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Sample records for aboriginal cardiac patients

  1. Factors influencing health care utilisation among Aboriginal cardiac patients in central Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians suffer from poorer overall health compared to the general Australian population, particularly in terms of cardiovascular disease and prognosis following a cardiac event. Despite such disparities, Aboriginal Australians utilise health care services at much lower rates than the general population. Improving health care utilisation (HCU) among Aboriginal cardiac patients requires a better understanding of the factors that constrain or facilitate use. The study aimed to identify ecological factors influencing health care utilisation (HCU) for Aboriginal cardiac patients, from the time of their cardiac event to 6–12 months post-event, in central Australia. Methods This qualitative descriptive study was guided by an ecological framework. A culturally-sensitive illness narrative focusing on Aboriginal cardiac patients’ “typical” journey guided focus groups and semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal cardiac patients, non-cardiac community members, health care providers and community researchers. Analysis utilised a thematic conceptual matrix and mixed coding method. Themes were categorised into Predisposing, Enabling, Need and Reinforcing factors and identified at Individual, Interpersonal, Primary Care and Hospital System levels. Results Compelling barriers to HCU identified at the Primary Care and Hospital System levels included communication, organisation and racism. Individual level factors related to HCU included language, knowledge of illness, perceived need and past experiences. Given these individual and health system barriers patients were reliant on utilising alternate family-level supports at the Interpersonal level to enable their journey. Conclusion Aboriginal cardiac patients face significant barriers to HCU, resulting in sub-optimal quality of care, placing them at risk for subsequent cardiovascular events and negative health outcomes. To facilitate HCU amongst Aboriginal people, strategies must be implemented

  2. Exploring the impact of an Aboriginal Health Worker on hospitalised Aboriginal experiences: lessons from cardiology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kate P; Thompson, Sandra C; Smith, Julie S; Dimer, Lyn; Ali, Mohammed; Wood, Marianne M

    2009-11-01

    To enhance Aboriginal inpatient care and improve outpatient cardiac rehabilitation utilisation, a tertiary hospital in Western Australia recruited an Aboriginal Health Worker (AHW). Interviews were undertaken with the cardiology AHW, other hospital staff including another AHW, and recent Aboriginal cardiac patients to assess the impact of this position. The impact of the AHW included facilitating culturally appropriate care, bridging communication divides, reducing discharges against medical advice, providing cultural education, increasing inpatient contact time, improving follow-up practices and enhancing patient referral linkages. Challenges included poor job role definition, clinical restrictions and limitations in AHW training for hospital settings. This study demonstrates that AHWs can have significant impacts on Aboriginal cardiac inpatient experiences and outpatient care. Although this study was undertaken in cardiology, the lessons are transferable across the hospital setting. PMID:20166903

  3. Anaesthesia for aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed

    Howe, P W; Condon, J R; Goodchild, C S

    1998-02-01

    This prospective study was designed to describe problems that arise when Aboriginal people undergo anaesthesia, in order to develop guidelines for anaesthetists who are not accustomed to treating Aboriginal people. Data were collected on 1122 consecutive different individuals undergoing anaesthesia at Royal Darwin Hospital, 24.5% of whom described themselves as Aboriginal. Aboriginal patients were in a poorer physiological state than were non-Aboriginal patients. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus, renal disease and rheumatic heart disease reported in Aboriginal patients was very high. Communication difficulties were more commonly reported in Aboriginal patients; the most common difficulty was apparent shyness or fear, rather than actual language difficulty. The results suggest that the treatment of Aboriginal people involves diagnosis and management of diverse preoperative medical problems, and that better management may be achieved by learning simple cultural strategies and by adding Aboriginal interpreters and health workers to the anaesthetic team. PMID:9513674

  4. Imaging patients with cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Gutierrez, Fernando R; Marmol-Velez, Juan A; Ocazionez, Daniel; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, trauma is the leading cause of death among those who are 1-44 years old, with cardiovascular injuries representing the second most common cause of traumatic death after central nervous system injuries. Evaluation of trauma patients with suspected cardiac injury may be complex and include electrocardiography, measurement of cardiac biomarkers, and imaging examinations. Contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most valuable imaging tools available for evaluating hemodynamically stable patients with suspected cardiac injury. The presence of hemopericardium, with or without cardiac tamponade, is one of the most significant findings of cardiac injury. Other complications that result from blunt cardiac injury, such as pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation, may be readily depicted at multidetector CT. Assessment of patients with cardiac injuries, particularly those with penetrating injuries, is a challenging and time-critical matter, with clinical and imaging findings having complementary roles in the formation of an accurate diagnosis. Patients who are hemodynamically stable, particularly those with penetrating cardiac injuries, also may benefit from a timely imaging examination. In addition to chest radiography, other available modalities such as transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging may play a role in selected cases. PMID:22582351

  5. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  6. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the “costly” crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  7. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the "costly" crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  8. The cardiac patient in Ramadan

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  9. The cardiac patient in Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting. PMID:27144139

  10. Utility of cardiac troponins in patients with suspected cardiac trauma or after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E

    1997-12-01

    Detection of cardiac injury after blunt chest wall trauma or cardiac surgery is problematic. Previously available biomarkers have been hindered largely by limitations of specifity for myocardial damage. Both cardiac troponin I and T have been evaluated in these patient subgroups. While many questions remain unanswered, it appears that measurement of troponin proteins will facilitate patient care in these difficult situations. PMID:9439875

  11. Are the processes recommended by the NHMRC for improving Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people being implemented?: an assessment of CR Services across Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of premature death of Indigenous Australians, and despite evidence that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and secondary prevention can reduce recurrent disease and deaths, CR uptake is suboptimal. The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) guidelines Strengthening Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, published in 2005, provide checklists for services to assist them to reduce the service gap for Indigenous people. This study describes health professionals' awareness, implementation, and perspectives of barriers to implementation of these guidelines based on semi-structured interviews conducted between November 2007 and June 2008 with health professionals involved in CR within mainstream health services in Western Australia (WA). Twenty-four health professionals from 17 services (10 rural, 7 metropolitan) listed in the WA Directory of CR services were interviewed. Results The majority of respondents reported that they were unfamiliar with the NHMRC guidelines and as a consequence implementation of the recommendations was minimal and inconsistently applied. Respondents reported that they provided few in-patient CR-related services to Indigenous patients, services upon discharge were erratic, and they had few Indigenous-specific resources for patients. Issues relating to workforce, cultural competence, and service linkages emerged as having most impact on design and delivery of CR services for Indigenous people in WA. Conclusions This study has demonstrated limited awareness and poor implementation in WA of the recommendations of the NHMRC Strengthening Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: A Guide for Health Professionals. The disproportionate burden of CVD morbidity and mortality among Indigenous Australians mandates urgent attention to this problem and alternative approaches to CR

  12. Scleroderma in Australian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, J; Beroukas, D; Walker, J G; Smith, M D; Ahern, M J; Roberts-Thomson, P J

    2005-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) has not been reported before in Australian Aborigines. We describe in detail a community middle-aged Aboriginal woman whose diffuse scleroderma terminated fatally with a renal crisis. Moreover, we have identified a further five Aboriginal patients on the South Australian Scleroderma Register (two with diffuse, two with limited and one with overlap scleroderma), a number consistent with that expected from the 2001 census data for our state. However, an analysis of all antinuclear antibody (ANA) requests from the Top End of Australia over a 6-year period revealed only two Aborigines with low titre anticentromere antibody (despite frequent occurrence of ANA with other specificities). Neither of these Aborigines had features of scleroderma. In conclusion, scleroderma does occur in indigenous Australians but further studies are needed to confirm the apparent infrequency of centromere-associated limited scleroderma (which is the commonest form of scleroderma in our Caucasian population). PMID:15667472

  13. Incidence of cardiac events in burned patients.

    PubMed

    Meyers, David G; Hoestje, Sara M; Korentager, Richard A

    2003-06-01

    Given the increased level of adrenergic stimulation in burn patients, it would be expected that they would experience an increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and other cardiac events. We performed a retrospective chart review of 56 acute burn patients matched by age, length of hospital stay, and sex to 56 trauma patients, all of whom had been continuously monitored electrocardiographically. Burn and trauma patients were similar in injury severity, admission laboratory values, and prior history of cardiopulmonary diseases. Arrhythmias were noted in 34% of burn patients and 28% of trauma patients. One myocardial infarction and six deaths occurred in burn patients. No myocardial infarctions or deaths were observed in trauma patients. A past history of cardiopulmonary disease increased the risk of myocardial infarction or death by 6.6 times. Cardiac arrhythmias and other events are relatively infrequent and benign in burn patients and are similar to those experienced by other patients with acute injuries. PMID:12781616

  14. Air medical transport of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Essebag, Vidal; Halabi, Abdul R; Churchill-Smith, Michael; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2003-11-01

    The air medical transport of cardiac patients is a rapidly expanding practice. For various medical, social, and economic indications, patients are being flown longer distances at commercial altitudes, including international and intercontinental flights. There are data supporting the use of short-distance helicopter flights early in the course of a cardiac event for patients needing emergent transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention or aortocoronary bypass. When considering elective long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients for social or economic reasons, it is necessary to weigh the benefits against the potential risks of flight. A few recent studies suggest that long-distance air medical transport is safe under certain circumstances. Current guidelines for air travel after myocardial infarction do not address the use of medical escorts or air ambulances equipped with intensive care facilities. Further research using larger prospective studies is needed to better define criteria for safe long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients. PMID:14605071

  15. The cardiac patient during Ramadan and Hajj

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Ahmed, Waqar H.; Al-Shaibi, Khaled F.

    2014-01-01

    The holy month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, fasting Muslims refrain from eating, drinking, smoking, and sex from dawn until sunset. Although the Quran exempts sick people from the duty of fasting, it is not uncommon for many heart disease patients to fast during Ramadan. Despite the fact that more than a billion Muslims worldwide fast during Ramadan, there is no clear consensus on its effects on cardiac disease. Some studies have shown that the effects of fasting on stable patients with cardiac disease are minimal and the majority of patients with stable cardiac illness can endure Ramadan fasting with no clinical deterioration. Fasting during Ramadan does not seem to increase hospitalizations for congestive heart failure. However, patients with decompensated heart failure or those requiring large doses of diuretics are strongly advised not to fast, particularly when Ramadan falls in summer. Patients with controlled hypertension can safely fast. However, patients with resistant hypertension should be advised not to fast until their blood pressure is reasonably controlled. Patients with recent myocardial infarction, unstable angina, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery should avoid fasting. Physician advice should be individualized and patients are encouraged to seek medical advice before fasting in order to adjust their medications, if required. The performance of the Hajj pilgrimage is another pillar of Islam and is obligatory once in the lifetime for all adult Muslims who are in good health and can afford to undertake the journey. Hajj is a physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually demanding experience. Medical checkups one or two months before leaving for Hajj is warranted, especially for those with chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Patients with heart failure, uncontrolled hypertension, serious arrhythmias, unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, or cardiac surgery should be

  16. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  17. Patient-Specific Models of Cardiac Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H; McCulloch, Andrew D; Kerckhoffs, Roy Cp

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures. PMID:23729839

  18. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  19. Aboriginal Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Sherry

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project for high school students in which they create Aboriginal-style paintings using cotton swabs. Discusses the process of creating the works of art in detail. Includes learning objectives, art materials, and a bibliography. (CMK)

  20. Is there an Aboriginal bioethic?

    PubMed

    Garvey, G; Towney, P; McPhee, J R; Little, M; Kerridge, I H

    2004-12-01

    It is well recognised that medicine manifests social and cultural values and that the institution of healthcare cannot be structurally disengaged from the sociopolitical processes that create such values. As with many other indigenous peoples, Aboriginal Australians have a lower heath status than the rest of the community and frequently experience the effects of prejudice and racism in many aspects of their lives. In this paper the authors highlight values and ethical convictions that may be held by Aboriginal peoples in order to explore how health practitioners can engage Aboriginal patients in a manner that is more appropriate. In doing so the authors consider how the ethics, values, and beliefs of the dominant white Australian culture have framed the treatment and delivery of services that Aboriginal people receive, and whether sufficient effort has been made to understand or acknowledge the different ethical predispositions that form the traditions and identity of Aboriginal Australia(ns). PMID:15574447

  1. [Cardiac valves calcifications in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Klarić, Vera; Kristić, Ivica

    2011-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, especially those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), are at much higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population. High serum phosphorus (P) level play important role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular calcifications and is a frequent and important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with CKD. We aimed to investigate the association of serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), parathyroid hormon (PTH). calcium phosphorus product (CaxP) with cardiac valves calcifications (VC) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). We investigated for VC using colour Doppler echocardiography. VC were considered present if mitral annular calcifications and/or aortic annular calcifications were visualized. We divided patients in two groups. VC negative group (VC-) were patients with absence of VC. Patients with presence of VC were VC positive (VC+). CRP mean levels in two samples were higher in VC+ group than in VC- group (17.0 vs 3.4mg/L) and (17.1 vs 4.0 mg/L) p<0.0001. CaxP mean level in both samples was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 4.8 vs 4.2 (p=0.0219) and 5.0 vs 4.3 (p=0.0078). We also made analysis of absolute highest levels of three samples of CRP (CRPmax) between groups. CRPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 19.5 vs 9.7 mg/L, (p=0.0045). We made analysis of absolute higher levels of two samples of Ca x P (CaxPmax) between groups. CaxPmax was higher in VC+ group than in VC- group, 5.2 vs 4.4 (p=0.0014). We found cardiac valve calcifications in 40 percent of patients on hemodialysis. We found that patients with correlation between PTH level, CRP level, CaxP product and cardiac valve calcifications have higher serum levels of PTH and CRP. We also found that CaxP product is higher in patients with cardiac valve calcifications. We didn't find correlation between age, dialysis duration, BMI and cardiac valve calcifications. These findings support careful monitoring of calcium metabolisum in end stage

  2. Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157876.html Stress Management Training May Help Cardiac Rehab Patients When added ... March 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of stress management training can make cardiac rehabilitation programs more effective, ...

  3. Cultural self-efficacy of Canadian nursing students caring for aboriginal patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Quine, Allisson; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Alberts, Nicole M

    2012-07-01

    Cultural self-efficacy refers to how capable one feels functioning in culturally diverse situations. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students, specifically in relation to individuals of Aboriginal ancestry. The authors examined the extent to which intercultural anxiety, intercultural communication, and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry predicted two aspects of cultural self-efficacy, namely, knowledge and skills. In this correlational study, non-Aboriginal Canadian nursing students (N = 59) completed a survey assessing these variables. Overall, cultural self-efficacy was rated as moderate by nursing students. Regression analyses indicated that greater intercultural communication skills and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry were significant unique predictors of higher cultural knowledge self-efficacy. Greater intercultural communication and lower intercultural anxiety significantly predicted higher cultural skills self-efficacy. The results provide direction to nursing programs interested in facilitating higher levels of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students. PMID:22477719

  4. Radiotherapy in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Last, A

    1998-01-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Modern pacemakers, using complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, differ from older bipolar semiconductor devices both in their sensitivity to damage and the types of malfunction observed. The mechanisms and types of radiotherapy-induced pacemaker malfunction are described and in vitro and in vivo studies of pacemaker irradiation are reviewed. Some simple precautions are recommended during the planning and administration of radiotherapy to minimize the risk of harm to patients with pacemakers. PMID:9534692

  5. Risk stratification for major adverse cardiac events and ventricular tachyarrhythmias by cardiac MRI in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masakazu; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kato, Takao; Izumi, Toshiaki; Inuzuka, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyaji, Yuki; Kawamura, Takayuki; Ikeguchi, Shigeru; Inoko, Moriaki; Kurita, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac MRI has prognostic value in cardiac sarcoidosis, and localisation may be equally relevant to clinical outcomes. Objective We aimed to analyse cardiac damage and function in detail and explore the relationship with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis using cardiac MRI. Methods We included 81 consecutive patients with cardiac sarcoidosis undergoing cardiac MR. Left ventricular mass and fibrosis mass were calculated, and localisation was analysed using a 17-segment model. Participants underwent follow-up through 2015, and the development of major adverse cardiac events including ventricular tachyarrhythmias was recorded. Results Increased left ventricular fibrosis mass was associated with increased prevalence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). When localisation was defined as the sum of late gadolinium enhancement in the left ventricular basal anterior and basal anteroseptal areas, or the right ventricular area, it was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis during a median follow-up of 22.1 months showed that both the mass and localisation groupings for fibrosis were significantly associated with major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias and that when combined, the risk stratification was better than for each variable alone (p<0.001, respectively). By Cox-proportional hazard risk analysis, the localisation grouping was an independent predictor for the both. Conclusions In patients with cardiac sarcoidosis, both fibrosis mass and its localisation to the basal anterior/anteroseptal left ventricle, or right ventricle was associated with the development of major adverse cardiac events or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cardiac MR with late gadolinium enhancement may be useful for improving risk stratification in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:27547432

  6. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact. PMID:26115137

  7. Aboriginal health.

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, H L; MacMillan, A B; Offord, D R; Dingle, J L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To inform health care workers about the health status of Canada's native people. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search for articles published from Jan. 1, 1989, to Nov. 31, 1995, with the use of subject headings "Eskimos" and "Indians, North American," excluding specific subject headings related to genetics and history. Case reports were excluded. Material was also identified from a review of standard references and bibliographies and from consultation with experts. STUDY SELECTION: Review and research articles containing original data concerning epidemiologic aspects of native health. Studies of Canadian populations were preferred, but population-based studies of US native peoples were included if limited Canadian information was available. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about target population, methods and conclusions was extracted from each study. RESULTS: Mortality and morbidity rates are higher in the native population than in the general Canadian population. The infant mortality rates averaged for the years 1986 to 1990 were 13.8 per 1000 live births among Indian infants, 16.3 per 1000 among Inuit infants, and only 7.3 per 1000 among all Canadian infants. Age-standardized all-cause mortality rates among residents of reserves averaged for the years 1979 to 1983 were 561.0 per 100,000 population among men and 334.6 per 100,000 among women, compared with 340.2 per 100,000 among all Canadian men and 173.4 per 100,000 among all Canadian women. Compared with the general Canadian population, specific native populations have an increased risk of death from alcoholism, homicide, suicide and pneumonia. Of the aboriginal population of Canada 15 years of age and older, 31% have been informed that they have a chronic health problem. Diabetes mellitus affects 6% of aboriginal adults, compared with 2% of all Canadian adults. Social problems identified by aboriginal people as a concern in their community include substance abuse, suicide, unemployment and family violence

  8. Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Wael; Hegazy, Ranya; AbdElAziz, Osama; Sobhy, Rodina; Hasanein, Hossam; Shaltout, Fawzan

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric pacemaker (PM) implants comprise less than 1 % of all PM implants. This study aimed to investigate permanent cardiac pacing among the pediatric population, identifying different indications and complications of pediatric cardiac pacing, especially focusing on the effect of the pacing sites, the PM lead type, and the indications for pacing. The current work is a cross-sectional study of 103 procedures for permanent PM insertion in pediatric patients between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were followed up 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation, then every 6 months or as needed. Evaluation included routine clinical examination, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and a full analysis of the pacing system measurements. The ages of the patients ranged from 0.09 to 12 years (median, 2.3 years). The most common indication for pacing was postoperative complete heart bock, noted in 54 patients (52.4 %). Transvenous endocardial PM insertion was performed in 92 procedures (89.3 %), whereas transthoracic epicardial insertion was performed in 11 procedures (10.7 %). The most common site of pacing was the right ventricular apex (n = 64, 62 %), followed by the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 25, 24.3 %). Transthoracic epicardial PM insertion was associated with a significantly higher percentage and greater severity of complications. In this study, 65 % of the patients with left ventricle (LV) dilation before pacing showed a significant improvement in LV dimensions and function after pacing. This was noted only in those with endocardially inserted PM leads in both the congenital and the postoperative groups regardless of the pacing site. Endocardial PM insertion in children is a safe procedure with fewer complications and a lower ventricular threshold than the epicardial route. Permanent single-chamber right ventricle pacing is safe and can lead to significant improvement in LV function and dimensions. However, long-term follow

  9. Cellular cardiac regenerative therapy in which patients?

    PubMed

    Chachques, Juan C

    2009-08-01

    Cell-based myocardial regenerative therapy is undergoing experimental and clinical trials in order to limit the consequences of decreased contractile function and compliance of damaged ventricles owing to ischemic and nonischemic myocardial diseases. A variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types have been proposed, such as skeletal myoblasts, mononuclear and mesenchymal bone marrow cells, circulating blood-derived progenitors, adipose-derived stromal cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord cells, endometrial mesenchymal stem cells, adult testis pluripotent stem cells and embryonic cells. Current indications for stem cell therapy concern patients who have had a left- or right-ventricular infarction or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies. Other indications and potential applications include patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy, Chagas heart disease (American trypanosomiasis), ischemic mitral regurgitation, left ventricular noncompacted myocardium and pediatric cardiomyopathy. Suitable sources of cells for cardiac implant will depend on the types of diseases to be treated. For acute myocardial infarction, a cell that reduces myocardial necrosis and augments vascular blood flow will be desirable. For heart failure, cells that replace or promote myogenesis, reverse apoptopic mechanisms and reactivate dormant cell processes will be useful. It is important to note that stem cells are not an alternative to heart transplantation; selected patients should be in an early stage of heart failure as the goal of this regenerative approach is to avoid or delay organ transplantation. Since the cell niche provides crucial support needed for stem cell maintenance, the most interesting and realistic perspectives include the association of intramyocardial cell transplantation with tissue-engineered scaffolds and multisite cardiac pacing in order to transform a passive regenerative approach into a 'dynamic cellular support', a promising method for the creation of

  10. Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chee, Donna Ah; Maidment, Debra; Hayes-Hampton, Margie

    The Institute for Aboriginal Development (IAD) is an Aboriginal-controlled language resource center and adult education center serving the Aboriginal communities of central Australia. Its activities include education programs, which range from literacy and numeracy to vocational and tertiary-level courses; an Aboriginal language and culture center…

  11. Patient radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, K.E.; Leibovic, S.J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure air product (EAP) and center field entrance exposure (free-in-air) were measured in seventeen pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Exposures were recorded separately for biplane fluoroscopy and cine angiocardiography using flat-plate ionization chambers. In the posterior-anterior (PA) projections, median EAP was 425 Roentgen-square centimeter (R-cm/sup 2/), with a range of 90.5-3,882 R-cm/sup 2/; 29-35% of this exposure occurred during cine filming. In the lateral projection, median EAP was 276 R-cm/sup 2/ (range 117-1,173); 52-59% of this exposure was due to cine filming. Median center field entrance exposure in the PA view was 7.86 Roentgens (R) with a range 2.16-73.9 of and in the lateral projection 7.39 R (range 2.64-24.6). As much as 25% of the exposure from the entire examination was contributed by manual ''test'' exposures to set cine radiographic kVp. We recommend use of testing circuits, which determine cine radiographic factors automatically and thus should lower levels of exposure.

  12. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Stéphane; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Delerme, Samuel; Bennaceur, Mohamed; Isnard, Richard; Achkar, Rony; Riou, Bruno; Boddaert, Jacques; Ray, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF) in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years) were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137) and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75), differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p < 0.05), history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (16% vs. 47%, p < 0.05), peripheral arterial disease (10% vs. 24%, p < 0.05). Patients with cardiac asthma had a significantly lower pH (7.38 ± 0.08 vs. 7.43 ± 0.06, p < 0.05), and a higher PaCO2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p < 0.05) at admission. In the cardiac asthma group, patients had greater distal airway obstruction: forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 1.09 vs. 1.33 Liter (p < 0.05), and a forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of vital capacity of 0.76 vs. 0.99 Liter (p < 0.05). The in-hospital (23% vs. 19%) and one year mortality (48% vs. 43%) rates were similar. Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar. PMID:17498318

  13. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  14. Cardiac surgery and catheterization in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    MacKinlay, N; Taper, J; Renisson, F; Rickard, K

    2000-03-01

    The present study summarizes the results of 12 cardiac surgical procedures performed in a carrier of Haemophilia B and in six patients with Haemophilia A at a single centre from 1979 to 1998. The median age of the patients at the time of intervention was 56 years ranging from 18 years to 73 years. The six patients with Haemophilia A ranged in severity from moderately to mildly affected. Three patients were hepatitis C antibody positive. No patients were HIV antibody or hepatitis B surface antigen positive. The cardiac procedures included cardiac catheterization (n=4), coronary artery bypass surgery (n=2), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (n=1), cardiac valve replacement (AVR n=1 and AVR/MVR n=2), and closure of an atrial septal defect and subsequent drainage of a pericardial effusion (n=1). No patients had demonstrable inhibitors at the time of surgery. Haemostasis was achieved with AHF in 10/11 procedures and high purity factor IX (Immunine) in one procedure. The initial procedures involved intermittent bolus factor therapy while more recently, AHF was administered by continuous intravenous infusion. All patients demonstrated excellent intra- and post-operative haemostasis. These results, although from a small and varied group of patients, demonstrate that cardiac surgical procedures can be performed safely in patients with Haemophilia. PMID:10781193

  15. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  16. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  17. Non-invasive cardiac investigations in patients awaiting renal transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Langford, E J; de Belder, A J; Cairns, H; Hendry, B M; Wainwright, R J

    1997-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure undergoing renal transplantation have a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Invasive investigation may identify those at risk of cardiac death during or after renal transplantation, but which patients should undergo cardiac catheterization is currently not clear. In 95 patients awaiting renal transplantation we assessed the ability of echocardiography and exercise electrocardiography to identify patients at risk of cardiac death. Echocardiography identified impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function in 20%, severe in 8%. Of the patients with severe LV dysfunction, 25% died before transplantation. Of those undergoing exercise electrocardiography, 44% did not achieve 85% of maximum predicted heart rate. No coronary artery disease requiring intervention was identified by exercise testing. These findings indicate that echocardiography, but not exercise electrocardiography, should be part of the assessment for renal transplantation. PMID:9135610

  18. Spirituality and aboriginal mental health: an examination of the relationship between Aboriginal spirituality and mental health.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Andrew R

    2008-01-01

    Previous research on Aboriginal [Native American] spirituality has demonstrated that some of its dimensions have significant, positive effects on health and healing. This review will explore and highlight some important spiritual domains and characteristics of Aboriginal life that are significant factors in both the prevention of and recovery from various mental health issues afflicting the Canadian Aboriginal population today. Findings from current research in this area is explored and presented as grounds for supporting the current objectives. As demonstrated, Aboriginal perspectives on health and healing are broader than those of biomedicine, encompassing emotional and spiritual aspects as well as the mental and physical. Mental health practitioners should, therefore, include spiritual dimensions while working with Aboriginal patients, not only to respect the patients' worldview but also for the demonstrated positive effects on healing. PMID:20664135

  19. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  20. [Radionuclide assessment of cardiac involvement in patients with sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Hiroe, M; Nagata, M; Sekiguchi, M; Ohta, Y; Kusakabe, K; Shigeta, A; Horie, T; Fujita, N; Hasumi, M; Toyosaki, T

    1990-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether nuclear methods were useful for examining cardiac pathology and for making a decision of corticosteroid therapy in patients with sarcoidosis. Thirty six patients were divided into two groups; GpA consisted of 19 patients with cardiac sarcoidosis and abnormal ECG findings, and GpB of 17 patients with sarcoidosis without ECG abnormalities. Cardiac uptake of 67Ga-citrate in 2 and 99mTc-PYP in one of GpA was observed and steroid therapy resulted in the disappearance of the uptake. 201Tl-CL cardiac tomograms disclosed perfusion defects in 10 of 14 patients (71%) in GpA, including defects with redistribution in 8 of the 10 pts, but only one case in GpB. Radionuclide ventriculography using 99mTc-RBC revealed abnormal response of left ventricular (LV) function to exercise and LV dysfunction in GpA. These data suggest that nuclear study is a useful tool for diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis, evaluating therapeutic effectiveness and long-term follow-up in patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:2162435

  1. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  2. Cardiac tamponade secondary to haemopericardium in a patient on warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Rubin, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin may contribute to certain complications, including bleeding into body cavities. Haemopericardiac tamponade secondary to warfarin is rare outside cardiac surgery. The present report describes an unusual presentation of spontaneous cardiac tamponade in a patient on warfarin and recently treated for chest infection with erythromycin. The patient was referred to the surgeons with acute abdominal pain and hypotension. Blood tests revealed an international normalised ratio (INR) of 16.9. An emergency abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan revealed pericardial effusion. Intravenous vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrate were administered and urgent referral to a cardiologist was made for pericardiocentesis. Monitoring INR in patients on warfarin is paramount in avoiding the potential detrimental complications of excessive anticoagulation. Clinicians should be aware of drug interactions of warfarin and risk factors associated with its prolonged half-life. Internal bleeding, including haemorrhagic cardiac tamponade, should be ruled out in patients with unexplained hypotension and excessive anticoagulation. PMID:22485118

  3. Preoperative evaluation of the cardiac patient for noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, L. A.; Barash, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac events continue to represent a significant cause of morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. The evaluation of the high risk patient should begin with an assessment of the probability of coronary artery disease and exercise tolerance. Decisions to undergo further evaluation, including noninvasive testing, should be based upon the perioperative morbidity and mortality rate for the planned surgical procedure. In patients with significant coronary artery stenoses and a high probability of perioperative cardiac morbidity, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and preoperative optimization of hemodynamics in an intensive care unit have all been advocated as means of reducing risk. PMID:7825340

  4. [Selection criteria for patient admission to cardiac rehabilitation centers].

    PubMed

    Greco, Cesare; Cacciatore, Giuseppe; Gulizia, Michele; Martinelli, Luigi; Oliva, Fabrizio; Olivari, Zoran; Seccareccia, Fulvia; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Urbinati, Stefano

    2011-03-01

    Current guidelines state that cardiac rehabilitation is indicated after the acute phase of major cardiovascular diseases and interventions; on the other hand implementation of these indications is difficult because of several barriers, i.e. the number of patients per year with an indication exceeds by far the accommodation offer of cardiac rehabilitation centers; the demand for access to cardiac rehabilitation from acute cardiac care hospitals is low because the attention is focused on the acute phase of cardiac diseases. The present Consensus Document describes the changes in clinical epidemiology of the main cardiovascular diseases, showing that complications are increasingly more frequent in the post-acute phase, especially in the setting of myocardial infarction. The Joint ANMCO/IACPR-GICR Committee defines priority criteria based on clinical risk for admission to cardiac rehabilitation centers as inpatients. This Consensus Document represents, therefore, an important step forward in the search for continuity of care in high-risk patients during the post-acute phase. PMID:21560480

  5. Assessment of pulmonary function tests in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    El-Sobkey, Salwa B; Gomaa, Magdi

    2011-04-01

    This study was aimed to assess the pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in cardiac patients; with ischemic or rheumatic heart diseases as well as in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or valvular procedures. For the forty eligible participants, the pulmonary function was measured using the spirometry test before and after the cardiac surgery. Data collection sheet was used for the patient's demographic and intra-operative information. Cardiac diseases and surgeries had restrictive negative impact on PFTs. Before surgery, vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), ratio between FEV1 and FVC, and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) recorded lower values for rheumatic patients than ischemic patients (P values were 0.01, 0.005, 0.0001, 0.031, and 0.035, respectively). Moreover, patients who underwent valvular surgery had lower PFTs than patients who underwent CABG with significant differences for VC, FVC, FEV1, and MVV tests (P values were 0.043, 0.011, 0.040, and 0.020, respectively). No definite causative factor appeared to be responsible for those results although mechanical deficiency and incisional chest pain caused by cardiac surgery are doubtful. More comprehensive investigation is required to resolve the case. PMID:23960642

  6. Medanta insulin protocols in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Beena; Mithal, Ambrish; Carvalho, Pravin; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and is associated with poor outcomes. This is a review of the perioperative insulin protocol being used at Medanta, the Medicity, which has a large volume cardiac surgery setup. Preoperatively, patients are usually continued on their preoperative outpatient medications. Intravenous insulin infusion is intiated postoperatively and titrated using a column method with a choice of 7 scales. Insulin dose is calculated as a factor of blood glucose and patient's estimated insulin sensitivity. A comparison of this protocol is presented with other commonly used protocols. Since arterial blood gas analysis is done every 4 hours for first two days after cardiac surgery, automatic data collection from blood gas analyzer to a central database enables collection of glucose data and generating glucometrics. Data auditing has helped in improving performance through protocol modification. PMID:25143899

  7. Diffuse panbronchiolitis in an Australian aborigine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; Simpson, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic sino-bronchial disease. It has remained restricted to the Japanese and cases in the West are unusual. We present a patient of Australian aboriginal origin with DPB. The known efficacy of low-dose erythromycin in DPB is again described. Chronic respiratory disease is common in the Australian aboriginal population and DPB should be considered in the differential. PMID:25473569

  8. Diffuse panbronchiolitis in an Australian aborigine.

    PubMed

    Brown, James; Simpson, Graham

    2014-06-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic sino-bronchial disease. It has remained restricted to the Japanese and cases in the West are unusual. We present a patient of Australian aboriginal origin with DPB. The known efficacy of low-dose erythromycin in DPB is again described. Chronic respiratory disease is common in the Australian aboriginal population and DPB should be considered in the differential. PMID:25473569

  9. Strategies in Aboriginal Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Alan T.

    1973-01-01

    Traditional Aboriginal practices render traditional adult education programs futile. Aboriginal adult education must be concerned with the growth and development of the total personality. Adopted strategies must motivate Aborigines as individuals and as members of the community. (AG)

  10. [Perioperative management of patients equipped with cardiac implanted electronic devices].

    PubMed

    Booke, Michael; Casu, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Anaesthetists are in increasing frequency confronted with patients equipped with cardiac implantable electrical devices. A consensus conference standardized the handling of such patients for elective cases. However, this multidisciplinary approach is characterized by a complexity, which is hard to handle in emergency cases and even in nowadays clinical routine. However, risks associated with electrocautery or electromagnetic interference can be easily handled applying a significantly easier approach. Telemetric reprogramming and/or postoperative interrogation of the cardiac implanted eletronical device can be avoided in most cases. PMID:27070514

  11. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: optimizing the device, optimizing the patient.

    PubMed

    Trupp, Robin J

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem in the United States, associated with high morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Despite recent advances in pharmacological treatments to attenuate disease progression, medications become relatively ineffective, resulting in worsening congestive symptoms and increased exercise intolerance. Cardiac resynchronization therapy provides a new adjunct for heart failure patients who remain symptomatic despite optimized medical therapies. This article discusses cardiac resynchronization therapy and measures that should be considered to ensure proper functioning of the device and improved quality of life for patients. PMID:15326978

  12. Laparoscopic Treatment of Subxiphoid Incisional Hernias in Cardiac Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Wanda M.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Bell, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias present difficult surgical problems, especially in immuno-suppressed cardiac transplant patients. Here, we describe the laparoscopic repair of subxiphoid incisional hernias in patients with a history of cardiac transplantation. Methods: Four patients with subxiphoid hernias who had previously undergone heart transplantation were identified from a prospective database. Each underwent a laparoscopic repair with mesh implantation. Results: Three patients had a previous open repair. The mean age was 62.5 years, an average of 64.3 months after transplantation. At the time of surgery, all patients were immunosuppressed, and each had a subxiphoid, poststernotomy incisional hernia. Gore dual mesh was used in 2 patients, while Parietex mesh was used in 2. Mean operative time was 122 minutes, and all were completed laparoscopically. The mean length of stay was 6.5 days, and the mean defect size was 286.25 cm2. There was a significant correlation between hernia size and length of stay (P=0.037). Postoperatively, one patient (25%) developed pulmonary edema, and 1 patient (25%) had a prolonged ileus. Conclusion: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias are a challenging surgical problem in patients with a history of sternotomy. Laparoscopic repair is safe and effective in immunosuppressed patients who have previously undergone cardiac transplantation. PMID:18765049

  13. Fourth Recurrence of Cardiac Myxoma in a Patient with the Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Jun Yong; Lee, Jong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac myxoma is the most commonly encountered benign cardiac tumor in cardiac surgery practice, recurrent cardiac myxoma is very rare, is most commonly related to the Carney complex, and usually requires multiple cardiac operations with specific requirements in terms of perioperative management. In this report, we describe a patient who experienced the fourth recurrence of cardiac myxoma and review the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. This is the first report of such a case in Korea. PMID:27066435

  14. Fourth Recurrence of Cardiac Myxoma in a Patient with the Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Jang, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ok; Cho, Jun Yong; Lee, Jong Tae

    2016-04-01

    Although cardiac myxoma is the most commonly encountered benign cardiac tumor in cardiac surgery practice, recurrent cardiac myxoma is very rare, is most commonly related to the Carney complex, and usually requires multiple cardiac operations with specific requirements in terms of perioperative management. In this report, we describe a patient who experienced the fourth recurrence of cardiac myxoma and review the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. This is the first report of such a case in Korea. PMID:27066435

  15. Non-cardiac issues in patients with heterotaxy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Shyam S

    2014-01-01

    Management of complex congenital heart disease in patients with Heterotaxy syndrome (HS) has steadily improved. However, there is an insufficient appreciation of various non-cardiac issues that might impact the overall status of these patients. This article briefly reviews the implications of gastrointestinal, immunologic, genitourinary, respiratory, and central nervous system involvement in HS patients with a view to aid in their comprehensive clinical management. PMID:25298693

  16. Early Cardiac Tamponade in a Patient with Postsurgical Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Archana; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Kumar, Rajan; Curry, Bryan H

    2015-01-01

    Pericardial effusion is a common cardiac manifestation of hypothyroidism, but effusion resulting in cardiac tamponade is extremely rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old African American woman with slurred speech and altered mental status that was initially suspected to have stroke. Her chest X-ray revealed cardiomegaly and subsequent echocardiogram showed a large pericardial effusion with echocardiographic evidence of cardiac tamponade. Clinically, patient did not have pulsus paradoxus or hypotension. Further questioning revealed a history of total surgical thyroidectomy and noncompliance with thyroid replacement therapy. Pericardiocentesis was performed promptly and thyroxine replacement therapy was started. Thereafter, her mental status improved significantly. The management of pericardial effusion associated with hypothyroidism varies depending on size of effusion and hemodynamic stability of the patient. The management strategy ranges from conservative management with close monitoring and thyroxine replacement to pericardiocentesis or creation of a pericardial window. PMID:26294982

  17. Cardiac operations in patients with severe pulmonary impairment.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, S; Sakata, R; Nakayama, Y; Ura, M; Arai, Y; Morishima, Y

    2000-04-01

    Many reviews concerning pulmonary complications after cardiac surgical procedures in patients with serious pulmonary disease have been published. However, no strict pulmonary function guidelines were proposed to help the clinician identify the patients at greater risk. We considered whether a low pulmonary function became a risk factor of cardiac operations. We conducted a retrospective analysis of records of 32 patients with severely impaired preoperative pulmonary function who had undergone cardiac operations between July 1988 and March 1999. There was 1 hospital death. The over-all mortality rate was 3.1% (1 of 32). However, this death could not be directly attributed to postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative pulmonary complications were seen in 2 patients (6.3%) who required tracheostomy due to atelectasis and pneumonia. No late deaths due to pulmonary complications were observed during the follow-up period. The actual survival rate is 68% at 7 years. A low pulmonary function did not, by itself, become a risk factor of cardiac operations, although a pulmonary function test can be used to alert the clinician to possible postoperative complications, including the requirement of tracheostomy. Especially strict control of postoperative respiration is necessary in patients with forced expiratory volume (FEV) of 1.0 <= 800 ml and/or FEV1.0/BSA <= 600 ml/m2. PMID:10870003

  18. Myocardial ischemia during intravenous DSA in patients with cardiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselink, J.R.; Hayman, L.A.; Chung, K.J.; McGinnis, B.D.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    A prospective study was performed for 48 patients who had histories of angina and were referred for digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Cardiac disease was graded according to the American Heart Association (AHA) functional classification system. Each patient received 2-5 injections of 40-ml diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium at 15 ml per second in the superior vena cava. Of the 28 patients in functional Classes I or II, 11% had angina and 32% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the DSA injections. Of the patients in functional Class III 63% had angina, and 58% had definite ischemic ECG changes after the injections. These observed cardiac effects following bolus injections of hypertonic ionic contrast media indicate that special precautions are necessary when performing intravenous DSA examinations on this group of high risk patients.

  19. Sudden chest pain and cardiac emergencies in the obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Mabie, W C; Freire, C M

    1995-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and work-up of a patient with chest pain during pregnancy is presented in this article. This is followed by discussions of cardiac emergencies including hypertensive crisis, pulmonary edema, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, myocardial infarction, and aortic dissection. PMID:7784039

  20. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  1. Perioperative management of pediatric patients on mechanical cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Motta, Pablo; Rossano, Joseph; Hale, Brittani; Morales, David L

    2011-05-01

    The population of children with end-stage heart failure requiring mechanical circulatory support is growing. These children present for diagnostic imaging studies, various interventions and noncardiac surgical procedures that require anesthetic care. This article is a review of the population demographics of children on mechanical cardiac support, the alternative devices available, and the important concepts for safe perioperative management of these patients. The discussion will be limited to devices for short- and long-term cardiac support, excluding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support. PMID:21332879

  2. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  3. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  4. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  5. Aboriginal Education Program, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginning of time, Aboriginal people have had a high regard for education. Euro-Canadian contact with Aboriginal peoples has and continues to have devastating effects. The encroachment on their traditional territory has affected the lands and resources forever. Generations of experience within the residential school system have greatly…

  6. Aboriginal English. PEN 93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eades, Diana

    This report focuses on the teaching of English to Aboriginal children in primary schools in Australia. A definition and analysis of dialectal differences between Aboriginal (Australian) English and Standard (Australian) English is offered that includes the phonological, morpho-syntactic, lexico-semantic, and pragmatic differences of the Aboriginal…

  7. Bullying in an Aboriginal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Juli; Larson, Ann; Cross, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Aboriginal children appear to be more likely to be involved in bullying than non-Aboriginal children. This paper describes part of the "Solid Kids Solid Schools" research process and discusses some of the results from this three year study involving over 260 Aboriginal children, youth, elders, teachers and Aboriginal Indigenous Education Officers…

  8. Cardiac dysfunction among soft tissue sarcoma patients in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Shantakumar, Sumitra; Olsen, Morten; Vo, Thao T; Nørgaard, Mette; Pedersen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients may experience post-treatment cardiotoxicity, yet no population-based data exist. We examined the incidence of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decline, heart failure, and cardiac death following STS diagnosis among adults, using Danish patient registries and medical record review. Patients and methods LVEF decline was examined in a regional cohort of STS patients diagnosed during 1997–2011 in Western Denmark for whom cardiac imaging data were available. LVEF decline was defined as an absolute decline from baseline to follow-up of 10% or more, or, where baseline imaging was not available, a decline below the lower limit of normal (or 40%) for a follow-up LVEF. Heart failure and cardiac death were investigated in a national Danish cohort of all STS patients diagnosed from 2000 to 2009. We followed patients from STS diagnosis until heart failure, cardiac death, emigration or December 31, 2012 (whichever occurred first). Results The incidence rate of LVEF decline for the regional cohort with follow-up data (N=100, five events) or baseline and follow-up measurements (N=75, 19 events) was 16.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.0–40.3) and 108 (95% CI: 69–170), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. In the national cohort (N=1,187), the incidence of heart failure (40 events) and cardiac death (15 events) was 7.3 (95% CI: 5.4–10.0) and 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6–4.5), respectively, per 1,000 person-years. The strongest predictors of heart failure were doxorubicin treatment (hazard ratio [HR] =2.2, 95% CI: 0.5–10.2) and pre-existing cardiovascular disease (HR=6.3, 95% CI: 0.98–40.6). Conclusion LVEF decline occurred more frequently compared to heart failure or cardiac death in a nationally representative cohort of Danish STS patients. PMID:27186077

  9. Psychiatric complications in the critically ill cardiac patient.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, K M; Cassem, E H

    1993-01-01

    Psychiatric consultation to the critically ill cardiac patient focuses on several common problems: anxiety, delirium, depression, personality reactions, and behavioral disturbances. A review of the causes and treatment of anxiety in the coronary care unit is followed by a discussion of delirium in the critically ill cardiac patient. A description of delirium associated with the use of the intraaortic balloon pump and its treatment with high doses of intravenous haloperidol is also included. After the initial crisis has been stabilized in the critical care unit, the premorbid personality traits of the patient may emerge as behavioral disturbances--particularly as the duration of stay increases. The use of psychiatric consultation completes the discussion. PMID:8219821

  10. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  11. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  12. [Nursing diagnoses in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Luciana Alves; Maia, Ticiane Fernandes; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima

    2006-01-01

    Exploratory and transversal research accomplished with postoperative patients outgoing coronary bypass. It was aimed at identifying nursing diagnoses according to Taxonomy II of NANDA and nursing interventions according to Nursing Interventions Classification, associating with the results of Nursing Outcomes Classification. The data were collected fom 22 patients using formularies and physical examination. The information made possible the identification of fifteen nursing diagnosis, according to Taxonomy II of NANDA. Among them, stand out: risk of infection; Risk of constipation; Deficit in self-care intimate hygiene and integrity of harmed skin. The study revealed being fundamental to develop studies about nursing diagnoses to direct analyses of problems that concern to the demanding patients of specific nursing actions, that contribute to the devepoment of the profession. PMID:17175721

  13. Cut the risks for cardiac cath patients.

    PubMed

    Beattie, S

    1999-01-01

    As the list of interventions performed with the aid of femoral catheterization grows, so does the number of patients at risk for developing post-procedure problems. Here's a primer on how to recognize and prevent complications like pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistulas, and retroperitoneal hematoma. PMID:9987436

  14. Identification of patient specific parameters for a minimal cardiac model.

    PubMed

    Hann, C E; Chase, J G; Shaw, G M; Smith, B W

    2004-01-01

    A minimal cardiac model has been developed which accurately captures the essential dynamics of the cardiovascular system (CVS). This paper develops an integral based parameter identification method for fast and accurate identification of patient specific parameters for this minimal model. The integral method is implemented using a single chamber model to prove the concept, and turns a previously nonlinear and nonconvex optimization problem into a linear and convex problem. The method can be readily extended to the full minimal cardiac model and enables rapid identification of model parameters to match a particular patient condition in clinical real time (3-5 minutes). This information can then be used to assist medical staff in understanding, diagnosis and treatment selection. PMID:17271801

  15. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection in Patients at Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Khaldoun G; Ellis, Christopher R; Defaye, Pascal; Kennergren, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection following implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing at a faster rate than that of device implantation. Patients with a CIED infection usually require hospitalisation and complete device and lead removal. A significant proportion die from their infection. Transvenous lead extraction (TLE) is associated with rare but serious complications including major vascular injury or cardiac perforation. Operator experience and advances in lead extraction methods, including laser technology and rotational sheaths, have resulted in procedures having a low risk of complication and mortality. Strategies for preventing CIED infections include intravenous antibiotics and aseptic surgical techniques. An additional method to reduce CIED infection may be the use of antibacterial TYRX™ envelope. Data from non-randomised cohort studies have indicated that antibacterial envelope use can reduce the incidence of CIED infection by more than 80 % in high-risk patients and a randomised clinical trial is ongoing. PMID:27403296

  16. Bridging antiplatelet therapy in patients requiring cardiac and non-cardiac surgery: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Capodanno, Davide; Tamburino, Corrado

    2014-02-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is the mainstay of pharmacotherapy after an acute coronary syndrome or percutaneous coronary intervention. While patients requiring interruption of DAPT at the time of cardiac or noncardiac surgery face an increased risk of thrombotic complications, the opportunity of continuing DAPT in the perioperative period should be balanced against the risk of bleeding. Tailoring antiplatelet therapy on patient- and surgery-specific characteristics mandates a clear understanding of pharmacodynamic and clinical data on using antithrombotic agents in the perioperative period. This is also important given the introduction of novel antiplatelet agents that are already adopted in practice (prasugrel, ticagrelor) or will likely be adopted in the near future (cangrelor). This article explores the theoretical background and rationale for bridging patients on antiplatelet drugs to their surgical procedure, and provides insights on how patient and procedural characteristics translate into different considerations for the use of antithrombotic agents in the surgical setting. PMID:24272832

  17. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  18. Noninvasive cardiac output measurements in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jonathan D; Archer, Stephen L; Rich, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterised by a progressive decline in cardiac output (CO) and right heart failure. NICOM® (noninvasive cardiac output monitor) is a bioreactance-based technology that has been broadly validated, but its specific application in right heart failure and PH is unknown. Cardiac catheterisation was performed in 50 consecutive patients with PH. CO measurements were performed using three different methods (thermodilution, Fick and NICOM) at baseline and after vasodilator challenge. We compared the precision (coefficient of variation) and accuracy of NICOM compared to thermodilution and Fick. The mean CO (L·min(-1)) at baseline as measured by the three methods was 4.73±1.15 (NICOM), 5.69±1.74 (thermodilution) and 4.84±1.39 (Fick). CO measured by NICOM was more precise than by thermodilution (3.5±0.3% versus 9.6±6.1%, p<0.001). Bland-Altman analyses comparing NICOM to thermodilution and Fick revealed bias and 95% limits of agreement that were comparable to those comparing Fick to thermodilution. All three CO methods detected an increase in CO in response to vasodilator challenge. CO measured via NICOM is precise and reliably measures CO at rest and changes in CO with vasodilator challenge in patients with PH. NICOM may allow for the noninvasive haemodynamic assessment of patients with PH and their response to therapy. PMID:23100501

  19. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  20. Mapping of cardiac electrophysiology onto a dynamic patient-specific heart model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kevin; Guiraudon, Gerard; Jones, Douglas L; Peters, Terry M

    2009-12-01

    Electrophysiological cardiac data mapping is an essential tool for the study of cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation. Over the past decade, various advanced cardiac mapping systems have been developed to create detailed cardiac maps and assist physicians in diagnosis and therapy guidance. While these systems have increased the ability to study and treat cardiac arrhythmias, inherent limitations exist. The objective of this paper is to describe and evaluate a system that extends current approaches to cardiac mapping, to create a dynamic cardiac map, using patient-specific cardiac models. This paper details novel approaches to collecting a stream of electrophysiological cardiac data, registering the data with patient-specific dynamic cardiac models, and displaying the data directly on the dynamic model surface, giving a more accurate and comprehensive visualization environment when compared to current systems. To validate the system, a series of laboratory and in vivo experiments were conducted. In the laboratory studies, the system was used to test the user's ability to accurately locate a landmark in physical space, as well as their ability to accurately navigate to a virtual location. In the in vivo studies the overall system performance was compared to an existing electrophysiological recording system, where right atrial cardiac maps were created during sinus and paced cardiac rhythms. The results showed that the new dynamic cardiac mapping system was able to maintain high accuracy in locating physical and virtual landmarks, while being able to create a dynamic cardiac map displayed on a dynamic cardiac surface model. PMID:19423433

  1. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary. PMID:26706454

  2. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  3. Ubiquitous Computing for Remote Cardiac Patient Monitoring: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Kambhatla, Kashyap; Hu, Fei; Lifson, Mark; Xiao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    New wireless technologies, such as wireless LAN and sensor networks, for telecardiology purposes give new possibilities for monitoring vital parameters with wearable biomedical sensors, and give patients the freedom to be mobile and still be under continuous monitoring and thereby better quality of patient care. This paper will detail the architecture and quality-of-service (QoS) characteristics in integrated wireless telecardiology platforms. It will also discuss the current promising hardware/software platforms for wireless cardiac monitoring. The design methodology and challenges are provided for realistic implementation. PMID:18604301

  4. New Approaches to Treating Cardiac Cachexia in the Older Patient.

    PubMed

    Azhar, Gohar; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2013-12-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, accounting for more hospitalizations than any other condition. Advanced stages of congestive heart failure can be associated with serious complications such as cardiac cachexia (defined here as unintentional weight loss of more than 6% in 6 months). Cardiac cachexia and the associated progressive weight loss are sometimes overlooked by older patients, their families and care providers. A delay in the diagnosis can result in further loss of vital organ tissue, progressive weakness, fall-related injuries and even long-term care institutionalization and/or death. During the past several years, researchers have begun to broaden their understanding of this common, morbid and often fatal condition, and these findings will help to characterize the features that assist in its diagnosis, minimize its exacerbation, delay the progressive decline, and educate clinicians about the potential management options. PMID:24489977

  5. Patient Decision Control and the Use of Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Orner, Michelle B.; Stewart, Sabrina K.; Kressin, Nancy R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shared decision-making is a key determinant of patient-centered care. A lack of patient involvement in treatment decisions may explain persistent racial disparities in rates of cardiac catheterization (CCATH). To date, limited evidence exists to demonstrate whether patients who engage in shared decision-makingare more or less likely to undergo non-emergency CCATH. Objective: To assess the relationship between participation in the decision to undergo a CCATH and the use of CCATH. We also examined whether preference for or actual engagement in decision-making varied by patient race. Methods: We analyzed data from 826 male Veterans Administration patients for whom CCATH was indicated and who participated in the Cardiac Decision Making Study. Results: After controlling for confounders, patients reporting any degree of decision control were more likely to receive CCATH compared with those reporting no control (doctor made decision without patient input) (54% vs 39%, P<.0001). Across racial groups, patients were equally likely to report a preference for control over decision-making (P=.53) as well as to experience discordance between their preference for control and their perception of the actual decision-making process (P=.59). Therefore, these factors did not mediate racial disparities in rates of CCATH use. Conclusion: Shared decision-making is an essential feature of whole-person care. While participation in decision-making may not explain disparities in CCATH rates, further work is required to identify strategies to improve congruence between patients' desire for and actual control over decision-making to actualize patient-centered care. PMID:26331101

  6. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  7. [Glucose-lowering therapy in patients with cardiac comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J

    2015-04-01

    The risk for cardiovascular events, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia is significantly increased in patients with diabetes. Although poor glycaemic control has been associated with an increased cardiovascular event rate, aggressive glucose-lowering strategies have failed to improve cardiovascular endpoints or mortality. Therefore, treatment-associated adverse effects, especially hypoglycaemia and weight gain, must be carefully outbalanced against the potential benefits of better glycaemic control. Furthermore, certain drug-specific aspects must be considered: Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with heart failure, and DPP-4 inhibitors have recently been associated with an increased heart failure rate. Heart rate may increase during treatment with GLP-1 analogues. Only with metformin a reduction in cardiovascular endpoint has been demonstrated in patients with diabetes. Insulin and sulphonylureas have yielded neutral results in the available endpoint trials. Endpoint studies with GLP-1 analogues or SGLT-2 inhibitors have not yet been completed. These various drug-specific actions in the cardiovascular system need to be born in mind for the choice of the optimal glucose-lowering strategy in patients with cardiac comorbidities. PMID:25924044

  8. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Imaging for Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification in Patients with Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chattranukulchai, Pairoj

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM), risk stratification for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and selection of patients who would benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators remains challenging. We aim to discuss the evidence of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial scar for the prediction of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in NICM. From the 15 studies analyzed, with a total of 2747 patients, the average prevalence of myocardial scar was 41%. In patients with myocardial scar, the risk for adverse cardiac events was more than 3-fold higher, and risk for arrhythmic events 5-fold higher, as compared to patients without scar. Based on the available observational, single center studies, CMR scar assessment may be a promising new tool for SCD risk stratification, which merits further investigation. PMID:26175568

  10. Reduced Oxygen Uptake Efficiency Slope in Patients with Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, Wilhelm; Wurps, Henrik; Klemens, Mark A.; Crolow, Catharina; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Bittner, Roland C.; Bauer, Torsten T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is difficult. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a very valuable diagnostic tool in patients with suspected CS, but usually a combination of different tests is used. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a parameter of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), which is used as an indicator for cardiovascular impairment. We investigated the predictive value of OUES for the diagnosis of myocardial involvement in sarcoid patients. Methods Retrospectively 37 consecutive patients (44.9±13.8 years) with histologically confirmed sarcoidosis and clinical suspicion of heart involvement underwent noninvasive diagnostic testing including CMR. CS was diagnosed according to the guidelines from the Japanese Society of Sarcoidosis and other Granulomatous Disorders with additional consideration of CMR findings. Furthermore, CPET with calculation of predicted OUES according to equations by Hollenberg et al. was carried out. Results Patients with CS (11/37; 30%) had a worse cardiovascular response to exercise. OUES was significantly lower in CS-group compared to non-CS-group (59.3±19.1 vs 88.0±15.4%pred., p<0.0001). ROC curve method identified 70%pred. as the OUES cut-off point, which maximized sensitivity and specificity for detection of CS (96% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 89% overall accuracy). OUES <70%pred. was the single best predictor of CS (Odds ratio: 100.43, 95% CI: 1.99 to 5064, p<0.001) even in multivariate analyses. Conclusion OUES assessed in CPET may be helpful in identifying patient with cardiac involvement of sarcoidosis. Patient selection for CMR may be assisted by CPET findings in patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:25029031

  11. Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koycheva, Reneta Yovcheva; Cholakov, Vasil; Andreev, Jivko; Penev, Margarit; Iliev, Rosen; Nancheva, Krasimira; Tsoneva, Vanya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac biomarkers are often elevated in dialysis patients showing the presence of left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of the study is to establish the plasma levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs TnT), precursor of B-natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP) and their relation to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients undergoing hemodialysis without signs of acute coronary syndrome or heart failure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 48 patients - 26 men and 22 women. Pre and postdialysis levels of hs cTnT, NT-proBNP and hs CRP were measured at week interim procedure. Patients were divided in two groups according to the presence of echocardiographic evidence of LVH - gr A - 40 patients (with LVH), and gr B - 8 patients (without LVH). RESULTS: In the whole group of patients was found elevated predialysis levels of all three biomarkers with significant increase (p < 0.05) after dialysis with low-flux dialyzers. Predialysis values of NT-proBNP show moderate positive correlation with hs cTnT (r = 0.47) and weaker with hs CRP (r = 0.163). Such dependence is observed in postdialysis values of these biomarkers. There is a strong positive correlation between the pre and postdialysis levels: for hs cTnT (r = 0.966), for NT-proBNP (r = 0.918) and for hs CRP (r = 0.859). It was found a significant difference in the mean values of hs cTnT in gr. A and gr. B (0.07 ± 0.01 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 ng/mL, p < 0.05) and NT-proBNP (15,605.8 ± 2,072.5 versus 2,745.5 ± 533.55 pg/mL, p < 0.05). Not find a significant difference in hs CRP in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the relationship of the studied cardiac biomarkers with LVH in asymptomatic patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment.

