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Sample records for aboriginal cardiac patients

  1. Factors influencing health care utilisation among Aboriginal cardiac patients in central Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians suffer from poorer overall health compared to the general Australian population, particularly in terms of cardiovascular disease and prognosis following a cardiac event. Despite such disparities, Aboriginal Australians utilise health care services at much lower rates than the general population. Improving health care utilisation (HCU) among Aboriginal cardiac patients requires a better understanding of the factors that constrain or facilitate use. The study aimed to identify ecological factors influencing health care utilisation (HCU) for Aboriginal cardiac patients, from the time of their cardiac event to 6–12 months post-event, in central Australia. Methods This qualitative descriptive study was guided by an ecological framework. A culturally-sensitive illness narrative focusing on Aboriginal cardiac patients’ “typical” journey guided focus groups and semi-structured interviews with Aboriginal cardiac patients, non-cardiac community members, health care providers and community researchers. Analysis utilised a thematic conceptual matrix and mixed coding method. Themes were categorised into Predisposing, Enabling, Need and Reinforcing factors and identified at Individual, Interpersonal, Primary Care and Hospital System levels. Results Compelling barriers to HCU identified at the Primary Care and Hospital System levels included communication, organisation and racism. Individual level factors related to HCU included language, knowledge of illness, perceived need and past experiences. Given these individual and health system barriers patients were reliant on utilising alternate family-level supports at the Interpersonal level to enable their journey. Conclusion Aboriginal cardiac patients face significant barriers to HCU, resulting in sub-optimal quality of care, placing them at risk for subsequent cardiovascular events and negative health outcomes. To facilitate HCU amongst Aboriginal people, strategies must be implemented

  2. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians’ perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers’ (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs’ views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). Methods A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006 - September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. Results CSPs’ lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients’ limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient–provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people’s distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff

  3. Characteristics and outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Trout, M I; Henson, G; Senthuran, S

    2015-03-01

    A retrospective cohort analysis of an admission database for the intensive care unit at The Townsville Hospital was undertaken to describe the characteristics and short-term outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. The Townsville Hospital is the tertiary referral centre for Northern Queensland and services a region in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people constitute 9.6% of the population. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients were significantly younger and had higher rates of invasive mechanical ventilation, emergency admissions and transfers from another hospital. Despite these factors, intensive care mortality did not differ between groups (9.4% versus 7.7%, P=0.1). Higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III-j scores were noted in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population requiring emergency admission (65 versus 60, P=0.022) but were lower for elective admission (38 versus 42, P <0.001). Despite higher predicted hospital mortality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring emergency admission, no significant difference was observed (20.1% versus 19.1%, P=0.656). In a severity adjusted model, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status did not statistically significantly alter the risk of death (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 1.2, P=0.398). Though Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring intensive care differed in admission characteristics, mortality was comparable to other critically ill patients.

  4. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  5. Experience of providing cultural safety in mental health to Aboriginal patients: A grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    McGough, Shirley; Wynaden, Dianne; Wright, Michael

    2017-02-06

    The need for mental health clinicians to practice cultural safety is vital in ensuring meaningful care and in moving towards improving the mental health outcomes for Aboriginal people. The concept of cultural safety is particularly relevant to mental health professionals as it seeks to promote cultural integrity and the promotion of social justice, equity and respect. A substantive theory that explained the experience of providing cultural safety in mental health care to Aboriginal patients was developed using grounded theory methodology. Mental health professionals engaged in a social psychological process, called seeking solutions by navigating the labyrinth to overcome the experience of being unprepared. During this process participants moved from a state of being unprepared to one where they began to navigate the pathway of cultural safety. The findings of this research suggest health professionals have a limited understanding of the concept of cultural safety. The experience of providing cultural safety has not been adequately addressed by organizations, health services, governments, educational providers and policy makers. Health services, organizations and government agencies must work with Aboriginal people to progress strategies that inform and empower staff to practice cultural safety.

  6. The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

    PubMed

    Blackadar, Robyn; Houle, Mishaela

    2009-01-01

    The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.

  7. ECLS in Pediatric Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Matteo; MacLaren, Graeme; Marano, Marco; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bernaschi, Paola; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an important device in the management of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Actually, two forms of ECLS are available for neonates and children: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and use of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Both these techniques have their own advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is another ECLS device that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has found limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we will present the “state of art” of ECMO in neonate and children with heart failure. ECMO is commonly used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically ill patients with cardiac disease. However, a strict selection of patients and timing of intervention should be performed to avoid the increase in mortality and morbidity of these patients. Therefore, every attempt should be done to start ECLS “urgently” rather than “emergently,” before the presence of dysfunction of end organs or circulatory collapse. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of VADs for long-term mechanical support in children, ECMO remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation. With the increase in familiarity with ECMO, new indications have been added, such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The literature supporting ECPR is increasing in children. Reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of support during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS have reduced in the last 5 years and many centers support patients with functionally univentricular circulations. Improved results have been recently achieved in this complex subset of patients. PMID

  8. Aboriginal Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Sherry

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project for high school students in which they create Aboriginal-style paintings using cotton swabs. Discusses the process of creating the works of art in detail. Includes learning objectives, art materials, and a bibliography. (CMK)

  9. Cultural self-efficacy of Canadian nursing students caring for aboriginal patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Quine, Allisson; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Alberts, Nicole M

    2012-07-01

    Cultural self-efficacy refers to how capable one feels functioning in culturally diverse situations. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students, specifically in relation to individuals of Aboriginal ancestry. The authors examined the extent to which intercultural anxiety, intercultural communication, and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry predicted two aspects of cultural self-efficacy, namely, knowledge and skills. In this correlational study, non-Aboriginal Canadian nursing students (N = 59) completed a survey assessing these variables. Overall, cultural self-efficacy was rated as moderate by nursing students. Regression analyses indicated that greater intercultural communication skills and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry were significant unique predictors of higher cultural knowledge self-efficacy. Greater intercultural communication and lower intercultural anxiety significantly predicted higher cultural skills self-efficacy. The results provide direction to nursing programs interested in facilitating higher levels of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students.

  10. Enhanced sympathetic cardiac modulation in bruxism patients.

    PubMed

    Marthol, Harald; Reich, Sven; Jacke, Julia; Lechner, Karl-Heinz; Wichmann, Manfred; Hilz, Max Josef

    2006-08-01

    Sleep bruxism, an oral parafunction including teeth clenching and grinding, might be related to increased stress. To evaluate sympathetic cardiac activity in bruxism patients, we monitored cardiac autonomic modulation using spectral analysis of heart rate variability and compared results to those of age-matched healthy volunteers. In bruxism patients, sympathetic cardiac activity was higher than in volunteers. The increased sympathetic tone suggests increased stress and might be related to occlusal disharmonies.

