasset, G.; Pianezzi, B.; Clegg, J.

    This paper gives the results of investigations performed on the first container (A) of the Biobloc III experiment, flown aboard the orbital station Salyut 7 for 40 days. The space flight resulted in a decreased developmental capacity of Artemia cysts, hit or not hit by the HZE particles. No effect was observed in cysts in bulk. A synergetic effect of microgravity and gamma pre irradiation is described. The germination of in-flight lettuce seeds was decreased. The space flight resulted also in a higher percentage of cells with chromosomal aberrations. Relations between biological response, TEL and location of HZE particles are discussed.

  8. A densitometric analysis of IIaO film flown aboard the space shuttle transportation system STS #3, 7, and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Since the United States of America is moving into an age of reusable space vehicles, both electronic and photographic materials will continue to be an integral part of the recording techniques available. Film as a scientifically viable recording technique in astronomy is well documented. There is a real need to expose various types of films to the Shuttle environment. Thus, the main objective was to look at the subtle densitometric changes of canisters of IIaO film that was placed aboard the Space Shuttle 3 (STS-3).

  9. Results of the joint utilization of laser integrated experiments flown on payload GAS-449 aboard Columbia mission 61-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckerheide, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The high peak power neodymium YAG laser and the HeNe laser aboard GAS-449 have demonstrated the survivability of the devices in the micro-gravity, cosmic radiation, thermal, and shock environment of space. Some pharmaceuticals and other materials flown in both the active and passive status have demonstrated reduction in volume and unusual spectroscopic changes. X-ray detectors have shown cosmic particle hits with accompanying destruction at their interaction points. Some scattering in the plates is in evidence. Some results of both active and passive experiments on board the GAS-449 payload are evaluated.

  10. Select Methodology for Validating Advanced Satellite Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xi; Smith, William L.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Measurement system validation is crucial to achieving this goal and maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns including satellite under-flights with well calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of the validation task. This presentation focuses on an overview of validation methodology developed for assessment of high spectral resolution infrared systems, and includes results of preliminary studies performed to investigate the performance of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument aboard the MetOp-A satellite.

  11. The development of the Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) experiment aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramall, Nathan E.; Quinn, Richard; Mattioda, Andrew; Bryson, Kathryn; Chittenden, Julie D.; Cook, Amanda; Taylor, Cindy; Minelli, Giovanni; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricco, Antonio J.; Squires, David; Santos, Orlando; Friedericks, Charles; Landis, David; Jones, Nykola C.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Hoffmann, Søren V.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) experiment is one of two scientific payloads aboard the triple-cube satellite Organism/ORganic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS). O/OREOS is the first technology demonstration mission of the NASA Astrobiology Small Payloads Program. The 1-kg, 1000-cm3 SEVO cube is investigating the chemical evolution of organic materials in interstellar space and planetary environments by exposing organic molecules under controlled conditions directly to the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particle and electromagnetic radiation environment. O/OREOS was launched on November 19, 2010 into a 650-km, 72°-inclination orbit and has a nominal operational lifetime of six months. Four classes of organic compounds, namely an amino acid, a quinone, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), and a metallo-porphyrin are being studied. Initial reaction conditions were established by hermetically sealing the thin-film organic samples in self-contained micro-environments. Chemical changes in the samples caused by direct exposure to LEO radiation and by interactions with the irradiated microenvironments are monitored in situ by ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (UV/VIS/NIR) absorption spectroscopy using a novel compact fixed-grating CCD spectrometer with the Sun as its light source. The goals of the O/OREOS mission include: (1) demonstrating key small satellite technologies that can enable future low-cost astrobiology experiments, (2) deploying a miniature UV/VIS/NIR spectrometer suitable for in-situ astrobiology and other scientific investigations, (3) testing the capability to establish a variety of experimental reaction conditions to enable the study of astrobiological processes on small satellites, and (4) measuring the chemical evolution of organic molecules in LEO under conditions that can be extrapolated to interstellar and planetary environments. In this paper, the science and technology development of the SEVO instrument payload and its