  12. Cardiac calcified amorphous tumor in a hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi; Aoyama, Takanobu; Sasako, Yoshikado

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of cardiac calcified amorphous tumor, a rare intracardiac non-neoplastic tumor, in a hemodialysis patient. A 72-year-old woman with no history of thromboembolic, malignant, or inflammatory disease presented with dyspnea. Echocardiography revealed a highly echoic, slightly mobile mass with an acoustic shadow originating from the mitral subvalvular apparatus, extending to the left ventricular outflow tract. She underwent surgical resection of the mass through the aortic valve, which was easily excised from the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae. Histopathologic examination revealed nodular calcium deposits on a background of amorphous degenerated fibrin material, consistent with calcified amorphous tumor. PMID:25742783

  13. [Comparative characteristics of clinical and immunologic indicators of various groups of opisthorchiasis patients in a focus. Aboriginal population].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, S B; Ozeretskovskaia, N N; Zolotukhin, V A

    1989-01-01

    Clinical and immunological observations of people belonging to two population groups--aborigens (khanty, mansi, komi) and 40 immigrants--were performed in opisthorchiasis foci of the Tyumen region. Rapid clinical reinvasion of unimmune immigrants (in a 3-4 year period) was established; the aborigens featured subclinical invasion pattern. T-system immunity in immigrants was suppressed, while in the aboriginal group insignificant reduction of the number of T-helpers and significant increase in the number of T-suppressors, lack of apparent mobilization of humoral immunity factors--reduction of the absolute B-lymphocytes number, normal A, G immunoglobulines and CIC levels-were observed. Such T--B immune systems' ratio may indicate immune tolerance of a suppressor type. The observed indicators of aborigens' tolerance to helminths' antigens point to the necessity of differentiated approach to chemotherapy prescription (especially of the repeated courses) in the endemic invasion foci. PMID:2526919

  14. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  15. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  17. Computed tomography in patients with cardiac pacemakers: difficulties and solutions.

    PubMed

    Mlynarski, Rafal; Sosnowski, Maciej; Mlynarska, Agnieszka; Tendera, Michał

    2012-05-01

    The presence of cardiac pacemaker systems may significantly limit interpretation of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) images. In 80 patients (45 men; aged 69.5 ± 13.4) with previously implanted anti-arrhythmic devices, a 64-slice CT (Aquilion-64) was performed. In 61 patients (76.3%), ECG gating was used (coronaries visualization) and in 19 patients (23.7%) without ECG gating (not coronaries visualization). In all 19 patients without ECG gating MSCT images were diagnostic. In 37 (60.6%) patients of 61, there was no problem with gating process and image quality was diagnostic. In 24 (39.4%) with visible spikes in the ECG-gating group, there were difficulties in differentiating the R spike from an artificial spike (unipolar pacing) by MSCT software. In 15 patients (24.6%) after reprogramming, it was possible to obtain good quality images. In nine (14.7%) patients, it was not possible to reprogram devices due to old unipolar leads, but in two cases (3.3%), ECG gating was corrected manually and good image quality was obtained. In seven (11.5%) patients, it was not possible to perform ECG gating. The ECG gating process was identified as the main cause of the imaging problems. Bipolar leads working as bipolar pacing seem to be necessary to perform MSCT with ECG gating. A unipolar system lead may cause serious problems with reconstructions. PMID:21505855

  18. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  19. Aboriginal Education: Fulfilling the Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marlene Brant, Ed.; Davis, Lynne, Ed.; Lahache, Louise, Ed.

    Education is at the heart of the struggle of Canada's Aboriginal peoples to regain control over their lives as communities and nations. Based on hearings and research generated by the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP), this collection of articles documents recent progress in transforming Aboriginal education to support…

  20. Aboriginal Report - Charting Our Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report outlines Aboriginal learner participation and achievement in British Columbia's public post-secondary institutions for the period 2003-04 to 2006-07. In developing the report, the Ministry worked with its Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Partners, which includes Aboriginal and First Nations leadership, public…

  1. Cardiac toxicity of trastuzumab in elderly patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Denegri, Andrea; Moccetti, Tiziano; Moccetti, Marco; Spallarossa, Paolo; Brunelli, Claudio; Ameri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is diagnosed in ≥ 65 year old women in about half of cases. Experts currently recommend that systemic therapy is offered to elderly patients with BC, if, based on their overall conditions and life expectancy, it can be reasonably anticipated that the benefits will outweigh the risks of treatment. Like for young subjects, the monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2), trastuzumab, represents a valid therapeutic option when BC over-expresses this receptor. Unfortunately, administration of trastuzumab is associated with the occurrence of left ventricular dysfunction and chronic heart failure (CHF), possibly because of interference with the homeostatic functions of HER-2 in the heart. Registry-based, retrospective analyses have reported an incidence of CHF around 25% in elderly women receiving trastuzumab compared with 10%–15% in those not given any therapy for BC, and the risk of CHF has been estimated to be two-fold higher in > 60–65 year old trastuzumab users vs. non-users. Extremely advanced age and preexisting cardiac disease have been shown to predispose to trastuzumab cardiotoxicity. Therefore, selection of older patients for treatment with trastuzumab should be primarily based on their general status and the presence of comorbidities; previous chemotherapy, especially with anthracyclines, should be also taken into account. Once therapy has started, efforts should be made to ensure regular cardiac surveillance. The role of selected biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin, or new imaging techniques (three-dimension, tissue Doppler echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging) is promising, but must be further investigated especially in the elderly. Moreover, additional studies are needed in order to better understand the mechanisms by which trastuzumab affects the old heart. PMID:27403145

  2. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Michelle M; O'Regan, John A; Lavin, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of all hemodialysis patients will succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD), a rate far exceeding that observed in the general population. A high prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease amongst patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) partly explains this exaggerated risk. However, uremia and dialysis related factors are also of critical importance. Interventions aimed at preventing SCD have been inadequately studied in patients with ESKD. Data extrapolated from non-renal populations cannot necessarily be applied to hemodialysis patients, who possess relatively unique risk factors for SCD including "uremic cardiomyopathy", electrolyte shifts, fluctuations in intravascular volume and derangements of mineral and bone metabolism. Pending data derived from proposed randomized controlled clinical trials, critical appraisal of existing evidence and the selective application of guidelines developed for the general population to dialysis patients are required if therapeutic nihilism, or excessive intervention, are to be avoided. We discuss the evidence supporting a role for medical therapies, dialysis prescription refinements, revascularization procedures and electrical therapies as potential interventions to prevent SCD amongst hemodialysis patients. Based on current best available evidence, we present suggested strategies for the prevention of arrhythmia-mediated death in this highly vulnerable patient population. PMID:24720456

  3. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anemia and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion occur frequently in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. In this narrative review, we report the epidemiology of anemia and RBC transfusion in hospitalized adults and children (excluding premature neonates) with cardiac disease, and on the outcome of anemic and transfused cardiac patients. Both anemia and RBC transfusion are common in cardiac patients, and both are associated with mortality. RBC transfusion is the only way to rapidly treat severe anemia, but is not completely safe. In addition to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, the determinant(s) that should drive a practitioner to prescribe a RBC transfusion to cardiac patients are currently unclear. In stable acyanotic cardiac patients, Hb level above 70 g/L in children and above 70 to 80 g/L in adults appears safe. In cyanotic children, Hb level above 90 g/L appears safe. The appropriate threshold Hb level for unstable cardiac patients and for children younger than 28 days is unknown. The optimal transfusion strategy in cardiac patients is not well characterized. The threshold at which the risk of anemia outweighs the risk of transfusion is not known. More studies are needed to determine when RBC transfusion is indicated in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. PMID:25024880

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  5. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  6. Cardiac veins: collateral venous drainage pathways in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Evrim; Algin, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Venous anomalies are diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Subclavian or superior vena cava stenosis can be developed and venous return can be achieved via cardiac veins and coronary sinus in patients with central venous catheter for long-term hemodialysis. These types of abnormalities are not extremely rare especially in patients with a history of central venous catheter placement. Detection of these anomalies and subclavian vein stenosis before the surgical creation of hemodialysis fistulae or tunneled central venous catheter placement may prevent unnecessary interventions in those patients. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technique can give further information when compared with fluoroscopy or digital subtraction angiography in the management of these patients. This case report describes interesting aspects of central vein complications in hemodialysis patients. As a conclusion, there are limited data about thoracic venous return, and further prospective studies with large patient number are required. MDCT with 3D reconstruction is particularly useful for the accurate evaluation of venous patency, variations, and collateral circulation. Also it is an excellent tool for choosing and planning treatment. PMID:27056032

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic scleroderma in patients from the aboriginal people and the newcomers of Yakutia under the extreme conditions of the far north.

    PubMed

    Bezrodnyhk, A A; Karelin, A P

    1994-01-01

    There is some information on the course of two main forms of large collagenoses-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic scleroderma (SSD) under the conditions of the North of the Asian part of Russia (Yakutia) in this paper. Seventy-nine cases (59 SLE patients and 20 SSD patients) belonging to different ethnic groups were studied. There were 47 patients of Yakutian nationality, among them SLE 38 patients and SSD nine patients. There were 32 patients (SLE-21, and SSD-11) migrant Europeans. It has been proved that the aboriginal people of the North are more subject to SLE and SSD diseases as compared to the migrants. It has also been proved that the greater spreading of the diseases, with the collagen metabolism disturbance in the first ethnic group, including Marfan's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis may be explained by genetic peculiarities. Some ethnically stipulated differences in clinical manifestations of two large collagenosis were revealed. Thus, during SLE smaller frequency of the skin impairment in the Yakuts (due to natural hyperpigmentations) is connected with the considerable frequency of large joints impairment and more frequent course of SLE similar to rheumatoid variant with typical wrist deformation. One-third SLE and SSD patients of Yakut nationality reveal "overlap-syndrome", which are typical of other collagenoses, the so-called overlap-syndrome. Some industrial factors (dust of silicon dioxide, vibration, hydrocarbon compounds) are the main reason for the diseases among the newcomers migrants of Russian and Ukranian nationality. One case of silico-lupus was revealed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7943620

  8. Cardiac Monitoring During Adjuvant Trastuzumab-Based Chemotherapy Among Older Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Niu, Jiangong; Zhang, Ning; Elting, Linda S.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Banchs, Jose; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Giordano, Sharon H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab require adequate cardiac monitoring. We describe the patterns of cardiac monitoring and evaluate factors associated with adequate monitoring in a large population-based study of older patients with breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients age 66 years or older with full Medicare coverage, diagnosed with stage I to III breast cancer between 2005 and 2009, and treated with adjuvant trastuzumab-based chemotherapy were identified in the SEER-Medicare and the Texas Cancer Registry-Medicare databases. The adequacy of cardiac monitoring was determined. Chemotherapy, trastuzumab use, cardiac monitoring, and comorbidities were identified by using International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes. Prescribing physician characteristics were also evaluated. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression models. Results In all, 2,203 patients were identified; median age was 72 years. Adequate monitoring was identified in only 36.0% of the patients (n = 793). In the multivariable model, factors associated with optimal cardiac monitoring included a more recent year of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54), anthracycline use (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.71), female prescribing physician (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.70), and physician graduating after 1990 (HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.12). The presence of cardiac comorbidities was not a determinant for cardiac monitoring. Of the variance in the adequacy of cardiac monitoring, 15.3% was attributable to physician factors and 5.2% to measured patient factors. Conclusion A large proportion of patients had suboptimal cardiac monitoring. Physician characteristics had more influence than measured patient-level factors in the adequacy of cardiac monitoring. Because trastuzumab-related cardiotoxicity is reversible, efforts to improve the adequacy of cardiac monitoring are needed

  9. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: Role of MicroRNA Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sardu, Celestino; Barbieri, Michelangela; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Pasquale; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Marfella, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two growing and related diseases in general population and particularly in elderly people. In selected patients affected by HF and severe dysfunction of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), with left bundle brunch block, the cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT) is the treatment of choice to improve symptoms, NYHA class, and quality of life. CRT effects are related to alterations in genes and microRNAs (miRs) expression, which regulate cardiac processes involved in cardiac apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis, and membrane channel ionic currents. Different studies have shown a different prognosis in T2DM patients and T2DM elderly patients treated by CRT-D. We reviewed the literature data on CRT-D effect on adult and elderly patients with T2DM as compared with nondiabetic patients. PMID:26636106

  10. Innovation and Aboriginal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnochie, K. R.

    After defining educational and cultural terms and establishing a model representing cultural reproduction, case studies illustrate how three Aboriginal communities are educating and socializing their children. Strelley, a community in Western Australia, has a history of determined independence that has resulted in a unique level of economic and…

  11. Aboriginal Family Education Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, A.

    1970-01-01

    The Department of Adult Education of the University of Sydney (Australia) has been conducting an action-research project in family education for the Aborigines. The staff is to be available on request to visit communities, listen to expressed needs, and find ways of translating professional knowledge into media that can be understood. Gradually,…

  12. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  13. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ashwath; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Shaw, Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness.This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model.The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  14. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  15. Dialysis and transplantation among Aboriginal children with kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Susan M.; Foster, Bethany J.; Tonelli, Marcello A.; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Soo, Andrea; Alexander, R. Todd; Crowshoe, Lynden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Relatively little is known about the management and outcomes of Aboriginal children with renal failure in Canada. We evaluated differences in dialysis modality, time spent on dialysis, rates of kidney transplantation, and patient and allograft survival between Aboriginal children and non-Aboriginal children. Methods: For this population-based cohort study, we used data from a national pediatric end-stage renal disease database. Patients less than 18 years old who started renal replacement treatment (dialysis or kidney transplantation) in nine Canadian provinces (Quebec data were not available) and all three territories between 1992 and 2007 were followed until death, loss to follow-up or end of the study period. We compared initial modality of dialysis and time to first kidney transplant between Aboriginal children, white children and children of other ethnicity. We examined the association between ethnicity and likelihood of kidney transplantation using adjusted Cox proportional hazard models for Aboriginal and white children (data for the children of other ethnicity did not meet the assumptions of proportional hazards). Results: Among 843 pediatric patients included in the study, 104 (12.3%) were Aboriginal, 521 (61.8%) were white, and 218 (25.9%) were from other ethnic minorities. Hemodialysis was the initial modality of dialysis for 48.0% of the Aboriginal patients, 42.7% of the white patients and 62.6% of those of other ethnicity (p < 0.001). The time from start of dialysis to first kidney transplant was longer among the Aboriginal children (median 1.75 years, interquartile range 0.69–2.81) than among the children in the other two groups (p < 0.001). After adjustment for confounders, Aboriginal children were less likely than white children to receive a transplant from a living donor (hazard ratio [HR] 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21–0.61) or a transplant from any donor (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.74) during the study period

  16. Baseline cerebral oximetry values in cardiac and vascular surgery patients: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aim This study was conducted to evaluate baseline INVOS values and identify factors influencing preoperative baseline INVOS values in carotid endarterectomy and cardiac surgery patients. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 157 patients (100 cardiac surgery patients, 57 carotid endarterectomy patients). Data were collected on factors potentially related to baseline INVOS values. Data were analyzed with student's t-test, Chi-square, Pearson's correlation or Linear Regression as appropriate. Results 100 cardiac surgery patients and 57 carotid surgery patients enrolled. Compared to cardiac surgery, carotid endarterectomy patients were older (71.05 ± 8.69 vs. 65.72 ± 11.04, P < 0.001), with higher baseline INVOS (P < 0.007) and greater stroke frequency (P < 0.002). Diabetes and high cholesterol were more common in cardiac surgery patients. Right side INVOS values were strongly correlated with left-side values in carotid (r = 0.772, P < 0.0001) and cardiac surgery patients (r = 0.697, P < 0.0001). Diabetes and high cholesterol were associated with significantly (P < 0.001) lower INVOS and smoking was associated with higher INVOS values in carotid, but not in cardiac surgery patients. Age, sex, CVA history, Hypertension, CAD, Asthma, carotid stenosis side and surgery side were not related to INVOS. Multivariate analysis showed that diabetes is strongly associated with lower baseline INVOS values bilaterally (P < 0.001) and explained 36.4% of observed baseline INVOS variability in carotid (but not cardiac) surgery. Conclusion Compared to cardiac surgery, carotid endarterectomy patients are older, with higher baseline INVOS values and greater stroke frequency. Diabetes and high cholesterol are associated with lower baseline INVOS values in carotid surgery. Right and left side INVOS values are strongly correlated in both patient groups. PMID:20497559

  17. Safety of nerve conduction studies in patients with implanted cardiac devices.

    PubMed

    Schoeck, Andreas P; Mellion, Michelle L; Gilchrist, James M; Christian, Fredric V

    2007-04-01

    Patients with implanted cardiac devices and their physicians may defer important electrodiagnostic testing because of anxiety about potential negative effects on the device. To determine the safety of routine nerve conduction studies (NCS) in this population, 10 patients with permanent dual-chamber pacemakers of various types and five patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD) underwent nerve stimulation at sites commonly used during NCS. The implanted cardiac device was interrogated before and after the study and there was continuous monitoring of the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and atrial and ventricular electrograms. Electrical impulses generated during routine NCS were never detected by the sensing amplifier and did not affect the programmed settings of the implanted cardiac device. We conclude that routine NCS is safe in patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers with bipolar sensing configurations and defibrillators. PMID:17094099

  18. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  19. Dosimetric review of cardiac implantable electronic device patients receiving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Makkar, Akash; Fox, Colleen J; Hayman, James A; Horwood, Laura; Pelosi, Frank; Moran, Jean M

    2015-01-01

    A formal communication process was established and evaluated for the management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) receiving radiation therapy (RT). Methods to estimate dose to the CIED were evaluated for their appropriateness in the management of these patients. A retrospective, institutional review board (IRB) approved study of 69 patients with CIEDs treated with RT between 2005 and 2011 was performed. The treatment sites, techniques, and the estimated doses to the CIEDs were analyzed and compared to estimates from published peripheral dose (PD) data and three treatment planning systems(TPSs) - UMPlan, Eclipse's AAA and Acuros algorithms. When measurements were indicated, radiation doses to the CIEDs ranged from 0.01-5.06 Gy. Total peripheral dose estimates based on publications differed from TLD measurements by an average of 0.94 Gy (0.05-4.49 Gy) and 0.51 Gy (0-2.74 Gy) for CIEDs within 2.5 cm and between 2.5 and 10 cm of the treatment field edge, respectively. Total peripheral dose estimates based on three TPSs differed from measurements by an average of 0.69 Gy (0.02-3.72 Gy) for CIEDs within 2.5 cm of the field edge. Of the 69 patients evaluated in this study, only two with defibrillators experienced a partial reset of their device during treatment. Based on this study, few CIED-related events were observed during RT. The only noted correlation with treatment parameters for these two events was beam energy, as both patients were treated with high-energy photon beams (16 MV). Differences in estimated and measured CIED doses were observed when using published PD data and TPS calculations. As such, we continue to follow conservative guidelines and measure CIED doses when the device is within 10 cm of the field or the estimated dose is greater than 2 Gy for pacemakers or 1 Gy for defibrillators. PMID:25679176

  20. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations

    PubMed Central

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-01-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  1. Complicated grief in Aboriginal populations.

    PubMed

    Spiwak, Rae; Sareen, Jitender; Elias, Brenda; Martens, Patricia; Munro, Garry; Bolton, James

    2012-06-01

    To date there have been no studies examining complicated grief (CG) in Aboriginal populations. Although this research gap exists, it can be hypothesized that Aboriginal populations may be at increased risk for CG, given a variety of factors, including increased rates of all-cause mortality and death by suicide. Aboriginal people also have a past history of multiple stressors resulting from the effects of colonization and forced assimilation, a significant example being residential school placement. This loss of culture and high rates of traumatic events may place Aboriginal individuals at increased risk for suicide, as well as CG resulting from traumatic loss and suicide bereavement. Studies are needed to examine CG in Aboriginal populations. These studies must include cooperation with Aboriginal communities to help identify risk factors for CG, understand the role of culture among these communities, and identify interventions to reduce poor health outcomes such as suicidal behavior. PMID:22754293

  2. Prediction of Suicide Intent in Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Adolescent Inpatients: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, Murray W.; Inayatulla, Mohamed; Cox, Brian; Cheyne, Lorraine

    1997-01-01

    Explored the relationship among depressive symptoms, anxiety, hopelessness, and suicidal intent in a group of 77 adolescents following a suicide attempt. Results indicate that hopelessness was the only significant predictor of suicide intent in Caucasian patients, and depressed mood was the only significant predictor in the Aboriginal group. (RJM)

  3. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  4. Improving palliative care outcomes for Aboriginal Australians: service providers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians have a lower rate of utilisation of palliative care services than the general population. This study aimed to explore care providers’ experiences and concerns in providing palliative care for Aboriginal people, and to identify opportunities for overcoming gaps in understanding between them and their Aboriginal patients and families. Methods In-depth, qualitative interviews with urban, rural and remote palliative care providers were undertaken in inpatient and community settings in Western Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers with QSR NVivo 10 software used to help manage data. Data analysis was informed by multiple theoretical standpoints, including the social ecological model, critical cultural theories and the ‘cultural security’ framework. Thematic analysis was carried out that identified patterns within data. Results Fifteen palliative care providers were interviewed. Overall they reported lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture and being uncertain of the needs and priorities of Aboriginal people during end-of-life care. According to several participants, very few Aboriginal people had an understanding of palliative care. Managing issues such as anger, denial, the need for non-medical support due to socioeconomic disadvantage, and dealing with crises and conflicts over funeral arrangements were reported as some of the tensions between Aboriginal patients and families and the service providers. Conclusion Early referral to palliative care is important in demonstrating and maintaining a caring therapeutic relationship. Paramount to meeting the needs for Aboriginal patients was access to appropriate information and logistical, psychological and emotional support. These were often seen as essential but additional to standard palliative care services. The broader context of Aboriginal history and historical distrust of mainstream services was seen to

  5. Community as Teacher Model: Health Profession Students Learn Cultural Safety from an Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Cathy C.; Godolphin, William J.; Chhina, Gagun S.; Towle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Communication between health care professionals and Aboriginal patients is complicated by cultural differences and the enduring effects of colonization. Health care providers need better training to meet the needs of Aboriginal patients and communities. We describe the development and outcomes of a community-driven service-learning program in…

  6. Risk stratification for cardiac death in hemodialysis patients without obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masato; Tsukamoto, Kazumasa; Tamaki, Nagara; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Ono, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of cardiac death is higher among patients receiving dialysis compared with the general population. Although obstructive coronary artery disease is involved in cardiac deaths in the general population, deaths in hemodialysis patients occur in the apparent absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. To study this further, we prospectively enrolled 155 patients receiving hemodialysis after angiography had confirmed the absence of obstructive coronary lesions. All patients were examined by single-photon emission computed tomography using the iodinated fatty acid analog, BMIPP, the uptake of which was graded in 17 standard myocardial segments and assessed as summed scores. Insulin resistance was determined using the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). During a mean follow-up of 5.1 years, 42 patients died of cardiac events. Stepwise Cox hazard analysis associated cardiac death with reduced BMIPP uptake and increased insulin resistance. Patients were assigned to subgroups based on BMIPP summed scores and HOMA-IR cutoff values for cardiac death of 12 and 5.1, respectively, determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Cardiac death-free survival rates at 5 years were the lowest (32.2%) in the subgroup with both a summed score and assessment equal to or above the cutoff values compared with any other combination (52.9-98.7%) above, equal to, or below the thresholds. Thus, impaired myocardial fatty acid metabolism and insulin resistance may be associated with cardiac death among hemodialysis patients without obstructive coronary artery disease. PMID:20944544

  7. Effects of a brief intervention on retention of patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Angele; Burkes, Robert; Badenhop, Dalynn; McGinnis, Ron

    2014-12-01

    This intervention assessed the effects of a brief intervention on dropout rate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. One hundred thirty five patients were recruited from a cardiac rehabilitation program and randomized to either a control or intervention group. The intervention group participated in four sessions of motivational interviewing and stress management-relaxation in addition to standard cardiac rehabilitation. The control group underwent cardiac rehabilitation alone. Patients who completed the intervention completed an average of 30 sessions while those who dropped out of the intervention completed about six (p < 0.001). Anxiety and depression measured at baseline were the primary predictors of dropout. Patients in both the intervention and controls groups who completed cardiac rehabilitation improved the distance walked, quality of life and decreased anxiety. PMID:25150038

  8. Cardiac amyloidosis masquerading as biventricular hypertrophy in a patient with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ilias Basha, Haseeb; Raj, Ethiraj; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis or amyloid cardiomyopathy is a rare disorder characterised by extracellular deposition of insoluble polymers composed of low-molecular-weight subunit proteins within the myocardium. This often results in an infiltrative cardiomyopathy with restrictive pathophysiology, leading to progressive heart failure. In this report, we present an interesting case of cardiac amyloidosis that eventually led to the diagnosis of underlying multiple myeloma in a patient with no previous cardiac history. Cardiac amyloidosis should be suspected in patients with unexplained congestive heart-failure symptoms accompanied by low-voltage complexes on ECG, preserved ejection fraction with asymmetric ventricular hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial texture, described as ‘granular sparkling’ on echocardiogram. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis should be closely monitored as mortality remains high, despite advances in treatment. PMID:23897372

  9. Long term follow up of severely ill patients who underwent urgent cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, D.; Fitzgerald, M.; Wright, C.; Sparrow, J.; Pepper, J.; Yacoub, M.; Fox, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess long term survival (> 5 years) and quality of life in severely ill patients referred for urgent cardiac transplantation. SETTING--Tertiary referral centres: before transplantation at the National Heart Hospital (late 1984 to end 1986); after transplantation at Harefield Hospital. SUBJECTS--Eighteen patients (15 men; three women) who had required intensive support in hospital before cardiac transplantation and were alive at short term follow up. INTERVENTIONS--Intravenous infusions of cardiac drugs (mean 2.2 infusions), intravenous diuretics (17 patients), and many other drugs before transplantation. Intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (four patients), temporary pacing (two), and resuscitation from cardiac arrest (three). Patients had specialised nursing care on a medical intensive care unit in almost every case. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Long term survival in patients after urgent cardiac transplantation and perceived quality of life. RESULTS--Of 18 patients who were alive at short term follow up (mean (range) 19.4 (10-33) months), 14 were still alive in 1992 (69 (61-83) months). Ten still worked full time, and 11 reported no restrictions in their daily activities. Three of four patients who died in the intervening period survived > 5 years after transplantation. Overall, 17 of 18 patients survived at least 5 years. CONCLUSIONS--In severely ill patients who undergo urgent cardiac transplantation and survive in the short term, long term (5-7 year) survival and quality of life seem good. PMID:8435650

  10. Cardiac transplant in young female patient diagnosed with diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennasar, Guillermo; Carlevaris, Leandro; Secco, Anastasia; Romanini, Felix; Mamani, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) in a multifactorial and systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the connective tissue. We present this clinical case given the low prevalence of diffuse SS with early and progressive cardiac compromise in a young patient, and treatment with cardiac transplantation. PMID:26702511

  11. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac performance in recovery from exercise in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jonathan N; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between cardiac performance during recovery and the severity of heart failure, as determined by clinical and cardiopulmonary exercise test responses. METHODS: As part of a retrospective cohort study, 46 heart failure patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing while cardiac output was measured using a noninvasive device. Cardiac output in recovery was expressed as the slope of a single exponential relationship between cardiac output and time; the recovery-time constant was assessed in relation to indices of cardiac function, along with clinical, functional, and cardiopulmonary exercise responses. RESULTS: The recovery time constant was delayed in patients with heart failure compared with normal subjects (296.7±238 vs. 110.1±27 seconds, p <0.01), and the slope of the decline of cardiac output in recovery was steeper in normal subjects compared with heart failure patients (p<0.001). The slope of the decline in cardiac output recovery was inversely related to peak VO2 (r = -0.72, p<0.001) and directly related to the VE/VCO2 slope (r = 0.57, p<0.001). Heart failure patients with abnormal recovery time constants had lower peak VO2, lower VO2 at the ventilatory threshold, lower peak cardiac output, and a heightened VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac output recovery kinetics can identify heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity, and inefficient ventilation. Estimating cardiac output in recovery from exercise may provide added insight into the cardiovascular status of patients with heart failure. PMID:21655761

  12. Blood glucose management in the patient undergoing cardiac surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pingle; Duggar, Brian; Butterworth, John

    2014-01-01

    Both diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia per se are associated with negative outcomes after cardiac surgery. In this article, we review these associations, the possible mechanisms that lead to adverse outcomes, and the epidemiology of diabetes focusing on those patients requiring cardiac surgery. We also examine outpatient and perioperative management of diabetes with the same focus. Finally, we discuss our own efforts to improve glycemic management of patients undergoing cardiac surgery at our institution, including keys to success, results of implementation, and patient safety concerns. PMID:25429332

  13. Comparison of Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Biomarkers for Risk Stratification in Elderly Patients with Non-Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Lescuyer, Pierre; Gerstel, Eric; Bounameaux, Henri; Aujesky, Drahomir; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers unrelated to myocardial necrosis, such as cystatin C, copeptin, and mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), showed promise for cardiovascular risk prediction. Knowing whether they are comparable to cardiac biomarkers such as high-sensitive cardiac-troponin T (hs-cTnT) or N-terminal pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in elderly patients with acute non-massive pulmonary embolism (NMPE) remains elusive. This study aims at comparing the prognostic accuracy of cardiac and non-cardiac biomarkers in patients with NMPE aged ≥65 years over time. In the context of the SWITCO65+ cohort, we evaluated 227 elderly patients with an available blood sample taken within one day from diagnosis. The primary study endpoint was defined as PE-related mortality and the secondary endpoint as PE-related complications. The biomarkers’ predictive ability at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months was determined using C-statistics and Cox regression. For both study endpoints, C-statistics (95% confidence interval) were stable over time for all biomarkers, with the highest value for hs-cTnT, ranging between 0.84 (0.68–1.00) and 0.80 (0.70–0.90) for the primary endpoint, and between 0.74 (0.63–0.86) and 0.65 (0.57–0.73) for the secondary endpoint. For both study endpoints, cardiac biomarkers were found to be independently associated with risk, NT-proBNP displaying a negative predictive value of 100%. Among non-cardiac biomarkers, only copeptin and MR-proADM were independent predictors of PE-related mortality but they were not independent predictors of PE-related complications, and displayed lower negative predictive values. In elderly NMPE patients, cardiac biomarkers appear to be valuable prognostic to identify very low-risk individuals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00973596 PMID:27219621

  14. Post cardiac surgery phrenic nerve palsy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Serraf, A; Planche, C; Lacour Gayet, F; Bruniaux, J; Nottin, R; Binet, J P

    1990-01-01

    From January 1978 to December 1988, 109 phrenic nerve paralyses (PNP) occurred in a total of 9149 cardiac operations performed in a population of patients younger than 15 years old (1.2%) whose age varied from 1 day to 15 years old and mean weight was 11.3 +/- 8.7 kg. PNP was diagnosed in 43 patients after closed procedures (1.2% of 3509 procedures) and in 66 patients after open heart operations (1.2% of 5640 operations). PNP was right sided in 49 cases and left sided in 60 cases. Open heart operations that predisposed to PNP were those which needed harvesting of autologous pericardium (P less than 0.0001) and wide exposure of the great vessels. The modified right Blalock-Taussig shunt was the main cause of PNP in closed procedures (P less than 0.02). Small children tolerated PNP less well. They needed longer ventilatory support (P less than 0.0005) and developed more respiratory complications. Seventeen children underwent plication of the affected hemidiaphragm and could be subsequently extubated. It is concluded that for prevention of PNP, a high level of attention should be exercised in neonates and small children, particularly when pericardium is harvested or when exposure needs extensive dissection of the great vessels and thymus resection, or at reoperation. We also prefer to avoid the use of iced slush lavage. PNP, when symptomatic, is best managed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation. Diaphragmatic plication is recommended when after 2-3 weeks there is no recovery of diaphragmatic function or when there are troublesome respiratory complications. PMID:2171593

  15. Aborigines of the Imaginary: Applying Lacan to Aboriginal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the work of Jacques Lacan, a French psychoanalyst, to decipher the desire of the teacher in Aboriginal education. It argues that the images of Aboriginal people represented in Australian classrooms are effects of the teacher's Imaginary, the Imaginary being one of the three psychoanalytic domains theorised by Lacan over a period…

  16. Examining Aboriginal Corrections in Canada. Aboriginal Peoples Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPrairie, Carol; And Others

    This report provides information about the state of Aboriginal corrections in Canada. It draws on survey results, analyses of quantitative data, and a review of the relevant literature and research and raises some complex questions about the meaning and future of Aboriginal corrections. There are nine parts that: (1) discuss the reliance on…

  17. Distribution of Hepatitis C Risk Factors and HCV Treatment Outcomes among Central Canadian Aboriginal

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Parmvir; Corsi, Daniel J.; Cooper, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aboriginal Canadians face many lifestyle risk factors for hepatitis C exposure. Methods. An analysis of Ottawa Hospital Viral Hepatitis Clinic (Ottawa, Canada) patients between January 2000 and August 2013 was performed. HCV infection risk factors and HCV treatment outcomes were assessed. Socioeconomic status markers were based on area-level indicators linked to postal codes using administrative databases. Results. 55 (2.8%) Aboriginal and 1923 (97.2%) non-Aboriginal patients were evaluated. Aboriginals were younger (45.6 versus 49.6 years, p < 0.01). The distribution of gender (63.6% versus 68.3% male), HIV coinfection (9.1% versus 8.1%), advanced fibrosis stage (29.2% versus 28.0%), and SVR (56.3% versus 58.9%) was similar between groups. Aboriginals had a higher number of HCV risk factors, (mean 4.2 versus 3.1, p < 0.001) with an odds ratio of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–4.4) for having 4+ risk factors. This was not explained after adjustment for income, social deprivation, and poor housing. Aboriginal status was not related to SVR. Aboriginals interrupted therapy more often due to loss to follow-up, poor adherence, and substance abuse (25.0% versus 4.6%). Conclusion. Aboriginal Canadians have higher levels of HCV risk factors, even when adjusting for socioeconomic markers. Despite facing greater barriers to care, SVR rates were comparable with non-Aboriginals. PMID:27446875

  18. Clinical risk predictors associated with cardiac mortality following vascular surgery in South African patients.

    PubMed

    Biccard, B M; Bandu, R

    2007-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is important in the prognostication of peri-operative cardiac complications and the management of high-risk cardiac patients for major non-cardiac surgery. However, the current pre-operative clinical risk indices have been derived in European and American patients and not validated in South African patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of the clinical risk predictors identified in Lee's revised cardiac risk index and in the African arm of the INTERHEART study, in predicting cardiac mortality following vascular surgery in South African patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients undergoing elective or urgent vascular surgery at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital over a three-year period. All in-hospital deaths were identified and classified into cardiac or non-cardiac deaths by an investigator blinded to the patients' pre-operative clinical risk predicators. A second investigator blinded to the cause of death identified the following clinical risk predictors: history of ischaemic heart disease, congestive cardiac failure and cerebrovascular accident, presence of diabetes, hypertension and obesity (BMI > 30 kg.m(-2)), elevated serum creatinine (> 180 micromol.l(-1)), positive smoking history and ethnicity. The main finding was that a serum creatinine level of greater than 180 micromol.l(-1) and a positive smoking history were significantly associated with cardiac death (p = 0.012, p = 0.012, respectively). Multivariate analyses using a backward stepwise modeling technique found only a serum creatinine of > 180 micromol.l(-1) and a positive smoking history to be significantly associated with cardiac mortality (p = 0.038, 0.035, respectively) with an odds ratio and 95% confidence interval of 3.02 (1.06-8.59) and 3.40 (1.09-10.62), respectively. All other clinical predictors were not significantly different between the two groups. However, based on the sample size of this study, a type 2 or

  19. Echocardiographic abnormalities in the assessment of cardiac organ damage in never-treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Avenatti, Eleonora; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Abram, Sara; Magnino, Corrado; Naso, Diego; Tosello, Francesco; Fabbri, Ambra; Vairo, Alessandro; Mulatero, Paolo; Rabbia, Franco; Veglio, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension-related cardiac organ damage, other than left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH), has been described: in particular, concentric remodeling, LV diastolic dysfunction (DD), and left atrial (LA) enlargement are significantly associated with cardiovascular morbility and mortality in different populations. This study evaluated the prevalence of these latter morphofunctional abnormalities, in never-treated essential hypertensive patients and the role of such a serial assessment of hypertensive cardiac damage in improving cardiovascular risk stratification in these patients. A total of 100 never-treated essential hypertensive subjects underwent a complete clinical and echocardiographic evaluation. Left ventricular morphology, systolic and diastolic function, and LA dimension (linear and volume) were evaluated by echocardiography. Left ventricular hypertrophy was present in 14% of the patients, whereas concentric remodeling was present in 25% of the subjects. Among patients free from LV morphology abnormalities, the most frequent abnormality was LA enlargement (global prevalence 57%); the percentage of patients with at least one parameter consistent with DD was 22% in the entire population, but DD was present as the only cardiac abnormality in 1% of our patient. Left atrial volume indexed for body surface area was the most sensitive parameter in identifying hypertension-related cardiac modification. The global prevalence of cardiac alteration reached 73% in never-treated hypertensive patients. Left ventricular remodeling and LA enlargement evaluation may grant a better assessment of cardiac organ damage and cardiovascular risk stratification of hypertensive patients without evidence of LVH after routine examination. PMID:22738434

  20. History of organ donation by patients with cardiac death.

    PubMed

    DeVita, M A; Snyder, J V; Grenvik, A

    1993-06-01

    When successful solid organ transplantation was initiated almost 40 years ago, its current success rate was not anticipated. But continuous efforts were undertaken to overcome the two major obstacles to success: injury caused by interrupting nutrient supply to the organ and rejection of the implanted organ by normal host defense mechanisms. Solutions have resulted from technologic medical advances, but also from using organs from different sources. Each potential solution has raised ethical concerns and has variably resulted in societal acclaim, censure, and apathy. Transplant surgery is now well accepted, and the list of transplant candidates has grown far quicker than the availability of organs. More than 30,000 patients were awaiting organs for transplantation at the end of March 1993. While most organs came from donors declared dead by brain criteria, the increasing shortage of donated organs has prompted a reexamination of prior restrictions of donor groups. Recently, organ procurement from donors with cardiac death has been reintroduced in the United States. This practice has been mostly abandoned by the U.S. and some, though not all, other countries. Transplantation has been more successful using organs procured from heart-beating, "brain dead" cadavers than organs from non-heart-beating cadavers. However, recent advances have led to success rates with organs from non-heart-beating donors that may portend large increases in organ donation and procurement from this source. PMID:10126525

  1. Primary Multiple Cardiac Myxomas in a Patient without the Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Shohei; Otsuka, Masato; Goto, Masayuki; Kahata, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Asako; Inoue, Koji; Koganei, Hiroshi; Enta, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and multiple myxomas are even rarer. The latter phenomenon is mostly associated with the Carney complex, a dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiple primary cardiac myxomas, endocrinopathy, and spotty pigmentation of the skin. We report the rare case of a patient who did not have the Carney complex but had multiple primary cardiac tumors. A 78-year-old woman with a past history of breast cancer was referred to our hospital for further examination of multiple cardiac tumors. Echocardiography showed 4 tumors in the left atrium and left ventricle. We could not diagnose them preoperatively and decided to resect them surgically because they were mobile and could have caused embolism and obstruction. The postoperative pathological findings of all 4 tumors were myxomas, although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. Therefore, a rare case of multiple primary cardiac myxomas was diagnosed. PMID:27081449

  2. Primary Multiple Cardiac Myxomas in a Patient without the Carney Complex

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Masato; Goto, Masayuki; Kahata, Mitsuru; Kumagai, Asako; Inoue, Koji; Koganei, Hiroshi; Enta, Kenji; Ishii, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and multiple myxomas are even rarer. The latter phenomenon is mostly associated with the Carney complex, a dominantly inherited disease characterized by multiple primary cardiac myxomas, endocrinopathy, and spotty pigmentation of the skin. We report the rare case of a patient who did not have the Carney complex but had multiple primary cardiac tumors. A 78-year-old woman with a past history of breast cancer was referred to our hospital for further examination of multiple cardiac tumors. Echocardiography showed 4 tumors in the left atrium and left ventricle. We could not diagnose them preoperatively and decided to resect them surgically because they were mobile and could have caused embolism and obstruction. The postoperative pathological findings of all 4 tumors were myxomas, although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria of the Carney complex. Therefore, a rare case of multiple primary cardiac myxomas was diagnosed. PMID:27081449

  3. Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a letter of understanding between British Columbia Teachers' Federation (BCTF) and British Columbia Public School Employers' Association (BCPSEA) in response to Employment Equity for Aboriginal Teachers. The parties recognize that Aboriginal teachers are under-represented in the public education system. The parties are committed to…

  4. Western Institutional Impediments to Australian Aboriginal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTaggart, Robin

    1991-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of developing an Aboriginal form of education by Aboriginal teachers. Expresses concern that the western bureaucratic educational system will not permit a suitable Aboriginal system to develop. Describes the Deakin-Batchelor Teacher Education Program as an example of action research in Aboriginal teacher education.…

  5. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-07-01

    We explore about fifty different Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarize the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses. We show that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, elders or medicine men claimed to be able to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their roles as providers and protectors within their communities. We also show that some Aboriginal groups seem to have understood the motions of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the Moon blocking the Sun.

  6. Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy in patients with calcification within the cardiac silhouette.

