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Sample records for abomasal infusion catheters

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A TOOL TO INSERT ABOMASAL INFUSION LINES INTO DAIRY COWS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A tool was developed to aid in ruminal insertion of abomasal infusion lines into dairy cows. The tool consisted of two pieces cut from polyvinyl chloride pipe. The first piece of pipe, the insertion tool, contained a groove that held the flexible plastic flange that was on the end of the infusion ...

  2. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Galindo, C; Larsen, M; Ouellet, D R; Maxin, G; Pellerin, D; Lapierre, H

    2015-11-01

    Nine Holstein cows fitted with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used to study the effects of supplementing AA on milk lactose secretion, whole-body rate of appearance (WB-Ra) of glucose, and tissue metabolism of glucose, lactate, glycerol, and β-OH-butyrate (BHBA) in postpartum dairy cows according to a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures in time. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and were allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (n=4) or abomasal infusion of free AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to the same basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half the maximal dose at 1 d in milk (DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d from DIM 2 to 29 to cover the estimated essential AA deficit. On DIM 5, 15, and 29, D[6,6-(2)H2]-glucose (23.7 mmol/h) was infused into a jugular vein for 5h, and 6 blood samples were taken from arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary sources at 45-min intervals, starting 1h after the initiation of the D[6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion. Trans-organ fluxes were calculated as veno-arterial differences times plasma flow (splanchnic: downstream dilution of deacetylated para-aminohippurate; mammary: Fick principle using Phe+Tyr). Energy-corrected milk and lactose yields increased on average with AA-CN by 6.4 kg/d and 353 g/d, respectively, with no DIM × treatment interaction. Despite increased AA supply and increased demand for lactose secretion with AA-CN, net hepatic release of glucose remained unchanged, but WB-Ra of glucose tended to increase with AA-CN. Portal true flux of glucose increased with AA-CN and represented, on average, 17% of WB-Ra. Splanchnic true flux of glucose was unaltered by treatments and was numerically equivalent to WB-Ra, averaging 729 and 741 mmol/h, respectively. Mammary glucose utilization increased with AA-CN infusion, averaging 78% of WB-Ra, and increased

  3. Effect of abomasal infusion of oligofructose on portal-drained visceral ammonia and urea-nitrogen fluxes in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Røjen, B A; Larsen, M; Kristensen, N B

    2012-12-01

    The effects of abomasal infusion of oligofructose in lactating dairy cows on the relationship between hindgut fermentation and N metabolism, and its effects on NH(3) absorption and transfer of blood urea-N across the portal-drained viscera versus ruminal epithelia were investigated. Nine lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in major splanchnic blood vessels were used in an unbalanced crossover design with 14-d periods. Treatments were continuous abomasal infusion of water or 1,500 g/d of oligofructose. The same basal diet was fed with both treatments. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, hepatic, and ruminal vein blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5h before the morning feeding and at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 h after feeding. It was hypothesized that an increased supply of fermentable substrate to the hindgut would increase the uptake of urea-N from blood to the hindgut at the expense of urea-N uptake to the forestomach. The study showed that abomasal oligofructose infusion decreased the total amount of urea-N transferred from the blood to the gut, NH(3) absorption, and arterial blood urea-N concentration. Subsequently, hepatic NH(3) uptake and urea-N production also decreased with oligofructose infusion. Additionally, urea-N concentration in milk and urinary N excretion decreased with oligofructose treatment. The oligofructose infusion did not affect ruminal NH(3) concentrations or any other ruminal variables, nor did it affect ruminal venous - arterial concentration differences for urea-N and NH(3). The oligofructose treatment did not affect milk yield, but did decrease apparent digestibility of OM, N, and starch. Nitrogen excreted in the feces was greater with the oligofructose infusion. In conclusion, the present data suggest that increased hindgut fermentation did not upregulate urea-N transfer to the hindgut at the expense of urea-N uptake by the rumen, and the observed reduction

  4. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M; Galindo, C; Ouellet, D R; Maxin, G; Kristensen, N B; Lapierre, H

    2015-11-01

    Nine Holstein cows with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used in a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures to study the effect of increased early postpartum AA supply on splanchnic and mammary AA metabolism. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (CTRL; n=4) or free AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to a basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half of the maximal dose at the calving day (1 d in milk; DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d until 29 DIM. On 5, 15, and 29 DIM, 6 sample sets of arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary blood were taken at 45-min intervals. Over the whole period, increasing AA supply increased milk (+7.8 ± 1.3 kg/d) and milk protein yields (+220 ± 65 g/d) substantially. The increased milk yield was not supported by greater dry matter intake (DMI) as, overall, DMI decreased with AA-CN (-1.6 ± 0.6 kg/d). Arterial concentrations of essential AA were greater for AA-CN compared with CTRL. The net portal-drained viscera (PDV) release of His, Met, and Phe was greater for AA-CN compared with CTRL, and the net PDV recovery of these infused AA ranged from 72 to 102% once changes in DMI were accounted for. The hepatic removal of these AA was increased equivalently to the increased net PDV release, resulting in an unaltered net splanchnic release. The net PDV release of Ile, Leu, Val, and Lys tended to be greater for AA-CN, and the net PDV recovery of these infused AA ranged from 69 to 73%, indicating increased PDV metabolism with AA-CN. The fractional hepatic removal of these AA did not differ from zero and was unaffected by the increased supply. Consequently, the splanchnic release of these AA was approximately equivalent to their net PDV release for both CTRL and AA-CN. Overall, greater early postpartum AA supply increased milk and milk protein

  5. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on net nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera and liver of growing lambs.

    PubMed

    Foote, A P; Freetly, H C

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine if supplying butyrate to the postruminal gastrointestinal tract of growing lambs alters blood flow and nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic tissues. Polled Dorset wether lambs ( = 10; initial BW = 55 ± 3.3 kg) had catheters surgically implanted into the portal vein, a branch of the hepatic vein, a mesenteric vein, and the abdominal aorta. A cannula was placed in the abomasum to deliver the treatment. Lambs were fed a pelleted ration once daily consisting of 69.7% dehydrated alfalfa, 30.0% ground corn, and 0.3% salt at 1.3 × NE requirement. The experimental design was a crossover balanced in time, so that each lamb received both treatments. Treatments consisted of either a pulse dose infusion of butyrate (buffered solution) to supply butyrate (10 mg/kg BW) or a buffered saline solution (1 mL/kg BW) once daily at the time of feeding. On d 14 of the treatment period, nutrient fluxes were measured using para-aminohippuric acid as a blood flow marker. Blood samples were collected from the aorta, portal vein, and hepatic vein every hour for 9 h beginning at 30 min prior to treatment/feeding. There was a tendency for a treatment × time interaction ( = 0.05) for portal vein blood flow, indicating that blood flow began to decrease earlier postprandial in lambs receiving butyrate. The butyrate treatment tended to increase the uptake of O ( = 0.07) and increased the uptake of glucose ( = 0.002), glutamate ( = 0.04), and glutamine ( = 0.02) by the PDV. There was a treatment × time interaction ( < 0.01) for flux of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, and valerate across the PDV. The interaction was mainly due to an earlier postprandial peak and associated decrease in the flux rate of the VFA. The alteration in timing of the postprandial peak of VFA flux was also observed in hepatic fluxes of VFA. It appears that supplying butyrate to the postruminal tissues through an abomasal cannula

  6. UREA-NITROGEN RECYCLING AND NITROGEN BALANCE IN LAMBS FED A HIGH-CONCENTRATE DIET AND INFUSED WITH DIFFERING PROPORTIONS OF CASEIN IN THE RUMEN AND ABOMASUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-five wether lambs (34 +/- 0.9 kg) fitted with ruminal and abomasal infusion catheters were used in a completely randomized design to determine the effects of differing proportions of ruminal and abomasal casein infusion on urea-N recycling and N balance in lambs fed a high-concentrate diet (1...

  7. Basal expression of nucleoside transporter mRNA differs among small intestinal epithelia of beef steers and is differentially altered by ruminal or abomasal infusion of starch hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Liao, S F; Alman, M J; Vanzant, E S; Miles, E D; Harmon, D L; McLeod, K R; Boling, J A; Matthews, J C

    2008-04-01

    In ruminants, microbial-derived nucleic acids are a major source of N and are absorbed as nucleosides by small intestinal epithelia. Although the biochemical activities of 2 nucleoside transport systems have been described for cattle, little is known regarding the regulation of their gene expression. This study was conducted to test 2 hypotheses: (1) the small intestinal epithelia of beef cattle differentially express mRNA for 3 concentrative (CNT1, 2, 3) and 2 equilibrative (ENT1, 2) nucleoside transporters (NT), and (2) expression of these NT is responsive to small intestine luminal supply of rumen-derived microbes (hence, nucleosides), energy (cornstarch hydrolysate, SH), or both. Eighteen ruminally and abomasally catheterized Angus steers (260 +/- 17 kg of BW) were fed an alfalfa cube-based diet at 1.33x NE(m) requirement. Six steers in each of 3 periods were blocked by BW (heavy vs. light). Within each block, 3 steers were randomly assigned to 3 treatments (n = 6): ruminal and abomasal water infusion (control), ruminal SH infusion/abomasal water infusion, or ruminal water infusion/abomasal SH infusion. The dosage of SH infusion amounted to 20% of ME intake. After a 14-or 16-d infusion period, steers were slaughtered, and duodenal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia were harvested for total RNA extraction and the relative amounts of mRNA expressed were determined using real-time RT-PCR quantification methodologies. All 5 NT mRNA were found expressed by each epithelium, but their abundance differed among epithelia. Specifically, jejunal expression of all 5 NT mRNA was higher than that by the ileum, whereas jejunal expression of CNT1, CNT3, and ENT1 mRNA was higher, or tended to be higher, than duodenal expression. Duodenal expression of CNT2, CNT3, and ENT2 mRNA was higher than ileal expression. With regard to SH infusion treatments, ruminal infusion increased duodenal expression of CNT3 (67%), ENT1 (51%), and ENT2 (39%) mRNA and ileal expression of CNT3 (210%) and

  8. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing. PMID:22059378

  9. Robotic-assisted placement of a hepatic artery infusion catheter for regional chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hellan, Minia; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy can be of value to patients with metastatic liver disease from colorectal cancer. Arterial infusion therapy requires surgical placement of a catheter into the gastroduodenal artery connected to a subcutaneous infusion pump or port, a procedure involving major abdominal surgery. Placement of chemotherapy infusion catheters by conventional laparoscopic techniques has been described, but is a technically challenging procedure. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new, minimally invasive approach for hepatic artery catheter placement using the DaVinci robotic system with the potential to minimize surgical trauma, pain, and hospital stay, and to render this minimal access procedure more feasible and widely applicable. PMID:17704873

  10. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  13. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  14. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  15. Complications Encountered with a Transfemorally Placed Port-Catheter System for Hepatic Artery Chemotherapy Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Honda, Hiroshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Irie, Hiroyuki; Aibe, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Masuda, Kouji

    2001-03-15

    A port-catheter system was implanted via femoral artery access for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion. Implantation was attempted in 90 patients and was successful in 88. Blood flow redistribution was performed using embolization coils. In the first ten patients a soft heparin-coated infusion catheter was used. For the following 78 patients we used a stiffer catheter coated with fluorine-acryl-styrene-urethane-silicone (FASUS) copolymer. The catheter was connected to a port implanted subcutaneously below the level of the inguinal ligament. Complications during the procedure and after placement were observed in 7 of 90 patients and 24 of 88 patients, respectively. These included catheter obstruction (11%), dislocation of the catheter tip (10%), drug toxicity (5.7%), and catheter infection (3.4%). In 6 of 10 patients with catheter obstruction, recanalization of the port system was achieved. In 7 of 9 patients with dislocation of the indwelling catheter tip, replacement of the port system was successful. Our complications appear to be comparable with those encountered with the subclavian/brachial approach when the new catheter coating is used. Notable is the avoidance of cerebral infarcts.

  16. [The cause of polyurethane catheter cracking during constant infusion of etoposide (VP-16) injection].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, H; Aoyama, T; Matsuyama, T; Yamamura, Y; Nakajima, K; Nakamura, K; Sato, H; Kotaki, H; Chiba, S; Hirai, H; Yazaki, Y; Iga, T

    1998-12-01

    We studied the cause of cracking of a clinically used polyurethane (PU) catheter during the constant infusion of etoposide (VP-16) injection (Lastet), administered without dilution to patients as a part of combination high-dose chemotherapy. After VP-16 injection was infused into the PU catheter at a constant infusion rate (30 ml/h) for 24 h, a decrease in the elasticity (36% of untreated) and on increase in the length of the catheter (3.7%) were observed. These changes were significantly higher than those treated with the control saline. The similar changes of the PU catheter were observed after treatment with a basal solution containing polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), polysorbate 80 and ethanol, which is the vehicle of the VP-16 injection, and with ethanol alone. Moreover, obvious degeneration of the internal wall (occurrence of spots like melting) and cutting face (micro-cracking) of the catheter was observed with an electron microscope after treatment with the vehicle. On the other hand, the elasticity or extension of the PU catheter were not changed after treatment with saline or PEG 400. From these findings, it was suggested that the degeneration and subsequent cracking of the PU catheter during the infusion of VP-16 injection was caused by ethanol contained in its injection solution. No cracking or morphological changes of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and silicone catheters were found after treatment with the vehicle solution. However, since it has been reported in previous reports that di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was leached from PVC bags, the high dose chemotherapy with the dilution-free VP-16 injection should be achieved safely and effectively using a silicon catheter, rather than the PU catheter. PMID:9921266

  17. Catheter salvage in home infusion patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Caroff, Daniel A; Norris, Anne H; Keller, Sara; Vinnard, Christopher; Zeitler, Kristen E; Lukaszewicz, Jennifer; Zborowski, Kristine A; Linkin, Darren R

    2014-12-01

    In a retrospective study of home infusion patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection, use of a central venous port, cancer diagnosis, and absence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome were associated with use of catheter salvage. Relapse of infection was uncommon. PMID:25465266

  18. Effect of abomasal butyrate infusion on net nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera and liver of growing lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine if supplying butyrate to the post-ruminal gastrointestinal tract of growing lambs alters blood flow and nutrient flux across the portal-drained viscera (PDV) and hepatic tissues. Polled Dorset wether lambs (n = 10; initial BW = 55 ± 3.3 kg) had cathet...

  19. INFLUENCE OF RUMINAL AND POSTRUMINAL CARBOHYDRATE INFUSION ON VISCERAL ORGAN MASS AND ADIPOSE TISSUE ACCRETION IN GROWING BEEF STEERS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty beef steers (243 ± 2 kg BW) with ruminal and abomasal infusion catheters were used to determine the effects of site of carbohydrate (CHO) digestion on visceral organ mass and adipose accretion. Treatments included a pelleted basal diet fed at 0.162 (LE) or 0.215 Mcal ME/kg BW.75/d, LE plus ru...

  20. EFFECT OF ABOMASAL INFUSION OF FORMATE ON MILK PROTEIN OF COWS FED A METHIONINE-DEFICIENT DIET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon from formate is transferred to the methyl group of Met in milk protein via the folate cycle. We hypothesized that post-ruminal formate infusion to dairy cows would partially compensate for dietary Met deficiency and enhance milk protein production. Six midlactation cows were used in a balance...

  1. Influence of fine-bore catheter length on infusion thrombophlebitis in peripheral intravenous nutrition: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, N. J.; McMahon, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the risk of thrombophlebitis associated with continuous infusion of intravenous nutrition (IVN) via peripheral veins was reduced when fine-bore catheters, inserted to 15 cm, were used in place of standard intravenous cannulas. An explanation has not been identified, but may be owing to the greater length of the catheters. A randomised controlled study was performed in which a standard nutritional solution was infused via 22G polyurethane catheters inserted to a length of either 5 cm or 15 cm. Catheters were reviewed twice each day and removed when complications occurred, or when IVN was no longer required. There was no significant difference in median time to thrombophlebitis or extravasation, or in daily risk of thrombophlebitis, between insertion lengths. Survival proportions were similar for each length at all times. Catheters inserted into cephalic veins were more prone to thrombophlebitis or extravasation (nine episodes, 14 catheters) than catheters inserted into basilic veins (five episodes, 24 catheters, P = 0.009). The survival proportion was at all times greater when catheter tips lay in basilic veins. Thus, the risk of thrombophlebitis or extravasation was not influenced by the length of catheter within the vein. However, the vein in which the catheter tip lay appeared to influence the development of morbidity. PMID:9196346

  2. A retrospective analysis of trabectedin infusion by peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a multicentric Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Martella, Francesca; Salutari, Vanda; Marchetti, Claudia; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Pietta, Francesca; Centineo, Dina; Caringella, Anna M; Musella, Angela; Fioretto, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    The European Medicines Agency strongly recommends administration of trabectedin through a central venous catheter (CVC) to minimize the risk of extravasation. However, CVCs place patients at risk of catheter-related complications and have a significant budgetary impact for oncology departments. The most frequently used CVCs are subcutaneously implanted PORT-chamber catheters (PORTs); peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are relatively new. We reviewed data of trabectedin-treated patients to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of the use of PORTs and PICCs in six Italian centres. Data on 102 trabectedin-treated patients (20 with sarcoma, 80 with ovarian cancer and two with cervical cancer) were evaluated. Forty-five patients received trabectedin by a PICC, inserted by trained nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at the bedside, whereas 57 patients received trabectedin infusion by a PORT, requiring a day surgery procedure in the hospital by a surgeon. Device dislocation and infections were reported in four patients, equally distributed between PORT or PICC users. Thrombosis occurred in a single patient with a PORT. Complications requiring devices removal were not reported during any of the 509 cycles of therapy (median 5; range 1-20). PICC misplacement or early malfunctions were not reported during trabectedin infusion. The cost-efficiency ratio favours PORT over PICC only when the device is used for more than 1 year. Our data suggest that trabectedin infusion by PICC is safe and well accepted, with a preferable cost-efficiency ratio compared with PORT in patients requiring short-term use of the device (≤1 year). PMID:26241804

  3. Efficacy of Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers Using Coaxial Catheter Technique: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Hirata, Hideki; Higaki, Yuichiro; Tomita, Kichinobu

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for head and neck cancers using a coaxial catheter technique: the superficial temporal artery (STA)-coaxial catheter method. Thirty-one patients (21 males and 10 females; 37-83 years of age) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (maxilla, 2; epipharynx, 4; mesopharynx, 8; oral floor, 4; tongue, 10; lower gingiva, 1; buccal mucosa, 2) were treated by intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. Four patients were excluded from the tumor-response evaluation because of a previous operation or impossibility of treatment due to catheter trouble. Forty-eight sessions of catheterization were performed. A guiding catheter was inserted into the STA and a microcatheter was advanced into the tumor-feeding artery via the guiding catheter under angiographic guidance. When the location of the tumor or its feeding artery was uncertain on angiography, computed tomographic angiography was performed. The anticancer agent carboplatin (CBDCA) was continuously injected for 24 h through the microcatheter from a portable infusion pump attached to the patient's waist. The total administration dose was 300-1300 mg per body. External radiotherapy was administered during intra-arterial chemotherapy at a total dose of 21-70.5 Gy.The initial response was complete response in 15 patients, partial response in 7 patients, and no change in 5 patients; the overall response rate was 81.5% (22/27). Complication-related catheter maintenance was observed in 15 of 48 sessions of catheterization. Injury and dislocation of the microcatheter occurred 10 times in 7 patients. Catheter infection was observed three times in each of two patients, and catheter occlusion and vasculitis occurred in two patients. Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via the STA-coaxial catheter method could have potential as a favorable treatment for head and neck tumors.

  4. The analgesic efficacy of continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion through a single catheter after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Dalia Abdelhamid; Abdelhamid, Hadeel Magdy; Mohsen, Mai; Aly, Ahmad Helmy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Median sternotomy, sternal spreading, and sternal wiring are the main causes of pain during the early recovery phase following cardiac surgery. Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion through a single catheter after parasternal block following cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: The total of 40 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologist status II, III), 45–60 years old, undergoing coronary – artery bypass grafting were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. A presternal catheter was inserted with continuous infusion of 5 mL/h bupivacaine 0.25% (Group B) or normal saline (Group C) during the first 48 postoperative hrs. Primary outcomes were postoperative morphine requirements and pain scores, secondary outcomes were extubation time, postoperative respiratory parameters, incidence of wound infection, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital stay duration, and bupivacaine level in blood. Statistical Methods: Student's t-test was used to analyze the parametric data and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Results: During the postoperative 48 h, there was marked reduction in morphine requirements in Group B compared to Group C, (8.6 ± 0.94 mg vs. 18.83 ± 3.4 mg respectively, P = 0.2), lower postoperative pain scores, shorter extubation time (117 ± 10 min vs. 195 ± 19 min, respectively, P = 0.03), better respiratory parameters (PaO2/FiO2, PaCO2 and pH), with no incidence of wound infection, no differences in ICU or hospital stay duration. The plasma concentration of bupivacaine remained below the toxic threshold (at T24, 1.2 ug/ml ± 0.3 and T48 h 1.7 ± 0.3 ug/ml). Conclusion: Continuous presternal bupivacaine infusion has resulted in better postoperative analgesia, reduction in morphine requirements, shorter time to extubation, and better postoperative respiratory parameters than the control group. PMID:25566704

  5. Chronic Infusion of Sterile Peritoneal Dialysis Solution Abrogates Enhanced Peritoneal Gene Expression Responses to Chronic Peritoneal Catheter Presence

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Matheson, Paul J.; Hurt, Ryan T.; Garrison, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic exposure to sterile peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions is associated with microvascular and interstitial changes within the blood–peritoneal barrier (peritoneum). These changes are commonly linked to loss of peritoneal function over time, presumably because of angiogenesis-related increased vascular area. However, the effects on peritoneal microvascular function of chronic peritoneal exposure to PD solutions are unknown. The present study examined peritoneal microvascular function after chronic exposure to sterile PD solution. Six rats underwent permanent catheter insertion under anesthesia. Three rats were treated with approximately 16 mL conventional PD solution daily for 6 weeks; catheter insertion controls received 1 mL saline daily. At 6 weeks, visceral peritoneal microvascular function was assessed in vivo using intravital microscopy. Endothelial cell functions were assessed using messenger RNA (mRNA) gene microarray analysis. In both groups, significant angiogenesis was seen, predominantly in the base of the mesentery. Sensitivity and reactivity of the intestinal visceral peritoneal pre-capillary arterioles (A3 arterioles, 8 – 15μm in diameter) were decreased in the catheter controls, but not in the chronic PD infusion rats. Chronic catheter presence increased the expression of 18 genes in the controls as compared with 12 genes in the chronic infusion rats. In both groups, expression of fibronectin, integrin-β, integrin-α5, collagen type XVIII-α1, and matrix metalloproteinase was enhanced. Endothelial expression of proinflammatory genes (interleukin-1β tissue pathway inhibitor, chemokine ligand 2) was enhanced by chronic catheter insertion, but not after chronic PD fluid infusion. Increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in inflammation and tissue remodeling results from peritoneal catheter–related endothelial cell activation. Chronic exposure of the nonuremic peritoneum to sterile PD solutions overrides the catheter

  6. Skin necrosis after a low-dose vasopressin infusion through a central venous catheter for treating septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Sae Hwan; Byun, Seung Woon; Kang, Ho Suk; Koo, Dong Hoe; Park, Hyun-Gu; Hong, Sang Bum

    2006-12-01

    This is a report on a case of severe skin necrosis in a vasodilatory septic shock patient after the infusion of low-dose vasopressin through a central venous catheter. An 84-year-old male was hospitalized for edema on both legs at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. On hospital day 8, the patient began to complain of dyspnea and he subsequently developed severe septic shock caused by E. coli. After being transferred to the medical intensive care unit, his hypotension, which was refractory to norepinephrine, was controlled by an infusion of low-dose vasopressin (0.02 unit/min) through a central venous catheter into the right subclavian vein. After the infusion of low-dose vasopressin, severe skin necrosis with bullous changes developed, necessitating discontinuation of the low-dose vasopressin infusion. The patient expired from refractory septic shock. Although low-dose vasopressin can control hypotension in septic shock patients, low-dose vasopressin must be used with caution because ischemic complications such as skin necrosis can develop even with administration through a central venous catheter. PMID:17249516

  7. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  8. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  9. Home infusion therapy. First things first: the patient and the prevention of central catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Gladys

    2006-01-01

    During the past seventeen years, I've had the privilege of working as a home healthcare nurse in two rural counties in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. In the early 1990s, it was rare that our agency received referrals for IV antibiotics, opiate infusions for pain management or for total parenteral infusion (TPN) to be administered at home. Most patients stayed in the hospital for infusion therapy. Today, as more healthcare treatments are being shifted from hospital to outpatient or home care settings, referrals for home infusion have become more common in our area as well as across the nation (Jarvis, 2001). I'll never forget my first patient whom I cared for with home infusion therapy for pain management. I learned a great deal from Sally, and to this day I always remember that I can make a real difference in patient outcomes when I keep--"First Things First": the patient and infection prevention--when caring for any of my patients. PMID:17135849

  10. Clostridial abomasal disease in Connecticut dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Van Kruiningen, Herbert J; Nyaoke, Carol A; Sidor, Inga F; Fabis, Jaroslaw J; Hinckley, Lynn S; Lindell, Kevin A

    2009-08-01

    Over 2 years, 24 dairy calves died of emphysematous abomasitis and abomasal bloat. Anaerobic cultures of necrotic abomasal mucosa yielded Clostridium perfringens from 10 of 15 calves. Sarcina were observed in 17 of 22 examined histologically. A change in the antibiotic regimen for newborns and improved sanitizing of feeding utensils eliminated further losses. PMID:19881926

  11. Abomasal ulceration and tympany of calves.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tessa S

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of abomasal ulcer formation and abomasal tympany in calves. The development of ulcers and bloat has been attributed to many factors, including coarse feed, environmental stress, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and bacterial infections. This article discusses various factors thought to play a role in the development of these abomasal conditions in calves. PMID:19174290

  12. Clinical Application of a New Indwelling Catheter with a Side-Hole and Spirally Arranged Shape-Memory Alloy for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagihashi, Kunihiro Takizawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Okamoto, Kyoko; Yoshimatsu, Misako; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2010-12-15

    A new indwelling catheter, G-spiral (GSP), was developed for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) by way of an implanted catheter-port system (CPS). Here we evaluated its physical properties and the outcomes of its clinical use. The GSP vessel-fixing power and its ability to follow a guidewire were determined with a vascular in vitro model, and Student t test was used to determine statistical significance (P < 0.05). A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the technical success rate and to identify the clinical complications associated with radiologic CPS implantation with GSP in 65 patients with unresectable hepatic tumors. The mean vessel-fixing power of the GSP (14.4 g) significantly differed from that of a GSP with a cut shape-memory alloy (3.3 g). The mean resistance to following the guidewire displayed by the GSP (88.5 g) was significantly less than that for a 5F W-spiral (106.3 g) or 4F Cobra-type angiographic catheter (117.8 g). The CPS was placed successfully in 64 of 65 cases (98.5%). Hepatic artery occlusion was observed in one case. Occlusion, cracking, and infection of CPS were observed in one, two, and one case, respectively. The GSP is a highly useful indwelling catheter that can be used for HAIC.

  13. Effect of abomasal carbohydrates and live yeast on measures of postruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gressley, T F; Davison, K A; Macies, J; Leonardi, C; McCarthy, M M; Nemec, L M; Rice, C A

    2016-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of abomasal carbohydrate infusion on nutrient digestibility and fecal measures. In Exp. 1, 5 Holstein steers were assigned to a Latin square with 1-wk periods and were abomasally infused on a single day at the end of each period with water alone, a single pulse dose of water with 1 g/kg BW oligofructose or cornstarch, or 4 pulse doses of water with 0.25 g/kg BW oligofructose or cornstarch administered every 6 h. Total tract nutrient digestibility was not affected by treatment except for a tendency for a decrease in starch digestibility in response to the 1 g/kg BW dose of cornstarch ( < 0.10). Compared with the control, both oligofructose and starch infusions caused similar decreases in fecal pH ( < 0.05) and increases in fecal short-chain fatty acids ( ≤ 0.01) measured 12 h after the first infusion, with the single 1 g/kg BW infusions causing a greater magnitude of pH change compared with the four 0.25-g/kg BW infusions ( < 0.01). All treatments increased concentration of fecal lipopolysaccharide compared with the control for at least 1 time point following the infusion ( < 0.05), with a greater increase observed for the 0.25 g/kg BW infusions of oligofructose compared with the other treatments ( < 0.05). Results of Exp. 1 indicate that both oligofructose and cornstarch infusions increased carbohydrate fermentation in the intestines and can be used as a method to evaluate the impact of excessive intestinal fermentation on intestinal health. In Exp. 2, 6 Holstein steers received abomasal pulse doses of 0 (control) or 10 g/d live var. (SB) according to a crossover design with 18-d periods. Abomasal infusions of 4 pulse doses of 0.25 g/kg BW oligofructose administered every 6 h were conducted on d 16 of each period. During the baseline period prior to the oligofructose challenge, there were no effects of SB on fecal measures except for an increase in apparent total tract NDF digestibility ( < 0.05), suggesting that

  14. Interaction between plastic catheter tubings and regular insulin preparations used for continuous subcutaneous insulin-infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E; Lange, G; Gasthaus, M; Boxberger, M; Berger, M

    1987-01-01

    In search of possible interactions between plastic tubings used for insulin-pump treatment and commercial regular insulin preparations, various catheter sets made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), and nylon plastics were perfused at 30 degrees C in a laboratory setting for up to 72 h. The perfused insulin solutions were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Although no plasticizer, e.g., dioctyl phthalate, or nickel or chromium ions were found in the perfusates, substantial interactions between the plastics and the insulin solutions were detected, extraction of bacteriostatic additives from the insulin solutions in particular. The PVC retained up to 88% of the bacteriostatics from the insulin preparations, whereas PE tubings retained only 10-15%. Whether the loss of preservatives during perfusion through PVC catheters predisposes to cutaneous infections during insulin-pump therapy remains to be shown. PMID:3297580

  15. Blood Samples of Peripheral Venous Catheter or The Usual Way: Do Infusion Fluid Alters the Biochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeganzadeh, Mahboobeh; Yazdankhahfard, Mohammadreza; Farzaneh, Mohammadreza; Mirzaei, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most blood tests require venous blood samples. Puncturing the vein also causes pain, infection, or damage to the blood, and lymph flow, or long-term healing. This study aimed to determine and compare the biochemical laboratory value of the blood samples that were provided through: peripheral vein infusion (PVI) receiving continuous intravenous fluid; and the usual method of blood sampling. Methods: This is an interventional, quasi-experimental, and controlled study. The selected study sample included 60 patients, who were hospitalized during 2014, in the Internal Medicine, part of Martyrs of Persian Gulf, teaching hospital at Bushehr. Three blood samples were taken from each patient that were provided through PVI line (5 ml blood collected at beginning of IVC and then another 5 cc), and another case was prepared by common blood sampling (control). All the samples were analyzed in terms of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine using SPSS Ver.19 software, by paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the amount of sodium and potassium in the first blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. However, no significant differences were found among the biochemical amount in the second blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. Conclusions: We can use blood samples taken from peripheral intravenous infusion lines after 5cc discarding from the first part of the sample for measuring the value of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine.

  16. Effectiveness of adding ketamine to ropivacaine infusion via femoral nerve catheter after knee anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Niknam, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elective knee surgery for repairing anterior cruciate ligament is usually associated with moderate to severe postoperative pain, and, therefore, selecting appropriate analgesia can considerably facilitate pain control and patient's discharge. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effectiveness of administration of ropivacaine or ropivacaine plus ketamine on pain control and improvement of muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament repair in adults. Materials and Methods: A double-blind randomized study which performed in Operating room and Sixty six patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists health status I to II that underwent elective knee surgery for repairing anterior cruciate ligament under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either ropivacaine 0.2% or an equivalent volume of ropivacaine 0.1% plus 1.0 mg/kg ketamine via continuous femoral block with pump infusion. The patients were familiarized with a 10-point verbal analog scale. Quadriceps muscle weakness and sedation score were assessed based on relevant scales. Parameters assessment were obtained from all patients immediately after PACU entrance, and postoperative assessment was performed at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 30, 36, 42, and 48 h after the operation. Results: The data of 31 patients who received ropivacaine and of 33 patients in ketamine-ropivacaine group were eligible for analysis. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores differed at various time points after surgery, with higher scores in patients who received concomitant ketamine and ropivacaine (P < 0.05). The degree of quadriceps muscle weakness was similar between the groups at the different time points. Patients in ropivacaine group rated better quality of pain control with appropriate sedation in comparison with the patients in ketamine/ropivacaine group. Conclusion: Our study shows that the addition of a ketamine 1 mg/kg to 0.1% ropivacaine via pump infusion after

  17. Evidence-based use of prokinetic drugs for abomasal disorders in cattle.

    PubMed

    Constable, Peter D; Nouri, Mohammad; Sen, Ismail; Baird, Aubrey N; Wittek, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Abomasal hypomotility is a prerequisite for abomasal displacement in cattle and is present immediately after surgical correction of left displaced abomasum or abomasal volvulus. Hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, and hyperinsulinemia should be corrected in cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility. The most effective prokinetic for calves and adult cattle suspected to have abomasal hypomotility is erythromycin. PMID:22374117

  18. [Survival analysis of German Holstein cows after an abomasal displacement].

    PubMed

    Ricken, M; Hamann, H; Scholz, H; Distl, O

    2005-02-01

    From 1996 to 2002 5159 cattle with abomasal displacement was treated in the Clinic for Cattle, School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover. An analysis of systematic effects on influences on the length of survival following surgical correction of the abomasal displacement could be performed for 1411 cows. These animals were under the official milk recording scheme. Significant influences on lifetime after an abomasal displacement were interval between calving and diagnosis of disease, lactation number, type of abomasal displacement, inbreeding coefficient, calving difficulties, region of origin and sire of the calf. The lifetime after an abomasal displacement significantly differed between several months of calving and some sires of the cow. The individual milk yield in lactations before and after abomasal displacement of the cow was significant for the length of lifetime. The heritability estimate for length of lifetime after abomasal displacement using residual maximum likelihood (REML) in a linear animal model was h2 = 0.01-0.03. PMID:15787315

  19. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  20. Ultrasonographic findings in a cow with abomasal lymphosarcoma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This case report describes the clinical and ultrasonographic findings in a Swiss Braunvieh cow with lymphosarcoma of the abomasum. Case Presentation The main clinical findings were vomiting in response to eating and melena. The results of serum biochemistry and rumen fluid analysis were indicative of abomasal reflux syndrome. The main ultrasonographic findings were two enlarged lymph nodes caudal to the reticulum and a severely enlarged abomasum with thickening of the abomasal wall and folds. Based on all the findings, pyloric stenosis caused by lymphosarcoma was tentatively diagnosed and later confirmed at postmortem examination. Conclusions This is an interesting case, which broadens the spectrum of abomasal reflux syndrome. PMID:21612590

  1. Surgical Resection of Perforated Abomasal Ulcers in Calves

    PubMed Central

    Tulleners, E. P.; Hamilton, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Surgical resection of perforating abomasal ulcers was successful in four of ten suckling calves. Mortality, usually occurring within 48 hours, was attributed to diffuse fibrinopurulent peritonitis, toxemia and shock. PMID:6254628

  2. New aspects in the pathogenesis of abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Doll, Klaus; Sickinger, Marlene; Seeger, Torsten

    2009-08-01

    Impaired abomasal motility and an increased accumulation of gas are prerequisites for displacement of the abomasum in the cow. Predisposing factors are the breed (e.g. Holstein-Friesian, Simmental-Red-Holstein cross breeds and Guernsey), genetic background, twin pregnancy, first weeks of lactation, metabolic disorders (ketosis, increased lipomobilisation, insulin resistance), high-concentrate and low-fibre diets, as well as other concomitant diseases, such as endometritis, mastitis and claw disorders. There does not appear to be a strong correlation between increased milk yield or endotoxaemia and abomasal displacement. Recent studies have focused on possible functional disorders of the enteric nervous system within the abomasal wall, since cattle with abomasal displacement have an increased activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, as well as decreased acetylcholine sensitivity. In addition, there appear to be significant differences between breeds in the levels of the neurotransmitters substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the abomasal wall. For example, SP (stimulatory) was significantly less in German Holsteins in comparison to the German Fleckvieh, whereas VIP (inhibitory) was markedly increased. These risk factors may explain why Holstein cows are more susceptible to abomasal displacement than other breeds. PMID:18397836

  3. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. Two arteries and one vein in the umbilical cord carry blood back and forth. If the ... catheter is a long, soft, hollow tube. An umbilical artery catheter (UAC) allows blood to be taken ...

  4. Potassium and insulin affect the contractility of abomasal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Türck, G; Leonhard-Marek, S

    2010-08-01

    Abomasal displacement is a frequent and important disease of high yielding dairy cows. Although several factors are related to its occurrence, the pathogenesis of the condition is still inadequately understood, particularly in regard to K(+) and insulin homeostasis. For this reason the aim was to investigate the effects of K(+) and insulin concentrations on in vitro motility of abomasal smooth muscle. The second aim was to determine whether the in vivo change in K(+) and insulin levels might be sufficient to induce reduced abomasal motility. Muscle strips were isolated from the abomasum of slaughtered cows and incubated in buffer solution under isometric conditions. Results show that a decrease in extracellular K(+) (between 5 and 1 mmol/L) or an increase in extracellular insulin concentrations (to 21 mU/L or higher) were able to affect the contraction activity of abomasal muscles. Contraction activity given as median (25th, 75th percentiles) changed from 28.1 mN/min (2.5, 49.9) at 5 mmol/L of K(+) to 9.4 mN/min (0.6, 35.7) at 1 mmol/L of K(+), and from 34.5 mN/min (10.8, 112.4) at 0 mU/L of insulin to 12.0 mN/min (7.6, 49.8) at 120 mU/L of insulin. Because the effect of insulin could be abolished by barium, glybenclamide, or ouabain, the underlying mechanisms of the insulin action could be an increased K(+) conductance or an increased Na/K-ATPase activity or both. Low K(+) or high insulin concentrations both reduced the activity of the circular muscle of the abomasal corpus (i.e., of the part that is responsible for the propulsion of abomasal chymus) and might play an important role in the pathogenesis of abomasal displacement. PMID:20655424

  5. Responses to Starch Infusion on Milk Synthesis in Low Yield Lactating Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; Yang, Zhanshan; Guo, Yongqing; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of starch infusion on production, metabolic parameters and relative mRNA abundance was investigated in low yield lactating cows from 86 days in milk. Six Holstein cows fitted with permanent ruminal cannulas were arranged into one of two complete 3×3 Latin squares and infused with a starch solution containing 800 grams starch for 16 days. The three treatments were: i) ruminal and abomasal infusion with water (Control); ii) ruminal infusion with cornstarch solution and abomasal infusion with water (Rumen); iii) ruminal infusion with water and abomasal infusion with cornstarch solution (Abomasum). There were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three treatments with low yield lactating cows in feed and energy intake, milk yield and composition, plasma metabolism, or even on gene expression. However, cows receiving starch through rumen performed better than directly through the abomasum during the glucose tolerance test procedure with a higher area under the curve (AUC; p = 0.08) and shorter half-time (t1/2; p = 0.11) of plasma insulin, therefore, it increased glucose disposal, which stated a lipid anabolism other than mobilization after energy supplementation. In conclusion, extra starch infusion at concentration of 800 g/d did not enhance energy supplies to the mammary gland and improve the lactating performance in low yield lactating cows. PMID:26194224

  6. In vivo quantitative assessment of catheter patency in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Formation of fibrin sleeves around catheter tips is a central factor in catheter failure during chronic implantation, and such tissue growth can occur despite administration of anticoagulants. We developed a novel method for monitoring catheter patency. This method recognizes the progressive nature of catheter occlusion, and tracks this process over time through measurement of changes in catheter resistance to a standardized 1 mL bolus infusion from a pressurized reservoir. Two indirect measures of catheter patency were used: (a) reservoir residual pressure and (b) reservoir discharge time. This method was applied to the study of catheter patency in rats comparing the effect of catheter material (silastic, polyurethane, Microrenathane™), lock solution (heparin, heparin/dexamethasone) and two different cannulation sites (superior vena cava via the external jugular vein, inferior vena cava via the femoral vein). Our findings reveal that application of flexible smaller-size silastic catheters and a dexamethasone lock solution resulted in prolonged catheter patency. Patency could be maintained over nine weeks with the femoral vein catheters, compared with five weeks with the external jugular vein catheters. The current method for measuring catheter patency provides a useful index for the assessment of tissue growth around the catheter tip. The method also provides an objective and quantitative way of comparing changes in catheter patency for different surgical methods and catheter types. Our method improves on the conventional method of assessing catheter occlusion by judging the ability to aspirate from the catheter. PMID:16004684

  7. [Influences on the occurrence of abomasal displacements in German Holstein cows].