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the blood plasma properties of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Anna; Czepas, Jan; Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise tolerance and general function. However, its effects on blood plasma in cardiac patients remain uncertain. Our aim was to examine the effect of comprehensive CR on the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant plasma status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after cardiac interventions. Exercise-based rehabilitation was established as ergometer training, adjusted for individual patients' physical efficiency. Training was repeated three times a week for two months. The standard biochemical (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and metabolic parameters (peak oxygen uptake [VO2] and peak workload) were determined. We assessed plasma viscosity, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl compounds levels, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) levels and the non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma in 12 patients with CAD before and after CR. Parameters were examined before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h later. We also compared morphological and biochemical parameters of blood, as well as other parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure (resting and exercise), VO2max and peak workload (W) before and after CR. Before CR, a significant decrease in GSH concentration was observed 1 h after exercise. Conversely, after CR, GSH, and ASC levels remained unchanged immediately after exercise. However, ASC increased after CR after exercise and 1 h later in comparison to before CR. There was a significant increase in ferric reduction ability of plasma immediately after exercise after CR, when compared with before CR. CR improved several blood biochemical parameters, peak VO2, induced an increase in systolic blood pressure peak, and patients' peak workload. After CR, improvements were detected in oxidative stress parameters, except in the level of carbonyls. These changes may contribute to the increased functional heart capacity and better tolerance to exercise and

  12. Depression and its treatment in cardiac patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, F

    1993-01-01

    In general medical-surgical hospital services, depression is the most common reason for seeking psychiatric consultation in behalf of patients with cardiovascular disease. The nontreatment of depression or the use of a psychotropic agent mismatched to a patient's particular cardiac condition or individual sensitivities has considerable negative impact. Therefore, a systematic approach should be used in the differential diagnosis of depression in cardiac patients, to eliminate other psychiatric disorders and to assure the correct treatment strategy. Physicians can develop an appropriate rationale for the use of a psychopharmacologic regimen in cardiovascular settings through recognition of the diagnostic criteria for depression and through comprehensive knowledge of the pharmacologic properties and possible cardiovascular effects of these vital treatments. Standard and alternative pharmacotherapies for depression in cardiac patients are reviewed. PMID:8219822

  13. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  14. Cardiac output response to exercise in chronic cardiac failure patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kurano, Miwa; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Morita, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise pattern of stroke volume (SV) response during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) compared with age-matched controls. Fourteen patients with CHF and 7 controls performed symptom-limited bicycle exercise testing with respiratory gas exchange measurement. Patients were classified into group A (n = 7) with peak VO2 ≥ 18.0 mL/kg/minute and group B (n = 7) with peak VO2 < 18.0 mL/kg/ minute. SV and cardiac output (CO) were continuously measured during exercise using a novel thoracic impedance method (Physioflow). CO and SV were lower in the group B patients than those in controls at peak exercise [CO: 11.3 ± 1.0 (SE) versus 15.6 ± 0.9 L/minute, P < 0.05, SV: 89 ± 6 versus 110 ± 6 mL, P < 0.05]. SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise and remained close to the peak value until peak exercise in 6 of 7 group B patients (86%). On the other hand, it progressively increased until peak exercise in 6 of 7 controls (86%) and 5 of 7 group A patients (71%). In all subjects, CO at peak exercise was more closely correlated with SV at peak exercise (r = 0.86, P < 0.001) than with peak heart rate (r = 0.69, P < 0.001). CHF patients with impaired exercise capacity had attenuated increment of CO during exercise, and SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise.

  15. Perioperative care in elderly cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiecak, Katarzyna; Urbańska, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz; Kaliś, Robert; Pakosiewicz, Waldemar; Kołodziej, Tadeusz; Knapik, Piotr; Przybylski, Roman; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgery is an extreme physiological stress for the elderly. Aging is inevitably associated with irreversible and progressive cellular degeneration. Patients above 75 years of age are characterized by impaired responses to operative stress and a very narrow safety margin. Aim To evaluate perioperative complications in patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent cardiac surgery in comparison to outcomes in younger patients. Material and methods The study was conducted at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases in Zabrze in 2009–2014 after a standard of perioperative care in seniors was implemented to reduce complications, in particular to decrease the duration of mechanical ventilation and reduce postoperative delirium. The study group included 1446 patients. Results The mean duration of mechanical ventilation was 13.8 h in patients aged ≥ 75 years and did not differ significantly compared to younger patients. In-hospital mortality among seniors was 3.8%, a value significantly higher than that observed among patients younger than 75 years of age. Patients aged ≥ 75 years undergoing cardiac surgery have significantly more concomitant conditions involving other organs, which affects treatment outcomes (duration of hospital stay, mortality). Conclusions The implementation of a standard of perioperative care in this age group reduced the duration of mechanical ventilation and lowered the rate of postoperative delirium. PMID:28096832

  16. A review of telerehabilitation for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Ines; Vanhees, Luc; Dendale, Paul; Goetschalckx, Kaatje

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of telerehabilitation interventions on cardiac patients. We searched for studies evaluating some form of telerehabilitation in cardiac patients. A total of 116 publications were screened initially, of which 37 publications were eligible for further review. We assessed study strength, based on the level of evidence and the quality of the intervention. The majority of the articles (70%) represented the highest level of evidence. Most interventions were of good (46%) or fair (51%) quality. Most studies evaluated the efficacy of the telerehabilitation interventions (84%), while 38% reported on feasibility and acceptance. Most studies did not include safety and/or cost-benefit analyses. Most telerehabilitation interventions (90%) employed only one or two core components of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Of the CR core components, physical activity was most frequently evaluated. Telerehabilitation appears to be a feasible and effective additional and/or alternative form of rehabilitation, compared to conventional in-hospital CR. Evaluations of telerehabilitation programmes taking into account patient safety and health economics are now required.

  17. The Prognostic Value of Using Ultrasonography in Cardiac Resuscitation of Patients with Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bolvardi, Ehsan; Pouryaghobi, Seyyed Mohsen; Farzane, Roohye; Chokan, Niaz Mohamad Jafari; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Reihani, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest is the final result of many diseases and therefore, need for a careful implementation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) protocols in these cases is undeniably important. The introduction of ultrasound into the emergency department has potentially allowed the addition of an extra data point in the decision about when to cease cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of cardiac ultrasonography performed by emergency physicians to predict resuscitation outcome in adult cardiac arrest patients. Ultrasonographic examination of the subxiphoid cardiac area was made immediately after admission to the emergency department with pulseless cardiac arrest. Sonographic cardiac activity was defined as any detectable motion within the heart including the atria, ventricles or valves. Successful resuscitation was defined as: return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min; return of breathing; palpable pulse; measurable blood pressure. The present study includes 159 patients. The presence of sonographic cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation was significantly associated with a successful outcome (41/49 [83.7%] versus 15/110 [13.6%] patients without cardiac activity at the beginning of resuscitation). Ultrasonographic detection of cardiac activity may be useful in determining prognosis during cardiac arrest. Further studies are needed to elucidate the predictive value of ultrasonography in cardiac arrest patients. PMID:27829827

  18. Cardiac surgery for a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Mitsugi; Higaki, Takashi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Yokoyama, Yuichiro

    2010-07-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome is an uncommon inherited autosomal disorder characterized by a prolonged QT interval, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. The deleterious effects of cardioplegia on periodic paralysis and cardiac arrhythmia are unknown, and no studies have reported the performance of cardiac surgery in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome. We present a case of successful cardiac surgery in a patient with Andersen-Tawil syndrome, without using cardioplegia.