    PubMed Central

    Wald, R W; Sternberg, L; Huckell, V F; Staniloff, H M; Feiglin, D H; Morch, J E

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintiscanning was performed in 22 patients with radiographically detected calcification within the cardiac silhouette. All but one of these scintigrams showed a localised area of increased activity similar to that ordinarily seen in acute myocardial infarction. Scintiscans in 3 patients after removal of the calcified aortic valve reverted to negative. It was concluded that this technique for acute infarct detection may yield false positive results in the presence of cardiac calcification. Images PMID:207292

  7. Recurrent right ventricular cardiac myxoma in a patient with Carney complex: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carney complex is a multiple neoplasia syndrome involving cardiac, endocrine, neural and cutaneous tumors with a variety of pigmented skin lesions. It has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Approximately 7% of cardiac myxomas are related to the Carney complex. Myxomas that occur as part of the Carney complex affect both sexes with equal frequency. Cardiac myxomas with Carney complex are reported mostly in the left side of the heart and are less common on the right side. As per our review, this is the first reported case of Carney complex with right ventricle cardiac myxoma. Case presentation We present a rare case of recurrent cardiac myxoma in a patient later diagnosed to have Carney complex. A 46-year-old Caucasian man with a history of thyroid hyperplasia came to out-patient cardiology department with new onset atrial fibrillation. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a right ventricular mass attached to his interventricular septum, which was later seen on a transesophageal echocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent resection of the ventricular mass which on pathology revealed myxoma. He later developed skin lesions, pituitary adenoma and Sertoli cell tumor suggesting Carney complex. Two years later he developed a new mass within his right atrium which was later resected. Conclusions Carney complex is a rare autosomal dominant disease with variable penetrance. Since it involves multiple organs, patients diagnosed with Carney complex should undergo serial endocrine workup, neural assessments, echocardiograms and testicular ultrasounds. Of the total number of cases of Carney complex, 65% are linked to PRKAR1A gene mutation. It is important for clinicians to be cognizant of a link between cardiac myxoma and Carney complex. The use of multi-imaging modalities allows better delineation of the mass before planned resection. Carney complex-related cardiac myxoma comprises 7% of all cardiac myxomas. Right ventricular

  8. Risks of packed red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David R

    2012-12-01

    Packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating that such patients can tolerate relatively low hemoglobins, and an extensive body of literature has developed demonstrating that patients undergoing such surgery who receive PRBC are at risk for several adverse outcomes including increased mortality, atrial fibrillation, and more postoperative infections, as well as numerous other complications. The PubMed database was searched for the English language literature on the topic of PRBC transfusion and outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, as well as alternatives to this intervention. Data were reviewed to assess the impact of transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on mortality, cardiac, infectious, and pulmonary, as well as a variety of miscellaneous complications. Patients receiving PRBC were consistently identified as being at higher risk for complications in all categories. The limited prospective data were consistent with the retrospective data, which comprised most of the literature. The preponderance of the literature suggests that patients undergoing cardiac surgery can tolerate lower hemoglobin/hematocrit values than traditionally appreciated. Most published data also indicate that PRBC transfusion should be reserved for patients with an identifiable clinical/physiologic indication fir this intervention, consistent with recent specialty society guidelines. PMID:22762927

  9. Detecting cardiac involvement with magnetic resonance in patients with active eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Yune, Sehyo; Choi, Dong-Chull; Lee, Byung-Jae; Lee, Jin-Young; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Kim, Sung Mok; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac involvement is the most important prognostic factor in eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome). The aims of this study were to describe findings of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with active EGPA and to find factors associated with cardiac involvement detected by CMR that could help identify patients who would benefit from the examination. Medical records and CMR images in 16 consecutive EGPA patients (8 women and 8 men, median age of 47 years ranging from 34 to 68 years) were reviewed. Clinical features and results of laboratory tests were compared according to the presence of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on CMR images. The patients were followed for the development of cardiac symptoms and signs (mean follow up duration, 40.5 ± 12.8 months). Among the total of 16 patients, 8 (50 %) had myocardial LGE according to CMR, located in the subendocardial layer in 7 of them (87.5 %). The extent of LGE had a significant negative correlation with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, ρ = -0.723, p = 0.043). The presence of LGE was associated with larger end-systolic left ventricle internal dimension (34 vs. 28 mm, p = 0.027) and presence of diastolic dysfunction (75 vs. 0 %, p = 0.008) on echocardiography, elevated NT-proBNP (75 vs. 12.5 %, p = 0.012), and elevated CK-MB (62.5 vs. 0 %, p = 0.010) compared to the group without LGE. Only one patient (6.3 %) had cardiac symptoms before CMR and another patient (6.3 %) developed heart failure 4 years later during remission. The other 14 patients remained free from cardiac signs and symptoms during the follow-up period. In patients with active EGPA, CMR enables detection of cardiac involvement when cardiac symptoms are not present. Echocardiographic diastolic dysfunction and elevated NT-proBNP or CK-MB may help identify active EGPA patients who can benefit from CMR to detect cardiac involvement without cardiac symptoms. PMID

  10. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C in a Canadian Aboriginal population: Results from the PRAIRIE study

    PubMed Central

    Minuk, Gerald Yosel; O’Brien, Meaghan; Hawkins, Kim; Emokpare, Didi; McHattie, James; Harris, Paul; Worobetz, Lawrence; Doucette, Karen; Kaita, Kelly; Wong, Stephen; Pinette, Gilles; Uhanova, Julia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Aboriginal population of Canada is at increased risk of exposure to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Previous data indicate that spontaneous clearance of HCV occurs more often in Aboriginals than Caucasians. Whether this enhanced response extends to antiviral therapy for chronic HCV remains to be determined. OBJECTIVES: To document and compare the biochemical and virological responses to antiviral therapy in HCV-infected Canadian Aboriginals and Caucasians. METHODS: A total of 101 treatment-naive adult patients (46 Aboriginal, 55 Caucasian) with chronic HCV genotype 1 infections were prospectively treated with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin and followed as per national guidelines. RESULTS: Aboriginals had higher HCV-RNA loads at baseline (6.42log10 versus 5.98log10; P<0.03). Although normalization of serum aminotransferase levels, decreases in viral loads, and rapid, early and end-of-treatment virological responses were similar in the two cohorts, sustained virological responses were significantly lower in Aboriginals (35% versus 55%; P=0.047). Premature discontinuation of treatment and/or loss of patients to follow-up was common (Aboriginals 37%, Caucasians 27%). Treatment-related side effects were similar in the two cohorts. CONCLUSION: Despite higher rates of spontaneous HCV clearance, the response to antiviral therapy was similar, if not lower, in Aboriginals compared with Caucasians with chronic HCV genotype 1 infections. Compliance with treatment is an issue that needs to be addressed in the management of these patients. PMID:24340315

  11. Effect of phase III cardiac rehabilitation and relaxation on the quality of life in patients with cardiac syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Aram; Ghaderi, Chiman; Dehghani, Mohammad R.; Khalkhali, Hamid R.; Sheikhi, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cardiac syndrome X is a relatively common disorder, and still not much is known about the causative factors or its pathophysiology, which makes it difficult to cure. Due to its chronic nature and debilitating symptoms, many patients have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL).The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and relaxation on the QOL of patients. Materials and Methods: This research is a randomized clinical trial study. Forty eligible and consenting women (age 30-65 years) were randomly assigned to four groups. In the first group (n = 11), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR); in the second group (n = 11), phase III CR; and in the third group (n = 11), PMR along with phase III CR were performed for 8 weeks at home. The fourth group (n = 7) was used as the control group. Short form of QOL questionnaire (SF-36) was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using χ2, Kruskal-Wallis, and rank sum difference tests. Results: After phase III CR, relaxation, and combination of CR and relaxation, patients demonstrated improved QOL (P < 0.001). The results of post-test multiple comparisons showed that there were statistically significant differences between control and all intervention groups (P < 0.05). There was also statistically significant difference between relaxation and combination of phase III CR and relaxation groups (P < 0.5). Conclusions: An 8-week phase III CR program together with relaxation improved QOL of patients with cardiac syndrome X. We suggest phase III CR program together with relaxation as an effective treatment in these patients. PMID:23922604

  12. Comparison of dynamic measurements of pulse contour with pulsed heat continuous cardiac output in postoperative cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Martin; Lawrence, John; Belessis, Andrew; Murgo, Margherita; Shehabi, Yahya

    2007-02-01

    Cardiac output (CO) can be measured using bolus thermodilution via a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and as continuous cardiac output (CCO), using pulsed heat thermoditution. Pulse contour cardiac output (PCCO) measures continuous CO by analysis of the arterial waveform after calibration with thermodilution CO. The Pulsion Medical Systems (PiCCO system) achieves this by transpulmonary aortic thermodilution (TDtpa). There is uncertainty regarding the agreement between TDtpa, CCO, and PCCO CO measurements in situations of rapid haemodynamic changes. We studied the agreement of the measures by comparing digital recordings of cardiac index (CI) determined by PCCO and CCO (PCCI and CCI, respectively) made during periods of haemodynamic instability. After ethics committee approval we studied four post-coronary artery bypass graft patients, in the immediate postoperative period. Each patient had a 7.5F CCO catheter (Edwards Lifesciences) and a 5F, 20cm PCCO femoral artery catheter. Digital recordings were obtained for the first 12-18 postoperative hours. Six epochs of instability were identified in the first two to three postoperative hours, and at the commencement of inotropic or vasoactive drugs. Notable features, despite frequent PCCO calibrations, were the marked difference of PCCI compared to CCI. In contradistinction, they tracked very closely during a period of stability. Limitations of both methods were noted. Whilst PCCO responded to rapid change, it developed significant error during haemodynmamic instability and requires frequent recalibration. CCO on the other hand has a considerable time lag in responding to changes in CO. The way a monitor measures CO must be taken into account when using the data in clinical management. PMID:17424793

  13. Paediatric cardiac surgery in a patient with cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    Cold agglutinins (CAs) lead to organ thrombosis or haemolysis due to increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping when blood temperature drops below the thermal amplitude for haemagglutination. Although it is well known that CAs are particularly relevant to adult cardiac surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), paediatric cardiac surgery with congenital heart disease and with CAs has been reported very rarely. We present here a case of paediatric cardiac surgery to repair atrial septal defect with pulmonary stenosis in an 11-month old infant with a family history of CAs. She was detected to have a high titre of CAs preoperatively, and underwent an intracardiac repair with normothermic CPB using temporary electrical fibrillation for added safety. Her post-operative course was uneventful without any complications. PMID:22184466

  14. Fibrofatty Changes: Incidence at Cardiac MR Imaging in Patients with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rastegar, Neda; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; James, Cynthia A; Bhonsale, Aditya; Murray, Brittney; Tichnell, Crystal; Calkins, Hugh; Tandri, Harikrishna; Bluemke, David A; Kamel, Ihab R; Zimmerman, Stefan L

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence of ventricular fatty replacement and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) at cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular (RV) dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) and the relationship of these findings to disease severity. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study. All subjects provided written informed consent. Seventy-six patients with ARVD/C were enrolled from 2002 to 2012. Quantitative and qualitative cardiac MR imaging analyses of the RV and the left ventricle (LV) were performed to determine cardiac MR imaging-specific Task Force Criteria (TFC) and non-TFC features (ARVD/C-type pattern of fatty infiltration and/or nonischemic pattern LGE). Patients were separated into four groups on the basis of cardiac MR imaging TFC: (a) patients with major cardiac MR imaging criteria, (b) patients with minor criteria, (c) patients with partial criteria, and (d) patients with no criterion. Continuous variables were compared by using the independent Student t test and analysis of variance. Categoric variables were compared by using the Fisher exact test. Results Of 76 patients (mean age, 34.2 years ± 14 [standard deviation]; 51.3% men), 42 met major cardiac MR imaging criteria, seven met minor criteria, seven met partial criteria, and 20 met no criterion. Most probands (36 [80.0%] of 45) met major or minor cardiac MR imaging criteria. Only 13 (41.9%) of 31 family members met any cardiac MR imaging criterion. The most common non-TFC MR imaging features were RV fatty infiltration (28.9%) and LV LGE (35.5%). Non-TFC cardiac MR imaging features were seen in 88.1% of subjects with major criteria, in 28.6% of those with minor criteria, in 71.4% of those with partial criteria, and in 10.0% of those with no criteria. Conclusion In this large cohort of patients with ARVD/C, non-TFC findings of ventricular fatty infiltration and LGE were frequent

  15. Peri-operative Levosimendan in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: An Overview of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shi, William Y; Li, Sheila; Collins, Nicholas; Cottee, David B; Bastian, Bruce C; James, Allen N; Mejia, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, has recently emerged as a valuable agent in the peri-operative management of cardiac surgery patients. Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitising ionodilator. By binding to cardiac troponin C and reducing its calcium-binding co-efficient, it enhances myofilament responsiveness to calcium and thus enhances myocardial contractility without increasing oxygen demand. Current evidence suggests that levosimendan enhances cardiac function after cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with both normal and reduced left ventricular function. In addition to being used as post-operative rescue therapy for low cardiac output syndrome, a pre-operative levosimendan infusion in high risk patients with poor cardiac function may reduce inotropic requirements, the need for mechanical support, the duration of intensive care admissions as well as post-operative mortality. Indeed, it is these higher-risk patients who may experience a greater degree of benefit. Larger, multicentre randomised trials in cardiac surgery will help to elucidate the full potential of this agent. PMID:25862519

  16. Factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal people in Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Shaouli; Teng, Tiew-Hwa Katherine; Bessarab, Dawn; Aoun, Samar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives Delayed presentation of symptomatic cancer is associated with poorer survival. Aboriginal patients with cancer have higher rates of distant metastases at diagnosis compared with non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper examined factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal Australians from patient and service providers' perspectives. Methods In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in two stages (2006–2007 and 2011). Inductive thematic analysis was assisted by use of NVivo looking around delays in presentation, diagnosis and referral for cancer. Participants Aboriginal patients with cancer/family members (n=30) and health service providers (n=62) were recruited from metropolitan Perth and six rural/remote regions of Western Australia. Results Three broad themes of factors were identified: (1) Contextual factors such as intergenerational impact of colonisation and racism and socioeconomic deprivation have negatively impacted on Aboriginal Australians' trust of the healthcare professionals; (2) health service-related factors included low accessibility to health services, long waiting periods, inadequate numbers of Aboriginal professionals and high staff turnover; (3) patient appraisal of symptoms and decision-making, fear of cancer and denial of symptoms were key reasons patients procrastinated in seeking help. Elements of shame, embarrassment, shyness of seeing the doctor, psychological ‘fear of the whole health system’, attachment to the land and ‘fear of leaving home’ for cancer treatment in metropolitan cities were other deterrents for Aboriginal people. Manifestation of masculinity and the belief that ‘health is women's domain’ emerged as a reason why Aboriginal men were reluctant to receive health checks. Conclusions Solutions to improved Aboriginal cancer outcomes include focusing on the primary care sector encouraging general practitioners to be proactive to suspicion of symptoms with appropriate

  17. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  18. [Cardiac MRI in the follow-up of adult congenital cardiomyopathy patients].

    PubMed

    Monney, P; Stalder, N; Clair, M; Vogt, P; Schwitter, J; Meijboom, E J; Bouchardy, J

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a rapidly developing modality in cardiology. It offers an excellent image definition and a large field of view, allowing a more accurate morphological assessment of cardiac malformations. Due to its unique versatility and its ability to provide myocardial tissue characterization, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is now recognized as a central imaging modality for a wide range of congenital heart diseases, including assessment of post-surgical cardiac anatomy, quantification of valvular disease and detection of myocardial ischemia. CMR provides useful diagnostic information without any radiation exposure, and improves the global management of patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:21717692

  19. Cardiac amyloidosis in a heart transplant patient - A case report and retrospective analysis of amyloidosis evolution.

    PubMed

    Kintsler, Svetlana; Jäkel, Jörg; Brandenburg, Vincent; Kersten, Katrin; Knuechel, Ruth; Röcken, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a very rare cause of heart failure in heart transplant recipients but an important differential diagnosis in cases of progressive cardiac failure. We report a 72-year-old male patient with the diagnosis of senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) in a transplanted heart 15 years after transplantation by the initial diagnosis of the dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally performed immunohistochemical analysis with anti-transthyretin antibody of the cardiac biopsies of the last 15 years enabled the possibility to show the evolution of this disease with characteristic biphasic pattern. PMID:25674390

  20. Exercise Rehabilitation for Chronic Heart Failure Patients with Cardiac Device Implants

    PubMed Central

    Haennel, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade a significant development in the management and rehabilitation of people with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been the utilization of cardiac devices. The use of biventricular pacemakers, referred to as Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) can yield improvements in functional abilities for a select group of CHF patients and the inclusion of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) may reduce the risk of sudden death. This review provides physical therapists with a basic understanding of how to prescribe exercise for people with CHF who have these device implants. PMID:22993499

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a young patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Tamami; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Yorozuya, Toshihiro; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was admitted to the hospital because of worsening dyspnea and general fatigue. He had received medication therapy for cardiomyopathy with heart failure and home mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. An electrocardiogram on admission showed intermittent third-degree atrioventricular block. Echocardiography showed global mild left ventricular systolic dysfunction with dyssynchrony (ejection fraction: 45%). He underwent implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy–defibrillator. His B-type natriuretic peptide level was improved after cardiac resynchronization therapy–defibrillator implantation, and he remains asymptomatic. The incidence of cardiomyopathy increases with age. By adulthood, 100% of patients have cardiac involvement. PMID:26346252

  2. [Manifestations of polymorphism of β1-adrenoreceptors in patients with newly diagnosed cardiac rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, S A; Rebrova, T Iu; Batalov, R E; Muslimova, É F; Borisova, E V; Popov, S V

    2013-01-01

    Individual peculiarities of the receptor apparatus of cardiomyocytes may determine pathological features of heart activity and susceptibility to pharmaceuticals. The possible role of beta-adrenoreceptor polymorphism in the development of cardiac rhythm disturbances is assessed by PCR. Special attention is given to A145G polymorphism of the ADRB1 gene in 127 patients with primary cardiac rhythm disorders. It was shown that AJ45G polymorphism (Ser49Gly) at DNA sites encoding for the amino acid sequence of beta-1 adrenoreceptors can influence the development of sex-specific cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:24437165

  3. An unusual case of mesenteric ischemia in a patient with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez Baztarrica, Gabriel; Bornancini, Norberto; Salvaggio, Flavio; Porcile, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms related to peripheral embolism are experienced in 2%-15% of cases of cardiac myxoma. We present a rare case of a 54-year-old man admitted due to sudden abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). As the patient's response to support treatment was favorable, a non-invasive approach was adopted, with prescription of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed a tumor in the left atrium. The cardiac mass was completely removed and diagnosed as myxoma by histopathological analysis. As periodic CT scans showed progressive improvement of blood flow through the SMA, OAC was continued. OAC may have been beneficial due to the nature of emboli originating from a cardiac myxoma: thrombi covering the surface of the tumor. At present, there is no explanation in the literature for the benefits of OAC in patients with embolism associated with cardiac myxoma. PMID:23890757

  4. Physical Therapy Management for Adult Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Canadian Practice Survey

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cathy M.; Jackson, Jennifer; Lucy, S. Deborah; Prendergast, Monique; Sinclair, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine current Canadian physical therapy practice for adult patients requiring routine care following cardiac surgery. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of a selected sample (n=18) of Canadian hospitals performing cardiac surgery to determine cardiorespiratory care, mobility, exercises, and education provided to patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Results: An average of 21 cardiac surgeries per week (range: 6–42) were performed, with an average length of stay of 6.4 days (range: 4.0–10.6). Patients were seen preoperatively at 7 of 18 sites and on postoperative day 1 (POD-1) at 16 of 18 sites. On POD-1, 16 sites performed deep breathing and coughing, 7 used incentive spirometers, 13 did upper-extremity exercises, and 12 did lower-extremity exercises. Nine sites provided cardiorespiratory treatment on POD-3. On POD-1, patients were dangled at 17 sites and mobilized out of bed at 13. By POD-3, patients ambulated 50–120 m per session 2–5 times per day. Sternal precautions were variable, but the lifting limit was reported as ranging between 5 lb and 10 lb. Conclusions: Canadian physical therapists reported the provision of cardiorespiratory treatment after POD-1. According to current available evidence, this level of care may be unnecessary for uncomplicated patients following cardiac surgery. In addition, some sites provide cardiorespiratory treatment techniques that are not supported by evidence in the literature. Further research is required. PMID:21629599

  5. Cardiac dysfunction and orthostatic intolerance in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and a small left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Kunihisa

    2015-07-01

    The etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is unknown. Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) has been recently postulated to be the cause of CFS. Orthostatic intolerance (OI) has been known as an important symptom in predicting quality of life in CFS patients. Cardiac function may be impaired in patients with ME. The presence or absence of OI was determined both symptomatically and by using a 10-min stand-up test in 40 ME patients. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function were determined echocardiographically in the ME patients compared to 40 control subjects. OI was noted in 35 (97%) of the 36 ME patients who could stand up quickly. The mean values for the cardiothoracic ratio, systemic systolic and diastolic pressures, LV end-diastolic diameter (EDD), LV end-systolic diameter, stroke volume index, cardiac index and LV mass index were all significantly smaller in the ME group than in the controls. Both a small LVEDD (<40 mm, 45 vs. 3%) and a low cardiac index (<2 l/ min/mm2, 53 vs. 8%) were significantly more common in the ME group than in the controls. Both heart rate and LV ejection fraction were similar between the groups. In conclusion, a small LV size with a low cardiac output was common in ME patients, in whom OI was extremely common. Cardiac dysfunction with a small heart appears to be related to the symptoms of ME. PMID:24736946

  6. Evaluation of transesophageal echocardiography in detecting cardiac sources of emboli in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Toodeji, Mohammad Amin; Izadi, Sadegh; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Nikoo, Mohamad Hosin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embolus is one of the causes of ischemic stroke that can be due to cardiac sources such as valvular heart diseases and atrial fibrillation and atheroma of the aorta. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is superior in identifying potential cardiac sources of emboli. Due to insufficient data on TEE findings in ischemic stroke in Iran, the present study was done to evaluate TEE in detecting cardiac sources of emboli. The main aim of this study was to describe the cardiogenic sources of emboli using TEE in the ischemic stroke patients. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted during a 13-month period from January 2012 to February 2013 in Shiraz Nemazee teaching hospital. Patients admitted with stroke diagnosis were included; but hemorrhagic stroke cases were excluded. 229 patients with ischemic stroke diagnosis were included and underwent TEE. Results: Causes of cardiac emboli were detected in 65 cases (40.7%) and categorized to high-risk (29.7%) and potential risk (11%). High risk cardiac sources included atrial fibrillation (8.7%), mitral valve disease (MS or MI) 11 cases (4.75%), aortic valve disease (AS or AI) 8 (3.5%), prosthetic valve 3 (1.35%), dilated cardiomyopathy 45 (19.65%) and congestive heart failure with ejection fraction < 30% in 8 cases (3.5%). Potential cardiac sources of emboli comprised 7 cases (3.05%) of septal aneurysm, 4 (1.75%) left ventricular hypokinesia, 13 (5.7%) mitral annular calcification and 9 cases (3.95%) complex atheroma in the ascending aorta or proximal arch. Conclusion: Our study showed that high risk cardiac sources of emboli can be detected using TEE in a considerable percentage of ischemic stroke patients. The most common high risk cardiac etiologies were dilated cardiomyopathy and valvular heart diseases. PMID:26793628

  7. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira; Santos, Bruno F. de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M. Francisco; de Oliveira, Daniel Pio; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all‑cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 – 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 – 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. PMID:25352460

  8. Cardiac evaluation and risk reduction in patients undergoing major vascular operations.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K

    1994-01-01

    Occult coronary artery disease often accompanies symptomatic peripheral vascular disease and has an important effect on survival. Most perioperative and late fatalities after peripheral vascular operations are due to cardiac causes. Noninvasive cardiac testing can identify patients at increased risk for postoperative cardiac complications, although controversy exists regarding the optimal preoperative evaluation. Risk reduction strategies for patients known to be at high risk are also controversial. Some authors advocate coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty before the vascular procedure. Others believe that the combined morbidity and mortality of 2 operations exceed those of a peripheral vascular operation performed with aggressive monitoring and medical therapy. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring after an operation has identified silent myocardial ischemia as a powerful predictor of cardiac complications. Ongoing research is likely to provide insights into the pathogenesis of postoperative cardiac complications and may lead to specific therapeutic interventions. Few prospective studies have been done in this area, and the threshold for preoperative and postoperative intervention is unknown. I review the literature and present an algorithm to guide cardiac testing and risk reduction in patients undergoing elective vascular surgical procedures. PMID:7941507

  9. Attenuated preejection period response to tyramine in patients with cardiac sympathetic denervation

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, Richard; Eldadah, Basil A.; Bentho, Oladi; Pechnik, Sandra; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Holmes, Courtney; Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress is a well-known factor affecting cardiac contractility through the cardiac sympathetic nerves. A positive inotropic effect of the cardiac sympathetic nerves on the myocardium is reflected by preejection period (PEP) shortening. Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH) (PD+NOH) or with pure autonomic failure (PAF) have markedly decreased myocardial 6-[18]F-fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity, reflecting cardiac sympathetic denervation. The functional effects of the cardiac sympathetic denervation have been unknown. Methods We measured PEP and heart rate-corrected PEP (PEPI) responses to i.v. tyramine (1 mg/min) in 13 patients (9 PD+OH and 4 PAF) with low 6-[18]F-fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity and in subjects with normal radioactivity (15 multiple system atrophy with NOS patients (MSA+NOS). Results Baseline PEP and PEPI did not differ between the groups. By 10 minutes after initiation of tyramine infusion, PEP and PEPI were significantly lower (p<0.01) in MSA+NOS, compared to baseline, whereas PEP and PEPI remained unchanged in the PD+NOH/PAF group. The PEP and PEPI decrease was larger in the MSA+NOS group than in the PD+NOH/PAF group (p<0.05). Conclusion One of the functional consequences of cardiac sympathetic denervation is failure to increase contractility in response to stimuli that depend on endogenous norepinephrine release. PMID:19120145

  10. Anxiety and Hypervigilance to Cardiopulmonary Sensations in Non-Cardiac Chest Pain Patients With and Without Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    White, Kamila S.; Craft, Jennifer M.; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated body vigilance, cardiac anxiety, and the mediating role of interoceptive fear on pain in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP; a syndrome of chest pain in the absence of identifiable organic etiology). Patients were more attentive to cardiac-congruent sensations than cardiac-incongruent sensations (e.g., gastrointestinal, cognitive dyscontrol; p's < .001). Patients with a DSM-IV Axis I anxiety or mood disorder were more body vigilant compared to patients who did not have a disorder (p's < .05). Patients with anxiety disorders were particularly vigilant to and fearful of cardiac sensations relative to patients without anxiety disorders. Latent variable path models examined the extent that interoceptive fear mediated the association between body vigilance and cardiac anxiety on chest pain. Within each model, diagnostic status, body vigilance, and cardiac anxiety were exogenous and predicted interoceptive fear that in turn predicted pain. Separate models examined body vigilance and cardiac anxiety, and both models fit the data well. Findings showed partial mediation for the body vigilance factor, and full mediation for the cardiac anxiety factor. Interoceptive fear played a mediating role in both models. The syndrome of NCCP may persist partly due to conscious hypervigilance to and fear of cardiac-congruent body sensations, particularly among anxious patients. PMID:20110083

  11. Management of Gingival Overgrowth in a Cardiac Transplant Patient Using Laser-Assisted Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Abhiram; Alluri, Leela Subhashini; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is an oral clinical manifestation associated with certain medications such as immunosuppressants that are administered to organ transplant patients to prevent graft rejection. In patients with cardiac transplants, management of DIGO is critical. In such patients, plaque biofilm accumulation at the gingival interface might be detrimental as it may lead to transient bacteremia as well as systemic inflammation resulting in thromboembolic events. This case report describes the management of DIGO in a cardiac transplant recipient by change of immunosuppressant medication, non-surgical periodontal therapy and laser-assisted gingivectomy. PMID:26373224

  12. Collaborative Cardiac Care Service: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Caring for Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandhoff, Brian G; Kuca, Susan; Rasmussen, Jon; Merenich, John A

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death in the US. In 1996, Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO) developed the Collaborative Cardiac Care Service (CCCS) with the goal of improving the health of patients with CAD. Description: CCCS consists of a nursing team (the KP Cardiac Rehabilitation program) and a pharmacy team (the Clinical Pharmacy Cardiac Risk Service). CCCS works collaboratively with patients, primary care physicians, cardiologists, and other health care professionals to coordinate proven cardiac risk reduction strategies for patients with CAD. Activities such as lifestyle modification, medication initiation and adjustment, patient education, laboratory monitoring, and management of adverse events are all coordinated through CCCS. The CCCS uses an electronic medical record and patient-tracking software to document all interactions with patients, track patient appointments, and collect data for evaluation of both short- and long-term outcomes. Outcomes: The CCCS currently follows over 12,000 patients with CAD. The CCCS has demonstrated improvement in surrogate outcomes including: cholesterol screening (55% to 96.3%), the proportion of patients with a goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) <100 mg/dL (22% to 76.9%), and has reduced the average LDL-c to 78.3 mg/dL for the CAD population it follows. The CCCS has shown a reduction in all-cause mortality associated with CAD by 76% in the patients followed by the service. Patient and physician satisfaction have been high with CCCS. Conclusion: The CCCS coordinates many aspects of cardiac risk reduction care resulting in excellent continuity of care. The CCCS has continued to grow and expand the number of patients enrolled by using innovative strategies and technology and has resulted in excellent care and improved outcomes of the CAD population at KPCO. PMID:21331203

  13. [THE DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC BRONCHOSCOPY IN CARDIAC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MECHANICAL VENTILATION IN THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Titova, I V; Khrustaleva, M V; Eremenko, A A; Babaev, M A

    2016-01-01

    The review presents an analysis of domestic and foreign literature on the use of bronchoscopy in patients with obstructive respiratory failure in the ICU. Separately considered the issue of additional research when performing bronchoscopy and create an algorithmfor the application of diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopy in cardiac surgical patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:27192859

  14. ECG telemonitoring during home-based cardiac rehabilitation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Jasionowska, Anna; Banaszak-Bednarczyk, Maria; Gwilkowska, Joanna; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2012-06-01

    We assessed ECGs recorded during home-based telemonitored cardiac rehabilitation (HTCR) in stable patients with heart-failure. The study included 75 patients with heart failure (NYHA II, III), with a mean age of 56 years. They participated in an eight-week programme of home cardiac rehabilitation which was telemonitored with a device which recorded 16-s fragments of their ECG. These fragments were transmitted via mobile phone to a monitoring centre. The times of the automatic ECG recordings were pre-set and coordinated with the cardiac rehabilitation. Patients were able to make additional recordings when they felt unwell using a tele-event-Holter ECG facility. During the study, 5757 HTCR sessions were recorded and 11,534 transmitted ECG fragments were evaluated. Most ECGs originated from the automatic recordings. Singular supraventricular and ventricular premature beats and ventricular couplets were detected in 16%, 69% and 16% of patients, respectively. Twenty ECGs were recorded when patients felt unwell: non sustained ventricular tachycardia occurred in three patients and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation episode in two patients. Heart failure patients undergoing HTCR did not develop any arrhythmia which required a change of the procedure, confirming it was safe. Cardiac rehabilitation at home was improved by utilizing the tele-event-Holter ECG facility. PMID:22604276

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  17. euHeart: personalized and integrated cardiac care using patient-specific cardiovascular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nic; de Vecchi, Adelaide; McCormick, Matthew; Nordsletten, David; Camara, Oscar; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Delingette, Hervé; Sermesant, Maxime; Relan, Jatin; Ayache, Nicholas; Krueger, Martin W.; Schulze, Walther H. W.; Hose, Rod; Valverde, Israel; Beerbaum, Philipp; Staicu, Cristina; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos; Hunter, Peter; Weese, Juergen; Lehmann, Helko; Chapelle, Dominique; Rezavi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The loss of cardiac pump function accounts for a significant increase in both mortality and morbidity in Western society, where there is currently a one in four lifetime risk, and costs associated with acute and long-term hospital treatments are accelerating. The significance of cardiac disease has motivated the application of state-of-the-art clinical imaging techniques and functional signal analysis to aid diagnosis and clinical planning. Measurements of cardiac function currently provide high-resolution datasets for characterizing cardiac patients. However, the clinical practice of using population-based metrics derived from separate image or signal-based datasets often indicates contradictory treatments plans owing to inter-individual variability in pathophysiology. To address this issue, the goal of our work, demonstrated in this study through four specific clinical applications, is to integrate multiple types of functional data into a consistent framework using multi-scale computational modelling. PMID:22670205

  18. Enhanced cardiac perception predicts impaired performance in the Iowa Gambling Task in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wölk, Julian; Sütterlin, Stefan; Koch, Stefan; Vögele, Claus; Schulz, Stefan M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Somatic marker theory predicts that somatic cues serve intuitive decision making; however, cardiovascular symptoms are threat cues for patients with panic disorder (PD). Therefore, enhanced cardiac perception may aid intuitive decision making only in healthy individuals, but impair intuitive decision making in PD patients. Methods PD patients and age-and sex-matched volunteers without a psychiatric diagnosis (n = 17, respectively) completed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) as a measure of intuitive decision making. Interindividual differences in cardiac perception were assessed with a common mental-tracking task. Results In line with our hypothesis, we found a pattern of opposing associations (Fisher's Z = 1.78, P = 0.04) of high cardiac perception with improved IGT-performance in matched control-participants (r = 0.36, n = 14) but impaired IGT-performance in PD patients (r = −0.38, n = 13). Conclusion Interoceptive skills, typically assumed to aid intuitive decision making, can have the opposite effect in PD patients who experience interoceptive cues as threatening, and tend to avoid them. This may explain why PD patients frequently have problems with decision making in everyday life. Screening of cardiac perception may help identifying patients who benefit from specifically tailored interventions. PMID:24683516

  19. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  20. Cardiac CT vs. Stress Testing in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Review and Expert Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease represent a major challenge to our health care systems affecting millions of patients each year. Until recently, the diagnosis of coronary artery disease could be conclusively determined only by invasive coronary angiography. To avoid risks from cardiac catheterization, many healthcare systems relied on stress testing as gatekeeper for coronary angiography. Advancements in cardiac computed tomography angiography technology now allows to noninvasively visualize coronary artery disease, challenging the role of stress testing as the default noninvasive imaging tool for evaluating patients with chest pain. In this review, we summarize current data on the clinical utility of cardiac computed tomography and stress testing in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. PMID:26500716

  1. Divine Love and Deep Connections: A Long-Term Followup of Patients Surviving Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Amy L.; Hall, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined experiencing divine love as an indicator of affective spiritual growth in a prospective cohort of 200 patients surviving cardiac surgery. These patients previously completed two-wave preoperative interviews when standardized cardiac surgery data were also collected. The information included left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association Classification, baseline health (physical and mental), optimism, hope, religiousness, prayer coping, religious/spiritual coping, and demographics. We then measured divine love at 900 days postoperatively. Hierarchical linear regression indicated the direct effect of positive religious coping on experiences of divine love, controlling for other key variables. Postoperatively perceived spiritual support was entered at the final step as an explanatory factor, which appeared to mediate the coping effect. None of the other faith factors predicted divine love. Further research regarding divine love and spiritual support may eventually guide clinical attempts to support patients' spiritual growth as an independently relevant outcome of cardiac surgery. PMID:21748012

  2. Myocardial Ischemia Induces SDF-1α Release in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Jacobs, Denise; Emontzpohl, Christoph; Goetzenich, Andreas; Soppert, Josefin; Jarchow, Mareike; Schindler, Lisa; Averdunk, Luisa; Kraemer, Sandra; Marx, Gernot; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Pallua, Norbert; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Simons, David; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    In the present observational study, we measured serum levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) in 100 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at seven distinct time points including preoperative values, myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and the postoperative course. Myocardial ischemia triggered a marked increase of SDF-1α serum levels whereas cardiac reperfusion had no significant influence. Perioperative SDF-1α serum levels were influenced by patients' characteristics (e.g., age, gender, aspirin intake). In an explorative analysis, we observed an inverse association between SDF-1α serum levels and the incidence of organ dysfunction. In conclusion, time of myocardial ischemia was identified as the key stimulus for a significant upregulation of SDF-1α, indicating its role as a marker of myocardial injury. The inverse association between SDF-1α levels and organ dysfunction association encourages further studies to evaluate its organoprotective properties in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:27055858

  3. [Anesthetic management for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a patient with impaired ventricular function caused by cardiac sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Hirofumi; Sato, Yoshiharu; Oouchi, Sueko; Wakimoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that laparoscopic surgery can reduce surgical trauma and postoperative pain, allowing earlier recovery and hospital discharge. However, because patients with severe cardiac depression may not tolerate the adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects of pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt position, laparoscopic surgery has been avoided in these patients. The present case with low ventricular function (ejection fraction=23-27%) due to cardiac sarcoidosis could successfully undergo laparoscopic sigmoidectomy by using pulmonary artery catheterization. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery can be performed in patients with cardiac dysfunction if the cardiopulmonary responses caused by pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt are sufficiently considered and adverse hemodynamic responses appropriately detected and treated through invasive monitoring techniques such as pulmonary artery catheterization and/or transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:22991812

  4. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-05-10

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  5. Recurrent Syncope and Cardiac Arrest in a Patient with Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis Treated with Bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Jaipaul, Navin; Pi, Alexander; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL) amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation. PMID:27499835

  6. Cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients taking antipsychotic drugs: cohort study using administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Bilker, Warren B; Knauss, Jill S; Margolis, David J; Kimmel, Stephen E; Reynolds, Robert F; Glasser, Dale B; Morrison, Mary F; Strom, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia and in non-schizophrenic controls. Design Cohort study of outpatients using administrative data. Setting 3 US Medicaid programmes. Participants Patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, haloperidol, risperidone, or thioridazine; a control group of patients with glaucoma; and a control group of patients with psoriasis. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular arrhythmia. Results Patients with treated schizophrenia had higher rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia than controls, with rate ratios ranging from 1.7 to 3.2. Overall, thioridazine was not associated with an increased risk compared with haloperidol (rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.2). However, thioridazine showed an increased risk of events at doses ⩾600 mg (2.6, 1.0 to 6.6; P=0.049) and a linear dose-response relation (P=0.038). Conclusions The increased risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia could be due to the disease or its treatment. Overall, the risk with thioridazine was no worse than that with haloperidol. Thioridazine may, however, have a higher risk at high doses, although this finding could be due to chance. To reduce cardiac risk, thioridazine should be prescribed at the lowest dose needed to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. What is already known on this topicThioridazine seems to prolong the electrocardiographic QT interval more than haloperidolAlthough QT prolongation is used as a marker of arrhythmogenicity, it is unknown whether thioridazine is any worse than haloperidol with regard to cardiac safetyWhat this study addsPatients taking antipsychotic drugs had higher risks of cardiac events than control patients with glaucoma or psoriasisOverall, the risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia was not higher with thioridazine than haloperidolThioridazine may

  7. Cancer survivorship: cardiotoxic therapy in the adult cancer patient; cardiac outcomes with recommendations for patient management.

    PubMed

    Steingart, Richard M; Yadav, Nandini; Manrique, Carlos; Carver, Joseph R; Liu, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cancer are now curable or, if not cured, becoming a chronic illness. In 2012, it was estimated that there were more than 13,500,000 cancer survivors in the United States. Late outcomes of these survivors are increasingly related to cardiovascular disease, either as a consequence of the direct effects of cancer therapy or its adverse effects on traditional cardiac risk factors (eg, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus). This article describes the therapies that have led to advances in cancer survival and the acute and chronic cardiovascular toxicities associated with these therapies. Recommendations are made for the surveillance and management of cancer survivors. Published guidelines on the subject of cardio-oncology are reviewed in light of clinical experience caring for these patients. To supplement this cancer-related knowledge base, appropriateness criteria and guidelines for cardiac care in the general population were extrapolated to cancer survivors. The result is a series of recommendations for surveillance and management of cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors. PMID:24331191

  8. The Role of Imaging with Cardiac Computed Tomography in Cardio-Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Pitekova, Barbora; Ravi, Sriram; Shah, Shimoli V; Mladosievicova, Beata; Heitner, Stephen; Ferencik, Maros

    2016-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and cancer represent the two most common causes of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. With the increase in long-term survival of cancer patients, cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality for many cancer survivors. In this article, we will review the most common cardiovascular toxicities of cancer therapies and will describe the role of cardiac CT in the detection and monitoring of cardiovascular disease. While there is limited evidence for the use of CT imaging in cancer patients, we will discuss the utility of cardiac CT in the detection and management of coronary artery disease, pericardial and valvular heart disease. PMID:27443383

  9. [Cardiac Surgery in Two Patients with Parkinson's Disease who were Using Deep Brain Stimulation Devices].

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Kazutaka; Nakata, Shunsuke; Komoda, Satsuki; Yuasa, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    For the treatment of Parkinson's disease, deep brain stimulation( DBS) devices are implanted for the control of motor symptoms including tremor. We performed cardiac surgery in 2 patients with Parkinson's disease who were using DBS devices. Coronary artery bypass was performed in one patient, and closure of ventricular septal perforation after acute myocardial infarction was performed in the other. There is a risk of injury and electromagnetic interference of DBS devices. No device failure or aggravation of Parkinson's symptom was observed in these cases. In many cases of cardiac surgery, various devices are concomitantly used, and the potential interference with the devices should be carefully examined in perioperative management. PMID:26329628

  10. Developing a visualized patient-centered, flow-based and objective-oriented care path of cardiac catheterization examination.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ming Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    It has been known that visualization is a user-preferred and more meaningful interface of information systems. To reduce the anxiety and uncertainty of patients, we transformed the sophisticated process of cardiac catheterization into visualized information. The Microsoft Visio 2003 and Excel 2003 with the VBA automation tool were used to design a process flow of Cardiac Catheterization. The results show the technical feasibility and potentials helpful for patient to realize the nursing process of cardiac catheterization. PMID:19593031

  11. Major depressive disorder predicts cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carney, R M; Rich, M W; Freedland, K E; Saini, J; teVelde, A; Simeone, C; Clark, K

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-two patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and subsequently found to have significant coronary artery disease (CAD) were given structured psychiatric interviews before catheterization. Nine of these patients met criteria for major depressive disorder. All 52 patients were contacted 12 months after catheterization, and the occurrence of myocardial infarction, angioplasty, coronary bypass surgery and death was determined. Results of the study show that major depressive disorder was the best predictor of these major cardiac events during the 12 months following catheterization. The predictive effect was independent of the severity of CAD, left ventricular ejection fraction, and the presence of smoking. Furthermore, with the exception of smoking, there were no statistically significant differences between those patients with major depressive disorder and the remaining patients on any variable studied. The possible mechanisms relating major depressive disorder to subsequent cardiac events are discussed. It is concluded that major depressive disorder is an important independent risk factor for the occurrence of major cardiac events in patients with CAD. PMID:2976950

  12. Cardiac Papillary Fibroelastoma: Single-Institution Experience with 14 Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    In general, treatment for symptomatic and asymptomatic cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is surgical resection-particularly of left-sided lesions, because of the risk of systemic embolization. However, few institutions have enough experience with these tumors to validate this approach. We present our institutional experience with papillary fibroelastoma and discuss our current approach. We searched our institution's cardiac tumor database, identified all patients diagnosed with cardiac papillary fibroelastoma from 1992 through 2014, and recorded the clinical and pathologic characteristics of each case. We found 14 patients (mean age, 60.5 ± 12.3 yr) who had 18 lesions. Eleven patients (79%) were symptomatic; however, we could not always definitively associate their symptoms with a cardiac tumor. Most lesions were solitary and ≤1.5 cm in diameter; half involved the left side of the heart. All 18 lesions were surgically excised. There were no operative or 30-day deaths, and no patient needed valve replacement postoperatively. There was one late death; at one year, another 3 patients were lost to follow-up, and the others were alive without tumor recurrence. Because of the embolic risk inherent to intracardiac masses and our relatively good postoperative outcomes, we recommend the surgical resection of all left-sided papillary fibroelastomas in surgical candidates, and we discuss with patients the advisability of resecting right-sided lesions. PMID:27127431

  13. Prospective study of the role of cardiac troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, P.; Collinson, P.; Moseley, D.; Greenwood, T.; Noble, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the prognostic significance and role in risk stratification of the biochemical marker troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina. DESIGN--Single centre, blinded, prospective study of patients admitted with chest pain. SETTING--Coronary care unit of a district general hospital. SUBJECTS--460 patients admitted with chest pain and followed up for a median of three years. 183 patients had a final diagnosis of unstable angina. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cardiac death, need for coronary revascularisation, or readmission with non-fatal myocardial infarction as first events. RESULTS--62 (34%) unstable angina patients were troponin T positive. This group had significantly increased incidence rates of subsequent cardiac death (12 cases (19%) v 14 (12%)), coronary revascularisation (22 (35%) v 26 (21%)), death or revascularisation (33 (53%) v 40 (33%)), and death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (18 (29%) v 21 (17%)) compared with the troponin T negative group. In multiple logistic regression troponin T status was a highly significant predictor for the end points coronary revascularisation and cardiac death or revascularisation as first events. CONCLUSION--Troponin T in the serum of patients with unstable angina identifies a subgroup at higher risk of subsequent cardiac events and its measurement aids in risk factor stratification. The increased risk extends to two years after admission. Prospective randomised trials are required to identify optimum therapeutic strategies for this subgroup. PMID:8704534

  14. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Is not Associated with Cardiac Arrhythmia in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenneth P.; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Feng, Mornin; Celi, Leo A.; Danziger, John

    2016-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia can lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, observational data has linked chronic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure to hypomagnesemia. Whether PPI exposure increases the risk for arrhythmias has not been well studied. Using a large, single center inception cohort of critically ill patients, we examined whether PPI exposure was associated with admission electrocardiogram (ECG) readings of a cardiac arrhythmia in over 8000 patients. There were 24.5% PPI users while 6% were taking a histamine 2 antagonist. 14.3% had a cardiac arrhythmia. PPI use was associated with a 1.18 (95% CI=1.02–1.36, p=0.02) unadjusted and 0.96 (95% CI=0.83–1.12, p=0.62) adjusted risk of arrhythmia. Amongst diuretic users (n=2468), PPI use was similarly not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. In summary, in a large cohort of critically ill patients, PPI exposure is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:25655574

  15. Shared Care Contributions to Self-Care and Quality of Life in Chronic Cardiac Patients.

    PubMed

    Sebern, Margaret; Brown, Roger; Flatley-Brennan, Patricia

    2016-07-01

    Shared care is an interpersonal interaction system composed of communication, decision making, and reciprocity; it is used by patients and family caregivers (care dyads) to exchange social support. This study's purpose was to describe the contributions of shared care to outcomes for individuals with cardiac disease. A secondary data analysis was used to answer the following questions. What is the association between elements of shared care and patient outcomes? Do dyad perceptions of shared care differentially contribute to patient outcomes? Participants in this study were 93 individuals with a cardiac disease and 93 family caregivers. Composite index structured equation modeling was the analytic tool. Caregiver communication and reciprocity were related to patient mental quality of life. Patient communication and reciprocity were related to their own mental and physical quality of life and self-care confidence. Findings from this study contribute a better understanding of how care dyads are integral to patient outcomes. PMID:26864996

  16. Cardiac, skeletal, and ocular abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and in their relatives. Comparison with the cardiac abnormalities in patients with kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, L; Tredici, S; Mangiavacchi, M; Colombo, V; Mazzotta, G F; Sirtori, C R

    1984-01-01

    Polygraphic (including apexcardiograms and carotid pulse tracings) and M mode echocardiographic examinations were carried out in 34 symptomatic patients with Marfan's syndrome; similar studies were performed in 32 relatives and in 34 young patients with kyphoscoliotic disease. The purpose of these investigations was to determine the association between cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities and to identify specific patterns of disease with a poor prognosis. Polygraphic tests showed significant changes in all patients with Marfan's syndrome: 74% showed the apical systolic click and murmur of mitral valve prolapse; 48% had the diastolic murmur of aortic regurgitation; isolated mitral valve prolapse was found in 52%, 26% had isolated aortic regurgitation, and 22% had a combination of the two. Echocardiographic changes were also found in all patients: 79% had aortic root dilatation; 48% fluttering of the anterior mitral leaflet; 79% mitral valve prolapse, mostly pansystolic; 34% both mitral prolapse and aortic root dilatation; and 34% left ventricular dilatation. The severities of the cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities were not correlated. The high prevalence of mitral valve prolapse found in these patients, which did not vary with age or sex, was also present in their relatives: mitral prolapse was present in 38% and aortic dilatation, with or without regurgitation, in 14%. Four of the relatives had clearcut Marfan's syndrome, and at least four others a forme fruste. The metacarpal index was abnormal in 41% of the relatives; ocular abnormalities were rare. In kyphoscoliotic patients only an increase in the prevalence of mitral prolapse (18.2% in women, none in men) was found. These findings underline a complex pattern of association between cardiac, ocular, and skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and confirm an appreciable inheritability of several of the markers of the disease. Images PMID:6691872

  17. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  18. Linguistic Aspects of Australian Aboriginal English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    It is probable that the majority of the 455 000 strong Aboriginal population of Australia speak some form of Australian Aboriginal English (AAE) at least some of the time and that it is the first (and only) language of many Aboriginal children. This means their language is somewhere on a continuum ranging from something very close to Standard…

  19. Culturally Framing Aboriginal Literacy and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antone, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    More than just the development of reading and writing skills, Aboriginal literacy is a wholistic concept, with spiritual, physical, mental, and emotional aspects, involving relationships between self, community, nation, and creation. Models are presented for incorporating traditional Aboriginal knowledge and methodologies into Aboriginal learning…

  20. Role of Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management of Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has evolved into a major tool for the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of patients suffering from heart failure. Anatomical and structural imaging, functional assessment, T1 and T2 mapping tissue characterization and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have provided clinicians with tools to distinguish between non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathies and to identify the etiology of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. LGE is a useful tool to predict the likelihood of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with CAD and to guide the LV lead placement in those who qualify for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy. In addition, the presence of LGE and its extent in myocardial tissue relates to overall cardiovascular outcomes. Emerging roles for cardiac imaging in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are being studied and CMR continues to be among the most promising noninvasive imaging alternatives in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26041670

  1. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in dialysis patients: drugs, defibrillators or what else.