    PubMed

    Wolf, V; Hamann, H; Scholz, H; Distl, O

    2001-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyse risk factors for the prevalence of abomasal displacement in German Holstein cows. In the period from 02/01/1999 to 01/31/2000 five veterinary surgeons in Northern Lower Saxony registered all cases of abomasal displacement in German Holstein cows being under the official milk recording scheme. In total, the investigation included 160 farms and 9315 cows. An abomasal displacement was registered in 151 German Holstein cows, corresponding to a frequency of 1.6%. More than 75% of the abomasal displacements appeared during the first 30 days after calving. The left abomasal displacement (74.8%) was recorded more often than the right abomasal displacement (25.2%). Milk recording and pedigree data were supplied by the VIT (Vereinigte Informationssystem Tierhaltung), Verden, and merged with the own recordings. The influences of the calving month, the lactation number, the age at calving, the inbreeding coefficient, calving performance, duration of pregnancy, breed of calf sire, calf sire and the breeding values for the milk performance did not explain a significant part of the variation of the frequency of the abomasal displacement. Significant effects of the sire, birth of twins or even more calves and the herd were obtained for the leftsided abomasal displacement. For the rightsided abomasal displacement and for all abomasal displacements the herd effect was not significant. Heritability estimates using bivariate linear REML models were h2 = 0.043 +/- 0.012 for the leftsided abomasal displacement, and h2 = 0.007 +/- 0.004 for the rightsided abomasal displacement, respectively. Using the threshold model the heritabilities yielded estimates of h2 = 0.51 for the left abomasal displacement, and for the right abomasal displacement of h2 = 0.19, respectively. PMID:11721586

  8. Phosphorus homeostasis in dairy cows with abomasal displacement or abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Grünberg, Walter; Constable, Peter; Schröder, Ulf; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Morin, Dawn; Rohn, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorus homeostasis occurs in dairy cows with an abomasal displacement or volvulus. The goal of this study was to identify potential mechanisms for hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia in cows with a left displaced abomasum (LDA), right displaced abomasum (RDA), or abomasal volvulus (AV). Accordingly, the results of preoperative clinicopathologic analyses for 1,368 dairy cows with an LDA (n = 1,189), RDA, or AV (n = 179) (data set 1) and for 44 cows with an AV (data set 2) were retrieved. Laboratory values were compared by Student's t-tests, and correlation and regression analyses were performed. Thirty-four percent of the animals from data set 1 (463/1,368) were hypophosphatemic (serum phosphorus concentration ([Pi]) < 1.4 mmol/L), and 9% (122/1,368) were hyperphosphatemic ([Pi] >2.3 mmol/L). Serum [Pi] was significantly lower (P < .05) in cows with an LDA (1.60 +/- 0.53 mmol/L; mean +/- SD) than in cows with an RDA or AV (1.85 +/- 0.68 mmol/L). For cows with an LDA, [Pi] was correlated with serum urea nitrogen concentration ([SUN]) (r = 0.34) and serum concentration of magnesium ([Mg]) (r = 0.20). For cows with an RDA or AV, linear correlations existed between [Pi] and [SUN] (r = 0.45), [Mg] (r = 0.43), and serum chloride concentration ([Cl]) (r = -0.27). Stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that low [SUN] and the diagnosis of an LDA had the strongest associations with hypophosphatemia. In cows with hyperphosphatemia, [Pi] was most strongly associated with azotemia. In cows with an AV, the strongest correlations with [Pi] were found for [SUN] and serum creatinine. We conclude that hypophosphatemia in cows with an LDA is primarily due to decreased feed intake. In contrast, hyperphosphatemia in cattle with an RDA or AV appears to result from dehydration and decreased renal blood flow. PMID:16355687

  9. [New therapy for acute abomasal tympany in calves].

    PubMed

    Kümper, H

    1994-02-01

    Abomasal bloat in calves can be a rapidly progressing, life-threatening disease. Gas must be removed from the tympanic abomasum as fast as possible, to prevent the calf from choking. It is very difficult to reach the abomasum with a stomach tube and in most cases it is also not possible to remove all gas from the abomasum by a single puncture in the distended right flank. A report is given about a method of abomasal puncture that can remove all abomasal gas by one single puncture. The calf is turned upside down and a puncture is performed with a 1.4 x 50 mm needle median on the highest point of the distended abdominal wall just between the umbilicus and xiphoid. Between 1985 and 1992 twenty of twenty-one calves that were suffering from abomasal tympany could be healed without further complications by one single puncture. When the state of health is getting worse or when the calf is bloating again within 2 or 3 hours after the puncture, a diagnostic laparotomy must be done, in order to detect and to treat a possibly twisted abomasum. PMID:8165656

  10. IT infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Infusing IT technology is a perennial challenge. The Technology Infusion and Maturity Assessment approach of Cornford & Hicks is shown applied to an example of IT infusion: moedl-based V&V of spacecraft software.

  11. Experimental induction of abdominal tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration by intraruminal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens type A in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Roeder, B L; Chengappa, M M; Nagaraja, T G; Avery, T B; Kennedy, G A

    1988-02-01

    The etiologic role of Clostridum perfringens type A in the acute abdominal syndrome characterized by abomasal and rumen tympany, abomasitis, and abomasal ulceration was investigated in neonatal calves. Eight calves, 4 to 12 days old, were inoculated intraruminally with toxigenic C perfringens type A. Before and after C perfringens inoculation, blood samples were collected from all calves for blood gas and serum biochemical analysis and for determination of serum copper concentration; ruminal fluid was obtained for isolation of C perfringens. Calves were monitored daily for clinical signs of the syndrome and, depending on the severity of clinical signs, they were either euthanatized or redosed within 4 to 7 days. After necropsy, specimens obtained from the abomasum and rumen for macroscopic and microscopic examination and for anaerobic bacteriologic culture were processed in routine manner. Intraruminal inoculation of C perfringens type A into healthy calves induced anorexia, depression, bloat, diarrhea, and in some calves, death. Serum copper concentration was within normal range. Necropsy revealed variable degrees of abomasitis, petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, and ulcers (ranging from pinpoint to nearly perforate) in the abomasum. Seven of those calves also had multiple trichobezoars in the rumen. These necropsy findings were not seen in calves (controls) given distilled H2O only. In affected calves, acute abdominal syndrome was unrelated to copper deficiency, and C perfringens type A given intraruminally was able to induce clinical signs similar to those of the naturally acquired disease. PMID:2894790

  12. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you use a catheter if you have: Urinary incontinence (leaking urine or being unable to control when ... Surgery Bladder Diseases Spinal Cord Injuries Urethral Disorders Urinary Incontinence Urine and Urination Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  14. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    PubMed Central

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; Peixoto, Cibelle Grassmann; May, Tássia Amanda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC) and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis) in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective. PMID:27508916

  15. Local Intravascular Drug Delivery: In Vitro Comparison of Three Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfke, Heiko; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Calmer, Christian; Klose, Klaus Jochen

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare different catheter systems for local drug delivery with respect to the penetration depth of a biotin marker solution delivered into the vessel wall. Methods: Post-mortem carotid arteries from pigs were locally infused with a biotin solution using three different catheter systems. With all catheters (microporous balloon catheter, hydrogel-coated balloon catheter, and spiral balloon catheter) we used the same pressure of 405 kPa (4 atm) and infusion times of 60, 90, and 300 sec. After infusion the arteries were histologically prepared and stained using a biotin-specific method. With a light microscope an observer, blinded to the catheter type, scored the amount of biotin within the vessel wall, measured as staining intensity, and the penetration depth of the biotin. Results: Delivery with the hydrogel-coated balloon catheter was limited to the intima and the innermost parts of the media. The spiral balloon and microporous balloon catheter showed both a deeper penetration and a larger amount of delivered biotin compared with the hydrogel catheter, with a slightly deeper penetration using the microporous catheter. The penetration depth showed a correlation with infusion time for the spiral balloon and microporous catheters, but not for the hydrogel-coated catheter. Conclusion: Different catheter designs lead to different patterns of local drug delivery. The differences in penetration depth and amount of the substance delivered to the vessel wall should be known and might be useful for targeting specific areas within the vessel wall.

  16. [The role of the interventional radiologist in central venous catheter dysfunction (pictorial essay)].

    PubMed

    Altunel, Ekrem; Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memiş, Ahmet

    2004-03-01

    Failure to aspirate blood from the lumen of venous catheters, inadequate blood flow and/or high resistance pressures during hemodialysis were accepted as catheter dysfunction. Other correctable problems such as residual lumen thrombus, external fibrin catheter sheath or malpositioned catheter tip were identified by contrast injection. Catheter malpositions were corrected by snare-mediated catheter repositioning or by exchange of the catheter over a guidewire. Catheters of inadequate length were exchanged over a guidewire to the appropriate position or replaced. Treatment of fibrin sheath formation included fibrin sheath stripping, guidewire catheter exchange, and urokinase infusion. Early catheter dysfunction is frequently due to mechanical problems such as inadequate positioning, kinking, or constriction. Delayed dysfunction usually results from thrombus formation, either within the lumen, around the catheter ("fibrin sleeve"), or in the host vein. In the management of catheter malfunctions and complications, interventional radiological techniques are safe and effective alternatives to standard surgical techniques. PMID:15054708

  17. [Phlebitogenicity of venous catheters of Vialon].

    PubMed

    Fassolt, A

    1985-12-01

    During three days 132 surgical patients with postoperative infusion treatment were checked on the frequency of venous reactions in the arms when catheters/cannulas of 4 different materials were used and the outcome compared. A significant result was obtained in connection with the I-cath catheter made of vialon (a polyurethanelike resin polymer) and the L-cath of polyurethane. Phlebitis was decreased to 27.3% resp. 24.2% - approximately half of its usual frequency - when I-cath of polyvinyl-chloride and FEP-teflon vasofix cannulas were applied (both 51.5%). The different predisposing factors of infusion phlebitis are under discussion. PMID:4093198

  18. Age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer from central Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study on age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer was conducted in Central Spain, by monthly samplings of fawns ( 2 yr) animals. Both intensity and prevalence of abomasal parasitism was higher in older animals, particularl...

  19. Abomasal ulceration and abomaso-pleural fistula in an 11-month-old beefmaster bull

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lais R. R.; Gill, Marjorie S.; Williams, Jamie; Johnson, Anthony J.; Angel, Kenneth L.; Mirza, Mustajab H.

    2002-01-01

    An 11-month-old, beefmaster bull presented with anorexia and signs of respiratory disease. Physical examination, thoracic ultrasonography and radiography, and pleural fluid analysis indicated pericarditis and septic neutrophilic pleuropneumonia. Postmortem findings were abomasal adherence to the diaphragm, a fibrotic fistulous tract connecting the abomasum and pleural cavity, granulomatous abomasitis, granulomatous pericarditis, and fibrinonecrotic pleuritis. PMID:11901596

  20. Infusion Extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  1. Studies on the pH value of abomasal contents in dairy cows during the first 3 weeks after calving.

    PubMed

    Van Winden, S C L; Müller, K E; Kuiper, R; Noordhuizen, J P T M

    2002-04-01

    The pH value of the abomasal contents in adult cattle is normally constant and has a value of 2. Abomasal contents with pH values of 5.5 and higher could give rise to bacterial fermentation with subsequent gas production. The accumulation of gas is thought to form a key event in the pathogenesis of abomasal displacement. The aim of the present study was to determine the pH values of abomasal contents of dairy cows in the first 3 weeks after calving. The pH of the abomasal contents was, over several days. higher than the pH value of the abomasal juice in mid-lactation cows. The highest pH values were measured on day 14 after calving, thereafter the pH declined. Possible explanations for the rise in the pH value of the abomasal contents are discussed. PMID:12019957

  2. Effect of spiramycin and tulathromycin on abomasal emptying rate in milk-fed calves

    PubMed Central

    Rashnavadi, Mehdi; Nouri, Mohammad; Haji Hajikolaei, Mohammad R.; Najafzadeh, Housain; Constable, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired abomasal motility is common in cattle with abomasal disorders. The macrolide erythromycin has been demonstrated to be an effective prokinetic agent in healthy calves and in adult cattle with abomasal volvulus or left displaced abomasum. We hypothesized that 2 structurally related macrolides, spiramycin and tulathromycin, would also be effective prokinetic agents in cattle. Six milk-fed, male, Holstein-Friesian calves were administered each of the following 4 treatments: spiramycin, 75 000 IU/kg BW, IM, this dose approximates 25 mg/kg BW, IM; tulathromycin, 2.5 mg/kg BW, SC; 2 mL of 0.9% NaCl (negative control); and erythromycin, 8.8 mg/kg BW, IM (positive control). Calves were fed 2 L of cow’s milk containing acetaminophen (50 mg/kg body weight) 30 min after each treatment was administered and jugular venous blood samples were obtained periodically after the start of sucking. Abomasal emptying rate was assessed by the time to maximal plasma acetaminophen concentration. Spiramycin, tulathromycin, and the positive control erythromycin increased abomasal emptying rate compared to the negative control. We conclude that the labeled antimicrobial dose of spiramycin and tulathromycin increases the abomasal emptying rate in healthy milk-fed calves. Additional studies investigating whether spiramycin and tulathromycin exert a prokinetic effect in adult cattle with abomasal hypomotility appear indicated. PMID:24396182

  3. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  4. Infusion extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction. A piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber. The method is applicable to operation in low or micro-gravity environments.

  5. Differential immune response between fundic and pyloric abomasal regions upon experimental ovine infection with Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Cuenca-Verde, C; Valdivia-Anda, G; Cuéllar-Ordaz, J A; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2012-04-30

    The effect of experimental haemonchosis on the number of tissue eosinophils, plasma cells and lymphocyte subpopulations was evaluated in the fundic abomasal region, the pyloric abomasal region and the abomasal lymph node of Blackbelly lambs, which are resistant to infection, and Columbia lambs, which are susceptible to infection. An increase in the number of tissue eosinophils and CD4+ and WC1(+)γδ T-cells was observed in the pyloric abomasal region of Blackbelly lambs and correlated with lower worm burden and greater resistance to infection. Increases in IgA+ plasma cells from the pyloric abomasal region were observed in both infected groups, but there was no difference between the groups. Therefore, increases in IgA+ plasma cells did not explain the resistance observed. Infection caused a significant increase in tissue eosinophils in the abomasal lymph node of Blackbelly lambs and a decrease in the number of CD4+ T-cells in lambs of both breeds. CD8+ T-cells and IgG+ and IgM+ plasma cells were not associated with either infection or resistance. In this work, clear differences were observed in the numbers of CD4+ and WC1(+)γδ T-cells, tissue eosinophils and IgA+ plasma cells between the abomasal regions studied. These differences indicate that the immunological response is not homogenous in all abomasal mucosa and that evaluating the response from a single abomasal region may not be representative of the cellular response across the abomasum. PMID:22153120

  6. Everting (toposcopic) catheter for broad clinical application.

    PubMed

    Shook, D R; Doppman, J L; Cattau, E L; Goldstein, S R

    1986-05-01

    The advanced development of the clinical everting (toposcopic) catheter is described. A detailed discussion of the design and outline of the fabrication techniques are followed by a thorough performance evaluation and summary of the first two clinical applications. The everting element is a low-durometer thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer. Surface treatments include the bonding of a hydrophilic polymeric coating, optimized for lubricity, to the sliding internal surfaces of the catheter. Eversion pressures and infusion/aspiration flow rates have been measured under various conditions and the infusate-in-blood mixing potential investigated. A preliminary assessment is given of the clinical performance of the catheter in the vascular delivery of chemotherapy and standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:3724105

  7. Use of heparin-coated central venous lines to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Achour, Wafa; Ben Othman, Tarek; Ladeb, Saloua; Torjman, Lamia; Lakhal, Amel; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hsairi, Mohamed; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2007-06-01

    Bloodstream infections related to the use of central venous catheters are an important cause of patient morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Catheter-related infection may be due to fibrin deposition associated with catheters. Interventions designed to decrease fibrin deposition have the potential to reduce catheter-related infections. This study was a randomized, controlled trial in which 246 patients with nontunneled central venous catheters were randomly assigned to receive a heparin-coated catheter with 50 mL/d of normal saline solution as a continuous infusion (heparin-coated group) or a noncoated catheter with a continuous infusion of low-dose unfractionated heparin (control group: continuous infusion of 100 U/kg/d). Catheter-related bloodstream infection occurred in 2.5% (3/120 catheters) in the heparin-coated group (0.9 events per 1,000 days) and in 9.1% (11/120 catheters) in the control group (3.5 events per 1,000 days; P = 0.027). No other risk factors were found for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infection. Six and seven patients experienced severe bleeding in the heparin-coated and control groups, respectively (P = 1.00). We did not observe heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. The use of heparin-coated catheters can be a safe and effective approach to the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection in patients with hematooncologic disease. PMID:17624052

  8. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  9. Metagenome plasticity of the bovine abomasal microbiota in immune animals in response to Ostertagia ostertagi infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ostertagia ostertagi infections in ruminants result in impaired gastrointestinal function. Partially immune animals were developed after multiple experimental infections. These animals displayed reduced worn burdens and a slightly elevated abomasal pH upon reinfection. In this study, we characterize...

  10. Does the weather influence the occurrence of abomasal displacement in dairy cows?

    PubMed

    Cannas da Silva, J; Schauberger, G; Rosário Oliveira, M; Segão, S; Kümper, H; Baumgartner, W

    2004-02-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the correlation between the occurrence of abomasal displacement and the weather situations. Data were collected for the years 2000 and 2001 in the area around Lisbon at 26 farms keeping about 6500 Holstein-Friesian milk cows; the analysis of 372 cases of abomasal displacement were included in the study. The weather situation was assessed on daily basis: atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, precipitation, daily insolation, maximum air temperature, minimum air temperature and average wind velocity. These original parameters were modified for the statistical analyses according to atmospheric pressure, water vapour pressure, relative humidity, temperature, temperature range, precipitation, insolation and wind speed. The change of the weather situation was described by the mean absolute deviation (deviation of the meteorological parameters from the running mean over a period of 5 and 10 days) and by a method which was based on the principal component analysis of the entire data set. A weak influence of water vapour pressure, relative humidity, temperature, temperature range, precipitation, and insolation on the occurrence of abomasal displacements was found by linear correlation- and regression analysis. A higher probability for abomasal displacement was verified for low water vapour pressure, high relative humidity, low air temperature, low temperature range, high precipitation and low insolation. No statistically significant relations were found between occurrence of abomasal displacement and either wind velocity or atmospheric pressure. A time series analysis exhibited a higher prevalence for abomasal displacement for periods with a change from sunny, warm and dry days to cool, overcast and humid days. From the present work it can be concluded that the meteorological situation has an influence on the occurrence of abomasal displacement. Therefore, the weather situation should be included among the predisposing causes of the

  11. Ultrasonographic findings in cows with right displacement of the abomasum and abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Feller, B

    2008-03-01

    Seventeen cows with right displacement of the abomasum (rda) without abomasal volvulus, nine cows with abomasal volvulus and 10 clinically healthy cows were examined ultrasonographically. A 5.0 MHz transducer was used to scan the eighth to 12th intercostal spaces and the cranial and caudal aspects of the flank on the right side. The position, size and dorsal and ventral margins of the abomasum were determined at each imaging position. In both groups of diseased cows, the ventral abomasum contained fluid ingesta, which appeared hypoechogenic with diffuse echogenic stippling. The abomasal folds could be seen clearly as echogenic sickle-shaped structures within the ingesta. The dorsal abomasal gas cap varied in size and was characterised by reverberation artefacts, which appeared as echogenic lines running parallel to the body surface. Compared with the healthy cows, the abomasum was larger and located significantly closer to the midline of the dorsum in both groups of cows. Compared with the cows with rda, the abomasum in the cows with abomasal volvulus was significantly smaller in the eighth intercostal space and significantly larger in the 11th intercostal space. It was not possible to differentiate between rda and abomasal volvulus on the basis of the ultrasonographic findings. PMID:18326843

  12. Net flux of amino acids across splanchnic tissues of ewes during abomasal protein and glucose infusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Studies in sheep (MacRae et al., 1997) and in pigs (Stoll et al., 1998) indicated approximately one-third of the amino acids absorbed by the enterocyte are metabolized within the enterocyte and are never released into the blood. Of those amino acids that are metabolized, 60% are appar...

  13. [Genetic analysis of the prevalence of abomasal displacement and its relationship to milk output characteristics in German Holstein cows].

    PubMed

    Ricken, M; Hamann, H; Scholz, H; Distl, O

    2004-09-01

    Genetic parameters for the prevalence of abomasal displacement and for milk yield traits were estimated using a data set of 3578 cows. The animals originated from 50 farms near Hanover being under the official milk recording scheme. At these farms all cases of abomasal displacement in German Holsteins were registered from July 2001 to January 2003. Using REML heritability estimates in linear animal models were h2 = 0.034 +/- 0.014, h2 = 0.017 +/- 0.013 and h2 = 0.029 +/- 0.011 for all cases of abomasal displacement, leftsided abomasal displacement and rightsided abomasal displacement, respectively. Additive genetic correlations between all cases of abomasal displacement and milk yield traits were small, ranging from rg = -0.20 (fat content) to rg = 0.08 (milk kg). However, there was a highly positive additive genetic correlation between leftsided abomasal displacement and milk yield of rg = 0.683 +/- 0.227. Leftsided abomasal displacement was correlated additive genetically to fat and protein yield, fat and protein content with rg = 0.595 +/- 0.297, r9 = 0.653 +/- 0.250, rg = -0.768 +/- 0.3280 und rg = -0.643 +/- 0.354, respectively. The additive genetic correlation to the ratio between fat and protein content was rg = -0.585 +/- 0.470. For rightsided abomasal displacement, additive genetic correlations were of similar size but with reversed signs. The estimates obtained for the residual correlations were negligibly small throughout. PMID:15503538

  14. Minimally invasive catheter implantation for regional chemotherapy of the liver: A new percutaneous transsubclavian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Frank K.; Boese-Landgraf, Jochen; Wagner, Armin; Albrecht, Dirk; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Fobbe, Franz

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Development of a percutaneously implantable catheter system for regional chemotherapy of liver metastases and its application in patients with surgically implanted but dislocated catheters. Methods. Thirty-three patients with liver metastases of colorectal tumors were submitted to percutaneous puncture of the subclavian artery and insertion of a catheter whose tip was placed in the proper hepatic artery and whose end was subcutaneously connected with an infusion pump. Results. The mean duration of therapy via the percutaneously inserted catheter was 27 weeks ({+-}14 weeks). The most frequent complication was disconnection of the therapy catheter from the tube of the infusion pump. Eighty percent of all complications were corrected by reintervention. The therapy drop-out rate due to catheter-associated complications was 9%. Conclusion. Percutaneous insertion of a catheter for regional chemotherapy of the liver is a relatively uncomplicated method with high patient acceptance and simple access for reintervention.

  15. Effects of wheat protein in milk replacers on abomasal emptying rate in calves.

    PubMed

    Wittek, T; Ernstberger, M; Muckenhuber, M; Flöck, M

    2016-04-01

    Diarrhoea is a condition with tremendous impact on calf health. Infectious agents play a dominant role; however, non-infective factors may also contribute to pathogenesis of diarrhoea. One factor, the abomasal emptying rate, is mainly influenced by the composition of feed. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of different protein sources in milk replacers on abomasal emptying rate and clinical parameters. The effect of increasing age of the calves on abomasal emptying was also evaluated. The study compared abomasal emptying rates and clinical parameters in calves, which were fed either milk replacer containing only whey protein or one which partially contained wheat protein. Abomasal emptying rate was estimated by ultrasonography. Ten calves were used in the study over 18 days, and each calf was fed 3 periods of 3 days length using different milk replacers in an alternating crossover design. The abomasum was emptied significantly faster when the wheat protein containing milk replacer was fed (half-emptying time wheat protein 49.1 ± 4.1 min, half-emptying time milk protein 59.1 ± 7.4 min); however, clinical parameters and weight gain did not differ between the feeding regimes. Age did not significantly influence abomasal emptying rate. As milk replacers containing wheat proteins increased abomasal emptying rate, they may have a higher potential to initiate diarrhoea, especially if high volumes are fed. Thus, the feeding regimes are likely to be even more important when such milk replacers are used. PMID:26189821

  16. Characterization of mucosa-associated bacterial communities in abomasal ulcers by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Hund, Alexandra; Dzieciol, Monika; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-05-15

    Abomasal ulcers are important pathological alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in cattle and are exceptionally hard to diagnose in vivo. The microbiome of the abomasum in cattle with or without ulcers has hardly been studied to date, and if so, the studies used culture-dependent methods. In the present study, the bacterial communities associated with abomasal ulcers of slaughter cows, bulls, and calves in Austria were described using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Sequences were clustered into 10,459 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), affiliating to 28 phyla with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes dominating (96.4% of all reads). The most abundant genera belonged to Helicobacter, Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, and novel Mycoplasma-like phylotypes. Significant differences between the microbial communities of healthy and ulcerated calves compared to cows and bulls could be observed. However, only few statistically significant differences in the abundances of certain OTUs between healthy and ulcerated abomasal mucosa were found. Additionally, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences of the most abundant phylotypes were obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing (n=88). In conclusion, our results allow the first deep insights into the composition of abomasal mucosal bacterial communities in cattle and describe a hitherto unknown high diversity and species richness of abomasal bacteria in cattle. Our results suggest that bacteria may have only limited involvement in the etiology of abomasal ulcers. However, future research will be needed to verify the contribution of bacteria to abomasal ulcer formation as presence or absence of bacteria does not necessarily correlate with etiology of disease. PMID:25770891

  17. Haemolyzed samples: responsibility of short catheters.

    PubMed

    Raisky, F; Gauthier, C; Marchal, A; Blum, D

    1994-01-01

    The haemolysis of blood samples is a source of error in the electrolytic and enzymatic determination in clinical biochemistry. This circumstance seems dependent on the material used for the venepuncture. In this study we compared three kinds of material in 350 patients who were sampled in the emergency department. This randomized study compared the haemolysis of blood samples collected with stainless steel needles and short catheters, either Teflon FEP (Cathlon Critikon) or polyurethane Vialon (Insyte Becton-Dickinson). Quantification of hemolysis was performed by assay of the optical density of plasma haemoglobin. Results were analysed, after verification of the randomization, by one-way analysis of variance by ranks. This study demonstrated a highly significant relation between occurrence of haemolysis and the sampling material, used according to its technical obligations. Haemolysis occurred frequently when short catheters were used in 42% and 55% of cases with the Teflon and Vialon catheters, respectively. Haemolysis was much less frequent with stainless steel needles (12%). This difference was even more marked for haemoglobin levels above 1.5 milligrams of plasma, where the incidence was 4.2%, 9% and 30%, respectively, for the stainless steel needles, the Teflon catheter and the Vialon catheter. This study induced our emergency department to take more blood samples with a needle, even if an infusion was to be given subsequently, or to take them using a Teflon catheter. PMID:7840428

  18. The use of dexmedetomidine continuous rate infusion for horses undergoing transvenous electrical cardioversion — A case series

    PubMed Central

    Marly-Voquer, Charlotte; Schwarzwald, Colin C.; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2016-01-01

    Five horses were presented for treatment of atrial fibrillation by transvenous electrical cardioversion (TVEC). A dexmedetomidine infusion was administered for sedation during positioning of the cardioversion catheters, and continued during general anesthesia. Shocks were applied until return to sinus rhythm. Dexmedetomidine infusion provided excellent conditions for TVEC catheter placement and procedure. PMID:26740702

  19. [Intraosseous infusion for adults].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kirchhoff, C

    2008-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion methods have been common for emergency treatment in infants and children for years. The role of IO access in adults is however much less clear, but its importance in this patient group is increasing, and different devices are available today. Each device has strengths and weaknesses, but all achieve rapid vascular access even in challenging situations. The potential of IO access regarding both therapeutic and diagnostic options has been shown in several operational studies in and out of hospital. Insertion times require between 1 and 2 min in most cases, while insertion and handling of the IO access devices seem to be easy and reliable. The flow rates of IO access devices for adults are lower than those of large-bore peripheral intravenous catheters, but fluid resuscitation is possible in most cases at least with pressure bag infusion systems. Most drugs administered intravenously can be given intraosseously in equivalent dosages and with the same effects. Nevertheless the limitations and risks of IO access routes need to be considered for each application. Rapid IO access is now possible in all age groups, and the 2005 AHA Guidelines favor it over drug administration via the endotracheal tube. PMID:18250995

  20. A mechanism of excessive accumulation of abomasal gas in vagotomized cattle determined using fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Megumi; Sasaki, Naoki; Kawamoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2011-05-01

    To better understand the mechanism of excessive gas accumulation in the abomasum in bovine abomasal displacement, we performed gastric fluoroscopy in vagotomized cattle. Fifteen 6-month-old Holstein steers were divided into three groups: a non-vagotomized control group (Group C; n=5), a ventral thoraco-vagotomized group (Group V; n=5), and a dorsal and ventral thoraco-vagotomized group (Group DV; n=5). These groups were examined by fluoroscopy before and during a 5-week observation period after surgery. In Group C, no change was observed throughout the observation period. In Group DV, immediately after surgery, reticuloruminal motility was completely absent and ruminal distention was seen. Two weeks after surgery, abnormal reticulum motility and increased gas accumulation in the abomasal body were noted. Abomasal dilatation was also observed. In Group V, 1 week after surgery, gas inflow into the abomasum and relatively normal reticulum motility were observed along with a rapid increase in abomasal gas. Abomasal dilatation was also observed. In addition, left-displaced abomasum occurred in one of the steers in this group. From these results, we concluded that one of the mechanisms of excessive gas accumulation in the abomasum is reticulum-mediated gas inflow from the rumen combined with vagotomy-induced hypomotility. PMID:21178321

  1. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  2. Electroacupuncture and moxibustion for correction of abomasal displacement in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kwang-ho; Lee, Joo-myoung; Nam, Tchi-chou

    2003-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the therapeutic effect of electroacupuncture and moxibustion on abomasal displacement in dairy cattle. After acupuncture needles were inserted bilaterally into the acupoints, 'Pi yu', 'Wei yu' and 'Guan yuan yu' , electronic stimulation (5 Hz and 10 V, 20 minutes) was conducted once a day for 3 days consecutively. Modified moxa patch was also applied at the same acupoints as in acupuncture for 3 days consecutively. Ten among twelve cows with abomasal displacement were recovered by electroacupuncture and moxibustion, but two were treated with paramedian abomasopexy. It is considered that electroacupuncture and moxibustion may be convenient, safe and economical therapeutic alternatives available instead of surgical procedures on abomasal displacement in dairy cattle. PMID:12819371

  3. Classification of abomasal displacement in cows according to histopathology of the liver and clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Y; Itoh, N; Taniyama, H; Kitazawa, T; Yokota, H; Koiwa, M; Ohtsuka, H; Terasaki, N; Maeno, K; Mizoguchi, M; Takeuchi, Y; Tanigawa, M; Nakamura, T; Watanabe, H; Matsuguchi, Y; Kukino, T; Honma, A

    2002-11-01

    Histopathological features of livers and blood chemical values in cows with abomasal displacement were investigated. Liver biopsy samples were collected during redressment operations in 92 cows with abomasal displacement, and the samples were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or periodic acid Schiff (PAS). Blood was collected for chemical tests. Livers were histopathologically divided into the following four types: normal histology cases (21%), fatty degeneration cases (36%), cloudy swelling cases (19%) and fatty degeneration cases with cloudy swelling (24%). The number of PAS-positive samples was significantly higher in the normal histology group and significantly lower in the severe fatty degeneration group and severe cloudy swelling group. Cows with fatty degeneration had significantly higher levels of serum 3-hydroxybutyric acid, non-esterified fatty acid and aspartate aminotransferase than did those with cloudy swelling or normal histology. The results indicate that the morbid conditions of cows with abomasal displacement can be classified into four types. PMID:12489873

  4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in cattle with abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Irmak, K; Turgut, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate haemostatic function in cattle with abomasal displacement (AD) and to reflect the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Ten adult cattle with left displacement of abomasum (LDA) (group I), 10 adult cattle with right displacement of abomasum with volvulus (RDA) (group II) and 10 clinically healthy adult cattle (control group) were used as material. Numbers of platelets (PLT) and coagulation tests (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), serum fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs), fibrinogen) were measured before the surgical treatment of cattle with LDA and RDA. APTT was prolonged only in group II compared with the control and group I (p<0.05). However, when the individual values of coagulation profiles of each cow were evaluated, two cattle in group I and three cattle in group II had at least three abnormal coagulation profiles, which reflect the occurrence of DIC. These cattle died after surgical treatment. The two cattle with LDA had abnormal APTT, FDPs and PLT values; three cattle with RDA had abnormal APTT, PT, TT, FDPs and PLT values. APTT (5 cases), FDPs (5 cases) and thrombocytopenia (5 cases) were the three most common abnormal tests on coagulation profile in the cattle with LDA and RDA. The results of the study indicate that cattle with AD had a spectrum of haemostatic dysfunction and that DIC was a significant risk factor for mortality. PMID:15727292

  5. Intraosseous infusion.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Brian G; Wang, Henry E

    2003-01-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital in the resuscitation of critically-ill children and adults. Intraosseous infusion (IOI) is a viable route for providing vascular access when traditional intravenous methods cannot be accomplished. IOI is relatively easy to perform and is a standard recommended intervention for the resuscitation of both adults and children. The authors review the history, anatomy, technique, and clinical application of IOI. They also highlight the use of IOI in the prehospital setting. PMID:12710793

  6. In vivo method for the evaluation of catheter thrombogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.D.; Arnold, W.L.; Martin, N.D.; Lentz, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new method has been developed to evaluate the relative thrombogenicity of vascular catheters. The technique provides a means to quantitatively differentiate between catheters made from different polymeric materials. Autologous In-111 labeled platelets were infused into a dog model and catheters were then inserted into the external jugular vein of the dog. The neck region was scanned using gamma camera imaging. Comparisons between catheter materials were made using computer generated uptake slopes during the first 40 min of the scan. In addition to scintigraphy, visual assessment of thrombus deposition, thrombus weight, platelet deposition, and scanning electron microscopy were used to validate the technique. Poly(vinyl chloride), polyurethane, heparinized polyurethane, and silicone catheter materials were tested. It was found that heparinized polyurethane was the least thrombogenic of all materials evaluated.

  7. Broadening infusion specialization as an adjunct to organizational sustainability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2014-01-01

    As changes in reimbursement structures create a stringent focus on the prevention of infection and other infusion-related complications that predispose to infection, it becomes important to examine the impact of vascular access and infusion specialty practices and procedures on overall organization sustainability and to implement strategies for disseminating infusion expertise to a broader contingent of nurses. This article discusses infusion nursing practice as it impacts the organization as a whole and details a performance improvement initiative for implementing a novel peripherally inserted central catheter tip determination technology that encompasses many of the goals of the industry standards. PMID:24384884

  8. Use of Pressure-volume Conductance Catheters in Real-time Cardiovascular Experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Abraham E.; Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Lovich, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most applications of pressure-volume conductance catheter measurements assess cardiovascular function at a single point in time after genetic, pharmacologic, infectious, nutritional, or toxicologic manipulation. Use of these catheters as a continuous monitor, however, is fraught with complexities and limitations. Methods Examples of the limitations and optimal use of conductance catheters as a continuous, real-time monitor of cardiovascular function are demonstrated during inotropic drug infusion in anesthetised rats. Results Inotropic drug infusion may alter ventricular dimensions causing relative movement of a well-positioned catheter, generating artifacts, including an abrupt pressure rise at end-systole that leads to over estimation of indices of contractility (max dP/dt) and loss of stroke volume signal. Simple rotation of the catheter, echocardiography-guided placement to the centre of the ventricle, or ventricular expansion through crystalloid infusion may correct for these artifacts. Fluid administration, however, alters left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and volume and therefore stroke volume, thereby obscuring continuous real-time haemodynamic measurements. Conclusions Pressure-volume artifacts during inotropic infusion are caused by physical contact of the catheter with endocardium. Repeated correction of catheter position may be required to use pressure volume catheters as a continuous real-time monitor during manipulations that alter ventricular dimensions, such as inotropic therapy. PMID:24954709

  9. Catheter fracture and embolization from totally implanted venous access ports--case reports.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, P; Dawn, B; Perry, M C

    1998-12-01

    Totally implanted venous access ports are excellent devices for delivering chemotherapeutic agents and prolonged intravenous infusions in patients with cancer. Catheter fracture and embolization are rare and potentially serious complications of these widely used devices. Retrieval of the embolized fragment is generally indicated but may not be possible. The authors report three cases of catheter embolization in their center over a period of 9 years. Catheter "pinch-off," fracture, embolization, and retrieval are discussed. PMID:9855376

  10. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abomasal transcriptome of Angus cattle in response to parasitic infection was characterized at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample using RNA-seq. These cattle displayed a distinctly separate resistance phenotype in terms of fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23,633 bovine gene...

  11. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most important helminth parasite for small ruminants. Here we characterized the impact of helminth infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were exposed to 5,000 H. contortus L3 larvae for 50 days. Six age-matched goats served a...

  12. Experience of on table modified standard catheters for directed arterial and venous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ram, Bhavin; Baliga, Kapil; Rajesh, S; George, Robbie K

    2016-07-01

    To describe an on-table modification of standard angiography catheters for use in directed arterial and venous thrombolysis. An angiogram is performed and the length of thrombosed vessel (artery or vein) is measured. A 5 or 6 Fr catheter (preferably straight/multi- purpose/vertebral catheter) is modified on table for use by making multiple holes with 23 G needle. After testing ex vivo with saline injection, the on table modified catheter is placed over a wire into the thrombosed segment of the vessel and thrombolytic agent infusion is commenced utilizing a syringe driver after giving a bolus dose of thrombolytic agent. Median duration of thrombolysis was 24 h in our study. We have utilized this method in twenty thrombosed vessels, without any catheter related complications. In our experience, this modification of a standard catheter as a multi-hole catheter is a readily available, simple, cheap, versatile and effective device for directed thrombolysis. PMID:26719163

  13. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  14. Thrombolytic Therapy Using Urokinase for Management of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Tack; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Pyong Wha; Heo, Tae Gil; Lee, Myung Soo; Kim, Chul-Nam; Kim, Hong-Yong; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Hye Ran; Roh, Young-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The management of central venous catheters (CVCs) and catheter thrombosis vary among centers, and the efficacy of the methods of management of catheter thrombosis in CVCs is rarely reported. We investigated the efficacy of bedside thrombolysis with urokinase for the management of catheter thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone CVC insertion by a single surgeon in a single center between April 2012 and June 2014. We used a protocol for the management of CVCs and when catheter thrombosis was confirmed, 5,000 U urokinase was infused into the catheter. Results: A total of 137 CVCs were inserted in 126 patients. The most common catheter-related complication was thrombosis (12, 8.8%) followed by infection (8, 5.8%). Nine of the 12 patients (75%) with catheter thrombosis were recanalized successfully with urokinase. The rate of CVC recanalization was higher in the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) group (87.5%) than the chemoport group (50%). Reintervention for catheter-related thrombosis was needed in only 2.2% of patients when thrombolytic therapy using urokinase was applied. Age <60 years (P=0.035), PICC group (P=0.037) and location of the catheter tip above the superior vena cava (P=0.044) were confirmed as independent risk factors for catheter thrombosis. Conclusion: Thrombolysis therapy using urokinase could successfully manage CVC thrombosis. Reintervention was rarely needed when a protocol using urokinase was applied for the management of CVC thromboses. PMID:26217634

  15. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  16. Mediastinal infusion with tracheal necrosis: an unusual complication of Port-a-cath devices.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Stéphane; Santelmo, Nicola; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Massard, Gilbert

    2011-06-01

    The Port-a-cath (PAC) is a catheter totally implanted under the skin. It is commonly used in oncology for permanent venous access. It provides a more simple way to infuse chemotherapies, antibiotics or parenteral nutrition, while offering improved comfort to patients. The usual complications of these devices (infections and catheter obstructions) are well documented. More exceptional events are catheter fractures with systemic migration, and endopleural perfusions due to a wrong positioning of the catheter. Since 1998, 10 cases of mediastinal infusion of cytotoxics have been reported. Surgical management was necessary in only two cases. We are reporting the case of a 57-year-old female suffering from a multimetastatic sigmoid adenocarcinoma. A mediastinal infusion of Folfiri and bevacizumab with a tracheal necrosis complicated the PAC use and required a latissimus dorsi myoplasty to fill up the tracheo-bronchial defect. PMID:21362735

  17. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  18. Effect of endotoxins on contractility of smooth muscle preparations from the bovine abomasal antrum.