  12. Combustion Research aboard the ISS Utilizing the Combustion Integrated Rack and Microgravity Science Glovebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutliff, T. J.; Otero, A. M.; Urban, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    The Physical Sciences Research Program of NASA has chartered a broad suite of peer-reviewed research investigating both fundamental combustion phenomena and applied combustion research topics. Fundamental research provides insights to develop accurate simulations of complex combustion processes and allows developers to improve the efficiency of combustion devices, to reduce the production of harmful emissions, and to reduce the incidence of accidental uncontrolled combustion (fires, explosions). The applied research benefit humans living and working in space through its fire safety program. The Combustion Science Discipline is implementing a structured flight research program utilizing the International Space Station (ISS) and two of its premier facilities, the Combustion Integrated Rack of the Fluids and Combustion Facility and the Microgravity Science Glovebox to conduct this space-based research. This paper reviews the current vision of Combustion Science research planned for International Space Station implementation from 2003 through 2012. A variety of research efforts in droplets and sprays, solid-fuels combustion, and gaseous combustion have been independently selected and critiqued through a series of peer-review processes. During this period, while both the ISS carrier and its research facilities are under development, the Combustion Science Discipline has synergistically combined research efforts into sub-topical areas. To conduct this research aboard ISS in the most cost effective and resource efficient manner, the sub-topic research areas are implemented via a multi-user hardware approach. This paper also summarizes the multi-user hardware approach and recaps the progress made in developing these research hardware systems. A balanced program content has been developed to maximize the production of fundamental and applied combustion research results within the current budgetary and ISS operational resource constraints. Decisions on utilizing the

  13. Ocular examination for trauma; clinical ultrasound aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, Leroy; Sharipov, Salizhan; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Melton, Shannon; Hamilton, Douglas R.; McFarlin, Kellie; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    aboard the ISS by a non-expert operator using remote guidance. Ocular ultrasound images were of diagnostic quality despite the 2-second communication latency and the unconventional setting of a weightless spacecraft environment. The remote guidance techniques developed to facilitate this successful NASA research experiment will support wider applications of ultrasound for remote medicine on Earth including the assessment of pupillary reactions in patients with severe craniofacial trauma and swelling.

  14. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  15. STS 134, 135 and 26S Return Samples: Air Quality aboard Shuttle (STS-134) and International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    This is a very limited set of samples on which to perform an air quality assessment. However, based on these samples, we have no reason to believe that nominal ISS air is unsafe to breathe. We must continue to be vigilant when dealing with nominal atmospheres in ISS. New, unmanned modules require special attention when the crew first enters. Carbon Monoxide Accumulation aboard ISS: Beginning in late 2008 the nominal concentrations of CO began increasing gradually (Figure 1). The results from samples returned on this flight indicate that the CO concentrations, after dropping in late 2009, have cycled upward and then settled back to concentrations near 2 mg/m3. In any case, these changes are well below the 180-day SMAC for CO, which is17 mg/m3. There is no threat to crew health. Carbon Dioxide: This anthropogenic compound has drawn much attention recently because of the possibility that it could contribute to the effects of intracranial hypertension experienced because of spaceflight-induced fluid shifts. From now on we will maintain a plot (Figure 2) of carbon dioxide concentrations ( SD) by averaging the values found in the 3-5 mini-GSC samples taken each month in diverse locations of the ISS. This will enable us to estimate the average exposure of crewmembers to carbon dioxide during their stay aboard the ISS. In general, concentrations are being maintained below 3.5 mmHg. Figure 1

  16. Comparison between carbon monoxide measurements from spaceborne and airborne platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, V. S.; Cahoon, D. R.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.; Scheel, H. E.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements of air pollution from satellites (MAPS) experiment measured the distribution of middle tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) from the Space Shuttle during October 1984. A critical area of the experiment is the assessment of experimental error of the MAPS data. This error is determined by the comparison between the space-based CO data and concurrent, direct CO measurements taken aboard aircraft. Because of the variability in the CO measurements near land sources, a strategy for comparing the tropospheric CO measurements over the remote oceans is presented.