    PubMed

    Passman, Rod

    2013-01-01

    Death from cardiovascular disease in general and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in particular are exponentially proportional to declining renal function and are a major cause of mortality among those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The greatest risk, however, is reserved for those patients on chronic dialysis. These individuals have an extraordinarily high rate of death, with cardiac disease accounting for 45% and SCA responsible for 25% of all-cause mortality. Once cardiac arrest occurs, survival is extremely poor. Thus, reducing mortality from cardiovascular disease and SCA in dialysis patients is a global health challenge. The main objectives of this review are to elucidate the nature of SCA in the dialysis population, describe possible mechanisms and risk factors, and discuss options for prevention. PMID:23343546

  2. DEGRO/DGK guideline for radiotherapy in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Israel, Carsten W; Dorenkamp, Marc; Dunst, Jürgen; Roser, Mattias; Schimpf, Rainer; Steil, Volker; Schäfer, Jörg; Höller, Ulrike; Wenz, Frederik

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) have cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIEDs, cardiac pacemakers (PMs) and implanted cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs)]. Ionizing radiation can cause latent and permanent damage to CIEDs, which may result in loss of function in patients with asystole or ventricular fibrillation. Reviewing the current literature, the interdisciplinary German guideline (DEGRO/DGK) was developed reflecting patient risk according to type of CIED, cardiac condition, and estimated radiation dose to the CIED. Planning for RT should consider the CIED specifications as well as patient-related characteristics (pacing-dependent, previous ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation). Antitachyarrhythmia therapy should be suspended in patients with ICDs, who should be under electrocardiographic monitoring with an external defibrillator on stand-by. The beam energy should be limited to 6 (to 10) MV CIEDs should never be located in the beam, and the cumulative scatter radiation dose should be limited to 2 Gy. Personnel must be able to respond adequately in the case of a cardiac emergency and initiate basic life support, while an emergency team capable of advanced life support should be available within 5 min. CIEDs need to be interrogated 1, 3, and 6 months after the last RT due to the risk of latent damage. PMID:25739476

  3. Cardiac transplantation in severely ill patients requiring intensive support in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, David; Wright, Christine; Mockus, Lorna; Yacoub, Magdi; Fox, Kim

    1988-01-01

    Sixty four patients were referred for cardiac transplantation from a single cardiac team at this hospital between October 1984 and December 1986. Of these patients, 33 were referred for urgent transplantation, all of whom required intensive treatment in hospital with intravenous infusions of cardiac drugs, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, peritoneal dialysis, ventilation, or any combination of these to sustain life. Of these 33 patients, six died while awaiting transplantation, one was removed from the waiting list for a transplant, and 26 received cardiac transplants. There were five deaths within 24 hours of operation and one death 10 days after the operation. Twenty of those who had surgery had a successful outcome of transplantation, but there was one late death 10 weeks postoperatively and a further death 31 months after surgery. Eighteen patients were alive and well 10 to 33 months (mean 19·4 months) after transplantation, with an overall survival rate after surgery of 69%. Provided that surgery can be performed before renal failure has progressed such that renal transplantation is necessary, the results are excellent (surgical survival 85·5%) and, we believe, justify the expenditure and staffing requirements necessary to treat these terminally ill patients. ImagesFIG 1FIG 2 PMID:3285954

  4. Cardiac transplantation in severely ill patients requiring intensive support in hospital.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, D; Wright, C; Mockus, L; Yacoub, M; Fox, K

    1988-03-19

    Sixty four patients were referred for cardiac transplantation from a single cardiac team at this hospital between October 1984 and December 1986. Of these patients, 33 were referred for urgent transplantation, all of whom required intensive treatment in hospital with intravenous infusions of cardiac drugs, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, peritoneal dialysis, ventilation, or any combination of these to sustain life. Of these 33 patients, six died while awaiting transplantation, one was removed from the waiting list for a transplant, and 26 received cardiac transplants. There were five deaths within 24 hours of operation and one death 10 days after the operation. Twenty of those who had surgery had a successful outcome of transplantation, but there was one late death 10 weeks postoperatively and a further death 31 months after surgery. Eighteen patients were alive and well 10 to 33 months (mean 19.4 months) after transplantation, with an overall survival rate after surgery of 69%. Provided that surgery can be performed before renal failure has progressed such that renal dialysis [corrected] is necessary, the results are excellent (surgical survival 85.5%) and, we believe, justify the expenditure and staffing requirements necessary to treat these terminally ill patients. PMID:3285954

  5. Autoimmunoreactive IgGs Against Cardiac Lipid Raft-Associated Proteins in Patients with POTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Ling, Tian-You; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Figueroa, Juan J.; Low, Phillip; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized plasma membrane microdomains that serve as platforms for integrating cellular signal transductions. We have recently reported that autoantibodies against cardiac membrane proteins are present in patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). In this study, we examined the presence of autoimmunoreactive IgGs against lipid raft proteins in these patients. IgGs were purified from the sera of 10 patients and 7 normal controls. Cardiac lipid raft preparations were isolated from normal human heart tissue. The lipid raft-associated proteins were resolved by 2DE and immunoblotted against IgGs from each subject. Protein spots that reacted specifically with patient IgGs were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Thirty-four such protein spots, and 72 unique proteins were identified. The targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs include proteins associated with caveolae structure, adrenergic signaling, calcium signaling, cytostructures, chaperone and energy metabolism. Multiple pathways were involved including those that regulate caveolae-mediated signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, protein ubiquitination, and cardiac β-adrenergic signaling. Our results suggest that cardiac lipid raft-associated proteins are targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs from patients with POTS. Autoimmunity may play a role in the pathogenesis of POTS. PMID:23562385

  6. Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrio, I.; Berna, L.; Ballester, M.; Estorch, M.; Obrador, D.; Cladellas, M.; Abadal, L.; Ginjaume, M.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin scans were used to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac transplant rejection. The calculation of a myocardium to lung ratio (AM index) to quantify antimyosin uptake was performed. AM index in normal subjects (n = 8) at 48 hr postinjection was 1.46 +/- 0.04. In patients with suspected myocarditis (16 studies in 13 patients), AM index was 2.0 +/- 0.5 (p less than 0.001); suggesting a considerable incidence of ongoing cell damage in this group, despite the small proportion of positive right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (RVbx) (4/13). In patients studied after cardiac transplantation (37 studies in 17 patients), AM indexes correlated with RVbx. In patients with RVbx proven rejection (n = 14), AM index was 1.87 +/- 0.19 (p less than 0.001). In patients with RVbx showing infiltrates but not myocyte damage (n = 13), AM index was 1.80 +/- 0.27 (p = 0.02). In patients with normal RVbx (n = 10), AM index was 1.56 +/- 0.17 (p = NS versus controls; p = 0.001 versus those with positive RVbx). Calculated AM indexes correlated with graded visual analysis of the scans (r = 0.823; p = 0.001). Antimyosin scans are an appropriate method to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection.

  7. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Franczyk-Skóra, Beata; Gluba, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Kozłowski, Dariusz; Małyszko, Jolanta; Rysz, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular deaths account for about 40% of all deaths of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly those on dialysis, while sudden cardiac death (SCD) might be responsible for as many as 60% of SCD in patients undergoing dialysis. Studies have demonstrated a number of factors occurring in hemodialysis (HD) that could lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with CKD undergoing HD are at high risk of ventricular arrhythmia and SCD since changes associated with renal failure and hemodialysis-related disorders overlap. Antiarrhythmic therapy is much more difficult in patients with CKD, but the general principles are similar to those in patients with normal renal function - at first, the cause of arrhythmias should be found and eliminated. Also the choice of therapy is narrowed due to the altered pharmacokinetics of many drugs resulting from renal failure, neurotoxicity of certain drugs and their complex interactions. Cardiac pacing in elderly patients is a common method of treatment. Assessment of patients' prognosis is important when deciding whether to implant complex devices. There are reports concerning greater risk of surgical complications, which depends also on the extent of the surgical site. The decision concerning implantation of a pacing system in patients with CKD should be made on the basis of individual assessment of the patient. PMID:23206758

  8. Results of medium-term survival in patients undergoing cardiac transplantation: institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Custódio, Ires Lopes; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Santos Neto, João David; Martins, Maria do Perpétuo Socorro; de Oliveira, Samya Coutinho

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The heart transplant became a consecrated therapy for patients with terminal heart failure, increasingly improving the survival. Objective To identify the medium-term results in patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Methods This is a descriptive, documentary and retrospective study, using a quantitative approach, developed in a Unit of Transplant and Heart Failure, of a tertiary level public hospital, located in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. The data were obtained from a sample of 188 patients (154 men and 34 women), submitted to the heart transplant, in the period from October 1997 to March 2011. There were calculated survival rates based on Kaplan-Meier methods. Results There were identified information about the patient's gender (male 81.91%), medical diagnosis which determined the heart transplantation (idiopathic cardiomyopathies 23.98%, ischemic 23.4% and Chagasic 17.02%). The median age of patients was 48 years old (interquartile range = 17.25 years) and the median observation period was 877 days. During this period, 78 patients died, resulting in survival ratios of 72%, 59% and 47% after 1, 5 and 9 years of cardiac transplantation, respectively. Younger patients had longer survival (P=0.0418). Conclusion The medium-term survival of patients undergoing cardiac transplantation is significant, especially for younger patients. PMID:24598951

  9. Preventing healthcare-associated infections in cardiac surgical patients as a hallmark of excellence.

    PubMed

    Masud, Faisal; Vykoukal, Daynene

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are the tenth-leading cause of death in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that HAIs annually account for 1.7 million infections, 99,000 associated deaths, and a cost of approximately $30 billion. Nonreimbursement of some of these HAIs by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, public reporting of data (currently in 27 states), and the statistics listed above are driving quality initiatives to reduce or eliminate HAIs. However, a 2009 report from the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality showed that little progress has been made towards eliminating HAIs. Reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections is the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goal Number 7. Cardiac surgery has always been at the leading edge of innovation and quality care. Improvements in this field have been brought about by the needs of critically ill patients who are at high risk of death and by leaders such as Dr. Michael DeBakey who were driven to provide excellence in patient care. One of the prime examples of quality initiatives in cardiac surgery has been the development of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database. This has helped to develop benchmarks by which different institutions are measured. The STS database will lead another initiative by providing public presentation of hospital- and surgeon-specific data in the near future. Even so, cardiac surgery patients are at especially high risk of developing HAIs. Use of invasive devices such as central lines, urinary catheters, ventilators, etc. - all of which are commonly utilized in the care of cardiac surgical patients - is one of the most significant risk factors for acquiring HAIs. Cardiac patients also have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes, obesity, increasing frailty, advanced age, and multiple redo-operations. This combination makes our patients more vulnerable to HAIs. Accordingly, in 2010 the

  10. Anesthetic challenges of patients with cardiac comorbidities undergoing major urologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. Number of this group of patients having to go through this procedure is constantly increasing, due to prolonged life, increased agressiveness of surgery and increased anesthesia’s safety. The anesthesiologist usually has to deal with several problems of the patient, such as hypertension, chronic heart failure, coronary artery disease, rhythm disturbances, intraoperative hemodymanic changes, intraoperative bleeding, perioperative fluid imbalance, and metabolic disturbances. A cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. The scope of this review article is to present the most frequent issues encountered with this group of patients, and to synthetically discuss the respective strategies and maneuvers during perioperative period, which is the major challenge for the anesthesiologist. PMID:24791166

  11. ‘Beats the alternative but it messes up your life’: Aboriginal people's experience of haemodialysis in rural Australia

    PubMed Central

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Australian Aboriginal people have at least eight times the incidence of end-stage kidney disease, requiring dialysis, as the non-Aboriginal population. Provision of health services to rural Aboriginal people with renal disease is challenging due to barriers to access and cultural differences. We aimed to describe the experiences of Aboriginal people receiving haemodialysis in rural Australia, to inform strategies for improving renal services. Design A qualitative design incorporating: Indigenist research methodology and Community Based Participatory Research principles. In-depth interviews used a ‘yarning’ and storytelling approach. Thematic analysis was undertaken and verified by an Aboriginal Community Reference Group. Setting A health district in rural New South Wales, Australia. Participants Snowball sampling recruited 18 Aboriginal haemodialysis recipients. Results Six themes emerged which described the patient journey: ‘The biggest shock of me life,’ expressed the shock of diagnosis and starting the dialysis; ‘Beats the alternative but it messes up your life,’ explained how positive attitudes to treatment develop; ‘Family is everything’, described the motivation and support to continue dialysis; ‘If I had one of them nurses at home to help me’, depicted acute hospital settings as culturally unsafe; ‘Don't use them big jawbreakers’, urged service providers to use simple language and cultural awareness; ‘Stop ‘em following us onto the machine’, emphasised the desire for education for the younger generations about preventing kidney disease. An Aboriginal interpretation of this experience, linked to the analysis, was depicted in the form of an Aboriginal painting. Conclusions Family enables Aboriginal people to endure haemodialysis. Patients believe that priorities for improving services include family-centred and culturally accommodating healthcare systems; and improving access to early screening of kidney disease

  12. CT and MRI evaluation of cardiac complications in patients with hematologic diseases: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yun; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Hae Giu

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac complications with hematologic diseases are not uncommon but it is difficult to diagnose, due to non-specific clinical symptoms. Prompt recognition of these potentially fatal complications by cardiac computed tomography (CT) or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to direct clinicians to specific treatments according to causes. Thrombosis is often related to central venous catheter use and is usually located at the catheter tip near the atrial wall. Differentiation of thrombosis from normal structure is possible with CT and, distinction of a thrombus from a tumor is possible on a delayed enhancement MRI with a long inversion time (500-600 ms). Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart is indicated by an infiltrative nature with involvement of whole layers of myocardium on CT and MRI. MRI with T2* mapping is useful in evaluating myocardial iron content in patients with hemochromatosis. Diffuse subendocardial enhancement is typically observed on delayed MRIs in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. T1 mapping is an emerging tool to diagnose amyloidosis. Myocardial abscess can occur due to an immunocompromised status. CT and MRI show loculated lesions with fluid density and concomitant rim-like contrast enhancement. Awareness of CT and MRI findings of cardiac complications of hematologic diseases can be helpful to physicians for clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25651878

  13. Smoking cessation in cardiac patients: the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on quitting smoking.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac patients completed a baseline questionnaire (N = 245) assessing demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, intention, self-efficacy, relapse self-efficacy and action and coping plans. Six months later (N = 184) continued abstinence from smoking was assessed. Self-efficacy predicted intention to quit smoking and was an indirect predictor of continued abstinence, through intention. Intention to quit smoking and making action plans both directly influenced continued abstinence. Future interventions to facilitate smoking cessation in cardiac patients should put strong emphasis on enhancing self-efficacy and on making specific action plans to increase the likelihood of smoking cessation. PMID:26827369

  14. Flow-regulated extracorporeal arteriovenous tubing loop for cardiac output measurements by ultrasound velocity dilution: validation in post-cardiac surgery intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Eremenko, Alexsandr A; Safarov, Perviz N

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of cardiac output (CO) is crucial in the management of the critically ill, especially in post cardiac surgery intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we validated CO measured by the novel ultrasound dilution (COUD) with those measured by pulmonary artery (PA) thermodilution (COTD) in 26 adult post cardiac surgery patients. For COUD, blood was circulated through an extracorporeal arteriovenous (AV) loop from the radial artery catheter to the introducer of PA catheter for 5-8 minutes. Three to four injections of 25 ml body temperature isotonic saline were performed into the venous limb of the AV loop. For COTD, five injections of 10 ml ice cold saline were performed. A total of 77 COUD and COTD measurement sets were compared. Cardiac output measured by thermodilution ranged from 3.28 to 9.4 L/min, whereas COUD ranged from 2.85 to 10.1 L/min. The correlation between the methods was found to be r = 0.91, COUD = 0.93(COTD) + 0.42 L/min. Bias and precision (mean difference ± 2SDs) was -0.004 ± 1.34 L/min between the two methods. The percentage error (2SD/mean) was 22.2%, which is below the clinically acceptable limit (<30%). Cardiac output measured by ultrasound dilution and thermodilution methods agreed well in post cardiac surgery ICU patients and hence can be interchangeably used. PMID:21245798

  15. Daughters of cardiac patients: the process of caregiving.

    PubMed

    Gage-Rancoeur, Donna-Michelle; Purden, Margaret A

    2003-06-01

    This prospective, exploratory study examined the caregiving role that adult daughters play when a parent is hospitalized for a cardiac condition. Specifically, the study addressed the development and evolution of the caregiving role during the hospital stay and in the post-discharge period. Data were collected from 9 daughters using participant observation and unstructured and semi-structured interviews. Daughters' caregiving was characterized by a non-linear process of "knowing" that included knowledge seeking, consolidation of knowledge, and acting on the knowledge. In a secondary process of self-assessment concerning their knowledge, the participants moved back and forth among the 3 dimensions. In addition, their level of involvement was defined by 4 different caregiving styles, based on the family's caregiving culture. Nurses might collaborate more effectively with women caring for a parent by determining their position in the "knowing" process and tailoring the intervention accordingly. Nurses should also be sensitive to families' opinions and traditions regarding caregiving. PMID:12908199

  16. Survival of 1476 patients initially resuscitated from out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, S. M.; Dalziel, K.; Ford, I.; Marsden, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the short and long term outcome of patients admitted to hospital after initially successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest out of hospital. DESIGN--Review of ambulance and hospital records. Follow up of mortality by "flagging" with the registrar general. Cox proportional hazards analysis of predictors of mortality in patients discharged alive from hospital. SETTING--Scottish Ambulance Service and acute hospitals throughout Scotland. SUBJECTS--1476 patients admitted to a hospital ward, of whom 680 (46%) were discharged alive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, time to death, and cause of death after discharge. RESULTS--The median duration of hospital stay was 10 days (interquartile range 8-15) in patients discharged alive and 1 (1-4) day in those dying in hospital. Neurological status at discharge in survivors was normal or mildly impaired in 605 (89%), moderately impaired in 58 (8.5%), and severely impaired in 13 (2%); one patient was comatose. Direct discharge to home occurred in 622 (91%) cases. The 680 discharged survivors were followed up for a median of 25 (range 0-68) months. There were 176 deaths, of which 81 were sudden cardiac deaths, 55 were non-sudden cardiac deaths, and 40 were due to other causes. The product limit estimate of 4 year survival after discharge was 68%. The independent predictors of mortality on follow up were increased age, treatment for heart failure, and cardiac arrest not due to definite myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION--About 40% of initial survivors of resuscitation out of hospital are discharged home without major neurological disability. Patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac death can be identified and may benefit from further cardiological evaluation. PMID:8664715

  17. Impact of Extracardiac Findings during Cardiac MR on Patient Management and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Dunet, Vincent; Barras, Heloise; Boulanger, Xavier; Monney, Pierre; Qanadli, Salah D.; Meuli, Reto; Schwitter, Juerg; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to assess heart diseases. Relevant non-cardiac diseases may also be incidentally found on CMR images. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and nature of incidental extra-cardiac findings (IEF) and their clinical impact in non-selected patients referred for CMR. Material/Methods MR images of 762 consecutive patients (515 men, age: 56±18 years) referred for CMR were prospectively interpreted by 2 radiologists blinded for any previous imaging study. IEFs were classified as major when requiring treatment, follow-up, or further investigation. Clinical follow-up was performed by checking hospital information records and by calling referring physicians. The 2 endpoints were: 1) non-cardiac death and new treatment related to major IEFs, and 2) hospitalization related to major IEFs during follow-up. Results Major IEFs were proven in 129 patients (18.6% of the study population), 14% of those being unknown before CMR. During 15±6 month follow-up, treatment of confirmed major IEFs was initiated in 1.4%, and no non-cardiac deaths occurred. Hospitalization occurred in 8 patients (1.0% of the study population) with confirmed major IEFs and none occurred in the remaining 110 patients with unconfirmed/unexplored major IEFs (p<0.001). Conclusions Screening for major IEFs in a population referred for routine CMR changed management in 1.4% of patients. Major IEFs unknown before CMR but without further exploration, however, carried a favorable prognosis over a follow-up period of 15 months. PMID:25943552

  18. Patient Positioning and Skin Sequelae: Ischemic Epidermal Necrosis from Tight Padding During Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghpour, Mona; Au, Jeremiah; Ho, Jonhan; Hyman, Jaime; Patton, Timothy

    2016-05-15

    Careful positioning and padding of pressure points during surgery are recommended to prevent pressure ulcers, vascular injury, and nerve damage in an immobilized patient. However, overpadding may have unintended consequences. We report a case of ischemia-induced full-thickness epidermal necrosis secondary to tight foam padding during a cardiac surgery. PMID:26934606

  19. Private Prayer and Optimism in Middle-Aged and Older Patients Awaiting Cardiac Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Amy L.; Peterson, Christopher; Bolling, Steven F.; Koenig, Harold

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of private prayer among middle-aged and older patients as a way of coping with cardiac surgery and prayer's relationship to optimism. Design and Methods: The measure of prayer included three aspects: (a) belief in the importance of private prayer, (b) faith in the efficacy of prayer on the basis of previous…

  20. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stafne, Signe N; Hiller, Aud; Slørdahl, Stig A; Aamot, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01), and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03). Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease. PMID:26770781

  1. The Astronomy of Aboriginal Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2011-06-01

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, which is usually reported in terms of songs or stories associated with stars and constellations. Here we argue that the astronomical components extend further, and include a search for meaning in the sky, beyond simply mirroring the earth-bound understanding. In particular, we have found that traditional Aboriginal cultures include a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and that this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. We also present evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, and paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts.

  2. Effects of gender, ejection fraction and weight on cardiac force development in patients undergoing cardiac surgery – an experimental examination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has long been recognized that differences exist between men and women in the impact of risc factors, symptoms, development and outcome of special diseases like the cardiovascular disease. Gender determines the cardiac baseline parameters like the number of cardiac myocyte, size and demand and may suggest differences in myofilament function among genders, which might be pronounced under pathological conditions. Does gender impact and maybe impair the contractile apparatus? Are the differences more prominent when other factors like weight, age, ejection fraction are added? Therefore we performed a study on 36 patients (21 male, 15 female) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) or aortocoronary bypass operation (CABG) to examine the influence of gender, ejection fraction, surgical procedure and body mass index (BMI) on cardiac force development. Methods Tissue was obtained from the right auricle and was stored in a special solution to prevent any stretching of the fibers. We used the skinned muscle fiber model and single muscle stripes, which were mounted on the “muscle machine” and exposed to a gradual increase of calcium concentration calculated by an attached computer program. Results 1.) In general female fibers show more force than male fibers: 3.9 mN vs. 2.0 mN (p = 0.03) 2.) Female fibers undergoing AVR achieved more force than those undergoing CABG operation: 5.7 mN vs. 2.8 mN (p = 0.02) as well as male fibers with AVR showed more force values compared to those undergoing CABG: 2.0 mN vs. 0.5 mN (p = 0.01). 3.) Male and female fibers of patients with EF > 55% developed significantly more force than from those with less ejection fraction than 30%: p = 0.002 for the male fibers (1.6 vs. 2.8 mN) and p = 0.04 for the female fibers (5.7 vs. 2.8 mN). 4.) Patients with a BMI between 18 till 25 develop significant more force than those with a BMI > 30: Females 5.1 vs. 2.6 mN; p 0.03, Males 3.8 vs. 0.8 mN; p 0

  3. Right Cardiac Catheterization Using the Antecubital Fossa Vein in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dae Sung; Lee, Soo Yong; Hwang, Jongmin; Chon, Min Ku; Hwang, Ki Won; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Huyn; Kim, June Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Right heart catheterization is traditionally performed using a femoral vein approach that involves admission, bed rest, and risks of bleeding and hematoma. Recent studies have confirmed safety of the use of forearm vein for right cardiac catheterization. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of right cardiac catheterization via the antecubital fossa vein in Korean patients. Subjects and Methods The medical records of all patients who underwent right heart catheterization at our hospital between January 2003 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Right cardiac catheterizations via the antecubital fossa vein and the femoral vein were compared in terms of demographic data (age, sex, weight, height, and body mass index), indications for right cardiac catheterization, and procedural and outcome data (initial success rate, procedure time, compression to ambulation time, and complications). Results We reviewed 132 cases (antecubital fossa vein approach, n=37; femoral vein approach, n=95). The demographic data, initial success rate (100% vs. 100%) and procedure time (21.6±16.8 min vs. 25.6±12.6 min, p=0.14) were similar in both groups. The antecubital fossa vein group had a shorter mean compression to ambulation time than the femoral vein group (0.0 min vs. 201.2±48.1 min, p<0.01). No complications were observed in either group. Conclusion Our study indicated the ease of performance of right cardiac catheterization via the antecubital fossa vein. Thus, the antecubital fossa vein can be an alternative access site for right cardiac catheterization in Korean patients. PMID:27014351

  4. Efficacy of cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator insertion in patients undergone coronary artery bypass graft: A cohort study of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Saburi, Amin; Ajudani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven therapeutic method in selected patients with heart failure and systolic dysfunction which increases left ventricular function and patient survival. We designed a study that included patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), with and without CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D) inserting and then measured its effects on these two groups. Patients and Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, we conducted a prospective cohort study on 100 coronary artery disease patients where candidate for CABG. Then based on the receiving CRT-D, the patients were categorized in two groups; Group 1 (n = 48, with CRT-D insertion before CABG) and Group 2 (n = 52 without receiving CRT-D). Thereafter both of these groups were followed-up at 1–3 months after CABG for mortality, hospitalization, atrial fibrillation (AF), echocardiographic assessment, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class level. Results: The mean age of participants in Group 1 (48 male) and in Group 2 (52 male) was 58 ± 13 and 57 ± 12 respectively. Difference between Groups 1 and 2 in cases of mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) changes and NYHA class level was significant (P > 0.05). Hospitalization (P = 0.008), mortality rate (P = 0.007), and AF were significantly different between these two groups. Conclusions: The results showed that the increase in LVEF and patient's improvement according to NYHA-class was significant in the first group, and readmission, mortality rate and AF was increased significantly in the second group. PMID:25566709

  5. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  6. Transthoracic echocardiography may be useful for preoperative cardiac evaluation of gynaecological patients undergoing routine surgery.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Pradhan, P; Shakya, G R; Giri, A; Regmi, R; Dhungel, S

    2012-12-01

    Echocardiography has been an integral noninvasive tool for [preoperative] cardiac evaluation that provides with echocardiographic details which may also be useful to perioperative clinicians to tailor their anesthetic deliberation while dealing with preoperative patients. The objective of this study is preoperative evaluation of routine gynecological patients echocardiographically after being referred from respective internists or anesthesiologists. This was a prospective, nonrandomized study of elective 68 cases who underwent echocardiographic evaluation preoperatively from 15th July 2009 to 14th July 2012. The mean age of the patients was 52.1 +/- 10.3 years with the age range of 30-79 years. Valvular heart disease was the most common echocardiographic finding (129.4%) followed by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, LVDD (48.5%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (22.1%). Systolic dysfunction was detected in 2.9% of patients and pulmonary arterial hypertension in 2.9% patients. Amongst patients referred after preoperative anaesthetic evaluation, patients had different cardiac lesions echocardiographically. Preoperative echocardiographic evaluation may provide important cardiac informations and values which might be employed by perioperative physicians to tailor their treatment. PMID:24579536

  7. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Philip A.

    Australian Aboriginal ethnoastronomical traditions were recorded from a wide variety of sources in different periods. While the corpus of mythology concerning the heavens is diverse, it is unified by beliefs of a Skyworld as land with its own topography, containing plants and animals familiar to those living below. Spirits of the dead reside alongside the Creation Ancestors as celestial bodies in the Skyworld. Aboriginal hunter-gatherers used the regular movement of constellations and planets to measure time and to indicate the season, while unexpected change in the sky was seen as an omen.

  8. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  9. The Influence of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jun; Qian, Ju; Cheng, Hao; Ji, Fuhai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dexmedetomidine may have benefits on the clinical outcomes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine versus other perioperative medications to determine the influence of perioperative dexmedetomidine on cardiac surgery patients. Methods Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine, another medication, or a placebo were retrieved from EMBASE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index. Results A total of 1702 patients in 14 studies met the selection criteria among 1,535 studies that fit the research strategy. Compared to other medications, dexmedetomidine has combined risk ratios of 0.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15, 0.55, P = 0.0002) for ventricular tachycardia, 0.35 (95% CI 0.20, 0.62, P = 0.0004) for postoperative delirium, 0.76 (95% CI 0.55, 1.06, P = 0.11) for atrial fibrillation, 1.08 (95% CI 0.74, 1.57, P = 0.69) for hypotension, and 2.23 (95% CI 1.36, 3.67, P = 0.001) for bradycardia. In addition, dexmedetomidine may reduce the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Conclusions This meta-analysis revealed that the perioperative use of dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery can reduce the risk of postoperative ventricular tachycardia and delirium, but may increase the risk of bradycardia. The estimates showed a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation, shorter length of ICU stay and hospitalization, and increased risk of hypotension with dexmedetomidine. PMID:27049318

  10. Electrocardiographic Presentation, Cardiac Arrhythmias, and Their Management in β-Thalassemia Major Patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    Beta-thalassemia major (β-TM) is a genetic hemoglobin disorder characterized by an absent synthesis of globin chains that are essential for hemoglobin formation, causing chronic hemolytic anemia. Clinical management of thalassemia major consists in regular long-life red blood cell transfusions and iron chelation therapy to remove iron introduced in excess with transfusions. Iron deposition in combination with inflammatory and immunogenic factors is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in these patients. Heart failure and arrhythmias, caused by myocardial siderosis, are the most important life-limiting complications of iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients. Cardiac complications are responsible for 71% of global death in the beta-thalassemia major patients. The aim of this review was to describe the most frequent electrocardiographic abnormalities and arrhythmias observed in β-TM patients, analyzing their prognostic impact and current treatment strategies. PMID:27324981

  11. Prolonged Intraoperative Cardiac Resuscitation Complicated by Intracardiac Thrombus in a Patient Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang; DeMaria, Samuel; Cohen, Edmond; Silvay, George; Zerillo, Jeron

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of successful resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest during orthotopic liver transplantation. After reperfusion, the patient developed ventricular tachycardia, complicated by intracardiac clot formation and massive hemorrhage. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated stunned and nonfunctioning right and left ventricles, with developing intracardiac clots. Treatment with heparin, massive transfusion and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation ensued for 51 minutes. Serial arterial blood gases demonstrated adequate oxygenation and ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted for potential use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, however, the myocardial function improved and the surgery was completed without further intervention. On postoperative day 6, the patient was extubated without neurologic or cardiac impairment. The patient continues to do well 2 years posttransplant, able to perform independent daily activities of living and his previous job. This case underscores the potential for positive outcomes with profoundly prolonged, effective advanced cardiovascular life support in patients who experience postreperfusion syndrome. PMID:27233818

  12. Are patients with cardiac implants protected against electromagnetic interference in daily life and occupational environment?

    PubMed

    Napp, Andreas; Stunder, Dominik; Maytin, Melanie; Kraus, Thomas; Marx, Nikolaus; Driessen, Sarah

    2015-07-21

    Utilization of cardiac implants such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators is now commonplace among heart disease patients. The ever-increasing technological complexity of these devices is matched by the near omnipresent exposure to electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields (EMFs), both in everyday life and the occupational environment. Given that electromagnetic interferences (EMIs) are associated with potential risk in device patients, physicians are increasingly confronted with managing device patients with intermittent EMI and chronic occupational exposure. The current review aims to provide a contemporary overview of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices, their function and susceptibility of non-medical EMFs and provide recommendations for physicians caring for cardiac device patients presenting with EMI. PMID:25908772

  13. Preoperative risk stratification models fail to predict hospital cost of cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preoperative risk stratification models have previously been suggested to predict cardiac surgery unit costs. However, there is a lack of consistency in their reliability in this field. In this study we aim to test the correlation between the values of six commonly known preoperative scoring systems and evaluate their reliability at predicting unit costs of cardiac surgery patients. Methods Over a period of 14 months all consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively classified using six preoperative scoring models (EuroSCORE, Parsonnet, Ontario, French, Pons and CABDEAL). Transplantation patients were the only patients we excluded. Total hospital costs for each patient were calculated independently on a daily basis using the bottom up method. The full unit costs were calculated including preoperative diagnostic tests, operating room cost, disposable materials, drugs, blood components as well as costs for personnel and fixed hospital costs. The correlation between hospital cost and the six models was determined by linear regression analysis. Both Spearman’s and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated from the regression lines. An analysis of residuals was performed to determine the quality of the regression. Results A total of 887 patients were operated on for CABG (n = 608), valve (n = 142), CABG plus valve (n = 100), thoracic aorta (n = 33) and ventricular assist devices (n = 4). Mean age of the patients was 68.3±9.9 years, 27.6% were female. 30-day mortality rate was 4.1%. Correlation between the six models and hospital cost was weak (Pearson’s: r < 0.30; Spearman’s: r < 0.40). Conclusion The risk stratification models in this study are not reliable at predicting total costs of cardiac surgical patients. We therefore do not recommend their use for this purpose. PMID:23659251

  14. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  15. Major Cardiac Events and the Value of Echocardiographic Evaluation in Patients Receiving Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Tan, Timothy C; Halpern, Elkan F; Neilan, Tomas G; Francis, Sanjeev A; Picard, Michael H; Fei, Hongwen; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Abramson, Jeremy S; Weyman, Arthur E; Kuter, Irene; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-08-01

    Anthracyclines are an important component of cancer treatments; however, their use is limited by the occurrence of cardiotoxicity. There are limited data on the occurrence of heart failure and the value of baseline and follow-up measurements of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) in the current era. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were twofold: (1) to characterize the occurrence of and risk factors for major adverse cardiac events (MACEs: symptomatic heart failure and cardiac death) in a large contemporaneous population of adult patients treated with anthracyclines and (2) to test the value of LVEF and LV dimensions obtained using echocardiography in the prediction of MACE. Five thousand fifty-seven patients were studied, of whom 124 (2.4%) developed MACE. Of the total cohort, 2,285 patients had an available echocardiogram pre-chemotherapy. Patients with MACE were older (p <0.0001), predominantly men (p = 0.03), and with a higher incidence of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac treatments. Patients with hematologic cancers had a higher incidence of cardiac events than patients with breast cancer (4.2% vs 0.7%, p <0.0001). Baseline LVEF, LVEF ≤5 points above the lower limits of normal, and LV internal diameter were predictive of the rate of occurrence of MACE. In conclusion, older patients with hematologic cancers and patients with a baseline LVEF ≤5 points above the lower limit of normal have higher incidence of MACE and should be closely monitored. PMID:26071994

  16. Contextual Issues Related to Aboriginal Children's Mathematical Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Peter

    This paper focuses on contextual issues arising during an ethnographic study of mathematics instruction for Aboriginal children in New South Wales, Australia. Conversational interviews with Aboriginal children in grades 5-6, Aboriginal parents, and Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal teachers and staff identified context as 1 of 17 core categories of…

  17. Aboriginal Representation: Conflict or Dialogue in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leane, Jeanine

    2010-01-01

    This research begins with the premise that non-Aboriginal students are challenged by much Aboriginal writing and also challenge its representations as they struggle to re-position themselves in relation to possible meanings within Aboriginal writing. Many non-Aboriginal students come to read an Aboriginal narrative against their understanding of…

  18. Prediction of Perioperative Cardiac Events through Preoperative NT-pro-BNP and cTnI after Emergent Non-Cardiac Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujie; Gao, Meng; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Clinical risk stratification has an important function in preoperative evaluation of patients at risk for cardiac events prior to non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether the combined measurement of pre-operative N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) could provide useful prognostic information about postoperative major adverse cardiac events (MACE) within 30 days in patients aged over 60 years undergoing emergent non-cardiac surgery. Methods The study group comprised 2519 patients aged over 60 years that were undergoing emergent non-cardiac surgery between December 2007 and December 2013. NT-pro-BNP and cTnI were measured during hospital admission. The patients were monitored for MACE (cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or cardiac arrest) during the 30-day postoperative follow-up period. Results MACE occurred in 251 patients (10.0%). Preoperative NT-pro-BNP and cTNI level were significantly higher in the individuals that experienced MACE than in those who did not (P < 0.001). The confounding factors of age, sex, co-morbidities and preoperative medications were adjusted in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. This analysis showed that preoperative NT-proBNP level > 917 pg/mL (OR 4.81, 95% CI 3.446–6.722, P < 0.001) and cTnI ≥ 0.07 ng/mL (OR 8.74, 95% CI 5.881–12.987, P < 0.001) remained significantly and independently associated with MACE after the adjustment of the confounding factors. Kaplan-Meier event-free survival curves demonstrated that patients with preoperative simultaneous NT-proBNP level > 917 pg/mL and cTnT ≥0.07 ng/mL had worse event-free survival than individual assessments of either biomarker. Conclusion Preoperative plasma NT-proBNP and cTnI are both independently associated with an increased risk of MACE in elderly patients after emergent non-cardiac surgery. The combination of these biomarkers provides better prognostic information than

  19. Australian Aboriginal Deaf People and Aboriginal Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des

    2013-01-01

    Many Australian Aboriginal people use a sign language ("hand talk") that mirrors their local spoken language and is used both in culturally appropriate settings when speech is taboo or counterindicated and for community communication. The characteristics of these languages are described, and early European settlers' reports of deaf Aboriginal…

  20. Current practice of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients: a national audit.

    PubMed

    Hosmane, Sharath; Birla, Rashmi; Marchbank, Adrian

    2012-04-01

    The Audit and Guidelines Committee of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery recently published a guideline on antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in cardiac surgery. We aimed to assess the awareness of the current guideline and adherence to it in the National Health Service through this National Audit. We designed a questionnaire consisting of nine questions covering various aspects of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients. A telephonic survey of the on-call cardiothoracic registrars in all the cardiothoracic centres across the UK was performed. All 37 National Health Service hospitals in the UK with 242 consultants providing adult cardiac surgical service were contacted. Twenty (54%) hospitals had a unit protocol for antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery. Only 23 (62.2%) registrars were aware of current European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery guidelines. Antiplatelet therapy is variable in the cardiac surgical units across the country. Low-dose aspirin is commonly used despite the recommendation of 150-300 mg. The loading dose of aspirin within 24 h as recommended by the guideline is followed only by 60.7% of surgeons. There was not much deviation from the guideline with respect to the anticoagulation therapy. PMID:22235003

  1. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  2. The usefulness of plateletcrit to predict cardiac syndrome X in patients with normal coronary angiogram

    PubMed Central

    Oylumlu, Mustafa; Yuksel, Murat; Dogan, Adnan; Cakici, Musa; Ozgeyik, Mehmet; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Kilit, Celal; Amasyali, Basri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac syndrome X (CSX) is a clinical entity defined as the triad of typical angina pectoris on exercise, electrocardiographic or metabolic findings of ischemia and normal epicardial coronary arteries. Platelets, whose amount in the blood is indicated with plateletcrit (PCT), play an important role in inflammatory and thrombotic processes and the physiopathology of cardiovascular events. Aim To investigate the association between cardiac syndrome X and PCT and platelet count. Material and methods A total of 113 patients with normal coronary angiogram were included in the study. Fifty patients with typical chest pain and evidence of myocardial ischemia in non-invasive tests formed the CSX patient group. The control group consisted of 63 age- and gender-matched patients with normal coronary arteries but without angina. Results The mean PCT value of the CSX group was significantly higher than that of the control group (0.22 ±0.06 vs. 0.19 ±0.04; respectively, p=0.03). Higher PCT was found to be associated with the presence of CSX in patients with normal coronary arteries by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions We suggest that high PCT may predict the presence of cardiac syndrome X in patients with normal coronary arteries. The value of PCT appears additive to conventional expensive methods commonly used in CSX prediction. PMID:26677359

  3. Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery in Patients With Previous Solid Organ Transplantation (Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas).

    PubMed

    Vargo, Patrick R; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Johnston, Douglas R; Smedira, Nicholas G; Moazami, Nader; Blackstone, Eugene H; Soltesz, Edward G

    2015-12-15

    A growing number of solid organ transplant survivors require surgery for cardiac disease. We examined the effect of having a previous transplant on outcomes after cardiac surgery in these patients from a population-based perspective. Of 1,709,735 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve, or thoracic aorta surgery from 2004 to 2008 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 3,535 patients (0.21%) had a previous organ transplant (2,712 kidney, 738 liver, 300 pancreas). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to determine the effect of a previous solid organ transplant on outcomes. In-hospital mortality rate was 7% for patients who underwent transplantation versus 4% for patients who did not undergo transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16 to 2.38). Patients who underwent transplantation were at an increased risk for acute renal failure (OR 1.62, CI 1.36 to 1.94) and blood transfusions (OR 1.63, CI 1.36 to 1.95). Median length of stay was longer (10 vs 9 days), with greater median total charges ($111,362 vs $102,221; both p <0.001). Occurrence of stroke, gastrointestinal complication, infection, and pneumonia was similar between groups. In conclusion, previous solid organ transplantation is an incremental risk factor for postoperative mortality after cardiac surgery. Renal protective strategies and bleeding control should be stressed to mitigate complications. PMID:26520471

  4. Impairment of cardiac autonomic control in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Sanja; Stevic, Zorica; Milovanovic, Branislav; Milicic, Biljana; Rakocevic-Stojanovic, Vidosava; Lavrnic, Dragana; Apostolski, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic cardiac control in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Fifty-five patients with sporadic ALS (28 female and 27 male; average age 56.00 +/- 10.34 years) were compared to 30 healthy controls (17 female and 13 male; average age 42.87 +/- 11.91 years). Patients with previous history of cardiac disease, diabetes mellitus, and impaired respiratory function were excluded from the study. Cardiovascular autonomic tests according to Ewing, power spectrum analysis of RR variability (low- and high-frequency bands - LF and HF, LF/HF index), real-time beat-to-beat ECG signal monitoring with heart rate variability analysis and baroreflex function analysis were carried out in all patients. Time-domain parameters of heart rate variability (mean RR interval, SDNN, SDANN, SDNN index, rMSSD and pNN50%) were obtained from 24-h ECG monitoring. ALS patients had a significantly higher score of sympathetic (p <0.01) and parasympathetic (p <0.001) dysfunction, as well as of the overall score of autonomic dysfunction (p <0.001). LF/HF index was significantly increased; baroreflex sensitivity and time-domain parameters of heart rate variability were highly significantly decreased in ALS patients (p <0.001). Our results demonstrated impaired cardiac autonomic control in ALS with marked parasympathetic dysfunction and sympathetic predominance. PMID:20001491

  5. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Schizophrenia and Their Healthy Relatives – A Small Review

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The majority of excess mortality among people with schizophrenia seems to be caused by cardiovascular complications, and in particular, coronary heart disease. In addition, the prevalence of heart failure and arrhythmias is increased in this population. Reduced efferent vagal activity, which has been consistently described in these patients and their healthy first-degree relatives, might be one important mechanism contributing to their increased cardiac mortality. A decrease in heart rate variability and complexity was often shown in unmedicated patients when compared to healthy controls. In addition, faster breathing rates, accompanied by shallow breathing, seem to influence autonomic cardiac functioning in acute unmedicated patients substantially. Moreover, low-physical fitness is a further and independent cardiac risk factor present in this patient population. Interestingly, new studies describe chronotropic incompetence during physical exercise as an important additional risk factor in patients with schizophrenia. Some studies report a correlation of the autonomic imbalance with the degree of positive symptoms (i.e., delusions) and some with the duration of disease. The main body of psychiatric research is focused on mental aspects of the disease, thereby neglecting obvious physical health needs of these patients. Here, a joint effort is needed to design interventional strategies in everyday clinical settings to improve physical health and quality of life. PMID:26157417

  6. Cardiac magnetic field map topology quantified by Kullback-Leibler entropy identifies patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirdewan, A.; Gapelyuk, A.; Fischer, R.; Koch, L.; Schütt, H.; Zacharzowsky, U.; Dietz, R.; Thierfelder, L.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary inherited cardiac muscle disorder, defined clinically by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. The detection of affected patients remains challenging. Genetic testing is limited because only in 50%-60% of all HCM diagnoses an underlying mutation can be found. Furthermore, the disease has a varied clinical course and outcome, with many patients having little or no discernible cardiovascular symptoms, whereas others develop profound exercise limitation and recurrent arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death. Therefore prospective screening of HCM family members is strongly recommended. According to the current guidelines this includes serial echocardiographic and electrocardiographic examinations. In this study we investigated the capability of cardiac magnetic field mapping (CMFM) to detect patients suffering from HCM. We introduce for the first time a combined diagnostic approach based on map topology quantification using Kullback-Leibler (KL) entropy and regional magnetic field strength parameters. The cardiac magnetic field was recorded over the anterior chest wall using a multichannel-LT-SQUID system. CMFM was calculated based on a regular 36 point grid. We analyzed CMFM in patients with confirmed diagnosis of HCM (HCM, n =33, 43.8±13 years, 13 women, 20 men), a control group of healthy subjects (NORMAL, n =57, 39.6±8.9 years; 22 women and 35 men), and patients with confirmed cardiac hypertrophy due to arterial hypertension (HYP, n =42, 49.7±7.9 years, 15 women and 27 men). A subgroup analysis was performed between HCM patients suffering from the obstructive (HOCM, n =19) and nonobstructive (HNCM, n =14) form of the disease. KL entropy based map topology quantification alone identified HCM patients with a sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 86.9% (overall classification rate 84.8%). The combination of the KL parameters with a regional field strength parameter improved the overall

  7. The Prognostic Value of Peak Cardiac Power Output in Chinese Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenlin; Gong, Zhu; Ni, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Wenjun; Jiang, Jinfa; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong; Yan, Wenwen; Zhou, Lin; Li, Guanghe; Zhang, Qiping; Wang, Lemin

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise testing has been widely used to risk stratify patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Peak oxygen consumption (peakVO2) was regarded as a powerful predictor of survival, as it is a surrogate for peak cardiac output (CO), which by most is considered the “true” measure of heart failure. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that CO is an even stronger predictor than peak VO2. The present study is aimed to investigate the prognostic value of peak cardiac power output (peak CPO) in comparison with peakVO2 in Chinese patients with CHF. Methods Participants provided written informed consent to participate in this study. Totally 129 patients with CHF underwent symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), with mean age 59.1±11.4 years, 87.6% male, 57.4% ischemic etiology, body mass index (BMI) 24.7±3.7 kg/m2 and LVEF 38±9%. CO was measured using an inert gas rebreathing method. The primary endpoints are cardiac deaths. Results Over median 33.7-month follow-up, 19 cardiac deaths were reported. Among peak VO2,VE/VCO2 slope and Peak CPO, their area under ROC were 0.64, 0.67, 0.68, respectively (Ρ<0.05).The optimal thresholds for predicting cardiac deaths were peak VO2≤13.4 ml.kg-1.min-1, and VE/VCO2 slope≥39.3 and peak CPO≤ 1.1 respectively by ROC analysis. Finally, in patients with a peak VO2≤13.4 ml.kg-1.min-1 those with peak CPO>1.1W had better survival than those with peak CPO ≤ 1.1W. However, by multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, BMI, resting heart rate, LVMI, LVEF, Peak CPO was not an independent predictor of cardiac deaths (P> 0.05). Conclusions Peak CPO was not a predictor of cardiac death in Chinese CHF patients. PMID:26808510

  8. Physical activity in patients with grown-up congenital heart defects after comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaworski, Radosław; Chojnicki, Maciej; Szalewska, Dominika; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The group of grown-up patients with congenital heart defects (grown-up congenital heart – GUCH) complains of a number of specific medical and non-medical problems. The presented program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR-GUCH), dedicated to the above mentioned group, can potentially improve the physical activity of GUCH patients. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on the physical activity of GUCH patients. Material and methods The invitation to take part in the CCR-GUCH program was addressed to a group of 57 patients (mean age: 23.7 ± 4.1 years) who had undergone the surgical correction of ventricular septal defects (VSD) or atrial septal defects (ASD) at least 12 months earlier. The patients were divided into two groups: A – patients undergoing rehabilitation, and B – patients who did not participate in the program. The patients were initially examined using functional and stress tests, and the program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was started in group A. After 30 days, the patients from both groups underwent further testing using the same methods as during the initial evaluation. Results After one month of rehabilitation, the physical activity parameters of patients participating in the CCR-GUCH program (group A) were significantly better than those observed among non-participants (group B). Conclusions The introduction of the comprehensive rehabilitation program improves the physical activity and, consequently, the quality of life of GUCH patients. The CCR-GUCH program appears to be a justified supplement to holistic care in the late rehabilitation of patients after the surgical correction of congenital heart defects. PMID:26336469

  9. Echocardiography based cardiac evaluation in the patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Dhungel, S; Chokhani, R

    2009-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most common medical problem in Nepal. Echocardiography based cardiac evaluation in COPD is rare in Nepal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the echocardiography based cardiac function in consecutively admitted COPD patients (507) in medical wards of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital during 13th April 2007 to 12th April 2008. Male female ratio was 0.9:1. Age (mean +/- SD) was 66.1 +/- 10.9 yr. Brahman and Chhetri ethnic group comprised of more than half of total COPD patients followed by similar number of patients in Newar (22.1%) and Mongolian ethnic groups (21.5%). More than half of the COPD patients were in age group 60-75 years, followed by less number of patients (approximately 20.0%) in both 45-59 years and 75-89 years age groups. Of the total patients (507), 141 patients underwent echocardiographic evaluation. Among them significant number of patients had poor LVEF (29, 20.6%) with statistically significant difference in LVEF (36.0 +/- 10.5 vs. 64.3 +/- 8.5%, p value < 0.01). More than half of the total patients showed features of chronic cor pulmonale (56.3%), followed by valvular heart disease (49.3%), diastolic dysfunction (38.7%) and left ventricular hypertrophy (14.1%). Mild pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) was detected in approximately half of patients (49.1%), followed by moderate PAH in 17.6% patients. Transthoracic echocardiography was found to be very useful to identify various concomitant cardiac abnormalities demanding special treatment consideration in managing clinically COPD like patients. PMID:19769230

  10. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  11. Chemoreflexsensitivity in patients with survived sudden cardiac arrest and prior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hennersdorf, M G; Perings, C; Niebch, V; Hillebrand, S; Vester, E G; Strauer, B E

    2000-04-01

    For evaluation of patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, the analyses of ventricular late potentials, heart rate variability, and baroreflexsensitivity are helpful. But so far, the prediction of a malignant arrhythmic event is not possible with sufficient accuracy. For a better risk stratification other methods are necessary. In this study the importance of the ChRS for the identification of patients at risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmic events should be investigated. Of 41 patients included in the study, 26 were survivors of sudden cardiac arrest. Fifteen patients were not resuscitated, of whom 6 patients had documented monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and 9 had no ventricular tachyarrhythmias in their prior history. All patients had a history of an old myocardial infarction (> 1 year ago). For determination of the ChRS the ratio between the difference of the RR intervals in the ECG and the venous pO2 before and after a 5-minute oxygen inhalation via a nose mask was measured (ms/mmHg). The 26 patients with survived sudden cardiac death showed a significantly decreased ChRS compared to those patients without a tachyarrhythmic event (1.74 +/- 1.02 vs 6.97 +/- 7.14 ms/mmHg, P < 0.0001). The sensitivity concerning a survived sudden cardiac death amounted to 88% for a ChRS below 3.0 ms/mmHg. During a 12-month follow-up period, the ChRS was significantly different between patients with and without an arrhythmic event (1.64 +/- 1.06 vs 4.82 +/- 5.83 ms/mmHg, P < 0.01). As a further method for evaluation of patients with increased risk of sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction the analysis of ChRS seems to be suitable and predicts arrhythmias possibly more sensitive than other tests of neurovegetative imbalance. The predictive importance has to be examined by prospective investigations in larger patient populations. PMID:10793434

  12. Helping older patients to cope with cardiac and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sotile, W M; Miller, H S

    1998-01-01

    Family challenges, depression, and age-related developmental and psychological issues must be considered when structuring interventions for elder cardiopulmonary patients. Elderly patients tend to have difficulty coping when they face novel, unpredictable circumstances and are left to flounder in suspenseful anticipation. Furthermore, if support is not forthcoming during such times--or if they are treated in ways that strip them of control rather than in ways that bolster their sense of control--elderly patients are at great risk of quickly developing a passive, learned helplessness that can significantly complicate their rehabilitation. The overall well-being of elderly cardiopulmonary patients is affected by more than the actions of health-care providers. Poverty, pension and health-care plans, institutionalization, concomitant diseases, family issues, and other factors have a profound and, frequently, an overriding effect on the functional status of the elderly population. However, it is also true that the provision of spirit-enhancing care can make a tremendous difference in quality of life for elderly patients, independent of factors such as residential circumstance or health status. The most valued and valuable sources of social support for elderly patients come from family, church, and health-care providers. Our interventions either enhance or diminish an elderly patient's sense of autonomy and control. Our task-driven health-care system, replete with its growing emphasis on brevity of treatments and cost-effectiveness, can create a style and pace of delivering care that demoralizes an elderly patient. The results can be devastating: "When the spirit is broken, one has no will to marshall coping skills". But health-care providers who are attuned to the psychosocial issues relevant to the later life stages can make a profound difference in enhancing both rehabilitation and quality of life for elderly cardiopulmonary patients and their loved ones. PMID:9559449