    PubMed

    Kaze, C; Mevissen, M; Hirsbrunner, G; Steiner, A

    2004-01-01

    The effects of endotoxin (ET) on spontaneous contractility and of carbachol- and alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine-(alpha-M-5-HT; 5-HT2 receptor agonist) induced contractions of smooth muscle preparations from the bovine abomasal antrum were investigated in vitro. Preparations from the abomasal antrum of freshly slaughtered healthy dairy cows were cut parallel to the longitudinal and circular fibres, suspended in isolated organ baths, and contractility was recorded and analyzed, using digitalized data. The traits maximum amplitude, time till maximum amplitude, frequency, basal tone, and area under curve were calculated. The contractile effect of Carbachol (CH) was concentration dependent. Repeated administration of CH (3.75 x 10(-6) M), each time interrupted by flushing of the organ baths, did not reveal any significant effect on contractility traits of CH-induced contractions. Endotoxin (10 micrograms/ml; lipopolysaccharide from E. coli, O26:B6) significantly reduced some of the spontaneously occurring contractility traits and of carbachol-(3.75 x 10(-6) M) and alpha-M-5-HT-induced (2.14 x 10(-5) M) contractions. The effects of higher and lower concentrations of ET occurred less consistently. The inhibitory effect of endotoxin was more pronounced after 6 hours as compared to 2 hours of incubation. The results of the present study (i) support the hypothesis of a possible role of endotoxin in reducing motility of the abomasum during the development of spontaneous abomasal displacement in dairy cows, and (ii) may serve as the basis for the development of an in vitro model of abomasal displacement with endotoxemia for future studies on the effect of motility modulating drugs. PMID:14983752

  19. Changes in the coagulation profile of cattle with left abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Sobiech, P; Radwińska, J; Krystkiewicz, W; Snarska, A; Stopyra, A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine changes in coagulation profile parameters in cattle with left abomasal displacement (LAD). The study was performed on 20 Holstein-Friesian (H-F) cows divided into two groups: group I--10 cows with diagnosed left abomasal displacement and group II--10 clinically healthy cows. Coagulation tests, including TT (thrombin time), PT (prothrombin time) and APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), were conducted, and fibrinogen content, D-dimer content, AT III (antithrombin III) activity and platelet (PLT) count were determined in all the animals. Prolonged TT, PT and APTT, a higher fibrinogen and D-dimer content, a drop in AT III activity and thrombocyte count were observed in the cattle with LAD. The above abnormal coagulation profiles were most predominant in three cows which died after surgical repositioning of the abomasum. The results of the study indicate that in cattle with abomasal displacement, the disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) syndrome was the most significant risk factor for mortality. PMID:19227127

  20. Peritoneal fluid analysis in dairy cows with left displaced abomasum and abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Grosche, A; Fürll, M; Wittek, T

    2012-04-21

    Peritoneal fluid (PF) was evaluated in 40 cows with left displaced abomasum (LDA) and 15 cows with abomasal volvulus (AV). PF was obtained by abdominocentesis at the right ventral abdomen at admission. Simultaneously, a blood sample was taken from the jugular vein. Biochemical and cytological variables in blood and PF specific for ischaemia, inflammation and cell damage were compared. Total protein, albumin, glucose and cholesterol were normal in PF of cows with LDA and AV. Although L-lactate increased in both groups, cows with AV had significantly higher values (LDA: 1.47/0.69/2.68 mmol/l; AV: 6.45/4.55/12.89 mmol/l (median/1. quartile/3. quartile)). D-dimer (LDA: 0.50/0.22/0.88 mg/l; AV: 1.11/0.40/1.85 mg/l) and LDH (LDA: 663/437/943 U/l; AV: 1099/750/1439 U/l) were only increased in PF of cows with AV. The number of leucocytes was normal; however, significantly more peritoneal neutrophils appeared necrotic or apoptotic after AV. PF of cows with abomasal displacement showed distinctive features of ischaemia and inflammation. Characteristics of haemostatic dysfunction and cell damage were mainly evident in PF of cows with AV. The results suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy is indicated in each cow with abomasal displacement. Additionally, medical treatment should be directed to prevent complications of ischaemia and reperfusion in cows with AV. PMID:22383328

  1. Local distribution and toxicity of prolonged hippocampal infusion of muscimol

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Walbridge, Stuart; Morrison, Paul; Hampton, Robert R.; Sato, Susumu; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Butman, John A.; O’Malley, James; Vidwan, Param; Dedrick, Robert L.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, is reduced in the hippocampus in patients with complex partial seizures from mesial temporal sclerosis. To provide preliminary safety and distribution data on using convection-enhanced delivery of agents to treat complex partial seizures and to test the efficacy and safety of regional selective neuronal suppression, the authors infused muscimol, a GABA-A receptor agonist, directly into the hippocampus of nonhuman primates using an integrated catheter electrode. Methods Ten rhesus monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) use of catheter electrode alone (four monkeys); 2) infusion of escalating concentrations of muscimol followed by vehicle (three monkeys); and 3) infusion of vehicle and subsequent muscimol mixed with muscimol tracer (three monkeys). Infusions were begun 5 days after catheter electrode placement and continued for 5.6 days before switching to the other agent. Head magnetic resonance (MR) images and electroencephalography recordings were obtained before and during the infusions. Brain histological studies and quantitative autoradiography were performed. Neurological function was normal in controls and when muscimol concentrations were 0.125 mM or less, whereas higher concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM) produced reversible apathy and somnolence. Fluid distribution was demonstrated on MR images and muscimol distribution was demonstrated on autoradiographs throughout the hippocampus and adjacent white matter. Conclusions Targeted modulation of neuronal activity is a reasonable research strategy for the investigation and treatment of medically intractable epilepsy. PMID:16381190

  2. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  3. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common reasons to have an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... gov/pubmed/22094023 . Read More Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Transurethral resection of the prostate Urge incontinence Urinary ...

  4. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... vaginal wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension Urinary incontinence - ...

  5. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... store. Other supplies you will need are sterile gloves, a catheter pack, syringes, sterile solution to clean ... your back. Put on two pairs of sterile gloves, one over the other. Then: Make sure your ...

  6. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  7. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  8. Ischaemia/reperfusion injury in experimentally induced abomasal volvulus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, K; Mostaghni, K; Maleki, M; Badiei, K

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate ischaemia/reperfusion injury in simulated abomasal volvulus in sheep. Sixteen ewes were randomly allocated to three groups. The control group (n=4) served as sham-operated controls. The animals of the ischaemia group and reperfusion group (n=6, each) underwent a simulated 'abomasal volvulus'. The abomasum was exteriorized under general inhalation anesthesia and forced into a 180( composite function) anticlockwise rotation around its longitudinal axis, followed by another 270( composite function) anticlockwise rotation around its transectional axis. All ewes were monitored for 4 h. In the reperfusion group, volvulus was released after 3 h (i.e., 1 h of reperfusion). In the ischaemia group, the volvulus remained for 4 h (no reperfusion). Vital signs were monitored and some haematological and biochemical parameters were measured, without any significant differences. Full-section biopsy specimens were taken at the 3rd and 4th hours from the greater curvature of the abomasum. Histopathological lesions were scored according to the severity of mucosal oedema, submucosal oedema, haemorrhage submucosal and submuscularis layers, and polymorphonuclear infiltration on a scale of 0 to 4 (nil, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme). Another biopsy specimen was taken at the 4th hour for transmission electron microscopic examination. The scored lesions in light-microscopic examination were significantly different at the 3rd and 4th hours between the control and the experimental groups (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between the reperfusion and ischaemia groups (p>0.1). Within-group comparisons (3rd hour with 4th hour) revealed no significant differences. In transmission electron microscopic examination there were no remarkable changes in the control group, but in the ischaemia and reperfusion groups there were remarkable cellular (epithelial and goblet cells), mitochondrial and microvillous changes that strongly implied the

  9. Modified plasma and abomasal disposition of albendazole in nematode-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, L I; Sánchez, S F; Lanusse, C E

    1997-05-01

    The influence of gastrointestinal nematode infection on the kinetics of albendazole (ABZ) and its metabolites, albendazole sulphoxide (ABZSO) and sulphone (ABZSO2) in plasma and abomasal fluid was investigated in sheep. A micronised suspension of ABZ was administered intraruminally at 7.5 mg kg-1 to the following groups of sheep: (a) non-parasitised (control); (b) artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus; (c) naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus and other species of gastrointestinal nematodes. Plasma and abomasal fluid samples were obtained serially over 72 h post-treatment and they were analysed by HPLC for ABZ and its metabolites. The ABZ parent drug was not detected in plasma at any time post-treatment, however the metabolites ABZSO and ABZSO2 were recovered in the bloodstream. The active metabolite ABZSO was recovered in plasma between 0.5 and 48 (uninfected), 60 (H. contortus infected) or 72 h (naturally infected sheep) post-administration. The area under the plasma concentration vs time curve (AUC) values for ABZSO were higher in both artificially infected (64.0 micrograms h ml-1) and naturally infected (79.3 micrograms h ml-1) sheep as compared with non-infected animals (41.8 micrograms h ml-1). Peak plasma concentrations for ABZSO and ABZSO2 were higher in both artificially and naturally infected sheep than in non-parasitised animals. No changes in the half-lives and mean residence times for these metabolites were observed in infected sheep. ABZ and its metabolites were found in the abomasum between 0.5 and 48 (infected animals) or 72 h (uninfected) post-treatment. The availability (total AUCs) of ABZ and its metabolites in abomasal fluid were lower in H. contortus infected sheep than in the uninfected control animals. The increased abomasal pH induced by the presence of the H. contortus infection may reduce the plasma/abomasum pH gradient, which results in a decreased ionic-trapping of ABZ and its metabolites in the abomasum. Such a

  10. Utility of Percutaneous Intervention in the Management of Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, John F.; Shilling, Alfred T.; Schenk, Worthington G.; Bissonette, Eric A.; Stadtlander, Kevin S.; Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Spinosa, David J.; Leung, Daniel A.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2003-02-15

    A variety of interventional techniques have been developed to restore function to dysfunctional tunneled hemodialysis catheters (THC). The relative efficacies of these techniques were evaluated retrospectively to determine which therapy might be most beneficial. The records of malfunctioning THCs referred to interventional radiology between November 1995 and December 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Dysfunctional THCs were studied using DSA images obtained while injecting contrast through the lumens of the THCs. The interventions performed were categorized into 1 of 5 groups:no treatment or conservative measures such as vigorous flushing;advancing a guidewire through the THC to reposition the catheter tip or to dislodge a small thrombus; catheter exchange over a guidewire; fibrin stripping of the THC using a loop snare; or prolonged (4 or more hr) direct thrombolytic infusion. A Cox Proportional Hazards model was developed to compare the rate of failure among the procedures. There were 340 THC studies. The catheters were managed as follows: 93 patients received conservative management only, 15 had a guidewire advanced through the catheter, 147 underwent catheter exchange, 62 were treated with a fibrin stripping procedure, and 23 received athrombolytic infusion. Estimated 30-day patency rates for THCs were 38.2% for conservative management, 30.9% for guidewire manipulation of catheter tip, 53.6% for catheter exchange, 76.1% for fibrin stripping, and 69.8% for thrombolytic infusion. Differences among the treatments were observed (p < 0.01) and pairwise comparisons were made among the treatment groups. Failure rates were significantly higher in the catheter exchange(p <0.01) and guidewire manipulation at catheter tip (p <0.01) groups when compared with the fibrin stripping group. The catheter exchange and guidewire manipulation groups also experienced higher rates of failure when compared with the thrombolytic infusion group, although the differences were not

  11. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    PubMed

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  12. Pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Meredith C; Barshop, Bruce A; Gangoiti, Jon A; Deutsch, Reena; Martin, Michael; Schneider, Jerry A; Dohil, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Aims Although cysteamine was first used in the treatment of cystinosis in 1976 and approved by the FDA as cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon™) in 1994, surprisingly little pharmacological data are available for this compound. Cysteamine and its related drugs are currently being evaluated for the treatment of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease. The aim of te study was to understand the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion. Method Cysteamine bitartrate was delivered through a naso-enteric catheter into the stomach (n = 8), small intestine (n = 8) and caecum (n = 4) of normal subjects. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results The rate and extent of drug absorption were assessed by comparing AUC(0, ∞), Cmax and tmax, among the gastrointestinal infusion sites. Total cysteamine exposure, expressed as area under the curve (AUC(0, ∞)) was greatest when the drug was infused into the small intestine (4331.3 ± 1907.6 min × µm) followed by stomach (3901.9 ± 1591.9 min × µm) and caecum (3141.4 ± 1627.6 min × µm). Cysteamine infusion into the small intestine resulted in the most rapid rise to maximal plasma concentrations (tmax = 21 ± 0.56 min); tmax was delayed to 50 ± 26 min and 64 ± 26 min after gastric and caecal infusion, respectively. The maximum cysteamine plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached after infusion of the drug into the small intestine (51 ± 21 µm), which was higher than plasma Cmax concentrations after gastric (39 ± 16 µm) and caecal infusion (23 ± 15 µm). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data generated help extend our understanding of cysteamine. PMID:17229040

  13. Method of infusion extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus and method of removing desirable constituents from an infusible material by infusion extraction, where a piston operating in a first chamber draws a solvent into the first chamber where it may be heated, and then moves the heated solvent into a second chamber containing the infusible material, and where infusion extraction takes place. The piston then moves the solvent containing the extract through a filter into the first chamber, leaving the extraction residue in the second chamber.

  14. Subcutaneous infusion: non-metal cannulae vs metal butterfly needles.

    PubMed

    Torre, Maria Carrion

    2002-07-01

    This review aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of non-metal cannulae compared to metal butterfly needles in maintaining subcutaneous infusion sites in patients receiving palliative care. The Cochrane Library, Medline, Pre-Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Amed and Cancerlit were searched for relevant studies. Controlled trials comparing non-metal cannulae with metal butterfly needles for giving subcutaneous infusion to palliative care patients were included. The outcome considered was site duration in terms of hours of patency or until change was required. Four trials met the inclusion criteria although overall quality was poor due to low follow-up. Studies examined either Teflon or Vialon-coated catheters. All studies showed non-metal cannulae to be superior to metal. In individual studies estimates in mean increase in duration of the site range from 21 to 159 hours. It seems that non-metal cannulae are more effective in maintaining the duration of subcutaneous infusion sites than butterfly needles. Both types of non-metal catheter showed clear benefits. This review has not examined other outcomes but in general adverse effects lead to the removal of the catheter and so would be reflected in the outcome of considered. Although historically non-metal cannulae have been considerably more expensive there is now little difference between metal and Teflon-coated catheters. This review recommends the use of non-metal cannulae in preference to butterfly needles. PMID:12131852

  15. A 6-Fr Guiding Catheter (Slim Guide®) for Use with Multiple Microdevices

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Y.; Ohmori, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Kaku, Y.; Morioka, M.; Hirano, T.; Yano, S.; Kawano, T.; Hamada, J-I.; Kuratsu, J-I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A modified technique is required in patients with wide-necked aneurysms whose treatment by the single microcatheter technique is difficult. We developed a 6-Fr guiding catheter (Slim Guide®) that features a large lumen (0.072 inch) for performing the modified technique. To evaluate the usefulness of Slim Guide® we carried out experiments using three types of 6-Fr guiding catheter. In experiment 1, the shaft hardness and kink resistance were compared among three different guiding catheters (Slim Guide®, Launcher®, Envoy®). In experiment 2, we inserted a microballoon catheter and a microcatheter into the three different guiding catheters and recorded the maximal infusion pressure. In experiment 3, we inserted 13 different types of microdevices into the three different guiding catheters and evaluated the resistance of the microdevices. Although the shaft of the Slim Guide® was softer than that of the other two guiding catheters, its kink resistance was comparable. The maximal infusion pressure was significantly lower than with Launcher® or Envoy® catheters. Furthermore, with Slim Guide®, in 136 of 143 microdevice combinations examined (95.1%) there was no resistance; this was true for 125 (87.4%) and 116 (81.1%) combinations using the Launcher® - and the Envoy® guiding catheters, respectively. There was a significant difference between Slim Guide® and the other two guiding catheters with respect to their accommodation of double microsystems (p<0.05). Although the inner diameter of Slim Guide® is slightly larger than of the other two guiding catheters, it significantly increased the combination of microdevices that could be used for the coil embolization of difficult aneurysms. PMID:23472717

  16. The influence of gastrointestinal infusion of fats on regulation of food intake in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P C; Rayner, D V

    1987-01-01

    1. The influence of gastrointestinal infusions of fat on short-term and 24 h control of food intake were studied in twenty-four pigs fed twice per day and seventeen fed three times per day. The pigs were fitted with up to four catheters placed in the stomach, the duodenum, and at 2, 4 and 8 m from the ligament of Treitz. 2. Various infusions were given into the catheters beginning 30 min before the first meal (two feeds) or second meal (three feeds) of the day and continuing until the end of the feeding period or until the pigs stopped eating. 3. Infusions of a fat emulsion (Intralipid) into the stomach, of oleic acid or glycerol into the duodenum, or of glycerol into the ileum (8 m from the ligament of Treitz) inhibited food intake during the infusion according to the amount of energy infused. 4. Food intake was inhibited by more than the amount of energy infused with duodenal infusion of Intralipid or monoglyceride, or with infusion of Intralipid mixed with bile salts and lipase (but not with Intralipid alone) into 2 or 4 m from the ligament of Treitz. 5. Duodenal infusion of glycerol, and ileal (8 m from the ligament of Treitz) infusion of monoglyceride or glycerol inhibited food intake at the following meal according to the amount of energy infused. 6. It is concluded that fats can exert both pre- and post-absorptive control of food intake and that since Intralipid infusion to the stomach but not to the duodenum inhibits food intake according to the amount of energy infused, it is likely that control of food intake is related to control of stomach emptying. 7. The inhibition of food intake by more than the amount of energy infused during upper intestinal infusion of fat is likely to be a result of digestion of the fat to monoglycerides, and interaction of monoglycerides with receptors in the proximal 4 m of intestine. PMID:3656166

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... central catheters and nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. ... Procedures . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007:chap 4. Mansour JC, Neiderhuber JE. Establishing and ...

  18. A novel method for measuring catheter lock spillage: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Polaschegg, Hans-Dietrich

    2012-09-01

    Catheters are widely used for blood purification, parenteral nutrition, and for the infusion of drugs. Previous work on catheter lock spillage has focused on the theory and in vitro demonstration of catheter lock spillage caused by the laminar flow profile and by fluid exchange caused by density differences. This work describes an in vitro test with a method that potentially allows measurement of catheter lock spillage in vivo without sampling. The method is based on the change of the electrical resistance of the catheter when the lock solution is injected. This method was tested in vitro with human blood at 36°C using 46.7% trisodium citrate as catheter lock solution. The catheter tip was placed in a beaker filled with whole blood. A stainless steel rod in the beaker served as one electrode and an Arrow-Johans ECG adapter, which was placed on the distal end of the catheter, served as a second electrode. Conductivity was measured with a 5V (rms) 310 Hz sinus voltage and a 10 kOhm resistor in series to the catheter. The driving voltage and the voltage drop at the catheter was continuously measured with a program written under LabView (National Instruments), and the results were converted into mean trisodium citrate concentrations. Within 20 min, the mean trisodium citrate concentration in the catheter decreased to less than 5%. Unlike the previous methods used for catheter lock spillage measurement, this principle can be employed to measure the time course of catheter lock spillage in vivo. PMID:22639886

  19. Effect of imaging and catheter characteristics on clinical outcome for patients in the PRECISE study

    PubMed Central

    Polley, Mei-Yin; Lee, Benjamin; Kunwar, Sandeep; Pedain, Christoph; Wembacher-Schröder, Eva; Mittermeyer, Stephan; Westphal, Manfred; Sampson, John H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Croteau, David; Chang, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The PRECISE study used convection enhanced delivery (CED) to infuse IL13-PE38QQR in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and compared survival to Gliadel Wafers (GW). The objectives of this retrospective evaluation were to assess: (1) catheter positioning in relation to imaging features and (2) to examine the potential impact of catheter positioning, overall catheter placement and imaging features on long term clinical outcome in the PRECISE study. Catheter positioning and overall catheter placement were scored and used as a surrogate of adequate placement. Imaging studies obtained on day 43 and day 71 after resection were each retrospectively reviewed. Catheter positioning scores, catheter overall placement scores, local tumor control and imaging change scores were reviewed and correlated using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. Cox PH regression analysis was used to examine whether these imaging based variables predicted overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) after adjusting for age and KPS. Of 180 patients in the CED group, 20 patients did not undergo gross total resection. Of the remaining 160 patients only 53% of patients had fully conforming catheters in respect to overall placement and 51% had adequate catheter positioning scores. Better catheter positioning scores were not correlated with local tumor control (P = 0.61) or imaging change score (P = 0.86). OS and PFS were not correlated with catheter positioning score (OS: P = 0.53; PFS: P = 0.72 respectively), overall placement score (OS: P = 0.55; PFS: P = 0.35) or imaging changes on day 43 MRI (P = 0.88). Catheter positioning scores and overall catheter placement scores were not associated with clinical outcome in this large prospective trial. PMID:20563833

  20. Comparison of abomasal emptying in neonatal calves with a nuclear scintigraphic procedure.

    PubMed

    Nappert, G; Lattimer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate that nuclear medicine technology allows observation of the effect that milk clotting has on abomasal emptying in the living neonatal calf. Scintigraphic evaluation of abomasal emptying was carried out in 6 healthy male Holstein calves. The calves were fed 10% of their body weight daily as whole cow's milk that was divided equally and consumed as 2 feedings via a nipple bottle. One day before the nuclear scintigraphic procedure, the calves were randomly fed whole cow's milk, or an oral rehydration solution (ORS) containing bicarbonate and high levels of soluble fibre was fed for 3 consecutive feedings an hour before the portion of milk. For each calf, both feeding programs were repeated twice at a one-week interval. Immediately following administration of the 99mTC-sulfur-colloid-containing milk, the calves were imaged with the gamma camera positioned lateral and ventral to the abomasum. Additional right lateral and ventral views of the abomasum were collected at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, and 240 min after administration of the radionuclide. Blood glucose determination were performed at one-hour intervals for 7 h after feeding milk to evaluate milk digestibility in both feeding programs. No significant differences in the results of the glucose absorption test or in the radionuclide counts of the abomasum were found between both feeding programs. Scintigraphic evaluation of abomasal emptying was found to be a useful technique for visualization of milk clotting and to test the effect of an ORS on milk digestibility. PMID:11227195

  1. [Cardiac tamponade associated with umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placed in inappropriate position].

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Cancino, Franco; de la Luz Sánchez-Tirado, María

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pericardial effusion is an uncommon but life-threatening complication; and tamponade have been reported in 3% of neonates having such catheters. We present a case of cardiac tamponade as a complication of venous catheter in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and the pericardiocentesis was performed, and after removal of the complete pericardial effusion,an improvement of the critical condition was achieved. It is important to document the optimal positioning of UVC before the start of infusions. PMID:26089276

  2. Heat transfer analysis of catheters used for localized tissue cooling to attenuate reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Thomas L; Mitchell, Jennifer E; Merrill, Denise R

    2016-08-01

    Recent revascularization success for ischemic stroke patients using stentrievers has created a new opportunity for therapeutic hypothermia. By using short term localized tissue cooling interventional catheters can be used to reduce reperfusion injury and improve neurological outcomes. Using experimental testing and a well-established heat exchanger design approach, the ɛ-NTU method, this paper examines the cooling performance of commercially available catheters as function of four practical parameters: (1) infusion flow rate, (2) catheter location in the body, (3) catheter configuration and design, and (4) cooling approach. While saline batch cooling outperformed closed-loop autologous blood cooling at all equivalent flow rates in terms of lower delivered temperatures and cooling capacity, hemodilution, systemic and local, remains a concern. For clinicians and engineers this paper provides insights for the selection, design, and operation of commercially available catheters used for localized tissue cooling. PMID:27312661

  3. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean between your fingers and under your nails. Wet one of the washcloths with warm water and soap it up. Gently wash all around the area where the catheter goes in with the soapy washcloth. Females should wipe from front to back. Males should wipe from ...

  4. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET.

    PubMed

    Junck, L; Koeppe, R A; Greenberg, H S

    1989-10-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip. PMID:2789230

  5. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  6. Hepatic portal glucose infusions decrease food intake and increase food preference.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, M G; Friedman, M I

    1986-07-01

    We examined the contribution of experimental factors to the hepatic control of food intake. Rats with either hepatic portal or jugular catheters were infused four times with glucose (4.5 mg/min) and equitonic saline (2 ml/2 h). During the infusions their food contained nonnutritive chocolate or chicken flavor, depending on the infusate received. Hepatic portal glucose decreased food intake relative to saline and no infusion conditions, but jugular glucose did not. When allowed to choose between the flavors associated with each infusate, rats with hepatic portal catheters preferred the flavor eaten during glucose infusion, and rats with jugular catheters showed no preference. These results suggest that a mechanism located in the liver can reduce food intake without producing malaise and that portal glucose can act as an unconditioned stimulus for the acquisition of a learned food preference. Several reports that hepatic portal infusions do not alter feeding behavior may be explained by a failure to control for previous experience in the test situation. PMID:3728707

  7. Forceful pulsatile local infusion of enzyme accelerates thrombolysis: in vivo evaluation of a new delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kandarpa, K; Drinker, P A; Singer, S J; Caramore, D

    1988-09-01

    Forceful local pulsatile infusion of fibrinolytic enzyme disrupts thrombi, increases clot surface area, and thereby hastens enzyme action compared with conventional constant infusion methods, which are time consuming and therefore expensive. Prolonged thrombolytic therapy is associated with increased patient morbidity. A prototype for a clinically applicable pulsatile jet infusion system for accelerating thrombolysis was designed. The system is adaptable to standard angiographic catheters and techniques. The core of the system is a reciprocating syringe pump that delivers small volumes of thrombolytic enzyme in short, rapid, frequent pulses at high exit-jet velocity through any side-hole catheter (the smallest used was a 3-F catheter). Comparison of this system with a constant infusion system was made in vivo in a 48-hour-old thrombus model in rabbit inferior vena cava (IVC). One hour of lysis by streptokinase was conducted with each of the methods. In the first experiment, the IVC thrombi were left intact before chemical lysis. Pulsatile infusion lysed 61% of the thrombus by weight in an hour, whereas constant infusion lysed only 15% (P less than .001). In the second experiment, IVC thrombi were subjected initially to standardized mechanical perturbation by a guide wire before chemical lysis. In the latter experiment, pulsatile infusion lysed 54% of the thrombus by weight, and constant infusion lysed only 26% (P less than .005). The difference in percentage of lysis by weight between pulsatile infusion groups in the two experiments (61% vs 54%) was not significant (P greater than .1). The same was true of the difference between the two constant infusion groups (26% vs 15%, P greater than .05). The effect of initial perturbation of the thrombus by a guide wire appears to be less important than the thrombus disruption and accelerated thrombolysis caused by the pulsatile delivery system. No angiographic or macroscopically visible damage was seen in any IVC

  8. Risk factor analysis for long-term tunneled dialysis catheter-related bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Charra, B; Chazot, C; Vanel, T; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M; Laurent, G

    2002-07-01

    Infection, mainly related to vascular access, is one of the main causes of morbidity and a preventable cause of death in hemodialysis patients. From January 1994 to April 1998 we conducted a prospective study to assess the incidence and risk factors of catheter-related bacteremia. One hundred and twenty-nine tunneled dual-lumen hemodialysis catheters were inserted percutaneously into the internal jugular vein in 89 patients. Bacteremia (n = 56) occurred at least once with 37 (29%) of the catheters (an incidence of 1.1/1,000 catheter-days); local infection (n = 45, 1/1,000 catheter-days) was associated with bacteremia in 18 cases. Death in 1 case was directly related to Staphylococcus aureus (SA) septic shock, and septicemia contributed to deaths in 2 additional cases. Catheters were removed in 48% of the bacteremic episodes. Treatment comprised intravenous double antimicrobial therapy for 15-20 days. Bacteriological data of bacteremia showed 55% involvement of SA. Nasal carriage of SA was observed in 35% of the patients with catheters. Bacteremic catheters were more frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.001), a previous history of bacteremia (p = 0.05), nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.0001), longer catheter survival time (p = 0.001), higher total intravenous iron dose (p = 0.001), more frequent urokinase catheter infusion (p < 0.01), and local infection (p < 0.001) compared with non-bacteremic catheters. Monovariate survival analysis showed that significant initial risk factors for bacteremia were nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.00001), previous bacteremia (p = 0.0001), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.04). This study confirms the relatively high incidence of bacteremia with tunneled double-lumen silicone catheters and its potential complications. Possible preventive actions are discussed according to the risk factors. PMID:12119469

  9. Continuous Femoral Nerve Analgesia after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Stimulating versus Non-Stimulating Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim M.; Ritchey, R. Michael; Sessler, Daniel; Helfand, Robert; Samuel, Samuel; Xu, Meng; Beven, Michael; Bourdakos, Demetrios; Barsoum, Wael; Brooks, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Continuous femoral analgesia provides extended pain relief and improved functional recovery for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Successful continuous peripheral nerve analgesia depends on the catheter proximity to the target nerve. If the catheter is not close to the nerve, high infusion rates may be required to provide analgesia or analgesia may be sub-optimal. Stimulating catheters may allow more accurate placement of catheters in close proximity to the nerve. This randomized prospective study examined the use stimulating catheters versus non-stimulating catheters in 41 patients undergoing TKA. All patients had intravenous patient controlled anesthesia (IVPCA) for supplementary pain relief. The principal aim of the trial was to examine whether the use of a stimulating catheter allowed the use of lesser amounts of local anesthetics than a non-stimulating catheter. Additional parameters examined included post-operative pain scores, opioid use, side effects and acute functional orthopedic outcomes. Analgesia was good in both groups, but there were no statistically significant differences in the amount of ropivacaine administered; the median amount of ropivacaine given to patients in the stimulating catheter group was 8.2 ml/h vs. 8.8 ml/h for patients with non-stimulating catheters, P = 0.26 (median difference -0.6; 95% confidence interval, -2.3 to 0.6). No significant differences between the treatment groups were noted for the amount of fentanyl dispensed by the IVPCA, numeric pain rating scale scores, acute functional orthopedic outcomes, side effects or amounts of oral opioids consumed. Implications: For total knee arthroplasty, there seems to be no significant advantage for the use of stimulating catheters over traditional non-stimulating catheters in continuous femoral nerve blocks. PMID:17122240

  10. Arrested development of abomasal trichostrongylid nematodes in lambs in a steppe environment (North-Eastern Algeria).

    PubMed

    Meradi, Salah; Cabaret, Jacques; Bentounsi, Bourhane

    2016-01-01

    Arrested development of abomasal trichostrongylid nematodes was studied in 30 permanent grazing lambs on a large farm in the North-East of Algeria. The steppe climate has cold winters and hot and dry summers. The lambs were monitored monthly for gastrointestinal nematodes using nematode faecal egg counts, from February 2008 to February 2009. Every 2 months, two of the original 30 permanent lambs were necropsied after being held in pens for three weeks so that recently ingested infective larvae could develop into adults. The highest percentage of fourth stage larvae (L4), reaching 48% of the total worm burden, was recorded in abomasal contents in June. Teladorsagia and other Ostertagiinae constituted the highest percentage of L4 larvae (71%), whereas the percentage of Trichostrongylus (17.4%) or Haemonchus (11.6%) remained low. The dynamics of infection observed here (highest faecal egg count in August) and the stage composition of worm burden (highest percentage of L4 in June) provide strong evidence that arrested development had occurred. PMID:27608531

  11. Intraarterial Infusion Therapy via a Subcutaneous Port for Limb-Threatening Ischemia: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter K.; Ostheim-Dzerowycz, Wladimir; Boos, Irene B.L.

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To present the initial results of a new percutaneously implantable catheter port system (PIPS) used for long-term intraarterial infusion therapy in patients with severe ischemic limb disease. Methods: Ten patients with deep, extended ischemic ulcerations (all 10) and osteomyelitis (6/10) of the foot received intraarterial infusions of prostaglandine E{sub 1} and antibiotics, if indicated, via a new port catheter system with the port placed subcutaneously above the groin after percutaneous introduction and the catheter tip placed into the superficial or deep femoral artery. Results: Port implantation and repeated port access were uncomplicated. During the follow-up period (mean 11 months, range 1 week-50 months), port migration, leakage, or infection was not observed. Three catheters thrombosed and were opened by fibrinolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator instilled via the port. Treatment success was achieved in 8 patients: relief from rest pain (8 patients), reduction of ulcer size (4/8), and complete healing (4/8). Limb savage rate was 80%. In 2 patients amputation could not be avoided. Conclusion: Selective long-term arterial infusion therapy presents a valuable therapeutic regimen for limb salvage. With the new catheter port system, repeated local intraarterial infusion is safe and simple.

  12. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  13. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  14. Venipuncture and intravenous infusion access during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger; Bechtle, Perry; Creager, Gerald J.; Boyce, Joey B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to establish the difficulty associated with securing an intravenous (IV) catheter in place in microgravity flight and the techniques applicable in training the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) for Space Station Freedom, as well as aiding in the selection of appropriate hardware and supplies for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). The objectives are the following: (1) to determine the difficulties associated with venipuncture in a microgravity environment; (2) to evaluate the various methods of securing an IV catheter and attached tubing for infusion with regard to the unique environment; (3) to evaluate the various materials available for securing an intravenous catheter in place; and (4) to evaluate the fluid therapy administration system when functioning in a complete system. The inflight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic flight test to simulate microgravity are presented.

  15. Programmable physiological infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. H.; Young, D. R.; Adachi, R. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A programmable physiological infusion device and method are provided wherein a program source, such as a paper tape, is used to actuate an infusion pump in accordance with a desired program. The system is particularly applicable for dispensing calcium in a variety of waveforms.

  16. [Peripheral venous catheterization: influence of catheter composition on the occurrence of thrombophlebitis].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, C; Fauvage, B; Bru, J P; Croize, J; Calop, J

    1989-01-01

    Infusion thrombophlebitis is a common troublesome complication of intravenous therapy. This study compared peripheral intravenous Teflon and Vialon catheters. The incidence of phlebitis, bacterial adherence and mechanical resistance (distortion) were assessed on 170 catheters, 85 of each type. The Vialon catheter resulted in less phlebitis than the Teflon one (18 vs. 35; p less than 0.01). During the period 49 to 72 h after the insertion of the catheter, the risk of phlebitis in the Teflon group was twice that in the Vialon group. The study of bacterial adherence using a semi-quantitative culture method demonstrated that 9.0% of the catheters were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (5.7% Vialon group vs. 12.5% Teflon group). The Teflon catheters were much more distorted than vialon catheters: 1.7% vs. 55.7% in the macroscopic study; 1.75% vs. 8.2% in the microscopic study. As Vialon softens at body temperature, it would seem likely that it generates a lesser degree of endothelial injury, explaining the lower rate of phlebitis with Vialon catheters. PMID:2633660

  17. Evaluation of a percutaneously placed 27-gauge central venous catheter in neonates weighing less than 1200 grams.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K T; Sato, Y; Erenberg, A

    1990-01-01

    A percutaneous 27-gauge OD central venous catheter was inserted at 4 +/- 3 (SD) days of age and left in place for up to 2 weeks in 20 neonates with birth weights less than 1200 g and greater than 24 h of age. Parenteral nutritional solutions and medications were administered through these catheters. Twenty neonates matched for birth weight and gestational age served as paired controls. In vitro studies demonstrate that the maximum infusion rate for parenteral nutrition solutions is about 20 ml/hr. Packed red blood cells could not be infused through these catheters. In vivo results demonstrate a significant (p less than 0.05) reduction in number of peripheral iv catheters inserted during study (2 +/- 1 vs 7 +/- 4, SD) with no difference in cost per day of iv access ($79.42 +/- 113.51 vs $43.91 +/- 15.99, SD). Two-dimensional ultrasound assessment of catheter thrombosis was unsuccessful. Moreover, there was no correlation between angiographic and electron microscopic evaluation of catheter tip thrombosis. Electron microscopy of catheter tips revealed 33% with complete, partial and no occlusion, respectively, and 39% with sheath thrombosis. In summary, percutaneous insertion of a 27-gauge OD Vialon central venous catheter is a feasible alternative in providing venous access in very low birth weight infants. PMID:2112646

  18. Taurolidine Lock Is Superior to Heparin Lock in the Prevention of Catheter Related Bloodstream Infections and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Evelyn D.; Versleijen, Michelle W.; Huisman–de Waal, Getty; Feuth, Ton; Kievit, Wietske; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients. Methods Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation. Results Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9–8.7) for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–3.1) for occlusions. Conclusions Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin. PMID:25379781

  19. Partial protection and abomasal cytokine expression in sheep experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus and pre-treated with Taenia hydatigena vesicular concentrate.

    PubMed

    Buendía-Jiménez, J A; Muñoz-Guzmán, M A; Vega-López, M A; Cuenca-Verde, C; Martínez-Labat, J P; Cuéllar-Ordaz, J A; Alba-Hurtado, F

    2015-06-30

    The abomasal expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IFNγ in lambs experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus and its relationship to protection induced by a Taenia hydatigena larvae vesicular concentrate (ThLVC) were evaluated. The lambs that were only infected with H. contortus larvae showed a worm burden greater (p<0.05) than the lambs that received ThLVC prior to infection. Moreover, the lambs that received ThLVC showed a greater (p<0.05) number of blood eosinophils than the lambs that did not receive the ThLVC. In general, the lambs that received ThLVC prior to infection had a greater amount of eosinophils and mast cells and higher in situ expression of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the abomasal wall than the lambs that were infected with H. contortus only or that received ThLVC (p<0.05) only. A higher expression of IL-2 and IFNγ in the submucosa compared to the abomasal mucosa and a higher expression of IL-4 in the abomasal mucosa compared to the submucosa was observed (p<0.05). These results suggest that there is a Th1 type response in the abomasal submucosa and a Th2 type response in in the abomasal mucosa. The amount of eosinophils and mast cells and the in situ expression of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6 in the abomasal walls were negatively correlated with the worm burden (p<0.05). These results suggest that ThLVC is a non-specific immune stimulator for the abomasal immune response, and it is likely that the protection observed is the result of this effect. PMID:25959643

  20. [A Case of Delayed Vascular Injury as a Complication Related to Implanted Central Venous Port Catheter].

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Tomohiro; Fujii, Ryoji; Minagawa, Takeyoshi; Fujie, Shinya; Kimura, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Yoshizaki, Naohito; Kondo, Hitoshi; Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Sugiyama, Junko; Hirayama, Michiaki; Tsuji, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawarada, You; Okushiba, Shunichi; Nishioka, Noriko; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    A 74-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. A central venous (CV) port catheter was implanted into the right subclavian vein for preoperative chemotherapy and parenteral nutritional management. On the 35th day after implantation, she complained of diarrhea, fever and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion. As the patient progressively fell into severe respiratory distress, endotracheal intubation was performed for management of respiration by mechanical ventilation. Initially, given the patient's symptoms, she was diagnosed with septic shock. Therefore, after placement of a CV catheter through the right femoral vein, in consideration of the possibility of a port infection, she was treated with thoracentesis and infusion of antibiotics. The patient gradually recovered, and again received parenteral nutrition through the CV port catheter. After the infusion was administered, she complained of dyspnea. A CT scan of the chest revealed a right pleural effusion and displacement of the tip of the CV port catheter out of the wall of the superior vena cava. We diagnosed delayed vascular injury (DVI), and the CV port catheter was removed. She soon recovered with conservative treatment. We speculated that the initial respiratory symptoms such as the pleural effusion were caused by DVI. DVI should therefore be recognized as a complication related to implanted CV port catheters. PMID:26809313

  1. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wear a mask, cap, sterile gown, and sterile gloves when putting in the catheter to keep it ... putting in the catheter. • Clean their hands, wear gloves, and clean the catheter opening with an antiseptic ...

  2. A 6-fr guiding catheter (slim guide(®)) for use with multiple microdevices. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kai, Y; Ohmori, Y; Watanabe, M; Kaku, Y; Morioka, M; Hirano, T; Yano, S; Kawano, T; Hamada, J-I; Kuratsu, J-I

    2013-03-01

    A modified technique is required in patients with wide-necked aneurysms whose treatment by the single microcatheter technique is difficult. We developed a 6-Fr guiding catheter (Slim Guide(®)) that features a large lumen (0.072 inch) for performing the modified technique. To evaluate the usefulness of Slim Guide(®) we carried out experiments using three types of 6-Fr guiding catheter. In experiment 1, the shaft hardness and kink resistance were compared among three different guiding catheters (Slim Guide(®), Launcher(®), Envoy(®)). In experiment 2, we inserted a microballoon catheter and a microcatheter into the three different guiding catheters and recorded the maximal infusion pressure. In experiment 3, we inserted 13 different types of microdevices into the three different guiding catheters and evaluated the resistance of the microdevices. Although the shaft of the Slim Guide(®) was softer than that of the other two guiding catheters, its kink resistance was comparable. The maximal infusion pressure was significantly lower than with Launcher(®) or Envoy(®) catheters. Furthermore, with Slim Guide(®), in 136 of 143 microdevice combinations examined (95.1%) there was no resistance; this was true for 125 (87.4%) and 116 (81.1%) combinations using the Launcher(®) - and the Envoy(®) guiding catheters, respectively. There was a significant difference between Slim Guide(®) and the other two guiding catheters with respect to their accommodation of double microsystems (p<0.05). Although the inner diameter of Slim Guide(®) is slightly larger than of the other two guiding catheters, it significantly increased the combination of microdevices that could be used for the coil embolization of difficult aneurysms. PMID:23472717

  3. Efficacy of moxibustion after rolling correction in dairy cows with abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Lee, M R; Kim, J H; Han, T S; Kang, S S; Bae, C S; Kim, D H; Kim, G; Choi, S H

    2007-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the efficacy of moxibustion after rolling correction in dairy cows with abomasal displacement (AD). The experimental group comprised 86 Holstein cows with left displacement of the abomasum (LDA) and right displacement of the abomasum (RDA), with a mean age of 3.8 with AD during a 2-year period. The cows were rolled for correction of AD. After the rolling procedure, moxibustion was conducted on six acupoints once a day during the course of treatment. After repositioning the abomasums, the bilateral points of BL-20, BL-21 and BL-26 were then stimulated. During the follow-up of 1 week, 67 (93.1%) of 72 LDA and 12 (85.7%) of 14 RDA cows were released as cured after moxibustion. In conclusion, moxibustion effectively treats AD following rolling correction in dairy cows. PMID:17265551

  4. Effects of cholic acid infusion in fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of prolonged intravenous infusions of cholic acid into fetal lambs are described in this study. The ewes (n = 10, 11 fetuses) were operated on at 114 days of gestation (term = 150 days) by placing plastic catheters in maternal and fetal vessels and in the amniotic cavity. Gestational ages were confirmed after delivery by radiographic examination of the ossification centers of the fetal legs. Infusions of cholic acid (1.6 mumoles/min-1) started 8 to 10 days after surgery in 5 fetuses (including one twin). The remaining 6 fetuses (also including one twin) were infused with 5% dextrose in water. Total plasma bile acids at the beginning of the experiment were similar in both groups (23.8 +/- 6.6 vs. 24.3 +/- 5.7 microM). No significant changes in fetal heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases or pH were detected during the infusion. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid was observed during the third day of infusion in all the fetuses infused with cholic acid and in one control fetus. Fetuses infused with cholic acid were delivered alive 19-26 days before term. The concentration of plasma bile acids in the experimental group at delivery was 829 +/- 305 microM, i.e. significantly higher than that of the control group (24.4 +/- 5.7 microM). Control fetuses (except one twin) were delivered at term. We concluded that cholic acid, even at the high dose infused, is neither lethal nor severely harmful for the fetus. Meconium passage of the fetuses infused with cholic acid, in our experiment, appeared to be related to the stimulatory effect of cholic acid on fetal colonic motility rather than to fetal hypoxia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3716776

  5. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23 632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13 758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427) with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%), Complement C3 (0.7%), and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5%) were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR < 5%). Among the 94 224 splice junctions identified, 133 were uniquely present: 90 were observed only in resistant animals, and 43 were present only in susceptible animals. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment of the genes under study uncovered an association with lipid metabolism, which was confirmed by an independent pathway analysis. Several pathways, such as FXR/RXR activation, LXR/RXR activation, LPS/IL-1 mediated inhibition of RXR function, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were impacted in resistant animals, which are potentially involved in the development of parasite resistance in cattle. Our results provide insights into the development of host immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infection and will facilitate understanding of mechanism underlying host resistance. PMID:22129081

  6. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  7. Saline infusion sonohysterography.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Saline infusion sonohysterography consists of ultrasonographic imaging of the uterus and uterocervical cavity, using real-time ultrasonography during injection of sterile saline into the uterus. When properly performed, saline infusion sonohysterography can provide information about the uterus and endometrium. The most common indication for sonohysterography is abnormal uterine bleeding. sonohysterography should not be performed in a woman who is pregnant or could be pregnant or in a woman with a pelvic infection or unexplained pelvic tenderness. Physicians who perform or supervise diagnostic saline infusion sonohysterograpy should have training, experience, and demonstrated competence in gynecologic ultrasonography and saline infusion sonohysterography. Portions of this document were developed jointly with the American College of Radiology and the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine. PMID:14968760

  8. SU-C-9A-05: A Medical Physics Approach to the Evaluation of a New Anti-Reflux Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; McElmurray, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Surefire Infusion System (SIS) is a coaxial microcatheter system with a pliant expanding tip designed to limit retrograde flow of administered intra-arterial embolic agents and resultant non-target embolization (NTE). A recent study suggests that the SIS may achieve relative arterial hypotension downstream to the catheter tip when compared to an end-hole catheter, potentially altering microsphere distribution. We have used a physics based approach to evaluate particulate distribution using both the SIS and standard end-hole microcatheter via a two-step same-day injection of Tc-99m MAA as a microsphere surrogate. Methods: Informed patient consent and IRB approval were obtained. Four patients with primary or secondary liver cancer underwent two sequential low-particulate infusions of Tc-99m MAA on the same day using both the SIS and a conventional end-hole catheter. Radiopharmaceutical dosages of approximately 1:8 were utilized in the first infusion relative to the second to eliminate the effect of residual activity on the images acquired after each step. SPECT imaging was obtained following each infusion, and MAA distribution was analyzed and compared. Archived fluoroscopic images confirmed near-identical catheter position for both infusions. Results: SPECT images from all four patients demonstrate qualitatively increased penetration of MAA distal to the site of infusion using the SIS when compared to a standard end-hole catheter. Quantitative evaluations corroborate these findings with some distal regions receiving between 33% to more than 200% greater relative activity when SIS was used. No appreciable NTE was identified in either patient subset. Conclusion: These preliminary data demonstrate the validity of this dual-infusion technique. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment of SPECT images and comparison with baseline contrast enhanced CT and PET/CT images indicate an improvement in MAA penetration into the target lesion with the SIS. However

  9. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Performance testing carried out in the development of the prototype zero-g fluid infusion system is described and summarized. Engineering tests were performed in the course of development, both on the original breadboard device and on the prototype system. This testing was aimed at establishing baseline system performance parameters and facilitating improvements. Acceptance testing was then performed on the prototype system to verify functional performance. Acceptance testing included a demonstration of the fluid infusion system on a laboratory animal.