  17. Active and passive microwave measurements in Hurricane Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, V. E.; Bahn, G. S.; Grantham, W. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Jones, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center analysis of the airborne microwave remote sensing measurements of Hurricane Allen obtained on August 5 and 8, 1980 is summarized. The instruments were the C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometer and the Ku-band airborne microwave scatterometer. They were carried aboard a NOAA aircraft making storm penetrations at an altitude of 3000 m and are sensitive to rain rate, surface wind speed, and surface wind vector. The wind speed is calculated from the increase in antenna brightness temperature above the estimated calm sea value. The rain rate is obtained from the difference between antenna temperature increases measured at two frequencies, and wind vector is determined from the sea surface normalized radar cross section measured at several azimuths. Comparison wind data were provided from the inertial navigation systems aboard both the C-130 aircraft at 3000 m and a second NOAA aircraft (a P-3) operating between 500 and 1500 m. Comparison rain rate data were obtained with a rain radar aboard the P-3. Evaluation of the surface winds obtained with the two microwave instruments was limited to comparisons with each other and with the flight level winds. Two important conclusions are drawn from these comparisons: (1) the radiometer is accurate when predicting flight level wind speeds and rain; and (2) the scatterometer produces well behaved and consistent wind vectors for the rain free periods.

  18. The GNSS polarimetric radio-occultation technique to sense precipitation events: a new concept to be tested aboard PAZ Low Earth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, Sergio; Oliveras, Santi; Cardellach, Estel; Rius, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) experiment, to be conducted aboard the Spanish PAZ satellite, consists of a radio occultation (RO) mission provided with dual-polarization capabilities. The research with polarimetric RO data has the goal of assessing the capabilities and limitations of this technique to infer profiles of heavy precipitation. The technique aims to provide vertical profiles of precipitation simultaneously to the vertical profiles of thermodynamic parameters (standard RO products) perfectly collocated both in space and time. If successful, the polarimetric RO will represent the first technique able to provide these complementary information on precipitation. This is a relevant input for studies on heavy and violent rainfall events, which being poorly represented by the current-generation of Numerical Weather Prediction and General Circulation Models appear to be difficult to forecast on all time-scales. The Low Earth Orbiter hosting this experiment, to be launched in 2013, will orbit at 500 km altitude in a near-Polar orbit. The Radio Occulation payload includes a RO GNSS receiver and a dual polarization (H/V) limb oriented antenna to capture the signals of setting GNSS transmitters. NOAA and UCAR participate in the ground-segment of the radiometric experiment to enable near-real time dissemination of the level-1 standard RO products. The space-based GNSS RO technique scans the atmosphere vertically at fine resolution (close to 300 meter in the troposphere) by precisely measure the delay between a GNSS transmitter and a GNSS receiver aboard a Low Earth Orbiter, when the former is setting below or rising above the Earth limb. The standard, thermodynamical, products are extracted from the excess delay induced by the atmosphere at different layers. This presentation will not focus on this well-established application, but a novel concept using polarimetry to also retrieve rain information. The precipitation-measurement principle is

  19. Using the Flow-3D General Moving Object Model to Simulate Coupled Liquid Slosh - Container Dynamics on the SPHERES Slosh Experiment: Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulman, Richard; Kirk, Daniel; Marsell, Brandon; Roth, Jacob; Schallhorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The SPHERES Slosh Experiment (SSE) is a free floating experimental platform developed for the acquisition of long duration liquid slosh data aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The data sets collected will be used to benchmark numerical models to aid in the design of rocket and spacecraft propulsion systems. Utilizing two SPHERES Satellites, the experiment will be moved through different maneuvers designed to induce liquid slosh in the experiment's internal tank. The SSE has a total of twenty-four thrusters to move the experiment. In order to design slosh generating maneuvers, a parametric study with three maneuvers types was conducted using the General Moving Object (GMO) model in Flow-30. The three types of maneuvers are a translation maneuver, a rotation maneuver and a combined rotation translation maneuver. The effectiveness of each maneuver to generate slosh is determined by the deviation of the experiment's trajectory as compared to a dry mass trajectory. To fully capture the effect of liquid re-distribution on experiment trajectory, each thruster is modeled as an independent force point in the Flow-3D simulation. This is accomplished by modifying the total number of independent forces in the GMO model from the standard five to twenty-four. Results demonstrate that the most effective slosh generating maneuvers for all motions occurs when SSE thrusters are producing the highest changes in SSE acceleration. The results also demonstrate that several centimeters of trajectory deviation between the dry and slosh cases occur during the maneuvers; while these deviations seem small, they are measureable by SSE instrumentation.