  19. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  1. Aboriginal English. PEN 93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eades, Diana

    This report focuses on the teaching of English to Aboriginal children in primary schools in Australia. A definition and analysis of dialectal differences between Aboriginal (Australian) English and Standard (Australian) English is offered that includes the phonological, morpho-syntactic, lexico-semantic, and pragmatic differences of the Aboriginal…

  2. Aboriginal Education Program, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Teachers' Federation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginning of time, Aboriginal people have had a high regard for education. Euro-Canadian contact with Aboriginal peoples has and continues to have devastating effects. The encroachment on their traditional territory has affected the lands and resources forever. Generations of experience within the residential school system have greatly…

  3. Transformation and Aboriginal Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamlin, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Literacy is discussed in the broadest sense. From an Aboriginal perspective, literacy is about sustaining a world view and culture, resymbolizing and reinterpreting past experience while honoring traditional values, living these values, and visioning a future in which an Aboriginal way of being will continue to thrive. Meaningful Aboriginal…

  4. Bullying in an Aboriginal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Juli; Larson, Ann; Cross, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Aboriginal children appear to be more likely to be involved in bullying than non-Aboriginal children. This paper describes part of the "Solid Kids Solid Schools" research process and discusses some of the results from this three year study involving over 260 Aboriginal children, youth, elders, teachers and Aboriginal Indigenous Education…

  5. Cardiac complications in pediatric patients on the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Best, T H; Franz, D N; Gilbert, D L; Nelson, D P; Epstein, M R

    2000-06-27

    Cardiac complications of the ketogenic diet, in the absence of selenium deficiency, have not been reported. Twenty patients on the ketogenic diet at one institution were investigated. Prolonged QT interval (QTc) was found in 3 patients (15%). There was a significant correlation between prolonged QTc and both low serum bicarbonate and high beta-hydroxybutyrate. In addition, three patients had evidence of cardiac chamber enlargement. One patient with severe dilated cardiomyopathy and prolonged QTc normalized when the diet was discontinued.

  6. Cardiac risk stratification for postmyocardial infarction dental patients.

    PubMed

    Roberts, H W; Mitnitsky, E F

    2001-06-01

    Traditional dental management guidelines of myocardial infarction survivors mandate a 6-month waiting period before elective treatment can be considered. Technological advances in cardiac disease diagnosis, management, and revascularization treatment may make this older mandatory 6-month waiting period obsolete. The purposes of this literature review are to provide an overview of the historical development of cardiac risk stratification and discuss current developments and guidelines in cardiac risk assessment. We hope that this review and update will stimulate the development of updated dental guidelines for treating the cardiac patient.

  7. Perioperative management of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Poveda-Jaramillo, R; Castro-Arias, H D; Vallejo-Zarate, C; Ramos-Hurtado, L F

    2017-05-01

    The use of implantable cardiac devices in people of all ages is increasing, especially in the elderly population: patients with pacemakers, cardioverter-defibrillators or cardiac resynchronization therapy devices regularly present for surgery for non-cardiac causes. This review was made in order to collect and analyze the latest evidence for the proper management of implantable cardiac devices in the perioperative period. Through a detailed exploration of PubMed, Academic Search Complete (EBSCO), ClinicalKey, Cochrane (Ovid), the search software UpToDate, textbooks and patents freely available to the public on Google, we selected 33 monographs, which matched the objectives of this publication.

  8. Assessment of cardiac parameters in evaluation of cardiac functions in patients with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Delibas, Yavuz; Salcioglu, Zafer; Kaya, Guldemet; Bakari, Suleyman; Bornaun, Helen; Aydogan, Gonul

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac function and early cardiac dysfunction of patients followed as thalassemia major. In this study, the authors compared 100 patients, diagnosed as thalassemia major with mean age 11.84 ± 4.35, with 60 healthy control subjects at the same age between 2008 and 2011. Early diagnosis of iron overload that may occur after repeated transfusions is important in this patient group. To detect early iron accumulation, the authors compared ferritin with the echo findings, the 24-hour Holter, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* values in the patients of same age and sex, treated with chelators, without heart failure, nonsplenectomized, and do not differ in the presence of hepatitis C. Ferritin levels, left ventricular systolic functions (ejection fraction [EF], shortening fraction [SF]), left ventricular measurements, left ventricular diastolic functions, T2* image on cardiac magnetic resonance, heart rate variables in 24 hours, and Holter rhythm were evaluated to show the early failure of cardiac functions. In this study the authors confirmed that iron-related cardiac toxicity damages electrical activity earlier than myocardial contractility. Left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd), left ventricular mass (LVM), and LV systolic diameter (LVDs) levels were significantly higher in the patient group with ectopia. Patients with ectopia are the ones in whom LVM and LVDd are increased. In thalassemia major patients with ectopia, LF/HF ratio was markedly increased, QTc dispersion was clearly found higher in patients with ectopia rather than nonectopic patients. The standard deviation all normal RR interval series (SDNN) was found clearly lower in thalassemia major group with ectopia than control group because it is assumed that increase in cardiac sympathetic neuronal activity is related to exposure to chronic diastolic and systolic failure.

  9. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  10. Weight and patients' decision to undergo cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    King-Shier, Kathryn M; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mather, Charles; Sandham, Sarah; Seneviratne, Cydnee; Maitland, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Obese patients are less likely to have cardiac surgery than normal weight patients. This could be due to physician or patient decision-making. We undertook a qualitative descriptive study to explore the influence of obesity on patients' decision-making to have cardiac surgery. Forty-seven people referred for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were theoretically sampled. Twelve people had declined cardiac surgery. Participants underwent in-depth interviews aimed at exploring their decision-making process. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Though patients' weight did not play a role in their decision, their relationship with their cardiologist/surgeon, the rapidity and orchestration of the diagnosis and treatment, appraisal of risks and benefits, previous experience with other illness or others who had cardiac surgery, and openness to other alternatives had an impact. It is possible that there is a lack of comfort or acknowledgment by all parties in discussing the influence of weight on CABG surgery risks.