  10. In situ measurement of linezolid and vancomycin concentrations in intravascular catheter-associated biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M H; Kite, P; Mills, K; Sugden, S

    2001-02-01

    We describe a new method for the measurement of antimicrobial concentrations in the biofilm associated with the endoluminal surface of intravascular catheters. We quantified endoluminal planktonic bacteria in haemodialysis catheters using the acridine orange method on catheter blood. After catheter removal, separate lumens were perfused in vitro with either vancomycin or linezolid to simulate in vivo antibiotic infusion. Biofilm was recovered using endoluminal brushes, weighed and assayed by fluoroimmunoassay for vancomycin and by bioassay for linezolid. Viable bacteria were counted by serial dilution and agar plating. Biofilm had measurable amounts of vancomycin in 11/11 catheter lumens post-infusion (0.3-18.2 mg biofilm per lumen, mean 6.8 mg; vancomycin concentration 0.2-89 mg/g biofilm, median 19 mg/g). By comparison, linezolid was detected in 4/11 catheter lumens post-infusion (0.5-18.1 mg biofilm per lumen, mean 5.9 mg; linezolid concentration 0.9-6.1 mg/g biofilm, median 1.5 mg/g). Percentage reductions in biofilm-associated bacterial counts post-antibiotic were 84-100%, median 95% (vancomycin) and 0-98%, median 91% (linezolid). We found a significant difference (P = 0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) in vancomycin concentrations in coagulase-negative staphylococcal biofilm (median 17.0 mg/g, mean 27.9 mg/g) compared with glycopeptide levels found in biofilm associated with other microorganisms (median 5.5 mg/g, mean 6.9 mg/g). Biofilm concentrations of vancomycin are generally higher than linezolid after antibiotic infusion, which can be explained partly by glycopeptide binding to glycocalyx. Neither antibiotic achieved consistent 100% kill of biofilm bacteria after single infusions, even when a very high concentration was present. The endoluminal brush technique can be used to measure antibiotic concentration in intravascular catheter-associated biofilm in situ. This approach can be exploited to measure biofilm antibiotic concentrations in vivo, without the

  11. Prospective study of the aetiology of infusion phlebitis and line failure during peripheral parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    May, J; Murchan, P; MacFie, J; Sedman, P; Donat, R; Palmer, D; Mitchell, C J

    1996-08-01

    Four techniques of administering peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) were examined prospectively to investigate the role of mechanical trauma in the development of infusion phlebitis. Patients in group 1 (n = 15) were fed via a standard 18-G Teflon cannula which was removed on completion of the infusion and was rotated to the contralateral arm every day. Group 2 patients (n = 15) had a similar catheter sited in each forearm simultaneously, with rotation of the side of infusion each day. Patients in group 3 (n = 17) had a 15-cm Silastic rubber catheter inserted into a forearm vein and a standard cannula sited in the contralateral forearm, with alternation of infusion each day. Those in group 4 (n = 13) had a fine-bore 23-G silicone catheter sited in one arm only. Patients in groups 1, 2 and 3 were fed over 12-h cycles and those in group 4 for a 24-h continuous cycle. A total of 408 patient-days of PPN were given. Mean duration of PPN in groups 1-4 was 7.5, 9, 5.5 and 5 days respectively. Infusion phlebitis was not recorded in patients who had a daily change of cannula (group 1), but occurred in four patients in group 2, eight in group 3 and eight in group 4. Phlebitis scores were 0, 9, 15 and 12 for groups 1-4 respectively. Severe phlebitis and line occlusion occurred more frequently in patients with a 15-cm catheter (group 3) and in those fed continuously over 24 h (group 4). These results suggest that mechanical trauma is an important factor in the aetiology of infusion phlebitis. This can be minimized by reducing the time for which the vein wall is exposed to nutrient infusion and by reducing the amount of prosthetic material within the vein. PMID:8869311

  12. Controlled trial of a continuous irrigation suction catheter vs conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions from ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Isea, J O; Poyant, D; O'Donnell, C; Faling, L J; Karlinsky, J; Celli, B R

    1993-04-01

    Continuous irrigation-suction catheter (Irri-cath) is a double-lumen device that allows for simultaneous saline solution infusion and aspiration. This system may theoretically be more effective than conventional dry intermittent suction due to its vortex principle. To test this hypothesis, we performed 200 suction maneuvers in 20 ventilated patients. Identically shaped catheters were used in a randomized sequence. For the same individual, we used equal instilled saline solution volume (40 ml), vacuum pressure (-180 cm H2O), and ventilatory parameters. Effectiveness of suction was determined by measuring the total aspirated volume, the dry lyophilized weight of secretion, the corrected dry weight (dry weight-weight of instilled salt), and protein concentration. No difference in heart rate, respiratory frequency, O2 saturation, systemic blood pressure, peak inspiratory pressure, or patient discomfort was found when the two modalities were compared; however, the total volume of secretions collected, the dry weight, the corrected dry weight, and the protein concentration were significantly higher with continuous irrigation suction catheter when compared with the conventional method (p < 0.05). The suction time was shorter with the Irri-cath (p < 0.05). We conclude that the Irri-Cath is more effective than conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions in patients on mechanical ventilation. PMID:8131470

  13. Changing practice in the subcutaneous infusion of fluids to improve safety.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Ann

    2004-11-01

    Many nurses administer subcutaneous infusion therapy; it is seen as an alternative to intravenous therapy. But how sharp-safe is the equipment they use? An evaluation of a clinical trial on a catheter to replace metal butterfly needles is outlined, together with details of how this was introduced into clinical areas. PMID:15552442

  14. The Cleveland Clinic Experience with Supraclavicular and Popliteal Ambulatory Nerve Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Gharabawy, Ramez; Eid, Gamal; Mendoza, Maria; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Ali Sakr Esa, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications. PMID:25535627

  15. Unintentional epidural placement of a thoracic paravertebral catheter inserted using an ultrasound-guided technique: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Shimizu, Hiroki; Furutani, Kenta; Baba, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This is the first case report describing the epidural misplacement of an infusion catheter, which was intended to be located in the thoracic paravertebral space using an ultrasound-guided technique. The patient was a 57-year-old female undergoing a laparoscopy-assisted left partial nephrectomy. Before surgery, a Tuohy needle was inserted into the paravertebral space at the left ninth intercostal space using an in-plane transverse ultrasound-guided approach in the lateral-to-medial direction. A catheter was then threaded into the paravertebral space through the needle. Subsequently, the catheter position was secured, although ultrasound-guided confirmation of air injected through the catheter into the paravertebral space was not obtained. Twenty milliliters of 0.5 % levobupivacaine was administered through the catheter at both the initiation and conclusion of surgery. A neurologic examination following surgery revealed paraplegia, along with sensory deficits in the bilateral T3-S5 dermatome. The motor dysfunction in the lower extremities lasted 7 h, and the sensory block lasted 13.5 h. Postoperative radiologic confirmation of the catheter position concomitant with the spread of radiopaque dye revealed that the tip of the catheter was lying in the epidural space. Unless precise attention is paid to detection of the catheter tip location, a thoracic paravertebral catheter can enter into the epidural space even under ultrasound guidance. PMID:27040105

  16. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  17. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  18. Intrabronchial Infusion of Autologous Blood Plus Thrombin for Intractable Pneumothorax After Bronchial Occlusion Using Silicon Spigots

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yasuharu; Kawamura, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shin; Tsukamoto, Hiroaki; Mochiduki, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bronchial occlusion therapy using silicon spigots is effective for intractable pneumothorax. However, sometimes the pneumothorax is refractory to bronchial occlusion because of collateral ventilation. For such difficult pneumothoraces, we attempted an intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin to control collateral ventilation and stop air leaks. Methods: We performed bronchial occlusions using silicon spigots in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to emphysema and refractory to chest drainage, but which was inoperable owing to each patient’s poor surgical candidacy and poor overall health condition. When bronchial occlusion proved ineffective, we undertook intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin, 2 to 4 days after bronchial occlusion. A catheter was inserted into the subpleural area, through a gap between the silicon spigot and the bronchial wall, using a flexible bronchoscope under fluoroscopic guidance. Autologous blood, followed by a thrombin solution, was infused using the catheter. We repeated the same infusion a total of 4 to 6 times while changing the target bronchi. All interventions were performed under local anesthesia. Results: The subjects were 9 men, aged from 61 to 88 years, with smoking histories. Three patients also had interstitial pneumonia, and 6 patients had undergone pleurodesis in vain before bronchial occlusion. For 4of the 9 patients, autologous blood plus thrombin infusions successfully stopped air leaks, and in 3 patients, intrabronchial infusions and pleurodesis halted leaks altogether. Conclusion: Intrabronchial infusion of autologous blood plus thrombin was effective for intractable pneumothoraces that could not be clinically managed, even by bronchial occlusion using silicon spigots. PMID:27454474

  19. Backflow length predictions during flow-controlled infusions using a nonlinear biphasic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Smith, Joshua H; García, José J

    2014-10-01

    A previously proposed finite element model that considers geometric and material nonlinearities and the free boundary problems that occur at the catheter tip and in the annular zone around the lateral surface of the catheter was revised and was used to fit a power-law formula to predict backflow length during infusions into brain tissue. Compared to a closed-form solution based on linear elasticity, the power-law formula for compliant materials predicted a substantial lower influence of the shear modulus and catheter radius on the backflow length, whereas the corresponding influence for stiffer materials was more consistent with the closed-form solution. The finite element model predicted decreases of the backflow length for reduction of the shear modulus for highly compliant materials (shear modulus less than 500 Pa) due to the increased area of infusion and the high fluid fraction near the infusion cavity that greatly increased the surface area available for fluid transfer and reduced the hydraulic resistance toward the tissue. These results show the importance of taking into account the material and geometrical nonlinearities that arise near the infusion surface as well as the change of hydraulic conductivity with strain for a proper characterization of backflow length during flow-controlled infusions into the brain. PMID:25154980

  20. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection. PMID:15792563

  1. Tenckhoff tunneled peritoneal catheter placement in the palliative treatment of malignant ascites: technical results and overall clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Indesteege, Inge; Laenen, Annouschka; Verslype, Chris; Vergote, Ignace; Prenen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To assess the technical and clinical outcome of percutaneous insertion of tunneled peritoneal catheters in the palliative treatment of refractory malignant ascites and to determine the safety and feasibility of intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs through the tunneled catheter. Materials and methods Consecutive patients palliatively treated with a tunneled peritoneal catheter to drain the malignant ascites were identified. Patients’ medical history, procedural and clinical follow-up data, including complications and estimated survival, were reviewed. Additionally, a sub analysis of the patients with widespread ovarian cancer and refractory ascites treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs was made. Results In all 94 patients it was technically feasible to insert the peritoneal drainage catheter and to drain a median of 3260 cc (range 100 cc – 8500 cc) of malignant ascitic fluid. Post procedural complications included catheter infection (n = 2; 2%), fluid leakage around the entry site (n = 4; 4%), catheter occlusion (n = 2; 2%), sleeve formation around the catheter tip (n = 1; 1%) and accidental loss of the catheter (n = 1; 1%). There was no increase in catheter infection rate in patients treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs. Median overall survival after catheter insertion is 1.7 months. Conclusions Percutaneous insertion of a tunneled Tenckhoff catheter for the palliative drainage of malignant ascites and intraperitoneal infusion of cytotoxic drugs is feasible and associated with a very low complication rate, including catheter infection. These tunneled peritoneal lines are beneficial for symptomatic palliative treatment of refractory ascites and allow safe intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:27247552

  2. Fluid infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Development of a fluid infusion system was undertaken in response to a need for an intravenous infusion device operable under conditions of zero-g. The initial design approach, pursued in the construction of the first breadboard instrument, was to regulate the pressure of the motive gas to produce a similar regulated pressure in the infusion liquid. This scheme was not workable because of the varying bag contact area, and a major design iteration was made. A floating sensor plate in the center of the bag pressure plate was made to operate a pressure regulator built into the bellows assembly, effectively making liquid pressure the directly controlled variable. Other design changes were made as experience was gained with the breadboard. Extensive performance tests were conducted on both the breadboard and the prototype device; accurately regulated flows from 6 m1/min to 100 m1/min were achieved. All system functions were shown to operate satisfactorily.

  3. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  4. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  5. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  6. Cross-sectional study of the association of abomasal displacement or volvulus with serum electrolyte and mineral concentrations in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Lecaroz, R; Warnick, L D; Guard, C L; Smith, M C; Barry, D A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate serum mineral and electrolyte concentrations at the time of on-farm diagnosis of left displaced abomasum, right displaced abomasum, or abomasal volvulus in dairy cows. Data were collected from 104 affected cows and 96 control cows matched with cases, based on herd, parity, and stage of lactation. Cows with abomasal displacement or volvulus had significantly lower calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, and chloride concentrations and increased anion gap at the time of diagnosis compared with control cows from the same herds. The percentages of cases and controls with total serum calcium concentrations below the lower limit of the laboratory reference range (2.08 mmol/L [8.3 mg/dL]) were 70% and 23%, respectively. Based on the large percentage of cases with hypocalcemia, administering calcium salts at the time of treatment of field cases of abomasal displacement or volvulus may be beneficial. PMID:10769767

  7. Cross-sectional study of the association of abomasal displacement or volvulus with serum electrolyte and mineral concentrations in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Lecaroz, R; Warnick, L D; Guard, C L; Smith, M C; Barry, D A

    2000-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate serum mineral and electrolyte concentrations at the time of on-farm diagnosis of left displaced abomasum, right displaced abomasum, or abomasal volvulus in dairy cows. Data were collected from 104 affected cows and 96 control cows matched with cases, based on herd, parity, and stage of lactation. Cows with abomasal displacement or volvulus had significantly lower calcium, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, and chloride concentrations and increased anion gap at the time of diagnosis compared with control cows from the same herds. The percentages of cases and controls with total serum calcium concentrations below the lower limit of the laboratory reference range (2.08 mmol/L [8.3 mg/dL]) were 70% and 23%, respectively. Based on the large percentage of cases with hypocalcemia, administering calcium salts at the time of treatment of field cases of abomasal displacement or volvulus may be beneficial. PMID:10769767

  8. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  13. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Li, Weizhong; Sun, Jiajie; Yu, Peng; Baldwin, Ransom L; Urban, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most injurious helminth parasite for small ruminants. We characterized the impact of H. contortus infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were inoculated with 5,000 H. contortus infective larvae and followed for 50 days. Six age-matched naïve goats served as uninfected controls. Reduced bodyweight gain and a significant increase in the abosamal pH was observed in infected goats compared to uninfected controls. Infection also increased the bacterial load while reducing the abundance of the Archaea in the abomasum but did not appear to affect microbial diversity. Nevertheless, the infection altered the abundance of approximately 19% of the 432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected per sample. A total of 30 taxa displayed a significantly different abundance between control and infected goats. Furthermore, the infection resulted in a distinct difference in the microbiome structure. As many as 8 KEGG pathways were predicted to be significantly affected by infection. In addition, H. contortus-induced changes in butyrate producing bacteria could regulate mucosal inflammation and tissue repair. Our results provided insight into physiological consequences of helminth infection in small ruminants and could facilitate the development of novel control strategies to improve animal and human health. PMID:26853110

  14. The reindeer abomasal nematode (Ostertagia gruehneri) is naturally transmitted to sheep when sharing pastures.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Saana-Maaria; Thamsborg, Stig M; Laaksonen, Sauli; Oksanen, Antti

    2014-11-01

    The increasing number of sheep (Ovis aries) in northern Finland, often alternately corralled with winter-fed reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus), creates potential for cross-infection of gastrointestinal nematodes. The aim of this study was to elucidate this possibility with 43 animals. Eleven reindeer and 8 sheep had shared a corral by turns, reindeer during winters, and sheep in summers. Another 12 reindeer had no known contact with sheep. Twelve sheep had no close contact to other ruminants. Both reindeer groups were free-ranging during summers. During slaughter in September to November, 2003, abomasa and parts of intestines were collected. Gastrointestinal nematodes were counted and identified. The species found were the following: in reindeer, Ostertagia gruehneri/Ostertagia arctica, Mazamastrongylus dagestanica, Nematodirus tarandi, Nematodirella longissimespiculata and Bunostomum trigonocephalum; in sheep, Teladorsagia circumcincta/Teladorsagia trifurcata, O. gruehneri/O. arctica, Nematodirus filicollis and N. spathiger. In the sheep sharing corral with reindeer, the only abomasal nematode species found was O. gruehneri, a reindeer parasite. The generation interval of O. gruehneri in Finnish reindeer appears to be shorter than in Canadian Arctic caribou, where complete larval inhibition leading to only one generation yearly has been reported. PMID:25106839

  15. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Robert W.; Li, Weizhong; Sun, Jiajie; Yu, Peng; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Urban, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most injurious helminth parasite for small ruminants. We characterized the impact of H. contortus infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were inoculated with 5,000 H. contortus infective larvae and followed for 50 days. Six age-matched naïve goats served as uninfected controls. Reduced bodyweight gain and a significant increase in the abosamal pH was observed in infected goats compared to uninfected controls. Infection also increased the bacterial load while reducing the abundance of the Archaea in the abomasum but did not appear to affect microbial diversity. Nevertheless, the infection altered the abundance of approximately 19% of the 432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected per sample. A total of 30 taxa displayed a significantly different abundance between control and infected goats. Furthermore, the infection resulted in a distinct difference in the microbiome structure. As many as 8 KEGG pathways were predicted to be significantly affected by infection. In addition, H. contortus-induced changes in butyrate producing bacteria could regulate mucosal inflammation and tissue repair. Our results provided insight into physiological consequences of helminth infection in small ruminants and could facilitate the development of novel control strategies to improve animal and human health. PMID:26853110

  16. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  17. Serial Non-Invasive Measurements of Dermal Carotenoid Concentrations in Dairy Cows following Recovery from Abomasal Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E.; Müller, Kerstin E.; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining the health of farm animals forms the basis for a sustainable and profitable production of food from animal origin. Recently, the effects of carotenoids on the oxidative status as well as on reproductive and immune functions in cattle have been demonstrated. The present study aimed at investigating dermal carotenoid levels in cattle recovering from abomasal displacement. For this purpose, serial in vivo measurements were undertaken using a miniaturized scanner system that relies on reflection spectroscopy (Opsolution GmbH, Kassel, Germany). In a first trial, repeated measurements of dermal carotenoid concentrations were performed on the udder skin of healthy non-lactating cattle (n = 6) for one month in weekly intervals. In a second trial, in vivo dermal carotenoid concentrations were determined in intervals in 23 cows following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement. The results show that dermal carotenoid concentrations, determined on a weekly basis over a period of one month, showed variations of up to 18% in the healthy individuals kept under constant conditions with respect to housing and nutrition. Repeated measurements during the recovery period following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement resulted in an increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in 18 of 20 animals with a favourable outcome when compared with results obtained within 12 hours following surgery. The mean increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in subsequent measurements was 53±44%, whereas levels decreased (mean 31±27%) in cattle with a fatal outcome. These results indicate potential applications for reflection spectroscopy for non-invasive early detection of changes in the dermal carotenoid concentrations as a reflection of the antioxidant status in an animal. PMID:23118891

  18. Serial non-invasive measurements of dermal carotenoid concentrations in dairy cows following recovery from abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julian; Klein, Julia; Darvin, Maxim E; Müller, Kerstin E; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining the health of farm animals forms the basis for a sustainable and profitable production of food from animal origin. Recently, the effects of carotenoids on the oxidative status as well as on reproductive and immune functions in cattle have been demonstrated. The present study aimed at investigating dermal carotenoid levels in cattle recovering from abomasal displacement. For this purpose, serial in vivo measurements were undertaken using a miniaturized scanner system that relies on reflection spectroscopy (Opsolution GmbH, Kassel, Germany). In a first trial, repeated measurements of dermal carotenoid concentrations were performed on the udder skin of healthy non-lactating cattle (n = 6) for one month in weekly intervals. In a second trial, in vivo dermal carotenoid concentrations were determined in intervals in 23 cows following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement. The results show that dermal carotenoid concentrations, determined on a weekly basis over a period of one month, showed variations of up to 18% in the healthy individuals kept under constant conditions with respect to housing and nutrition. Repeated measurements during the recovery period following surgical treatment of abomasal displacement resulted in an increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in 18 of 20 animals with a favourable outcome when compared with results obtained within 12 hours following surgery. The mean increase in dermal carotenoid concentrations in subsequent measurements was 53 ± 44%, whereas levels decreased (mean 31 ± 27%) in cattle with a fatal outcome.These results indicate potential applications for reflection spectroscopy for non-invasive early detection of changes in the dermal carotenoid concentrations as a reflection of the antioxidant status in an animal. PMID:23118891

  19. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm(3)) versus the infused volume (mm(3)) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min(-1)) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min(-1) functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application. PMID:22331865

  20. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm3) versus the infused volume (mm3) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min-1) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min-1 functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application.

  1. Inadvertent Puncture of the Thoracic Duct During Attempted Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraber, Ulf K.M. Nibbe, Lutz; Gebauer, Bernhard; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-11-15

    We report a case of puncture of the thoracic duct during left subclavian vein catheterization on the intensive care unit. Computed tomography and measurement of the triglyceride levels in the aspirated fluid proved the inadvertent penetration of the guidewire into the thoracic duct. Early recognition of central line misplacement avoided serious complications. Inadvertent central venous catheter placement into the thoracic duct may have the potential complications of infusion mediastinum and chylothorax.

  2. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... (performance standards). (2) Class I for the catheter punch instrument, nondisposable cannula and trocar,...

  6. Per-catheter ASD closure.

    PubMed

    Latson, L A

    1998-01-01

    Per-catheter devices for atrial septal defect (ASD) closure have been evolving since 1974. The four major devices available for use on a limited basis in early 1997 are reviewed. These include (in alphabetical order) the Angel Wing device, the ASDOS device, the Buttoned device, and the CardioSeal device (successor to the Clamshell). Sufficient data have been collected to indicate that transcatheter ASD closure is a viable alternative to surgery in selected patients. The advantages of the concept of per-catheter closure over surgical closure should lead to the continued development of devices and techniques for per-catheter treatment of ASD and other septal defects in the years to come. PMID:9396853

  7. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  8. Intravenous Catheter-Associated Candidemia due to Candida membranaefaciens: The First Iranian Case.

    PubMed

    Aghili, Seyed Reza; Shokohi, Tahereh; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi Fesharaki, Shirinsadat; Salmanian, Bahar

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of candidemia due to the uncommon non-albicans Candida species appears to be increasing, and certain species such as Candida (C.) membranaefaciens have been reported in some clinical researches. Vascular catheters are considered the likely culprit for the sudden emergence of hospital-acquired candidemia. The identification of C. membranaefaciens can be problematic in clinical practice owing to its phenotypic resemblance to C. guilliermondii. We report the first case of C. membranaefaciens in Iran, which occurred in a 70-year-old woman, who had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We isolated germ-tube negative yeast from both blood culture and central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture on brain-heart infusion agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar plates, and biphasic brain-heart infusion media bottle; it developed smooth, pink colonies on CHROMagar Candida. By using the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of theinternal transcribed spacer region of rDNA, we identified C. membranaefaciens. After the removal of the CVC and initiation of Fluconazole treatment, the patient's condition gradually improved and she was discharged from the hospital. The early detection of organisms in the catheter, removal of the catheter, and treatment with anti-fungal antibiotics have an important role in controlling disease and preventing septicemia after CABG. As C. membranaefaciens is an opportunistic Candida species, both clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the factors that confer fast diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26110010

  9. Neuraxial anesthesia for labor and cesarean delivery in a parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency on recombinant human antithrombin infusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Pamnani, Anup; Rosenstein, Megan; Darwich, Alaeldin; Wolfson, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    A recombinant human antithrombin (rhAT; generic name: antithrombin Alfa) has recently been developed. A 37 year-old parturient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency, receiving rhAT infusion therapy, who successfully received an epidural catheter for analgesia and anesthesia during labor and cesarean delivery, is presented. PMID:20868967

  10. Mediastinal infusion of epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil. A complication of totally implantable central venous systems. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Rodier, J M; Malbec, L; Lauraine, E P; Batel-Copel, L; Bernadou, A

    1996-01-01

    Perforation of the wall of the superior vena cava by a central venous catheter is reported. The resultant inadvertent infusion of 5-fluorouracil and epirubicin caused a severe acute inflammatory reaction in the right-lobe bronchus, mediastinal infiltration and pleural and pericardial effusions. The patient recovered but has residual mild oesophageal dysfunction. PMID:8781572

  11. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  12. Hemodialysis Catheter Care: Identifying Best Cleansing Agents.

    PubMed

    Stupak, Deborah M; Trubilla, Jennifer A; Groller, Susann R

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to create a standardized resource for cleansing both non-tunneled and tunneled hemodialysis catheters, it was discovered that all disinfectants are not compatible with all catheters. This article describes the process used to identify best practices for hemodialysis catheter care and steps taken to standardize practice throughout a hospital network. Standardized evidence-based practice preserves the integrity of catheters while allowing nurses to provide quality care to patients. PMID:27254970

  13. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  14. The development of a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns1

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Priscila; Kimura, Amélia Fumiko; Brandon, Debra Huffman; Paiva, Eny Dorea; de Camargo, Patricia Ponce

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to develop a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns. METHOD: prospective cohort study conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit with newborn babies who underwent 524 catheter insertions. The clinical characteristics of the newborn, catheter insertion and intravenous therapy were tested as risk factors for the unplanned removal of catheters using bivariate analysis. The risk score was developed using logistic regression. Accuracy was internally validated based on the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. RESULTS: the risk score was made up of the following risk factors: transient metabolic disorders; previous insertion of catheter; use of a polyurethane double-lumen catheter; infusion of multiple intravenous solutions through a single-lumen catheter; and tip in a noncentral position. Newborns were classified into three categories of risk of unplanned removal: low (0 to 3 points), moderate (4 to 8 points), and high (≥ 9 points). Accuracy was 0.76. CONCLUSION: the adoption of evidence-based preventative strategies based on the classification and risk factors faced by the newborn is recommended to minimize the occurrence of unplanned removals. PMID:26155011

  15. Cytometric Catheter for Neurosurgical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Allison, Stephen W; Fillmore, Helen; Broaddus, William C; Dyer, Rachel L; Gillies, George

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of neural progenitor cells into the central nervous system has attracted strong interest for treatment of a variety of pathologies. For example, the replacement of dopamine-producing (DA) neural cells in the brain appears promising for the treatment of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Previous studies of cell-replacement strategies have shown that less than 90% of implanted cells survive longer than 24 - 48 hours following the implantation procedure. However, it is unknown if these cells were viable upon delivery, or if they were affected by other factors such as brain pathology or an immune response. An instrumented cell-delivery catheter has been developed to assist in answering these questions by facilitating quantification and monitoring of the viability of the cells delivered. The catheter uses a fiber optic probe to perform flourescence-based cytometric measurments on cells exiting the port at the catheter tip. The current implementation of this design is on a 3.2 mm diameter catheter with 245 micrometer diameter optical fibers. Results of fluorescence testing data are presented and show that the device can characterize the quantity of cell densities ranging from 60,000 cells/ml to 600,000 cells/ml with a coefficient of determination of 0.93.

  16. Determination of the effect of single abomasal or jejunal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens Type A in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A randomized study was conducted to determine if inoculation of the abomasum or jejunum with Clostridium perfringens Type A would induce jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in healthy cows. Twelve adult nonlactating dairy cows were inoculated with 10 mL of pure culture broth of C. perfringens type A (beta2 toxin positive) into the abomasum (n = 6) or jejunum (n = 6). On day 6, the cows were euthanized and samples for culture were taken from the abomasum, jejunum, and feces. No cows developed clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome during the course of the study. Five of 6 abomasal samples and 1 of 6 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) prior to inoculation. Eight of 12 abomasal samples, 11 of 12 fecal samples, and 10 of 12 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) after inoculation. Intraluminal inoculation of C. perfringens Type A alone at this dose and under these conditions did not induce clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in adult dairy cows. The multifactorial nature of the disease likely contributed to our inability to reproduce the disease in this study. PMID:16231652

  17. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  18. Minimizing the complications associated with migrating catheters.

    PubMed

    Billington, A; Crane, C; Jownally, S; Kirkwood, L; Roodhouse, A

    2008-11-01

    This article seeks to explore the clinical practice of urinary catheter fixation. Traditionally, this area of practice has been neglected and nurses are familiar with tension lesions and dermal problems associated with inappropriate or incorrect urinary catheter fixation. A novel solution to this problem is a catheter fixation device. This device secures the catheter safely, making clinical practice safer and the experience of catheterization more tolerable for the patient. An example of a urinary catheter fixation device available in the UK is Bard's StatLock. PMID:18981965

  19. Use of continuous local anesthetic infusion in the management of postoperative split-thickness skin graft donor site pain.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jorge L Reguero; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E; Cholewczynski, Walter; Atweh, Nabil; Possenti, Paul; Schulz, John T

    2013-01-01

    Donor sites from split-thickness skin grafts (STSG) impose significant pain on patients in the early postoperative period. We report the use of continuous local anesthetic infusion as a method for the management of postoperative STSG donor site pain. Patients undergoing single or dual, adjacent STSG harvest from the thigh (eight patients) or back (one patient) were included in this study. Immediately after STSG harvest, subcutaneous catheters were placed for continuous infusion of local anesthetic. Daily donor site-specific pain severity scores were prospectively recorded in nine patients receiving local anesthetic infusion. Patient characteristics, technical aspects, and postoperative complications were identified in the study. The thigh was the anatomic location chosen for most donor sites. A single catheter was placed for donor sites limited to 4 inches in width or less. A dual catheter system was used for those wider than 4 inches. An elastomeric pump delivered continuously a total of 4 ml/hr of a solution of 0.5% bupivacaine. The average anesthetic infusion duration was 3.1 days. A substantial decrease in worst, least, and average donor site pain scores was found from the first 24 hours to the second postoperative day in our patients, a treatment trend that continued through postoperative day 3. One patient developed minor anesthetic leakage from the catheter insertion site; and in three cases, accidental dislodgement of the catheters occurred. There were no cases of donor site secondary infection. All donor sites were completely epithelialized at 1-month follow-up. Continuous local anesthetic infusion is technically feasible and may represent an option for postoperative donor site pain control after STSG harvesting. Relative cost-benefit of the technique remains to be determined. PMID:23271060

  20. Shunt Testing In Vivo: Observational Study of Problems with Ventricular Catheter.

    PubMed

    Czosnyka, Zofia H; Sinha, Rohitiwa; Morgan, James A D; Wawrzynski, James R; Price, Steven J; Garnett, Matthew; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, M

    2016-01-01

    Most shunt obstructions happen at the inlet of the ventricular catheter. Three hundred six infusion studies from 2007 to 2011 were classified as having a typical pattern of either proximal occlusion or patency. We describe different patterns of shunt ventricular obstruction.Solid block: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) aspiration was impossible. Baseline pressure was without pulse waveform (respiratory waveform may be visible). A quick increase of pressure to a level compatible with the shunt's setting was recorded in response to infusion. Distal occlusion of the shunt via transcutaneous compression resulted in a rapid increase in pressure to levels above 50 mmHg. This pattern was attributed to a solid ventricular block.Slit ventricles: At baseline, a pattern similar to that of the solid block was observed. After compression, the pressure increases, the pulse waveform appears, and the intracranial pressure is often stabilized at 25-40 mmHg. It is probable that previously slit ventricles were opened during the test.Partial block: In a partial block of the ventricular catheter by an in-growing choroid plexus, the pulse waveform at baseline was observed and CSF aspiration was possible. During infusion, the pressure increased, but the pulse amplitude disappeared. During the increase in the pressure in the shunt prechamber, the connection with the ventricles is disturbed by repositioning of the plexus.Infusion study via the shunt prechamber is able to visualize ventricular obstruction of the hydrocephalus shunt. PMID:27165935

  1. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  2. Chronic swine instrumentation techniques utilizing the GOR-REX peritoneal catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. C.; White, F. C.; Crisman, R. P.; Wisniewski, J.; McKirnan, D.

    1985-05-01

    The GORE-TEX peritoneal catheter interface is an effective skin interface device for many types of instrumentation in the swine. When properly utilized, the interface allows the development of a stable and effective biological seal which will reduce or eliminate sinus tract formation and resultant systemic infection. The interface is suitable for running any wire or catheter (up to about 2.5mm diameter) through the integument of the animal, thus increasing the possibilities for chronic instrumentation while maintaining a healthy animal. The lack of evidence of any growth phenomenon acting to extrude the interface segment, similar to that observed using other synthetic materials, and the superior biological seal which the interface develops, may allow many chronic studies which were previously not feasible. Using special catheter adapter stubs and an intermittent infusion plug, a sterile, sealed catheter system has decreased the possibilities for introducing pathogens while allowing ready access to the blood stream. Detailed descriptions of surgical implantation techniques and catheter set up and maintenance techniques are included.

  3. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  4. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Housholder, D.F.; Hynes, H.E.; Dakhil, S.R.; Marymont, J.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients receiving hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) required cholecystectomy for both acute and chronic cholecystitis with cholelithiasis suggesting chemical cholecystitis. To evaluate the incidence of gall bladder dysfunction in patients receiving HAIC, the authors performed hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m DISIDA or PIPIDA on eight patients receiving HAIC through an indwelling hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid (trademark) pump. In 7 of 8 patients, there was non-visualization of the gall bladder throughout the hepatobiliary study. In the eighth patient, the gall bladder visualized at 2 hr. One patient with non-visualization of the gall bladder at 4 hr developed acute symptoms requiring cholecystectomy which showed acute and chronic cholecystitis with cholethiasis. There was prominent sclerosis which was thought to be due to chemical cholecystitis as well as cholelithiasis. In all 10 patients, no evidence of cholecystitis had been observed during the surgical placement of the hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid pump. The hepatobiliary scintigraphic finding of gall bladder dysfunction in all eight patients studied is most likely due to chemical cholecystitis from HAIC. This series suggests that chemical cholecystitis is common during HAIC and can be identified by hepatobiliary scintigraphy. The authors consider elective cholecystectomy during the operative placement of the hepatic artery catheter and Infusaid pump.

  5. [Development of smart infusion system].

    PubMed

    Li, Junyang

    2014-01-01

    The free care smart infusion system which has the function of liquid end alarm and automatic stopping has been designed. In addition, the system can send the alarm to the health care staff by Zigbee wireless network. Besides, the database of infusion information has been set up, it can be used for inquiry afterwards. PMID:24839846

  6. Removing the confusion about infusion.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G

    1997-02-01

    There is more to infusion technology than simply connecting the "pump-du-jour" to the central line. The purpose of infusion technology, its safety products and four categories of devices-elastomeric, mechanical, gas and membrane-are discussed. PMID:9287736

  7. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  8. Intra-articular Placement of an Intraosseous Catheter.

    PubMed

    Grabel, Zachary; DePasse, J Mason; Lareau, Craig R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-02-01

    Gaining vascular access is essential in the resuscitation of critically ill patients. Intraosseous (IO) placement is a fundamentally important alternative to intravenous (IV) access in conditions where IV access delays resuscitation or is not possible. This case report presents a previously unreported example of prehospital misplacement of an IO catheter into the intra-articular space of the knee joint. This report serves to inform civilian and military first responders, as well as emergency medicine physicians, of intra-articular IO line placement as a potential complication of IO vascular access. Infusion of large amounts of fluid into the joint space could damage the joint and be catastrophic to a patient who needs immediate IV fluids or medications. In addition, intra-articular IO placement could result in septic arthritis of the knee. PMID:25483729

  9. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  10. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies. PMID:24709460

  11. Isolated limb infusion chemotherapy with or without hemofiltration for recurrent limb melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Sara; Sarti, Donatella; Ricci, Stefano; Vergini, Ludovico Delle; Sallei, Manuela; Serresi, Stefano; Ricotti, Giuseppe; Mulazzani, Luca; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Fiorentini, Giammaria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To better define the efficacy and the safety of intra-arterial infusion performed with or without hemofiltration for recurrent limb melanoma. METHODS: Patients with the following characteristics were included in the study: recurrent limb melanoma not indicated for surgical resection, measurable disease in the extremity, > 18 years, performances status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ) was 0-1 and life expectancy of at least 6 mo. Twenty nine consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent fluoroscopic placement of angiographic arterial and venous catheters to infuse the drug in the artery [isolated limb infusion (ILI)], and to stop the out flow (venous). Melphalan was rapidly infused into the isolated limb via the arterial catheter after the inflation of venous balloon catheter. Then the circulation of the limb was completely blocked with a pneumatic cuff at the root of the limb. Haemofiltration (HF) was available only in the main center, and was performed with an extracorporeal perfusion system, in order to reduce high systemic toxic peaks of drug. RESULTS: Thirty seven ILI were done in 29 cases (31 ILI-HF and 6 ILI) between 2001 and 2014 at Ancona and Pesaro Hospitals, Italy. Clinical outcomes were monitored 30 d after treatment. Eleven patients (38%) received infusion of melphalan alone, 7 (24%) melphalan associated to mitomicin C and 7 (24%) melphalan associated to cisplatin, the remaining 4 were treated with cisplatin, melphalan and epirubicin or cisplatin and mitomicin C. The overall response rate was 66%, in particular, 3 patients (10%) were complete responders and 16 (56%) were partial responders; whereas 7 patients (24%) had stable disease, and 3 (10%) showed progressive disease. Limb toxicity was assessed adopting Wieberdink scale, with evidence of 90% of low grade (I and II) toxicity. CONCLUSION: ILI-HF and ILI are effective and safe treatments for recurrent non-resectable limb melanoma. They present evidence of favorable

  12. Effects of arterial and venous volume infusion on coronary perfusion pressures during canine CPR.

    PubMed

    Gentile, N T; Martin, G B; Appleton, T J; Moeggenberg, J; Paradis, N A; Nowak, R M

    1991-08-01

    Intraarterial (IA) volume infusion has been reported to be more effective than intravenous (IV) infusion in treating cardiac arrest due to exsanguination. A rapid IA infusion was felt to raise intraaortic pressure and improve coronary perfusion pressure (CPP). The purpose of this study was to determine if IA or IV volume infusion could augment the effect of epinephrine on CPP during CPR in the canine model. Nineteen mongrel dogs with a mean weight of 26.3 +/- 4.2 kg were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Thoracic aortic (Ao), right atrial (RA) and pulmonary artery catheters were placed for hemodynamic monitoring. Additional Ao and central venous catheters were placed for volume infusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced and Thumper CPR was begun after 5 min (t = 5). At t = 10, all dogs received 45 micrograms/kg IV epinephrine. Six animals received epinephrine alone (EPI). Five dogs received EPI plus a 500 cc bolus of normal saline over 3 min intravenously (EPI/IV). Another group (n = 8) received EPI plus the same fluid bolus through the aortic catheter (EPI/IA). Resuscitation was attempted at t = 18 using a standard protocol. There was a significant increase in CPP over baseline in all groups. The changes in CPP from baseline induced by EPI, EPI/IV and EPI/IA were 20.6 +/- 3.7, 22.8 +/- 4.2 and 22.2 +/- 2.4 mmHg, respectively. Volume loading did not augment the effect of therapeutic EPI dosing. By increasing both preload and afterload, volume administration may in fact be detrimental during CPR. PMID:1658894

  13. Basal Expression of Nucleoside Transporter mRNA Differs Among Small Intestinal Epithelia of Beef Steers and is Differentially Altered by Ruminal or Abomasal Infusion of Starch Hydrolysate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In ruminants, microbial-derived nucleic acids are a major source of N and are absorbed as nucleosides by small intestinal epithelia. Although the biochemical activities of 2 nucleoside transport systems have been described for cattle, little is known regarding the regulation of their gene expression...