  13. Treatment of Depression in Patients with Concomitant Cardiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Teply, Robyn M; Packard, Kathleen A; White, Nicole D; Hilleman, Daniel E; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2016-01-01

    Depressed patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD) and those with concomitant depression and CVD are at increased risk of death. The safety and efficacy of antidepressants in patients with CVD varies greatly between the agent used and type of disease. This review will summarize the CV adverse effect and drug interaction profile of antidepressants and discuss the use of antidepressants in CVD patients. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and The Cochrane Library from inception to June 2014 to identify studies relevant to antidepressant use in patients with CVD. Primary references from the identified articles were also evaluated for inclusion. Descriptive analysis was performed for the included studies in this review. Orthostatic hypotension was more common with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), trazodone and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Hypertension can be significant with serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and MAOIs. The potential for QT prolongation is present with TCAs, certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), certain SNRIs and mirtazapine. Due to its low risk of drug-drug interactions, adverse effect profile and potential for beneficial antiplatelet activity, sertraline could be considered the choice antidepressant for patients with ischemic heart disease. SSRIs and potentially SNRIs are relatively safe and effective options for patients with heart failure. In patients at high risk for ventricular arrhythmias, bupropion has the overall lowest risk for QT prolongation. TCAs and MAOIs should be avoided in patients with concomitant CVD. In conclusion, due to the increased morbidity and mortality associated with comorbid CVD and depression, practitioners should readily assess and initiate management of depression in such patients. The choice of antidepressant should take into account the potential CV impact of the various agents balancing safety and efficacy. PMID

  14. Effects of oral premedication on cognitive status of elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Javed M; Schweiger, Marc; Vallurupalli, Neelima; Bellantonio, Sandra; Cook, James R

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedatives and analgesics are often administered to achieve conscious sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Appropriate concerns have been raised regarding post procedure delirium related to peri-procedural medication in the elderly. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of premedication on new onset delirium and procedural care in elderly patients. Methods Patients ≥ 70 years old and scheduled for elective cardiac catheterization were randomly assigned to receive either oral diphenhydramine and diazepam (25 mg/5 mg) or no premedication. All patients underwent a mini mental state exam and delirium assessment using confusion assessment method prior to the procedure and repeated at 4 h after the procedure and prior to discharge. Patients' cooperation during the procedure and ease of post-procedure were measured using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The degree of alertness was assessed immediately on arrival to the floor, and twice hourly afterwards using Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 77 years, and 47 patients received premedication prior to the procedure. None of the patients in either group developed delirium. Patients' cooperation and the ease of procedure was greater and pain medication requirement less both during and after the procedure in the pre-medicated group (P < 0.05 for both). Nurses reported an improvement with patient management in the pre-medicated group (P = 0.08). Conclusions In conclusion, premedication did not cause delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The reduced pain medication requirement, perceived procedural ease and post procedure management favors premedication in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. PMID:26089850

  15. Visibility and Voice: Aboriginal People Experience Culturally Safe and Unsafe Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hole, Rachelle D; Evans, Mike; Berg, Lawrence D; Bottorff, Joan L; Dingwall, Carlene; Alexis, Carmella; Nyberg, Jessie; Smith, Michelle L

    2015-12-01

    In Canada, cultural safety (CS) is emerging as a theoretical and practice lens to orient health care services to meet the needs of Aboriginal people. Evidence suggests Aboriginal peoples' encounters with health care are commonly negative, and there is concern that these experiences can contribute to further adverse health outcomes. In this article, we report findings based on participatory action research drawing on Indigenous methods. Our project goal was to interrogate practices within one hospital to see whether and how CS for Aboriginal patients could be improved. Interviews with Aboriginal patients who had accessed hospital services were conducted, and responses were collated into narrative summaries. Using interlocking analysis, findings revealed a number of processes operating to produce adverse health outcomes. One significant outcome is the production of structural violence that reproduces experiences of institutional trauma. Positive culturally safe experiences, although less frequently reported, were described as interpersonal interactions with feelings visibility and therefore, treatment as a "human being." PMID:25583958

  16. Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique in a Patient with Multiple Previous Cardiac Procedures: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Torsten; Lembcke, Alexander; Laule, Michael; Dohmen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background We present the case of a 69-year-old female patient with giant aortic aneurysm who underwent previously multiple cardiac surgeries or interventions. Case Report Ross procedure was performed in 2006 due to aortic valve regurgitation and aneurysm of the ascending aorta. In 2010 the patient was re-admitted for pulmonary valve insufficiency and a transcatheter pulmonary valve was implanted. Recently, the patient presented with an aortic arch aneurysm, maximum diameter 78 mm, which was treated by a hybrid approach, implanting a frozen elephant trunk and a covered stent graft. Conclusions The current case report demonstrates a suitable hybrid option for an extremely demanding procedure by multiple previous cardiac procedures. PMID:27357920

  17. Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique in a Patient with Multiple Previous Cardiac Procedures: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Christ, Torsten; Lembcke, Alexander; Laule, Michael; Dohmen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We present the case of a 69-year-old female patient with giant aortic aneurysm who underwent previously multiple cardiac surgeries or interventions. CASE REPORT Ross procedure was performed in 2006 due to aortic valve regurgitation and aneurysm of the ascending aorta. In 2010 the patient was re-admitted for pulmonary valve insufficiency and a transcatheter pulmonary valve was implanted. Recently, the patient presented with an aortic arch aneurysm, maximum diameter 78 mm, which was treated by a hybrid approach, implanting a frozen elephant trunk and a covered stent graft. CONCLUSIONS The current case report demonstrates a suitable hybrid option for an extremely demanding procedure by multiple previous cardiac procedures. PMID:27357920

  18. Considerations in Patients With Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices at End of Life.

    PubMed

    Gura, Melanie T

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of implantable cardiac pacemakers in 1958 and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators in 1980, these devices have been proven to save and prolong lives. Pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy are deemed life-sustaining therapies. Despite these life-saving technologies, all patients ultimately will reach the end of their lives from either their heart disease or development of a terminal illness. Clinicians may be faced with patient and family requests to withdraw these life-sustaining therapies. The purpose of this article is to educate clinicians about the legal and ethical principles that underlie withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies such as device deactivation and to highlight the importance of proactive communication with patients and families in these situations. PMID:26484996

  19. Decreased cardiac index as an indicator of tension pneumothorax in the ventilated patient.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Lipman, J

    1994-02-01

    We describe three critically ill patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation who suffered acute hypotensive episodes associated with the development of tension pneumothoraces. In four documented episodes of tension pneumothorax a major decrease in cardiac index was the most consistently detected abnormality. The expected increases in central venous pressure and heart rate did not occur in three of the episodes in two of the patients, both of whom were receiving inotropic therapy. Any increases in airway pressure could not be assessed on pressure-controlled ventilation. The physiology of tension pneumothorax in the ventilated patient is described and the importance of decreased cardiac index as a haemodynamic indicator of tension pneumothorax is discussed. PMID:8129123

  20. [Anesthetic Management for Non-cardiac Surgery in a Patient with Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sho; Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Murouchi, Takeshi; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2016-05-01

    Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension is a significant risk factor for anesthetic management in patients undergoing even non-cardiac surgery. A 64-year-old female patient with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension was scheduled to undergo inguinal hernioplasty. Preoperative systolic pulmonary arterial pressure was 115 mmHg. We selected monitored anesthesia care with 0.2-0.5 μg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) dexmedetomidine and ultrasound-guided iliohypogastric block. Thereafter, LiDCOrapid was used to acquire the hemodynamic responses during surgery. Continuous iliohypogastric block produced postoperative pain relief and the supplemental analgesic was not needed. The monitored anesthesia care by dexmedetomidine and ultrasound guided continuous iliohypogastric block would be a safe procedure for patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension undergoing non-cardiac surgery. LiDCO rapid could be low invasive and useful as a hemodaynamic monitor in such a case. PMID:27319099

  1. [Assessment of risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Philipp; Blaschke, Florian; Pieske, Burkert; Tschöpe, Carsten; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a hereditary disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy with or without concomitant outflow tract obstruction. Identification of patients with HCM who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is crucial as those patients are likely to benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Based on the HCM Risk-SCD study published in 2013, that included 3675 HCM patients with 24 313 years of follow up, a new clinical risk prediction model for sudden cardiac death was developed. This model was included in the recently released 2014 ESC guidelines. This review summarizes the changes in the prediction model and the resulting recommendations and discusses potential risks and limitations of the new score. PMID:27404936

  2. Stories of Aboriginal Transracial Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttgens, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significant number of transracial Aboriginal adoptions that have taken place in Canada, little research is available that addresses the psychological and psychosocial ramifications for the children involved. The scant literature that does exist raises concerns about the psychological impact of this type of adoption. The present…

  3. Aboriginal Literacy: Reading the Tracks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Myra

    2001-01-01

    Describes cultural, political, and linguistic factors that have affected the literacy development of Aboriginal children in Australia. Discusses how oral and literate cultures manage knowledge differently, the social context of language development, literacy and power, cultural differences, and story reading. Suggests ways schools and teachers of…

  4. Dark Sparklers: Yidumduma's Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Hugh; Harney, Bill Yidumduma

    2004-06-01

    Dark Sparklers is a book with over 100 photographs, many of which focus on prehistoric Aboriginal paintings and engravings. It is also, with 30 sky maps, the first properly presented, detailed indigenous astronomy published anywhere in the world. Over 150 extended passages of verbatim quotations from the Senior Elder provide an understanding of indigenous culture seldom given to the outside reader.

  5. Terminology Planning in Aboriginal Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troy, Jakelin; Walsh, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Australia, as far as Aboriginal languages are concerned, is not yet engaged in systematic language planning exercises. This is in contrast to other parts of the world where language planning is institutionalised and enforced. In this paper we chronicle some of the language planning exercises we have observed, been involved in, or have studied of…

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome in Australian aboriginal and non-aboriginal infants: an analytical comparison.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, L M; Read, A W; Burton, P R; Stanley, F J

    1996-07-01

    Our previous research has shown that the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) rate for Aboriginal infants in Western Australia (WA) is markedly higher than that for non-Aboriginal infants. The aim of this study was to identify factors that may be important in explaining this disparity. A case-control study was conducted based on routinely collected data for the population of WA singleton births from 1980 to 1990 inclusive. Cases were infants born and classified as dying from SIDS in WA (Aboriginal n = 88, non-Aboriginal n = 409). Controls were infants born in WA and not classified as dying from SIDS; 2% samples of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal infants were included. The risk of dying from SIDS in Aboriginal infants was 3.86 times [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.98 to 5.02] that in non-Aboriginal infants. Statistically significant univariable risk factors for SIDS in Aboriginal infants were preterm birth, low birthweight and small-for-gestational-age; for non-Aboriginal infants they included these factors as well as single marital status, young maternal age, parity of one or greater and male sex. Comparing Aboriginal with non-Aboriginal controls, most of the risk factors were more common in the Aboriginal population. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that Aboriginal infants were 1.43 times [95% CI = 1.04 to 1.95] more likely to die from SIDS than non-Aboriginal infants. Differences in the risk factor profile for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal infants were sought using interaction terms. The only important differences were that the risk of SIDS in Aboriginal infants, unlike that in non-Aboriginal infants, appeared not to be strongly related to male sex or to single marital status. Thus, the results show that the disparity between the incidence of SIDS in the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations can be explained largely, although not totally, by the high prevalence of routinely recorded risk factors in the Aboriginal population. A limitation of

  7. Cardiac side effects of trastuzumab in breast cancer patients – single centere experiences

    PubMed Central

    Leś, Dominika; Sarzyczny-Słota, Danuta; Nowara, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study The aim of this study was to present our own experiences concerning risk factors for cardiac side effects in the study group. Material and methods The study was performed in 120 patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who received immunotherapy in the Clinical and Experimental Oncology Department, between 2006 and 2011. Results LVEF reduction > 10% of the baseline fraction was observed in 10 (8%) patients. Symptomatic heart failure occurred in two individuals. Due to persistent cardiotoxicity five patients (4%) had to discontinue therapy prematurely. Risk factors for cardiac toxicity in the analyzed group included: previous radiotherapy to the left side of the chest (p = 0.05), higher BMI (p = 0.05), negative steroid receptor status (p = 0.045) and low baseline LVEF (p < 0.001). Patients receiving radiotherapy were more likely to develop cardiotoxicity if presenting older age (p = 0.0003). Conclusions Previous radiotherapy to the left side of the chest, negative steroid receptor status, high BMI and low baseline LVEF were associated with increased risk of cardiac dysfunction. There was no difference between patients receiving adjuvant therapy and those treated due to metastatic disease. PMID:23788989

  8. Life associated with fear and worry: A major concern among the cardiac valve-replaced patients

    PubMed Central

    Taghadosi, Mohsen; Memarian, Robabeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few attempts were made for alleviating the physical/psychological problems among the cardiac valve–replaced patients and no comprehensive study was done based on the experiences of such patients. This study was undertaken to describe the stressful experiences of the heart valve-replaced patients. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study performed during 2012-2013 with a content analysis approach, 13 patients from Tehran and Kashan therapeutic centers participated. The study sampling was accomplished with purposeful sampling using a semi-structured interview that continued until data saturat ion. All interviews were recorded, and were immediately handwritten word by word and finally typewritten. Description and analysis of the data were done by Graneheim and Lundman content analysis. Results: One hundred and seventy-five primary codes were derived among the 680 codes taken from the participants interviewed. Using abstract and deep perception of the categories, 14 subcategories and 5 themes were derived. The themes are as follows: worry of care conditions, worry of life with the ongoing condition of having prosthetic cardiac valve, worry regarding the instability in life, fear of hospital, and fear of unknown factors. Each theme consisted of special subsidiary themes with specific functions. Conclusions: The main themes of fear and worry about on losing the valve were identified and introduced in the cardiac valve-replaced patients. As the nature and function of these themes are different in different societies, recognition and discrete definition of them are necessary for care planning and promotion. PMID:25709701

  9. Progression of cardiac amyloid deposition in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis patients after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liepnieks, Juris J; Benson, Merrill D

    2007-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis may progress after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) as a result of continued amyloid fibril synthesis and deposition from normal TTR. To test this hypothesis amyloid fibrils were isolated from cardiac tissues of three patients who died 1(1/2) to 5(1/2) years after OLT: two with Val30Met and one with Thr60Ala TTR. The ratio of variant to normal TTR in each case was determined and compared with the ratio of variant to normal in cardiac tissues from seven patients who died with TTR amyloidosis but who had not had liver transplantation. Tissues from patients with TTR amyloidosis without OLT included three with Val30Met, two with Thr60Ala, one with deltaVal122, and one with Val122Ile. All tissues from patients without OLT had greater amounts of variant TTR than normal TTR except for the Val122Ile in which the ratio was 50:50. The overall median variant to normal ratio was 60:40 with a range of 50-70% variant. In contrast, the mean percentage of variant TTR in the three tissues from patients after OLT was 25% (range 20-35). These data are consistent with the continued deposition of normal TTR in cardiac tissue after liver transplantation. PMID:17968687

  10. [Cardiac arrest in dialysis patients: Risk factors, preventive measures and management in 2015].

    PubMed

    Luque, Yosu; Bataille, Aurélien; Taldir, Guillaume; Rondeau, Éric; Ridel, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Patients undergoing hemodialysis have a 10 to 20 times higher risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) than the general population. Sudden cardiac death is a rare event (approximately 1 event per 10,000 sessions) but has a very high mortality rate. Epidemiological data comes almost exclusively from North American studies; there is a great lack of European data on the subject. Ventricular arrhythmia is the main mechanism of sudden cardiac deaths in dialysis patients. These patients develop increased sensitivity mainly due to a high prevalence of severe ischemic heart disease and left ventricular hypertrophy and to a frequent trigger event: electrolytic and plasma volume shifts during dialysis sessions. Unfortunately, accurate predictive markers of SCA do not exist, however some primary prevention trials using beta-blockers or angiotensin II receptor blockers are encouraging, while the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in the population of chronic dialysis patients remains controversial. Identification of patients at risk, minimizing trigger events such as electrolytic shifts and improving team skills in the diagnosis and initial resuscitation with the latest recommendations from 2010 seem necessary to reduce incidence and improve survival in this high risk population. Organization of European studies would also allow a more accurate view of this reality in our dialysis units. PMID:26547563

  11. Responses of coronary arteries of cardiac transplant patients to acetylcholine.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, R D; Nabel, E G; Selwyn, A P; Ludmer, P L; Mudge, G H; Kirshenbaum, J M; Schoen, F J; Alexander, R W; Ganz, P

    1988-01-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis is a major cause of graft failure after heart transplantation. Graft atherosclerosis is typically diffuse and difficult to detect even with coronary arteriography. Recently, acetylcholine was shown to dilate blood vessels by releasing a vasorelaxant substance from the endothelium (endothelium-derived relaxing factor). We have demonstrated paradoxical vasoconstriction induced by acetylcholine both early and late in the course of coronary atherosclerosis in patients, suggesting an association of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that coronary arteries of heart transplant patients can show endothelial dysfunction before or in the early stages of angiographically evident coronary atherosclerosis. Acetylcholine was infused into the left anterior descending artery of 13 heart transplant patients at 12 (n = 9) and 24 (n = 4) mo after transplantation. Vascular responses were evaluated by quantitative angiography. Among patients with angiographically smooth coronary arteries, relatively few (6/25) arterial segments had preserved vasodilator responses, while the majority failed to dilate (10/25) or paradoxically constricted (9/25). Angiographically irregular coronary arteries were present in three patients, in whom 8/10 segments showed marked paradoxical constriction and the remaining 2/10 failed to dilate. Only 1 of 13 patients retained appropriate dilation to acetylcholine in all segments. Nitroglycerin, which acts directly on vascular smooth muscle, dilated nearly all segments. No clinical features of the patients, including myocardial rejection appeared to correlate with the impaired functional response of vessels. Thus impaired response to acetylcholine is a common early finding in heart transplant patients and emphasizes the potential importance of endothelial dysfunction in the development of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:3121675

  12. Effective mechanical thrombectomy in a patient with hyperacute ischemic stroke associated with cardiac myxoma.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seol-Hee; Park, Soonchan; Lee, Nam Joon; Kang, Youngjin; Cho, Kyung-Hee

    2014-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is the most common neurologic manifestation of cardiac myxoma. However, there has been no current guideline on the treatment of hyperacute ischemic stroke due to cardiac myxoma. We describe a patient with hyperacute stroke caused by cardiac myxoma who had a good outcome with rapid recanalization through mechanical thrombectomy. A 46-year-old man was admitted with acute symptoms of right side hemiplegia and global aphasia. Brain computed tomography (CT) angiography showed a T occlusion of the left internal carotid artery. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was administered. However, his clinical symptoms did not improve. Thus, we performed endovascular treatment and had a successful outcome. A pathologic examination of the retrieved clot revealed a tumor emboli from a cardiac myxoma. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a left atrial myxoma in which a large mass was attached to the posterior wall of the aorta. The patient's neurologic deficits recovered with the exception of left eye blindness. Reperfusion therapy with mechanical thrombectomy might be safe and effective for the rapid revascularization of large vessel occlusions in hyperacute ischemic stroke, from which the tumor thrombi can be retrieved. PMID:25174564

  13. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  14. Changes in pulse pressure variability during cardiac resynchronization therapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Keyl, Cornelius; Stockinger, Jochem; Laule, Sven; Staier, Klaus; Schiebeling-Römer, Jochen; Wiesenack, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The respiratory variation in pulse pressure (PP) has been established as a dynamic variable of cardiac preload which indicates fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. The impact of acute changes in cardiac performance on respiratory fluctuations in PP has not been evaluated until now. We used cardiac resynchronization therapy as a model to assess the acute effects of changes in left ventricular performance on respiratory PP variability without the need of pharmacological intervention. Methods In 19 patients undergoing the implantation of a biventricular pacing/defibrillator device under general anesthesia, dynamic blood pressure regulation was assessed during right ventricular and biventricular pacing in the frequency domain (power spectral analysis) and in the time domain (PP variation: difference between the maximal and minimal PP values, normalized by the mean value). Results PP increased slightly during biventricular pacing but without statistical significance (right ventricular pacing, 33 ± 10 mm Hg; biventricular pacing, 35 ± 11 mm Hg). Respiratory PP fluctuations increased significantly (logarithmically transformed PP variability -1.27 ± 1.74 ln mm Hg2 versus -0.66 ± 1.48 ln mm Hg2; p < 0.01); the geometric mean of respiratory PP variability increased 1.8-fold during cardiac resynchronization. PP variation, assessed in the time domain and expressed as a percentage, showed comparable changes, increasing from 5.3% (3.1%; 12.3%) during right ventricular pacing to 6.9% (4.7%; 16.4%) during biventricular pacing (median [25th percentile; 75th percentile]; p < 0.01). Conclusion Changes in cardiac performance have a significant impact on respiratory hemodynamic fluctuations in ventilated patients. This influence should be taken into consideration when interpreting PP variation. PMID:17445270

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of QTc dispersion for identification of risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Darbar, D.; Luck, J.; Davidson, N.; Pringle, T.; Main, G.; McNeill, G.; Struthers, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether QTc dispersion, which is easily obtained from a standard electrocardiogram, can predict those patients with peripheral vascular disease who will subsequently suffer a cardiac death, despite having no cardiac symptoms or signs. DESIGN: Patients with peripheral vascular disease were followed up for five years after they had had coronary angiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and their QTc dispersion calculated from their 12 lead electrocardiogram. SUBJECTS: 49 such patients were then divided into three groups: survivors (34), cardiac death (12), and non-cardiac death (3). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Survival. RESULTS: The mean (SD; range) ejection fractions were similar in all three groups: survivors 45.9 (11.0; 27.0-52.0), cardiac death 44.0 (7.90; 28.5-59.0), and non-cardiac death 45.3 (4.55; 39.0-50.0). QTc dispersion was significantly prolonged in the cardiac death group compared with in the survivors (86.3(23.9; 41.0-139) v 56.5 (25.4; 25.0-164); P = 0.002). A QTc dispersion > or = 60 ms had a 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in predicting cardiac death, QTc dispersion in patients with diffuse coronary artery disease was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in those with no disease or disease affecting one, two, or three vessels. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong link between QTc dispersion and cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. QTc dispersion may therefore be a cheap and non-invasive way of assessing the risk of cardiac death in patients with peripheral vascular disease. PMID:8611874

  16. Aldosterone and cortisol affect the risk of sudden cardiac death in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan; Schönfeld, Stephan; Blouin, Katja; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Hammer, Fabian; Krane, Vera; März, Winfried; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is common and accounts largely for the excess mortality of patients on maintenance dialysis. It is unknown whether aldosterone and cortisol increase the incidence of sudden cardiac death in dialysis patients. Methods and results We analysed data from 1255 diabetic haemodialysis patients participating in the German Diabetes and Dialysis Study (4D Study). Categories of aldosterone and cortisol were determined at baseline and patients were followed for a median of 4 years. By Cox regression analyses, hazard ratios (HRs) were determined for the effect of aldosterone, cortisol, and their combination on sudden death and other adjudicated cardiovascular outcomes. The mean age of the patients was 66 ± 8 years (54% male). Median aldosterone was <15 pg/mL (detection limit) and cortisol 16.8 µg/dL. Patients with aldosterone levels >200 pg/mL had a significantly higher risk of sudden death (HR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06–2.69) compared with those with an aldosterone <15 pg/mL. The combined presence of high aldosterone (>200 pg/mL) and high cortisol (>21.1 µg/dL) levels increased the risk of sudden death in striking contrast to patients with low aldosterone (<15 pg/mL) and low cortisol (<13.2 µg/dL) levels (HR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.32–6.21). Furthermore, all-cause mortality was significantly increased in the patients with high levels of both hormones (HR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.01–2.62). Conclusions The joint presence of high aldosterone and high cortisol levels is strongly associated with sudden cardiac death as well as all-cause mortality in haemodialysed type 2 diabetic patients. Whether a blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor decreases the risk of sudden death in these patients must be examined in future trials. PMID:23211232

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of infection in cardiac transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gentry, L O; Zeluff, B J

    1986-06-01

    Despite major advances in the management of rejection and the development of newer and more potent antimicrobials, infection still constitutes a major problem in transplant patients and other immunosuppressed hosts. Infectious complications in transplant patients clearly occur in two phases. The first phase includes the first 30 to 60 days after transplantation. During this period, nosocomial bacterial infections are most commonly encountered. Pulmonary, renal, and wound infections have all been encountered, and prophylactic antibiotics appear to decrease their frequency. Opportunistic infections usually do not occur during this period unless the patient undergoes treatment for acute rejection. The second phase of infectious complications usually follows the first month after transplantation. In this period, the level of immunosuppression is high, and opportunistic infections are common. Opportunistic pulmonary infections caused by P. carinii, L. pneumophila, cytomegalovirus, Aspergillus, and Nocardia spp. all are potentially life-threatening complications to the transplant patient. Aggressive diagnostic tests such as bronchoscopy, percutaneous needle biopsy, or open lung biopsy are frequently needed to make a diagnosis. Empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy is indicated in the ill patient; however, more specific therapy should be instituted once the diagnosis is confirmed. PMID:3520889

  18. A Prospective Evaluation of a Protocol for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Implanted Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nazarian, Saman; Hansford, Rozann; Roguin, Ariel; Goldsher, Dorith; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Lardo, Albert C.; Caffo, Brian S.; Frick, Kevin D.; Kraut, Michael A.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Calkins, Hugh; Berger, Ronald D.; Bluemke, David A.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is avoided in most patients with implanted cardiac devices because of safety concerns. Objective To define the safety of a protocol for MRI at the commonly used magnetic strength of 1.5 T in patients with implanted cardiac devices. Design Prospective nonrandomized trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01130896) Setting One center in the United States (94% of examinations) and one in Israel. Patients 438 patients with devices (54% with pacemakers and 46% with defibrillators) who underwent 555 MRI studies. Intervention Pacing mode was changed to asynchronous for pacemaker-dependent patients and to demand for others. Tachy-arrhythmia functions were disabled. Blood pressure, electrocardiography, oximetry, and symptoms were monitored by a nurse with experience in cardiac life support and device programming who had immediate backup from an electrophysiologist. Measurements Activation or inhibition of pacing, symptoms, and device variables. Results In 3 patients (0.7% [95% CI, 0% to 1.5%]), the device reverted to a transient back-up programming mode without long-term effects. Right ventricular (RV) sensing (median change, 0 mV [interquartile range {IQR}, −0.7 to 0 V]) and atrial and right and left ventricular lead impedances (median change, −2 Ω[IQR, −13 to 0 Ω], −4 Ω [IQR, −16 to 0 Ω], and −11 Ω [IQR, −40 to 0 Ω], respectively) were reduced immediately after MRI. At long-term follow-up (61% of patients), decreased RV sensing (median, 0 mV, [IQR, −1.1 to 0.3 mV]), decreased RV lead impedance (median, −3 Ω, [IQR, −29 to 15 Ω]), increased RV capture threshold (median, 0 V, IQR, [0 to 0.2 Ω]), and decreased battery voltage (median, −0.01 V, IQR, −0.04 to 0 V) were noted. The observed changes did not require device revision or reprogramming. Limitations Not all available cardiac devices have been tested. Long-term in-person or telephone follow-up was unavailable in 43 patients (10%), and

  19. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Methods: Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Results: Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of <1.5 for the water phantom but up to 4.2 in the anthropomorphic phantom. Changes were larger for axial than for transverse translations. These results were supported by SPS changes of up to six seen in the physical anthropomorphic phantom for axial translations. Defect width was also seen to significantly increase. The

  20. Bioactive oxidized lipids in the plasma of cardiac surgical intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Frey, Bettina; Johnen, Wolfram; Haupt, Renate; Kern, Hartmut; Rüstow, Bernd; Kox, Wolfgang J; Schlame, Michael

    2002-07-01

    Critical illness is associated with increased oxidative stress that may give rise to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and various secondary degradation products such as fragmented phosphatidylcholine (FPC) and lipids related to the platelet-activating factor (PAF). Because some oxidized phospholipids are potent proinflammatory agents, we measured the concentration of LOOH, FPC, and PAF-like activity in blood plasma of 36 patients who had undergone cardiac surgery and developed postoperative complications associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or multiple organ failure (MOF). These patients were compared to two control groups, namely preoperative patients scheduled for cardiac surgery (n = 13), and postoperative patients without complications (n = 19). Postoperative patents had higher concentrations of LOOH and lower concentrations of FPC than preoperative patients (P < 0.01). However, SIRS and MOF had no significant effect on the concentration of oxidatively modified lipids. This is despite the fact that MOF patients showed evidence of increased lipid peroxidation (7-fold higher ratio of alpha-tocoquinone/alpha-tocopherol compared to control). LOOH correlated positively with the white blood cell count. Postoperative patients had 4-fold higher plasma activities of phospholipase A2 and this activity was further increased in patients with SIRS (P < 0.04). Phospholipase A2 activity correlated negatively with the concentration of FPC. The data suggest that oxidatively modified lipids do not accumulate in patients with SIRS and MOF, perhaps because enhanced peroxidation of lipids is offset by enhanced lipolytic activity. PMID:12095127

  1. Relationship of non-cardiac biomarkers with periprocedural myocardial injury in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rui-Xiang; Li, Jian-Jun; Liao, Peng-da; Zhang, Min-Zhou

    2016-10-15

    percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is one of the dominant methods for revascularization in patient with coronary artery disease (CAD), which accompanied with high incidence of periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) evaluated by postprocedural cardiac biomarker elevation. For the convenience of risk stratification of PMI following PCI, the aim of present review provides a unique opportunity to summarize the relationship of non-cardiac biomarkers with PMI by extensively searching in the MEDLINE to identify all the relevant studies. In conclusion, we found that PCI related PMI might be correlated positively to those non-cardiac biomarkers such as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglyceride, the ratios of LDL-C to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), the ratios of HDL-C to apolipoprotein A-I, the ratio of eicosapentaenoic acid to arachidonic acid, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1, C-reactive protein, high on-treatment platelet reactivity, platelet-monocyte aggregates, N-term pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, hemoglobin and albuminuria. Inversely, no relationships of PMI with those non-cardiac biomarkers such as mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, platelet-larger cell ratio, uric acid, eosinophils count and the genetic variant of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 C>T polymorphism. Moreover, there were controversial associations between PMI and those non-cardiac biomarkers such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin, homocysteine and the polymorphism Leu33Pro of platelet glycoprotein IIbIIIa. However, almost all studies failed to provide definite mechanism of its findings, and further reaches are needed to focus on the potential mechanisms of association between non-cardiac biomarkers and PMI related to PCI. PMID:27428312

  2. Some effects of a health educational film on cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Kliment, P; Palát, M; Riecanský, I; Fejfar, Z

    1982-01-01

    A health educational film on the psychosocial problems of their illness and recovery was viewed by 51 male patients with myocardial infarction. The attractiveness of the topic was tested and found to be high. Reactions elicited by separate messages of the film during the performance were recorded: their rate rose significantly after statements concerning mostly psychosocial aspects of recovery. On behalf of 13 criteria the film was evaluated by the patients medium positively with differences depending on their education. Viewing of the film changed the kind and structure of expressed demands for more health information and made them more concrete. PMID:7183112

  3. Voting with their feet - predictors of discharge against medical advice in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal ischaemic heart disease inpatients in Western Australia: an analytic study using data linkage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Discharge Against Medical Advice (DAMA) from hospital is associated with adverse outcomes and is considered an indicator of the responsiveness of hospitals to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, the indigenous people of Australia. We investigated demographic and clinical factors that predict DAMA in patients experiencing their first-ever inpatient admission for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The study focuses particularly on the differences in the risk of DAMA in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients while also investigating other factors in their own right. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study was undertaken using linked hospital and mortality data with complete coverage of Western Australia. Participants included all first-ever IHD inpatients (aged 25–79 years) admitted between 2005 and 2009, selected after a 15-year clearance period and who were discharged alive. The main outcome measure was DAMA as reflected in the hospital record. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine disparities in DAMA between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients, adjusting for a range of demographic and clinical factors, including comorbidity based on 5-year hospitalization history. A series of additional models were run on subgroups of the cohort to refine the analysis. Ethics approval was granted by the WA Human Research and the WA Aboriginal Health Ethics Committees. Results Aboriginal patients comprised 4.3% of the cohort of 37,304 IHD patients and 23% of the 224 DAMAs. Emergency admission (OR=5.9, 95% CI 2.9-12.2), alcohol admission history (alcohol-related OR=2.9, 95% CI 2.0-4.2) and Aboriginality (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.5) were the strongest predictors of DAMA in the multivariate model. Patients living in rural areas while attending non-metropolitan hospitals had a 50% higher risk of DAMA than those living and hospitalised in metropolitan areas. There was consistency in the ORs for Aboriginality in the different

  4. Association of cardiac troponin I with disease severity and outcomes in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Martínez, Mariella; Ayers, Colby; Mishkin, Joseph D; Bartolome, Sonja B; García, Christine K; Torres, Fernando; Drazner, Mark H; de Lemos, James A; Turer, Aslan T; Chin, Kelly M

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies have identified cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as an important marker in pulmonary hypertension (PH) prognosis. However, traditional assays are limited by poor sensitivity, even among patients at high risk. cTnI was measured in 255 PH patients using a new highly sensitive (hs) assay. Other measures included demographics, creatinine, 6-minute walk distance, hemodynamics, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and B-type natriuretic peptide level. The association between cTnI and survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. cTnI was detectable with the hs assay in 95% of the patients with a median level of 6.9 pg/ml (IQR 2.7-12.6 pg/ml). Higher cTnI levels associated with higher levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, shorter 6-minute walk distance, and more severe hemodynamic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. During a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 60 individuals died. Unadjusted event rates increased across higher cTnI quartiles (3, 5, 13, 17 events/100 person-years, respectively, p trend = 0.002). cTnI in the fourth (vs first) quartile remained associated with death in a final stepwise multivariable model that included clinical variables and hemodynamics (adjusted hazard ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 1.8-15.6). In conclusion, cTnI levels, detectable with a novel hs assay, identify patients with PH who have more severe hemodynamic and cardiac structural abnormalities and provide novel and independent prognostic information. This hs assay has the potential to detect more at-risk patients and improve current risk-stratification algorithms. PMID:23540547

  5. [Cardiac safety of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient--a case report].

    PubMed

    Karakuła-Juchnowicz, Hanna; Próchnicki, Michał; Kiciński, Paweł; Olajossy, Marcin; Pelczarska-Jamroga, Agnieszka; Dzikowski, Michał; Jaroszyński, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Since electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was introduced as treatment for psychiatric disorders in 1938, it has remained one of the most effective therapeutic methods. ECT is often used as a "treatment of last resort" when other methods fail, and a life-saving procedure in acute clinical states when a rapid therapeutic effect is needed. Mortality associated with ECT is lower, compared to the treatment with tricyclic antidepressants, and comparable to that observed in so-called minor surgery. In the literature, cases of effective and safe electroconvulsive therapy have been described in patients of advanced age, with a burden of many somatic disorders. However, cases of acute cardiac episodes have also been reported during ECT. The qualification of patients for ECT and the selection of a group of patients at the highest risk of cardiovascular complications remains a serious clinical problem. An assessment of the predictive value of parameters of standard electrocardiogram (ECG), which is a simple, cheap and easily available procedure, deserves special attention. This paper reports a case of a 74-year-old male patient treated with ECT for a severe depressive episode, in the context of cardiologic safety. Both every single ECT session and the full course were assessed to examine their impact on levels of troponin T, which is a basic marker of cardiac damage, and selected ECG parameters (QTc, QRS). In the presented case ECT demonstrated its high general and cardiac safety with no negative effect on cardiac troponin (TnT) levels, corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, or other measured ECG parameters despite initially increased troponin levels, the patient's advanced age, the burden of a severe somatic disease and its treatment (anticancer therapy). PMID:26608489

  6. [Pre-operative care for cardiac surgery patients with cold antibody disorder, cryoglobulinaemia and cryofibrinogenemia].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Brát, R; Kolek, M; Chrástecký, B; Korístka, M; Cermáková, Z; Nováková, L; Sáchová, L; Chasáková, K; Ranochová, A; Ryzí, M; Návratová, P; Zuchnická, J; Bodzásová, C; Plonková, H; Slezák, P

    2009-03-01

    We present an example of a patient with confirmed cold agglutinin disease who underwent cardiac surgery in hypothermia to illustrate a known fact that, when exposed to cold, cold agglutinins induce haemolysis of erythrocytes and that cryoglobulins and cryofibrinogens may, upon exposition to cold during a surgery under hypothermia, precipitate or gelify and thus increase plasma viscosity and damage microcirculation. Detailed immunological and haematological investigations in all patients awaiting cardiac surgery with a risk of developing hypothermia is not advantageous considering the low number of patients with clinical and laboratory signs of cold agglutinin disease, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia or paroxysmal cold haemoglobinuria and considering that these investigations, in addition, might not detect cryoglobulinaemia and cryofibrinogenemia. Identification of in-risk patients from the warning signs in the medical history, physical or basal laboratory testing who would subsequently undergo confirmatory investigations to verify the presence of these entities and define them accurately might be a potential solution to this clinical issue. Cardiac surgery strategy and peri-operative care should be tailored to the results of these investigations. Well-structured, practiced and functional cooperation between clinicians and laboratory personnel is a prerequisite for success in these circumstances. PMID:19378854

  7. Detection and putative effect of GATA4 gene variants in patients with congenital cardiac septal defects.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzouny, M A; El Ruby, M O; Issa, H A; Behiry, E G; Elsayed, N R; Fayez, A G

    2016-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor GATA4, located on chromosome 8p23.1-p22, has been implicated as a critical regulator of cardiac development during embryogenesis. Mutations of GATA4 appear to be responsible for some cardiac septal defects. The aim of this work was to screen for mutations in the GATA4 gene in sample of Egyptian patients affected by isolated and non-isolated cardiac septal defects. We examined 20 patients with atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricle septal defect (VSD), atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) and A-V canal disturbance defect and compared with examined 10 unaffected individuals as normal control. The patients were referred from Congenital Heart Disease Clinic of the Clinical Genetics department at the National Research Centre. All patients were subjected to clinical evaluation, echocardiography and karyotyping. Genomic DNA was extracted from all cases and subjected to PCR followed by direct sequencing. The predicted effect of variants was done by a variety of proper prediction tools. We detected six variants in GATA4 gene, two of them are novel variants. Predicted functional analysis of the relevant variants was performed by In silico analysis. Further confirmatory studies on familial segregation and in vitro / in vivo functional analysis are recommended to support our results. PMID:27064867

  8. Knowledge, Awareness and Self-Care Practices of Hypertension among Cardiac Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Muhammad; Haseeb, Abdul; Lashkerwala, Sehan Siraj; Zahid, Ibrahim; Siddiq, Khadijah; Saad, Muhammad; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Shahnawaz, Waqas; Ahmed, Bilal; Yaqub, Aimen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The most prevalent form of hypertension is systolic blood pressure (SBP) and it is considered to be predisposing risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The objective of the study was to assess self-care practices, knowledge and awareness of hypertension, especially related to SBP among cardiac hypertensive patients. Methodology: A Cross sectional study was conducted on 664 cardiac hypertensive patients, which were selected by non-probability convenience sampling from cardiology outpatient department of three tertiary care hospitals. Face to face interviews were conducted using a pre designed questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed by SPSS (V17). Results: 81.8%, did not know that hypertension is defined as high blood pressure. 97.1% of the sample population did not know that top measurement of blood pressure was referred to as systolic and only 25.0% correctly recognized normal systolic blood pressure to be less than 140mmHg. 7.4% of the patients consulted their doctor for hypertension once or twice in a month. Risk factor for high blood pressure most commonly identified by the participants was too much salt intake Conclusions: The results state that there is an inadequate general knowledge of hypertension among cardiac patients and they do not recognise the significance of elevated SBP levels. There is a need to initiate programs that create community awareness regarding long term complications of uncontrolled hypertension, particularly elevated SBP levels so that there is an improvement in self-care practices of the cardiacpatients. PMID:26383212

  9. Myocardial extracellular volume by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Neilan, Tomas G; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Shah, Ravi V; Feng, Jiazuo H; Pena-Herrera, Diego; Mandry, Damien; Pierre-Mongeon, Francois; Heydari, Bobak; Francis, Sanjeev A; Moslehi, Javid; Kwong, Raymond Y; Jerosch-Herold, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to determine whether the myocardial extracellular volume (ECV), measured using T1 measurements obtained during cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were increased in patients treated with anthracyclines. We performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography and measured the ECV in 42 patients treated with anthracyclines. The data from the cardiac magnetic resonance study were compared to those from healthy volunteers. The anthracycline-treated cohort consisted of 21 men and 21 women with a mean age of 55 ± 17 years, who presented a median of 84 months after chemotherapy with a cumulative anthracycline exposure of 282 ± 65 mg/m(2) and a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 52 ± 12%. The ECV was elevated in the anthracycline-treated patients compared to the age- and gender-matched controls (0.36 ± 0.03 vs 0.28 ± 0.02, p <0.001). A positive association was found between the ECV and left atrial volume (ECV vs indexed left atrial volume, r = 0.65, p <0.001), and negative association was found between the ECV and diastolic function (E' lateral, r = -0.64, p <0.001). In conclusion, the myocardial ECV is elevated in patients with previous anthracycline treatment and is associated with the diastolic function and increased atrial volumes. PMID:23228924

  10. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Rosane Maria; Zanini, Maurice; Ferrari, Juliana Nery; Silva, César Augusto; Farias, Leonardo Fontanive; Comel, João Carlos; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Santos, Antonio Cardoso; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard. PMID:24759952

  11. Universal access: but when? Treating the right patient at the right time: access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, William; Arthur, Heather; Stokes, Helen; Morrin, Louise; Beaton, Louise

    2006-09-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society formed an Access to Care Working Group ('Working Group') in the spring of 2004. The mandate of the group was to use the best science and information to establish reasonable triage categories and safe wait times for access to common cardiovascular services and procedures. The present commentary presents the rationale for benchmarks for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services. The Working Group's search for evidence included: a full literature review of the efficacy of CR, and the factors affecting access and referral to CR; a review of existing guidelines for access to CR; and a national survey of 14 CR programs across Canada undertaken in May 2005 to solicit information on referral to, and wait times for, CR. The Working Group also reviewed the results of The Ontario Cardiac Rehabilitation Pilot Project (2002) undertaken by the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, which reported the average and median wait times for CR. Some international agencies have formulated their own guidelines relating to the optimal wait time for the onset of CR. However, due to the limited amount of supporting literature, these guidelines have generally been formed as consensus statements. The Canadian national survey showed that few programs had guidelines for individual programs. The Cardiac Care Network of Ontario pilot project reported that the average and median times from a cardiac event to the intake into CR were 99 and 70 days, respectively. The national survey of sampled CR programs also revealed quite remarkable differences across programs in terms of the length of time between first contact to first attendance and to commencement of exercise. Programs that required a stress test before program initiation had the longest wait for exercise initiation. Some patients need to be seen within a very short time frame to prevent a marked deterioration in their medical or psychological state. In some cases, early intervention and advocacy may reduce the risk

  12. Cardiac Function in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul Bee; Choi, Han Seul; Son, Sejung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Respiratory symptoms are often observed in children with Kawasaki disease (KD) during the acute phase. The association of respiratory viruses in children with KD was investigated using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Subjects and Methods 138 KD patients were included from January 2010 to June 2013. We compared 3 groups (group 1: n=94, KD without respiratory symptoms; group 2: n=44, KD with respiratory symptoms; and group 3: n=50, febrile patients with respiratory symptoms). Laboratory data were obtained from each patient including N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Echocardiographic measurements were compared between group 1 and group 2. RT-PCR was performed using nasopharyngeal secretion to screen for the presence of 14 viruses in groups 2 and 3. Results The incidence of KD with respiratory symptoms was 31.8%. The duration of fever was significantly longer, and coronary artery diameter was larger in group 2 than in group 1. Tei index was significantly higher and coronary artery diameter larger in group 2 than group 1. Coronary artery diameter, C-reactive protein levels, platelet count, alanine aminotransferase levels, and NT-pro BNP levels were significantly higher and albumin levels lower in group 2 compared with group 3. Conclusion NT-pro BNP was a valuable diagnostic tool in differentiating KD from other febrile viral respiratory infections. Some viruses were more frequently observed in KD patients than in febrile controls. Tei index using tissue Doppler imaging was increased in KD patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:26240586

  13. Nurses' under-medication of analgesia in cardiac surgical patients: a personal exploration.

    PubMed

    Cottle, S

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines aspects of care which may account for some of the reasons why critical care nurses fail to relieve patients' pain following cardiothoracic surgery. Factors that may influence the critical care nurses' decision regarding the amount of opiate analgesia to give a patient are examined using the 'Theory of Planned Behaviour' as a framework for enquiry. The skills required by the critical care nurse in planning how to play the phenomena of 'the doctor-nurse game' may be a key element in meeting the goal of pain relief for the patient following cardiac surgery. PMID:9873316

  14. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:26636965

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  16. Cardiac valve degeneration in a patient with Sneddon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Diosteanu, Raluca; Schuler, Gerhard; Müller, Ulrike

    2015-06-01

    Sneddon syndrome--a rare cause of aortic and mitral valve stenosis. Sneddon syndrome is a rare disorder that leads to repeated occurrence of cerebrovascular disease and skin manifestation, defined as livedo racemosa generalisata. The authors report the occurrence of multiple valve degenerations in a 49-year-old patient with Sneddon syndrome, which seemed to have been asymptomatic through a long period of time and was diagnosed as it needed a complex surgical intervention. PMID:25479820

  17. Young aboriginals are less likely to receive a renal transplant: a Canadian national study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated Aboriginals are less likely to receive a renal transplant in comparison to Caucasians however whether this applies to the entire population or specific subsets remains unclear. We examined the effect of age on renal transplantation in Aboriginals. Methods Data on 30,688 dialysis (Aboriginal 2,361, Caucasian 28, 327) patients obtained between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2009 were included in the final analysis. Racial status was self-reported. Cox proportional hazards, the Fine and Grey sub-distribution method and Poisson regression were used to determine the association between race, age and transplantation. Results In comparison to Caucasians, Aboriginals were less likely to receive a renal transplant (Adjusted HR 0.66 95% CI 0.57-0.77, P < 0.0001) however after stratification by age and treating death as a competing outcome, the effect was more predominant in younger Aboriginals (Age 18–40: 20.6% aboriginals vs. 48.3% Caucasians transplanted; aHR 0.50(0.39-0.61), p < 0.0001, Age 41–50: 10.2% aboriginals vs. 33.9% Caucasians transplanted; aHR 0.46(0.32-0.64), p = 0.005, Age 51–60: 8.2% aboriginals vs. 19.5% Caucasians transplanted; aHR0.65(0.49-0.88), p = 0.01, Age >60: 2.7% aboriginals vs. 2.6% Caucasians transplanted; aHR 1.21(0.76-1.91), P = 0.4, Age X race interaction p < 0.0001). Both living and deceased donor transplants were lower in Aboriginals under the age of 60 compared to Caucasians. Conclusion Younger Aboriginals are less likely to receive a renal transplant compared to their Caucasian counterparts, even after adjustment for comorbidity. Determination of the reasons behind these discrepancies and interventions specifically targeting the Aboriginal population are warranted. PMID:23317294

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR

  19. Patient reported outcome measures for cardiac ablation procedures: a multicentre pilot to develop a new questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Kathleen L.; White, Judith; Carolan-Rees, Grace; Patrick, Hannah; O'Callaghan, Peter; Murray, Stephen; Cunningham, David; Wood, Kathryn A.; Lencioni, Mauro; Griffith, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the feasibility of administering Patient Reported Outcomes Measures (PROMs) in patients treated with ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, and to conduct the first stage of development and testing of a new PROM tool. Methods and results A new tool was developed by a multidisciplinary team and tested alongside an adaptation of the patient perception of arrhythmia questionnaire (PPAQ) and EQ-5D-5L in a multicentre retrospective audit involving 791 consecutive cardiac arrhythmia patients treated with catheter ablation at three UK centres over 13 months. Data were recorded in the National Cardiac Rhythm Management Database, part of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research. The response rate was 71.9% (n = 569). Patients reported significant improvements across all outcomes and impacts, with reductions in symptoms of 51.7% (heart racing), 33.9% (fatigue) 31.8% (heart flutters), 43.5% (dizziness), 38.6% (breathlessness), 44.2% (chest pressure), 33.1% (trouble concentrating), 15.9% (headache), 28.3% (neck pressure), and 23.4% (fainting) (P < 0.001). The mean number of social days affected reduced by 7.49 days/month (P < 0.001); mean work/school days affected/month reduced by 6.26 (P < 0.001); mean GP/hospital visits reduced by 1.36 days/month (P < 0.001). The procedure met patient expectations in 72% of responders. Conclusions The high response rate suggests that the use of PROMs in this patient group is feasible, with rates equalling those of the National PROMs Programme. The results showed that patients experienced significant improvements in their quality of life following ablation, while feedback allowed the tools to be improved. Further work is required to validate these tools; however, the findings suggest that PROMs could be useful in the audit of ablation techniques. PMID:24627541

  20. Usefulness of cardiac meta-iodobenzylguanidine imaging to identify patients with chronic heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction <35% at low risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tsutomu; Yamada, Takahisa; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Morita, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshio; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Kawasaki, Masato; Kikuchi, Atsushi; Kondo, Takumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimi, Masashi; Hakui, Hideyuki; Ozaki, Tatsuhisa; Sato, Yoshihiro; Seo, Masahiro; Sakata, Yasushi; Fukunami, Masatake

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are often treated with implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). However, current criteria for device use that is based largely on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) lead to many patients receiving ICDs that never deliver therapy. It is of clinical significance to identify patients who do not require ICDs. Although cardiac I-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging provides prognostic information about CHF, whether it can identify patients with CHF who do not require an ICD remains unclear. We studied 81 patients with CHF and LVEF <35%, assessed by cardiac MIBG imaging at enrollment. The heart-to-mediastinal ratio (H/M) in delayed images and washout rates were divided into 6 grades from 0 to 5, according to the degree of deviation from control values. The study patients were classified into 3 groups: low (1 to 4), intermediate (5 to 7), and high (8 to 10), according to the MIBG scores defined as the sum of the H/M and washout rate scores. Sixteen patients died of SCD during a follow-up period. Patients with low MIBG score had a significantly lower risk of SCD than those with intermediate and high scores (low [n = 19], 0%; intermediate [n = 37], 19%; high [n = 25], 36%; p = 0.001). The positive predictive value of low MIBG score for identifying patients without SCD was 100%. In conclusion, the MIBG score can identify patients with CHF and LVEF <35% who have low risk of developing SCD. PMID:25851796

  1. Hand-held echocardiography in the setting of pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery: results from a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Mega, Simona; Goffredo, Costanza; Patti, Giuseppe; Chello, Massimo; Di Sciascio, Germano

    2015-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is not a routine test in the pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery but may be considered in those with known heart failure and valvular heart disease or complaining cardiac symptoms. In this setting, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) could find a potential application as an alternative to standard echocardiography in selected patients; however, its utility in this context has not been investigated. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the conclusiveness of HHE compared to standard echocardiography in this subset of patients. 100 patients scheduled for non-cardiac surgery were randomized to receive a standard exam with a Philips Ie33 or a bedside evaluation with a pocket-size imaging device (Opti-Go, Philips Medical System). The primary endpoint was the percentage of satisfactory diagnosis at the end of the examination referred as conclusiveness. Secondary endpoints were the mean duration time and the mean waiting time to perform the exams. No significant difference in terms of conclusiveness between HHE and standard echo was found (86 vs 96%; P = 0.08). Mean duration time of the examinations was 6.1 ± 1.2 min with HHE and 13.1 ± 2.6 min with standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). HHE resulted in a consistent save of waiting time because it was performed the same day of clinical evaluation whereas patients waited 10.1 ± 6.1 days for a standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). This study suggests the potential role of HHE for pre-operative evaluation of selected patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, since it provided similar information but it was faster and earlier performed compared to standard echocardiography. PMID:25985940

  2. [Massive cardiac lipomatosis, an autopsy finding in a patient with sudden death].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón-de Lucas, Ester; García-Fernández, Eugenia; Carpio, Carlos; Alcolea, Sergio; Martínez-Abad, Yolanda; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2016-06-17

    The fat replacement of myocardial cells is a degenerative process that usually affects the right ventricle and is found in 50% of the elderly. The problem arises when this degeneration occurs to a massive degree, a differential diagnosis with other pathologies being necessary. We present the case of a patient who died suddenly and a massive cardiac lipomatosis was found on autopsy, as the only explanation of the outcome. PMID:27143526

  3. Anaesthesia Application for Cardiac Denervation in a Patient with Long QT Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Koçulu, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is a congenital disorder that is characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiograms and a propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest or sudden death. Cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension diseases have additional risks in anaesthesia management. In this study, we emphasize on one lung ventilation, pacemaker-implantable cardioverter–defibrillator and the anaesthesia management process in a patient with long QT syndrome, cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension who underwent thoracic sympathectomy. PMID:27366557

  4. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2) followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week). Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max) and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp) was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001) and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose) improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01) as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15). Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity and cardiac function

  5. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  6. [Remote monitoring for follow-up of patients with implantable cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mário; Silva Cunha, Pedro; da Silva, Nogueira

    2013-03-01

    With a widening of indications for cardiac devices, especially in view of the clinical benefits of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy, the number of patients with such devices is growing steadily. However, the resources required, and the need for long-term regular interrogation in dedicated clinics, represent a significant burden for already overstretched electrophysiology teams and hospital services. Remote telemonitoring is increasingly used for such follow-up, as it is a safe and effective alternative to conventional follow-up programs in outpatient clinics. This technology has been shown to be technically reliable, enabling early identification of device malfunction, arrhythmic events and heart failure decompensation, while reducing the risk of under-reporting, the number of outpatient clinic visits and hospitalizations due to cardiac events, and healthcare costs. Further studies are needed to determine how best to implement this new technology in a cost-effective manner, and what new legislation governing the use of remote monitoring in clinical practice may be required. In this article, we describe current systems, review the technical and clinical evidence in the literature regarding remote monitoring of implantable cardiac devices, and expand on outstanding questions. PMID:23415739

  7. Pheochromocytoma Crisis With Severe Cyclic Blood Pressure Fluctuations in a Cardiac Pheochromocytoma Patient Successfully Resuscitated by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Dawei; Su, Longxiang; Long, Yun; Du, Wei; Miao, Qi; Li, Fang; Jin, Zhengyu; Zeng, Zhengpei; Luo, Ailun; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac pheochromocytoma is relatively rare. Few reports describe the intraoperative and postoperative progression of patients experiencing a life-threatening pheochromocytoma crisis treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A 35-year-old man was referred to our facility for paroxysmal hypertension with a 10-year history of sweating, headaches, cardiac palpitations, and postexercise dyspnea. The patient initially underwent urine catecholamine measurement and an isotope scan, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (CT), which indicated a multiple, cardiac pheochromocytoma. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT reconstruction, and a coronary CT angiography revealed several lesions at the aortic root and along the cardiac vasculature. Multifocal cardiac pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and pheochromocytoma crisis with severe cyclic blood pressure fluctuation occurred during surgery. Surgical resection of multiple pheochromocytomas in the right medial carotid sheath, mediastinum between the main and pulmonary arteries, and between the abdominal aorta and inferior vena artery was performed. To ensure cardiac perfusion and avoid severe circulatory fluctuation, the cardiac paraganglioma resection was prioritized. After resecting the cardiac pheochromocytoma, a severe pheochromocytoma crisis with rapid cyclic blood pressure fluctuation developed. ECMO and intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) were initiated to stabilize circulation and perfusion. Phenoxybenzamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and fluid resuscitation were administered to support cardiovascular function. The magnitude of blood pressure fluctuation steadily decreased with treatment. IABP was discontinued after 3 days, and ECMO was discontinued after 16 days. The patient was discharged 3 months postoperatively. This case indicates that mechanical life support with ECMO is a valuable option for

  8. Pseudoidiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis in a patient with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Pandi, A S; Kronik, G

    1987-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman with a large pericardial effusion and tamponade presented with signs of IHSS including a grade 4/6 apical systolic murmur, severe SAM, early systolic aortic valve closure and a small hypercontractile left ventricle but at most borderline left ventricular hypertrophy. Following pericardiocentesis, the clinical and echocardiographic signs of subvalvular obstruction resolved completely. One year later the patient died of bronchial carcinoma and no evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was found at autopsy. Pericardial tamponade should be added to the list of possible causes of dynamic subvalvular obstruction in a structurally normal heart. PMID:3829760

  9. Tomotherapy and Multifield Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning Reduce Cardiac Doses in Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Cardiac Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: For patients with left-sided breast cancers, radiation treatment to the intact breast results in high doses to significant volumes of the heart, increasing the risk of cardiac morbidity, particularly in women with unfavorable cardiac anatomy. We compare helical tomotherapy (TOMO) and inverse planned intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using opposed tangents (3D-CRT) for reductions in cardiac volumes receiving high doses. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with left-sided breast cancers and unfavorable cardiac anatomy, determined by a maximum heart depth (MHD) of {>=}1.0 cm within the tangent fields, were planned for TOMO and IMRT with five to seven beam angles, in addition to 3D-CRT. The volumes of heart and left ventricle receiving {>=}35 Gy (V35) were compared for the plans, as were the mean doses to the contralateral breast and the volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V20) for the ipsilateral lung. Results: The mean MHD was 1.7 cm, and a significant correlation was observed between MHD and both heart and left ventricle V35. The V35s for IMRT (0.7%) and TOMO (0.5%) were significantly lower than for 3D-CRT (3.6%). The V20 for IMRT (22%) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (15%) or TOMO (18%), but the contralateral breast mean dose for TOMO (2.48 Gy) was significantly higher than for 3D-CRT (0.93 Gy) or IMRT (1.38 Gy). Conclusions: Both TOMO and IMRT can significantly reduce cardiac doses, with modest increases in dose to other tissues in left-sided breast cancer patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy.