  20. [Levels of radiation exposure and radiation risk in flights aboard the orbital complex "Mir" and the International space station].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Petrov, V M

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculating mean daily values of absorbed and equivalent doses from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Earth's radiation belts (ERB) to crew members on orbital missions aboard Mir and the International space station during solar minimum and maximum. Calculated doses were corrected in accordance with the dosimetric and spectrometric data from Mir missions 18 through to 23 that took place in the period of solar minimum. Contribution of local and albedo neutrons to equivalent dose was also taken into account. Presented are calculated total radiation risk and tumor risk over life time for Mir and ISS crews following missions of varying duration, and predictions for reduction in life span in view of recent dosimetric data.

  1. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Alex; Chamberlain, Dale J.; Forsyth, Sasha W.; Hanna, David S.; Scovazzo, Paul; Horner, Michael B.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Todd, Paul; Heyenga, A. Gerard; Kliss, Mark H.; Bula, Raymond; Yetka, Robert

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support.

  2. The effects of background noise on cognitive performance during a 70 hour simulation of conditions aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Baranski, J V; Thompson, M M; Abel, S M

    2003-01-01

    A total of twenty-five subjects were cloistered for a period of 70 hours, five at a time, in a hyperbaric chamber modified to simulate the conditions aboard the International Space Station (ISS). A recording of 72 dBA background noise from the ISS service module was used to simulate noise conditions on the ISS. Two groups experienced the background noise throughout the experiment, two other groups experienced the noise only during the day, and one control group was cloistered in a quiet environment. All subjects completed a battery of cognitive tests nine times throughout the experiment. The data showed little or no effect of noise on reasoning, perceptual decision-making, memory, vigilance, mood, or subjective indices of fatigue. Our results suggest that the level of noise on the space station should not affect cognitive performance, at least over a period of several days.

  3. Results on artemia cysts, lettuce and tobacco seeds in the Biobloc 4 experiment flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1129

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubin, Y.; Planel, H.; Gasset, G.; Pianezzi, B.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of space flight factors, in particular the heavy ion component of cosmic rays, on dormant stages of life forms were investigated as part of the Biobloc 4 experiment flown aboard the Cosmos 1129 biosatellite. Artemia cysts and seeds of tobacco and lettuce plants were placed in tubes and in monolayers sandwiched between layers of visual particle track detectors. Although Artemia cysts exposed in the dry state did not differ from ground controls, hydrated cysts exhibited a slight decrease in hatchability and reduced (C-14)O2 incorporation and protein and nucleic acid synthesis. For cysts held in the monolayers, hits by HZE particles were observed to stimulate emergence, hatching and survival. Higher proportions of chromosomal aberrations were found in lettuce seeds hit by HZE particles, while space flight produced a stimulatory effect on both germination rate and abnormality frequency in both hit and nonhit tobacco seeds. 9 references.

  4. Results of cytogenetic studies of seeds after their extended orbital flight aboard the Salyut orbital scientific station.

    PubMed

    Nevzgodina, L V; Grigoryev, Y G; Papyan, N M; Skukina, I S; Farber, Y V

    1973-01-01

    Air-dry seeds of Lactuca sativa (lettuce) with a different level of spontaneous mitagenesis were used in these experiments. A part of the seeds was given pre-flight gamma radiation in doses of 1 and 10 krads. Comparison of the results for the in-flight experiments, laboratory and "transport" control showed an increase of cells with chromosome aberrations and an increase of radiobiological effect in irradiated seeds flown aboard the Salyut scientific station. A comparative analysis was made of the cytogenetic changes in seeds after their exposure to different periods of weightlessness during the Cosmos 368, Zond 8 and Salyut missions. The effect of weightlessness of different duration on the development of cytogenetic changes in irradiated and unirradiated seeds is discussed.