  14. Ruminal and Abomasal Starch Hydrolysate Infusions Selectively Decrease the Expression of Cationic Amino Acid Transporter mRNA by Small Intestinal Epithelia of Forage-fed Beef Steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although cationic amino acids (CAA) are consid-ered essential to maximize optimal growth of cattle, transporters responsible for CAA absorption by bovine small intestinal epithelia have not been described. This study was conducted to test 2 hypotheses: 1) the duo¬denal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia ...

  15. The Small Intestinal Epithelia of Beef Steers Differentially Express Sugar Transporter Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Response to Abomasal Versus Ruminal Infusion of Starch Hydrolysate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mammals, the absorption of mono¬saccharides from small intestinal lumen involves at least 3 sugar transporters (SugT): sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1; gene SLC5A1) transports glucose and galactose, whereas glucose transporter (GLUT) 5 (GLUT5; gene SLC2A5) transports fructose, acros...

  16. Net Flux of Amino Acids Across the Portal-drained Viscera and Liver of the Ewe During Abomasal Infusion of Protein and Glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decreasing the fraction of amino acids metabolized by the mucosal cells may increase the fraction of AA being released into the blood. A potential mechanism to reduce AA catabolism by mucosal cells is to provide an alternative source of energy. We hypothesized that increasing glucose flow to the s...

  17. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  18. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters.

    PubMed

    Kesner, Samuel B; Howe, Robert D

    2011-07-21

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  19. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. PMID:11062835

  20. Accidental Entrapment of Electrical Mapping Catheter by Chiari's Network in Right Atrium during Catheter Ablation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Sakakibara, Tomoaki; Sano, Makoto; Suwa, Kenichiro; Saitoh, Takeji; Saotome, Masao; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to frequent palpitation. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented regular narrow QRS tachycardia with 170 bpm, and catheter ablation was planned. During electroanatomical mapping of the right atrium (RA) with a multiloop mapping catheter, the catheter head was entrapped nearby the ostium of inferior vena cava. Rotation and traction of the catheter failed to detach the catheter head from the RA wall. Exfoliation of connective tissue twined around catheter tip by forceps, which were designed for endomyocardial biopsy, succeeded to retract and remove the catheter. Postprocedural echocardiography and pathologic examination proved the existence of Chiari's network. The handling of complex catheters in the RA has a potential risk of entrapment with Chiari's network. PMID:27366332

  1. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  2. Genome sequencing and analysis of a type A Clostridium perfringens isolate from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Victoria J; Kropinski, Andrew M; Songer, J Glenn; MacInnes, Janet I; Parreira, Valeria R; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a common inhabitant of the avian and mammalian gastrointestinal tracts and can behave commensally or pathogenically. Some enteric diseases caused by type A C. perfringens, including bovine clostridial abomasitis, remain poorly understood. To investigate the potential basis of virulence in strains causing this disease, we sequenced the genome of a type A C. perfringens isolate (strain F262) from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis. The ∼3.34 Mbp chromosome of C. perfringens F262 is predicted to contain 3163 protein-coding genes, 76 tRNA genes, and an integrated plasmid sequence, Cfrag (∼18 kb). In addition, sequences of two complete circular plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), and two incomplete plasmid fragments, pF262A (48.5 kb) and pF262B (50.0 kb), were identified. Comparison of the chromosome sequence of C. perfringens F262 to complete C. perfringens chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed 261 unique genes. No novel toxin genes related to previously described clostridial toxins were identified: 60% of the 261 unique genes were hypothetical proteins. There was a two base pair deletion in virS, a gene reported to encode the main sensor kinase involved in virulence gene activation. Despite this frameshift mutation, C. perfringens F262 expressed perfringolysin O, alpha-toxin and the beta2-toxin, suggesting that another regulation system might contribute to the pathogenicity of this strain. Two complete plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), unique to this strain of C. perfringens were identified. PMID:22412860

  3. Variation in the Ovine Abomasal Lymph Node Transcriptome between Breeds Known to Differ in Resistance to the Gastrointestinal Nematode.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Albin M; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P; McGettigan, Paul; Browne, John; Keane, Orla M; Bahar, Bojlul; Mehta, Jai; Markey, Bryan; Lohan, Amanda; Sweeney, Torres

    2015-01-01

    Texel lambs are known to be more resistant to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection than Suffolk lambs, with a greater ability to limit infection. The objectives of this study were to: 1) profile the whole transcriptome of abomasal lymph node tissue of GIN-free Texel and Suffolk lambs; 2) identify differentially expressed genes and characterize the immune-related biological pathways and networks associated with these genes. Abomasal lymph nodes were collected from Texel (n = 6) and Suffolk (n = 4) lambs aged 19 weeks that had been GIN-free since 6 weeks of age. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed using RNA-seq on the Illumina platform. At the time of conducting this study, a well annotated Ovine genome was not available and hence the sequence reads were aligned with the Bovine (UMD3.1) genome. Identification of differentially expressed genes was followed by pathway and network analysis. The Suffolk breed accounted for significantly more of the differentially expressed genes, (276 more highly expressed in Suffolk v 162 in Texel; P < 0.001). The four most significant differentially expressed pathways were all related to immunity and were classified as: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Recognition of Bacteria and Viruses, Activation of IRF by Cytosolic Pattern Recognition Receptors, Role of RIG-I-like Receptors in Antiviral Innate Immunity, and Interferon Signaling. Of significance is the fact that all of these four pathways were more highly expressed in the Suffolk. These data suggest that in a GIN-free environment, Suffolk lambs have a more active immune profile relative to the Texel: this immune profile may contribute to the poorer efficiency of response to a GIN challenge in the Suffolk breed compared to the Texel breed. PMID:25978040

  4. Metabolic profiles in five high-producing Swedish dairy herds with a history of abomasal displacement and ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Stengärde, Lena; Tråvén, Madeleine; Emanuelson, Ulf; Holtenius, Kjell; Hultgren, Jan; Niskanen, Rauni

    2008-01-01

    Background Body condition score and blood profiles have been used to monitor management and herd health in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to examine BCS and extended metabolic profiles, reflecting both energy metabolism and liver status around calving in high-producing herds with a high incidence of abomasal displacement and ketosis and to evaluate if such profiles can be used at herd level to pinpoint specific herd problems. Methods Body condition score and metabolic profiles around calving in five high-producing herds with high incidences of abomasal displacement and ketosis were assessed using linear mixed models (94 cows, 326 examinations). Cows were examined and blood sampled every three weeks from four weeks ante partum (ap) to nine weeks postpartum (pp). Blood parameters studied were glucose, fructosamine, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), insulin, β-hydroxybutyrate, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin and cholesterol. Results All herds had overconditioned dry cows that lost body condition substantially the first 4–6 weeks pp. Two herds had elevated levels of NEFA ap and three herds had elevated levels pp. One herd had low levels of insulin ap and low levels of cholesterol pp. Haptoglobin was detected pp in all herds and its usefulness is discussed. Conclusion NEFA was the parameter that most closely reflected the body condition losses while these losses were not seen in glucose and fructosamine levels. Insulin and cholesterol were potentially useful in herd profiles but need further investigation. Increased glutamate dehydrogenase suggested liver cell damage in all herds. PMID:18687108

  5. Variation in the Ovine Abomasal Lymph Node Transcriptome between Breeds Known to Differ in Resistance to the Gastrointestinal Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Albin M.; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P.; McGettigan, Paul; Browne, John; Keane, Orla M.; Bahar, Bojlul; Mehta, Jai; Markey, Bryan; Lohan, Amanda; Sweeney, Torres

    2015-01-01

    Texel lambs are known to be more resistant to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection than Suffolk lambs, with a greater ability to limit infection. The objectives of this study were to: 1) profile the whole transcriptome of abomasal lymph node tissue of GIN-free Texel and Suffolk lambs; 2) identify differentially expressed genes and characterize the immune-related biological pathways and networks associated with these genes. Abomasal lymph nodes were collected from Texel (n = 6) and Suffolk (n = 4) lambs aged 19 weeks that had been GIN-free since 6 weeks of age. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed using RNA-seq on the Illumina platform. At the time of conducting this study, a well annotated Ovine genome was not available and hence the sequence reads were aligned with the Bovine (UMD3.1) genome. Identification of differentially expressed genes was followed by pathway and network analysis. The Suffolk breed accounted for significantly more of the differentially expressed genes, (276 more highly expressed in Suffolk v 162 in Texel; P < 0.001). The four most significant differentially expressed pathways were all related to immunity and were classified as: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Recognition of Bacteria and Viruses, Activation of IRF by Cytosolic Pattern Recognition Receptors, Role of RIG-I-like Receptors in Antiviral Innate Immunity, and Interferon Signaling. Of significance is the fact that all of these four pathways were more highly expressed in the Suffolk. These data suggest that in a GIN-free environment, Suffolk lambs have a more active immune profile relative to the Texel: this immune profile may contribute to the poorer efficiency of response to a GIN challenge in the Suffolk breed compared to the Texel breed. PMID:25978040

  6. Postoperative Pain Control with the Fentanyl Patch and Continuous Paravertebral Anesthetic Infusion after Posterior Occipitocervical Junction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a significant concern for patients who undergo surgery via a midline posterior approach to the occipitocervical junction and spinal axis. The development of the disposable, ambulatory pain pump presents a novel alternative for treatment of postoperative pain. The authors describe a multimodal treatment algorithm for postoperative pain after posterior occipitocervical junction surgery that uses the On-Q pain catheter system (I-Flow Corp., Lake Forest, CA) and a fentanyl patch. The On-Q PainBuster catheter system is a disposable, ambulatory device that allows for continuous anesthetic delivery directly into or adjacent to the wound. On-Q catheters are placed in the nuchal musculature for continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine. The On-Q catheter infusion is continued for three days, and the catheters are then withdrawn. Patients are also provided with a transdermal fentanyl patch at the start of surgery. In regards to complications at our facility, there have been no cases of respiratory depression or arrest postoperatively and no wound infections, but one case of inadvertent subdural placement. The technique described for the use of the fentanyl patch and a continuous anesthetic delivery device in surgery of the occipitocervical junction presents a novel alternative to the current standard of care in pain control after suboccipital decompression. PMID:27433423

  7. Postoperative Pain Control with the Fentanyl Patch and Continuous Paravertebral Anesthetic Infusion after Posterior Occipitocervical Junction Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea; Schmidt, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a significant concern for patients who undergo surgery via a midline posterior approach to the occipitocervical junction and spinal axis. The development of the disposable, ambulatory pain pump presents a novel alternative for treatment of postoperative pain. The authors describe a multimodal treatment algorithm for postoperative pain after posterior occipitocervical junction surgery that uses the On-Q pain catheter system (I-Flow Corp., Lake Forest, CA) and a fentanyl patch. The On-Q PainBuster catheter system is a disposable, ambulatory device that allows for continuous anesthetic delivery directly into or adjacent to the wound. On-Q catheters are placed in the nuchal musculature for continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine. The On-Q catheter infusion is continued for three days, and the catheters are then withdrawn. Patients are also provided with a transdermal fentanyl patch at the start of surgery. In regards to complications at our facility, there have been no cases of respiratory depression or arrest postoperatively and no wound infections, but one case of inadvertent subdural placement. The technique described for the use of the fentanyl patch and a continuous anesthetic delivery device in surgery of the occipitocervical junction presents a novel alternative to the current standard of care in pain control after suboccipital decompression. PMID:27433423

  8. Depressed left ventricular performance. Response to volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, F.P.; Parker, M.M.; Natanson, C.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Volume infusion, to increase preload and to enhance ventricular performance, is accepted as initial management of septic shock. Recent evidence has demonstrated depressed myocardial function in human septic shock. We analyzed left ventricular performance during volume infusion using serial data from simultaneously obtained pulmonary artery catheter hemodynamic measurements and radionuclide cineangiography. Critically ill control subjects (n = 14), patients with sepsis but without shock (n = 21), and patients with septic shock (n = 21) had prevolume infusion hemodynamic measurements determined and received statistically similar volumes of fluid resulting in similar increases in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. There was a strong trend (p = 0.004) toward less of a change in left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI) after volume infusion in patients with sepsis and septic shock compared with control subjects. The LVSWI response after volume infusion was significantly less in patients with septic shock when compared with critically ill control subjects (p less than 0.05). These data demonstrate significantly altered ventricular performance, as measured by LVSWI, in response to volume infusion in patients with septic shock.

  9. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1200 - Diagnostic intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intracardiac pressures, to sample blood, and to introduce substances into the heart and vessels. Included in this generic device are right-heart catheters, left-heart catheters, and angiographic catheters,...

  14. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  15. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  16. [Transitory hyperbilirubinemia and oxytocin infusion].

    PubMed

    Quoss, I

    1978-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels at 5th day of life was compared between 100 mature newborns with oxytocin infusion to the mother during labour and 100 mature newborns without oxytocin. Newborns, whose mothers received more than 5 IU oxytocin had significant higher bilirubin values than the controll group without oxytocin and the cases with oxytocin administration under 5 U. Hyperbilirubinaemie was also present in babies after vacuum extraction and oxytocin infusion. PMID:645287

  17. Local anesthetic infusion pumps improve postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Barry; Waxman, Kenneth; Tatevossian, Raymond; Gamberdella, Marla; Read, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Pain after an open inguinal hernia repair may be significant. In fact, some surgeons feel that the pain after open repair justifies a laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of local anesthetic infusion pumps would reduce postoperative pain after open inguinal hernia repair. We performed a prospective, double-blind randomized study of 45 open plug and patch inguinal hernia repairs. Patients were randomized to receive either 0.25 per cent bupivicaine or saline solution via an elastomeric infusion pump (ON-Q) for 48 hours, at 2 cc/h. The catheters were placed in the subcutaneous tissue and removed on postoperative day 3. Both groups were prescribed hydrocodone to use in the postoperative period at the prescribed dosage as needed for pain. Interviews were conducted on postoperative days 3 and 7, and patient's questionnaires, including pain scores, amount of pain medicine used, and any complications, were collected accordingly. During the first 5 postoperative days, postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Twenty-three repairs were randomized to the bupivicaine group and 22 repairs randomized to the placebo group. In the bupivicaine group, there was a significant decrease in postoperative pain on postoperative days 2 through 5 with P values <0.05. This significant difference continued through postoperative day 5, 2 days after the infusion pumps were removed. Patients who had bupivicaine instilled in their infusion pump had statistically significant lower subjective pain scores on postoperative days 2 through 5. This significant difference continued even after the infusion pumps were removed. Local anesthetic infusion pumps significantly decreased the amount of early postoperative pain. Pain relief persisted for 2 days after catheter and pump removal. PMID:15586515

  18. The Michigan Appropriateness Guide for Intravenous Catheters (MAGIC): Results From a Multispecialty Panel Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Vineet; Flanders, Scott A; Saint, Sanjay; Woller, Scott C; O'Grady, Naomi P; Safdar, Nasia; Trerotola, Scott O; Saran, Rajiv; Moureau, Nancy; Wiseman, Stephen; Pittiruti, Mauro; Akl, Elie A; Lee, Agnes Y; Courey, Anthony; Swaminathan, Lakshmi; LeDonne, Jack; Becker, Carol; Krein, Sarah L; Bernstein, Steven J

    2015-09-15

    Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has grown substantially in recent years. Increasing use has led to the realization that PICCs are associated with important complications, including thrombosis and infection. Moreover, some PICCs may not be placed for clinically valid reasons. Defining appropriate indications for insertion, maintenance, and care of PICCs is thus important for patient safety. An international panel was convened that applied the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to develop criteria for use of PICCs. After systematic reviews of the literature, scenarios related to PICC use, care, and maintenance were developed according to patient population (for example, general hospitalized, critically ill, cancer, kidney disease), indication for insertion (infusion of peripherally compatible infusates vs. vesicants), and duration of use (≤5 days, 6 to 14 days, 15 to 30 days, or ≥31 days). Within each scenario, appropriateness of PICC use was compared with that of other venous access devices. After review of 665 scenarios, 253 (38%) were rated as appropriate, 124 (19%) as neutral/uncertain, and 288 (43%) as inappropriate. For peripherally compatible infusions, PICC use was rated as inappropriate when the proposed duration of use was 5 or fewer days. Midline catheters and ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous catheters were preferred to PICCs for use between 6 and 14 days. In critically ill patients, nontunneled central venous catheters were preferred over PICCs when 14 or fewer days of use were likely. In patients with cancer, PICCs were rated as appropriate for irritant or vesicant infusion, regardless of duration. The panel of experts used a validated method to develop appropriate indications for PICC use across patient populations. These criteria can be used to improve care, inform quality improvement efforts, and advance the safety of medical patients. PMID:26369828

  19. Evaluation of 2 portable ion-selective electrode meters for determining whole blood, plasma, urine, milk, and abomasal fluid potassium concentrations in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Megahed, A A; Hiew, M W H; Grünberg, W; Constable, P D

    2016-09-01

    Two low-cost ion-selective electrode (ISE) handheld meters (CARDY C-131, LAQUAtwin B-731; Horiba Ltd., Albany, NY) have recently become available for measuring the potassium concentration ([K(+)]) in biological fluids. The primary objective of this study was to characterize the analytical performance of the ISE meters in measuring [K(+)] in bovine whole blood, plasma, urine, milk, and abomasal fluid. We completed 6 method comparison studies using 369 whole blood and plasma samples from 106 healthy periparturient Holstein-Friesian cows, 138 plasma samples from 27 periparturient Holstein-Friesian cows, 92 milk samples and 204 urine samples from 16 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows, and 94 abomasal fluid samples from 6 male Holstein-Friesian calves. Deming regression and Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize meter performance against reference methods (indirect ISE, Hitachi 911 and 917; inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy). The CARDY ISE meter applied directly in plasma measured [K(+)] as being 7.3% lower than the indirect ISE reference method, consistent with the recommended adjustment of +7.5% when indirect ISE methods are used to analyze plasma. The LAQUAtwin ISE meter run in direct mode measured fat-free milk [K(+)] as being 3.6% lower than the indirect ISE reference method, consistent with a herd milk protein percentage of 3.4%. The LAQUAtwin ISE meter accurately measured abomasal fluid [K(+)] compared to the indirect ISE reference method. The LAQUAtwin ISE meter accurately measured urine [K(+)] compared to the indirect ISE reference method, but the median measured value for urine [K(+)] was 83% of the true value measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. We conclude that the CARDY and LAQUAtwin ISE meters are practical, low-cost, rapid, accurate point-of-care instruments suitable for measuring [K(+)] in whole blood, plasma, milk, and abomasal fluid samples from cattle. Ion-selective electrode methodology is

  20. Infiltration during intravenous therapy in neonates: comparison of Teflon and Vialon catheters.

    PubMed

    Stanley, M D; Meister, E; Fuschuber, K

    1992-09-01

    Infiltration is a frequent complication of intravenous therapy using peripheral venous lines in neonatal patients. In a randomized trial of two catheter materials, Vialon (Becton Dickinson) and Teflon (DuPont), we studied 19 putative risk factors for infiltration, including 11 infusates, in 772 peripheral venous lines in patients aged 1 to 67 days. The best-fit Cox regression model identified six significant predictors of infiltration (P less than .05): catheter material, age, anatomic insertion site, hyperalimentation, and use of furosemide and dopamine. For the subsample of patients weighing less than or equal to 1500 g, a second Cox regression model identified time spent inserting the catheter and the number of insertion attempts as additional significant predictors. These multivariate models showed that Vialon catheter material reduced the risk of infiltration by 18% (95% CI, 1% to 32% reduction) in the total sample and by 35% (95% CI, 15% to 50% reduction) in the higher risk low-weight (less than or equal to 1500 g) subsample. PMID:1523447

  1. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  2. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  3. Tandem balloon catheter for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Finci, L; Meier, B; Steffenino, G; Rutishauser, W

    1986-01-01

    The Tandem balloon catheter is a triple lumen steerable catheter for coronary angioplasty with two separately inflatable balloons of different diameters. Indications and results of 26 consecutive patients treated with a Tandem balloon catheter are reviewed. Adequate distal pressure measurements were obtained in 71% of the cases. In ten patients, the Tandem balloon catheter was selected for two stenoses in different segments of the same coronary artery. Angioplasty was successful for all lesions in five and for at least the strategic lesions in five patients (in one only after changing to a single-balloon catheter). In the seven patients with stenoses in two different coronary arteries of various calibers, angioplasty was successful for both vessels in three and for one vessel in four patients. In the six patients with a very tight stenosis, where the Tandem balloon catheter was selected to predilate with the small balloon, the procedure was technically successful in all, but there was a myocardial infarction in one patient. In the three patients with a chronic total occlusion, where the stiffness of the Tandem balloon was the reason for selection, one recanalization was successful. The Tandem balloon catheter provides a handy tool for complex coronary angioplasty. It offers comparable ease in manipulation and pressure transmission and may save time, money, and radiation exposure by avoiding catheter exchanges. PMID:2949848

  4. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  5. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  6. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  7. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  8. 21 CFR 874.4175 - Nasopharyngeal catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasopharyngeal catheter. 874.4175 Section 874.4175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4175 Nasopharyngeal catheter....

  9. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  10. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    PubMed

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  11. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  12. Use of ultrasound guidance to remove entrapped stimulating popliteal catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hulin, James B.; Daniels, Don J.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are beneficial for continuous pain relief following surgery or trauma to an extremity. However, spring-loaded peripheral nerve catheters can become uncoiled and entrapped, resulting in difficulty in catheter removal. We present two cases where ultrasound guidance provided significant assistance in the safe removal of entrapped peripheral nerve catheters without neurologic sequelae. One of the catheters was adhered to nearby tissue, and one had become uncoiled and anchored in place by the distal tip. Guidelines for the safe management of entrapped catheters are suggested, including the use of saline injections through the catheter under ultrasound guidance to assist in the evaluation and removal of the catheters. PMID:27034548

  13. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  14. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique. PMID:6421183

  15. Development and Testing of an Instrument to Measure Short Peripheral Catheter Insertion Confidence.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Catherine; Stahl, Brian; Murray, Connie; Glover, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Peripheral Intravenous Insertion Confidence Assessment for short peripheral catheters is a 10-item, 5-point Likert scale, self-administered tool to measure a person's confidence in his or her personal intravenous insertion skills, including site selection and assessment, procedure, dressing, and documentation. Expert opinion validity was obtained from a panel of 3 infusion therapy leaders. Two-day test-retest reliability and internal consistency were determined using 22 practicing nurses. Individual question correlations ranged from r = 0.93 to 0.16, and the total score correlation was r = 0.96. Using first-test results only, internal consistency was 0.85 (α = 0.85, n = 22). Overall, the insertion confidence assessment is valid and, in the present study, a reliable tool to measure the short peripheral catheter insertion confidence of staff nurses. PMID:27074992

  16. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate. PMID:26896945

  17. Perineural infusion of 0.5% ropivacaine for successful treatment of phantom limb syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Borghi, B; Bugamelli, S; Stagni, G; Missiroli, M; Genco, R; Colizza, M T

    2009-11-01

    Phantom limb syndrome (PLS) comprises various disturbances, including pain in the missing limb and phantom sensations. This study is about the successful treatment of a PLS patient by prolonged infusion of local anesthetic through a perineural catheter. A 45-year-old man came to the Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute (Bologna, Italy) complaining of a painful right leg after trauma. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II was diagnosed. Therapy with tricyclics, gabapentin, and spinal infusion of morphine was started. After 4 years of treatment, infection led to the need for right below-the-knee amputation. After amputation, PLS appeared immediately and was not responsive to pharmacological treatment. At day II, a perineural sciatic catheter was positioned and 0.5% ropivacaine infusion with an elastomeric pump at 5 mL/h was started. The infusion was temporarily discontinued every week to evaluate the PLS. After 7 days, a 30% reduction in pain was observed, increased to 60% after 14 days, and disappeared completely after 21 days, leaving only the phantom limb sensations. After 28 days of continuous infusion, the phantom limb sensations had also disappeared. The perineural catheter was removed after 48 hours without perineural infusion. The patient was weaned from morphine over 150 days. Follow-ups at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months confirmed that the PLS did not reappear. The results are limited to one patient but are encouraging, particularly due to the relevance of the pathology and the poor results of conventional treatments. More cases are obviously needed to support the efficacy of this therapy. PMID:19881462

  18. Prevention of central venous line-related thrombosis by continuous infusion of low-dose unfractionated heparin, in patients with haemato-oncological disease. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahman; Ben Othman, Tarek; Kammoun, Leïla; Chelli, Mouna; Romdhane, Neïla Ben; Kriaa, Azza; Ladeb, Saloua; Torjman, Lamia; Lakhal, Amel; Achour, Wafa; Ben Hassen, Assia; Hsaïri, Mohamed; Ladeb, Fethi; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2004-09-01

    We have conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate the role of low-dose unfractionated heparin prophylaxis in preventing central venous line-related thrombosis in patients with haemato-oncological disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either prophylactic intravenous unfractionated heparin (continuous infusion of 100 IU/kg/daily) or 50 ml/daily of normal saline solution as a continuous infusion. CVLs were externalized, non tunneled, double lumen catheters. All CVLs were placed percutaneously by the same physician in the subclavian vein. Upper limb veins were systematically examined by ultrasonography just before, or <24 hours after, catheter removal, and in case of clinical signs of thrombosis. One hundred and twenty-eight CVLs were inserted. Catheter-related thrombosis occurred in 1.5% of the catheters inserted in patients of the heparin group, and in 12.6% in the control group (p = 0.03). No other risk factors were found for the development of catheter-related thrombosis. Two and three patients experienced severe bleeding in the heparin group, and in the control group, respectively (p = 0.18). There were no other side-effects clearly ascribable to the use of unfractionated heparin. This is the first prospective, randomized study, which shows that low-dose of unfractionated heparin is safe and effective to prevent catheter-related thrombosis in patients with haemato-oncological disease. PMID:15351864

  19. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Kellawan, J. Mikhail; Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Proctor, Lester T.; Sebranek, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise − rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P < 0.01) and a greater reduction in MRT with AA infusion (r = −0.43, P = 0.02). We concluded that AA infusion during moderate-intensity, rhythmic forearm exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA. PMID:25038148

  20. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  1. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Iain Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  2. Effects of β-hydroxybutyrate and different calcium and potassium concentrations on the membrane potential and motility of abomasal smooth muscle cells in cattle.

    PubMed

    Zurr, L; Leonhard-Marek, S

    2012-10-01

    The left displacement of the abomasum (LDA) is a common disease in periparturient dairy cows. Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) levels above the reference range are regarded as risk factors for the occurrence of LDA. Additionally, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia have been observed in LDA cows. The aim of the present study was to characterize the membrane potential and the slow waves in abomasal smooth muscle cells by a microelectrode technique and to determine possible effects of BHBA and of various calcium and potassium concentrations on the membrane potential. Subsequently, the results obtained by the microelectrode technique were combined with in vitro motility experiments of abomasal smooth muscles. Strips of the abomasal circular smooth muscles were prepared and incubated in different buffer solutions. For the microelectrode technique, healthy bulls and cows that underwent surgery for LDA were sampled. These measurements showed a frequency of the slow waves between 3.5 and 10.9 per minute (for amplitudes ≥ 3mV) and between 0.6 and 4.5 per minute (for amplitudes ≥ 5mV). The frequency of contractions (1.8 to 3.1 per minute) were in the same order as the frequency of the slow waves with amplitudes ≥ 5 mV. Blocking potassium conductance with barium chloride induced a depolarization of the basal membrane potential (from -43±2.9 to -37±4.1mV; mean ± standard error of the mean) without affecting the frequency or the height of the slow waves. The reduction in the potassium concentration from 5.4 to 2 mmol/L resulted in a nominal decrease in the activity of contractions (from 22.2 to 18.6 mN/min). The subsequent addition of 1 mmol of KCl/L induced a nominal increase in contraction activity (from 18.6 to 25.7 mN/min). An effect of BHBA (5 mmol/L) could not be demonstrated, neither on the electric nor on the motility parameters. A simulated hypocalcemia (1.2 mmol/L total, 0.9 mmol/L ionized Ca) did not change slow waves and motility. In conclusion, changes in

  3. ATLS: Catheter and tube placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.; Pepper, L.; Orsak, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this experiment are: to evaluate the rack mounted equipment and medical supplies necessary for medical procedures; to evaluate the attachments, mounting points, and inner drawer assemblies for the medical supplies; and to evaluate the procedures for performing medical scenarios. The resources available in the HMF miniracks to accomplish medical scenarios and/or procedures include: medical equipment mounted in the racks; a patch panel with places to attach tubing and catheters; self contained drawers full of critical care medical supplies; and an ALS 'backpack' for deploying supplies. The attachment lines, tubing and associated medical supplies will be deployed and used with the equipment and a patient mannequin. Data collection is provided by direct observations by the inflight experimenters, and analysis of still and video photography.

  4. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  5. Catheter associated infections in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Suzan; Ghods, Ahad; Afshar, Reza

    2007-03-01

    Hemodialysis catheter related infections (HCRI) are one of the major causes of increasing mortality, morbidity and cost of therapy in hemodialysis patients. Prevention of HCRI requires the identification of predisposing risk factors. To determine the frequency of HCRI risk factors, we studied 116 patients (54% male, mean age of 49.5+/-16 years) patients with HCRI between 2003-2004. Forty one percent of the patients were diabetic. There was a history of previous catheter placement and infection in 41% and 32% of patients, respectively. Pathogenic organisms isolated from blood cultures included Staphylococcus-aureus 42%, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci 20%, E. Coli 19%, Enterococci 7%, Streptococcus D 7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4%, and Klebsiella 1%. Bacterial resistance to vancomycin and amikacin was present in 7% and 4% of the cases, respectively. Hemodialysis catheter related blood borne infections comprised 67% of the total blood-borne infections in our hospital. No significant statistical association was found between HCRI and age, gender, diabetes mellitus, serum albumin level <30 g/L, leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anatomical location of catheter, mean duration of antibiotic therapy, mean catheter duration, frequency of hemodialysis sessions, pathogenic organisms, and history of previous catheter infection. We conclude that the prevalence of pathogenic organisms of HCRI were similar to previous studies. However, bacterial resistance to antibiotics was low. The mean duration of catheter usage was longer than previously reported. PMID:17237890

  6. Interventional MRI-guided catheter placement and real time drug delivery to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Han, Seunggu J; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Butowski, Nicholas A; Larson, Paul S; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-06-01

    Local delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain has many advantages; however, the inability to predict, visualize and confirm the infusion into the intended target has been a major hurdle in its clinical development. Here, we describe the current workflow and application of the interventional MRI (iMRI) system for catheter placement and real time visualization of infusion. We have applied real time convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of therapeutic agents with iMRI across a number of different clinical trials settings in neuro-oncology and movement disorders. Ongoing developments and accumulating experience with the technique and technology of drug formulations, CED platforms, and iMRI systems will continue to make local therapeutic delivery into the brain more accurate, efficient, effective and safer. PMID:27054877

  7. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  8. [Pericardial tamponade due to malpositioned cooling catheter].

    PubMed

    Löwer, C; Niedeggen, A; Janssens, U

    2016-05-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who received prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiopulmonary arrest is reported. In the hospital, coronary angiography was performed including percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending artery and placement of a cooling catheter. After approximately 30 min, severe hypotension progressively developed. Pericardial tamponade was identified and treated by pericardial puncture. Clear fluid was drained. Transesophageal echocardiography detected a perforation of the right atrial roof by the cooling catheter. Open surgery was performed immediately and the catheter was removed. The patient was discharged from the hospital without any further complication 10 days later. PMID:26065384

  9. Use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J W

    1990-08-01

    The use of infusion devices for epidural or intrathecal administration of spinal opioids is described. The risks of infection and mechanical catheter complications, the need for escalating doses, reservoir volume, drug stability, and cost are practical considerations associated with use of both external and internal infusion systems. Use of patient criteria to identify suitable candidates for intraspinal administration of pain medication helps ensure successful management. The criteria for intraspinal delivery pumps are safety, accuracy, reliability, ease of management by the patient and the health-care professional, and compatibility of the drug with the pump components. The primary factors to consider when comparing pumps to be used for intraspinal delivery of pain medication are the volume and flow rate requirements of the devices. External portable infusion devices are classified according to the mechanism of operation into three primary groups: syringe pumps, peristaltic mechanisms, and elastomeric reservoir pumps. Portable patient-controlled analgesia pumps that have syringes, flexible reservoir bags, and elastomeric reservoirs have been developed. Implanted systems with flow rates that are preset at the factory make pain management more difficult when the patient requires changes or escalations in doses over time. A programmable implanted pump is available. Two advantages of continuous epidural or intrathecal infusion are (1) the peaks and valleys of pain relief with bolus injections are eliminated and (2) the need for multiple injections is reduced. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps enhance the efficacy of continuous infusions by allowing the patient to administer bolus doses to control acute pain. PMID:2202209

  10. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  11. Dialysis catheter fibrin sheath stripping: a useful technique after failed catheter exchange.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ali, Af; Uhwut, E; Liew, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheath formation around long-term haemodialysis catheter is a common cause of failed dialysis access. Treatment options include pharmacological and mechanical methods. This paper reports a case of failed dialysis access due to fibrin sheath encasement. Pharmacologic thrombolysis, mechanical disruption using guide wire and catheter exchange had failed to address the issue. Eventually, fibrin sheath stripping using the loop snare technique was able to successfully restore the catheter function. PMID:22970064

  12. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  13. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of ornithine decarboxylases in the sheep abomasal nematode parasites Teladorsagia circumcincta and Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Umair, Saleh; Knight, Jacqueline S; Simpson, Heather V

    2013-06-01

    Full length cDNA encoding ornithine decarboxylases (ODC; EC 4.1.1.17) were cloned from the sheep abomasal nematode parasites Teladorsagia circumcincta (TcODC) and Haemonchus contortus (HcODC). The TcODC (1272 bp) and HcODC cDNA (1266 bp) encoded 424 and 422 amino acid proteins respectively. The predicted TcODC amino acid sequence showed 87% identity with HcODC and 65% and 64% with Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae ODC respectively. All binding sites and active regions were completely conserved in both proteins. Soluble N-terminal His-tagged ODC proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21, purified and characterised. The recombinant TcODC and HcODC had very similar kinetic properties: K(m) ornithine was 0.2-0.25 mM, optimum [PLP] was 0.3 mM and the pH optima were pH 8. No enzyme activity was detected when arginine was used as substrate. One millimolar difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) completely inhibited TcODC and HcODC activity, whereas 2 mM agmatine did not inhibit activity. The present study showed that ODC is a separate enzyme from arginine decarboxylase and strictly uses ornithine as substrate. PMID:23499950

  15. In vitro effects of bethanechol on smooth muscle preparations from abomasal fundus, corpus, and antrum of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Buehler, M; Steiner, A; Meylan, M; Portier, C J; Mevissen, M

    2008-06-01

    Abomasal displacement has been associated with gastric hypomotility. The supply of prokinetic drugs available to address this problem is insufficient. The goal of the study was to investigate the effect of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol (BeCh) on contractility parameters of smooth muscle preparations from several regions of the bovine abomasum (fundus, corpus, and antrum). Cumulative concentration-response curves were constructed using BeCh in vitro with and without pre-incubation with antagonists targeted at M(2) and M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. In all preparations investigated, BeCh induced a significant and concentration-dependent increase in all contractility parameters investigated. The maximal attainable effect (V(max)) was more pronounced in circular specimens, and V(max) of antral specimens in circular orientation were significantly lower when compared to the other preparations. Both antagonists caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve, suggesting that the effect of BeCh is mediated at least partly by M(2) and M(3) AChRs. PMID:17632190

  16. Etiology, forms, and prognosis of gastrointestinal dysfunction resembling vagal indigestion occurring after surgical correction of right abomasal displacement.

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, N; Fecteau, G; Hélie, P; Lapointe, J M; Chouinard, L; Babkine, M; Desrochers, A; Couture, Y; Dubreuil, P

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the etiology and types of vagal indigestion (VI) occurring after right displacement of the abomasum or abomasal volvulus (RDA/AV), and the prognosis for each type. Data of cows presented for RDA/AV from a retrospective (n = 288) and a prospective (n = 132) study were used. Vagal indigestion occurred in 39 and 22 cows in each study, respectively. A necropsy was performed in 29 cases. Gastric compartment dilation compatible with VI type III or IV occurred in 23 cases. An abnormal gastric wall was detected in 22 cases. Peritonitis was present in 18 cows. Vagal nerve lesions were present in 5 out of 13 cases studied. Clinical, hematological, and necropsy results suggested a classification of VI with respect to presence or absence of peritonitis. Gastric wall damage, peritonitis and vagal nerve lesions appear important in the etiology. Considering peritonitis occurrence, antimicrobial therapy appears necessary in the treatment of RDA/AV. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:11062835

  17. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  18. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Joshi, Sandeep; Maheshwari, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal tube (ETT) suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases. PMID:25722554

  19. Responses to increasing amounts of high-oleic sunflower fatty acids infused into the abomasum of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Drackley, J K; Overton, T R; Ortiz-Gonzalez, G; Beaulieu, A D; Barbano, D M; Lynch, J M; Perkins, E G

    2007-11-01

    Increasing the oleic acid (18:1 cis-9) content of milk fat might be desirable to meet consumer concerns about dietary healthfulness and for certain manufacturing applications. The extent to which milk fat could be enriched with oleic acid is not known. Increasing the intestinal supply of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases dry matter intake (DMI) in cows, but the effects of oleic acid have not been quantified. In a crossover design, 4 multiparous Holstein cows were abomasally infused with increasing amounts (0, 250, 500, 750, or 1,000 g/d) of free fatty acids from high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSFA) or with carrier alone. Continuous infusions (20 to 22 h/d) were for 7 d at each amount. Infusions were homogenates of HOSFA with 240 g/d of meat solubles and 11.2 g/d of Tween 80; controls received carrier only. The HOSFA contained (by wt) 2.4% 16:0, 1.8% 18:0, 91.4% 18:1 cis-9, and 2.4% 18:2. The DMI decreased linearly (range 22.0 to 5.8 kg/d) as the infused amount of HOSFA increased. Apparent total tract digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and energy decreased as the infusion increased to 750 g/d and then increased when 1,000 g/d was infused. Digestibility of total fatty acids increased linearly as infused fatty acids increased. Yields of milk, fat, true protein, casein, and total solids decreased quadratically as infused amounts increased; decreases were greatest when 750 or 1,000 g/d of HOSFA were infused. Concentrations of fat and total solids increased at the higher amounts of HOSFA. The volume mean diameter of milk fat droplets and the diameter below which 90% of the volume of milk fat is contained both increased as HOSFA infusion increased. Concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, 12:0, 14:0, and 16:0 in milk fat decreased linearly as HOSFA increased. The concentration of 18:1 cis-9 (19.4 to 57.4% of total fatty acids) increased linearly as HOSFA infusion increased. Concentrations of 18:1 cis-9 in blood triglyceride

  20. Infusing Culture in Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the culture-infused career counselling (CICC) model. Six principles are foundational to a tripartite model emphasizing cultural self-awareness, awareness of client cultural identities, and development of a culturally sensitive working alliance. The core competencies ensure the cultural validity and relevance of career…

  1. Infusing Service Learning into Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Harriette J.; Moore, Sara Delano

    2001-01-01

    Describes how service learning can link to the middle school curriculum to strengthen the learning of various skills and concepts. Presents service learning model involving preparation, action, reflection, and recognition. Includes examples of effective infusion of service learning into units, lessons, and projects. Concludes with recommendations…

  2. Enhancing Instruction through Software Infusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sia, Archie P.

    The presence of the computer in the classroom is no longer considered an oddity; it has become an ordinary resource for teachers to use for the enhancement of instruction. This paper presents an examination of software infusion, i.e., the use of computer software to enrich instruction in an academic curriculum. The process occurs when a chosen…

  3. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  4. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  5. Mechanical properties and imaging characteristics of remanufactured intravascular ultrasound catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Haager, P; Mintz, G; Klues, H

    2000-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as a routine device in interventional cardiology is handicapped by its high price. 19 factory-made, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters which consist of sterilized, used phased-array IVUS transducers inserted into a new catheter shaft were compared with 23 new IVUS catheters. 3 mechanical and 4 imaging characteristics were assessed on a 5 point scale (1 = unacceptable, 5 = excellent). Mechanical as well as imaging properties of 'remanufactured' IVUS catheter were comparable to new catheters with excellent ratings for each of the evaluated characteristics in 38 to 94% of 'remanufactured' catheters and 50 to 96% of new catheters. The initial failure rate for 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters was 31.6% vs. 4.3% for new catheters (P < 0.05). Overall failure rate was 47.3% for "remanufactured" catheters vs. 8.7% for new catheters (P < 0.05). The failure was due to an electronic connecting problem occurring during mechanical stress to the IVUS catheter. In conclusion, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters offer mechanical and imaging characteristics which are comparable to new catheters. Improvements in the 'remanufacturing' process to resolve the high rate of electronic connecting problems may make this a promising approach to substantially lower the price of IVUS catheters. PMID:10832621

  6. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  7. Magnetocardiographically-guided catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fenici, R R; Covino, M; Cellerino, C; Di Lillo, M; De Filippo, M C; Melillo, G

    1995-12-01

    After more than 30 years since the first magnetocardiographic (MCG) recording was carried out with induction coils, MCG is now approaching the threshold of clinical use. During the last 5 years, in fact, there has been a growing interest of clinicians in this new method which provides an unrivalled accuracy for noninvasive, three-dimensional localization of intracardiac source. An increasing number of laboratories are reporting data validating the use of MCG as an effective method for preoperative localization of arrhythmogenic substrates and for planning the best catheter ablation approach for different arrhythmogenic substrates. In this article, available data from literature have been reviewed. We consider the clinical use of MCG to localize arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and in patients with ventricular tachycardia in order to assess the state-of-the-art of the method on a large number of patients. This article also addresses some suggestions for industrial development of more compact, medically oriented MCG equipments at reasonable cost. PMID:10159774

  8. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or...

  9. Transcriptional profiling of the ovine abomasal lymph node reveals a role for timing of the immune response in gastrointestinal nematode resistance.