  11. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services.

  12. Sacral Neuromodulation in Patients With a Cardiac Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe our experience using sacral neuromodulation to treat urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, and chronic urinary retention in patients with cardiac pacemakers. With the increasingly widespread use of InterStim for bladder function restoration, we are seeing more complex patients with multiple comorbidities, including cardiac conditions. Herein, we report 3 cases of individuals with cardiac pacemakers who underwent InterStim implantation to treat urinary conditions. This study is a case series of 3 patients with cardiac pacemakers who underwent sacral neuromodulation to treat refractory voiding dysfunction. The initial patient screening for InterStim therapy involved percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE), in which a temporary untined lead wire was placed through the S3 foramen. Patients who did not respond to PNE proceeded to a staged implant. All patients in this study had a greater than 50% improvement of their urinary symptoms during the initial trial and underwent placement of the InterStim implantable pulse generator (IPG). Postoperative programming was done under electrocardiogram monitoring by a cardiologist. No interference was observed between the Inter-Stim IPG and the cardiac pacemaker. In this group of patients, sacral neuromodulation in the presence of a cardiac pacemaker appears to have been safe. PMID:27706012

  13. AFRICAN ABORIGINAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Philip A. E.

    1920-01-01

    No other man in America has so complete a knowledge of the aborigines of South Africa as Dr. Sheppard. For twenty-one years he spent his vacations in their kraals. He is a blood-brother in two tribes, and a chief, and sits on his own mat at tribal councils. His picture of their aboriginal therapy is unique. Imagesp228-ap228-bp229-ap229-bp231-ap232-ap232-bp233-ap235-ap235-b PMID:18010265

  14. Echocardiographic approach to cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    McCanny, Peter; Colreavy, Frances

    2016-12-24

    Cardiac tamponade should be considered in a critically ill patient in whom the cause of haemodynamic shock is unclear. When considering tamponade, transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role and is the initial investigation of choice. Diagnostic sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiography is dependent on image quality, and in some cases a transoesophageal approach may be required to confirm the diagnosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and echocardiographic features of cardiac tamponade are essential for the practicing Intensivist. This review presents an approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

  15. Aboriginal nurses' beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2002-11-01

    The potential of risky sexual behaviors and adolescent unplanned pregnancy has become a primary issue in the health care system for aborigines in eastern Taiwan. Using aboriginal nurses to provide information on sexual behaviors may have potential in promoting healthy sexual practices among aborigines. The purposes of this study were to explore Taiwanese aboriginal nurses beliefs. attitudes, and values about sexuality. Several health centers in eastern Taiwan were randomly selected to recruit participants in the year 2000. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 206 female nurses (mean age = 28.4, SD = 7.4) who worked in various clinical units. The results revealed that aboriginal nurses hold moderately positive beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality. The conflict between aboriginal nurses' belief and value systems about sexuality was clear. A conflict between aboriginal nurses' value systems and patients behaviors also existed. Strategies to help aboriginal nurses to be more aware of their beliefs, attitudes, and values about sexuality should be an essential issue in the practice and education of nurses.

  16. Prediction of cardiac risk in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Morise, A.P.; McDowell, D.E.; Savrin, R.A.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabrielle, O.F.; Oliver, F.N.; Nullet, F.R.; Bekheit, S.; Jain, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to determine whether noninvasive cardiac testing could be used to assess cardiac risk in patients undergoing surgery for vascular disease, the authors studied 96 patients. Seventy-seven patients eventually underwent major vascular surgery with 11 (14%) experiencing a significant cardiac complication. Thallium imaging was much more likely to be positive (p less than 0.01) in patients with a cardiac complication; however, there was a significant number of patients with cardiac complications who had a positive history or electrocardiogram for myocardial infarction. When grouped by complication and history of infarction, thallium imaging, if negative, correctly predicted low cardiac risk in the group with a history of infarction. Thallium imaging, however, did not provide a clear separation of risk in those without a history of infarction. Age and coronary angiography, on the other hand, did reveal significant differences within the group without a history of infarction. The resting radionuclide ejection fraction followed a similar pattern to thallium imaging. It is concluded that a positive history of myocardial infarction at any time in the past is the strongest risk predictor in this population and that the predictive value of noninvasive testing is dependent on this factor. Considering these findings, a proposed scheme for assessing risk that will require further validation is presented.

  17. Fluid management in cardiac surgery patients: pitfalls, challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Bignami, Elena; Guarnieri, Marcello; Gemma, Marco

    2017-01-17

    Fluid administration is a powerful tool for hemodynamic stabilization as it increases preload and improves cardiac function in fluid-responsive patients. However, there are various types of fluid to choose from. The use of colloids and crystalloids in non-cardiac Intensive Care Units (ICU) has been reported, showing controversial results. Many trials on sepsis in a non-cardiac ICU setting show that colloids, in particular hydroxyethyl starches and gelatins, might have a detrimental effect on kidney function, and on major outcomes such as mortality. Many small randomized clinical trials focusing on coagulation and bleeding show controversial results regarding fluid safety during the perioperative period in cardiac surgery, and in the cardiac ICU. No definitive data are available on the superiority of one fluid compared with another for fluid replacement after cardiac surgery. Only few data are available regarding the impact of fluids on kidney function in the cardiac ICU. On the other hand, there is much evidence showing that fluid administration requires strict protocols and close monitoring. Improved clinical outcomes are evident in protocols for goal-directed therapy. In conclusion, the application of a close monitoring and a pre-defined goal-directed protocol are far more important than the choice of a single fluid. This review examines the available evidence on fluid management in cardiac surgery and in the ICU, and analyzes the key steps of fluid strategy in these settings.

  18. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the cardiac patient: a case study.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, C; Stone, N L

    1995-02-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard procedure for the surgical management of cholelithiasis. Compared with open cholecystectomy, this procedure offers shorter hospital stays, shorter recovery time, better cosmetic results, and an overall reduction in health care cost for the patient. As the number of cardiac patients having elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy increases, it is important for the postanesthesia nurse to understand the postoperative assessment and nursing interventions these patients require. Congestive heart failure and acute pulmonary edema are two potential complications resulting from insufflation of the abdomen and intraoperative fluids. This case study of a cardiac patient undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy demonstrates important postanesthesia assessment parameters.