  5. 10 day flight performance of the plant generic bioprocessing apparatus (PGBA) plant growth facility aboard STS-77

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehn, A.; Chamberlain, D.J.; Forsyth, S.W.; Hanna, D.S.; Scovazzo, P.; Horner, M.B.; Stodieck, L.S.; Todd, P.; Heyenga, A.G.; Kliss, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    PGBA, a plant growth facility developed for space flight biotechnology research, successfully grew a total of 30 plants in a closed, multi-crop chamber for 10 days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor (STS-77). {ital Artemisia annua, Catharanthus roseus, Pinus taeda, Spinacia oleracea and Trifolium repens} were the five species studied during this mission. The primary mission objectives were to study the effects of microgravity for commercial and pharmaceutical production purposes. PGBA is a payload that represents a consortium of interests including BioServe Space Technologies (payload sponsor), NASA Ames Research Center (Controlled Ecological Life Support System, CELSS, Flight Program), Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), and industrial affiliates (spaceflight effects on plants and formation of plant products such as pharmaceuticals). Although BioServe is responsible for the flight hardware development and integration of PGBA, NASA Ames, WSCAR and industrial affiliates provide significant hardware subsystems and technical biological expertise support. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Results on Artemia cysts, lettuce and tobacco seeds in the biobloc 4 experiment flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubin, Y.; Planel, H.; Gasset, G.; Pianezzi, B.; Delpoux, M.; Clegg, J.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maximova, E. N.; Miller, A. T.

    Artemia cysts, lettuce and tobacco seeds were flown aboard the Cosmos 1129 for 19 days. A correlative method was used in order to determine the passage of cosmic heavy ions (HZE particles) through the biological test objects. This space flight resulted in a decrease on hatchability, nucleic acid and protein synthesis in hydrated Artemia cysts. HZE particle effects on plant cellular chromosomes are confirmed. In tobacco seeds, a stimulating effect on germination rate and a higher frequency of abnormalities were observed. Dormant biological objects are a very suitable material to study cosmic ray effects: these objects can be arranged in monolayers and sandwiched between visual track detectors in order to determine the passage of the cosmic heavy ions (HZE particles). On the other hand this method allows us to study effects of microgravity and those of the protonic component of cosmic rays in the objects not hit by the HZE particles.

  7. [Morphological changes in gastric wall of mongolian gerbils following the 12-day orbital flight aboard Foton-M3].

    PubMed

    Atiashkin, D A; Bykov, É G

    2012-01-01

    Gastric wall of Meriones unguiculatus is distinguished by species-specific properties arising from the peculiar proportion of interstitium, muscle and epithelial tissues. Exposure to the factors of the 12-d Foton-M3 flight led to microfocal lesions of the mucous coat, dystrophic developments in the acid glands, dissociation of the mucous barrier function and deterioration of its biosynthetic function. Modifications of the tinctorial properties of the interstitium reticulum in every stomach layer progressed concurrently with reductions in prismatic epithelium height, as well as in mucous and muscular layer thickness. It is assumed that existence in the low gravity aboard the Biosat stimulated involutory processes in the gastric wall. Animals of the ground synchronous control conducted in the flight equipment mockup (Kontur-L) exhibited though similar yet less pronounced changes.

  8. Public school teachers in the U.S. evaluate the educational impact of student space experiments launched by expendable vehicles, aboard Skylab, and aboard Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Burkhalter, B B; McLean, J E; Curtis, J P; James, G S

    1991-12-01

    Space education is a discipline that has evolved at an unprecedented rate over the past 25 years. Although program proceedings, research literature, and historical documentation have captured fragmented pieces of information about student space experiments, the field lacks a valid comprehensive study that measures the educational impact of sounding rockets, Skylab, Ariane, AMSAT, and Space Shuttle. The lack of this information is a problem for space educators worldwide which led to a national study with classroom teachers. Student flown experiments continue to offer a unique experiential approach to teach students thinking and reasoning skills that are imperative in the current international competitive environment in which they live and will work. Understanding the history as well as the current status and educational spin-offs of these experimental programs strengthens the teaching capacity of educators throughout the world to develop problem solving skills and various higher mental processes in the schools. These skills and processes enable students to use their knowledge more effectively and efficiently long after they leave the classroom. This paper focuses on student space experiments as a means of motivating students to meet this educational goal successfully.