  10. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring in patients with bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery: Observational case series

    PubMed Central

    Aktuerk, Dincer; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Luckraz, Heyman; Garnham, Andrew; Khazi, Fayaz Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with significant bilateral carotid artery stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery have an increased risk of stroke and death. The optimal management strategy remains inconclusive, and the available evidence does not support the superiority of one strategy over another. Materials and Methods: A number of noninvasive strategies have been developed for minimizing perioperative stroke including continuous real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The number of patients presenting with this combination (bilateral significant carotid stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery) in any single institution will be small and hence there is a lack of large randomized studies. Results: This case series describes our early experience with NIRS in a select group of patients with significant bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery (n = 8). In contrast to other studies, this series is a single surgeon, single center study, where the entire surgery (both distal ends and proximal ends) was performed during single aortic clamp technique, which effectively removes several confounding variables. NIRS monitoring led to the early recognition of decreased cerebral oxygenation, and corrective steps (increased cardiopulmonary bypass flow, increased pCO2, etc.,) were taken. Conclusion: The study shows good clinical outcome with the use of NIRS. This is our “work in progress,” and we aim to conduct a larger study. PMID:26750675

  11. Cardiac catheterization--before and after. What the patient should understand! What the nurse needs to know!

    PubMed

    Perdue, B

    1990-01-01

    This article provides helpful cardiac catheterization information for nurses preparing patients for this procedure and administering follow-up care. Pre-cath and post-cath teaching information and discharge instructions are included. PMID:2310468

  12. Survival of patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Deborah; Carter, William E; Cifu, David X; Carne, William

    2014-01-01

    Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI) are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate), both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size. PMID:25436984

  13. Culprit versus non-culprit lesion related adverse cardiac events in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruogu; Loh, Kelvin; Loo, Germaine; Tai, Bee-Choo; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2013-01-01

    Background In patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the relative contribution of culprit versus non-culprit lesions to subsequent major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unknown. Elucidating this relationship will shed light on the contributions of OSA to the advancement of coronary artery disease. Methods In a cohort of 105 patients who underwent an overnight sleep study after AMI, 98 were diagnosed with OSA (Apnoea–Hypopnoea Index (AHI) ≥5). The clinical outcomes at 5-year follow-up were determined. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiac death, reinfarction and repeat revascularisation. A culprit lesion was defined as the lesion involved in the initial AMI, and a non-culprit lesion as any lesion in the entire coronary tree outside the culprit lesion. Results Eighteen patients (median AHI: 28.1) developed MACE, of whom 12 presented with reinfarction and 6 with repeat revascularisation for stable angina. There was no cardiac death. Based on repeated coronary angiography, the MACE was related to the culprit lesion in 4 patients and the non-culprit lesion in 12 patients. The lesion responsible for the MACE was indeterminate in 2 patients, as coronary angiography was declined. The median duration from index AMI to culprit lesion-related and non-culprit lesion-related MACE were 10.5 and 20 months, respectively. Conclusions The incidence of MACE among patients with OSA and AMI was 18.4%, and most of the events were related to non-culprit lesions rather than the culprit lesion during the initial AMI.

  14. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  15. Meta-analysis of the effects of preoperative renin-angiotensin system inhibitor therapy on major adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaocheng; Tong, Jin; Hu, Qiongwen; Chen, Shaojie; Yin, Yuehui; Liu, Zengzhang

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the role of preoperative renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (RASI) therapy on major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The Medline, Cochrane Library and Embase databases were searched for clinical studies published up to May 2014. Studies that evaluated the effects of preoperative RASI therapy in cardiac surgery were included. Odds ratio (OR) estimates were generated under a random-effects model. After a literature search in the major databases, 18 studies were identified [three randomized prospective clinical trials (RCTs) and 15 observational trials] that reported outcomes of 54 528 cardiac surgery patients with (n = 22 661; 42%) or without (n = 31 867; 58%) preoperative RASI therapy. Pool analysis indicated that preoperative RASI therapy was not associated with a significant reduction of early all-cause mortality [OR: 1.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.15, P = 0.93; I(2) = 25%], myocardial infarction (OR: 1.04; 95% CI 0.91-1.19, P = 0.60; I(2) = 16%), or stroke (OR: 0.93; 95% CI 0.75-1.14, P = 0.46; I(2) = 38%). Meta-regression analysis confirmed that there was a strong negative correlation between the percentage of diabetics and early all-cause mortality (P = 0.03). Furthermore, preoperative RASI therapy significantly reduced mortality in studies containing a high proportion of diabetic patients (OR: 0.84; 95% CI 0.71-0.99, P = 0.04; I(2) = 0%). In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicated that although preoperative RASI therapy was not associated with a lower risk of MACE in cardiac surgery patients, it might provide benefits for diabetic patients. PMID:25301954

  16. Three versions of Perceived Stress Scale: validation in a sample of Chinese cardiac patients who smoke

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Smoking causes heart disease, the major cause of death in China and Hong Kong. Stress is one major trigger of smoking and relapse, and understanding stress among smoking cardiac patients can therefore help in designing effective interventions to motivate them to quit. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and to compare the appropriateness of the three versions of the scale (PSS-14, PSS-10, and PSS-4) among Chinese cardiac patients who were also smokers. Methods From March 2002 to December 2004, 1860 cardiac patients who smoked were recruited at the cardiac outpatient clinics of ten acute hospitals in Hong Kong, and 1800 questionnaires were analysed. Participants completed a questionnaire including the PSS, nicotine dependence and certain demographic variables. The psychometric properties of the PSS were investigated: construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis, reliability using Cronbach's alpha and concurrent validity by examining the relationship with smoking- and health-related variables. Results For all the three versions of the PSS, confirmatory factor analyses corroborated the 2-factor structure of the scale, with the positive and negative factors correlating significantly and negatively to a moderate extent (r < -0.5), and high Cronbach's alpha values for the two subscales (alpha > 0.5). All the correlations of the two subscales and the smoking- and health-related variables were statistically significant and in the expected directions although of small magnitudes, except daily cigarette consumption. Conclusions The findings confirmed the satisfactory psychometric properties of all three Chinese versions of PSS. We recommend the use of PSS-10 for research which focuses on the two components of perceived stress, as it shows a higher reliability; and the use of PSS-4 if such partition is not essential and space for multiple measures is limited. PMID:20735860

  17. Stress testing for risk stratification of patients with low to moderate probability of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Rudraiah, L; Zalenski, R J

    2001-02-01

    In summary, this article focused on the use of stress testing to risk-stratify patients at the conclusion of their emergency evaluation for ACI. As discussed, those patients in the probably not ACI category require additional risk stratification prior to discharge. It should be kept in mind that patients in this category are heterogeneous, containing subgroups at both higher and lower risk of ACI and cardiac events. The patients with lower pretest probability for ACI may only need exercise testing in the ED. Patients with higher pretest probability should undergo myocardial perfusion or echocardiographic stress testing to maximize diagnostic and prognostic information. Prognostic information is the key to provocative testing in the ED. Prognostic information is the component that will help emergency physicians identify the patients who may be discharged home safely without having to worry about a 6% annual cardiac death rate and a 10% overall death rate over the next 30 months. Stress testing provides this key prognostic data, and it can be obtained in short-stay chest pain observation units in a safe, timely, and cost-effective fashion. PMID:11214405

  18. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions. PMID:26687150

  19. Anesthetizing a Patient with Escalating Cardiac Enzyme Levels for Urgent Noncardiac Surgery: Clinical and Ethical Concerns.

    PubMed

    Ramarapu, Srikiran

    2015-07-15

    An 81-year-old man with a history of villous adenoma of the duodenum was admitted with new-onset jaundice, abdominal pain, and pruritus, which raised concerns about disease progression and hepatobiliary obstruction. The patient had refused surgical resection of tumor on initial diagnosis 2 years earlier and opted out of it again at the current presentation because of his significant comorbidities. While discussing treatment options with his family, he developed symptoms suggesting myocardial infarction. Therefore, before anesthetizing this patient with escalating cardiac enzyme levels for an urgent noncardiac procedure, it was important to attend to the dynamics of the decision-making process. PMID:26171740

  20. Troponin Marker for Acute Coronary Occlusion and Patient Outcome Following Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, David A.; Wares, Catherine M.; Mayer, Katherine A.; Runyon, Michael S.; Studnek, Jonathan R.; Ward, Shana L.; Kraft, Kathi M.; Heffner, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The utility of troponin as a marker for acute coronary occlusion and patient outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is unclear. We sought to determine whether initial or peak troponin was associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), OHCA survival or neurological outcome. Methods Single-center retrospective-cohort study of OHCA patients treated in a comprehensive clinical pathway from November 2007 to October 2012. Troponin I levels were acquired at presentation, four and eight hours after arrest, and then per physician discretion. Cardiac catheterization was at the cardiologist’s discretion. Survival and outcome were determined at hospital discharge, with cerebral performance category score 1–2 defined as a good neurological outcome. Results We enrolled 277 patients; 58% had a shockable rhythm, 44% survived, 41% good neurological outcome. Of the 107 (38%) patients who underwent cardiac catheterization, 30 (28%) had PCI. Initial ED troponin (median, ng/mL) was not different in patients requiring PCI vs no PCI (0.32 vs 0.09, p=0.06), although peak troponin was higher (4.19 versus 1.57, p=0.02). Of the 85 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization without STEMI (n=85), there was no difference in those who received PCI vs no PCI in initial troponin (0.22 vs 0.06, p=0.40) or peak troponin (2.58 vs 1.43, p=0.27). Regarding outcomes, there was no difference in initial troponin in survivors versus non-survivors (0.09 vs 0.22, p=0.11), or those with a good versus poor neurological outcome (0.09 vs 0.20, p=0.11). Likewise, there was no difference in peak troponin in survivors versus non-survivors (1.64 vs 1.23, p=0.07), or in those with a good versus poor neurological outcome (1.57 vs 1.26, p=0.14). Conclusion In our single-center patient cohort, peak troponin, but not initial troponin, was associated with higher likelihood of PCI, while neither initial nor peak troponin were associated with survival or neurological outcome in

  1. Immune dysfunction in Australian Aborigines.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Thomson, P J; Roberts-Thomson, R A; Nikoloutsopoulos, T; Gillis, D

    2005-12-01

    An examination of the prevalence and phenotype of immune disorders in different ethnic groups may provide important clues to the etiopathogenesis of these disorders. Whilst still conjectural the restricted and somewhat unique polymorphisms of the MHC (and other genetic loci involving host defences) of the Australian Aborigines may provide an explanation for their apparent heightened susceptibility to newly encountered infections and their resistance to many (auto) immune and allergic disorders. In comparison with non-Aboriginal Australians, Australian Aborigines have heightened frequencies of rheumatic fever, systemic lupus erythematosus, various infections and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. In contrast various autoimmune disorders (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, CREST, biliary cirrhosis, coeliac disease, pernicious anaemia, vitiligo), B27 related arthropathies, psoriasis, lymphoproliferative disorders and atopic disorders appear infrequent or absent. Similarly various autoantibodies occur with increased or diminished frequency. With continuing racial admixture, social deprivation and deleterious lifestyles of these people it is likely that further changes in both the frequencies and phenotype of these immune disorders will occur. It is only with a full understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in these immune disorders that meaningful and clinical relevant interventions will be possible. PMID:16572744

  2. Cardiac Affection in Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Relation to Omentin

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Soha M. Abd El; Battah, Ahmed A.; Shehaby, Amal El

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate cardiac affection in type 1 diabetes in relation to Omentin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty two diabetics and 30 volunteer of the same age and sex were included as a control group. Blood sample was taken for assessment of omentin and oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1) and lipid profile. Urine sample was taken for assessment of albumin/creatinine ratio. 24 hour holter was also done. T-test, simple correlation followed by stepwise multiple regression analysis was used for analysis of data. RESULTS: Parameters of 24 hour holter were significantly lower in diabetics. Omentin was significantly lower, while OxLDL were significantly higher than controls. RMSSD, ST deviation and OxLDL were the parameters related to omentin by stepwise multiple regression analysis in diabetics. CONCLUSION: Diabetic patients had a cardiac autonomic neuropathy. A significant reduction of omentin and elevation OxLDL imply that they influence glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetes. Omentin had a significant relation to 24 hr holter which may reflect its role in cardiac affection. Omentin and OxLDL had a role in renal affection.

  3. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis. PMID:26379761

  4. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Drivers of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Cardiac Rehabilitation Use: Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mead, Holly; Ramos, Christal; Grantham, Sarah C

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) use is lower for racial and ethnic minorities than White patients. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that drive this disparity at the system, provider, and patient levels. A mixed methods study combined descriptive analysis of 2007 Medicare claims data and thematic analysis of 19 clinician interviews, 8 minority patient focus groups and 8 one-on-one interviews with minority heart patients across three communities. The disparity between White and non-White CR use ranged from 7 to 11 percentage points among study sites (p < .05). Key themes suggest disparities are driven by (a) flawed financing and reimbursement that creates disincentives to invest in CR programs, (b) a health care system whose priorities are misaligned with the needs of patients, and (c) subjective decision-making around referral processes. These findings suggest that the health care system needs to address multiple levels of problems to mitigate disparities in CR use. PMID:26400868

  6. Patient Report and Review of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infection after Cardiac Device Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, David S.; Goswami, Neela D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections resulting from cardiac implantable electronic devices are rare, but as more devices are implanted, these organisms are increasingly emerging as causes of early-onset infections. We report a patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator pocket and associated bloodstream infection caused by an organism of the Mycobacterium fortuitum group, and we review the literature regarding mycobacterial infections resulting from cardiac device implantations. Thirty-two such infections have been previously described; most (70%) were caused by rapidly growing species, of which M. fortuitum group species were predominant. When managing such infections, clinicians should consider the potential need for extended incubation of routine cultures or dedicated mycobacterial cultures for accurate diagnosis; combination antimicrobial drug therapy, even for isolates that appear to be macrolide susceptible, because of the potential for inducible resistance to this drug class; and the arrhythmogenicity of the antimicrobial drugs traditionally recommended for infections caused by these organisms. PMID:26890060

  7. The effect of preoperative education on anxiety of open cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Asilioglu, Kezban; Celik, Sevilay Senol

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative teaching method on anxiety levels of the patients. This study consisted of 100 patients having open cardiac surgery. Of 100 patients 50 were placed in the intervention group while the remaining 50 were in the control group. The patients in the intervention group were given a planned teaching according to the patient education booklet. Patients in the control group were informed about pre- and postoperative routines by a nurse by the purpose of comparing anxiety levels of the patients in the intervention and control groups. The anxiety level of the patients in control and intervention groups was measured on the 3rd day after the operation by using the Self-Evaluation Questionnaire for State and Trait Anxiety Inventory. The mean postoperative state and trait anxiety score in the control group was slightly higher than the mean of the patients in the intervention group. There was no statistically significant difference in the state and trait anxiety scores between the groups, and the patients in the intervention group had lower scores than the patients in the control group. In addition, all patients in the intervention group stated that they were satisfied with the preoperative teaching given by the researcher. PMID:15062906

  8. Early Absent Pupillary Light Reflexes After Cardiac Arrest in Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Laxmi P; Sen, Ayan; Stanko, Carlene M; Rawal, Bhupendra; Heckman, Michael G; Hoyne, Jonathan B; Dimberg, Elliot L; Freeman, Michelle L; Ng, Lauren K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Freeman, William D

    2016-08-01

    Loss of pupillary light reactivity is one recognized indicator of poor prognosis after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). However, drug overdose, low cardiac output, and/or resuscitation drugs can lead to impaired pupillary light reflex. To investigate pupillary light reflex status before therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in relation to neurological outcome, we retrospectively reviewed the data of a prospectively implemented TH protocol in patients with cardiac arrest (CA) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (January 2006-January 2012), and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona (August 2010-March 2014). During this period, all CA patients who underwent hypothermia were included. These patients were selected from an institutional database and hypothermia data set. The Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at time of discharge was our primary outcome measure. A CPC of 1 to 2 was defined as good outcome and a CPC from 3 to 5 was defined as poor outcome. We identified 99 patients who had CA treated with TH. Twenty-nine patients (29%) had pupils that were nonreactive to light on admission examination before TH, eight of whom later had return of pupil reactivity by day 3. Two of these 29 patients (6.9%) had good outcome, compared to 24 of 70 patients (34.3%) with pupils that were reactive to light (p = 0.005). Both of these patients had CA after illicit drug overdose. Early nonreactive pupils occurred in almost a third of patients after CPR and before TH in our patient population. Recovery of pupillary light reactivity is possible, and in a small minority of those cases (particularly when CA is preceded by the use of illicit drugs), a good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27135180

  9. Barriers to Nurse-Patient Communication in Cardiac Surgery Wards: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafipour, Vida; Mohammad, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: An appropriate and effective nurse-patient communication is of the most important aspect of caring. The formation and continuation of such a relationship depends on various factors such as the conditions and context of communication and a mutual understanding between the two. A review of the literature shows that little research is carried out on identification of such barriers in hospital wards between the patients and the healthcare staff. Objectives: The present study was therefore conducted to explore the experiences of nurses and patients on communication barriers in hospital cardiac surgery wards. Design and Methods: This qualitative research was carried out using a content analysis method (Graneheim & Lundman, 2004). The participants were selected by a purposeful sampling and consist of 10 nurses and 11 patients from the cardiac surgery wards of three teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data was gathered by unstructured interviews. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Results: Findings were emerged in three main themes including job dissatisfaction (with the sub-themes of workload tension and decreased motivation), routine-centered care (with the sub-themes of habitual interventions, routinized and technical interventions, and objective supervision), and distrust in competency of nurses (with the sub-themes of cultural contrast, less responsible nurses, and their apathy towards the patients). Conclusions: Compared to other studies, our findings identified different types of communication barriers depending on the nursing settings. These findings can be used by the ward clinical nursing managers at cardiac surgery wards to improve the quality of nursing care. PMID:25363126

  10. The attitude of cardiac care patients towards CPR and CPR education.

    PubMed

    Thorén, Ann-Britt; Axelsson, Asa; Herlitz, Johan

    2004-05-01

    The recommended targeting of the elderly, those with heart conditions and their family members for CPR education remains unaccomplished. Little is known about cardiac patients' knowledge of and attitude towards CPR and CPR education. This study aimed to investigate cardiac care patients' attitude towards CPR and interest in CPR education. An interview, based on a questionnaire, was conducted with 401 consecutive patients admitted to a coronary care unit. Most participants had heard about the concept of CPR and 64% were aware of its content. In the event of an emergency, 96% were willing to undergo CPR. Age, previous myocardial infarction and heart failure were significantly associated with the willingness or lack of willingness to undergo CPR. Forty percent of the participants had attended one or more courses but only a few within the last two years. The major reasons for not being educated in CPR were a lack of awareness of the availability of CPR training for the public, lack of interest or lack of enterprise. Among those not educated in CPR, 46% would like to attend a course. A hospital was the preferred location for the course, often due to the perceived higher competence of the instructors, but sometimes, because it offered a safe environment. The primary health care centre was preferred because of its location near the participants' homes. In order to increase the proportion of people trained in CPR in target groups such as cardiac care patients and their family members, healthcare professionals should provide patients with information and opportunities to attend locally situated, professionally led courses. PMID:15135193

  11. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  12. Risk of Bleeding in End-Stage Liver Disease Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Elgendy, Islam Y.; Choi, Calvin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage liver disease frequently have baseline coagulopathies. The international normalized ratio is in common use for the estimation of bleeding tendency in such patients, especially those undergoing an invasive procedure like cardiac catheterization. The practice of international normalized ratio measurement—followed by pharmacologic (for example, vitamin K or fresh frozen plasma) or nonpharmacologic intervention—is still debatable. The results of multiple randomized trials have shown the superiority of the radial approach over femoral access in reducing catheterization bleeding. This reduction in bleeding in turn decreases the risk and cost of blood-product transfusion. However, there is little evidence regarding the use of the radial approach in the end-stage liver disease patient population specifically. In this review, we summarize the studies that have dealt with cardiac catheterization in patients who have end-stage liver disease. We also discuss the role of the current measurements that are used to reduce the risk of bleeding in these same patients. PMID:26504433

  13. Microdeletions of chromosomal region 22q11 in patients with congenital conotruncal cardiac defects.

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, E; Driscoll, D; Budarf, M L; Zackai, E H; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Biegel, J A; Emanuel, B S

    1993-01-01

    Congenital conotruncal cardiac defects occur with increased frequency in patients with DiGeorge syndrome (DGS). Previous studies have shown that the majority of patients with DGS or velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) have a microdeletion within chromosomal region 22q11. We hypothesised that patients with conotruncal defects who were not diagnosed with DGS or VCFS would also have 22q11 deletions. Seventeen non-syndromic patients with one of three types of conotruncal defects most commonly seen in DGS or VCFS were evaluated for a 22q11 deletion. DNA probes from within the DiGeorge critical region were used. Heterozygosity at a locus was assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Copy number was determined by dosage analysis using Southern blot analysis of fluorescence in situ hybridisation of metaphase spreads. Five of 17 patients were shown to have a 22q11 deletion when evaluated by dosage analysis. This study shows a genetic contribution to the development of some conotruncal cardiac malformations and alters knowledge regarding the risk of heritability of these defects in certain cases. Images PMID:7901419

  14. Assessment of total cardiac repolarization’s spatial distribution among patients with aortic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Oguzhan Ekrem; Ozturk, Mustafa; Ilter, Abdulselam; Inc, Mustafa; Karaman, Kayihan; Kiris, Gulhanim; Kutlu, Merih

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure the Tp-e value, which shows the spatial distribution of cardiac repolarization and is defined as a possible predictor for ventricular arrhythmia among patients with aortic sclerosis (AS), and to compare this parameter’s length to QTc length within the same population. Method: 60 patients that have been diagnosed with AS have been prospectively included in this study. Results: 60 AS and 64 control patients were evaluated as part of the study. The median age, prevalence for hypertension and diabetes, baseline medications and laboratory results of the groups were similar. The Electrocardiographic QT length of both groups were found similar. In the AS group Tp-e tangent and Tp-e tail values were more longer than control group (P < 0.001). Tp-e tangent index and Tp-e tail index values were also statistically higher among AS patients when compared to the control group. (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study showed that Tp-e durations had increased in AS patients with no structural coronary heart disease. AS causes local degeneration on the aortic root and also has a negative effect on the total cardiac spatial repolarization. PMID:26064308

  15. Is Dabigatran As Effective As Warfarin on Cardiac Thrombus in a Patient With Atrial Fibrillation? A Challenging Question.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, Murat; Cincin, Altug; Mammadov, Ceyhun; Mutlu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important risk factor for cardioembolic stroke. Warfarin is an effective treatment in reducing the risk of cardioembolic stroke in patients with AF. New anticoagulants have been widely using for stroke prophylaxis in patients with nonvalvular AF. Previous studies have suggested that thrombolytic therapy is effective treatment choice in patients with pulmonary embolisms. Warfarin therapy is also effective on prevention or treatment of cardiac thrombus in patients with AF. However, there are no evidence-based data on treatment of cardiac thrombus with new oral anticoagulants in patients with AF. In our case report, we reported an AF patient with cardiac thrombus and pulmonary embolism under dabigatran therapy. PMID:25415546

  16. Gastroscopy-related adverse cardiac events and bleeding complications among patients treated with coronary stents and dual antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Egholm, Gro; Thim, Troels; Madsen, Morten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Pedersen, Jan Bech; Eggert Jensen, Svend; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Maeng, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). DAPT is a risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to quantify (1) the rate of gastroscopy within 12 months after PCI, (2) the rate of adverse cardiac events and gastroscopy-related bleeding complications within 30 days of gastroscopy, and (3) the association between antiplatelet therapy and these events. Patients and methods: Patients receiving gastroscopy within 12 months of PCI were identified and two nested case-control analyses were performed within the PCI cohort by linking Danish medical registries. Cases were patients with adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) or hemostatic intervention. In both studies, controls were patients with gastroscopy including biopsy without adverse cardiac events and hemostatic intervention, respectively. Medical records were reviewed to obtain information on exposure to DAPT. Results: We identified 22 654 PCI patients of whom 1497 patients (6.6 %) underwent gastroscopy. Twenty-two patients (1.5 %) suffered an adverse cardiac event, 93 patients (6.2 %) received hemostatic intervention during or within 30 days of the index gastroscopy. Interrupting DAPT was associated with a 3.46 times higher risk of adverse cardiac events (95 %CI 0.49 – 24.7). Discontinuation of one antiplatelet agent did not increase the risk (OR 0.65, 95 %CI 0.17 – 2.47). No hemostatic interventions were caused by endoscopic complications. Conclusion: Gastroscopy can be safely performed in PCI patients treated with DES and single antiplatelet therapy while interruption of DAPT may be associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiac events. PMID:27227109

  17. Impact of Critical Limb Ischemia on Long-Term Cardiac Mortality in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Liistro, Francesco; Angioli, Paolo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Porto, Italo; Ricci, Lucia; Tacconi, Danilo; Ducci, Kenneth; Falsini, Giovanni; Bellandi, Guido; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Development of critical limb ischemia (CLI) has been reported as an independent predictor of cardiac mortality in diabetic patients. We aimed to determine whether CLI, managed in a structured setting of close collaboration between different vascular specialists and treated with early endovascular intervention, has any impact on long-term cardiac mortality of diabetic patients initially presenting with symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We designed a prospective observational study of 764 consecutive diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in whom development of CLI was assessed by a dedicated diabetic foot clinic. Cardiac mortality at 4-year follow-up was the primary end point of the study. RESULTS Among the 764 patients, 111 (14%) developed CLI (PCI-CLI group) and underwent revascularization of 145 limbs, with procedural success in 140 (96%). PCI-CLI patients at baseline had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (51 ± 11% vs. 53 ± 10%, P = 0.008), higher prevalence of dialysis (7% vs. 0.3%, P < 0.0001), and longer diabetes duration (13 ± 8 vs. 11 ± 7 years, P = 0.02) compared with PCI-only patients. At 4-year follow-up, cardiac mortality occurred in 10 (9%) PCI-CLI patients vs. 42 (6%) PCI-only patients (P = 0.2). Time-dependent Cox regression model for cardiac death revealed that CLI was not associated with an increased risk of cardiac mortality (hazard ratio 1.08 [95% CI 0.89–3.85]; P = 0.1). CONCLUSIONS The development of promptly assessed and aggressively treated CLI was not significantly associated with increased risk of long-term cardiac mortality in diabetic patients initially presenting with symptomatic CAD. PMID:23340882

  18. Predictors of Elevated Cardiac Enzyme Levels in Hospitalized Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and No Known Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinales, Karyne L.; Najib, Mohammad Q.; Marella, Punnaiah C.; Katayama, Minako

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the predictive capabilities of elevated cardiac enzyme levels in terms of the prognosis of patients who were hospitalized with atrial fibrillation and who had no known coronary artery disease. Among 321 patients with atrial fibrillation, 60 without known coronary artery disease had their cardiac enzyme concentrations measured during hospitalization and underwent stress testing or cardiac catheterization within 12 months before or after hospitalization. We then compared the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics of the 20 patients who had elevated cardiac enzyme levels and the 40 patients who had normal levels. Age, sex, and comorbidities did not differ between the groups. In the patients with elevated cardiac enzyme levels, the mean concentrations of troponin T and creatine kinase-MB isoenzymes were 0.08 ± 0.08 ng/mL and 6.49 ± 4.94 ng/mL, respectively. In univariate analyses, only peak heart rate during atrial tachyarrhythmia was predictive of elevated enzyme levels (P <0.0001). Mean heart rate was higher in the elevated-level patients (146 ± 22 vs 117 ± 29 beats/min; P=0.0007). Upon multivariate analysis, heart rate was the only independent predictor of elevated levels. Coronary artery disease was found in only 2 patients who had elevated levels and in one patient who had normal levels (P=0.26). Increased myocardial demand is probably why the presenting heart rate was predictive of elevated cardiac enzyme levels. Most patients with elevated enzyme levels did not have coronary artery disease, and none died of cardiac causes during the 6-month follow-up period. To validate our findings, larger studies are warranted. PMID:27047283

  19. Long-term evaluation of cardiac and vascular toxicity in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias treated with bosutinib.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Jorge E; Jean Khoury, H; Kantarjian, Hagop; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Mauro, Michael J; Matczak, Ewa; Pavlov, Dmitri; Aguiar, Jean M; Fly, Kolette D; Dimitrov, Svetoslav; Leip, Eric; Shapiro, Mark; Lipton, Jeff H; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Vascular and cardiac safety during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is an emerging issue. We evaluated vascular/cardiac toxicities associated with long-term bosutinib treatment for Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemia based on treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and changes in QTc intervals and ejection fraction in two studies: a phase 1/2 study of second-/third-/fourth-line bosutinib for Ph+ leukemia resistant/intolerant to prior TKIs (N = 570) and a phase 3 study of first-line bosutinib (n = 248) versus imatinib (n = 251) in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia. Follow-up time was ≥48 months (both studies). Incidences of vascular/cardiac TEAEs in bosutinib-treated patients were 7%/10% overall with similar incidences observed with first-line bosutinib (5%/8%) and imatinib (4%/6%). Few patients had grade ≥3 vascular/cardiac events (4%/4%) and no individual TEAE occurred in >2% of bosutinib patients. Exposure-adjusted vascular/cardiac TEAE rates (patients with events/patient-year) were low for second-line or later bosutinib (0.037/0.050) and not significantly different between first-line bosutinib (0.015/0.024) and imatinib (0.011/0.017; P ≥ 0.267). Vascular/cardiac events were managed mainly with concomitant medications (39%/44%), bosutinib treatment interruptions (18%/21%), or dose reductions (4%/8%); discontinuations due to these events were rare (0.7%/1.0%). Based on logistic regression modelling, performance status >0 and history of vascular or cardiac disorders were prognostic of vascular/cardiac events in relapsed/refractory patients; hyperlipidemia/hypercholesterolemia and older age were prognostic of cardiac events. In newly diagnosed patients, older age was prognostic of vascular/cardiac events; history of diabetes was prognostic of vascular events. Incidences of vascular and cardiac events were low with bosutinib in the first-line and relapsed/refractory settings following long-term treatment in patients

  20. Preventive health care, 1999 update: 2. Echocardiography for the detection of a cardiac source of embolus in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, M K; Silver, F L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop guidelines for the use of echocardiography in the investigation of patients with stroke. OPTIONS: (1) Routine transthoracic echocardiography (TTE); (2) routine transesophageal echocardiography (TEE); (3) routine TTE followed by TEE if the TTE findings are noncontributory; (4) selective TTE or TEE in patients with cardiac disease who would not otherwise receive anticoagulant therapy. OUTCOMES: This article reviews the available evidence on the yield of TTE and TEE in detecting cardiac sources of cerebral emboli in patients with stroke, the effectiveness of treatment for cardiac sources of emboli and the effectiveness of screening echocardiography for secondary stroke prevention. EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched for relevant articles published from January 1966 to April 1998; also reviewed were additional articles identified from the bibliographies and citations obtained from experts. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Echocardiography can detect intracardiac masses (thrombus, vegetation or tumour) in about 4% (with TTE) to 11% (with TEE) of stroke patients. The yield is lower among patients without clinical evidence of cardiac disease by history, physical examination, electrocardiography or chest radiography (less than 2%) than among patients with clinical evidence of cardiac disease (less than 19%). The risks of echocardiography to patients are small. TTE has virtually no risks, and TEE is associated with cardiac, pulmonary and bleeding complications in 0.18%. Patients with an identified intracardiac thrombus are at increased risk for embolic events (absolute risk uncertain, range 0%-38%), and this appears to be reduced with anticoagulant therapy (absolute risk reduction uncertain). Anticoagulant therapy carries a risk of major hemorrhage of 1% to 3% per year. The overall effectiveness of echocardiography in the prevention of recurrent stroke is unknown. VALUES: The strength of evidence was evaluated using the methods of the Canadian Task Force on

  1. Cardiac MR enables diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated biomarkers and unobstructed coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, K; Abegunewardene, N; Oberholzer, K; Dueber, C; Muenzel, T; Kreitner, K-F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of cardiac MRI (CMR) in patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Methods: This study included a total of 125 patients treated in the chest pain unit during a 39-month period. Each included patient underwent MRI within a median of 3 days after cardiac catheterization. The MRI protocol comprised cine, oedema-sensitive and late gadolinium-enhancement imaging. The standard of reference was a consensus diagnosis based on clinical follow-up and the synopsis of all clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Results: MRI revealed a multitude of diagnoses, including ischaemic cardiomyopathy (CM), dilated CM, myocarditis, Takotsubo CM, hypertensive heart disease, hypertrophic CM, cardiac amyloidosis and non-compaction CM. MRI-based diagnoses were the same as the final reference diagnoses in 113/125 patients (90%), with the two diagnoses differing in only 12/125 patients. In two patients, no final diagnosis could be established. Conclusion: CMR performed early after the onset of symptoms revealed a broad spectrum of diseases. CMR delivered a correct final diagnosis in 90% of patients with acute chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes and a negative coronary angiogram. Advances in knowledge: Diagnosing patients with acute coronary syndrome but unobstructed coronary arteries remains a challenge for cardiologists. CMR performed early after catheterization reveals a broad spectrum of diseases with only a simple and quick examination protocol, and there is a high concordance between MRI-based diagnoses and final reference diagnoses. PMID:25782462

  2. Achieving better in-hospital and after-hospital care of patients with acute cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Denaro, Charles P; Bennett, Cameron J; Hickey, Annabel C; Mudge, Alison M; Flores, Judy L; Sanders, Daniela C J; Thiele, Justine M; Wenck, Beres; Bennett, John W; Jones, Mark A

    2004-05-17

    In patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and congestive heart failure (CHF), evidence suggests opportunities for improving in-hospital and after-hospital care, patient self-care, and hospital-community integration. A multidisciplinary quality improvement program was designed and instigated in Brisbane in October 2000 involving 250 clinicians at three teaching hospitals, 1080 general practitioners (GPs) from five Divisions of General Practice, 1594 patients with ACS and 904 patients with CHF. Quality improvement interventions were implemented over 17 months after a 6-month baseline period and included: clinical decision support (clinical practice guidelines, reminders, checklists, clinical pathways); educational interventions (seminars, academic detailing); regular performance feedback; patient self-management strategies; and hospital-community integration (discharge referral summaries; community pharmacist liaison; patient prompts to attend GPs). Using a before-after study design to assess program impact, significantly more program patients compared with historical controls received: ACS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents at discharge, aspirin and beta-blockers at 3 months after discharge, inpatient cardiac counselling, and referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. CHF: Assessment for reversible precipitants, use of prophylaxis for deep-venous thrombosis, beta-blockers at discharge, ACE inhibitors at 6 months after discharge, imaging of left ventricular function, and optimal management of blood pressure levels. Risk-adjusted mortality rates at 6 and 12 months decreased, respectively, from 9.8% to 7.4% (P = 0.06) and from 13.4% to 10.1% (P = 0.06) for patients with ACS and from 22.8% to 15.2% (P < 0.001) and from 32.8% to 22.4% (P = 0.005) for patients with CHF. Quality improvement programs that feature multifaceted interventions across the continuum of care can change clinical culture, optimise care

  3. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care. PMID:26996767

  4. The role of surgeon-performed ultrasound in patients with possible cardiac wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Feliciano, D V; Schmidt, J A; Cushman, J G; Sisley, A C; Ingram, W; Ansley, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluate surgeon-performed ultrasound in determining the need for operation in patients with possible cardiac wounds. BACKGROUND DATA: Ultrasound quickly is becoming part of the surgeon's diagnostic armamentarium; however, its role for the patient with penetrating injury is less well-defined. Although accurate for the detection of hemopericardium, the lack of immediate availability of the cardiologist to perform the test may delay the diagnosis, adversely affecting patient outcome. To be an effective diagnostic test in trauma centers, ultrasound must be immediately available in the resuscitation area and performed and interpreted by surgeons. METHODS: Surgeons performed pericardial ultrasound examinations on patients with penetrating truncal wounds but no immediate indication for operation. The subcostal view detected hemopericardium, and patients with positive examinations underwent immediate operation by the same surgeon. Vital signs, base deficit, time from examination to operation, operative findings, treatment, and outcome were recorded. RESULTS: During 13 months, 247 patients had surgeon-performed ultrasound. There were 236 true-negative and 10 true-positive results, and no false-negative or false-positive results; however, the pericardial region could not be visualized in one patient. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 100%; mean examination time was 0.8 minute (246 patients). Of the ten true-positive examinations, three were hypotensive. The mean time (8 patients) from ultrasound to operation was 12.1 minutes; all survived. Operative findings (site of cardiac wounds) were: left ventricle (4), right ventricle (3), right atrium (2), right atrium/superior vena cava (1), and right atrium/inferior vena cava (1). CONCLUSIONS: Surgeon-performed ultrasound is a rapid and accurate technique for diagnosing hemopericardium. Delay times from admission to operating room are minimized when the surgeon performs the ultrasound examination

  5. Evaluation of carotid artery dynamics & correlation with cardiac & hepatic iron in β-thalassaemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Rashid H.; Chate, Someshwar; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmad, Noor; Karnik, Alka; Jankaria, Bhavin

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Early atherosclerosis and vascular complication have been described in thalassaemia patients. There is lack of data or guidelines regarding monitoring of vascular health in thalassaemia. This study was conducted to compare carotid artery structural and functional indices such as carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), stiffness index (SI) and Young's elastic modulus (YEM) in β-thalassemia patients with age and sex matched controls, and to correlate these parameters with serum ferritin, cardiac iron, and hepatic iron. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 53 β-thalassaemia patients receiving regular blood transfusions. Carotid artery indices such as CIMT, SI, and YEM were calculated by duplex ultrasound and colour Doppler. Serum ferritin levels were measured by chemiluminescence. Cardiac and hepatic iron estimation were done using MRI T2* sequences analyzed by a special thalassaemia software. Results: Mean CIMT of cases and controls were 0.48 ± 0.04 and 0.44±0.02 mm, respectively and these were significantly different (P<0.001). Similarly significant differences were noted in SI and YEM of cases (2.45±0.79 and 96.12±34.85, respectively) as compared to controls (1.98±0.54 and 68.60±24.29, respectively) (P<0.001). There was significant inverse correlation between stiffness index and cardiac iron overload assessed by MRI cardiac T2* (P=0.03). Mean SI and YEM of cases were (2.1736 ± 0.2986 and 107.3± 41.6, respectively) significantly higher among non-splenectomized patients compared to splenectomized patients (2.0136 ± 0.263 and 86.9 ± 25.2, respectively) (P<0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: CIMT and arterial stiffness indices were significantly increased in β-thalassaemia patients compared to controls which was indicative of early atherogenic changes. This study supports the hypothesis that iron overload is a risk factor for early atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27377500

  6. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Aboriginal Healing Foundation (AHF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1998 with funding from the Canadian Government. Its mission is to support Aboriginal people in building sustainable healing processes that address the legacy of physical and sexual abuse in the residential school system, including intergenerational impacts. AHF…

  7. No Aboriginal Students left Behind in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sue-Jen; Hartzler-Miller, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    The project is motivated by Taiwan's huge gap of educational levels between the aborigines and the Hans. The low achievement of aboriginal students lies in factors related to problems in finance, health, and cultural difference, which contribute to their sense of self-deprecation. The purpose of the project is to provide early intervention and…

  8. Aboriginal Student Enclaves as Discourse Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Ian G.

    A study investigated the role of the Aboriginal Student Enclave, one of five campuses of Edith Cowan University (Australia) as a discourse community. The relatively small but cohesive university subcommunity is designed to provide additional support for Aboriginal students enrolled in standard programs and an environment in which the students are…

  9. As We See...Aboriginal Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiffarm, Lenore A., Ed.

    For many years, Aboriginal knowledge was invalidated by Western ways of knowing. This collection of papers discusses ways of teaching, ways of knowing, and ways of being that have sustained Aboriginal people for over 500 years. The papers are: "Spirit Writing: Writing Circles as Healing Pedagogy" (Lenore A. Stiffarm); "Pedagogy from the Ethos: An…

  10. Aboriginal Literacy: Raising Standards, Blazing Trails.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaikezehongai, Sally

    2003-01-01

    Prophecies say that Aboriginal peoples of the Americas will educate and illuminate the world by sharing their Sacred Fire, the spiritual strength that has enabled their survival. Such a vision sustains Aboriginal literacy practitioners, who are developing a unique holistic foundation for the healing and nurturing of minds, bodies, and spirits.…

  11. Aboriginal Language Knowledge and Youth Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Darcy; Chandler, Michael J.; Lalonde, Christopher E.

    2007-01-01

    This brief report details a preliminary investigation into how community-level variability in knowledge of Aboriginal languages relate to "band"-level measures of youth suicide. In Canada, and, more specifically, in the province of British Columbia (BC), Aboriginal youth suicide rates vary substantially from one community to another. The results…

  12. Aboriginal health promotion through addressing employment discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Angeline S; Paradies, Yin; Perry, Ryan; Kelaher, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Localities Embracing and Accepting Diversity (LEAD) program aimed to improve the mental health of Aboriginal Victorians by addressing racial discrimination and facilitating social and economic participation. As part of LEAD, Whittlesea Council adopted the Aboriginal Employment Pathways Strategy (AEPS) to increase Aboriginal employment and retention within the organisation. The Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Training Program was developed to build internal cultural competency and skills in recruiting and retaining Aboriginal staff. Analysis of surveys conducted before (pre; n=124) and after (post; n=107) the training program indicated a significant increase in participant understanding across all program objectives and in support of organisational policies to improve Aboriginal recruitment and retention. Participants ended the training with concrete ideas about intended changes, as well as how these changes could be supported by their supervisors and the wider organisation. Significant resources have since been allocated to implementing the AEPS over 5 years. In line with principles underpinning the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-23, particularly the focus on addressing racism as a determinant of health, this paper explores the AEPS and training program as promising approaches to health promotion through addressing barriers to Aboriginal employment. Possible implications for other large organisations are also considered. PMID:25155236

  13. Aboriginal Gambling and Problem Gambling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Helen; Gainsbury, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of gambling-related problems amongst Aboriginal communities has been neglected by most public health strategies which concentrate on mainstream populations. Research indicates that rates of problem gambling are higher for Aboriginal groups than the general population. Specific cultural, familial, and social patterns influence…

  14. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  15. Fitzgerald factor deficiency in an Australian aborigine.

    PubMed

    Exner, T; Barber, S; Naujalis, J

    1987-05-18

    This case reports the first description of Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) deficiency in Australia. Since this homozygous abnormality was found in an Aborigine it is suggested that the defective gene may be prevalent in some tribes and that abnormal results of clotting tests in Aborigines should be investigated carefully. PMID:3574180

  16. Early Childhood Services for Aboriginal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnochie, K. R.; Russell, A.