  19. Airway Management of the Cardiac Surgical Patients: Current Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arindam; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2017-01-01

    The difficult airway (DA) is a common problem encountered in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the challenge is not only just establishment of airway but also maintaining a definitive airway for the safe conduct of cardiopulmonary bypass from initiation to weaning after surgical correction or palliation, de-airing of cardiac chambers. This review describes the management of the DA in a cardiac theater environment. The primary aims are recognition of DA both anatomical and physiological, necessary preparations for (and management of) difficult intubation and extubation. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery should initially be considered as having potentially DA as many of them have poor physiologic reserve. Making the cardiac surgical theater environment conducive to DA management is as essential as it is to deal with low cardiac output syndrome or acute heart failure. Tube obstruction and/or displacement should be suspected in case of a new onset ventilation problem, especially in the recovery unit. Cardiac anesthesiologists are often challenged with DA while inducing general endotracheal anesthesia. They ought to be familiar with the DA algorithms and possess skill for using the latest airway adjuncts. PMID:28074820

  20. Aboriginal Education: Fulfilling the Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Marlene Brant, Ed.; Davis, Lynne, Ed.; Lahache, Louise, Ed.

    Education is at the heart of the struggle of Canada's Aboriginal peoples to regain control over their lives as communities and nations. Based on hearings and research generated by the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP), this collection of articles documents recent progress in transforming Aboriginal education to support…

  1. [Evaluation of the cardiac risks in non-cardiac surgery in patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M

    2002-02-01

    Cardiac insufficiency represents a major risk factor in patients about to undergo non-cardiac surgery. The post-operative mortality is linked to the severity of the pre-operative functional impairment: rising from 4% in NYHA class 1 to 67% in class IV. The operative risk is greater when the cardiac insufficiency is more disabling, the patient is older (> 70 years) and if there is a history of acute pulmonary oedema and a gallop bruit on auscultation. The use of metabolic equivalents (Duke Activity Status Index) is recommended: the functional capacity is defined as excellent if > 7 MET, moderate between 4 and 7, or poor if < 4. A non-invasive evaluation of left ventricular function is necessary in each patient with obvious congestive cardiac insufficiency or poor control under the American consensus, but it is rare that the patient has not already been seen by a cardiologist. The degree of per-operative haemodynamic constraint is linked to the surgical technique and is stratified according to the type of surgical intervention and whether or not it is performed as an emergency. An intervention duration > 5 hours is associated with an increased peri-operative risk of congestive cardiac insufficiency and non-cardiac death. Deaths from a cardiac cause are thus twice as frequent after intra-abdominal, non-cardiac thoracic or aortic surgery and the post-operative cardiac complications are six times more frequent. Numerous studies have attempted to document the impact of different anaesthetic techniques on the prognosis for the population at increased risk of post-operative cardiovascular complications. It is advisable to opt for peripheral nerve blocks. The cardiovascular morbidity and overall mortality do not differ between general anaesthetic, epidural anaesthetic or spinal nerve block. The ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) classification is widely used to determine the overall risk. The ASA class and the age are however too coarse as methods of evaluation for

  2. Risk factors for cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenqing; Tian, Li; Ke, Jinshan; Sun, Yi; Wu, Ruixia; Zhu, Jianfang; Ke, Qinmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inconsistent results have been reported about the risk stratification of patients with Brugada syndrome. We have summarized the evidence regarding the strength of association between 6 risk factors (family history of sudden cardiac death [SCD] or syncope, inducible ventricular arrhythmias on electrophysiology study [EPS], spontaneous type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram [ECG], male sex, family history of SCD, and sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 [SCN5A] gene mutation) and subsequent cardiac events in Brugada syndrome patients. Methods: Pubmed, Ovid, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published between January 1992 and March 2016. Only prospective studies (27 studies, 4494 patients) that reported estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of cardiac events for the 6 risk factors were included. Results: Family history of SCD or syncope (risk ratio [RR] 4.97, 95% CI 3.96–6.23, P < 0.001), inducible ventricular arrhythmia on EPS (RR 3.56, 95% CI 1.30–9.74, P = 0.01), and spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG (RR 4.07, 95% CI 2.23–7.41, P < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of future cardiac events. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG was associated with an elevated risk of future cardiac events in patients without a family history of SCD. Conclusions: Inducible ventricular arrhythmias on EPS, spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG, and family history of SCD or syncope indicate a high risk of future cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome. Spontaneous type 1 Brugada ECG significantly increased the risk of future cardiac events in patients without family history of SCD. PMID:27472692

  3. Aboriginal pregnancies and births in South Australia, 1981-1982.

    PubMed

    Hart, G; MacHarper, T; Moore, D; Roder, D

    1985-10-28

    Information on 555 Aboriginal births which occurred during 1981 and 1982 was forwarded by midwives to the South Australian perinatal statistics unit. Corresponding information was also supplied for all other births in the state. This information showed that Aboriginal women appear to have a higher fertility rate than do other women, particularly in the teenage years. Aboriginal mothers are very young and have a high parity. They appear to receive little antenatal care and there is a greater tendency for their pregnancies to be complicated by medical conditions, such as anaemia, urinary tract infections, cardiac disorders and diabetes. Post-partum haemorrhages and retained placentas are relatively common, as are genital tract infections after delivery. Aboriginal babies are characterized by low birthweights, low Apgar scores, and prematurity. There is an indication that Aboriginal babies may have a high perinatal mortality rate in the country areas of South Australia. It is intended that this information be used as a baseline for evaluating trends in the health status of Aborigines.

  4. Cardiac iron overload in thalassemic patients: an endomyocardial biopsy study.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, T; Tamburino, C; Bartoloni, G; Morrone, M L; Frontini, V; Italia, F; Cordaro, S; Privitera, A; Calvi, V

    1995-09-01

    Secondary heart failure induced by organ siderosis is the main cause of death in patients affected by thalassemia major. At present it cannot be predicted whether heart siderosis is correlated with iron overload and little is known about the real cardiac histological pattern of post transfusional hemochromatosis in patients with thalassemia major and intermedia. The study aim was to evaluate cardiac iron overload by non invasive and invasive techniques. Fifteen thalassemic patients were investigated and endomyocardial biopsy performed in ten revealed different grades of endomyocardial iron overload with histochemical positivity. Non invasive techniques are not able to furnish an exact picture of the cardiac hemochromatosis. There was a significant correlation between serum ferritin and myocardial iron grade. Patients with elevated ferritin levels and poor compliance to chelating therapy are at high risk of severe heart hemochromatosis. It was seen that endomyocardial biopsy is a useful tool in studying myocardial iron.