    PubMed

    McRae, Kathryn M; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P; McCabe, Matthew S; Cormican, Paul; Sweeney, Torres; O'Connell, Mary J; Keane, Orla M

    2016-07-15

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in grazing ruminants. The major ovine defence mechanism is acquired immunity, with protective immunity developing over time in response to infection. Nematode resistance varies both within and between breeds and is moderately heritable. A detailed understanding of the genes and mechanisms involved in protective immunity, and the factors that regulate this response, is required to aid both future breeding strategies and the development of effective and sustainable nematode control methods. The aim of this study was to compare the abomasal lymph node transcriptome of resistant and susceptible lambs in order to determine biological processes differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible individuals. Scottish Blackface lambs, with divergent phenotypes for resistance, were challenged with 30,000 Teladorsagia circumcincta larvae (L3), and abomasal lymph nodes recovered at 7 and 14days post-infection (dpi). High-throughput sequencing of cDNA from the abomasal lymph node was used to quantitatively sample the transcriptome with an average of 32 million reads per sample. A total of 194 and 144 genes were differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible lambs at 7 and 14 dpi respectively. Differentially expressed networks and biological processes were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Genes involved in the inflammatory response, attraction of T lymphocytes and binding of leukocytes were more highly expressed in resistant animals at 7 dpi and in susceptible animals at 14 dpi indicating that resistant animals respond to infection earlier than susceptible animals. Twenty-four Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) within 11 differentially expressed genes, were tested for association with gastrointestinal nematode resistance in the Scottish Blackface lambs. Four SNP, in 2 genes (SLC30A2 and ALB), were suggestively associated with faecal egg count. In conclusion, a large

  10. Reducing inappropriate urinary catheter use: quality care initiatives.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Clements, Charlotte; Hopper, Adrian

    Healthcare-acquired urinary infection presents a substantial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Urinary tract infections have not gained the same level of media attention as other healthcare-associated infections, yet interventions to reduce urinary catheter use are one of the top ten recommended patient safety strategies. To improve practice around urinary catheter placement and removal requires interventions to change the expectations and habits of nurses, medical teams and patients regarding the need for a urinary catheter. In the authors' trust, a redesign of the existing urinary catheter device record was undertaken to help avoid unnecessary placement of catheters, and resulted in a reduction of urinary catheters in situ longer than 48 hours. Other strategies included implementation of catheter rounds in a high-usage area, and credit-card-sized education cards. A catheter 'passport' was introduced for patients discharged with a catheter to ensure information for insertion and ongoing use were effectively communicated. PMID:25978469

  11. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  12. Computational analysis of the effectiveness of blood flushing with saline injection from an intravascular diagnostic catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph C.; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Optical techniques including fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy have demonstrated potential as a tool for study and diagnosis of arterial vessel pathologies. However, their application in the intravascular diagnostic procedures has been hampered by the presence of blood hemoglobin that affects the light delivery to and the collection from the vessel wall. We report a computational fluid dynamics model that allows for the optimization of blood flushing parameters in a manner that minimizes the amount of saline needed to clear the optical field of view and reduces any adverse effects caused by the external saline jet. A 3D turbulence (k−ω) model was employed for Eulerian–Eulerian two-phase flow to simulate the flow inside and around a side-viewing fiber-optic catheter. Current analysis demonstrates the effects of various parameters including infusion and blood flow rates, vessel diameters, and pulsatile nature of blood flow on the flow structure around the catheter tip. The results from this study can be utilized in determining the optimal flushing rate for given vessel diameter, blood flow rate, and maximum wall shear stress that the vessel wall can sustain and subsequently in optimizing the design parameters of optical-based intravascular catheters. PMID:24953876

  13. Tracing Fasting Glucose Fluxes with Unstressed Catheter Approach in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui; Xu, Xiao; Meng, Ying; Xia, Fangzhen; Zhai, Hualing; Lu, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Blood glucose concentrations of type 1 diabetic rats are vulnerable, especially to stress and trauma. The present study aimed to investigate the fasting endogenous glucose production and skeletal muscle glucose uptake of Streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats using an unstressed vein and artery implantation of catheters at the tails of the rats as a platform. Research Design and Methods. Streptozotocin (65 mg·kg−1) was administered to induce type 1 diabetic state. The unstressed approach of catheters of vein and artery at the tails of the rats was established before the isotope tracer injection. Dynamic measurement of fasting endogenous glucose production was assessed by continuously infusing stable isotope [6, 6-2H2] glucose, while skeletal muscle glucose uptake by bolus injecting radioactively labeled [1-14C]-2-deoxy-glucose. Results. Streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats displayed polydipsia, polyphagia, and polyuria along with overt hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. They also had enhanced fasting endogenous glucose production and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle compared to nondiabetic rats. Conclusions. The dual catheters implantation at the tails of the rats together with isotope tracers injection is a save time, unstressed, and feasible approach to explore the glucose metabolism in animal models in vivo. PMID:24772449

  14. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  15. [Swan Ganz catheter. Experts opinion].

    PubMed

    Cohen Arazi, Hernán; Nani, Sebastián; Giorgi, Mariano; Guardiani, Fernando; Caturla, Nicolás; Benzadón, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Investigators have raised doubts as to the safety of the Swan Ganz catheter (SGC). In order to define the point of view of cardiologists in our country, the Argentine Society of Cardiology's Emergency Council organized a meeting to analyze their views in different settings (non-cardiac surgery, cardiac surgery, acute coronary syndromes and heart failure) using the RAND-UCLA appropriateness method. A detailed review with the scientific evidence was sent to the experts in cardiology prior to the meeting in the SAC auditorium where the panellists selected the clinical variables create the specific situations. These hypothetic situations were resent to the panellists at a second stage for their individual evaluation, rating the benefit-to-harm ratio of the procedure on a scale of 1 to 9 (1 meant that the expected harms greatly outweighed the expected benefits, and 9 that the expected benefits greatly outweighed the expected harms, 5 could mean either that the harms and benefits were roughly equal). Two experts analyzed the results, describing the agreement/disagreement ratio. Finally, each indication was classified as "appropriate" "uncertain" or "inappropriate" ,for the procedure in accordance with the panelists' median score: median scores in the 1-3 range were classified as inappropriate, those in the 4-6 range as uncertain, and those in the 7-9 range as appropriate. We observed high disagreement rates in SGC indications between cardiologists. However, the panelists were in favor of SGC use when situations included shock and myocardial dysfunction, especially in the presence of organic dysfunction. There were some situations when panelists considered SGC not useful, in patients without organ failure. PMID:25188663

  16. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  17. Intrathecal infusions for intractable cancer pain: A qualitative study of the impact on a case series of patients and caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Philippa; Beddard-Huber, Elizabeth; Grose, Cameron; McDonald, William; Lobb, Daphne; Malysh, Louise

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The need for intrathecal infusion in a palliative care setting is infrequent. Despite established efficacy, safety and cost effectiveness, this is considered an ‘extraordinary measure’ in Canada. Patients requiring this approach are not typical palliative care patients, having shorter and more uncertain life expectancies. OBJECTIVES: The present study is a qualitative exploration of the impact of intrathecal pump implantation on cancer patients, and also the impact of the intervention on the staff caring for those patients. METHODS: Palliative care unit patients who received an implanted intrathecal pump or dome catheter for intractable cancer pain participated in multiple semistructured interviews. Doctors and nurses caring for each patient were also interviewed. Interviews were recorded and analyzed for themes. The study terminated when saturation was reached. RESULTS: Six patients participated, with up to three interviews each. Twenty-four staff interviews took place. Patients’ hopes and expectations were not always fully met, but the infusions had a profound positive effect on quality of life. Patients expressed anxiety about dependence on the device, and also on a few highly skilled individuals. Staff interviews revealed a significant impact on the ‘culture’ of the palliative care unit. Clear communication of the rationale for infusion was very important, as was regular education about infusion management. CONCLUSIONS: Implanted intrathecal infusion devices are a necessary part of a tertiary level cancer pain management service for the unfortunate minority with intractable pain. Practical recommendations for care are made for palliative care programs contemplating offering intrathecal infusions. PMID:19862372

  18. Evaluation of abomasal outflow diversion as an experimental model of hypochloremic, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in lactating cows.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J L; Smith, D F; Fubini, S L; Deuel-Aromando, D M

    1994-01-01

    Four adult, lactating dairy cows were subjected to diversion (loss) of gastric contents through a T-shaped cannula placed in the cranial part of the duodenum just distal to the pylorus. Diversion was continued for 10 to 12 hours, at which point the cows were very weak and depressed. The volume of effluent during this period ranged from 37.3 to 46.8 L, with the largest volume being produced during the first four hours. All cows became dehydrated, with mean packed cell volume and total plasma protein concentration increasing 30% and 19.6%, respectively, but with only a slight increase in plasma creatinine concentration. Plasma Cl- concentrations decreased from a mean of 97.3 mEq/L at the beginning of diversion to a mean of 87.2 mEq/L at eight hours. This was followed by a plateau or slight increase in concentrations over the final hours of diversion. Plasma K+ concentration followed a similar pattern, decreasing from a mean of 3.9 mEq/L to a mean of 2.94 mEq/L at six hours, followed by increasing values until termination of diversion. No changes in plasma Na+ concentration were noted, except for a mild decrease in one cow. Plasma calcium concentrations decreased significantly, reaching 6.6 +/- 0.6 mEq/L at the end of diversion. Venous pH, plasma HCO3- concentration, and plasma base excess concentration increased during the first four to eight hours of diversion, followed by a gradual decline. Although a mild hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis resulted from diversion of abomasal outflow in all cows, substantiated by a mild increase in plasma strong ion difference, the changes observed were not as great as expected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8143247

  19. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  20. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  1. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  2. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  3. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  4. Left Atrial Anatomy Relevant to Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Cabrera, José Angel; Saremi, Farhood

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of interventional procedures for the treatment of arrhythmias in humans, especially the use of catheter ablation techniques, has renewed interest in cardiac anatomy. Although the substrates of atrial fibrillation (AF), its initiation and maintenance, remain to be fully elucidated, catheter ablation in the left atrium (LA) has become a common therapeutic option for patients with this arrhythmia. Using ablation catheters, various isolation lines and focal targets are created, the majority of which are based on gross anatomical, electroanatomical, and myoarchitectual patterns of the left atrial wall. Our aim was therefore to review the gross morphological and architectural features of the LA and their relations to extracardiac structures. The latter have also become relevant because extracardiac complications of AF ablation can occur, due to injuries to the phrenic and vagal plexus nerves, adjacent coronary arteries, or the esophageal wall causing devastating consequences. PMID:25057427

  5. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  6. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  7. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  8. Localized infusion of IGF-I results in skeletal muscle hypertrophy in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) peptide levels have been shown to increase in overloaded skeletal muscles (G. R. Adams and F. Haddad. J. Appl. Physiol. 81: 2509-2516, 1996). In that study, the increase in IGF-I was found to precede measurable increases in muscle protein and was correlated with an increase in muscle DNA content. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that direct IGF-I infusion would result in an increase in muscle DNA as well as in various measurements of muscle size. Either 0.9% saline or nonsystemic doses of IGF-I were infused directly into a non-weight-bearing muscle of rats, the tibialis anterior (TA), via a fenestrated catheter attached to a subcutaneous miniosmotic pump. Saline infusion had no effect on the mass, protein content, or DNA content of TA muscles. Local IGF-I infusion had no effect on body or heart weight. The absolute weight of the infused TA muscles was approximately 9% greater (P < 0.05) than that of the contralateral TA muscles. IGF-I infusion resulted in significant increases in the total protein and DNA content of TA muscles (P < 0.05). As a result of these coordinated changes, the DNA-to-protein ratio of the hypertrophied TA was similar to that of the contralateral muscles. These results suggest that IGF-I may be acting to directly stimulate processes such as protein synthesis and satellite cell proliferation, which result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  9. In vitro effects of bethanechol on abomasal and duodenal smooth muscle preparations from dairy cows with left displacement of the abomasum and from healthy dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Niederberger, Markus D; Hirsbrunner, Gaby; Steiner, Adrian; Brechbühl, Monika; Meylan, Mireille

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of bethanechol (BeCh) on abomasal and duodenal smooth muscle preparations from dairy cows with left displacement of the abomasum (LDA) and from healthy dairy cows, and determined the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes 2 and 3 (M(2) and M(3)) in mediating contraction. Concentration-response curves for BeCh, with or without prior incubation with an M(2) antagonist (AF-DX 116) or an M(3) antagonist (4-DAMP), were established and evaluated. BeCh induced a significant, concentration-dependant increase in the contractility variables for all locations in both groups of cows. The inhibiting effect of 4-DAMP was stronger than that of AF-DX 116, which suggested that contractions were mediated by M(3) and to a lesser extent by M(2). The basal tone of abomasal smooth muscle was reduced in cows with LDA, which indicated hypotonia. The use of BeCh as a prokinetic drug in cows with gastrointestinal motility disorder warrants further investigation. PMID:19272820

  10. A new method for detecting the abomasal position and characteristics of movement at the onset of the left displacement of the abomasum in cows.

    PubMed

    Itoh, N; Egawa, M; Kitazawa, T; Ueda, M; Koiwa, M

    2006-09-01

    A new method has been developed by us to observe the movements of the abomasum by using a magnet and digital magnetometer. Four cows with left displacement of the abomasum underwent conventional correction by rolling without tacking. A doughnut-type magnet was sutured to the pyloric region in a routine operation. The same was done in three control cows. The position of the pyloric region was observed with a digital magnetometer from outside the cow's body. The magnets in the pyloric region of the control cows were located at the right side of the abdominal cavity at 10-30 cm anterior to the udder base, and moved slightly in various directions within the span of a day. On the other hand, the magnets in the pyloric region of cows with abomasal displacement moved widely in the abdominal cavity from the normal right side to the abnormal left front side. A large movement of the magnet from the normal right side to the abnormal left side of the abdominal cavity was observed within 12 h of the onset of abomasal displacement. PMID:16922837

  11. The Safety of Target-Controlled Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schnider, Thomas W; Minto, Charles F; Struys, Michel M R F; Absalom, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) technology has been available in most countries worldwide for clinical use in anesthesia for approximately 2 decades. This infusion mode uses pharmacokinetic models to calculate infusion rates necessary to reach and maintain the desired drug concentration. TCI is computationally more complex than traditional modes of drug administration. The primary difference between TCI and conventional infusions is that TCI decreases the infusion rate at regular intervals to account for the uptake of drug into saturable compartments. Although the calculated infusion rates are consistent with manually controlled infusion rates, there are concerns that TCI administration of IV anesthetics could introduce unique safety concerns. After approximately 2 decades of clinical use, it is appropriate to assess the safety of TCI. Our aim in this article was to describe safety-relevant issues related to TCI, which should have emerged after its use in millions of patients. We collected information from published medical literature, TCI manufacturers, and publicly available governmental Web sites to find evidence of safety issues with the clinical use of TCI. Although many case reports emphasize that IV anesthesia is technically more demanding than inhaled anesthesia, including human errors associated with setting up IV infusions, no data suggest that a TCI mode of drug delivery introduces unique safety issues other than selecting the wrong pharmacokinetic model. This is analogous to the risk of selecting the wrong drug with current infusion pumps. We found no evidence that TCI is not at least as safe as anesthetic administration using constant rate infusions. PMID:26516801

  12. Catheter-related bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Santangelo, Rosaria; Fiori, Barbara; De Angelis, Giulia; Conte, Viola; Giaquinto, Alessia; Palucci, Ivana; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Florio, Viviana; Giani, Tommaso; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Spanu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus bacteremia is a rare infection and identification of the pathogen is difficult. We present four cases of bacteremia by Cupriavidus metallidurans that were initially identified to the genus level by both Bruker and Vitek matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and later identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of C. metallidurans catheter-related infections. Patients were successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and catheter removal. PMID:25446890

  13. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  14. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  15. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) and Gastrostomy (Feeding) Tubes People with ... without surgery by an interventional radiologist. Central Venous Access Catheters (CVAC) A CVAC is a tube that ...

  16. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  17. Comparison of catheter tip migration using flexible and stimulating catheters inserted into the adductor canal in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher A J; Kim, T Edward; Funck, Natasha; Howard, Steven K; Harrison, T Kyle; Ganaway, Toni; Keng, Heidi; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Use of adductor canal blocks and catheters for perioperative pain management following total knee arthroplasty is becoming increasingly common. However, the optimal equipment, timing of catheter insertion, and catheter dislodgement rate remain unknown. A previous study has suggested, but not proven, that non-tunneled stimulating catheters may be at increased risk for catheter migration and dislodgement after knee manipulation. We designed this follow-up study to directly compare tip migration of two catheter types after knee range of motion exercises. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 30 catheter insertion trials were randomly assigned to one of two catheter types: flexible or stimulating. All catheters were inserted using an ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane technique. Intraoperative knee manipulation similar to that performed during surgery was simulated by five sequential range of motion exercises. A blinded regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after exercise. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.547) and catheter length within the adductor canal (p = 0.498) were not different between groups. Therefore, catheter type may not affect the risk of catheter tip migration when placed prior to knee arthroplasty. PMID:25510467

  18. Reduced intravascular catheter-related infection by routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kamal, G D; Divishek, D; Kumar, G C; Porter, B R; Tatman, D J; Adams, J R

    1998-03-01

    We report a comparative analysis of intravascular catheter-related infection before and after routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in an intensive care unit. Cefazolin-bonded catheters were placed in patients requiring catheterization for at least 3 days, or with remote infection, standard catheters at other times. One thousand forty-five catheters (259 patients) over 6 months were compared with 801 (236 antibiotic-bonded, 565 standard) catheters (239 patients) the next 6 months. After use of antibiotic-bonded catheters, we found: 1.7% catheters infected versus 3.7% (p = 0.01); catheter-associated bacteremia 0.1% versus 1.3% (p < 0.005); catheter-related infection rate 4.39 versus 10.73 per 1000 patient days (p < 0.005), and 5.06 versus 11.47 per 1000 catheter days (p < 0.01); and cumulative risk of infection decreased (p < 0.005). Antibiotic-bonded catheters were used with more remote infections (52% versus 27%, p < 0.001), had longer indwelling time (4.4 versus 3.1 days, p = 0.0001), and more were inserted over a guide wire (66% vs. 28%, p < 0.001). In conclusion routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters was associated with a significant reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9572020

  19. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  20. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1330 - Catheter guide wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter guide wire. 870.1330 Section 870.1330...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1330 Catheter guide wire. (a) Identification. A catheter guide wire is a coiled wire that is designed to fit inside...

  6. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  7. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  8. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  9. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  10. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1240 - Flow-directed catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flow-directed catheter. 870.1240 Section 870.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1240 Flow-directed catheter. (a) Identification. A flow-directed catheter is a device that incorporates a gas-filled balloon...

  17. Activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis attached to plastic catheters.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A; García, I; Ramirez de Arellano, E; Perea, E J

    1995-08-01

    The activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on different plastic catheters was evaluated. Sparfloxacin showed high bactericidal activity against S. epidermidis biofilms on Vialon and polyvinylchloride catheters. The combination of sparfloxacin with amikacin or rifampicin significantly increased its activity against bacterial biofilms on polyurethane and Teflon catheters. PMID:8522473

  18. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1290 Steerable catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that...

  3. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  4. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  5. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  6. Ultrasound assessment of caudal catheter position in infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen A; Galvez, Ignacio

    2005-05-01

    The positioning of caudally inserted epidural catheters is crucial to their effectiveness. However, level assessment can be difficult and time consuming. We report the use of ultrasound to assess the catheter position in three patients aged between 1 and 10 months. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed in relation to other methods of assessing caudal catheter placement. PMID:15828997

  7. 21 CFR 876.4020 - Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. 876.4020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4020 Fiberoptic light ureteral catheter. (a) Identification. A fiberoptic light ureteral catheter is a device that consists of...

  8. Infusing PDA technology into nursing education.

    PubMed

    White, Ann; Allen, Patricia; Goodwin, Linda; Breckinridge, Daya; Dowell, Jeffery; Garvy, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Use of the personal digital assistant (PDA) has been infused into the accelerated baccalaureate program at Duke University to help prepare nursing students for professional practice. The authors provide an overview of the use of PDAs in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting. Technical aspects of PDA infusion and steps to ensure regulatory compliance are explored. Benefits of PDA use by both faculty and students in the program and challenges met with the infusion of this technology are also described. PMID:16030450

  9. Effects of Dexmedetomidine Infusion on the Recovery Profiles of Patients Undergoing Transurethral Resection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transurethral resection has been the gold standard in the operative management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and bladder tumor; however, it is associated with several complications that may cause patient discomfort. We evaluated the usefulness of continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine on emergence agitation, hemodynamic status, and recovery profiles in patients undergoing elective surgery by a randomized clinical trial. Sixty patients aged 30 to 80 yr who were scheduled for elective transurethral resection under general anesthesia were included in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups (control group, group C; dexmedetomidine group, group D). A total of 60 male patients were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to group C (n=30) or group D (n=30). The quality of emergence in group D was marked by a significantly lower incidence of emergence agitation than in group C (P=0.015). Patients in group D therefore felt less discomfort induced by the indwelling Foley catheter than those in group C (P=0.022). No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with respect to side effects including bradycardia (P=0.085), hypotension (P=0.640), and postoperative nausea and vomiting (P=0.389). Our study showed that intraoperative dexmedetomidine infusion effectively reduced the incidence and intensity of emergence agitation and catheter-induced bladder discomfort without delaying recovery time and discharge time, thus providing smooth emergence during the recovery period in patients undergoing transurethral resection (Clinical Trial Registry No. KT0001683). PMID:26770048

  10. Hepatic arterial infusion of mitoxantrone in the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, F A; Evans, W K; Blackstein, M E; Fine, S; Heathcote, J; Langer, B; Taylor, B; Habal, F; Kutas, G; Pritchard, K I

    1987-04-01

    Twenty-three patients (16 male, seven female) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were treated by hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of mitoxantrone every 4 weeks. At each treatment, a catheter was inserted percutaneously into the main hepatic artery via the femoral artery under image intensification. Treatment consisted of a 24-hour continuous HAI of mitoxantrone, 6 mg/m2/d X 3 (eight patients) or 10 mg/m2/d X 3 (14 patients) without heparin. Eight patients had only one infusion, nine patients four infusions, five patients three infusions, two patients two infusions, and one patient five infusions. A partial response was seen in six patients, with a median duration of 20 weeks (range, 18 to 38 weeks). Five patients achieved stable disease, with a median duration of 20 weeks (range, 11 to 42 weeks). The median survival of the overall group was 22 weeks. Survivals of responding, stable, and nonresponding patients were 32 weeks, 24 weeks, and 9 weeks, respectively. Complications of catheter placement included asymptomatic dissection of the hepatic artery (one patient), and asymptomatic thrombosis of the hepatic artery (five patients). Three patients experienced mild nausea and vomiting, and six patients had mild to moderate alopecia. Granulocytopenia was frequent at both dose schedules. The granulocyte nadir was greater than 1,000/microL in 34% of evaluable courses, 500 to 1,000/microL in 32%, and less than 500/microL in 34% of courses. Two patients developed neutropenia-associated fever. A platelet nadir below 100,000/microL was seen after only 10% of courses, and only two patients had platelets below 50,000/microL. Seven patients received doxorubicin after progression on mitoxantrone. Four received systemic doxorubicin, 50 mg/m2, and three HAI of doxorubicin, 25 mg/m2, for three days. Two patients achieved partial response (18 weeks and 32 weeks) to HAI doxorubicin. Mitoxantrone has activity in HCC and is well tolerated when administered by HAI. It is not entirely

  11. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  12. Risk factors associated with catheter-related upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients with peripherally inserted central venous catheters: a prospective observational cohort study: part 2.

    PubMed

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Clemence, Bonnie J

    2014-01-01

    This is the second part of a 2-part series that reports on the results of a prospective observational cohort study designed to examine risk factors associated with symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Part 1, published in the May/June 2014 issue of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, provided an extensive review and critique of the literature regarding risk factors associated with catheter-related UEDVT and identified 28 suspected risk factors. A study was undertaken to examine each of the risk factors among 203 acute care patients with PICCs, 13 of whom experienced a UEDVT, yielding an incidence of 6.4%. The most common reason for admission was infection (33.5%), and the primary reason for insertion of the PICC was venous access (58.6%). Hypertension (P = .022) and obesity (P = .008), defined as a body mass index ≥30, were associated with UEDVT. The clinical symptoms of edema (P < .001) and a 3-cm or more increase in arm circumference (P < .001) in the PICC arm after PICC placement were associated with UEDVT. All other variables were not statistically significant. The results suggest that patients who are obese and hypertensive may be at greater risk for the development of UEDVT and that the physical finding of edema and increased arm circumference in the PICC arm are possibly suggestive of UEDVT. PMID:24983259

  13. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  14. [Drug administration through enteral feeding catheters].

    PubMed

    Goñi Viguria, R; Sánchez Sanz, L; Asiain Erro, M; Baztán Indave, A

    2001-01-01

    Because of easiness and accessibility, the oral route of administration is usually the route of choice for medication delivery, as long as the oral drug form is available and the patients' circumstances allow it.In patients admitted to the intensive care unit this route is frequently altered. This provokes difficulties in swallowing and consequently an enteral feeding catheter must be inserted to supply the patient's nutritional requirements. This catheter is also used for the drug administration, which necessitates opening capsules or crushing pills before dilution. When added to drug-nutrient interactions, this process alters the drug's properties and modifies its pharmacokinetic profile, its pharmacological effect and the intensity of side effects. It can also provoke catheter obstruction. The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for drug administration through enteral feeding catheters. We provide a thorough review of the literature, describe oral drug forms, present a protocol for correct drug administration and provide a guide to the most commonly used drugs in our unit. For each of these drugs we include recommendations on administration and possible alternatives. PMID:11459545

  15. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. A new catheter system for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J B; Baim, D S; Robert, E W; Harrison, D C

    1982-04-01

    A new catheter system has been designed for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. An independently movable, flexible-tipped guide wire within the balloon dilation catheter facilitates selection of the involved vessel. This guide wire can be passed slowly and carefully beyond the coronary stenosis, permitting safe advancement of the balloon catheter. After testing in animal and cadaver hearts, this system was used in 53 patients (56 stenoses) with single vessel coronary artery disease, with an overall primary success rate of 64 percent. In the last 41 of these 56 cases, use of a balloon catheter with a smaller deflated diameter increased the success rate to 73 percent. In patients with lesions of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the success rate was 89 percent. Three (6 percent) of the 53 patients had complications during coronary arterial dilation that necessitated emergency coronary arterial bypass graft surgery. There were no procedure-related or late cardiac deaths. During the mean follow-up period of 8 months (range 1 to 21), there were one late death (of noncardiac causes) and no late myocardial infarctions. Clinical status was persistently improved in 31 of the 36 patients who had successful dilation. The remaining five patients experienced restenosis at the angioplasty site and return of angina pectoris within 3 months of dilation. Two of these patients had repeat coronary angioplasty with restoration of asymptomatic status, and three had elective coronary bypass graft surgery. PMID:6461241

  18. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  19. [Candida catheter related-blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masako; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Candida catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a biofilm-related disease, which is usually refractory because antifungals show limited effect. With medical development and increase in number of compromised hosts, CRBSI became more frequent. Candida, which is one of the opportunistic pathogens, ranks the fourth causative organism of bacteremia. The onset of bacteremia is greatly associated with the presence of catheter. Repeated blood cultures and the central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture are done for the definitive diagnosis of Candida CRBSI. Additionally serological examinations such as (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan and mannan antigen are also useful for early diagnosis. It is important for the appropriate treatment to remove CVC, which is an artificial contaminated material, and administer antifungals promptly. As to the choice of antifungals, we should also take into account the ability of antibiofilm effect of antifungals as well as immunological state of host including neutropenia, prior administration of azoles, isolated or estimated Candida species, sensitivity against antifungals, administration route, pharmacokinetics (bioavailability, metabolic and excretion pathway, distribution) and drug interaction. As to complication of Candida bacteremia, first we should check endophthalmitis, which occurs frequently and leads to the loss of eyesight, as well as infective endocarditis, arthritis, metastatic infections such as embolic pneumonia and suppurative thrombotic phlebitis of catheter insertion site. Lastly we emphasize that the appropriate treatment based on the character of Candida bacteremia and biofilm leads to favorable prognosis. PMID:24809204

  20. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  1. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4100 - Ventricular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A ventricular catheter is a device used to gain access to the cavities of the brain for injection of material into, or removal of material from, the brain. (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. Design of low cost smart infusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Yohanes David; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri

    2015-01-01

    We propose design of a smart infusion device suitable for public hospitals in Indonesia. The device comprised of LED, photodiode and DC motor to measure and control the infusion rate, using the principle of LED beam absorption. The infusion rate was identified by using microcontroller and displayed through computer unit. Experiment results for different flow rate level and concentration of Dextrose showed that the device is able to detect, measure, and control the infusion droplets flow rate by the average error rate of 1.0081%.

  7. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13) and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13), decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96), but increased significantly in intensive care (IC) and coronary care (CC) units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17). The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16) and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18) and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96) and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90). The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of urinary tract infections in catheterized patients did not change. The mean cost saved per 100 patients was € 537. Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an

  8. Histochemical study of the effects on abomasal mucins of Haemonchus contortus or Teladorsagia circumcincta infection in lambs.

    PubMed

    Simpson, H V; Umair, S; Hoang, V C; Savoian, M S

    2016-08-15

    in both antrum and fundus contrasts with reported hypersecretion of mucus in the intestine, which is believed to aid in parasite expulsion. It has been proposed that intestinal goblet cell hypersecretion occurs only in resistant animals, therefore reduced mucins in the abomasum may be indicative of susceptibility to abomasal parasites. PMID:27387375

  9. Azygos catheter placement as a cause of failure of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Jackson, A; Beards, S C

    1993-11-01

    Common complications of venous dialysis catheters include sepsis and accidental removal. Angiographic demonstration of dialysis lines is only rarely requested usually to confirm the presence of clot or stenosis as a cause for poor dialysis flow. Poor flow can also be due to inadvertent placement of the catheter in the azygos system. The use of dialysis catheters with a long venous limb which extends beyond the arterial port may predispose to such placement as their lumen is lateral to the central axis of the catheter. In those patients with poor venous access catheter placement under angiographic control may be helpful. PMID:8258225

  10. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced. PMID:27005500

  11. Prevention of urinary catheter incrustations by acetohydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Burns, J R; Gauthier, J F

    1984-09-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid was administered in 5 patients to determine its effect in reducing urinary catheter incrustations. All patients had chronic indwelling catheters that required frequent changes because of severe incrustations and catheter occlusion. Incrustations were analyzed chemically for calcium, magnesium, ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus. The degree of incrustation before and during acetohydroxamic acid therapy was compared in each patient and was decreased significantly (average 81 per cent) during therapy (p less than 0.05). Catheter changes were required less frequently during therapy in all patients. Acetohydroxamic acid is effective in preventing catheter incrustations and should be considered in patients with this problem. PMID:6381758

  12. Effects of crystalloid and colloid infusions on intracranial pressure and computerized electroencephalographic data in dogs with vasogenic brain edema.

    PubMed

    Tranmer, B I; Iacobacci, R I; Kindt, G W

    1989-08-01

    This experiment was designed to study the effects of intravascular volume expansion with crystalloid and colloid agents on intracranial pressure (ICP) and computerized electroencephalographic (EEG) data in dogs with cerebral vasogenic edema. A liquid nitrogen cold lesion was produced in the right parietal lobes of 30 anesthetized mongrel dogs. ICP data from an intraventricular catheter, hemodynamic data, and EEG power data were recorded continuously during the course of the experiment. Six hours after creation of the liquid nitrogen cold lesion, each dog was infused with one of the following treatments: 1) no treatment (control); 2) 5% dextrose in water (D5W) (30 ml/kg/h); 3) 0.9% NaCl (30 ml/kg/h); 4) hetastarch (10 ml/kg/h); and 5) hetastarch (30 ml/kg/h). The animals were treated for 2 hours, killed, and the brains examined and measured for water content. During the D5W infusion, ICP increased significantly (141%) but the EEG power data did not change. During the normal saline infusion, ICP increased significantly (91%) and the EEG power data showed marked deterioration. Both hetastarch infusions produced no change in ICP and demonstrated an improvement in the EEG power data (P less than 0.001). These data suggest that crystalloid infusions may have profound deleterious effects in the presence of brain edema, but colloids do not, and should be considered in the fluid management of patients with cerebral edema. PMID:2671780

  13. Chronic peritoneal dialysis catheters: challenges and design solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, S R

    2006-01-01

    Although highly successful as transcutaneous access devices, today's peritoneal dialysis catheters still have imperfect hydraulic function, biocompatibility and resistance to infection. Success of Tenckhoff catheters is greatly improved by the proper positioning of deep and subcutaneous cuffs and intraperitoneal segment. Newer peritoneal catheter designs are intended to improve hydraulic function, avoid outflow failure, and diminish exit site infection. These catheter designs serve as excellent alternatives for patients with various types of failure of Tenckhoff catheters. Catheters have been designed for Continuous Flow Peritoneal Dialysis, and have generally been successful in providing high peritoneal dialysis flow rate, but not always successful in optimally distributing flow of peritoneal fluid. Improvements in catheter design may expand the use of peritoneal dialysis as a successful home dialysis therapy. PMID:16485243

  14. Acute hepatitis after amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo; Dias, Adelaide; Gonçalves, Helena; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Gama, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatitis is a very rare, but potentially fatal, adverse effect of intravenous amiodarone. We present a case of an 88-year-old man with history of ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and severely depressed left ventricular function that was admitted to our coronary care unit with diagnosis of decompensated heart failure and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. A few hours after the beginning of intravenous amiodarone he developed an acute hepatitis. There was a completely recovery within the next days after amiodarone withdrawn and other causes of acute hepatitis have been ruled out. This case highlights the need for close monitoring of hepatic function during amiodarone infusion in order to identify any potential hepatotoxicity and prevent a fatal outcome. Oral amiodarone is, apparently, a safe option in these patients. PMID:26488027

  15. Infusing Systems Thinking into Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charles W.; Tomlin, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of career counselors in infusing systems thinking into occupational advising. The authors conducted a qualitative review and analysis of selected literature on systems thinking and analyzed trends for adaptation to career counseling practice. This analysis suggests that career counselors need to infuse systems…

  16. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5725 Infusion pump. (a) Identification....

  17. Prolonged intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan with a subcutaneously implantable infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Sonabend, Adam M; Stuart, R Morgan; Yun, Jonathan; Yanagihara, Ted; Mohajed, Hamed; Dashnaw, Steven; Bruce, Samuel S; Brown, Truman; Romanov, Alex; Sebastian, Manu; Arias-Mendoza, Fernando; Bagiella, Emilia; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2011-08-01

    Intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of chemotherapeutic agents currently requires an externalized catheter and infusion system, which limits its duration because of the need for hospitalization and the risk of infection. To evaluate the feasibility of prolonged topotecan administration by CED in a large animal brain with the use of a subcutaneous implantable pump. Medtronic Synchromed-II pumps were implanted subcutaneously for intracerebral CED in pigs. Gadodiamide (28.7 mg/mL), with or without topotecan (136 μM), was infused at 0.7 mL/24 h for 3 or 10 days. Pigs underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and at 6 times points after surgery. Enhancement and FLAIR+ volumes were calculated in a semi-automated fashion. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based topotecan signature was also investigated. Brain histology was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and with immunoperoxidase for a microglial antigen. CED of topotecan/gadolinium was well tolerated in all cases (n = 6). Maximum enhancement volume was reached at day 3 and remained stable if CED was continued for 10 days, but it decreased if CED was stopped at day 3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a decrease in parenchymal metabolites in the presence of topotecan. Similarly, the combination of topotecan and gadolinium infusion led to a FLAIR+ volume that tended to be larger than that seen after the infusion of gadolinium alone. Histological analysis of the brains showed an area of macrophage infiltrate in the ipsilateral white matter upon infusion with topotecan/gadolinium. Intracerebral topotecan CED is well tolerated in a large animal brain for up to 10 days. Intracerebral long-term CED can be achieved with a subcutaneously implanted pump and provides a stable volume of distribution. This work constitutes a proof of principle for the safety and feasibility for prolonged CED, providing a means of continuous local drug delivery that is accessible to the practicing neuro-oncologist. PMID

  18. Prolonged intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan with a subcutaneously implantable infusion pump

    PubMed Central

    Sonabend, Adam M.; Stuart, R. Morgan; Yun, Jonathan; Yanagihara, Ted; Mohajed, Hamed; Dashnaw, Steven; Bruce, Samuel S.; Brown, Truman; Romanov, Alex; Sebastian, Manu; Arias-Mendoza, Fernando; Bagiella, Emilia; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of chemotherapeutic agents currently requires an externalized catheter and infusion system, which limits its duration because of the need for hospitalization and the risk of infection. To evaluate the feasibility of prolonged topotecan administration by CED in a large animal brain with the use of a subcutaneous implantable pump. Medtronic Synchromed-II pumps were implanted subcutaneously for intracerebral CED in pigs. Gadodiamide (28.7 mg/mL), with or without topotecan (136 μM), was infused at 0.7 mL/24 h for 3 or 10 days. Pigs underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and at 6 times points after surgery. Enhancement and FLAIR+ volumes were calculated in a semi-automated fashion. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based topotecan signature was also investigated. Brain histology was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and with immunoperoxidase for a microglial antigen. CED of topotecan/gadolinium was well tolerated in all cases (n = 6). Maximum enhancement volume was reached at day 3 and remained stable if CED was continued for 10 days, but it decreased if CED was stopped at day 3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a decrease in parenchymal metabolites in the presence of topotecan. Similarly, the combination of topotecan and gadolinium infusion led to a FLAIR+ volume that tended to be larger than that seen after the infusion of gadolinium alone. Histological analysis of the brains showed an area of macrophage infiltrate in the ipsilateral white matter upon infusion with topotecan/gadolinium. Intracerebral topotecan CED is well tolerated in a large animal brain for up to 10 days. Intracerebral long-term CED can be achieved with a subcutaneously implanted pump and provides a stable volume of distribution. This work constitutes a proof of principle for the safety and feasibility for prolonged CED, providing a means of continuous local drug delivery that is accessible to the practicing neuro-oncologist. PMID

  19. Preperitoneal catheter analgesia is an effective method for pain management after colorectal surgery: the results of 100 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ali; Yılmazlar, Aysun; Oztürk, Ersin; Yılmazlar, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Background In a previous prospective randomized trial, we showed that local anesthetic infusion using a preperitoneal catheter is an effective postoperative analgesic method following colorectal resections. Over time, we have improved the technique of preperitoneal catheter analgesia. In this prospective cohort study, we report the results of 100 consecutive patients who underwent colorectal resections. Materials and methods Preperitoneal catheter analgesia was performed via a multihole catheter placed in the preperitoneal space using 10 mL 0.5% levobupivacaine every 4 hours following the operation for the first 3 days. Additional analgesics were used whenever necessary. Postoperative pain was assessed with the visual analog scale score. Short-term clinical outcomes, such as need for systemic analgesics, time to first gas and stool discharge, length of hospital stay, and morbidity, particularly surgical site infections, were reported. Results From May 2009 to May 2010, 100 consecutive patients were recruited in the study. A total of 83 patients were operated on for malignancy, and the tumor was located in the rectum in 52 patients and in the colon in 31 patients. The median pain score was 4 (0–6), 3 (0–9), 2 (0–8), 1 (0–8), 1 (0–6), 0 (0–6), and 0 (0–3) at postoperative hours 0, 1, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72, respectively. Additional analgesics were required in 34 patients: 21 of them required only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 13 patients needed opioids additionally. The median amounts of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were 1.76±0.78 mg and 6.70±1.18 mg, respectively. However, almost all of the additional analgesics were given in the first 24 hours. Surgical site infections were detected in eight patients. Conclusion Preperitoneal catheter analgesia is an effective analgesic method. When applied and used properly, it may even be used as the sole analgesic method in some patients. PMID:25336988

  20. Implementing and maintaining an infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2010-01-01

    Infusion therapy models are ever changing and growing in modern health care. New technologies and problems arise daily as researchers and clinicians explore our world. As technologies advance, health care costs are also skyrocketing. The vast majority of hospitalized patients will receive some form of infusion therapy during their stay, and many will continue to receive therapy after they are discharged from the inpatient setting. Infusion alliances can aid cost containment by decreasing infusion-related complication rates, affect customer satisfaction, and promote interdisciplinary collaboration. This article discusses the potential benefits of an infusion alliance, details steps for using the performance improvement process when implementing and maintaining an alliance, and outlines the components of a successful business plan. PMID:20841983

  1. Fluid delivery from infusion-pump syringes.

    PubMed

    Carl, J L; Erstad, B L; Murphy, J E; Slack, M K

    1995-07-01

    Fluid-delivery rates of five small-volume infusion-pump syringes were compared. The study consisted of a comparison of the infusion-pump syringes in their respective infusion pumps (1) set for continuous delivery at 1 mL/hr, (2) set for continuous delivery at 3 mL/hr, and (3) set to deliver 1-mL bolus volumes during continuous delivery at 4 mL/hr. The Life-care prefilled 30-mL syringe (Abbott), the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 770205 (DBL Inc.), and the Pump-Jet 30-mL syringe no. 1931 (International Medication Systems) were tested in the Lifecare PCA Plus II infusion pump no. 4100 (Abbott). The 30-mL Pump-Jet syringe no. 1911 (International Medication Systems) and the DBL 30-mL syringe no. 709700 (DBL Inc.) were tested in the Stratofuse PCA infusion pump (Baxter). The infusion pumps were set to deliver fluid continuously at 1 mL/hr for 30 hours, and the solutions were collected separately and weighed. The procedure was repeated with the infusion rate set at 3 mL/hr for 10 hours. For the third part of the study, each syringe was tested to deliver 1-mL boluses with 0, 5, 15, and 25 mL removed from the syringe. The solutions were collected and weighed before and after each bolus was delivered. The volume of solution collected was calculated by using the specific gravity of the solution. The syringes delivered significantly different volumes during the first hour of infusion at both the 1- and 3-mL/hr rates. Differences also existed across time for most of the syringes. Bolus volumes varied greatly after infusion of 0 or 5 mL of fluid but were acceptable for the remainder of the infusions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7671041

  2. [Case of small bowel angioectasia in which the resection site was angiographically detected using intraoperative dye infusion].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Kumada, Takashi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kanamori, Akira; Tada, Toshifumi; Kitabatake, Syusuke; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    A 37-year-old Japanese man undergoing treatment for dilated cardiomyopathy was presented with weakness and melena. He had conjunctival pallor and difficulty in standing;his blood pressure was 81/62 mmHg. Abdominal computed tomography revealed contrast dye leakage into the small intestine. He was diagnosed with hemorrhagic shock secondary to intestinal bleeding;we administered large volumes of intravenous fluid along with performing a blood transfusion. We then performed angiography to determine the site of bleeding angioectasia and placed a catheter into the affected artery. We identified the resection site using an intraoperative dye infusion via the catheter, and successfully performed small bowel resection. He was subsequently discharged without complications. PMID:24769467

  3. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  4. Bowel Perforation During Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Abreo, Kenneth; Sequeira, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Interventional nephrologists and radiologists place peritoneal dialysis catheters using the percutaneous fluoroscopic technique in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Nephrologists caring for such patients may have to diagnose and manage the complications resulting from these procedures. Abdominal pain can occur following peritoneal dialysis catheter placement when the local and systemic analgesia wears off. However, abdominal pain with hypotension is suggestive of a serious complication. Bleeding into the abdomen and perforation of the colon or bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the case reported here, the peritoneogram showed contrast in the bowel, and correct interpretation by the interventionist would have prevented this complication. The characteristic pattern of peritoneogram images in this case will guide interventionists to avoid this complication, and the discussion of the differential diagnosis and management will assist nephrologists in taking care of such patients. PMID:26857647

  5. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  6. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-08-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi. PMID:26738054

  7. Live volumetric imaging (LVI) intracardiac ultrasound catheter.

    PubMed

    Dausch, David E; Castellucci, John B; Gilchrist, Kristin H; Carlson, James B; Hall, Stephen D; von Ramm, Olaf T

    2013-01-01

    The Live Volumetric Imaging (LVI) catheter is capable of real-time 3D intracardiac echo (ICE) imaging, uniquely providing full volume sectors with deep penetration depth and high volume frame rate. The key enabling technology in this catheter is an integrated piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducer (pMUT), a novel matrix phased array transducer fabricated using semiconductor microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques. This technology innovation may enable better image guidance to improve accuracy, reduce risk, and reduce procedure time for transcatheter intracardiac therapies which are currently done with limited direct visualization of the endocardial tissue. Envisioned applications for LVI include intraprocedural image guidance of cardiac ablation therapies as well as transcatheter mitral and aortic valve repair. PMID:23773496

  8. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  9. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS).