    The report is the result of a 1981 research project commissioned by Australia's Commonwealth Department of Education to investigate early childhood education for Aborigines. The study encompassed the care and education of Aboriginal children from age 0 to age 5 in government and non-government school systems. The report is divided into three major…

  17. ADHD Characteristics in Canadian Aboriginal Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baydala, Lola; Sherman, Jody; Rasmussen, Carmen; Wikman, Erik; Janzen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine how many Aboriginal children attending two reservation-based elementary schools in Northern Alberta, Canada, would demonstrate symptoms associated with ADHD using standardized parent and teacher questionnaires. Method: Seventy-five Aboriginal children in Grades 1 through 4 are tested. Seventeen of the 75 (22.7%)…

  18. Knowledge Building in an Aboriginal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The report on the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1996), the Kelowna Accord announced in 2005 (five-billion dollars) followed by its demise in 2006, and the settlement in 2006 for Aboriginal survivors of residential schools (1.9 billion dollars), are but some of the recent high-profile indicators of the challenges to Canada in dealing with…

  19. A cost/benefit analysis of randomized invasive monitoring for patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Pearson, K S; Gomez, M N; Moyers, J R; Carter, J G; Tinker, J H

    1989-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of choice of invasive monitoring on cost, morbidity, and mortality in cardiac surgery. Two hundred and twenty-six adults undergoing elective cardiac surgery were initially assigned at random to receive either a central venous pressure monitoring catheter (group I), a conventional pulmonary artery (PA) catheter (group II), or a mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) measuring PA catheter (group III). If the attending anesthesiologist believed that the patient initially randomized to group I should have a PA catheter, that patient was then reassigned to receive either a conventional PA catheter (group IV) or SvO2 measuring PA catheter (group V). The total costs were defined as the total amount billed to the patient for the catheter used; the professional cost of its insertion; and the determinations of cardiac output, arterial blood gas tensions, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit. Mean total monitoring and laboratory costs in Group I ($591 +/- 67) were statistically significantly (P less than 0.05) less than costs in Group II ($856 +/- 231). Further, mean monitoring and laboratory costs in Group II were statistically significantly (P less than 0.05) less than those in Group III ($1128 +/- 759). Patients in group IV incurred mean total costs of $986 +/- 578, while those in group V had mean total costs of $1126 +/- 382 (NS). There were no significant differences between any of the groups with respect to length of stay in the intensive care unit, morbidity, or mortality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2505641

  20. Mechanisms of Cardiac and Renal Dysfunction in Patients Dying of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Osamu; Gaut, Joseph P.; Watanabe, Eizo; To, Kathleen; Fagley, R. Eliot; Sato, Brian; Jarman, Steve; Efimov, Igor R.; Janks, Deborah L.; Srivastava, Anil; Bhayani, Sam B.; Drewry, Anne; Swanson, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanistic basis for cardiac and renal dysfunction in sepsis is unknown. In particular, the degree and type of cell death is undefined. Objectives: To evaluate the degree of sepsis-induced cardiomyocyte and renal tubular cell injury and death. Methods: Light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical staining for markers of cellular injury and stress, including connexin-43 and kidney-injury-molecule-1 (Kim-1), were used in this study. Measurements and Main Results: Rapid postmortem cardiac and renal harvest was performed in 44 septic patients. Control hearts were obtained from 12 transplant and 13 brain-dead patients. Control kidneys were obtained from 20 trauma patients and eight patients with cancer. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated low levels of apoptotic cardiomyocytes (<1–2 cells per thousand) in septic and control subjects and revealed redistribution of connexin-43 to lateral membranes in sepsis (P < 0.020). Electron microscopy showed hydropic mitochondria only in septic specimens, whereas mitochondrial membrane injury and autophagolysosomes were present equally in control and septic specimens. Control kidneys appeared relatively normal by light microscopy; 3 of 20 specimens showed focal injury in approximately 1% of renal cortical tubules. Conversely, focal acute tubular injury was present in 78% of septic kidneys, occurring in 10.3 ± 9.5% and 32.3 ± 17.8% of corticomedullary-junction tubules by conventional light microscopy and Kim-1 immunostains, respectively (P < 0.01). Electron microscopy revealed increased tubular injury in sepsis, including hydropic mitochondria and increased autophagosomes. Conclusions: Cell death is rare in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction, but cardiomyocyte injury occurs. Renal tubular injury is common in sepsis but presents focally; most renal tubular cells appear normal. The degree of cell injury and death does not account for severity of sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. PMID:23348975

  1. Identifying illness perception schemata and their association with depression and quality of life in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Le Grande, Michael R; Elliott, Peter C; Worcester, Marian U C; Murphy, Barbara M; Goble, Alan J; Kugathasan, Vanessa; Sinha, Karan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify groups of cardiac patients who share similar perceptions about their illness and to examine the relationships between these schemata and psychosocial outcomes such as quality of life and depression. A total of 190 cardiac patients with diagnoses of myocardial infarction, stable angina pectoris or chronic heart failure, completed a battery of psychosocial questionnaires within four weeks of their admission to hospital. These included the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI II) and The MacNew Health-related Quality of Life instrument (MacNew). BIPQ items were subjected to latent class analysis (LCA) and the resulting groups were compared according to their BDI II and MacNew scores. LCA identified a five-class model of illness perception which comprised the following: (1) Consequence focused and mild emotional impact, n = 55, 29%; (2) Low illness perceptions and low emotional impact, n = 45, 24%; (3) Control focused and mild emotional impact, n = 10, 5%; (4) Consequence focused and high emotional impact, n = 60, 32%; and (5) Consequence focused and severe emotional impact, n = 20, 10%. Gender and diagnosis did not appear to reflect class membership except that class 2 had a significantly higher proportion of AMI patients than did class 5. There were numerous significant differences between classes in regards to depression and health-related quality of life. Notably, classes 4 and 5 are distinguished by relatively high BDI II scores and low MacNew scores. Identifying classes of cardiac patients based on their illness perception schemata, in hospital or shortly afterwards, may identify those at risk of developing depressive symptoms and poor quality of life. PMID:22416847

  2. Post-extrasystolic Blood Pressure Potentiation as a Risk Predictor in Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Alexander; Sinnecker, Daniel; Barthel, Petra; Müller, Alexander; Gebhardt, Josef; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-01-01

    For more than 100 years physicians have observed that heartbeats following extrasystolic beats are characterised by augmented myocardial contractility. This phenomenon was termed post-extrasystolic potentiation (PESP). In the 1970s it was first noted that PESP measured at the blood pressure level is typically pronounced in heart failure patients. Only recently, it was shown that PESP measured non-invasively as post-extrasystolic blood pressure potentiation was a strong and independent predictor of death in survivors of myocardial infarction and in patients with chronic heart failure. A similar parameter (PESPAfib) can be also assessed in patients with atrial fibrillation. PESP and PESPAfib can be understood as non-invasive parameters that indicate myocardial dysfunction. They have the potential to improve risk stratification strategies for cardiac patients. PMID:27403290

  3. Prognostic value of the six-minute walk test in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac surgery: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Dominika; Bellwon, Jerzy; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Elkady, Mohamed Amr

    2013-01-01

    Background. The prognostic value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is known, but the predictive value of 6MWT in patients with heart failure (HF) and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is not established yet. Objective. We conducted a systematic review exploring the prognostic value of 6MWT in HF patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The aim was to find out whether the change in the distance walked during follow-up visits was associated with prognosis. Data Source. We searched "PubMed" from January 1990 to December 2012 for any review articles or experimental studies investigating the prognostic value of 6MWT in HF patients and patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Results. 53 studies were included in the review, and they explored the role of 6MWT in cardiology, cardiac surgery, and rehabilitation. The results did not show the relation between the six-minute walk distance and adverse events after CABG. The predictive power of the distance walked for death in HF patients undergoing cardiac surgery was not found. It is not yet proved if the change in the six-minute walk distance is associated with prognosis. The predictive power of the six-minute walk distance for death in HF patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains unclear. PMID:23984074

  4. Review of National Aboriginal Languages Program. Occasional Paper Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Mundine, Lynette; Roberts, Bryn

    This review of Australia's National Aboriginal Languages Program, undertaken in September-November 1989, involved consultation with individuals in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal organizations and communities in several areas. It was found that 56% of 1988-89 funding went to Aboriginal communities and regional language centers, 20% to state schools,…

  5. Teacher Awareness and Understandings about Aboriginal English in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Vanderford, Samantha; Grote, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Repeated assessments of literacy skills have shown that Aboriginal students do not achieve at the same level as their non-Aboriginal peers. Many Aboriginal students speak Aboriginal English, a dialect different from the Standard Australian English used in schools. Research shows that it is crucial for educators in bidialectal contexts to be aware…

  6. Improved Cardiac Function in Patients With Obstructive Jaundice After Internal Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Padillo, Javier; Puente, Jesús; Gómez, Manuel; Dios, Francisco; Naranjo, Antonio; Vallejo, Juan A.; Miño, Gonzalo; Pera, Carlos; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate myocardial function in patients with obstructive jaundice before and after internal biliary drainage. Summary Background Data Increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been found in patients with biliary obstruction. Methods Thirteen patients with newly diagnosed obstructive jaundice and no previous heart, lung, or renal disease were studied using a Swan-Ganz catheter. Hemodynamic measurements were taken before and 4 days after internal biliary drainage. Levels of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were obtained and liver function tests were also determined. Results Plasma levels of ANP and BNP were increased twofold to fourfold in the basal state and declined after biliary drainage. Independent variables predicting left ventricular systolic work were total bilirubin concentrations, duration of jaundice, and BNP. In addition, bilirubin concentrations correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance, mean arterial pulmonary pressure, and right ventricular systolic work. Internal biliary drainage resulted in an improvement in left ventricular systolic work. A correlation was found between decreasing ANP concentrations and increasing cardiac output. Conclusions Increased plasma levels of natriuretic peptides in patients with obstructive jaundice may reflect a subclinical myocardial dysfunction correlating with the degree of jaundice. After internal biliary drainage, there is a measurable improvement of cardiac function. PMID:11685028

  7. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning.

  8. Cardiac hemodynamics in alcoholic patients with chronic liver disease and a presystolic gallop

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Lawrence; Shariff, Mahmood; Zahir, Mohammad; Lieto, Mary Di

    1969-01-01

    10 male subjects with chronic liver disease and with normal cardiovascular findings, except for the presence of a presystolic gallop, underwent right and left heart catheterization. In general, all of the patients had a high resting cardiac output, narrow arteriovenous oxygen difference, a low peripheral vascular resistance, and normal left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and volumes. The plasma volume was increased in the seven patients in which it was determined. On exercise, all of the patients demonstrated a significant increase in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and mean pulmonary artery pressure, while the stroke index remained the same or fell in seven of the subjects. It appears logical to assume that the excessive intake of alcohol is associated with an impairment in the metabolic and contractile properties of the left ventricle and the resultant hemodynamic effects may not be readily discerned in the resting state. However, upon exercise these patients, with a congested circulation, can show abnormal cardiac dynamics. Images PMID:4180971

  9. Exploring time series retrieved from cardiac implantable devices for optimizing patient follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guéguin, Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Hernández, Alfredo I; Porée, Fabienne; Mabo, Philippe; Graindorge, Laurence; Carrault, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Current cardiac implantable devices (ID) are equipped with a set of sensors that can provide useful information to improve patient follow-up and to prevent health deterioration in the postoperative period. In this paper, data obtained from an ID with two such sensors (a transthoracic impedance sensor and an accelerometer) are analyzed in order to evaluate their potential application for the follow-up of patients treated with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). A methodology combining spatio-temporal fuzzy coding and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) is applied in order to: i) reduce the dimensionality of the data and provide new synthetic indices based on the “factorial axes” obtained from MCA, ii) interpret these factorial axes in physiological terms and iii) analyze the evolution of the patient’s status by projecting the acquired data into the plane formed by the first two factorial axes named “factorial plane”. In order to classify the different evolution patterns, a new similarity measure is proposed and validated on simulated datasets, and then used to cluster observed data from 41 CRT patients. The obtained clusters are compared with the annotations on each patient’s medical record. Two areas on the factorial plane are identified, one being correlated with a health degradation of patients and the other with a stable clinical state. PMID:18838359

  10. Utility of Traditional Circulating and Imaging-Based Cardiac Biomarkers in Patients with Predialysis CKD

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Gates; Jain, Nishank; de Lemos, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP), are commonly used to diagnose acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure exacerbation in symptomatic patients. Levels of these biomarkers are frequently chronically elevated in asymptomatic patients with ESRD who are receiving maintenance dialysis. Other imaging biomarkers commonly encountered in nephrologists’ clinical practice, such as coronary artery calcium measured by computed tomography, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness, are also frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with ESRD. This article critically reviews the limited observational data on associations between cTnT, BNP, NT-pro-BNP, coronary artery calcium, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness with cardiovascular events and death in non–dialysis-dependent patients with CKD. Although sufficient evidence suggests that these biomarkers may be used for prognostication, the diagnostic utility of cTnT, BNP, and NT-pro-BNP remain challenging in patients with CKD. Decreased renal clearance may affect the plasma levels of these biomarkers, and upper reference limits were originally derived in patients without CKD. Until better data are available, higher cutoffs, or a rise in level compared with previous values, have been proposed to help distinguish acute myocardial infarction from chronic elevations of cTnT in symptomatic patients with CKD. Additionally, it is not known whether these biomarkers are modifiable and amenable to interventions that could change hard clinical outcomes in patients with CKD not yet undergoing long-term dialysis. PMID:25403922

  11. Pulsatile mechanical cardiac assistance in pediatric patients with the Berlin heart ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Stiller, Brigitte; Hetzer, Roland

    2003-06-01

    Mechanical cardiac assistance for neonates, infants, children and adolescents may be accomplished with pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VAD) instead of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or centrifugal pumps. The Berlin Heart VAD consists of extracorporeal, pneumatically driven blood pumps for pulsatile univentricular or biventricular assistance for patients of all age groups. The blood pumps are heparin-coated. The stationary driving unit (IKUS) has the required enhanced compressor performance for pediatric pump sizes. The Berlin Heart VAD was used in a total number of 424 patients from 1987 to November 2001 at our institution. In 45 pediatric patients aged 2 days-17 years the Berlin Heart VAD was applied for long-term support (1-111 days, mean 20 days). There were three patient groups: Group I: "Bridge to transplantation" with various forms of cardiomyopathy (N = 21) or chronic stages of congenital heart disease (N = 9); Group II: "Rescue" in intractable heart failure after corrective surgery for congenital disease (N = 7) or in early graft failure after heart transplantation (N = 1); and Group III: "Acute myocarditis" (N = 7) as either bridge to transplantation or bridge to recovery. Seventeen patients were transplanted after support periods of between 4 and 111 days with 12 long-term survivors, having now survived for up to 10 years. Five patients (Groups I and III) were weaned from the system with four long-term survivors. In Group II only one patient survived after successful transplantation. Prolonged circulatory support with the Berlin Heart VAD is an effective method for bridging until cardiac recovery or transplantation in the pediatric age group. Extubation, mobilization, and enteral nutrition are possible. For long-term use, the Berlin Heart VAD offers advantages over centrifugal pumps and ECMO in respect to patient mobility and safety. PMID:12939019

  12. Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hajibagheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients’ sleep quality. PMID:26835463

  13. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  14. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    SciTech Connect

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-04-24

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning.

  15. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  16. Template of patient-specific summaries facilitates education and outcomes in paediatric cardiac surgery units

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Hemant S.; Wolfram, Karen B.; Slayton, Jennifer M.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Cutrer, William B.; Bichell, David P.; Harris, Zena L.; Barr, Frederick E.; Deshpande, Jayant K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Few educational opportunities exist in paediatric cardiac critical care units (PCCUs). We introduced a new educational activity in the PCCU in the form of of patient-specific summaries (TPSS). Our objective was to study the role of TPSS in the provision of a positive learning experience to the multidisciplinary clinical team of PCCUs and in improving patient-related clinical outcomes in the PCCU. METHODS Prospective educational intervention with simultaneous clinical assessment was undertaken in PCCU in an academic children's hospital. TPSS was developed utilizing the case presentation format for upcoming week's surgical cases and delivered once every week to each PCCU clinical team member. Role of TPSS to provide clinical education was assessed using five-point Likert-style scale responses in an anonymous survey 1 year after TPSS provision. Paediatric cardiac surgery patients admitted to the PCCU were evaluated for postoperative outcomes for TPSS provision period of 1 year and compared with a preintervention period of 1 year. RESULTS TPSS was delivered to 259 clinical team members including faculty, fellows, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists and others from the Divisions of Anesthesia, Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Critical Care, and Pediatrics working in the PCCU. Two hundred and twenty-four (86%) members responded to the survey and assessed the role of TPSS in providing clinical education to be excellent based on mean Likert-style scores of 4.32 ± 0.71 in survey responses. Seven hundred patients were studied for the two time periods and there were no differences in patient demographics, complexity of cardiac defect and surgical details. The length of mechanical ventilation for the TPSS period (57.08 ± 141.44 h) was significantly less when compared with preintervention period (117.39 ± 433.81 h) (P < 0.001) with no differences in length of PCICU stay, hospital stay and mortality for the two time periods

  17. Web-based multimedia courseware for emergency cardiac patient management simulations.

    PubMed

    Ambrosiadou, V; Compton, T; Panchal, T; Polovina, S

    2000-01-01

    This is a multidisciplinary inter-departmental/faculty project between the departments of computer science, electronic, communications and electrical engineering and nursing and paramedic sciences. The objective is to develop a web based multimedia front end to existing simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. It will be used firstly in the teaching of nurses. The University of Hertfordshire is the only University in Britain using simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria for nurse and paramedic science education and therefore this project will add the multimedia dimension in distributed courses over the web and will assess the improvement in the educational process. The use of network and multimedia technologies, provide interactive learning, immediate feedback to students' responses, individually tailored instructions, objective testing and entertaining delivery. The end product of this project will serve as interactive material to enhance experiential learning for nursing students using the simulations of cardiac emergency scenaria. The emergency treatment simulations have been developed using VisSim and may be compiled as C code. The objective of the project is to provide a web based user friendly multimedia interface in order to demonstrate the way in which patients may be managed in critical situations by applying advanced technological equipment and drug administration. Then the user will be able to better appreciate the concepts involved by running the VisSim simulations. The evaluation group for the proposed software will be the Department of Nursing and Paramedic Sciences About 200 nurses use simulations every year for training purposes as part of their course requirements. PMID:11187619

  18. Usefulness of hemodynamic sensors for physiologic cardiac pacing in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Bortnik, Miriam; Marino, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The rate adaptive sensors applied to cardiac pacing should respond as promptly as the normal sinus node with an highly specific and sensitive detection of the need of increasing heart rate. Sensors operating alone may not provide optimal heart responsiveness: central venous pH sensing, variations in the oxygen content of mixed venous blood, QT interval, breathing rate and pulmonary minute ventilation monitored by thoracic impedance variations, activity sensors. Using sensors that have different attributes but that work in a complementary manners offers distinct advantages. However, complicated sensors interactions may occur. Hemodynamic sensors detect changes in the hemodynamic performances of the heart, which partially depends on the autonomic nervous system-induced inotropic regulation of myocardial fibers. Specific hemodynamic sensors have been designed to measure different expression of the cardiac contraction strength: Peak Endocardial Acceleration (PEA), Closed Loop Stimulation (CLS) and TransValvular Impedance (TVI), guided by intraventricular impedance variations. Rate-responsive pacing is just one of the potential applications of hemodynamic sensors in implantable pacemakers. Other issues discussed in the paper include: hemodynamic monitoring for the optimal programmation and follow up of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy; hemodynamic deterioration impact of tachyarrhythmias; hemodynamic upper rate limit control; monitoring and prevention of vasovagal malignant syncopes. PMID:21461359

  19. Personality and the physician-patient relationship as predictors of quality of life of cardiac patients after rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous studies document the influence of psychosocial variables on the course of coronary heart disease. This study examines the influence of personality traits (trait anger, cynicism) and aspects of the physician-patient relationship (promoting patient participation by the physician, active communication behavior of the patient, trust in the physician) on the health related quality of life (HRQOL) of cardiac patients after rehabilitation. Methods N = 331 patients with chronic ischemic heart disease were surveyed using questionnaires at two time points (beginning and end of 3-weeks inpatient rehabilitation). In addition, characteristics of the disease and cardiac risk factors were provided by the physician. HRQOL was measured using a total of six scales and three instruments: SF-12, MacNew questionnaire, and SAQ. Hierarchical regression analyses were carried out to predict HRQOL after rehabilitation, in which the baseline values of HRQOL, sociodemographic variables, characteristics of the disease and risk factors, personality traits, and finally the aspects of the physician-patient relationship were included stepwise. As a number of variables were used for the regression models, multiple imputation was conducted. Results The baseline values explain most of the variance (42%-60%). After controlling the baseline values, the sociodemographic variables explain up to 5% incremental variance of HRQOL, with income being the most important predictor. The characteristics of the disease and cardiac risk factors explain between 0.4% and 3.8% incremental variance, however, variance increase is often not significant. The personality traits added in the fourth step explain up to 2% additional variance; trait anger is a significant predictor of HRQOL in three of the six scales. The features of the physician-patient relationship included in the last step lead to a significant increase in explained variance (between 1.3% and 3.9%) for all six scales. In particular, the

  20. Effect of mediastinal irradiation on cardiac function of patients treated during childhood and adolescence for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.M.; Gingell, R.L.; Pearce, J.; Panahon, A.M.; Ghoorah, J.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the frequency of cardiac dysfunction in patients treated during childhood or adolescence with mediastinal irradiation for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 28 patients underwent cardiac evaluation 19 to 182 months (median, 90 months) after the completion of radiation therapy. No patient had symptoms of cardiac disease. All were normotensive. All patients had a normal cardiothoracic ratio. There were no abnormalities of voltage or rhythm in the ECGs. The left ventricular end diastolic volume was increased in 19.2% of patients, none of whom had evidence of impaired left ventricular function. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was increased in 15.3% of patients. No patient had a decreased LVEF. Pericardial thickening was demonstrated on echocardiograms from 12 of 28 patients (42.9%). Thickening was more frequent among those patients observed for 72 or more months (47.1%; eight of 17) than among those with shorter periods of follow-up (36.4%; four of 11). This study demonstrates that cardiac dysfunction is an infrequent sequela of mediastinal irradiation following treatment using an equally weighted, anterior-posterior technique. Longitudinal study of these patients will be necessary to determine the clinical significance and evolution of the occult pericardial thickening that was identified.

  1. Cardiac oxygen supply is compromised during the night in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Parati, Gianfranco; van Montfrans, Gert A; Guelen, Ilja; Spaan, Jos A E; Westerhof, Nico; Karemaker, John M; Bos, Willem Jan W

    2011-09-01

    The enhanced heart rate and blood pressure soon after awaking increases cardiac oxygen demand, and has been associated with the high incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the morning. The behavior of cardiac oxygen supply is unknown. We hypothesized that oxygen supply decreases in the morning and to that purpose investigated cardiac oxygen demand and oxygen supply at night and after awaking. We compared hypertensive to normotensive subjects and furthermore assessed whether pressures measured non-invasively and intra-arterially give similar results. Aortic pressure was reconstructed from 24-h intra-brachial and simultaneously obtained non-invasive finger pressure in 14 hypertensives and 8 normotensives. Supply was assessed by Diastolic Time Fraction (DTF, ratio of diastolic and heart period), demand by Rate-Pressure Product (RPP, systolic pressure times heart rate, HR) and supply/demand ratio by A(dia)/A(sys), with A(dia) and A(sys) diastolic and systolic areas under the aortic pressure curve. Hypertensives had lower supply by DTF and higher demand by RPP than normotensives during the night. DTF decreased and RPP increased in both groups after awaking. The DTF of hypertensives decreased less becoming similar to the DTF of normotensives in the morning; the RPP remained higher. A(dia)/A(sys) followed the pattern of DTF. Findings from invasively and non-invasively determined pressure were similar. The cardiac oxygen supply/demand ratio in hypertensive patients is lower than in normotensives at night. With a smaller night-day differences, the hypertensives' risk for cardiovascular events may be more evenly spread over the 24 h. This information can be obtained noninvasively. PMID:21786015

  2. Endothelial dysfunction and progressive coronary atherosclerosis: sequential invasive studies in a patient with multiple cardiac risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chander, R; Kuhner, P A; Laws Houghton, J

    2001-08-01

    This manuscript describes sequential angiographic, endothelial and vasoreactivity characteristics of the coronary arterial circulation in a middle-aged patient with multiple cardiac risk factors who developed hemodynamically significant coronary atherosclerosis over a 6-year period. A 56-year-old woman demonstrated marked angiographic progression of coronary atherosclerosis over time beginning with minor luminal irregularities in the setting of severe endothelial dysfunction. The association of endothelial dysfunction, ineffective cardiac risk factor management and progressive atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:11481511

  3. Radiation Dose to the Thyroid and Gonads in Patients Undergoing Cardiac CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Behroozi, Hamid; Davoodi, Mohammad; Aghasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present data show a global increase in the rate of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac CT angiography has developed as a fast and non-invasive cardiac imaging modality following the introduction of multi-slice computed tomogaraphy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure the radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions in patients undergoing cardiac CT angiography using the Care Dose 4D method of 64-slice scanner. Patients and Methods: Eighty-one patients (41 males and 40 females) who were diagnosed with suspected coronary artery disease and were referred to Golestan Hospital, Imaging Department were recruited. Inclusion criteria were based on the protocol of multi-slice CT coronary angiography. The radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions was measured using thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Results: The mean radiation dose to the thyroid in male and female subjects was 0.32 mSv and 0.41 mSv, respectively (P = 0.032) (total mean, 0.36 mSv). The mean radiation dose to the pelvis in male and female subjects was 81 μSv and 112 μSv, respectively (P = 0.026) (total mean, 96.5 μSv), Conclusions: The total mean radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads was 0.36 mSv, and 96.5 μSv, respectively for the subjects. These values were high for one organ in a single study. Gender can affect the radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads. This can be attributed to the anatomical characteristic differences of the male and female subjects. PMID:26060556

  4. Sex Differences in the Prevalence of Diastolic Dysfunction in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Renata G.; Worthington, Andrea; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Aranki, Sary F.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The mortality from diastolic dysfunction is approximately 9% to 28%. In patients with ischemic heart disease, female sex and advanced age are associated with increases in ventricular diastolic stiffness. Clinical studies have found higher rates of diastolic dysfunction in women, despite higher ejection fractions, than in men post–myocardial infarction. Therefore, we hypothesized that female patients undergoing cardiac surgery have higher degrees of diastolic dysfunction and experience more adverse outcomes, such as prolonged hospitalization. Methods We prospectively enrolled 153 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Diastolic function was assessed using early transmitral velocity (E) and early diastolic lateral mitral annular tissue velocity (e′). Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was defined as binary and a continuous outcome (E/e′). Results Females were more likely than malesto present with higher E/e′ (11.5 vs. 7.9, p = 0.001) and higher left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (71% vs. 36%, p< 0.001). The addition of sex to the model for left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was significant. The relationship between sex and E/e′ ratio showed the biggest difference between males and females in the 56–72-year-old age brackets, where women were much more likely to have a higher E/e′ than males. Conclusions We identified a significantly higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction among females presenting for elective cardiac surgery compared to males. This finding is more pronounced with age. Additionally, we found that female sex is at higher risk of prolonged ICU and hospital length of stay. PMID:25571945

  5. Improving Ascertainment of Sudden Cardiac Death in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Patrick H.; Herzog, Charles A.; Middleton, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Data collected by the US Renal Data System (USRDS) identify sudden cardiac death (SCD) as the leading cause of death among hemodialysis patients. However, evidence suggests that clinical events captured on the USRDS death notification form may be inaccurate. A new method for classifying SCD was recently developed to enhance the accuracy of SCD classification. This study examined the performance characteristics of this refined definition using a cohort of hemodialysis patients who experienced a witnessed SCD as the reference standard. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This is a retrospective cohort study of 363 patients who experienced a witnessed SCD in US Gambro (DaVita) outpatient dialysis clinics. Sensitivity of SCD defined by death notification forms and SCD defined using additional administrative sources was compared. Clinical data recorded near time of death were also examined. Results Existing USRDS death notification forms reported 70.8% of witnessed SCD as “cardiac arrest/cause unknown” or “arrhythmia.” The refined definition significantly improved identification to 83.8% of witnessed SCD events (P<0.001). Verified SCD cases that were not identified by either definition were more likely to be reported on the death notification form as death due to myocardial infarction, hyperkalemia, sepsis, malignancy, or unknown cause. Conclusions Compared with the death notification form alone, the refined SCD definition significantly improves the sensitivity of reporting of witnessed SCD occurring within outpatient hemodialysis clinics. More accurate reporting of cardiac events by clinicians and refinements to existing death notification forms may further improve recognition and understanding of SCD. PMID:22076878

  6. Melatonin treatment in the prevention of postoperative delirium in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek; Torok, Pavol; Kolarcik, Peter; Kolesar, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiac surgery delirium is a severe complication. The circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion has been shown to be altered postoperatively. Aim of the study It was hypothesized that restoring normal sleeping patterns with a substance that is capable of resynchronizing circadian rhythm such as exogenous administration of melatonin may possibly reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium. Material and methods This paper represents a prospective clinical observational study. Two consecutive groups of 250 consecutive patients took part in the study. Group A was the control group and group B was the melatonin group. In group B, the patients received prophylactic melatonin treatment. The main objectives were to observe the incidence of delirium, to identify any predictors of delirium, and to compare the two groups based on the delirium incidence. Results The incidence of delirium was 8.4% in the melatonin group vs. 20.8% in the control group (p = 0.001). Predictors of delirium in the melatonin group were age (p = 0.001) and higher EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age and EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.014) were predictors of postoperative delirium. Comparing the groups, the main predictors of delirium were age (p = 0.001), EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001), cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p = 0.001), aortic cross-clamping (ACC) time (p = 0.008), sufentanil dose (p = 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.033). Conclusions Administration of melatonin significantly decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin should be considered in every patient scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:26336494

  7. Assessment of use of music by patients participating in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Metzger, L Kay

    2004-01-01

    The primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States is heart disease. It is a costly and pervasive group of disorders that effect all ages, races, and genders. Behavioral medicine and health psychology have focused on prevention and psychosocial influences of cardiovascular diseases for the past 30 years. Music therapy is a viable collaborative method in the psychosocial arena for alleviating risks and motivating rehabilitation from cardiac events. There is research to support the use of music to modulate heart health measurements such as heart rate and blood pressure, to enhance exercise programs, and to relieve stress symptoms. However, inconsistencies in the results of this research warrant continued collaboration of social scientists to find scientific means of establishing interventions with measurable outcomes. This project involved administering a music therapy survey in order to determine current use and preference for music in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Patients who were attending rehabilitation sessions in a large city hospital completed a survey on which they rated their level of use of music for exercise, relaxation, and enjoyment. The researcher also gathered information about musical preferences, musical experiences, and pertinent demographics. Patients, mostly white males over the age of 60, showed positive responses to the aesthetically pleasurable aspects of music. The use of music as a stimulus cue for exercise was decidedly absent. Nursing staff members were receptive to the project, and both staff and patients showed some interest for learning about music for therapeutic purposes. The results suggest that education about and development of music therapy in a cardiac rehabilitation program is warranted. PMID:15157124

  8. A contemporary assessment of the risk for sudden cardiac death in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silka, Michael J; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv

    2012-03-01

    Assessment of the risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) after surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) remains a difficult challenge. In the study of this problem, the focus has evolved from concern regarding late-onset heart block to a subsequent focus on ventricular and reentrant atrial arrhythmias, with the most recent emphasis on ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. Sudden cardiac death in CHD patients has been studied most extensively in tetralogy of Fallot. More than 30 risk factors have been proposed, with age at repair, QRS duration, right ventricular enlargement, and left ventricular dysfunction considered the most predictive risk factors. Additionally, SCD has been studied in patients with atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries, left heart obstructive lesions, and to a limited extent, patients with univentricular physiology. This review discusses current risk factors for SCD in CHD and the limited positive predictive value of any individual factor. The emphasis is on contemporary patients with CHD, who differ markedly from those who had repair of CHD decades earlier. This is characterized by complete repairs during the neonatal period, improved physiologic outcomes, and extended survival of patients with complex forms of CHD. Therefore, earlier data and conclusions may not be relevant to newer generations of patients with CHD. According to current perspectives, systemic ventricular dysfunction becomes a major risk factor beyond the age of 20 years. The first symptomatic arrhythmia may result in SCD, and defibrillators are increasingly implanted despite the lack of risk stratification criteria. The large number of potential risk factors and therapeutic options, in contrast to the low incidence of actual events, results in a difficult clinical challenge in the assessment of the risk for SCD in the individual patient with CHD. PMID:22311569

  9. Experience With the Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator in Patients at High Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Michael; Quick, Silvio; Pfluecke, Christian; Rottstädt, Fabian; Szymkiewicz, Steven J.; Ringquist, Steven; Strasser, Ruth H.; Speiser, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. Methods: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. Results: Ninety-four patients (1.6%) were treated by the WCD in response to ventricular tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation. The incidence rate was 8.4 (95% confidence interval, 6.8–10.2) per 100 patient-years. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation had an incidence rate of 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 12.2–29.0) per 100 patient-years. In contrast, an incidence rate of 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–10.3) was observed in the remaining cardiac diagnosis groups, including dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Among 120 shocked patients, 112 (93%) survived 24 hours after treatment, whereas asystole was observed in 2 patients (0.03%) with 1 resulting death. ConclusionS: This large cohort represents the first nationwide evaluation of WCD use in patients outside the US healthcare system and confirms the overall value of the WCD in German treatment pathways. PMID:27458236

  10. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  11. Simple Measures of Function and Symptoms in Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients Predict Short-Term Cardiac Event-Free Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Janine; Mackin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent chronic condition where patients experience numerous uncomfortable symptoms, low functional status, and high mortality rates. Objective. To determine whether function and/or symptoms predict cardiac event-free survival in hospitalized HF patients within 90 days of hospital discharge. Methods. Inpatients (N = 32) had HF symptoms assessed with 4 yes/no questions. Function was determined with NYHA Classification, Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), and directly with the short physical performance battery (SPPB). Survival was analyzed with time to the first postdischarge cardiac event with events defined as cardiac rehospitalization, heart transplantation, or death. Results. Mean age was 58.2 ± 13.6 years. Patient reported ADL function was nearly independent (5.6 ± 1.1) while direct measure (SPPB) showed moderate functional limitation (6.4 ± 3.1). Within 90 days, 40.6% patients had a cardiac event. At discharge, each increase in NYHA Classification was associated with a 3.4-fold higher risk of cardiac events (95% CI 1.4–8.5). Patients reporting symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, and orthopnea before discharge had a 4.0-fold, 9.7-fold, and 12.8-fold, respectively, greater risk of cardiac events (95% CI 1.2–13.2; 1.2–75.1; 1.7–99.7). Conclusions. Simple assessments of function and symptoms easily performed at discharge may predict short-term cardiac outcomes in hospitalized HF patients. PMID:24672717

  12. Pathways to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients: mediation of coping, spiritual struggle and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Ai, Amy Lee; Pargament, Kenneth; Kronfol, Ziad; Tice, Terrence N; Appel, Hoa

    2010-03-01

    Using structural equation modeling, we estimated major pathways from preoperative distress, indicated by anxiety and other factors, to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients. Sequential interviews were conducted before and after surgery. Standardized medical and surgical indices were selected from a national database. Results showed that preoperative spiritual struggle mediated indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on Interleukin-6 (IL-6) immediately before surgery. The link between spiritual struggle and IL-6 further mediated the indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on postoperative hostility. Anger coping mediated the harmful influence of anxiety and counteracted the protection of positive religious coping on adjustment. PMID:20207662

  13. Examining IV Insulin Practice Guidelines in the Cardiac Surgery Patient: Nurses Evaluating Quality Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Amy; Sherry, Daisy; McDermott, Martha; Gobber, Michele; Pabst, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in the Surgical Care Improvement Project guideline require blood glucose values be less than 180 mg/dL 18 to 24 hours after anesthesia end time after cardiac surgery. Our study compares the first group of patients transitioned off IV insulin on postoperative day 1, 24 hours after anesthesia end time, whereas the second group was transitioned off IV insulin on the second day, 48 hours after anesthesia end time. Results show no statistical difference in outcomes between groups. PMID:27164170

  14. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, A.; West, T.E.; Gupta, M.; Loghmanee, F.

    1987-12-01

    A 34-year-old male prisoner with a history of intravenous drug abuse presented with fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss, and recent onset of congestive heart failure. Serologic testing was positive for antibodies to human immune deficiency virus. There was intense myocardial uptake of gallium. Autopsy showed a primary immunoblastic lymphoma involving only the myocardium. While primary cardiac lymphoma is an extremely rare condition, the incidence may be higher in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and should be suspected in cases with atypical cardiomyopathy.

  15. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  16. [Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Genda, A; Nakayama, A; Igarashi, Y; Takeda, R

    1985-06-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (T1-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8%) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +/- 2.4 vs 2.1 +/- 1.8; p less than 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise T1-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. PMID:4093624

  17. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  18. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms. PMID:27489064

  19. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  20. Risk factors for mediastinitis after cardiac surgery – a retrospective analysis of 1700 patients

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Claudius; Koch, Daniel; Kuss, Oliver; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Friedrich, Ivar; Boergermann, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    Background Mediastinitis is a rare, but serious complication of cardiac surgery. It has a significant socioeconomic impact and high morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-, intra-, and postoperative predictors of mediastinitis. Methods and results In 1700 consecutive patients, who underwent cardiac surgery in 2001, 49 variables were retrospectively assessed. Forty-five patients (2.65%, 95% CI [1.88; 3.41]) developed postoperative mediastinitis. None of these patients died during their hospitalization. Multivariate analysis identified three of the 49 variables as highly significant independent predictors for the development of mediastinitis: obesity (OR 1.03, 95% CI [1.01; 1.04] p = 0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 3.30, 95% CI [1.58; 6.88], p = 0.001), and bilateral grafting of the internal mammary artery (OR 3.18, 95% CI [1.20; 8.43] p = 0.02). The model is reliable in terms of its goodness of fit, it also discriminates well. Additionally, univariate analysis identified diabetes mellitus, CCS class and the number of intraoperatively transfused units of fresh frozen plasma as variables with a significant impact. Conclusion The present study suggests that bilateral IMA grafting, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obesity are important predictors of mediastinitis. PMID:17511885

  1. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  2. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  3. Cardiac Care Assistance using Self Configured Sensor Network—a Remote Patient Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma Dhulipala, V. R.; Kanagachidambaresan, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive health care systems are used to monitor patients remotely without disturbing the normal day-to-day activities in real-time. Wearable physiological sensors required to monitor various significant ecological parameters of the patients are connected to Body Central Unit (BCU). Body Sensor Network (BSN) updates data in real-time and are designed to transmit alerts against abnormalities which enables quick response by medical units in case of an emergency. BSN helps monitoring patient without any need for attention to the subject. BSN helps in reducing the stress and strain caused by hospital environment. In this paper, mathematical models for heartbeat signal, electro cardio graph (ECG) signal and pulse rate are introduced. These signals are compared and their RMS difference-fast Fourier transforms (PRD-FFT) are processed. In the context of cardiac arrest, alert messages of these parameters and first aid for post-surgical operations has been suggested.

  4. Tools for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death: A review of the literature in different patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathi, Loheetha; Pavri, Behzad B.

    2014-01-01

    While various modalities to determine risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have been reported in clinical studies, currently reduced left ventricular ejection fraction remains the cornerstone of SCD risk stratification. However, the absolute burden of SCD is greatest amongst populations without known cardiac disease. In this review, we summarize the evidence behind current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use for the prevention of SCD in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). We also evaluate the evidence for risk stratification tools beyond clinical guidelines in the general population, patients with IHD, and patients with other known or suspected medical conditions. PMID:24568833

  5. Anhedonia Predicts Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Mortality in Patients 1 Year After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Karina W.; Burg, Matthew M.; Kronish, Ian M.; Shimbo, Daichi; Dettenborn, Lucia; Mehran, Roxana; Vorchheimer, David; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Lespérance, Francois; Rieckmann, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Context Depression is a consistent predictor of recurrent events and mortality in ACS patients, but it has 2 core diagnostic criteria with distinct biological correlates—depressed mood and anhedonia. Objective To determine if depressed mood and/or anhedonia (loss of pleasure or interest) predict 1-year medical outcomes for patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). Design Observational cohort study of post-ACS patients hospitalized between May 2003 and June 2005. Within one week of admission, patients underwent a structured psychiatric interview to assess clinically impairing depressed mood, anhedonia, and major depressive episode (MDE); also assessed were the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, antidepressant use, and depressive symptom severity. Setting Coronary care and cardiac care step-down units of 3 university hospitals in New York and Connecticut. Participants Consecutive sample of 453 ACS patients (aged 25–93 years; 42% women). Main Outcomes Measures All-cause mortality (ACM) and documented major adverse cardiac events (MACE; myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or urgent revascularization) were actively surveyed for 1 year after admission. Results There were 67 events (16 deaths and 51 MACE; 14.8%). 108 (24%) and 77 (17%) patients with anhedonia and depressed mood, respectively. After controlling for sex, age, and medical covariates, anhedonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.16–2.14; P<.01) and MDE (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.04; P=.02) were significant predictors of combined MACE/ACM, but depressed mood was not. Anhedonia continued to significantly predict outcomes controlling for MDE diagnosis and depressive symptom severity, each of which were no longer significant. Conclusions Anhedonia identifies risk for MACE/ACM beyond that of established medical prognostic indicators

  6. Investigation of Cardiac Complications and their Incidence in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Soroush, Mohsen; Mominzadeh, Mahmood; Ghelich, Younes; Soroosh, Soosan; Pasha, Morteza Aghajanpoor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology which involves the sacroiliac and axial joints, but can also cause peripheral conflicts. It also comprises non-joint symptoms such as acute anterior uveitis, cardiac conduction defects, upper lobe pulmonary fibrosis, neurological involvement and renal amyloidosis. Material and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional descriptive and analytical survey. In this study, 50 patients with AS were examined according to the New York Criteria in Army 501 Hospital in Tehran. Physical examinations, laboratory testing and HLA-B27, as well as X-ray of the spine and sacroiliac joint were taken from all subjects and involvement grading was identified. The control group consisted of 40 healthy people with no evidence of disease. The people resembled the study group in terms of age, sex, smoking, presence of high blood pressure, history of ischemic heart disease and also diabetes. Results: The mean age of patients in control and study group was 33.97 and 33.65 years, respectively. 37 (92.5%) patients in the control group and 46 in study group (92%) were male. The mean duration of cardiac involvement in patients was 8.6 years with SD=6.26. In AS group, 48 (96%) patients suffered from back pain, 43 from enteritis, 100% from Ankylosing Spondylitis, one from unilateral involvement, 22(44%) from peripheral arthritis and 27 (54%) from HLA–B27. Conclusion: In total, Average heart involvement in the control group and AS group was 13.25 with SD=7.64 and 16.2 with SA=8.54, respectively, indicating no significant difference. In sum, based on the results obtained in this study, some types of heart involvements, such as mitral valve regurgitation and Mitral Valve Prolapse in AS patients are more prevalent than in the normal population. PMID:26980929

  7. Patient-centered imaging: shared decision making for cardiac imaging procedures with exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Berman, Daniel S; Min, James K; Hendel, Robert C; Gerber, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cullom, S James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal W; Dorbala, Sharmila; Fazel, Reza; Garcia, Ernest V; Gibbons, Raymond J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R; Raff, Gilbert L; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A; Shaw, Leslee J

    2014-04-22

    The current paper details the recommendations arising from an NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium held in November 2012, aiming to identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Symposium participants, working in 3 tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3 mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written informed consent. However, a protocol effective dose >20 mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  8. Butorphanol premedication to facilitate invasive monitoring in cardiac surgery patients before induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Nath, Soumya Shanker; Banerjee, Sudipto; Tripathi, Mamta

    2009-01-01

    Cannulations (peripheral vein, radial artery and jugular vein) performed for invasive monitoring before induction of anaesthesia in cardiac surgery patients may be associated with stress and anxiety. The efficacy and safety of butorphanol premedication was assessed in setting up of invasive monitoring. The study was a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled one with 70 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. In group-1 patients (n = 35) (placebo) intramuscular saline was administered 1-2 hours before the surgery in equivalent volume to butorphanol. In group-2 (n = 35) butorphanol (1, 1.5 and 2 mg for three body weight groups < 40 kg, 41-60 kg and> 60 kg, respectively) was administered 1-2 hours before surgery. Observer blinded for medication recorded the sedation score, pupil size and pain after each cannulation using visual analogue score (VAS). Student's 't' test and Chi-square test for proportions, Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric data was carried out. The median pain score of cannulation in group-2 (butorphanol) in the hand (10 mm) and neck (20 mm) were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than group-1 (placebo) patients (hand = 30 mm and neck = 40 mm). Pain during neck cannulation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced (VAS < 30 mm) in patients with the pupil size of < 2.5 mm. Since the pain during neck cannulation was more than pain during hand cannulations in both the groups, we conclude that the intensity of pain depends also upon the site of cannulation. Besides the analgesic effect of butorphanol, its sedative effect helped to effectively decrease the pain during neck cannulation in conscious patients. PMID:19136753

  9. Determinants of eligibility and use of ehealth for cardiac rehabilitation patients: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, Anne-Marieke; Peek, Niels; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik; Jaspers, Monique

    2014-01-01

    To foster implementation of eHealth in care practice, it is important to gain insight into the factors that influence acceptance. The aim of this study was to identify determinants of eligibility and use for completing an electronic needs assessment for cardiac rehabilitation. We analysed the influence of age, gender, diagnosis, health literacy, quality of life scores, and depression and anxiety scores. Among 240 patients entering CR in two clinics, 101 patients were deemed eligible to use the system by their CR professional, of which 75 (74.2%) actually used it. Only 50% of the patients who had an acute coronary syndrome and 20% of the patients with chronic heart failure were deemed eligible. Furthermore, there was a decreasing trend towards usage in female patients, patients with symptoms of anxiety, and patients with a better quality of life. In the future we will continue to explore barriers and success factors as experienced by the patients and the participating clinics to optimize the system. PMID:25160301

  10. Safety of anticoagulation with uninterrupted warfarin vs. interrupted dabigatran in patients requiring an implantable cardiac device

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Shivanshu; Muthusamy, Purushothaman; Mowers, Katie L.; Elmouchi, Darryl A.; Finta, Bohuslav; Gauri, Andre J.; Woelfel, Alan K.; Fritz, Timothy D.; Davis, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal strategy of peri-procedural anticoagulation in patients undergoing permanent cardiac device implantation is controversial. Our objective was to compare the major bleeding and thromboembolic complications in patients managed with uninterrupted warfarin (UW) vs. interrupted dabigatran (ID) during permanent pacemaker (PPM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) implantation. Methods A retrospective cohort study of all eligible patients from July 2011 through January 2012 was performed. UW was defined as patients who had maintained a therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) on the day of the procedure. ID was defined as stopping dabigatran ≥12 hours prior to the procedure and then resuming after implantation. Major bleeding events included hemothorax, hemopericardium, intracranial hemorrhage, gastrointestinal bleed, epistaxis, or pocket hematoma requiring surgical intervention. Thromboembolic complications included stroke, transient ischemic attack, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or arterial embolism. Results Of the 133 patients (73.4±11.0 years; 91 males) in the study, 86 received UW and 47 received ID. One (1.2%) patient in the UW group sustained hemopericardium perioperatively and died. In comparison, the ID patients had no complications. As compared to the ID group, the UW group had a higher median CHADS2 score (2 vs. 3, P=0.04) and incidence of Grade 1 pocket hematoma (0% vs. 7%, P=0.09). Neither group developed any thromboembolic complications. Conclusions Major bleeding rates were similar among UW and ID groups. Perioperative ID appears to be a safe anticoagulation strategy for patients undergoing PPM or ICD implantation. PMID:26885486

  11. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings: delays to patient care and effect on survival

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Ian R.; Strum, Ryan P.; Byers, Adam; Buick, Jason E.; Lin, Steve; Cheskes, Sheldon; Hu, Samantha; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increasing number of people living in high-rise buildings presents unique challenges to care and may cause delays for 911-initiated first responders (including paramedics and fire department personnel) responding to calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We examined the relation between floor of patient contact and survival after cardiac arrest in residential buildings. Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNet Epistry database for the period January 2007 to December 2012. We included all adult patients (≥ 18 yr) with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of no obvious cause who were treated in private residences. We excluded cardiac arrests witnessed by 911-initiated first responders and those with an obvious cause. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine the effect on survival of the floor of patient contact, with adjustment for standard Utstein variables. Results: During the study period, 7842 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest met the inclusion criteria, of which 5998 (76.5%) occurred below the third floor and 1844 (23.5%) occurred on the third floor or higher. Survival was greater on the lower floors (4.2% v. 2.6%, p = 0.002). Lower adjusted survival to hospital discharge was independently associated with higher floor of patient contact, older age, male sex and longer 911 response time. In an analysis by floor, survival was 0.9% above floor 16 (i.e., below the 1% threshold for futility), and there were no survivors above the 25th floor. Interpretation: In high-rise buildings, the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was lower for patients residing on higher floors. Interventions aimed at shortening response times to treatment of cardiac arrest in high-rise buildings may increase survival. PMID:26783332

  12. Prediction of oxygen consumption in cardiac rehabilitation patients performing leg ergometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, John Gershwin

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, to determine the validity of the ACSM leg ergometry equation in the prediction of steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2) in a heterogeneous population of cardiac patients. Second, to determine whether a more accurate prediction equation could be developed for use in the cardiac population. Thirty-one cardiac rehabilitation patients participated in the study of which 24 were men and 7 were women. Biometric variables (mean +/- sd) of the participants were as follows: age = 61.9 +/- 9.5 years; height = 172.6 +/- 1.6 cm; and body mass = 82.3 +/- 10.6 kg. Subjects exercised on a MonarchTM cycle ergometer at 0, 180, 360, 540 and 720 kgm ˙ min-1. The length of each stage was five minutes. Heart rate, ECG, and VO2 were continuously monitored. Blood pressure and heart rate were collected at the end of each stage. Steady state VO 2 was calculated for each stage using the average of the last two minutes. Correlation coefficients, standard error of estimate, coefficient of determination, total error, and mean bias were used to determine the accuracy of the ACSM equation (1995). The analysis found the ACSM equation to be a valid means of estimating VO2 in cardiac patients. Simple linear regression was used to develop a new equation. Regression analysis found workload to be a significant predictor of VO2. The following equation is the result: VO2 = (1.6 x kgm ˙ min-1) + 444 ml ˙ min-1. The r of the equation was .78 (p < .05) and the standard error of estimate was 211 ml ˙ min-1. Analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between means for actual and predicted VO2 values for each equation. The analysis found the ACSM and new equation to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO2 during unloaded pedaling. Furthermore, the ACSM equation was found to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO 2 during the first loaded stage of exercise. When the accuracy of the ACSM and new equations were compared based on