  5. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs’ exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period. PMID:28349037

  6. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  7. High prevalence of altered cardiac repolarization in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Altered cardiac repolarization and increased dispersion of repolarization have been identified as risk factors for sudden cardiac death (SCD). The prevalence of and the mechanisms contributing to altered cardiac repolarization are currently unknown in COPD. Methods In 91 COPD patients, 32 controls matched for age, cardiovascular risk and medication, and 41 healthy subjects, measures of cardiac repolarization and dispersion of repolarization (QTc interval, QT dispersion) were derived from 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG). Prevalence rates of heart rate corrected QT (QTc) >450ms and QT dispersion >60ms were determined to assess the number of subjects at risk for SCD. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify possible factors contributing to altered cardiac repolarization. Results QTc was found to be prolonged in 31.9% and QT dispersion in 24.2% of the COPD patients compared to 12.5% in matched controls and 0% in healthy subjects. The QTc interval was longer in COPD patients compared to matched and healthy controls respectively (437.9 ± 29.5 vs. 420.1 ± 25.3 ms, p = 0.001 and vs. 413.4 ± 18.2 ms, p < 0.001). QT dispersion was significantly increased in COPD patients compared to healthy subjects (45.4 (34.8 , 59.5) vs. 39.7 (29.3 , 54.8) ms, p = 0.049). Only oxygen saturation was independently associated with QTc duration in multivariate analysis (β = -0.29, p = 0.015). Conclusion One third of a typical COPD population has altered cardiac repolarization and increased dispersion of repolarization, which may be related to hypoxia. Altered cardiac repolarization may expose these patients to an increased risk for malignant ventricular arrhythmias and SCD. PMID:24690123

  8. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  9. Dialysis: Hypokalaemia and cardiac risk in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun

    2012-09-01

    Dialysis, particularly haemodialysis, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study confirms that hypokalaemia confers an excess cardiovascular risk and contributes disproportionately to the high risk of death in patients on peritoneal dialysis, which may partially account for the fact that observed cardiac risk is similar for patients on peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis.

  10. Management of pregnancy in the post-cardiac transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Marwah; Mancini, Donna M

    2014-08-01

    Over the past 10 years, heart transplantation survival has increased among transplant recipients. Because of improved outcomes in both congenital and adult transplant recipients, the number of male and female patients of childbearing age who desire pregnancy has also increased within this population. While there have been many successful pregnancies in post-cardiac transplant patients reported in the literature, long-term outcome data is limited. Decisions regarding the optimal timing and management of pregnancy in male and female post-cardiac transplant patients are challenging and should be coordinated by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers. Pregnant patients will need to be counseled and monitored carefully for complications including rejection, graft dysfunction, and infection. This review focuses on preconception counseling for both male and female cardiac transplant recipients. The maternal and fetal risks during pregnancy and the postpartum period, including risks to the fetus fathered by a male cardiac transplant recipient will be reviewed. It also provides a brief summary of our own transplant experience and recommendations for overall management of pregnancy in the post-cardiac transplant recipient.

  11. [Embracement and anxiety symptoms in patients before cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Assis, Cinthia Calsinski; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2014-01-01

    This is a randomized clinical trial, aimed to compare the frequency and intensity of symptoms of anxiety in patients of preoperative cardiac surgery who received empathic behavior from nurse or family or those who received no specific type of empathic behavior. The sample consisted of 66 patients in preoperative of cardiac surgery, which were divided in three groups: empathic behavior by nurses, without specific empathic behavior and by family. Anxiety was assessed at two points in time: before and after the intervention. The instrument used was developed and validated by Suriano, comprising 19 defining characteristics of the nursing diagnosis anxiety. It was observed that the reduction of anxiety symptoms was higher in the group receiving empathic behavior of relatives when compared to the other two groups. The results suggested that encouraging the participation of family members can contribute to the reduction of anxiety symptoms in patients in preoperative cardiac surgery.

  12. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  13. Innovation and Aboriginal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnochie, K. R.

    After defining educational and cultural terms and establishing a model representing cultural reproduction, case studies illustrate how three Aboriginal communities are educating and socializing their children. Strelley, a community in Western Australia, has a history of determined independence that has resulted in a unique level of economic and…

  14. Non-cardiac issues in patients with heterotaxy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Shyam S

    2014-01-01

    Management of complex congenital heart disease in patients with Heterotaxy syndrome (HS) has steadily improved. However, there is an insufficient appreciation of various non-cardiac issues that might impact the overall status of these patients. This article briefly reviews the implications of gastrointestinal, immunologic, genitourinary, respiratory, and central nervous system involvement in HS patients with a view to aid in their comprehensive clinical management. PMID:25298693

  15. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Diego Grimaldi; Simas, Ana Amélia Souza

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome. PMID:27872765

  16. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  17. Primary cardiac lymphoma in a patient with concomitant renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Severino, Davide; Santos, Beatriz; Costa, Cátia; Durão, David; Alves, Miguel; Monteiro, Isabel; Pitta, Luz; Leal, Margarida

    2015-12-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is defined as non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving the heart and/or pericardium. It is a rare cancer that primarily affects the right heart and in particular the right atrium. By contrast, renal cell carcinoma is a relatively common cancer, which in rare circumstances can metastasize to the heart. It is now known that there is an association between non-Hodgkin lymphoma and renal cell carcinoma, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The authors present a case of primary cardiac non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and explore the possible reasons for this association.

  18. Perioperative management of pediatric patients on mechanical cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Motta, Pablo; Rossano, Joseph; Hale, Brittani; Morales, David L

    2011-05-01

    The population of children with end-stage heart failure requiring mechanical circulatory support is growing. These children present for diagnostic imaging studies, various interventions and noncardiac surgical procedures that require anesthetic care. This article is a review of the population demographics of children on mechanical cardiac support, the alternative devices available, and the important concepts for safe perioperative management of these patients. The discussion will be limited to devices for short- and long-term cardiac support, excluding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support.

  19. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  20. Levosimendan in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Leimberger, Jeffrey D; van Diepen, Sean; Meza, James; Wang, Alice; Jankowich, Rachael; Harrison, Robert W; Hay, Douglas; Fremes, Stephen; Duncan, Andra; Soltesz, Edward G; Luber, John; Park, Soon; Argenziano, Michael; Murphy, Edward; Marcel, Randy; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Nagpal, Dave; Bozinovski, John; Toller, Wolfgang; Heringlake, Matthias; Goodman, Shaun G; Levy, Jerrold H; Harrington, Robert A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Alexander, John H

    2017-03-19

    Background Levosimendan is an inotropic agent that has been shown in small studies to prevent or treat the low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery. Methods In a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of levosimendan in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less who were undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous levosimendan (at a dose of 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute for 1 hour, followed by a dose of 0.1 μg per kilogram per minute for 23 hours) or placebo, with the infusion started before surgery. The two primary end points were a four-component composite of death through day 30, renal-replacement therapy through day 30, perioperative myocardial infarction through day 5, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5; and a two-component composite of death through day 30 or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5. Results A total of 882 patients underwent randomization, 849 of whom received levosimendan or placebo and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. The four-component primary end point occurred in 105 of 428 patients (24.5%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 103 of 421 (24.5%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.54; P=0.98). The two-component primary end point occurred in 56 patients (13.1%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 48 (11.4%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18; 96% CI, 0.76 to 1.82; P=0.45). The rate of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions Prophylactic levosimendan did not result in a rate of the short-term composite end point of death, renal-replacement therapy, perioperative myocardial infarction, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device that was lower than the rate