  9. Operational modes for a wave injection facility aboard spacelab and a sub-satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Various modes of operation are described for an orbiting wave injection facility planned to measure the properties of waves propagating in space plasma. Such a facility would cover a wide frequency range including MF and HF. Phase shift and Doppler shift measurements will yield more accurate measurements of echo time delay and the angle of arrival. Because Spacelab will involve some sub-satellites, some consideration is given to propagation between two vehicles both at HF and VHF.

  10. Russian measurements of neutron energy spectra on the Mir orbital station.

    PubMed

    Lyagushin, V I; Dudkin, V E; Potapov, Y V; Sevastianov, V D

    2001-06-01

    Results of the experiments on neutron energy spectra measurements within broad energy range from 5 x 10(-7) to 2 x 10(2) MeV aboard the Mir orbital station and equivalent neutron dose estimation are presented. Four measurement techniques were used during the experiments. The shape of spectra and their absolute values are in good agreement. According to those experiments, an equivalent neutron dose depends upon effective shielding thickness and spacecraft mass. The neutron dose mentioned is comparable with that of ionizing radiation. Neutron flux levels measured aboard the Mir station have shown that a neutron spectrometer involving broad energy range will be used within the radiation monitoring systems in manned space flights.

  11. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  12. 47 CFR 25.227 - Blanket licensing provisions for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAAs) receiving in the 10.95-11...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Blanket licensing provisions for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAAs) receiving in the 10.95-11.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 11.45-11.7 GHz (space-to-Earth), and 11.7-12.2 GHz (space-to-Earth) frequency bands and transmitting in the 14.0-14.5 GHz...

  13. 47 CFR 25.227 - Blanket licensing provisions for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAAs) receiving in the 10.95-11...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Blanket licensing provisions for Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft (ESAAs) receiving in the 10.95-11.2 GHz (space-to-Earth), 11.45-11.7 GHz (space-to-Earth), and 11.7-12.2 GHz (space-to-Earth) frequency bands and transmitting in the 14.0-14.5 GHz...

  14. Seroepidemiologic Investigation of an Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009 Aboard a U.S. Navy Vessel - San Diego, 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Naval Health Research Center Seroepidemiologic Investigation of An Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009 Aboard A US Navy Vessell – San...Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (from – to) 2009 4. TITLE Seroepidemiologic Investigation of an Outbreak of Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 2009...outbreaks. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Adolescent; adult; Disease Outbreaks; H1N1 Subtype/genetics; epidemiology; Influenza A Virus; military personnel 16

  15. Lidar and Occultation Remote Sensing Applied to Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.

    2008-05-01

    The use of lidar began in the early 1960s soon after a laboratory laser was shown to Q-switch and emit short pulses of light. The lidar technique makes measurements typically through backscattering, fluorescence, attenuation and absorption, and has become more and more sophisticated over the years, being used at ground stations and aboard airplanes and spacecraft. Routine measurements of aerosols, clouds, ozone, and atmospheric constituents like wind speeds and direction are being made. The passive technique of solar, lunar and stellar occultation has been used aboard balloons, aircraft and spacecraft also beginning in the 1960s, and since 1975, aboard spacecraft. It is a technique that, like lidar, is capable of vertical profiling, and has produced global measurements of stratospheric aerosols and ozone on a routine basis since about 1978. This talk will present a walk through the history of the author's involvement in the development of and measurements using these two techniques. Record-setting data sets on stratospheric aerosols from a ground-based lidar and satellite measurements of global aerosols and ozone (SAM~II and SAGE series) will be presented. The naming and characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds will be described in the context of the ozone hole. Aircraft lidar campaigns to study the impact of volcanic aerosols will be described, as well as the use of airborne lidar to validate satellite occultation measurements. Finally, the proof-of-principle LITE Space Shuttle lidar experiment and the long duration unmanned CALIPSO lidar mission presently in orbit will be discussed along with example results. A look-back at these contributions will be followed by a look into the future.