  13. Correlation of NT-proBNP levels and cardiac iron concentration in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Delaporta, Polyxeni; Kattamis, Antonios; Apostolakou, Filia; Boiu, Sorina; Bartzeliotou, Anastasia; Tsoukas, Evangelos; Papassotiriou, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Iron-induced cardiotoxicity remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia major. Heart failure in these patients, which may be reversible but has a poor prognosis, is characterized by myocardial iron deposition-related early diastolic dysfunction. Amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a sensitive biomarker for the detection of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. In this study, we prospectively evaluated plasma NT-proBNP levels in 187 adult patients aged 19-54 years with β-TM. Possible correlations with the proposed recently cardiac iron concentration based on an equation derived from heart T2* assessment by MRI: [Fe] = 45.0 × [T2*](-1.22) with [Fe] in milligrams per gram dry weight and T2* in milliseconds were explored. We found that: 143 patients had no cardiac hemosiderosis, defined as [Fe] < 1.1 mg/g dry weight, corresponding to T2* > 20 ms and 44 patients had cardiac hemosiderosis, defined as [Fe] > 1.2mg/g dry weight. The main results of the study showed that: a) NT-proBNP levels were markedly increased in thalassemic patients (152.2 ± 190.1 pg/mL, ranged from 6.0 to 1336.0 pg/mL compared to normal control levels 40.1 ± 19.7 pg/mL, p < 0.001, b) NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients with cardiac hemosiderosis compared to patients without cardiac hemosiderosis (185.1 ± 78.0 vs 128.9 ± 20.2 pg/mL, p < 0.05), c) NT-proBNP levels correlated with [Fe] values (r = 0.387, p < 0.001). This correlation was significant in patients with cardiac hemosiderosis (r = 0.520, p < 0.001), but not in patients without cardiac hemosiderosis (p > 0.1), and d) no significant correlation was found between NT-proBNP levels and left ventricular ejection fraction values, (p > 0.3). Our study demonstrated for first time the significant association of NT-proBNP levels and cardiac iron concentration in patients with β-thalassemia major linking blood chemistry and imaging

  14. [Development of an embedded mobile terminal for real-time remote monitoring of out-of-hospital cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-min; Fang, Zu-Xiang; Lai, Da-Kun; Song, Hai-Lang

    2007-05-01

    A kind of real-time remote monitoring embedded terminal which is combined with mobile communication technology and GPS localization technology, has been developed. The results of preliminary experiments show that the terminal can transmit ECG signals and localization information in real time and continuously, supply a real-time monitoring of out-of-hospital cardiac patients and trace the patients. PMID:17672363

  15. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild. PMID:27233227

  16. Pulse contour analysis: Is it able to reliably detect changes in cardiac output in the haemodynamically unstable patient?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Three pulse contour systems for monitoring cardiac output - LiDCO Plus™, PiCCO Plus™ and FloTrac™ - were compared in postcardiac surgery patients. None of the three methods demonstrated good trending ability according to concordance analysis. Pulse contour systems remain unreliable in the haemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:21349140

  17. Non-insulin antidiabetic therapy in cardiac patients: current problems and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Fisman, Enrique Z; Motro, Michael; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Five types of oral antihyperglycemic drugs are currently approved for the treatment of diabetes: biguanides, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, glitazones and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. We briefly review the cardiovascular effects of the most commonly used antidiabetic drugs in these groups in an attempt to improve knowledge and awareness regarding their influences and potential risks when treating patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Regarding biguanides, gastrointestinal disturbances such as diarrhea are frequent, and the intestinal absorption of group B vitamins and folate is impaired during chronic therapy. This deficiency may lead to increased plasma homocysteine levels which, in turn, accelerate the progression of vascular disease due to adverse effects on platelets, clotting factors, and endothelium. The existence of a graded association between homocysteine levels and overall mortality in patients with CAD is well established. In addition, metformin may lead to lethal lactic acidosis, especially in patients with clinical conditions that predispose to this complication, such as heart failure or recent myocardial infarction. Sulfonylureas avoid ischemic preconditioning. During myocardial ischemia, they may prevent opening of the ATP-dependent potassium channels, impeding the necessary hyperpolarization that protects the cell by blocking calcium influx. Meglitinides may exert similar effects due to their analogous mechanism of action. During treatment with glitazones, edema has been reported in 5% of patients, and these drugs are contraindicated in diabetics with NYHA class III or IV cardiac status. The long-term effects of alpha-glucosidase inhibitors on morbidity and mortality rates and on diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications is still unknown. Combined sulfonylurea/metformin therapy reveals additive effects on mortality. Four points should be mentioned: (1) the five oral antidiabetic drug groups present proven or potential cardiac hazards; (2

  18. Use of Closed Incision Management with Negative Pressure Therapy for Complex Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with major comorbidities undergoing complex cardiothoracic surgery, incision management is critical. This retrospective review evaluated negative pressure over closed sternal incisions in cardiac patients with multiple comorbidities within 30 days post-median sternotomy. Methods: Records of post-sternotomy patients treated with Prevena™ Incision Management System (KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, TX), a closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT), were reviewed from September 2010 through September 2014. Data collected included demographics, major comorbidities, types of surgery, relevant medical history, incision length, therapy duration, time to follow-up, and incision complications. Descriptive statistics were computed for continuous variables, frequency, and percentages for categorical variables. Results: Twenty-seven patients were treated with ciNPT between September 2010 and September 2014. The mean patient age was 62.5 (SD 7.9), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 (SD 4.4) kg/m2. Risk factors included obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, 27/27; 100%), diabetes (25/27; 92.6%), hypertension (16/27; 59.3%), and 20/27 patients (74%) had ≥ 5 comorbidities. Mean ciNPT duration was 5.6 (SD 0.9) days. Within 30 days post-surgery, 21/27 (77.8%) patients had intact incisions with good reapproximation. Two patients experienced minor dehiscences; four cases of superficial cellulitis were treated and resolved. One patient with a dehiscence was readmitted for intravenous antibiotics and five patients were managed successfully with antibiotics as outpatients. All patients had intact incisions with good skin approximation at final follow-up. Conclusions: In this retrospective study of post-sternotomy patients at high risk of developing complications, ciNPT over closed sternal incisions resulted in favorable outcomes within 30 days of surgery. PMID:27026831

  19. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs. PMID:27013915

  20. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Poenisch, Falk; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Sheu, Tommy; Chang, Joe Y.; Memon, Nada; Mohan, Radhe; Rozner, Marc A.; Dougherty, Anne H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving

  1. Malfunctions of implantable cardiac devices in patients receiving proton beam therapy: incidence and predictors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Poenisch, Falk; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Sheu, Tommy; Chang, Joe Y.; Memon, Nada; Mohan, Radhe; Rozner, Marc A.; Dougherty, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) (28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defillibrators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23 [55%]), prostate (15 [36%]), liver (3[7%]), or base of skull (1 [2%]) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy(RBE) [range 46.8–87.5 Gy(RBE)], and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8–40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13–21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11–1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in five patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and one patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator (ERI) after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9–8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330–1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the ERI message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving thoracic PBT be followed closely. PMID

  2. Remote Monitoring for Follow-up of Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Morichelli, Loredana; Varma, Niraj

    2014-01-01

    Follow-up of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices is challenging due to the increasing number and technical complexity of devices coupled to increasing clinical complexity of patients. Remote monitoring (RM) offers the opportunity to optimise clinic workflow and to improve device monitoring and patient management. Several randomised clinical trials and registries have demonstrated that RM may reduce number of hospital visits, time required for patient follow-up, physician and nurse time, hospital and social costs. Furthermore, patient retention and adherence to follow-up schedule are significantly improved by RM. Continuous wireless monitoring of data stored in the device memory with automatic alerts allows early detection of device malfunctions and of events requiring clinical reaction, such as atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias and heart failure. Early reaction may improve patient outcome. RM is easy to use and patients showed a high level of acceptance and satisfaction. Implementing RM in daily practice may require changes in clinic workflow. To this purpose, new organisational models have been introduced. In spite of a favourable cost:benefit ratio, RM reimbursement still represents an issue in several European countries. PMID:26835079

  3. Remote Monitoring for Follow-up of Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Renato Pietro; Morichelli, Loredana; Varma, Niraj

    2014-08-01

    Follow-up of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices is challenging due to the increasing number and technical complexity of devices coupled to increasing clinical complexity of patients. Remote monitoring (RM) offers the opportunity to optimise clinic workflow and to improve device monitoring and patient management. Several randomised clinical trials and registries have demonstrated that RM may reduce number of hospital visits, time required for patient follow-up, physician and nurse time, hospital and social costs. Furthermore, patient retention and adherence to follow-up schedule are significantly improved by RM. Continuous wireless monitoring of data stored in the device memory with automatic alerts allows early detection of device malfunctions and of events requiring clinical reaction, such as atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias and heart failure. Early reaction may improve patient outcome. RM is easy to use and patients showed a high level of acceptance and satisfaction. Implementing RM in daily practice may require changes in clinic workflow. To this purpose, new organisational models have been introduced. In spite of a favourable cost:benefit ratio, RM reimbursement still represents an issue in several European countries. PMID:26835079

  4. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  5. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  6. Evidence for improved cardiac performance after beta-blockade in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Nigri, A; Gioffrè, P A

    1976-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the acute haemodynamic effects of bunitrolol (0-2-hydroxy-3-(tert.butylamino)-propoxy)-bity. Right and left heart catheterization was performed in eleven patients with documented coronary artery disease. After bunitrolol (10 mg i.v.), there was a statistically significant decrease in left ventricular and aortic systolic pressures left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, aortic diastolic and mean pressures, pressure-rate product and compliance index (delta P/delta V). Left ventricular dp/dt, left ventricular dp/dt over isovolumic pressure, systemic resistance and heart rate tended to decrease, stroke volume and left ventricular stroke work index tended to increase, without statistical significance. Cardiac index showed individual variations, the mean values for the group being unchanged. Correlation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and left ventricular stroke work index showed a shift toward improved ventricular function curve in most cases, deterioration in no instance. Supine exercise was performed in ten patients. Angina occurred in nine patients; in five only before and in four before and after beta-blockade. Post-drug exercise heart rate, pressure-rate product and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were significantly lower, the latter also in the four patients who still presented exercise angina. It is concluded that certain beta-blockers can improve cardiac performance at rest and during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease. This is explainable on the basis of a more favourable balance between oxygen supply and demand, together with a less marked negative inotropic effect due to the partial agonist activity of the agent used in the study. PMID:18374

  7. Diurnal Cortisol Rhythm Is Associated With Adverse Cardiac Events and Mortality in Coronary Artery Bypass Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Tara; Poole, Lydia; Leigh, Elizabeth; Jahangiri, Marjan; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is growing evidence that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis plays a role in the progression of cardiovascular disease. We examined the relationship between diurnal cortisol rhythm and adverse events in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We hypothesized that a flatter presurgical diurnal cortisol slope would be associated with higher rates of adverse cardiac events and death in the years following the CABG procedure. Methods: Repeated measures of saliva were taken over the day from 250 CABG patients 1 month before surgery to assess diurnal cortisol slope and overall output (area under the curve). Long-term clinical outcomes were occurrence of a major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and death, and were collected up to 2.68 (SD = 0.40) years after surgery. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine relationships between presurgical cortisol and clinical outcomes. EuroSCORE, chronic illness burden, and whether or not the patient had undergone cardiopulmonary bypass were included as covariates in the models. Results: Diurnal cortisol slope predicted the occurrence of MACE or death after surgery (hazard ratio = 0.73; 95% confidence interval = 0.56–0.96; P = .023). Patients with a steeper slope were at reduced risk of adverse outcomes. This association was driven by changes in both waking and evening cortisol levels. Conclusion: These results provide evidence for a link between diurnal cortisol rhythm and recovery after CABG. Measuring diurnal cortisol slope before surgery may help to identify those patients at risk of adverse outcomes in the years after the procedure. PMID:26305622

  8. Quantification of HDL Proteins, Cardiac Events, and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Chantal; Genser, Bernd; Drechsler, Christiane; Krane, Vera; Kaltenecker, Christopher C.; Hengstschläger, Markus; März, Winfried; Wanner, Christoph; Säemann, Marcus D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Impairment of HDL function has been associated with cardiovascular events in patients with kidney failure. The protein composition of HDLs is altered in these patients, presumably compromising the cardioprotective effects of HDLs. This post hoc study assessed the relation of distinct HDL-bound proteins with cardiovascular outcomes in a dialysis population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The concentrations of HDL-associated serum amyloid A (SAA) and surfactant protein B (SP-B) were measured in 1152 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis participating in The German Diabetes Dialysis Study who were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment of 20 mg atorvastatin daily or matching placebo. The association of SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) with cardiovascular outcomes was assessed in multivariate regression models adjusted for known clinical risk factors. Results High concentrations of SAA(HDL) were significantly and positively associated with the risk of cardiac events (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.19). High concentrations of SP-B(HDL) were significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19). Adjustment for HDL cholesterol did not affect these associations. Conclusions In patients with diabetes on hemodialysis, SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) were related to cardiac events and all-cause mortality, respectively, and they were independent of HDL cholesterol. These findings indicate that a remodeling of the HDL proteome was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with ESRD. PMID:25424990

  9. Utilization of YouTube as a Tool to Assess Patient Perception Regarding Implanted Cardiac Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Kevin; Mainali, Prajeena; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Pant, Sadip; Badheka, Apurva O; Paydak, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The outreach of YouTube may have a dramatic role in the widespread dissemination of knowledge on implantable cardioverter devices (ICD). Aims: This study was designed to review and analyze the information available on YouTube pertaining to implantable cardiac devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers. Materials and Methods: YouTube was queried for the terms “ICD”, “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator”, and “Pacemaker”. The videos were reviewed and categorized as according to content; number of views and “likes” or “dislikes” was recorded by two separate observers. Results: Of the 55 videos reviewed, 18 of the videos were categorized as patient education, 12 were advertisements, 8 were intraoperative videos documenting the device implantation procedures, 7 of the videos were produced to document personal patient experiences, and 4 were categorized as documentation of a public event. 3 were intended to educate health care workers. The remaining 3 were intended to raise public awareness about sudden cardiac death. The videos portraying intraoperative procedures generated the most “likes” or “dislikes” per view. Conclusion: While YouTube provides a logical platform for delivery of health information, the information on this platform is not regulated. Initiative by reputed authorities and posting accurate information in such platform can be a great aid in public education regarding device therapy. PMID:25077075

  10. Insomnia symptoms and heart rate recovery among patients in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Kristin J; Rouleau, Codie R; Garland, Sheila N; Samuels, Charles; Aggarwal, Sandeep G; Stone, James A; Arena, Ross; Campbell, Tavis S

    2016-08-01

    Insomnia symptoms (i.e., difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and early morning awakenings) are common among people with cardiovascular disease, and have been linked to adverse cardiovascular health outcomes. Reduced parasympathetic tone is one pathway through which risk may be conferred. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether insomnia symptoms are associated with lower parasympathetic tone in cardiac rehabilitation patients with suspected insomnia. Participants (N = 121) completed a self-report measure of insomnia severity. 1-min heart rate recovery (HRR), an index of parasympathetic tone, was obtained during a maximal exercise test. Difficulty falling asleep, but not difficulty staying asleep or early awakenings, was associated with attenuated 1-min HRR. When analyses were restricted to participants with moderate and severe insomnia severity (n = 51), the strength of this association increased. In a sample of cardiac rehabilitation patients with insomnia, only the symptom of difficulty falling asleep was associated with lower parasympathetic tone, suggesting that individual insomnia symptoms may show specificity in their associations with physiological mechanisms. PMID:26944765

  11. Use of central venous saturation monitoring in a patient with pediatric cardiac beriberi.

    PubMed

    Majima, Nozomi; Umegaki, Osamu; Soen, Masako

    2013-09-16

    The patient was a 1-year-and-4-mo-old boy. He had drunk about 1 L of an isotonic drink for infants daily since about 10 mo after birth. He was examined by a local doctor due to anorexia and vomiting, found to have cardiomegaly, and transported to our hospital with suspected myocarditis. After admission, the patient showed polypnea, a decreased level of consciousness, and marked metabolic acidosis and lapsed into circulatory insufficiency, requiring catecholamine administration, endotracheal intubation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Initially, low-output heart failure due to acute myocarditis was suspected, but the central venous oxygen saturation was high, at 82%. Considering high-output heart failure to be more likely, we evaluated its cause and noted, by urinary organic acid analysis, increases in lactate, pyruvate, 3-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, metabolic products of branched-chain amino acids, 2-ketoglutarate, 2-OH-glutarate, 2-keto-adipate, and 2-OH-adipate. Since the vitamin B1 level was reduced to 12 ng/mL (normally 20-50 ng/mL), a diagnosis of cardiac beriberi due to vitamin B1 deficiency was made. When unexplained heart failure is observed in children, cardiac beriberi must be excluded as a differential diagnosis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. The measurement of the central venous oxygen saturation may be useful for the diagnosis. PMID:24303502

  12. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Simona M; Kiss, Rudolf; Hekkert, Sacco te Lintel; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J M; Risby, Terence H; Marczin, Nandor

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (> 30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (> 10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene. PMID:25128523

  13. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Simona M.; Kiss, Rudolf; te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J. M.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (>30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (>10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene. PMID:25128523

  14. The first Caucasian patient with p.Val122Ile mutated-transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis treated with isolated heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ammirati, Enrico; Marziliano, Nicola; Vittori, Claudia; Pedrotti, Patrizia; Bramerio, Manuela A; Motta, Valentina; Orsini, Francesco; Veronese, Silvio; Merlini, Piera A; Martinelli, Luigi; Frigerio, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Effective treatments for mutated transthyretin (TTR)-related cardiac amyloidosis are limited. Heart transplantation or combined liver-heart transplantation are the most successful options, although results rely on underline mechanism and systemic nature of the disease. In this report, we present the first case of a Caucasian patient with the p.Val122Ile mutated TTR-related cardiac amyloidosis treated with heart transplantation due to this gene mutation frequent in Afro-Americans with a prevalent isolated heart involvement. The choice of isolated heart transplantation instead of combined heart and liver transplantations was based on (1) severe and progressive cardiac disease, (2) evidence of a gene mutation generally associated with isolated cardiac disease and (3) absence of relevant extra-cardiac involvement (with the possible exception of mild peripheral neuropathy). In any case, the very short post-transplant observation period of 10 months does not allow any conclusions on the long-term course of the presented strategy. Finally, it is the first European Caucasian family with the p.Val122Ile TTR mutation that has been described. Till now, very few Caucasian cases of p.Val122Ile mutated TTR-related cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. The patient and some members of his family also had mild peripheral neuropathy suggesting a regional phenotypic heterogeneity of European Caucasian TTR p.Val122Ile. PMID:22449240

  15. Mental disabilities in an Aboriginal context.

    PubMed

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Aboriginal (meaning original peoples) North American mental health is acknowledged to be in a more precarious state than that of the dominant cultures. Disability arises from the conditions of poverty, homelessness, and lack of resources that are compounded for North American aboriginal people by the historical trauma of conquest, being placed on reservations, residential schools, and continued discrimination. We present culturally sensitive and syntonic intervention programs that can reduce the impact of Aboriginal mental disabilities and discuss the commonality among these programs of celebrating culture, language, and tradition. PMID:26146771

  16. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction of the cardiac surgery patient; a point of view for the cardiac surgeon and cardio-anesthesiologist

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD) is defined as the inability of the ventricle to fill to a normal end-diastolic volume, both during exercise as well as at rest, while left atrial pressure does not exceed 12 mm Hg. We examined the concept of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in a cardiac surgery setting. Materials and methods Literature review was carried out in order to identify the overall experience of an important and highly underestimated issue: the unexpected adverse outcome due to ventricular stiffness, following cardiac surgery. Results Although diverse group of patients for cardiac surgery could potentially affected from diastolic dysfunction, there are only few studies looking in to the impact of DD on the postoperative outcome; Trans-thoracic echo-cardiography (TTE) is the main stay for the diagnosis of DD. Intraoperative trans-oesophageal (TOE) adds to the management. Subgroups of DD can be defined with prognostic significance. Conclusion DD with elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure can predispose to increased perioperative mortality and morbidity. Furthermore, DD is often associated with systolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy or indeed pulmonary hypertension. When the diagnosis of DD is made, peri-operative attention to this group of patients becomes mandatory. PMID:19930694

  17. Patient mobility for cardiac problems: a risk-adjusted analysis in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Italian National Health System was revised in the last 20 years, introducing new elements such as efficacy, efficiency and competitiveness. Devolution to regional authorities has created a quasi-market system where patients can choose the hospital in which to be treated. Patient mobility therefore becomes an indicator of perceived hospital quality and of financial flows between the regions of Italy. Previous studies analyzed patient mobility in general or by specific disease/diagnosis-related groups but there is a lack of research on the influence of severity of patient condition. The aim of the study was to describe patient mobility, crude and stratified by disease severity, in cardiac surgery units of three health areas (HAs) in Tuscany (Italy). Methods In this retrospective observational study, data was gathered from hospital discharge records obtained from the Tuscan Regional Health Agency, Italy. The three HAs (HA1, HA2, HA3) recorded 25,017 planned hospitalizations in cardiac surgery units in the period 2001–2007. Patients were stratified in four All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group (APR-DRG) severity levels. Gandy’s nomogram was used to describe how HAs met health care demand and their capacity to attract patients. Cuzick’s test was used to identify significant differences in time trends. Results Raw data showed that the HAs met their own local health care demand. Stratifying by APR-DRG severity, it emerged that capacity to meet local demand remained unchanged for zero-to-minor severity levels, but one HA was less able to meet demand for moderate severity levels or to attract patients from other HAs and Regions of Italy. In fact, HA3 showed a decrease in admissions of local residents. Conclusions The study highlights important differences between the three HAs that were only revealed by severity stratification: unlike HA3, HA1 and HA2 seemed able to deal with local demand, even after severity stratification. Planners and

  18. The relative role of patient physiology and device optimisation in cardiac resynchronisation therapy: A computational modelling study.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Andrew; Blazevic, Bojan; Lamata, Pablo; Plank, Gernot; Ginks, Matthew; Duckett, Simon; Sohal, Manav; Shetty, Anoop; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Smith, Nicolas P; Niederer, Steven A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for heart failure, however the effective selection of patients and optimisation of therapy remain controversial. While extensive research is ongoing, it remains unclear whether improvements in patient selection or therapy planning offers a greater opportunity for the improvement of clinical outcomes. This computational study investigates the impact of both physiological conditions that guide patient selection and the optimisation of pacing lead placement on CRT outcomes. A multi-scale biophysical model of cardiac electromechanics was developed and personalised to patient data in three patients. These models were separated into components representing cardiac anatomy, pacing lead location, myocardial conductivity and stiffness, afterload, active contraction and conduction block for each individual, and recombined to generate a cohort of 648 virtual patients. The effect of these components on the change in total activation time of the ventricles (ΔTAT) and acute haemodynamic response (AHR) was analysed. The pacing site location was found to have the largest effect on ΔTAT and AHR. Secondary effects on ΔTAT and AHR were found for functional conduction block and cardiac anatomy. The simulation results highlight a need for a greater emphasis on therapy optimisation in order to achieve the best outcomes for patients. PMID:26546827

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  20. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  1. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  2. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  3. Ranolazine: Electrophysiologic Effect, Efficacy, and Safety in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Assadi, Hamid; Heidary, Shahriar; Shenasa, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Ranolazine is currently approved as an antianginal agent in patients with chronic angina (class IIA). Ranolazine exhibits antiarrhythmic effects that are related to its multichannel blocking effect, predominantly inhibition of late sodium (late INa) current and the rapid potassium rectifier current (IKr), as well as ICa, late ICa, and INa-Ca. It also suppresses the early and delayed after depolarizations. Ranolazine is effective in the suppression of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias (off-label use) without significant proarrhythmic effect. Currently, ongoing trials are evaluating the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in patients with cardiac arrhythmias; preliminary results suggest that ranolazine, when used alone or in combination with dronedarone, is safe and effective in reducing atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine is not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an antiarrhythmic agent. PMID:27261835

  4. Elevated postoperative serum procalcitonin is not indicative of bacterial infection in cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Kavaraganahalli, Deepak; Pargaonkar, Sumant; Hosur, Rajathadri; Harivelam, Chidananda; Bharadwaj, Ashwin; Raghunathan, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identifying infections early, commencing appropriate empiric antibiotic not only helps gain control early, but also reduces mortality and morbidity. Conventional cultures take about 5 days to identify infections. To identify the infections early biomarker like serum procalcitonin (SPC). Aims: We studied the correlation of an elevated level of SPC and positive culture in elective adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from January to December 2013. SPC was checked in patients showing evidence of sepsis. Simultaneously, relevant culture was also undertaken. Correlation, specificity, and sensitivity of elevated SPC were checked. Results: A total of 819 adult patients were included in the study. 43 of them had signs of infection and SPC levels were checked. Based on the level of SPC criteria, 10 patients were diagnosed as “nil”, out of them, 4 had culture-positive infections, 17 were suggested to have “mild infection,” 3 out those had culture positivity. None among the eleven patients suggested to have “moderate infection,” had a positive culture, and one among the five suggested to have a severe infection had a positive culture. The sensitivity was 50% and the specificity 17%. The positive predictive value was 12% and the negative predictive value 60%. Conclusions: We failed to elicit positive correlation between elevated SPC levels and postoperative infection in cardio surgical patients. PMID:25849691

  5. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the cardiac chambers in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tomaru, Takanobu; Miwa, Atsuko; Hirose, Junichi; Sasaki, Michihiko; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Tsubouchi, Hiroyuki

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in fiberoptic technology enables us to observe the cardiac chambers percutaneously in various categories of heart disease. We applied cardioscopy in 4 patients with HCM. Two of them presented excessive or good left ventricular function and no history of congestive heart failure (CHF). The other two patients showed reduced left ventricular function with a history of CHF. Cardioscopy was successfully performed in all patients. In patients with excessive or good left ventricular function, the color of the endocardial surface was light brown mixed with white. The trabeculae were significantly thick and contracted vigorously. In patients with reduced left ventricular function, the color was whiter, and the thickness and contraction of the trabeculae were reduced obviously. Myocardial biopsy revealed that interstitial fibrosis was prominent in the latters. These results indicate that (1) cardioscopy is safe and useful for evaluation of the internal surface of the ventricle in patients with HCM, and (2) cardioscopic characteristics of the ventricle are closely related to histopathological features.

  6. Preserved cardiac autonomic dynamics during sleep in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Proserpio, Paola; Sambusida, Katrina; Lanza, Andrea; Redaelli, Tiziana; Frigerio, Pamela; Fratticci, Lara; Rosa, Silvia; Casali, Karina R.; Somers, Virend K; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) are associated with altered cardiovascular autonomic control. Sleep is characterized by modifications of autonomic control across sleep stages; however, no data are available on the effects of SCI on CAC during sleep. The aim of our study was to assess cariac autonomic modulation during sleep in SCI patients. Overnight polysomnographic recordings were obtained in 27 patients with cervical (Cerv) and thoracic (Thor) SCI and in healthy subjects (Controls). ECG and respiration were extracted from PSG, divided into sleep stages (W, N2, N3 and REM) for assessment of CAC, using symbolic analysis and Corrected Conditional Entropy. SA identifies three main indices, 0V%, index of sympathetic modulation, and 2LV% and 2UV%, markers of vagal modulation. CCE evaluates the complexity of heart period time series. Symbolic analysis revealed a reduction of 0V% in N2 and N3 compared to W and REM and an increase of 2LV% and 2UV% in N2 and N3 compared to W and REM in SCI patients, independent of the level of the lesion, and similar to Controls. Corrected Conditional Entropy was higher in N2 and N3 compared to W and REM in all three groups. In SCI patients, cardiac autonomic control changed across sleep stages, with a reduction of sympathetic and an increase of parasympathetic modulation during NREM compared to W and REM and a parallel increase of complexity during NREM, similar to Controls. Cardiac autonomic dynamics during sleep are maintained in SCI, independent of the level of the lesion. PMID:25953303

  7. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  8. MYBPH acts as modifier of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients.

    PubMed

    Mouton, J M; van der Merwe, L; Goosen, A; Revera, M; Brink, P A; Moolman-Smook, J C; Kinnear, C

    2016-05-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is considered a model disease to study causal molecular factors underlying isolated cardiac hypertrophy. However, HCM manifests with various clinical symptoms, even in families bearing the same genetic defects, suggesting that additional factors contribute to hypertrophy. The gene encoding the cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMYBPC) is one of the most frequently implicated genes in HCM. Recently another myosin binding protein, myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) was shown to function in concert with cMYBPC in regulating cardiomyocyte contraction. Given the similarity in sequence, structure and the critical role MYBPH plays in sarcomere contraction, we proposed that MYBPH may be involved in HCM pathogenesis. Family-based genetic association analysis was employed to investigate the contribution of MYBPH in modifying hypertrophy. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in MYBPH were investigated for hypertrophy modifying effects in 388 individuals (27 families), in which three unique South African HCM-causing founder mutations (p.R403W and pA797T in β-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) and p.R92W in the cardiac troponin T gene (TNNT2)) segregate. We observed a significant association between rs2250509 and hypertrophy traits in the p.A797T MYH7 mutation group. Additionally, haplotype GGTACTT significantly affected hypertrophy within the same mutation group. MYBPH was for the first time assessed as a candidate hypertrophy modifying gene. We identified a novel association between MYBPH and hypertrophy traits in HCM patients carrying the p.A797T MYH7 mutation, suggesting that variation in MYBPH can modulate the severity of hypertrophy in HCM. PMID:26969327

  9. Health literacy in relation to cancer: addressing the silence about and absence of cancer discussion among Aboriginal people, communities and health services.

    PubMed

    Treloar, Carla; Gray, Rebecca; Brener, Loren; Jackson, Clair; Saunders, Veronica; Johnson, Priscilla; Harris, Magdalena; Butow, Phyllis; Newman, Christy

    2013-11-01

    Cancer outcomes for Aboriginal Australians are poorer when compared with cancer outcomes for non-Aboriginal Australians despite overall improvements in cancer outcomes. One concept used to examine inequities in health outcomes between groups is health literacy. Recent research and advocacy have pointed to the importance of increasing health literacy as it relates to cancer among Aboriginal people. This study examined individual, social and cultural aspects of health literacy relevant to cancer among Aboriginal patients, carers and their health workers in New South Wales. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 Aboriginal people who had been diagnosed with cancer, 18 people who were carers of Aboriginal people with cancer and 16 healthcare workers (eight Aboriginal and eight non-Aboriginal health workers). Awareness, knowledge and experience of cancer were largely absent from people's lives and experiences until they were diagnosed, illustrating the need for cancer awareness raising among Aboriginal people, communities and services. Some beliefs about cancer (particularly equating cancer to death) differed from mainstream Western biomedical views of the body and cancer and this served to silence discussion on cancer. As such, these beliefs can be used to inform communication and help illuminate how beliefs can shape responses to cancer. Participants proposed some practical strategies that could work to fill absences in knowledge and build on beliefs about cancer. These results were characterised by a silence about cancer, an absence of discussions of cancer and an acknowledgement of an already full health agenda for Aboriginal communities. To promote health literacy in relation to cancer would require a multi-layered programme of work involving grass-roots community education, workers and Board members of Aboriginal community-controlled health organisations and speciality cancer services, with a particular focus on programmes to bridge community-based primary

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in a Patient With Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Case Report and a Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Paul, Neha; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Balasubramaniyam, Nivas; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kolte, Dhaval; Khera, Sahil; Shah, Amar B; Gass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a phenotypic variant of nonobstructive HCM, in which hypertrophy of the myocardium predominantly involves the left ventricular apex. It is common in Japanese and other Asian populations but is rare in the United States. Apical HCM has a relatively benign prognosis in terms of cardiovascular mortality; however, morbid events such as ventricular aneurysms, apical thrombi, diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation, and myocardial infarction are not uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old white man who presented to our hospital after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The patient had a witnessed collapse while playing basketball in the field. He was found to be pulseless and unresponsive by his coach, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was immediately started. Upon arrival of emergency medical services, an automated external defibrillator advised shock and he was defibrillated thrice. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 15 minutes. He was intubated for airway protection and was brought to the hospital. Therapeutic hypothermia was initiated. He demonstrated good neurological status after active rewarming. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of apical HCM with right ventricular involvement. The patient underwent an implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement for secondary prevention and was subsequently discharged. In conclusion, apical HCM can rarely be associated with adverse cardiovascular events. The diagnosis may be missed on transthoracic 2-dimensional cardiac echocardiogram, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging should be considered to exclude apical HCM in young patients who present after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:25923227

  11. Safety of cardiac catheterization at a center specializing in the care of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important for the management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It is used for diagnosis, assessment, and monitoring of PAH patients, as well as to perform interventions such as balloon atrial septostomy and coil embolization of collateral vessels. Although reports on the risks of catheterization in PAH patients are scarce, many centers hesitate to perform these procedures in such fragile patients. We performed a retrospective chart review of all cardiac catheterizations performed in PAH patients over 10 years at our pulmonary hypertension center. Demographic, hemodynamic, and outcome data were collected. Complication rates were determined, and multivariate proportional hazards modeling was performed to identify predictors of catheterization-related complications. There were 1,637 catheterizations performed in 607 patients over 10 years. Pediatric patients accounted for 50% of these cases, 48% were performed in patients with idiopathic PAH, and 49% were performed under general anesthesia. While the overall complication rate was 5.7%, the rate of major complications was only 1.2% (). Although there were 8 deaths during the admission following catheterization, only 4 of these were related to the procedure, yielding a catheterization-related mortality of 0.2%. In conclusion, when performed at a pulmonary hypertension center with expertise in the care of PAH patients, cardiac catheterization is associated with low complication rates and mortality, and it should remain an important tool in the management of these patients. PMID:25006398

  12. Aboriginal Gambling and Problem Gambling: A Review.

    PubMed

    Breen, Helen; Gainsbury, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of gambling-related problems amongst Aboriginal communities has been neglected by most public health strategies which concentrate on mainstream populations. Research indicates that rates of problem gambling are higher for Aboriginal groups than the general population. Specific cultural, familial, and social patterns influence gambling by Aboriginal groups, which are individually different, making it difficult to implement a cohesive strategy to address gambling-related harms. Because of this complexity, a thorough literature review is necessary to identify gaps in policy and research. This paper uses a public health framework to consider multi-dimensional influences (personal, environmental, economic, cultural and social) that affect gambling uptake. Such analysis is also important for identifying risk factors which facilitate the development and maintenance of problem gambling and potentially for underpinning protection, prevention and treatment programs. It is advised that strategies be developed in consultation with Aboriginal peoples to guide public health policy and research to minimise any gambling-related harms. PMID:24707239

  13. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  14. Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrollment and the Impact of Systematic Nursing Interventions for Postmyocardial Infarction and Stent Patients.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joan A Cebrick

    2016-08-01

    A randomized experimental design was used to determine the most effective intervention for enhancing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) enrollment for postmyocardial infarction and stent patients. The 104 subjects (70 males and 34 females; 23-87 years old) were patients with a discharge diagnosis of a myocardial infarction followed by a percutaneous coronary intervention, which included a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and the placement of one or more coronary stents. Regardless of the intervention, patients who received face-to-face nursing interventions were more likely to enroll in CR than were patients who had indirect interventions, χ(2)(3) = 32.84, p < .001. Patients who experienced an entrance interview were most likely to enroll, χ(2)(1) = 86.80, p < .001. Direct logistic regression determined that the full model was statistically significant for all predictors, χ(2)(5), 105.56, p < .001, with the strongest predictor, the entrance interview, having an odds ratio of 1.73. PMID:26655562

  15. Inadequate Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients Referred for Cardiac Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Akinseye, Oluwaseun A; Kerwin, Todd C

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the degree of blood pressure (BP) control and incidence of myocardial ischemia in hypertensive patients (n=2039) referred for cardiac stress test. Patients were categorized into well-controlled (<140/90 mm Hg), poorly controlled (140-160/90-100 mm Hg), and very poorly controlled (>160/100 mm Hg) groups according to their resting BP. The mean age[±standard error of the mean] of the patients was 68±13 years, and 885 (43.4%) were men. The prevalence of well-controlled hypertension (HTN) was 47.2%, poorly controlled HTN was 29.5%, and very poorly controlled HTN was 23.3%. Evidence of ischemia was seen in 19.8% and 19.3% of the well-controlled and poorly controlled groups, respectively. The very poorly controlled group had the lowest incidence of ischemia (14.3%) (P<.05) compared with the other two groups. Symptoms that mimic ischemic heart disease in hypertensive patients may be partly explained by poorly controlled BP. Quality of care might be improved by optimally controlling BP in patients with angina symptoms prior to ordering diagnostic testing associated with radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26011137

  16. Radiation exposure of pediatric patients and physicians during cardiac catheterization and balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.R.; Huang, T.Y.; Wu, D.K.; Hsu, P.C.; Weng, P.S. )

    1991-07-15

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were applied to various areas of 61 pediatric patients and physicians to measure radiation doses during routine cardiac catheterization and during 4 cases of balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty. Radiation doses were measured during chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy and cineangiography. Average skin dose to the chest was 121 microGy during chest x-ray, 5,182 microGy during catheterization and 641 mGy during valvuloplasty. For the eyes, thyroid and gonads of the patients, the exposure during routine catheterization was equal to 0.4, 6 and 0.2 chest x-rays, respectively. Radiation dose of the operator was 3 microGy for the eyes and 6 miCroGy in the thyroid. About 56% of the operator's dose could be reduced by thyroid shields, and 80% by lead aprons. The assistant received only 1 microGy outside the thyroid shield. Therefore, the authors have concluded that the patients dose during routine catheterization is largely based on our experimental results, but the dose is acceptable based on the risk factor analysis. The skin dose to the right lateral chest of the patient during valvuloplasty is extremely high, perhaps as high as the equivalent of 1,000 chest x-rays. Besides the clinical benefits of valvuloplasty, the long-term radiation-related hazards to the patient should be carefully monitored.

  17. Troponin T in Patients with Traumatic Chest Injuries with and without Cardiac Involvement: Insights from an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; El-Menyar, Ayman; Dabdoob, Wafer; Abdulrahman, Yassir; Siddiqui, Tarriq; Atique, Sajid; Arumugam, Suresh Kumar; Latifi, Rifat; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serum troponin T (TnT) is a common marker of myocardial injury. However, its implication in the absence of clinical evidence of cardiac reason is not well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the implications of positive TnT in traumatic chest injury (TCI) patients regardless of the cardiac involvement. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all TCI patients admitted to level 1 trauma center between 2008 and 2011. Patients who underwent TnT testing were divided into two groups: Group 1 (positive TnT) and Group 2 (negative TnT). The two groups were analyzed and compared, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of TnT positivity and mortality. Results: Out of 993 blunt TCI patients, 19.3% had positive TnT (Group 1). On comparison to Group 2, patients in Group 1 were 5 years younger and more likely to have head, cardiac, hepatic, splenic, and pelvic injuries, in addition to lung contusion. Positive TnT was associated with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (P = 0.001), higher chest Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) (P = 0.001), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.03). In addition, Group 1 patients were more likely to undergo chest tube insertion, exploratory laparotomy, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy. Twenty patients had cardiac involvement, and of them 14 had positive TnT. Among 973 patients who showed no evidence of cardiac involvement, 178 had positive TnT (18.3%). There were 104 deaths (60% in Group 1). On multivariate regression analysis, the predictors of hospital mortality were positive TnT, head injury, and high ISS, whereas, the predictors of TnT positivity were cardiac, hepatic, and pelvic injuries; higher ISS; and age. Conclusions: Positive TnT in blunt TCI patients is a common challenge, particularly in polytrauma cases. Patients with positive TnT tend to have the worst outcome even in the absence of clinical evidence of acute cardiac involvement. Positive TnT is

  18. Control of breathing during acute change in cardiac preload in a patient with partial cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Bekteshi, Edgar; Bell, Harold J; Haouzi, Annick; El-Banayosy, Aly; Haouzi, Philippe

    2010-01-31

    We recently had the opportunity to investigate the ventilatory effects of changing the rate of venous return to the heart (and thus pulmonary gas exchange) in a patient equipped with a venous-arterial oxygenated shunt (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support). The presence of the ECMO support provided a condition wherein venous return to the right heart could be increased or decreased while maintaining total aortic blood flow and arterial blood pressure (ABP) constant. The patient, who had received a heart transplant 12 years ago, was admitted for acute cardiac failure related to graft rejection. The clinical symptomatology was that of right heart failure. We studied the patient on the 4th day of ECMO support, while she was breathing spontaneously. The blood flow diverted through the ECMO system represented 2/3 of the total aortic flow (4 l min(-1)). With these ECMO settings, the baseline level of ventilation was low (3.89+/-0.99 l min(-1)), but PET(CO2) was not elevated (37+/-2 mmHg). When Pa(CO2) in the blood coming from the ECMO was increased, no stimulatory effect on ventilation was observed. However, when the diversion of the venous return to the ECMO was stopped then restored, minute ventilation respectively increased then decreased by more than twofold with opposite changes in PET(CO2). These maneuvers were associated with large changes in the size of the right atrium and ventricle and of the left atrium. This observation suggests that the change in venous return affects breathing by encoding some of the consequences of the changes in cardiac preload. The possible sites of mediation are discussed. PMID:19837189

  19. Changes of cardiac structure and function in pediatric patients with high altitude pulmonary hypertension in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Ma, Ru-yan; Bao, Hai-hua; Zhao, Xi-peng; Qi, Hai-ning

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the structural and functional cardiac changes in pediatric high altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler echocardiography (Echo). Ten patients with infantile HAPH (aged 12 to 24 months) and eight healthy age-matched children (control group) underwent MRI and Echo studies. All participants were born and living in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (3600 to 4600 m). The studies were performed at the Children's Hospital located in Xining, Qinghai (2260 m). The right and left ventricular end-systolic (RVEST and LVEST, respectively) and end-diastolic (RVEDT and LVEDT, respectively) wall thicknesses were calculated directly from the MRI scans. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured using Echo. RVEST was significantly higher in the HAPH group than in the control group (6.8 +/- 0.6 and 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm, respectively; p < 0.001). RVEDT was significantly higher in the HAPH patients when compared with the control group (4.9 +/- 1.1 and 2.1 +/- 0.3 mm, respectively; p < 0.05). Mean PAP in the HAPH group was significantly higher than in the control group (66.8 +/- 6.7 and 33.8 +/- 3.6 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.001) and was positively correlated with RVEDT (r(2) = 0.562, p < 0.001). Right ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower in the HAPH group when compared with the control group (29.8 +/- 11.8 and 55.5 +/- 9.9%, respectively; p < 0.001); however, left ventricular ejection fraction was similar in both groups. These results indicate that hypoxia-induced infantile HAPH leads to right ventricular hypertrophy in these patients. These structural cardiac changes may lead to right ventricular dysfunction and right heart failure; however, left ventricular function is preserved. PMID:19775214

  20. Explaining the clinical manifestations of T wave alternans in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying sudden cardiac death (SCD) are complex and diverse. Therefore, correct application of any marker to risk stratify patients for appropriate therapy requires knowledge regarding how the marker is reflective of a particular electro-anatomical substrate for arrhythmias. Non-invasive measurement of beat-to-beat alternation of the electrocardiographic T-wave, referred to as T-wave alternans (TWA), is an important marker of risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Is this relationship a mere association or is TWA mechanistically linked to SCD? Recent experimental evidence strongly supports a mechanistic relationship between TWA and SCD. This review will consider the underlying mechanisms of TWA derived from experimental studies, as they relate to clinical observations of TWA in humans, addressing the following questions derived from common clinical observations: 1) Where does TWA on the surface ECG come from? 2) Why is controlled heart rate elevation required to elicit TWA? 3) Why is TWA associated with risk for SCD? 4) Why is TWA associated with a broad range of ventricular arrhythmias? and 5) How do commonly used medications affect TWA? PMID:19168395

  1. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos têm demonstrado a acurácia diagnóstica e o valor prognóstico da ecocardiografia com estresse f

  2. Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of blood mononuclear cells link with cardiac disturbance in patients with early-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Wang, Bin; Sun, Fang; Li, Yingsha; Li, Qiang; Lang, Hongmei; Zhao, Zhigang; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Yu; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiometabolic risk factors and asymptomatic cardiac hypertrophy are hallmarks of early-stage heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) may be associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in early-stage HF patients complicated with cardiometabolic risk factors. Totally 49 subjects were enrolled with 25 early-stage HF patients (stages A and B) having cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and 24 healthy controls. It showed that excessive inflammation and reduced antioxidant capacity were closely associated with cardiac abnormalities in early-stage HF patients. Furthermore, the values of mitochondrial respiratory functional parameters R, CIOXPHOS, CIIOXPHOS, CI+IIOXPHOS, CI+IIETS and CIIETS were significantly lowered in early-stage HF patients. Interestingly, these respiratory parameters were correlated with inflammation and antioxidant capacity in participants. Finally, cardiometabolic risk factors such as salt intake and blood pressure were related to the mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions, which were further validated by in vitro experiments. Our study indicated that cardiometabolic risk factor-mediated mitochondrial respiratory dysfunctions of PBMCs link with the cellular inflammation / oxidative stress and cardiac disturbance in early-stage HF. PMID:26018291

  3. [New approaches to primary differentiation of dyspnea in patients with pulmonary and cardiac pathology].

    PubMed

    Martynenko, T I; Paraeva, O S; Dronov, S V; Shoikhet, Ia N

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at searching new instruments for primary differentiation of dyspnea associated with lung or heart pathology. The study consisted of 3 stages and included analysis of "glossary dyspnea" of 482 patients aged 18-90yr. Stages i and II involved 359 patients with the known diagnosis: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n=114, 31.8%), bronchial asthma (BA) (n=134, 3 7.3%), chronic heart failure (CHF) unrelated to lung pathology (n=111, 30.9%). The patients were 205 (57.1%) men and 154 (42.9%) women. Stage III involved 123 patients complaining ofdyspneapresumably ofpulmnonary or cardiac origin. 75 (61.0%) of these patients were men, 48 (39.0%) women aged 18-89 yr. Subsequent comprehensive diagnostics revealed BA in 47 (38.2%), COPD in 46 (37.4%), CHF in 30 (24.4%) patents. Stage I was designed to evaluate the dyspnea language based on the frequency of the phases of glossary dyspnea (Simon et al., 1999) and Fisher's Z criterion. It permitted to create the modified glossary dyspnea (MGD) consisting of 11i phrases and 7 clusters that revealed statistically significant differences between patients with BA, COPD, and CHE At stage II, we developed the model for estimating the probability of a priori diagnosis (PPD) as a possible cause of dyspnea based on the data of MGD and modified Bayesian classificator. At stage III, the PPD model was verified using blindly selected patients. Prior to verification, the patients filled MGD. The final diagnosis was specified in accordance with the national recommendations. on diagnostics of BA, COPD and CHE Comparison of the frequency of coincidence between preliminary (a priori) and definitive (a posteriori) diagnoses made it possible to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of the PPD model for BA, COPD, and CHF unrelated to lung pathology. PMID:25790711

  4. Predictors of Post Pericardiotomy Low Cardiac Output Syndrome in Patients With Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pathological involvement of pericardium by any disease that resulting in effusion may require decompression and pericardiectomy. The current article describes rare patients with effusion who after pericadiectomy and transient hemodynamic improvement rapidly developed progressive heart failure and subsequent multi organ failure. Methods: During periods of five years, 423 patients in our hospital underwent pericardiotomy for decompression of effusion. The clinical characteristics of those patient with postoperative low cardiac output (B group) (14 cases) recorded and compared with other patients without this postoperative complication (A group) by test and X2. Significant variables in invariables (P≤0.1) entered in logistic regression analysis and odd ratio of these significant variables obtained. Results: Idiopathic pericardial effusion, malignancy, renal failure, connective tissue disease, viral pericarditis was found in 125 patients (27%), 105 patients (25.4%), 65 patients (15.6%), 50 (17.1%) and 10 (2.4%) of patients subsequently. The factors that predict post-operative death in logistic regression analysis were malignancy, radiotherapy, constrictive pericarditis inotropic drug using IABP using, pre-operative EF and pericardial calcification. Conclusion: Certain preoperative variables such as malignancy, radiotherapy, low EF, calcified pericardium and connective tissue disease are associated with POLCOS and post-operative risk of death. This paradoxical response to pericardial decompression may be more frequent than currently appreciated. Its cause may relate to the sudden removal of the chronic external ventricular support from the effusion or thicken pericardium resulting in ventricular dilatation and failure or intra operative myocardial injury due to pericardiectomy of calcified pericardium, radiation and cardiomyopathy. PMID:25859311

  5. Overhydration Is a Strong Predictor of Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients – Independently of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jotterand Drepper, Valérie; Kihm, Lars P.; Kälble, Florian; Diekmann, Christian; Seckinger, Joerg; Sommerer, Claudia; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    Background Overhydration is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis patients and has been shown to be associated with mortality. However, it still remains unclear whether overhydration per se is predictive of mortality or whether it is mainly a reflection of underlying comorbidities. The purpose of our study was to assess overhydration in peritoneal dialysis patients using bioimpedance spectroscopy and to investigate whether overhydration is an independent predictor of mortality. Methods We analyzed and followed 54 peritoneal dialysis patients between June 2008 and December 2014. All patients underwent bioimpedance spectroscopy measurement once and were allocated to normohydrated and overhydrated groups. Overhydration was defined as an absolute overhydration/extracellular volume ratio > 15%. Simultaneously, clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory data were assessed. Heart failure was defined either on echocardiography, as a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, or clinically according to the New York Heart Association functional classification. Patient survival was documented up until December 31st 2014. Factors associated with mortality were identified and a multivariable Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results Apart from higher daily peritoneal ultrafiltration rate and cumulative diuretic dose in overhydrated patients, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups, in particular with respect to gender, body mass index, comorbidity and cardiac medication. Mortality was higher in overhydrated than in euvolemic patients. In the univariate analysis, increased age, overhydration, low diastolic blood pressure, raised troponin and NTproBNP, hypoalbuminemia, heart failure but not CRP were predictive of mortality. After adjustment, only overhydration, increased age and low diastolic blood pressure remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Overhydration remains an

  6. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  7. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  8. Does the EDI Equivalently Measure Facets of School Readiness for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhajarine, Nazeem; Puchala, Chassidy; Janus, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current paper was to examine the equivalence of the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a teacher rating measure of school readiness, for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. The current study used an approach, which analyzes the structure and properties of the EDI at the subdomain level. Similar subdomain score distributions…

  9. How Aboriginal Peer Interactions in Upper Primary School Sport Support Aboriginal Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kickett-Tucker, Cheryl S.

    2008-01-01

    This ethnographic study tested the hypothesis that positive social interactions in sport will contribute positively to the Aboriginal identity of urban, Australian Aboriginal children. Nine male and female children aged 11-12 years were observed and interviewed. Significant responses were extracted and meanings were identified and grouped into…

  10. Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

  11. Miscommunication Between Aboriginal Students and Their Non-Aboriginal Teachers in a Bilingual School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowell, Anne; Devlin, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that while various models of bilingual education have been implemented in Aboriginal communities in Australia's Northern Territory, the degree to which these programs operate successfully is quite another matter. One example from a particular program outlines the ongoing miscommunication that occurs between Aboriginal students and their…

  12. Non-Cardiac Symptoms of Moderate to Severe Hypokalemia in a Patient with a Syncardia™ Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Amit; Ghodsizad, Ali; Pae, Walter; Singbartl, Kai; Boone, Jacqueline; Zeriouh, M; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Loebe, M; Khorrami, G Sadat Hoesseini; Koerner, Michael M; Brehm, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The Syncardia™ total artificial heart (TAH) is an option for patients as a bridge to transplant in those who are not candidates for left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) due to right ventricular failure. Po