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Benjamin J; Nowell, Victoria J; Parreira, Valeria R; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-10-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature. PMID:23543949

  10. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS)

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Benjamin J.; Nowell, Victoria J.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature. PMID:23543949

  11. Peripherally inserted central catheter: compliance with evidence-based indications for insertion in an inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Wojnar, Danuta G; Beaman, Margaret L

    2013-01-01

    A randomized, retrospective chart review was conducted at a medium-sized community hospital to verify appropriateness of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) use in 49 inpatient patients. Study results support the Infusion Nurses Society recommendation to use PICCs to facilitate either short- or long-term intravenous therapy of vesicants, irritants, and any medications with a pH less than 5 or greater than 9 and osmolarity greater than 600 mOsm/L. All PICC insertion criteria recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were met except one--the intended duration of intravenous therapy of more than 6 days. Identical PICC selection criteria are needed to standardize clinical practice. PMID:23823005

  12. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Iain; Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation. PMID:26229681

  13. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Iain; Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation. PMID:26229681

  14. Soft robotic concepts in catheter design: an on-demand fouling-release urinary catheter.

    PubMed

    Levering, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2014-10-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation is used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters are constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  15. Soft Robotic Concepts in Catheter Design: an On-demand Fouling-release Urinary Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Leveri, Vrad; Wang, Qiming; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Zhao, Xuanhe; L00F3;pez, Gabriel P.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious biofilms are problematic in many healthcare-related devices, and are especially challenging and ubiquitous in urinary catheters. This report presents an on-demand fouling-release methodology to mechanically disrupt and remove biofilms, and proposes this method for the active removal of infectious biofilms from the previously-inaccessible main drainage lumen of urinary catheters. Mature Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms detach from silicone elastomer substrates upon application of strain to the substrate, and increasing the strain rate increases biofilm detachment. The study presents a quantitative relationship between applied strain rate and biofilm debonding through an analysis of biofilm segment length and the driving force for debonding. Based on this mechanism, hydraulic and pneumatic elastomer actuation was used to achieve surface strain selectively within the lumen of prototypes of sections of a fouling-release urinary catheter. Proof-of-concept prototypes of sections of active, fouling-release catheters were constructed using techniques typical to soft robotics including 3D printing and replica molding, and those prototypes demonstrate release of mature P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms (e.g., ≈90%) from strained surfaces. These results provide a basis for the development of a new urinary catheter technology in which infectious biofilms are effectively managed through new methods that are entirely complementary to existing approaches. PMID:24668920

  16. Ultrasound catheters for circumferential cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Taylor, Kevin; Maguire, Mark T.; Picazo, Guillermo; Gangu, Madhuri; Lesh, Michael D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate performance characteristics of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator intended for circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue. The catheter design integrates a cylindrical ultrasound transducer within a distendable water filled balloon in order to produce circumferential lesions at sites in the atria (i.e., pulmonary vein ostia), intended for treatment of certain atrial arrhythmias. Biothermal simulations were used to investigate thermal lesion depths corresponding to variations in applied power, duration, balloon diameter, and acoustic efficiency. Prototype applicators of varying frequency (7 - 12 MHz) and balloon diameter were constructed and characterized using measurements of acoustic efficiency and rotational beam plots. In vitro studies were performed in freshly excised beef hearts to characterize the radial penetration, axial length, and angular uniformity of thermal lesions produced by these applicators. Selected applicators were tested in vivo within pulmonary veins, coronary sinus, and atrial appendage of canine and porcine hearts. These preliminary efforts have indicated that circumferential ablation of cardiac tissue using ultrasound balloon catheters is feasible, and devices between 7 - 12 MHz with balloon diameters of 1.5 - 2.0 cm are capable of producing uniform lesions between 1 - 5 mm depth or greater for treatment durations of 120 seconds or less.

  17. Permcath Catheter Embolization: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefshahi, Hadi; Bina, Payvand; Yousefshahi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, many types of intravascular devices and catheters are used in order to diagnose and treat diseases. Complications related to these instruments are the costs that doctors and patients have to pay to benefit from their advantages. Catheter embolization is one of these side effects. Patients with devices in their cardiopulmonary system are at risk for severe complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, myocardial injuries, hemoptysis, thrombosis and perforation. Case Presentation: A 50-years-old woman, with a history of breast cancer, had a PermCath emplacement in right subclavian vein for a course of chemotherapy. The treatment for cancer seemed to be successful and the PermCath had remained in its position without complication, for a couple of years however, the catheter was founded broken and embolized to the right ventricle and the main left pulmonary artery, diagnosed by a chest X-ray study incidentally. Conclusions: It is better to remove the unused devices safely to prevent and decrease their possible complications. PMID:25964881

  18. Catheter-related mortality among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2008-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  19. Pharmacokinetics of sufentanil during long-term infusion in critically ill pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bartkowska-Śniatkowska, Alicja; Bienert, Agnieszka; Wiczling, Paweł; Rosada-Kurasińska, Jowita; Zielińska, Marzena; Warzybok, Justyna; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Tibboel, Dick; Kaliszan, Roman; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of sufentanil and to assess the influence of covariates in critically ill children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit. After institutional approval, 41 children were enrolled in the study. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic (PK) assessment were collected from routinely placed arterial catheters during and after discontinuation of infusion. Population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was performed using NONMEM. A 2-compartment model described sufentanil PK sufficiently. Typical values of the central and peripheral volume of distribution and the metabolic and intercompartmental clearance for a theoretical patient weighing 70 kg were VC = 7.90 l, VT  = 481 L, Cl =  5.3 L/h, and Q = 38.3 L/h, respectively. High interindividual variability of all PK parameters was noted. Allometric/isometric principles to scale sufentanil PK revealed that to achieve the same steady-state sufentanil concentrations in plasma for pediatric patients of different body weights, the infusion rate should follow the formula (infusion rate for a 70-kg adult patient, μg/h) × (body weight/70 kg)(0.75). Severity of illness described by PRISM score, the monitored physiological and laboratory parameters, and coadministered drugs such as vasopressors were not found to be significant covariates. PMID:26105145

  20. Perioperative Continuous Ropivacaine Wound Infusion in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Randomized Controlled Double-blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, Argyro; Vassi, Emilia; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Zotou, Marianna

    2016-02-01

    Wound infusion with local anesthetics has been used for postoperative pain relief with variable results. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial examines the effect of ropivacaine infusion on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups. After induction of anesthesia a 75-mm catheter was inserted subcutaneously and connected to an elastomeric pump containing either 0.75% ropivacaine (ropivacaine group) or normal saline (control group) for 24 hours postoperatively. Before skin closure, each hole was infiltrated with 2 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine or normal saline according to randomization. Pain at rest, pain during cough, and analgesic consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit and at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Analgesic requirements and pain scores were recorded 1 and 3 months after surgery. The ropivacaine group reported less pain during cough (P=0.044) in the postanesthesia care unit (P=0.017) and 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.038). Ropivacaine wound infusion had no effect on late and chronic pain. PMID:26679680

  1. Overflow cascades in liquid-infused substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, I.; Wexler, J. S.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid-infused patterned surfaces offer a promising new platform for generating omniphobic surface coatings. However, the liquid infused in these surfaces is susceptible to shear-driven dewetting. Recent work [Wexler et al., "Shear-driven failure of liquid-infused surfaces," Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 168301 (2015)] has shown how the substrate pattern in these surfaces can be designed to exploit capillary forces in order to retain infused lubricants against the action of an immiscible shear flow. In this study, we explore the behavior of the infused lubricant when external shear causes the lubricant to overflow finite or "dead-end" surface features, resulting in either temporary or permanent lubricant loss. Microfluidic experiments illustrate how both geometry and chemical Marangoni stresses within liquid-infused surfaces generate an overflow cascade in which the lubricant escapes from the substrate and forms droplets on the surface, after which the droplets depin and are washed away by the external shear flow, allowing the overflow to repeat. General guidelines are developed to estimate the onset of the different stages of the cascade with the aim of providing additional robustness criteria for the design of future liquid-infused surfaces.

  2. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578

  3. Infusion pump development and implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul

    Infusion pumps are commonplace in today's healthcare settings and their design and development has kept pace with technology over the decades. In the 1970s and 1980s infusion pumps began to emerge in the UK market and were basic, mechanical devices with limited functions. Today, infusion pumps have a plethora of functions and features and a range of alarms to help alert the user and the patient that infusions are nearing completion, have ended or their range of sensors has detected that the infusion pump, or patient, requires attention. The role of the nurse in safely managing this ever-changing technology should not be underestimated. This paper reviews the progress made over the past 40 years in the UK healthcare setting and how the nurses have had to keep up to speed with the technology as it develops. It highlights the importance of fully integrating infusion pumps into intravenous (IV) therapy training and assessment. The important role the nurse plays is highlighted as well as exploring how he or she can help organisations better understand infusion pumps in the day-to-day management of patients undergoing intravenous therapy. PMID:26496875

  4. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C/sub 3/H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures.

  5. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I–III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  6. Safety of rapid intravenous of infusion acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Needleman, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Intravenous acetaminophen, Ofirmev®, is approved for management of mild to moderate pain, management of moderate to severe pain with adjunctive opioids, and reduction of fever. The product is supplied as a 100 mL glass vial. As stated in the prescribing information, it is recommended to be infused over 15 minutes. This recommendation is related to the formulation propacetamol, the prodrug to acetaminophen, approved in Europe, which caused pain on infusion, and data from the clinical development of acetaminophen. The objective of this retrospective chart review study was to show the lack of side effects of rapidly infusing intravenous acetaminophen. Charts of American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) Class I-III ambulatory surgical patients who received only acetaminophen in the preoperative setting were reviewed for any infusion-related side effects. Using standard binomial proportion analyses and employing SAS/JMP software, all vital signs were analyzed for statistically significant changes between pre- and postinfusion values. One hundred charts were reviewed. Only one patient had pain on infusion, which lasted 10 seconds. No reported side effects or erythema was seen at the injection site. No infusions had to be slowed or discontinued. The median infusion time was 3:41 minutes. Of the vital signs monitored, only the systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P < 0.0099) blood pressures had statistically significant changes from pre- to postinfusion; however, they were of no clinical relevance. Acetaminophen can be administered as a rapid infusion with no significant infusion-related side effects or complications. PMID:23814378

  7. Comparison between qualitative and semiquantitative catheter-tip cultures: laboratory diagnosis of catheter-related infection in newborns

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Camila; de Lourdes RS Cunha, Maria; Lyra, João C; Bentlin, Maria R; Batalha, Jackson EN; Sugizaki, Maria Fátima; Rugolo, Lígia MSS

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated semiquantitative and qualitative catheter-culture methods for diagnosis of catheter-related infection (CRI) in newborns. Catheter tips from newborns admitted to the Neonatal Unit of the University Hospital of the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP were included in the study. Catheter cultures were performed with both semiquantitative and qualitative techniques. For CRI diagnosis, microorganisms isolated from catheter cultures and from peripheral blood cultures were identified and submitted to agent susceptibility test. The gold standard was the certain CRI diagnosis when same microorganism (specie and profile of susceptibility to agents) was isolated from both catheter tips and peripheral blood culture. A total of 85 catheters from 63 newborns were included in the study. The semiquantitative culture method, despite presenting lower sensitivity (90%), showed higher specificity (71%) when compared to 100% of sensitivity and 60% of specificity in the qualitative method. The identification of the microorganisms obtained from the catheter cultures showed a prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) species. The specie Staphylococcus epidermidis (77.5%) was the prevalent in the catheters with positive semiquantitative cultures. Among 11 episodes with CRI diagnosis, 8 (72.7%) were associated with CNS species, of which 6 were S. epidermidis. Two episodes of CRI by S. aureus and one by Candida parapsilosis were also detected. The semiquantitative catheter-culture method showed advantages for CRI diagnosis in newborns when compared to the conservative qualitative method. PMID:24031213

  8. Recombinant human nerve growth factor for clinical trials: protein expression, purification, stability and characterisation of binding to infusion pumps.

    PubMed

    Allen, S J; Robertson, A G; Tyler, S J; Wilcock, G K; Dawbarn, D

    2001-02-26

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been suggested to be of therapeutic benefit to patients with Alzheimer's disease. One of the early changes in this disease is a loss of cholinergic function within the brain, and NGF is able to rescue cholinergic neurons both in vitro and in vivo. We describe the production of recombinant human beta-NGF (rhNGF), using baculovirus infection of insect cells; its purification, formulation and subsequent stability for use in clinical trials. Tests were also carried out to monitor release of protein from infusion pumps and catheters for intracerebroventricular administration (icv). Initial problems with non-specific binding were overcome using a blocking formula. PMID:11245895

  9. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  10. [Medium- and long-term use of central venous catheters in pediatrics. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Orfei, P; Pinto, G; Properzi, E; Piccardo, A; Cerroni, A; Prosperi, M; Cozzi, F

    1996-04-01

    From January 1992 to October 1994, 74 central venous catheters were inserted, in the University Hospital of Rome: Polyclinic Umberto I - "La Sapienza", in 62 paediatric patients (15.17 +/- 1.64 years old), admitted to the paediatric surgery division. The authors used a large amount of CVC: totally implanted devices (34 Groshong, 7 Broviac, 2 Hickman, 3 Port) and percutaneous catheters (28 Arrow). The choice of the infusional devices has been influenced by the length of the treatment, the primitive disease, the age and the size of the patient. The authors used totally implanted devices in paediatric patients undergoing chemotherapeutic and nutritional therapies. External central venous access devices were used in patients undergoing central catheterization lasting less than two months. The subclavian vein has been used as venous access in patients weighing > 5 kg, the internal jugular vein in < 5, kg patients. This work reports the early (PNX, hematomas, arterial access) and the long term complications (infections, accidental unthreading, occlusions and dislocations). We can say that the medium and long last term CVC is well tolerated and accepted in paediatric patients too, for antineoplastic, nutritional and infusion therapies. PMID:8984428

  11. Role of Catheter-directed Thrombolysis in Management of Iliofemoral Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, James X; Sudheendra, Deepak; Stavropoulos, S William; Nadolski, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The treatment for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is challenging, as the use of anticoagulation alone can be insufficient for restoring venous patency and thus lead to prolongation of acute symptoms and an increased risk of chronic complications, including venous insufficiency and postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). In these cases, earlier and more complete thrombus removal can ameliorate acute symptoms and reduce long-term sequelae. Endovascular therapies involving the use of pharmacologic, mechanical, and combined pharmacomechanical modalities have been developed to achieve these goals. The most frequently used of these techniques, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), involves the infusion of a thrombolytic agent through a multiple-side-hole catheter placed within the thrombosed vein to achieve high local doses and thereby break down the clot while minimizing systemic thrombolytic agent exposure. Randomized controlled trial results have indicated decreased PTS rates and improved venous patency rates in patients treated with CDT compared with these rates in patients treated with anticoagulation. The use of newer pharmacomechanical techniques, as compared with conventional CDT, reduces procedural times and thrombolytic agent doses and is the subject of ongoing investigations. Endovascular thrombus removal techniques offer a means to improve venous valvular function and decrease the risk of debilitating long-term complications such as PTS and are a promising option for treating patients with iliofemoral DVT. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618329

  12. Solid Tumor Embolotherapy in Hepatic Arteries with an Anti-reflux Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zelin; Jernigan, Shaphan; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Buckner, Gregory D

    2016-04-01

    Unresectable hepatoma accounts for the majority of malignant liver tumor cases for which embolization therapy is considered a viable treatment option. However, the potential risk of aberrant particle deposition in non-target regions could cause severe side-effects, alongside diminished efficacy. A computational model has been developed to analyze the particle-hemodynamics before and after deployment of an FDA-approved anti-reflux catheter. The catheter features a retractable, porous cone-like tip designed to allow forward blood flow while preventing microsphere reflux. A patient-specific hepatic artery system, with different daughter branches connected to a liver tumor, was chosen as a representative test bed. In vitro as well as in vivo measurements were used to validate the computer simulation model. The model captures the effect of tip-deployment on blood perfusion and pressure drop in an interactive manner under physiologically realistic conditions. A relationship between the pressure drop and embolization level was established, which can be used to provide clinicians with real-time information on the best infusion-stop point. However, the results show that the present procedure for embolization of downstream vessels which feed a tumor is quite arbitrary. Nevertheless, a method to recycle aberrant particles captured by the deployed tip was proposed to minimize side-effects. PMID:26265458

  13. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  14. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    PubMed

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas. PMID:2434670

  15. Risk Factors and Prevention of Guiding Catheter-induced Vasospasm in Neuroendovascular Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ISHIHARA, Hideaki; ISHIHARA, Shoichiro; NIIMI, Jun; NEKI, Hiroaki; KAKEHI, Yoshiaki; UEMIYA, Nahoko; KOHYAMA, Shinya; YAMANE, Fumitaka; KATO, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically-induced vasospasm often occurs during guiding catheter insertion, occasionally preventing catheter advancement to the desired location. Delicate manipulation would be impossible without the proper positioning of guiding catheters, and vasospasm-induced cerebral hypoperfusion may cause thrombotic complications. From June 2012 to December 2013, we prospectively analyzed 150 endovascular treatment cases, excluding acute cases, for the frequency of vasospasm, risk factors, and countermeasures. The associated risk factors such as the Japanese-style State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) score; anatomy and devices; and the efficacies of warm compresses, intra-arterial lidocaine/nicardipine, and tranquilizers were analyzed. Groups 1, 2, and 3 comprised 50 patients each with controls, tranquilizer administration, and prophylactic warm compresses/intra-arterial drug injection, respectively. Moderate or severe vasospasm was seen in approximately 40% patients in each group; however, severe vasospasm was absent in Group 3. Mild vasospasm-induced cerebral infarction occurred in one patient each in Groups 1 and 2. Vasospasm during diagnostic angiography [odds ratio (OR) = 10.63; P = 0.01], many ≥ 30° vessel curves [OR = 4.21; P = 0.01], and the high STAI score [OR = 1.84; P = 0.01] were risk factors for severe vasospasm. Although the relationship between anxiety and sympathetic tone remained unclear, tranquilizer administration relieved vasospasm. Warm compresses and the intra-arterial drug infusion were also useful for relieving vasospasm. Prophylactic measures such as a tranquilizer and warm compresses are expected to alleviate vasospasm; in addition, countermeasures such as the intra-arterial injection of lidocaine/nicardipine are effective. PMID:25739431

  16. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required. PMID:24847039

  17. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  18. [Catheter ablation of atrial flutter and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for atrial flutter based on studies demonstrating the role of the cavotricuspid isthmus. With a high rate of success and minimal complications, catheter ablation is the therapy of choice for patients with the common type of atrial flutter. Left atrial flutter, non-cavotricuspid isthmus dependent, and those associated with heart disease have a worst outcome with catheter ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has also emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a transseptal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this is the only curative method for these patients. PMID:12966653

  19. Radiographically guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Merriam, M A; Cronan, J J; Dorfman, G S; Lambiase, R E; Haas, R A

    1988-12-01

    We reviewed the outcome of guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections in 18 patients over a 5-year period. Catheter positioning was guided by fluoroscopy in 10 (56%) cases, CT in seven (39%), and sonography in one (6%). Included were 16 patients with empyemas and one each with a sterile hematoma and transudate. In nine of the patients, previous surgical chest tube drainage had been unsuccessful. The majority of collections were treated with a 12- or 14-French catheter and closed underwater seal drainage. Twelve (80%) of the 15 patients who had an adequate trial of guided drainage were cured. Propyliodone oil suspension contrast sinography after catheter placement showed two clinically unsuspected bronchopleural fistulas. Although an extensive multilocular pleural collection was a contraindication to percutaneous catheter drainage, the thick fibrous peel of a chronic empyema was not. Drainage of pleural fluid collections with radiographic guidance ensures proper catheter placement and is successful in a high percentage of cases. PMID:3055887

  20. The caprine abomasal microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasitism is considered the number one health problem in small ruminants. The barber's pole worm Haemonchus contortus infection in goats elicits a strong host immune response. However, the effect of the parasitic infection on the structure and function of the gut microbiome remains largely unknown....

  1. Two cases of central venous catheter-related thrombosis in living liver donors: how can the risk be minimized?

    PubMed

    Hata, Taigo; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Kim, Byeoknyeon; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Hayato; Arikawa, Takashi; Nagai, Shunji; Kamei, Hideya; Nakamura, Taro; Edamoto, Yoshihiro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya

    2009-01-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) is commonly used for intraoperative management by anesthetists and surgeons during major operations, including donor operations for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), in which donor safety is of utmost importance. Reasons for use of CVC for donors include measurement of central venous pressure and drug infusion when necessary. A potentially serious complication of a major operation is pulmonary thromboembolism. We report two cases of LDLT donors complicated by catheter related thrombosis (CRT) of the jugular vein, who were eventually discharged without long-term complications. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report of CRT among LDLT donor population. In this report, in order to minimize the risks related to CRT in LDLT donors, we propose thorough screening for thrombophilic disorders, use of a silicone or polyurethane double-lumen CVC as thin as possible, placement of the tip of the CVC at the superior vena cava via the right jugular vein using ultrasonography as a guide for puncture, and removal of the catheter at the end of the operation based on our experience of CRT among LDLT donors. PMID:19191817

  2. Epidural catheter with integrated light guides for spectroscopic tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Astorga, R. P.; West, S.; Putnis, S.; Hebden, J. C.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidural catheters are used to deliver anesthetics and opioids for managing pain in many clinical scenarios. Currently, epidural catheter insertion is performed without information about the tissues that are directly ahead of the catheter. As a result, the catheter can be incorrectly positioned within a blood vessel, which can cause toxicity. Recent studies have shown that optical reflectance spectroscopy could be beneficial for guiding needles that are used to insert catheters. In this study, we investigate the whether this technique could benefit the placement of catheters within the epidural space. We present a novel optical epidural catheter with integrated polymer light guides that allows for optical spectra to be acquired from tissues at the distal tip. To obtain an initial indication of the information that could be obtained, reflectance values and photon penetration depth were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and optical reflectance spectra were acquired during a laminectomy of a swine ex vivo. Large differences between the spectra acquired from epidural adipose tissue and from venous blood were observed. The optical catheter has the potential to provide real-time detection of intravascular catheter placement that could reduce the risk of complications. PMID:24298420

  3. Use of tunnelled catheters in haematological malignancy patients with neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sariosmanoglu, N; Uğurlu, B; Turgut, N H; Demirkan, F; Ozsan, H; Ergor, G; Gulay, Z; Hazan, E; Oto, O

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study analysed 83 patients (age 45 +/- 17 years) with haematological neoplasms, implanted with 93 tunnelled catheters, who were neutropenic or developed neutropenia during treatment. Catheters were implanted in the right (n = 82) or left (n = 11) jugular vein by the same surgical team using the same technique. They remained in place for 124 +/- 88 days: 29% were removed due to infection; 18% due to treatment termination and 2% due to mechanical problems. Seventeen patients died with catheters in place. At 30, 60, 90, 120 and 200 days mean catheter duration rates were 82%, 75%, 65%, 60% and 35%, respectively, and freedom from catheter removal due to infection was 92%, 88%, 80%, 77% and 67%, respectively. Patient diagnosis and history of previous catheter infection did not increase catheter infection risk, but patients undergoing stem cell transplantation had an increased infection risk. Tunnelled catheters can be used in high-risk patients with neutropenia. Systemic infections can be managed in most patients without catheter removal. PMID:18831907

  4. [Incidence and risk factors for infections from hemodialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Jean, G

    2001-01-01

    We report here a revue of hemodialysis catheter-related infections data published since 1985. The reported prevalence of bacteremia is 1 to 20% of catheters, and incidence is 0.72 to 9/1000 catheter-days. Local infection is reported in 6 to 63% of catheters and in 1 to 5/1000 catheter-days. Tunneled catheters and implantables chambers reported less infection rate. The most severe complication is endocarditis (4% rate). Death occurs in 8 to 20% of cases. Reported microbial data show that Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is responsible for most infections ahead of non-aureus Staphylococcus. SA skin colonisation is a risk factor for catheter colonisation and the first step of infection. On the other hand, the host immunity impairment in hemodialysis patients seems a significant risk factor. Iron overload, specially after blood transfusions, older age, diabetes mellitus, low serum albumin level, previous history of bacteremia and immunosuppressive treatment have been frequently involved. Other catheter-related factors are time of use, absence of tunnel and use for parenteral nutrition. Nurses plans, dressing type and frequency, nurses work experience are also important. In spite of recent progress in risk factor understanding, hemodialysis-related infection remains frequent. Multicentre studies are necessary to better evaluated care protocols and new catheter material. PMID:11811006

  5. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the options?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher C.K.; Khandasamy, Yugasaravanan; Singam, Praveen; Hong Goh, Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli M.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here another technique of dealing with a stuck and encrustated catheter, via direct crushing of the encrustations with a rigid cystoscope inserted through a suprapubic cystostomy tract. PMID:21483557

  6. Multifunctional Catheters Combining Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging and Electrophysiology Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan; Liu, Ruibin; Zhao, Jian Zhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Nguyen, Hien; Chia, Raymond; Dentinger, Aaron; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Kim, Kang; O’Donnell, Matthew; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre T.; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A family of 3 multifunctional intracardiac imaging and electrophysiology (EP) mapping catheters has been in development to help guide diagnostic and therapeutic intracardiac EP procedures. The catheter tip on the first device includes a 7.5 MHz, 64-element, side-looking phased array for high resolution sector scanning. The second device is a forward-looking catheter with a 24-element 14 MHz phased array. Both of these catheters operate on a commercial imaging system with standard software. Multiple EP mapping sensors were mounted as ring electrodes near the arrays for electrocardiographic synchronization of ultrasound images and used for unique integration with EP mapping technologies. To help establish the catheters’ ability for integration with EP interventional procedures, tests were performed in vivo in a porcine animal model to demonstrate both useful intracardiac echocardiographic (ICE) visualization and simultaneous 3-D positional information using integrated electroanatomical mapping techniques. The catheters also performed well in high frame rate imaging, color flow imaging, and strain rate imaging of atrial and ventricular structures. The companion paper of this work discusses the catheter design of the side-looking catheter with special attention to acoustic lens design. The third device in development is a 10 MHz forward-looking ring array that is to be mounted at the distal tip of a 9F catheter to permit use of the available catheter lumen for adjunctive therapy tools. PMID:18986948

  7. Particulate contaminants of intravenous medications and infusions.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, C M; Ball, P R; Booth, S; Kelshaw, M A; Potter, S R; McCollum, C N

    1987-04-01

    Particulate contamination in small volume parenteral medications has been studied and compared with that found in a selection of large volume infusions. Particle counts in 39 commonly used small volume medications and 7 large volume infusions were performed by an automated light blockage method (HIAC) or by optical microscopy. Based on these results and a random survey of drug therapy of intensive care patients, it is concluded that the contribution of intravenous medications to the total particle load received by such patients is likely to be many times greater than from infusion fluids. Until firm evidence regarding the harmful systemic effects of drug particles is available and the manufacturing regulations adjusted appropriately, final in-line filtration of infusions immediately proximal to the intravenous cannula should be considered when drugs are being given intravenously. PMID:2884285

  8. Conditioning Effects of Chronic Infusions of Dobutamine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chang-Seng; Tuttle, Ronald R.; Hood, William B.; Gavras, Haralambos

    1979-01-01

    We studied the conditioning effects of chronic infusion of dobutamine and exercise training in three groups of chronically instrumented dogs. One group was infused with normal saline, a second group was infused with dobutamine (40 μg/kg per min), and the third group was exercised on a treadmill at 4 mph, up a 10° incline. Each group was either infused or exercised for 2 h a day, 5 d a week for 5 consecutive wk. Resting heart rate and arterial blood lactate concentration, measured at weekly intervals, decreased progressively in the dobutamine and exercise groups, but not in the group that received normal saline infusion. Cardiovascular responses to submaximal treadmill exercise were not changed by 5 wk of normal saline infusion. However, the increases in heart rate, cardiac output, mean aortic blood pressure, arterial blood lactate, plasma renin activity, and norepinephrine concentration during exercise were significantly smaller after 5 wk of conditioning with either dobutamine or exercise training. After conditioning, the increases in arteriovenous oxygen difference during exercise were larger in the latter two groups, but the increases in total body oxygen consumption did not differ before and after conditioning. To assess ventricular function, we intravenously infused methoxamine both before and after conditioning. The slope of the line that related systolic aortic blood pressure and mean left atrial pressure increased in the animals conditioned with either dobutamine or exercise, indicating enhanced myocardial contractility. Left ventricular blood flow was lower in these two groups of animals than it was in the normal saline group. Left ventricular weight did not differ among the three groups. Our results show that chronic infusion of dobutamine produced cardiovascular and metabolic conditioning effects like those produced by exercise training, and further suggest that sympathetic stimulation during exercise plays a role in physical conditioning. PMID:457872

  9. [Perioperative infusion therapy in children].

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, K H; Kraus, G B

    1990-03-01

    An incorrect fluid therapy can lead to serious complications considerably more rapidly in children, especially in newborns and infants, than in adults. The pediatric patient has a limited range of compensation for maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Precise knowledge of the physiological age-dependent fluid balance, i.e. the large extracellular space, the developing renal function, the increased metabolism, the acid-base state, the electrolyte balance with the relatively higher sodium and chloride requirements must be the basis of an adequate fluid therapy. The basic fluid requirement (normal fluid and electrolyte requirement) varies with age and is influenced considerably by environmental conditions, body temperature and metabolism. For substitution of this basic fluid requirement one-third to one-half strength electrolyte solution in 5% dextrose is used, the amount depending on age. The perioperative fluid requirement, however, has to be calculated with due consideration for the characteristic changes in fluid and electrolyte balance during anaesthesia and surgery, the preoperative fasting period, drug effects of anesthetics, hormonal changes and ventilation; it is higher than the basic fluid requirement (infants 6-8 ml.kg-1.h-1, toddlers 4-6 ml.kg.h-1, schoolchildren 2-4 ml.kg-1.h-1). For intraoperative fluid therapy infusions with an increased sodium concentration (70-100 mmol/l) or Ringer's lactate (Na+ = 130 mmol/l) must be used. On no account must electrolyte-free solutions, e.g., 5-10% glucose, be used intraoperatively, as they can lead to water intoxication. The third-space requirements compensate for the additional losses by drainage, third-space deficits by evaporation and gastric and enteral secretions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2184693

  10. Influence of catheter orientation on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Sagerer-Gerhardt, Michaela; Weber, Helmut P

    2016-09-01

    Lesion sizes and quality are crucial for successful catheter ablation procedures. We sought to test the influence of catheter orientation towards the endocardial surface on lesion formation in bovine myocardium by using an open-irrigated laser ablation catheter. Continuous wave 1064-nm laser catheter applications at 15 W (4.5 W/mm²)/30 s, (135 J/mm²), irrigation flow 30 mL/min, were aimed at the left ventricular endocardial surface of bovine myocardium. The catheter was kept in vertical, in slanting (67.5°, 45°, 22.5°), and in flat positions; in flat position, also 60 s of radiation times were applied (n = 10, each). Lesions were evaluated morphometrically. Maximum depth of lesion was achieved with the catheter in a vertical orientation. Catheter inclination of <22.5 showed a highly significant decrease of lesion depth from 5.6 ± 1.1 to 3.7 ± 0.5 mm (p = 0.0001). In a flat catheter position, laser radiation of 30 s achieved the smallest lesions. However, after 60 s of radiation, the flat lesions were similar in depth (p = 087) and were larger in width (p = 0.0004) and in volumes (p = 0.0025) as compared to the lesions achieved with the catheter in vertical position after 30 s of radiation. Steam-pop with intramural cavitation or tissue vaporization with crater formation did not occur. Longer radiation times can achieve larger lesions regardless of catheter orientation. Catheter orientation is not a major determinant for laser ablation lesion size and quality, and a steerable support may not be needed when using the open-irrigated electrode-laser mapping and ablation (ELMA) catheter RytmoLas. PMID:27286865

  11. Onset Time and Durability of Huntingtin Suppression in Rhesus Putamen After Direct Infusion of Antihuntingtin siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Richard; Ge, Pei; Chen, Qingmin; Sutherland, Jessica E.; Zhang, Zhiming; Gash, Don M; Stiles, David K; Stewart, Gregory R; Sah, Dinah W Y; Kaemmerer, William F

    2015-01-01

    One possible treatment for Huntington's disease involves direct infusion of a small, interfering RNA (siRNA) designed to reduce huntingtin expression into brain tissue from a chronically implanted programmable pump. Here, we studied the suppression of huntingtin mRNA achievable with short infusion times, and investigated how long suppression may persist after infusion ceases. Rhesus monkeys received 3 days of infusion of Magnevist into the putamen to confirm catheter patency and fluid distribution. After a 1-week washout period, monkeys received radiolabeled siRNA targeting huntingtin. After 1 or 3 days of siRNA delivery, monkeys were either terminated, or their pumps were shut off and they were terminated 10 or 24 days later. Results indicate that the onset of huntingtin mRNA suppression in the rhesus putamen occurs rapidly, achieving a plateau throughout the putamen within 4 days. Conversely, loss of huntingtin suppression progresses slowly, persisting an estimated 27–39 days in the putamen and surrounding white matter. These findings indicate the rapid onset and durability of siRNA-mediated target gene suppression observed in other organs also occurs in the brain, and support the use of episodic delivery of siRNA into the brain for treatment of Huntington's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26125484

  12. Diuretic Agent and Normal Saline Infusion Technique for Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomies in Nondilated Pelvicaliceal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yagci, Cemil Ustuner, Evren Atman, Ebru Dusunceli; Baltaci, Sumer; Uzun, Caglar Akyar, Serdar

    2013-04-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) in a nondilated pelvicaliceal system is technically challenging. We describe an effective method to achieve transient dilatation of the pelvicaliceal system via induction of diuresis using infusion of a diuretic agent in normal saline, therefore allowing easier access to the pelvicaliceal system. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, the technique had been tested in 22 nephrostomies with nondilated system (a total of 20 patients with 2 patients having bilateral nephrostomies) during a 5-year period. Patients were given 40 mg of furosemide in 250 ml of normal saline solution intravenously by rapid infusion. As soon as maximum calyceal dilatation of more than 5 mm was observed, which is usually 15 min later after the end of rapid infusion, patients were positioned obliquely, and PCN procedure under ultrasound guidance was performed. The procedure was successful in 19 of the nephrostomies in 17 patients with a success rate of 86.36 % per procedure and 85 % per patient in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems. No major nephrostomy-, drug-, or technique-related complications were encountered. The technique failed to work in three patients due to the presence of double J catheters and preexisting calyceal perforation which avoided transient dilation of the pelvicaliceal system with diuresis. Diuretic infusion in saline is a feasible and effective method for PCN in nondilated pelvicaliceal systems.

  13. Polymer multilayers loaded with antifungal β-peptides kill planktonic Candida albicans and reduce formation of fungal biofilms on the surfaces of flexible catheter tubes.

    PubMed

    Raman, Namrata; Lee, Myung-Ryul; Palecek, Sean P; Lynn, David M

    2014-10-10

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen responsible for hospital-acquired infections. Most C. albicans infections are associated with the implantation of medical devices that act as points of entry for the pathogen and as substrates for the growth of fungal biofilms that are notoriously difficult to eliminate by systemic administration of conventional antifungal agents. In this study, we report a fill-and-purge approach to the layer-by-layer fabrication of biocompatible, nanoscale 'polyelectrolyte multilayers' (PEMs) on the luminal surfaces of flexible catheters, and an investigation of this platform for the localized, intraluminal release of a cationic β-peptide-based antifungal agent. We demonstrate that polyethylene catheter tubes with luminal surfaces coated with multilayers ~700nm thick fabricated from poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) can be loaded, post-fabrication, by infusion with β-peptide, and that this approach promotes extended intraluminal release of this agent (over ~4months) when incubated in physiological media. The β-peptide remained potent against intraluminal inoculation of the catheters with C. albicans and substantially reduced the formation of C. albicans biofilms on the inner surfaces of film-coated catheters. Finally, we report that these β-peptide-loaded coatings exhibit antifungal activity under conditions that simulate intermittent catheter use and microbial challenge for at least three weeks. We conclude that β-peptide-loaded PEMs offer a novel and promising approach to kill C. albicans and prevent fungal biofilm formation on surfaces, with the potential to substantially reduce the incidence of device-associated infections in indwelling catheters. β-Peptides comprise a promising new class of antifungal agents that could help address problems associated with the use of conventional antifungal agents. The versatility of the layer-by-layer approach used here thus suggests additional opportunities to

  14. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter. PMID:25547257

  15. Effects of the Infusion of 4% or 20% Human Serum Albumin on the Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation in Endotoxemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisa; Ince, Can; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea; Mocchegiani, Federico; Pelaia, Paolo; Provinciali, Mauro; Donati, Abele

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis-induced microcirculatory alterations contribute to tissue hypoxia and organ dysfunction. In addition to its plasma volume expanding activity, human serum albumin (HSA) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and may have a protective role in the microcirculation during sepsis. The concentration of HSA infused may influence these effects. We compared the microcirculatory effects of the infusion of 4% and 20% HSA in an experimental model of sepsis. Methods Adult male Wistar rats were equipped with arterial and venous catheters and received an intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, serotype O127:B8, 10 mg/kg over 30 minutes) or vehicle (SHAM, n = 6). Two hours later, endotoxemic animals were randomized to receive 10 mL/kg of either 4% HSA (LPS+4%HSA, n = 6), 20% HSA (LPS+20%HSA, n = 6) or 0.9% NaCl (LPS+0.9%NaCl, n = 6). No fluids were given to an additional 6 animals (LPS). Vessel density and perfusion were assessed in the skeletal muscle microcirculation with sidestream dark field videomicroscopy at baseline (t0), 2 hours after LPS injection (t1), after HSA infusion (t2) and 1 hour later (t3). The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were recorded. Serum endothelin-1 was measured at t2. Results MAP was stable over time in all groups. The microcirculatory parameters were significantly altered in endotoxemic animals at t1. The infusion of both 4% and 20% HSA similarly increased the perfused vessel density and blood flow velocity and decreased the flow heterogeneity to control values. Microvascular perfusion was preserved in the LPS+20%HSA group at t3, whereas alterations reappeared in the LPS+4%HSA group. Conclusions In a rat model of normotensive endotoxemia, the infusion of 4% or 20% HSA produced a similar acute improvement in the microvascular perfusion in otherwise unresuscitated animals. PMID:26942605

  16. Subcutaneous insulin infusion: change in basal infusion rate has no immediate effect on insulin absorption rate

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, P.; Birch, K.; Jensen, B.M.; Kuehl, C.

    1986-11-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were simultaneously given subcutaneous infusions (1.12 IU/h each) of /sup 125/I-labeled Actrapid insulin in each side of the abdominal wall. After 24 h of infusion, the size of the infused insulin depots was measured by external counting for 5 h. The basal infusion rate was then doubled in one side and halved in the other for the next 4 h. Finally, 1.12 IU/h of insulin was given in both sides of the abdominal wall for an additional 3 h. The changes in the size of the depots were measured, and the absorption rates for each hour were calculated. During the first 5 h of infusion, the depot size was almost constant (approximately 5 IU) with an absorption rate that equaled the infusion rate. Doubling the infusion rate led to a significant increase in depot size, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h, and only thereafter was a significant increase seen. When the infusion rate was reduced to the initial 1.12 IU/h, the absorption rate remained elevated during the next 3 h. Correspondingly, when the infusion rate was decreased, the depot size also decreased, but the absorption rate remained unchanged for the first 3 h. The results show that a change in the basal insulin infusion rate does not lead to any immediate change in the insulin absorption rate. This should be considered when planning an insulin-infusion program that includes alteration(s) in the basal-rate setting.