  1. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  2. Opportunistic screening to detect atrial fibrillation in Aboriginal adults in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Flaskas, Yvonne; O'Brien, Ciaran; Jeffries, Thomas Lee; McCowen, Debbie; Finlayson, Heather; Martin, Tanya; Neubeck, Lis; Freedman, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a 10-year gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. The leading cause of death for Aboriginal Australians is cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is a known precursor to stroke there are no published studies about the prevalence of AF for Aboriginal people and limited evidence about AF in indigenous populations globally. Methods and analysis This mixed methods study will recruit and train Aboriginal health workers to use an iECG device attached to a smartphone to consecutively screen 1500 Aboriginal people aged 45 years and older. The study will quantify the proportion of people who presented for follow-up assessment and/or treatment following a non-normal screening and then estimate the prevalence and age distribution of AF of the Australian Aboriginal population. The study includes semistructured interviews with the Aboriginal health workers about the effectiveness of the iECG device in their practice as well as their perceptions of the acceptability of the device for their patients. Thematic analysis will be undertaken on the qualitative data collected in the study. If the device and approach are acceptable to the Aboriginal people and widely adopted, it may help prevent the effects of untreated AF including ischaemic stroke and early deaths or impairment in Aboriginal people. Ethics and dissemination This mixed methods study received ethics approval from the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council (1135/15) and the Australian Health Council of Western Australia (HREC706). Ethics approval is being sought in the Northern Territory. The findings of this study will be shared with Aboriginal communities, in peer reviewed publications and at conferences. There are Aboriginal investigators in each state/territory where the study is being conducted who have been actively involved in the study. They will also be involved in data analysis

  3. Anxiety Level and Cardiac Autonomic Modulations in Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiac Syndrome X Patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Anxiety and cardiac autonomic modulations (CAM) were thoroughly investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients worldwide, but not among Sudanese with similar pathology. Aims To compare levels of anxiety and CAM between Sudanese patients with CSX and CAD. Materials and Methods Anxiety was evaluated in 51 CAD and 26 CSX patients using Taylor Manifest anxiety score (TMAS) questionnaire while heart rate variability derived indices were used to assess CAM, namely natural logarithm of low frequency (LnLF), high frequency (LnHF) and LF/HF ratio (LnLF/HF). Results Low anxiety levels were achieved by 6 (23.1%) and 9 (17.6%) patients with CSX and CAD respectively. High anxiety level was achieved by only one (3.8%) patient, who was suffering from CSX. TMAS was significantly higher in CSX (31.27 (21.97)) compared to CAD (21.86 (12.97), P = 0.021). However, abnormally increased anxiety was not associated with higher risk of CSX. LnLF, LnHF and LnLF/HF were comparable in CAD and CSX patients. Conclusion CSX and CAD patients showed comparable CAM. Although anxiety levels were higher in CSX compared to CAD, TMAS ≥ 35 failed to show significant association with CSX. PMID:28068419

  4. Ultrastructural features of degenerated cardiac muscle cells in patients with cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Maron, B. J.; Ferrans, V. J.; Roberts, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Degenerated cardiac muscle cells were present in hypertrophied ventricular muscle obtained at operation from 12 (38%) of 32 patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) or aortic valvular disease. Degenerated cells demonstrated a wide variety of ultrastructural alterations. Mildly altered cells were normal-sized or hypertrophied and showed focal changes, including preferential loss of thick (myosin) filaments, streaming and clumping of Z band material, and proliferation of the tubules of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were normal-sized or atrophic and showed additional changes, including extensive myofibrillar lysis and loss of T tubules. The appearance of the most severely degenerated cells usually reflected the cytoplasmic organelle (sarcoplasmic reticulum, glycogen, or mitochondria) which underwent proliferation and filled the myofibril-free areas of these cells. Moderately and severely degenerated cells were present in areas of fibrosis, had thickened basement membranes, and had lost their intercellular connections. These observations suggest that degenerated cardiac muscle cells have poor contractile function and may be responsible for impaired cardiac performance in some patients with chronic ventricular hypertrophy. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Figs 4-6 Figs 7-8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Figs 12-15 Fig 16 Fig 17 Figs 18-21 Figs 22-23 Fig 24 Fig 25 Fig 26 Fig 27 Figs 28-29 Fig 30 Figs 31-32 Fig 33 PMID:124533

  5. Community as Teacher Model: Health Profession Students Learn Cultural Safety from an Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Cathy C.; Godolphin, William J.; Chhina, Gagun S.; Towle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Communication between health care professionals and Aboriginal patients is complicated by cultural differences and the enduring effects of colonization. Health care providers need better training to meet the needs of Aboriginal patients and communities. We describe the development and outcomes of a community-driven service-learning program in…

  6. [Heart to heart: rehabilitation of sexuality in cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Shiber, Asher

    2006-05-01

    Heart disease in general and acute myocardial infarction involve sexual dysfunction caused by anxiety and by the same physiological problems that caused the heart problem, namely endothelial dysfunction. Unfortunately, many patients and their spouses hesitate to approach their doctor on issues related to their sexual concerns. Furthermore, the medical team in general and doctors in particular are irresolute in bringing up sexual issues when dealing with overall cardiac rehabilitation. Although patients can safely resume sexual activity at some point, only one in four actually return to their previous level of sexual activity. If we really want to assist in the rehabilitation of patients we have to advise them about resuming their sex life. Solving sexual problems can serve as a tool in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of cardiac problems, as it can be used as an "arm swinger" for changing one's life habits. We urge increased research and treatment of sexual problems, in cardiac patients in general and in female patients in particular.

  7. Aborigines of the Imaginary: Applying Lacan to Aboriginal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies the work of Jacques Lacan, a French psychoanalyst, to decipher the desire of the teacher in Aboriginal education. It argues that the images of Aboriginal people represented in Australian classrooms are effects of the teacher's Imaginary, the Imaginary being one of the three psychoanalytic domains theorised by Lacan over a period…

  8. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xiao, Feng; Wang, Jin; Song, Bo; Li, Xi-Hui; Li, Jian; He, Zhi-Song; Zhang, Huan; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery. Methods From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries. Results Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%]), pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%), hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%), incisional infection (3, 4.7%), subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%), and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%). Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%. Conclusion Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible with satisfactory short-term and long-term survival. PMID:27486311

  9. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  10. Distribution of Hepatitis C Risk Factors and HCV Treatment Outcomes among Central Canadian Aboriginal