  16. Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Based on Samples Returned Aboard STS-ll1 (UF2) in June 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of grab sample canisters (GSCs) and 2 solid sorbent air samplers (SSASs) returned aboard STS-111 are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the GSCs were 86-106% and 62% to 136 % from the SSASs; 2 tubes with low surrogate recoveries were not reported. Pressure tracking indicated no leaks in the canisters during analysis. Recoveries from lab and trip controls for formaldehyde analyses ranged from 87 to 96%. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). Because of the inertness of Freon 218 (octafluoropropane, OFP), Its contribution to the NMVOC is subtracted and tabulated separately. Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols (including acetone) are also shown for each sample. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is listed separately. The table shows that the air quality in general was acceptable for crew respiration; however, certain values shown in bold require further explanation. The 1.05 T value on 2/28/02 was caused by an unusually high measurement ofhexamethylcyc1otrisiloxane (T value = 0.50), which is not a concern. The MPLM T value of 1.42 and the alcohol level of 7.5 mg/cu m were due to an overall polluted atmosphere, which was expected at first entry. The major T-value component was carbon monoxide at a contribution of 0.44 units. Since the crew was only exposed momentarily to the polluted atmosphere, no health effects are expected. The formaldehyde value of 0.060 mg/cu m found in the Lab sample from 3/27/02 is cause for concern because the Lab consistently shows higher concentrations of formaldehyde than the SM and occasionally the concentrations are above the acceptable guideline. Levels of OFP have remained low, suggesting

  17. Global exospheric temperatures from ESRO 4 scale height measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Prior, E. J.; Lake, L. R.; Nicholson, J. Y., III; Fricke, K.

    1977-01-01

    The scale height temperatures considered are based on molecular nitrogen measurements by the gas analyzer aboard the ESRO 4 in the altitude range from 280 to 310 km during the interval from December 1972 to April 1974, a period of low solar activity. At the altitude of measurement during the considered period, the scale height temperature is essentially the exospheric temperature. The mean scale height temperature derived from 1833 independent N2 scale heights is 708 K. It is concluded that the ESRO 4 data provides evidence of mean global temperatures of less than 800 K.

  18. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  19. Satellite Occultation Measurements-Contributions to Middle Atmosphere Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    2003-12-01

    Solar occultation measurements from earth-orbit began with two orbits of data from aboard Apollo during the Apollo-Soyuz test project flight in 1975. The instrument was called SAM for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement. It was a simple proof-of-principle, one-spectral channel experiment that led to the long-duration occultation measurement series beginning in 1978 with the launch of SAM II aboard Nimbus 7. SAGE I, II, and III followed with increasing instrument complexity and capability. SAGE II and III are presently in orbit providing excellent high vertically-resolved measurements of aerosol, ozone, and other constituents. Other occultation sensors for long-duration measurements were launched in the 1990s including HALOE and POAM. This paper will present a historical overview of satellite occultation missions from 1975 to the present. The fundamentals of the occultation technique will be presented along with its advantages and comparison with other remote sensors. The occultation sensors, to-date, have produced exceedingly important measurements that have contributed to atmospheric and climate science. These have included such measurements as: the naming and characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds; aerosol and ozone associated with the wintertime polar vortex phenomena; ozone, HCl and HF trends associated with the effects of CFCs; the impact of volcanic aerosols; and aerosol and cirrus cloud distributions and trends. As the lead-off paper in this session, examples of the above data will be presented. Finally, some "lessons-learned" from these occultation missions will be discussed.

  20. Microstructure and Macrosegregation Study of Directionally Solidified Al-7Si Samples Processed Terrestrially and Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angart, Samuel; Erdman, R. G.; Poirier, David R.; Tewari, S.N.; Grugel, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    This talk reports research that has been carried out under the aegis of NASA as part of a collaboration between ESA and NASA for solidification experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus has been on the effect of convection on the microstructural evolution and macrosegregation in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys during directional solidification (DS). The DS-experiments have been carried out under 1-g at Cleveland State University (CSU) and under low-g on the International Space Station (ISS). The thermal processing-history of the experiments is well defined for both the terrestrially-processed samples and the ISS-processed samples. We have observed that the primary dendrite arm spacings of two samples grown in the low-g environment of the ISS show good agreement with a dendrite-growth model based on diffusion controlled growth. The gravity-driven convection (i.e., thermosolutal convection) in terrestrially grown samples has the effect of decreasing the primary dendrite arm spacings and causes macrosgregation. In order to process DS-samples aboard the ISS, dendritic-seed crystals have to partially remelted in a stationary thermal gradient before the DS is carried out. Microstructural changes and macrosegregation effects during this period are described.