  17. Yttrium-90 Resin Microsphere Radioembolization Using an Antireflux Catheter: An Alternative to Traditional Coil Embolization for Nontarget Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Morshedi, Maud M. Bauman, Michael Rose, Steven C. Kikolski, Steven G.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeSerious complications can result from nontarget embolization during yttrium-90 (Y-90) transarterial radioembolization. Hepatoenteric artery coil embolization has been traditionally performed to prevent nontarget radioembolization. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved Surefire Infusion System (SIS) catheter, designed to prevent reflux, is an alternative to coils. The hypothesis that quantifiable SIS procedural parameters are comparable to coil embolization was tested.MethodsFourteen patients aged 36–79 years with colorectal, neuroendocrine, hepatocellular, and other predominantly bilobar hepatic tumors who underwent resin microsphere Y-90 radioembolization using only the SIS catheter (n = 7) versus only detachable coils (n = 7) for nontarget protection were reviewed retrospectively. Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, contrast dose, radiation dose, and cost were evaluated.ResultsMultivariate analysis identified significant cohort differences in the procedural parameters evaluated (F(10, 3) = 10.39, p = 0.04). Between-group comparisons of the pretreatment planning procedure in the SIS catheter group compared to the coil embolization group demonstrated a significant reduction in procedure time (102.6 vs. 192.1 min, respectively, p = 0.0004), fluoroscopy time (14.3 vs. 49.7 min, respectively, p = 0.0016), and contrast material dose (mean dose of 174.3 vs. 265.0 mL, respectively, p = 0.0098). Procedural parameters were not significantly different between the two groups during subsequent dose delivery procedures. Overall cost of combined first-time radioembolization procedures was significantly less in the SIS group ($4252) compared to retrievable coil embolization ($11,123; p = 0.001).ConclusionThe SIS catheter results in a reduction in procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast material dose and may be an attractive cost-effective alternative to detachable coil embolization for prevention of nontarget radioembolization.

  18. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  19. Stability of admixture containing morphine sulfate, bupivacaine hydrochloride, and clonidine hydrochloride in an implantable infusion system.

    PubMed

    Classen, Ashley M; Wimbish, Gary H; Kupiec, Thomas C

    2004-12-01

    Intrathecal infusion is often performed using drug combinations. This study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the admixture of morphine sulfate, bupivacaine hydrochloride, and clonidine hydrochloride when used in an implantable pump under simulated clinical use conditions. SynchroMed implantable pumps were filled with an admixture and incubated at 37 degrees C for a period of 90 days. Drug admixture stored in glass vials at 4 degrees C and at 37 degrees C served as controls. Samples which included pump reservoir and catheter delivered aliquots were collected every 30 days and analyzed for drug concentrations using a stability-indicating HPLC method. All drugs contained in the admixture were stable and the original concentrations remained greater than 96%. Over 90 days, and with the pump at the simulated body temperature of 37 degrees C, there were no evident heat catalyzed or device catalyzed reactions. PMID:15589086

  20. Catheter-Based Sensing In The Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouke, J. M.; Saunders, K. G.

    1988-04-01

    Studies attempting to define the role of the respiratory tract in heating and humidifying inspired air point to the need for sensing many variables including airway wall and airstream temperatures, humidity, and surface fluid pH and osmolarity. In order to make such measurements in vivo in human volunteers, catheter based technologies must be exploited both to assure subject safety and subject comfort. Miniturization of the electrodes or sensors becomes a top priority. This paper describes the use of thin-film microelectronic technology to fabricate a miniature, flexible sensor which can be placed directly onto the surface of the airway to measure the electrical conductance of the fluids present. From this information the osmolarity of the surface fluid was calculated. Physiologic evaluation of the device and corroboration of the calculations was performed in mongrel dogs. We also describe the successful application of current thermistor technology for the thermal mapping of the airways in humans in order to characterize the dynamic intrathoracic events that occur during breathing. The thermal probe consisted of a flexible polyvinyl tube that contained fourteen small thermistors fixed into the catheter. Data have been obtained in dozens of people, both normal subjects and asthmatic patients, under a variety of interventions. These data have substantively advanced the study of asthma, a particularly troublesome chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder.

  1. Engineering Considerations Of Catheters For Intravascular Ultrasonic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roy W.; Johnson, Christopher C.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanical properties of commonly used fluid transfusion or pressure monitoring catheters are similar to the properties required of catheters which include sensing devices. Consequently, bending and torsional stiffness of commercial catheters and tubes were measured at both room and body temperature. Five of these usually placed with the aid of fluoroscopy had an average Young's modulus of 5714x101 dyne/cm at 21°C which decreased 29% at body temperature; a shear modulus of 70.5x101 dyne/cm 4 at 21°C which decreased 13% at body temperature, and plastic deformation of 8% when loaded for 1 minute at 37°. Four of these were composed of a composite material. Catheters which are balloon directed during insertion had moduli values approximately 1/3 of these or less. The drag forces produced on balloons used on such catheters were measured for fluid velocities ranging from 10-50 cm/sec. Using this information the average force applied to a balloon throughout a cardiac cycle was calculated; values of 1280 dynes for a .6 ml balloon and 2490 dynes for a 1 ml balloon were found. The maximum wall thicknesses to catheter radii for single lumen catheters were determined for various material moduli which would allow the catheter tip to be directed by a balloon during its passage into the right heart.

  2. Device for Catheter Placement of External Ventricular Drain

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Jae-Min; Oh, Jae-Sang; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2016-01-01

    To introduce a new device for catheter placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This device was composed of three portions, T-shaped main body, rectangular pillar having a central hole to insert a catheter and an arm pointing the tragus. The main body has a role to direct a ventricular catheter toward the right or left inner canthus and has a shallow longitudinal opening to connect the rectangular pillar. The arm pointing the tragus is controlled by back and forth movement and turn of the pillar attached to the main body. Between April 2012 and December 2014, 57 emergency EVDs were performed in 52 patients using this device in the operating room. Catheter tip located in the frontal horn in 52 (91.2%), 3rd ventricle in 2 (3.5%) and in the wall of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle in 3 EVDs (5.2%). Small hemorrhage along to catheter tract occurred in 1 EVD. CSF was well drained through the all EVD catheters. The accuracy of the catheter position and direction using this device were 91% and 100%, respectively. This device for EVD guides to provide an accurate position of catheter tip safely and easily. PMID:27226870

  3. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated into... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment...

  6. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  7. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Feneley, Roger C. L.; Hopley, Ian B.; Wells, Peter N. T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0–2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  8. Diagnosis and Rescue of a Kinked Pulmonary Artery Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J.; Stein, Erica J.; Moran, Kenneth R.; Go, Michael R.; Papadimos, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hemodynamic monitoring with a pulmonary catheter has been relatively routine in cardiovascular and complex surgical operations as well as in the management of critical illnesses. However, due to multiple potential complications and its invasive nature, its use has decreased over the years and less invasive methods such as transesophageal echocardiography and hemodynamic sensors have gained widespread favor. Unlike these less invasive forms of hemodynamic monitoring, pulmonary artery catheters require an advanced understanding of cardiopulmonary physiology, anatomy, and the potential for complications in order to properly place, manage, and interpret the device. We describe a case wherein significant resistance was encountered during multiple unsuccessful attempts at removing a patient's catheter secondary to kinking and twisting of the catheter tip. These attempts to remove the catheter serve to demonstrate potential rescue options for such a situation. Ultimately, successful removal of the catheter was accomplished by simultaneous catheter retraction and sheath advancement while gently pulling both objects from the cannulation site. In addition to being skilled in catheter placement, it is imperative that providers comprehend the risks and complications of this invasive monitoring tool. PMID:26075106

  9. Intrapleural migration of a percutaneous transhepatic hemodialysis catheter.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Sharon W; Kerlan, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic catheters are a form of nonconventional access for patients requiring hemodialysis. We report a complication of these catheters which has not been previously described in the literature. The mechanism for intrapleural migration and a way to avoid this potential complication are discussed. PMID:21786242

  10. 21 CFR 870.2870 - Catheter tip pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... change in relation to changes in blood pressure. These changes are transmitted to accessory equipment for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter tip pressure transducer. 870.2870 Section... pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A catheter tip pressure transducer is a device incorporated...

  11. Urinary catheters: history, current status, adverse events and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Feneley, Roger C L; Hopley, Ian B; Wells, Peter N T

    2015-01-01

    For more than 3500 years, urinary catheters have been used to drain the bladder when it fails to empty. For people with impaired bladder function and for whom the method is feasible, clean intermittent self-catheterization is the optimal procedure. For those who require an indwelling catheter, whether short- or long-term, the self-retaining Foley catheter is invariably used, as it has been since its introduction nearly 80 years ago, despite the fact that this catheter can cause bacterial colonization, recurrent and chronic infections, bladder stones and septicaemia, damage to the kidneys, the bladder and the urethra, and contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance. In terms of medical, social and economic resources, the burden of urinary retention and incontinence, aggravated by the use of the Foley catheter, is huge. In the UK, the harm resulting from the use of the Foley catheter costs the National Health Service between £1.0-2.5 billion and accounts for ∼2100 deaths per year. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of an alternative indwelling catheter system. The research agenda is for the new catheter to be easy and safe to insert, either urethrally or suprapubically, to be retained reliably in the bladder and to be withdrawn easily and safely when necessary, to mimic natural physiology by filling at low pressure and emptying completely without damage to the bladder, and to have control mechanisms appropriate for all users. PMID:26383168

  12. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  13. Endovascular Removal of Long-Term Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Peter T.; Carter, Ranjana M.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-09-15

    Central venous catheters that have been in place for a long time can become fixed to the vein wall, making them impossible to pull out. Leaving them in situ is undesirable because of the risk that they could act as a nidus for thrombosis. Moreover, inserting new catheters alongside the old ones might compromise flow in the superior vena cava, further predisposing to thrombosis. Surgical removal is likewise undesirable, as this would necessitate thoracotomy with the attendant risks. We describe a novel technique, which we were able to use to remove retained long-term hemodialysis catheters in a patient who needed new catheters and who would have been a high-risk candidate for surgery. The right internal jugular vein was punctured adjacent to the site of insertion and a guide wire was used to form a snare, which was passed around the catheters and used to saw through the fibrous attachments to the vein wall. The midsection of one catheter could not be freed but the snare was used to cut off the proximal and distal ends, which could then be removed, the latter via the femoral vein. New catheters were then inserted via the left internal jugular vein. This technique enabled successful catheter extraction and replacement in a patient who would have been a poor candidate for cardiothoracic surgery.

  14. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  15. Intrameal Hepatic Portal and Intraperitoneal Infusions of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Reduce Spontaneous Meal Size in the Rat via Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann, Elisabeth B.; Arnold, Myrtha; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J.; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral administration of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 reduces food intake in animals and humans, but the sites and mechanism of this effect and its physiological significance are not yet clear. To investigate these issues, we prepared rats with chronic catheters and infused GLP-1 (0.2 ml/min; 2.5 or 5.0 min) during the first spontaneous dark-phase meals. Infusions were remotely triggered 2–3 min after meal onset. Hepatic portal vein (HPV) infusion of 1.0 or 3.0 (but not 0.33) nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced the size of the ongoing meal compared with vehicle without affecting the subsequent intermeal interval, the size of subsequent meals, or cumulative food intake. In double-cannulated rats, HPV and vena cava infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly. HPV GLP-1 infusions of 1.0 nmol/kg GLP-1 also reduced meal size similarly in rats with subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentations and in sham-operated rats. Finally, HPV and ip infusions of 10 nmol/kg GLP-1 reduced meal size similarly in sham-operated rats, but only HPV GLP-1 reduced meal size in subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation rats. These data indicate that peripherally infused GLP-1 acutely and specifically reduces the size of ongoing meals in rats and that the satiating effect of ip, but not iv, GLP-1 requires vagal afferent signaling. The findings suggest that iv GLP-1 infusions do not inhibit eating via hepatic portal or hepatic GLP-1 receptors but may act directly on the brain. PMID:18948395

  16. Timing of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A; Dejong, Cornelis H; van Eijck, Casper H; Fockens, Paul; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastrointestinal indication for hospital admission, and infected pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic necrosis is a potentially lethal complication. Current standard treatment of infected necrosis is a step-up approach, consisting of catheter drainage followed, if necessary, by minimally invasive necrosectomy. International guidelines recommend postponing catheter drainage until the stage of 'walled-off necrosis' has been reached, a process that typically takes 4 weeks after onset of acute pancreatitis. This recommendation stems from the era of primary surgical necrosectomy. However, postponement of catheter drainage might not be necessary, and earlier detection and subsequent earlier drainage of infected necrosis could improve outcome. Strong data and consensus among international expert pancreatologists are lacking. Future clinical, preferably randomized, studies should focus on timing of catheter drainage in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In this Perspectives, we discuss challenges in the invasive treatment of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, focusing on timing of catheter drainage. PMID:26956064

  17. Catheter Obstruction of Intrathecal Drug Administration System -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seok Myeon; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2012-01-01

    Intrathecal drug administration system (ITDAS) can reduce the side effects while increasing the effectiveness of opioids compared to systemic opioid administration. Therefore, the use of ITDAS has increased in the management of cancer pain and chronic intractable pain. Catheter obstruction is a serious complication of ITDAS. Here, we present a case of catheter obstruction by a mass formed at the side hole and in the lumen. A 37-year-old man suffering from failed back surgery syndrome received an ITDAS implantation, and the ITDAS was refilled with morphine every 3 months. When the patient visited the hospital 18 months after ITDAS implantation for a refill, the amount of delivered morphine sulfate was much less than expected. Movement of the pump rotor was examined with fluoroscopy; however, it was normal. CSF aspiration through the catheter access port was impossible. When the intrathecal catheter was removed, we observed that the side hole and lumen of the catheter was plugged. PMID:22259717

  18. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  19. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  20. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  1. Liver fluid collection in neonates and its association with the use of a specific umbilical vein catheter: Report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikas; Rahman, Asad; Tarawneh, Amjad; Sant'anna, Guilherme Mendes

    2011-01-01

    In newborns, the presence of liver fluid collection is a rare event. The reported cases are isolated or described over long periods. Within four months, five neonates were diagnosed with liver fluid collection from safety occurrence reports. Clinical, laboratory and radiological data were extracted from medical records. The definite diagnosis was made by ultrasound. Four of the patients were preterm, male and had very low birth weights. The osmolality of the infused solution was within the acceptable range. Investigations revealed that the use of a new brand of umbilical vein catheter introduced in the neonatal intensive care unit, one month before the first case, was associated with this cluster. Low positioning of the umbilical vein catheter tip appeared to be a second contributory factor. Neonatal practitioners may benefit from the present report when facing the occurrence of similar lesions. PMID:22211066

  2. Self-intoxication with morphine obtained from an infusion pump.

    PubMed

    Gock, S B; Wong, S H; Stormo, K A; Jentzen, J M

    1999-01-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male was found unresponsive by his wife. He had white foam around his mouth and was pronounced dead shortly thereafter. He had a history of back pain and was treated with intrathecal morphine because of his previous addiction to oral opiate medications. Because of crimping of the pump catheter, it was replaced 4 days before his death. Toxicological findings included urine screen positive for amitriptyline, nortriptyline, opiates, hydrocodone metabolites, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, caffeine, nicotine, and metabolite. Drug concentrations were as follows: blood, 0.260 mg/L amitriptyline, 0.160 mg/L nortriptyline, 0.460 mg/L unconjugated morphine, and 0.624 mg/L total morphine; vitreous humor, 0.034 mg/L unconjugated morphine and 0.080 mg/L total morphine; and cerebrospinal fluid, 0.099 mg/L unconjugated morphine and 0.095 mg/L total morphine. Shortly after death, the volume of the residual pump reservoir was only 8 mL instead of the expected 17 mL. Testing by the FDA showed that the pump was functional. The residual content of the pump accounted for only 230 mg instead of the expected 488 mg. The high blood-morphine concentrations did not correlate with the intrathecal infusion dose. The symptoms were consistent with opiate overdose, possibly by injection of morphine withdrawn from the pump reservoir. The cause of death was determined to be fatal morphine self-intoxication, and the manner of death was accidental. This case is intended to alert regulatory agencies, pain management health professionals, pathologists, and toxicologists to the abuse potential of one of the newer analgesic-delivery systems. PMID:10192419

  3. Infusion Methods for Continuous Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block for Postoperative Pain Control after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Gyeong Jo; Yoon, Ji Uk; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Seung Hoon; Ri, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Infusion methods during regional analgesia using perineural catheters may influence the quality of postoperative analgesia. This study was conducted to compare the effects of combined or bolus-only infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine on the postoperative analgesia in interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with perineural catheterization. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were divided into two groups, one that would receive a combined infusion (group C, n = 32), and one that would receive intermittent infusion (group I, n = 32). A perineural catheter was inserted into the interscalene brachial plexus (ISBP) using ultrasound (US) and nerve stimulation, and 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was administered. After the operation, group C received a continuous infusion of 4 ml/h, and a 4 ml bolus with a lockout interval of 60 min. Group I received only a 4 ml bolus, and the lockout interval was 30 min. Postoperative pain by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and the forearm muscle tone by the manual muscle test (MMT) were checked and evaluated at the following timepoints: preoperative, and postoperative 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. Supplemental opioid requirements, total consumed dose of local anesthetic, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Results Sixty-four patients completed the study and the postoperative values such as operation time, time to discharge, and operation site were comparable. There were no differences in NRS scores and supplemental opioid requirements between the two groups. The MMT scores of group I at 4 and 12 h after surgery were significantly higher than those of group C (P < 0.05). The total consumed dose of local anesthetic was significantly lower in group I than in group C (P < 0.05). The adverse effects were not different between the groups. Conclusions The bolus-only administration of 0.2% ropivacaine provided a similar analgesic effect with a lower total volume of local anesthetic and decreased

  4. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  5. [Continuous intrathecal infusion of baclofen. A new therapeutic method for spasticity].

    PubMed

    Berg-Johnsen, J; Røste, G K; Solgaard, T; Lundar, T

    1998-09-10

    Intrathecal administration of baclofen is now generally accepted as a powerful treatment of spasticity caused by spinal lesions. 35 patients with severe spasticity, 29 of spinal origin and six of supraspinal origin resistant to conservative treatment, had a programmable pump (Synchromed, Medtronic) for continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion implanted. The patients were followed-up for an average of 29 months (0-68). The initial effect of the treatment was positive for all patients; spasms were less frequent, there was remission of pain caused by cramps, and in some cases improved ambulation. In five patients, however, the pump was later removed: in two patients the pump ceased to be effective, two patients became infected, and one experienced multiple catheter problems. Problems with the catheter was the most common complication experienced, and this was seen in nine patients. Three patients died of the underlying disease. The majority of patients became accommodated to intrathecal baclofen and it was necessary to administer increasingly larger doses to maintain the clinical effect. Long-term control of spinal spasticity by intrathecal baclofen can be achieved in most patients, but close follow-up is necessary for assessing efficacy and refilling the pump. PMID:9772811

  6. Influence of Vancomycin Infusion Methods on Endothelial Cell Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous therapy is frequently used in routine hospital practice and, due to various factors, its most common side effect is phlebitis. The infusion of vancomycin is particularly associated with phlebitis despite its widespread use. French guidelines recommend central intravenous infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous therapy is often preferred in intensive care units. Methods of vancomycin infusion are either intermittent infusion or continuous infusion. A comparison of these methods under in vitro conditions simulating clinical use could result in better infusion efficacy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were therefore challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over a 24- to 72-h period using these infusion methods. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. Concentration-dependent and time-dependent vancomycin toxicity on HUVECs was noted with a 50% lethal dose at 5 mg/ml after 24 h, reaching 2.5 mg/ml after 72 h of infusion, simulating long-term infusion. This toxicity does not seem to be induced by acidic pH. In comparing infusion methods, we observed that continuous infusion induced greater cell toxicity than intermittent infusion at doses higher than 1 g/day. The increasing use of vancomycin means that new guidelines are required to avoid phlebitis. If peripheral intravenous therapy is used to reduce infusion time, along with intermittent infusion, vein irritation and localized phlebitis may be reduced. Further studies have to be carried out to explore the causes of vancomycin endothelial toxicity. PMID:25421476

  7. Comparison of Heparin-Coated and Conventional Split-Tip Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W. I. Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W.; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A.

    2009-07-15

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 {+-} 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 {+-} 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 {+-} 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 {+-} 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  8. Placement of tibial intraosseous infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Crawley, Geoffrey; Mabry, Robert; Mazuchowski, Edward

    2011-07-01

    Post-mortem preautopsy multidetector computed tomography was used to assess the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles in 52 cases of battlefield trauma deaths for which medical intervention included the use of the technique. In 58 (95%) of 61 needles, the tip was positioned in medullary bone. All 3 (5%) unsuccessful placements were in the left leg, and the needle was not directed perpendicular to the medial tibial cortex as recommended. Considering the nature of military trauma and the environmental conditions under which care is rendered, military medical personnel appear to be highly successful in the placement of tibial intraosseous infusion needles. PMID:22128726

  9. Cultural Congruence and Infusion Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Abitz, Tracey L

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cultural competence in every nursing practice setting in today's world cannot be understated. Unconscious bias can have detrimental effects on therapeutic relationships and health outcomes. Nursing models of cultural competence by Purnell, Leininger, and Campinha-Bacote are reviewed. The Kleinman Model and LEARN Model offer questions and guidelines to facilitate assessment of patients' understanding of illness and treatment. The Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice contains elements of diversity and cultural competence throughout. Self-reflection of one's own values, beliefs, biases, and practice as an infusion nurse will promote the development of cultural competence. PMID:26934161

  10. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM. PMID:22256282

  11. Our Experience with Left-Sided Abomasal Displacement Correction via the Roll-and-Toggle-Pin Suture Procedure according to Grymer/Sterner Model

    PubMed Central

    Zadnik, T.; Lombar, R.

    2011-01-01

    All over the world, and also in Slovenia, left-sided displacement of the abomasum (LDA) occurs most commonly in large-sized, high-producing adult dairy cows immediately after parturition. Yearly retrospective analyses of our ambulatory records showed significantly increased prevalence of LDA (2000 = 0.9%, 2010 = 3.7%), especially in cows after first parturition. Surgical replacement is now commonly practiced, and many techniques have been devised with emphasis on avoidance of recurrence of the displacement. Because of good results as recorded in the literature and encouragement of Keith E. Sterner, the author of this method, we want to try the right paramedian abomasopexy—Grymer/Sterner model. Since May 2009 till October 2011 109 cows from 46 farms were operated on because of LDA. As many as 44 (40.3%) were affected with LDA after first parturition. The analysis of successful procedure that was carried out 2 months after suture showed that 104 (95.4%) cows were cured. Only 5 (4.5%) cows died within 24 hours after surgery (4 cases of severe toxemia with hypokalemia and one case of acute abomasal hemorrhage were established). Our experience with Grymer/Sterner LDA transfixation sutures proved favorable. Because roll-and-toggle-pin suture technique is rapid and inexpensive we recommend it. PMID:23738100

  12. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  13. Hemodynamic and clinical response to three-day infusion of sulmazol (AR-L 115 BS) in severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Renard, M; Jacobs, P; Dechamps, P; Dresse, A; Bernard, R

    1983-10-01

    Sulmazol (AR-L 115 BS) is a new positively inotropic drug with arterial and venous vasodilating properties. We studied the effects of sulmazol (three-day infusion) on clinical tolerance, hemodynamics, and blood gas levels in ten patients with severe chronic heart failure. The hemodynamic monitoring included a Swan-Ganz catheter in the pulmonary artery and a radial catheter. Blood gas levels were determined on samples of arterial and mixed venous blood. After 24 hours of infusion, there was a significant increase in cardiac index (2 to 2.5 L/min/sq m; p less than 0.005) and a significant decrease in pulmonary wedge pressure (28 to 19 mm Hg; p less than 0.001) and in right atrial pressure (7 to 4 mm Hg; p less than 0.001) without significant changes in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These beneficial effects lasted during the three days of infusion. Oxygen delivery was significantly increased (350 to 443 ml/min/sq m; p less than 0.005) without significant change in arterial oxygen tension. The side effects included nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and mild thrombocytopenia. We conclude that sulmazol is a potent drug which may improve severely deteriorated left and right ventricular function in patients with chronic refractory heart failure without affecting the heart rate and the systolic blood pressure. PMID:6413136

  14. Magnetic Catheter Manipulation in the Interventional MRI Environment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark W.; Martin, Alastair B.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D.; Yee, Erin J.; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional MRI environment. Materials and Methods Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3 – 3.0 Fr microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (solenoid) and saddle-shaped (Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5T clinical MRI scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane utilizing a “real-time” steady-state free precession (SSFP) MRI sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. Results The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Conclusion Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multi-axis coil tipped catheters in the MRI environment. PMID:23707097

  15. Bacteria on Catheters in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, Maria; Davies, Julia R.; Johansson, Ann-Cathrine; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritonitis is the leading cause of morbidity for peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and microbial biofilms have previously been identified on catheters from infected patients. However, few studies of catheters from patients without clinical signs of infection have been undertaken. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which bacteria are present on catheters from PD patients with no symptoms of infection. ♦ Methods: Microbiologic culturing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to determine the distribution of bacteria on PD catheters from 15 patients without clinical signs of infection and on catheters from 2 infected patients. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing technique was used to identify cultured bacteria. ♦ Results: Bacteria were detected on 12 of the 15 catheters from patients without signs of infection and on the 2 catheters from infected patients. Single-species and mixed-microbial communities containing up to 5 species were present on both the inside and the outside along the whole length of the colonized catheters. The bacterial species most commonly found were the skin commensals Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes, followed by S. warneri and S. lugdunensis. The strains of these micro-organisms, particularly those of S. epidermidis, varied in phenotype with respect to their tolerance of the major classes of antibiotics. ♦ Conclusions: Bacteria were common on catheters from patients without symptoms of infection. Up to 4 different bacterial species were found in close association and may represent a risk factor for the future development of peritonitis in patients hosting such micro-organisms. PMID:22855889

  16. Videolaparoscopic Catheter Placement Reduces Contraindications to Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Stefano; Zeiler, Matthias; Monteburini, Tania; Agostinelli, Rosa Maria; Marinelli, Rita; Degano, Giorgio; Ceraudo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Videolaparoscopy is considered the reference method for peritoneal catheter placement in patients with previous abdominal surgery. The placement procedure is usually performed with at least two access sites: one for the catheter and the second for the laparoscope. Here, we describe a new one-port laparoscopic procedure that uses only one abdominal access site in patients not eligible for laparotomic catheter placement. ♦ Method: We carried out one-port laparoscopic placement in 21 patients presenting contraindications to blind surgical procedures because of prior abdominal surgery. This technique consists in the creation of a single mini-laparotomy access through which laparoscopic procedures and placement are performed. The catheter, rectified by an introducer, is inserted inside the port. Subsequently, the port is removed, leaving the catheter in pelvic position. The port is reintroduced laterally to the catheter, confirming or correcting its position. Laparotomic placement was performed in a contemporary group of 32 patients without contraindications to blind placement. Complications and long-term catheter outcome in the two groups were evaluated. ♦ Results: Additional interventions during placement were necessary in 12 patients of the laparoscopy group compared with 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.002). Laparoscopy documented adhesions in 13 patients, with need for adhesiolysis in 6 patients. Each group had 1 intraoperative complication: leakage in the laparoscopy group, and intestinal perforation in the laparotomy group. During the 2-year follow-up period, laparoscopic revisions had to be performed in 6 patients of the laparoscopy group and in 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.26). The 1-year catheter survival was similar in both groups. Laparoscopy increased by 40% the number of patients eligible to receive peritoneal dialysis. ♦ Conclusions: Videolaparoscopy placement in patients not eligible for blind surgical

  17. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  18. Thromboresistance Characterization of Extruded Nitric Oxide-Releasing Silicone Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Amoako, Kagya A.; Archangeli, Christopher; Handa, Hitesh; Major, Terry; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Annich, Gail M.; Bartlett, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheters used in clinical practice can activate platelets, leading to thrombus formation and stagnation of blood flow. Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing polymers have been shown previously to reduce clot formation on a number of blood contacting devices. In this work, trilaminar NO-releasing silicone catheters were fabricated and tested for their thrombogenicity. All catheters had specifications of L = 6 cm, inner diameter = 21 gauge (0.0723 cm), outer diameter = 12 gauge (0.2052 cm), and NO-releasing layer thickness = 200 ± 11 μm. Control and NO-releasing catheters were characterized in vitro for their NO flux and NO release duration by gas phase chemiluminescence measurements. The catheters were then implanted in the right and left internal jugular veins of (N = 6 and average weight = 3 kg) adult male rabbits for 4 hours thrombogenicity testing. Platelet counts and function, methemoglobin (metHb), hemoglobin (Hb), and white cell counts and functional time (defined as patency time of catheter) were monitored as measured outcomes. Nitric oxide-releasing catheters (N = 6) maintained an average flux above (2 ± 0.5) × 10−10 mol/min/cm2 for more than 24 hours, whereas controls showed no NO release. Methemoglobin, Hb, white cell, and platelet counts and platelet function at 4 hours were not significantly different from baseline (α = 0.05). However, clots on controls were visibly larger and prevented blood draws at a significantly (p < 0.05) earlier time (2.3 ± 0.7 hours) into the experiment, whereas all NO-releasing catheters survived the entire 4 hours test period. Results indicate that catheter NO flux levels attenuated thrombus formation in a short-term animal model. PMID:22395119

  19. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  20. A comprehensive review of clinical nurse specialist-led peripherally inserted central catheter placement in Korea: 4101 cases in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yun; Kim, Hyun Lim

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are expected to be convenient and reliable venous access devices. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical nurse specialist (CNS)-led PICC placement and to describe its growth in a tertiary hospital. A computerized database identified 3508 patients who had PICCs placed between November 2001 and June 2010. One thousand, eight hundred ninety-eight of the 4101 PICCs were available for complete follow-up, and 791 of 1898 PICCs were still in place. The mean dwell time of 1898 PICCs was 27.4 days (1∼422 days). Most PICCs were removed after the completion of infusion therapy; the remainder were removed following death, occlusion, suspected infection, or phlebitis, or were removed by the patient. The study found that CNS-led PICC placement for infusion therapies was effective and safe with relatively low complication rates and that CNSs played important roles in the increased use of PICCs. PMID:25723834

  1. "The home infusion patient": patient profiles for the home infusion therapy market.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, K W; Powers, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors review the relevant literature regarding home health care patient profiles. An empirical analysis is provided from archival data for a home infusion company servicing patients in urban and rural areas. The results are provided as a 2 x 2 matrix for patients in urban and rural areas seeing either a specialist or primary care physicians. A series of moderated regressions indicate that type of treating physician, patient's gender, geographic residence and level of acuity are cogent in predicting the complexity of prescribed infusion therapies. Managerial implications are provided for the home care marketer in segmenting patient markets for infusion services. PMID:10538737

  2. Catheter Related Escherichia hermannii Sepsis in a Haemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Lommer Kristensen, Peter; Schrøder Hansen, Dennis; Brandi, Lisbet

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia hermannii is an extremely rare etiological agent of invasive infection, and thus, the bacterium was initially considered non-pathogenic. However, in five previously reported case reports E. hermannii has been implicated as the sole pathogen. Our case report describes blood stream infection with E. hermannii in a haemodialysis patient with persisting symptoms, high fever and inflammatory markers despite appropriate antibiotic treatment until replacement of the dialysis catheter. We suspect biofilm formation to be a crucial pathogenic feature for E. hermannii in the maintenance of an infection, which stresses the necessity of antibiotic treatment along with catheter replacement in bloodstream- and catheter-related infection with E. hermannii. PMID:27006723

  3. Ion beam sputter-etched ventricular catheter for hydrocephalus shunt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A cerebrospinal fluid shunt in the form of a ventricular catheter for controlling the condition of hydrocephalus by relieving the excessive cerebrospinal fluid pressure is described. A method for fabrication of the catheter and shunting the cerebral fluid from the cerebral ventricles to other areas of the body is also considered. Shunt flow failure occurs if the ventricle collapse due to improper valve function causing overdrainage. The ventricular catheter comprises a multiplicity of inlet microtubules. Each microtubule has both a large openings at its inlet end and a multiplicity of microscopic openings along its lateral surfaces.

  4. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  5. Malposition of Subclavian Venous Catheter Leading to Chest Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amarjit; Sidhu, Kuldeep Singh; Kaur, Avleen

    2016-01-01

    Although Central Venous Catheter (CVC) placement is a relatively simple procedure but its insertion and maintenance are associated with significant risks. Malposition (defined as any CVC tip position outside the superior vena cava) may be associated with catheter insertion and may require immediate intervention. It may result in complications like haemothorax, pleural effusions, pneumothorax, sepsis, thrombosis and cardiac tamponade. This case report presents timely detection of the complication after placement of CVC. Everyone should be aware of the complications and monitor consistently appropriate position of catheter tips.

  6. Spiculated Bladder Calculi: The Culprit for Repeated Catheter Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wek, C.; Fox, T. P.; Muir, G. H.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the case of a frustrated 90-year-old gentleman who was seen in the Accident and Emergency department for the third time in four days with failure of his long-term urethral catheter. He reported that the catheter simply “fell out” with the balloon deflated. On each occasion previously, the catheter had been reinserted in A&E and the patient discharged home. These repeated visits to A&E were understandably a source of much frustration for the patient and his family. On the third presentation, plain abdominal radiography demonstrated a large spiculated bladder calculus. PMID:23984173

  7. Catheterization in the community: converting to the Foley catheter tray.

    PubMed

    Yates, Ann

    2011-11-01

    With the aim of minimizing clinical incidents and improving clinical practice, the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board carried out a trial of a Foley catheter tray to be carried by district nurses as emergency boot stock. As part of the trial all nurses had to undergo training on the Foley catheter tray prior to use. The district nurses using the tray reported improvement in confidence, efficiency, convenience and patient experience. Owing to the success of the initiative, use of the Foley catheter tray as emergency boot stock is now standard practice for District Nursing/Acute Response and out-of-hours care in the Cardiff and Vale area. PMID:22067568

  8. Hemiballismus as a complication of an intratumoral chemotherapy catheter.

    PubMed

    Zuccarelli, Britton; Aalbers, Brian; Grabb, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We report an unusual case of delayed bilateral, right greater than left hemiballismus in a 15-year-old female patient with a history of a craniopharyngioma 2years following the insertion of a right intratumoral chemotherapy catheter. Following cyst decompression, the catheter was found to have changed position, traversing the basal ganglia structures, namely the right subthalamic nucleus. Her movement disorder near-completely resolved immediately following removal of the catheter. A review of the current literature and proposed pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:26964474

  9. Splanchnic net balance of oxygen and metabolites in response to a discontinuous mesenteric vein infusion of ammonium in sheep.

    PubMed

    Recavarren, M I; Milano, G D

    2013-12-01

    To simulate daily episodes of high absorption associated with the intake of diets with high N content, four wethers (42 ± 3.4 kg body weight), fitted with permanent catheters in the femoral artery and splanchnic vessels, were infused with 340 μmol into the mesenteric vein for 3 h, during the morning meal, over seven consecutive days. On the 7th day, mass transfers of , urea, glucose, lactate, ß-OH-butyrate and O2 were measured across portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver and splanchnic tissues during the last 90 min of the infusion. Measurements were repeated on the following day, at the same time, without the infusion. Plasma concentration in the portal vein (+332 μm; p = 0.006), portal absorption (+424 μmol/min; p < 0.001), liver uptake (+375 μmol/min; p = 0.003) and urea N production (+338 μmol/min; p = 0.059) were higher during infusion. Mass transfers of urea, glucose, lactate, ß-OH-butyrate and O2 across the PDV, and glucose, lactate, ß-OH-butyrate and O2 across the liver, were not altered by the infusion. Results suggest that a daily, discontinuous increase in portal flow during a meal stimulates liver removal and urea N production but does not significantly affect liver glucose production and O2 consumption in sheep. PMID:23005900

  10. Percutaneous Untying of a Knot in a Retained Swan-Ganz Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Waqar A.; Sinha, Sankar; Rowlands, Peter

    2000-03-15

    A patient was referred to us with a tightly knotted Swan-Ganz catheter. The catheter could not be removed by conventional simple methods. We describe a minimally invasive means of removal of the catheter using an Amplatz gooseneck snare and an angioplasty balloon. This allowed the catheter to be removed without trauma.

  11. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  12. The NASA SARP Software Research Infusion Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrence; Feather, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the NASA Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) research infusion projects is shown. The topics include: 1) Background/Motivation; 2) Proposal Solicitation Process; 3) Proposal Evaluation Process; 4) Overview of Some Projects to Date; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  13. A Telecommunications-Infused Community Action Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Thomas; Puma, Jessica

    1996-01-01

    The Nonprofit Prophets, a telecommunications-infused community action project, was designed for high school students. Students were teamed with a nonprofit organization and produced videoconferences or Web sites for them. Although specific skills were acquired, students also gained confidence and self-esteem as well as a belief that they…

  14. Infusing Earth Systems Concepts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Boyd, Sally

    The Program for Leadership in Earth Systems Education (PLESE), a teacher enhancement program sponsored by the National Science Foundation in 1990-94, was a coordinated effort to infuse Earth Systems concepts throughout the K-12 science curriculum across the United States. Characteristics of the program are reviewed in this paper and the results of…

  15. Multiple Intravenous Infusions Phase 1b

    PubMed Central

    Cassano-Piché, A; Fan, M; Sabovitch, S; Masino, C; Easty, AC

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimal research has been conducted into the potential patient safety issues related to administering multiple intravenous (IV) infusions to a single patient. Previous research has highlighted that there are a number of related safety risks. In Phase 1a of this study, an analysis of 2 national incident-reporting databases (Institute for Safe Medical Practices Canada and United States Food and Drug Administration MAUDE) found that a high percentage of incidents associated with the administration of multiple IV infusions resulted in patient harm. Objectives The primary objectives of Phase 1b of this study were to identify safety issues with the potential to cause patient harm stemming from the administration of multiple IV infusions; and to identify how nurses are being educated on key principles required to safely administer multiple IV infusions. Data Sources and Review Methods A field study was conducted at 12 hospital clinical units (sites) across Ontario, and telephone interviews were conducted with program coordinators or instructors from both the Ontario baccalaureate nursing degree programs and the Ontario postgraduate Critical Care Nursing Certificate programs. Data were analyzed using Rasmussen’s 1997 Risk Management Framework and a Health Care Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Results Twenty-two primary patient safety issues were identified with the potential to directly cause patient harm. Seventeen of these (critical issues) were categorized into 6 themes. A cause-consequence tree was established to outline all possible contributing factors for each critical issue. Clinical recommendations were identified for immediate distribution to, and implementation by, Ontario hospitals. Future investigation efforts were planned for Phase 2 of the study. Limitations This exploratory field study identifies the potential for errors, but does not describe the direct observation of such errors, except in a few cases where errors were observed. Not all

  16. 21 CFR 526.1590 - Novobiocin infusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... strains of Staphylococcus aureus. (iii) Limitations. Do not milk for at least 6 hours after treatment... is used in dry cows for the treatment of mastitis caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. (iii) Limitations. Infuse each quarter at the time of drying...

  17. Infusing Catholic Identity throughout the Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amata

    2011-01-01

    This article, originally presented as a plenary address at the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities 2011 Annual Meeting, addresses a bottom-up methodology for infusing the spirit of Catholic identity more deeply throughout a campus community. The author begins with an exploration of some theoretical underpinnings of this approach and…

  18. Propofol Infusion Syndrome in Refractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Woo Sub; Gwak, Hye Min; Seo, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Propofol is used for treating refractory status epilepticus, which has high rate of mortality. Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but often fatal syndrome, characterized by lactic acidosis, lipidemia, and cardiac failure, associated with propofol infusion over prolonged periods of time. We investigated the clinical factors that characterize propofol infusion syndrome to know the risk of them in refractory status epilepticus. Methods: This retrospective observation study was conducted in Samsung medical center from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2009. Thirty two patients (19 males, 13 females, aged between 16 and 64 years), with refractory status epilepsy were included. Their clinical findings and treatment outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. We divided our patients into established status epilepticus (ESE) and refractory status epilepticus (RSE). And then the patients with RSE was further subdivided into propofol treatment group (RSE-P) and the other anesthetics treatment group (RSE-O). We analyzed the clinical characteristics by comparison of the groups. Results: There were significant differences of hypotension and lipid change between ESE and RSE (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between RSE-P and RSE-O groups. The hospital days were longer in RSE than in ESE (p=0.012) and treatment outcome was also worse in RSE than in ESE (p=0.007) but there were no significant differences of hospital stays and treatment outcome between RSE-P and RSE-O. Conclusions: RSE is very critical disease with high mortality, which may show as many clinical changes as propofol infusion syndrome. Therefore propofol infusion syndrome might be considered as one of the clinical manifestations of RSE. PMID:24649467

  19. Infusion fluids contain harmful glucose degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Bryland, Anna; Broman, Marcus; Erixon, Martin; Klarin, Bengt; Lindén, Torbjörn; Friberg, Hans; Wieslander, Anders; Kjellstrand, Per; Ronco, Claudio; Carlsson, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Glucose degradation products (GDPs) are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that cause cellular damage and inflammation. We examined the content of GDPs in commercially available glucose-containing infusion fluids and investigated whether GDPs are found in patients’ blood. Methods The content of GDPs was examined in infusion fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. To investigate whether GDPs also are found in patients, we included 11 patients who received glucose fluids (standard group) during and after their surgery and 11 control patients receiving buffered saline (control group). Blood samples were analyzed for GDP content and carboxymethyllysine (CML), as a measure of AGE formation. The influence of heat-sterilized fluids on cell viability and cell function upon infection was investigated. Results All investigated fluids contained high concentrations of GDPs, such as 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG). Serum concentration of 3-DG increased rapidly by a factor of eight in patients receiving standard therapy. Serum CML levels increased significantly and showed linear correlation with the amount of infused 3-DG. There was no increase in serum 3-DG or CML concentrations in the control group. The concentration of GDPs in most of the tested fluids damaged neutrophils, reducing their cytokine secretion, and inhibited microbial killing. Conclusions These findings indicate that normal standard fluid therapy involves unwanted infusion of GDPs. Reduction of the content of GDPs in commonly used infusion fluids may improve cell function, and possibly also organ function, in intensive-care patients. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-1873-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20397009

  20. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410