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Parmvir; Corsi, Daniel J.; Cooper, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aboriginal Canadians face many lifestyle risk factors for hepatitis C exposure. Methods. An analysis of Ottawa Hospital Viral Hepatitis Clinic (Ottawa, Canada) patients between January 2000 and August 2013 was performed. HCV infection risk factors and HCV treatment outcomes were assessed. Socioeconomic status markers were based on area-level indicators linked to postal codes using administrative databases. Results. 55 (2.8%) Aboriginal and 1923 (97.2%) non-Aboriginal patients were evaluated. Aboriginals were younger (45.6 versus 49.6 years, p < 0.01). The distribution of gender (63.6% versus 68.3% male), HIV coinfection (9.1% versus 8.1%), advanced fibrosis stage (29.2% versus 28.0%), and SVR (56.3% versus 58.9%) was similar between groups. Aboriginals had a higher number of HCV risk factors, (mean 4.2 versus 3.1, p < 0.001) with an odds ratio of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–4.4) for having 4+ risk factors. This was not explained after adjustment for income, social deprivation, and poor housing. Aboriginal status was not related to SVR. Aboriginals interrupted therapy more often due to loss to follow-up, poor adherence, and substance abuse (25.0% versus 4.6%). Conclusion. Aboriginal Canadians have higher levels of HCV risk factors, even when adjusting for socioeconomic markers. Despite facing greater barriers to care, SVR rates were comparable with non-Aboriginals. PMID:27446875

  11. Anesthesia Patients with Concomitant Cardiac and Hepatic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ahdout, Julianne; Nurok, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Anesthesia and surgery in patients with hepatic and cardiac dysfunction poses a challenge for anesthesiologists. It is imperative to optimize these patients perioperatively. Cirrhosis is associated with a wide range of cardiovascular abnormalities. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is characterized by blunted contractile responsiveness or systolic incompetence, and/or diastolic dysfunction. In liver disease, anesthetic drug distribution, metabolism, and elimination may be altered. Among patients with liver disease, propofol is a reasonable anesthetic choice and cisatracurium is the preferred neuromuscular blocker. Regional anesthesia should be used whenever appropriate if not contraindicated by coagulopathy, because it reduces the need for systemic analgesia.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection in Canadian and related Arctic Aboriginal populations.

    PubMed

    Goodman, K J; Jacobson, K; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S

    2008-03-01

    In 2006, the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group identified Aboriginal communities among Canadian population groups most at risk of Helicobacter pylori-associated disease. The objective of this systematic review was to summarize what is known about the H pylori-associated disease burden in Canadian and related Arctic Aboriginal populations to identify gaps in knowledge. Six health literature databases were systematically searched to identify reports on H pylori prevalence in Canadian population groups, or any topic related to H pylori in Canadian Aboriginals, Alaska Natives or Aboriginals of other Arctic regions. Identified reports were organized by subtopic and summarized in narrative form. Key data from studies of H pylori prevalence in defined populations were summarized in tabular form. A few Arctic Aboriginal communities were represented in the literature: two Canadian Inuit; one Canadian First Nation; two Greenland Inuit; one Russian Chutkotka Native; and several Alaska Native studies. These studies uniformly showed elevated H pylori prevalence; a few studies also showed elevated occurrence of H pylori-related diseases and high rates of treatment failure. Based on the evidence, it would be warranted for clinicians to relax the criteria for investigating H pylori and related diseases in patients from Arctic Aboriginal communities, and to pursue post-therapy confirmation of eradication. Additional community-based research is needed to develop public health policies for reducing H pylori-associated health risks in such communities.

  13. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  14. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L C; Vano, E; Gutierrez, F; Rodriguez, C; Gilarranz, R; Manzanas, M J

    2007-08-21

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm(2) respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  15. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-07-01

    We explore about fifty different Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarize the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses. We show that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, elders or medicine men claimed to be able to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their roles as providers and protectors within their communities. We also show that some Aboriginal groups seem to have understood the motions of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the Moon blocking the Sun.

  16. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  17. Ambulatory monitoring for chronic cardiac and pulmonary patients.

    PubMed

    Zarakovitis, Konstantinos; Angelidis, Pantelis; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Psymarnou, Markela

    2004-01-01

    In the Greek pilot of the e-Vital project, remote telemedicine services are provided to chronic cardiac and pulmonary patients who are not confined to a hospital (i.e. receiving home/ambulatory health care) with the aim of exploring the dynamics of interactive continuous chronic patient monitoring, particularly focusing on the impact on patient's quality of life, the patient's active involvement in their own care and according impact on the overall quality of healthcare provision, as well as the benefits for healthcare providers (time management, patient management, savings, etc). The current trial in progress validates the business potential of remote monitoring services and demonstrates the technical environment that enables patient-doctor interaction regardless of location and the according communication modes and protocols. The domain for applying the envisaged service is the private healthcare sector and the users groups include individual chronic patients with cardiac and pulmonary diseases. So far, from the patient's point of view, the service mainly appeals to patients with arrhythmias due to lightweight technology and easy processes involved in the transmission of 1-lead ECG. Asthma and COPD patients are also enthusiastic, as they can receive doctor advice in real time. From the health professional's point of view the service has real added value in the fields of diagnosis, prevention, monitoring and follow up. In the case of asthma and COPD the value of the service in diagnosis is even more apparent as these patients may be asymptomatic, when they visit their doctor and have exacerbations when they are at home. e-Vital in this case ensures that the healthcare professional will acquire the complete image of the patient condition. Finally, the experiences gained so far indicate that e-Vital could be particularly efficient in isolated areas, with shortage of experienced scientific personnel.

  18. Management of radiation therapy patients with cardiac defibrillator or pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Francesca; Gomellini, Sara; Caruso, Cristina; Barbara, Raffaele; Musio, Daniela; Coppi, Tamara; Cardinale, Mario; Tombolini, Vincenzo; de Paula, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The increasing growth of population with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) such as Pacemaker (PM) and Implantable Cardiac Defibrillators (ICD), requires particular attention in management of patients needing radiation treatment. This paper updates and summarizes some recommendations from different international guidelines. Ionizing radiation and/or electromagnetic interferences could cause device failure. Current approaches to treatment in patients who have these devices vary among radiation oncology centres. We refer to the German Society of Radiation Oncology and Cardiology guidelines (ed. 2015); to the Society of Cardiology Australia and New Zealand Statement (ed. 2015); to the guidelines in force in the Netherlands (ed. 2012) and to the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology recommendations (ed. 2013) as reported in the guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with CIED. Although there is not a clear cut-off point, risk of device failure increases with increasing doses. Cumulative dose and pacing dependency have been combined to categorize patients into low-, medium- and high-risk groups. Measures to secure patient safety are described for each category. The use of energy ≤6MV is preferable and it's strongly recommended not to exceed a total dose of 2 Gy to the PM and 1 Gy for ICD. Given the dangers of device malfunction, radiation oncology departments should adopt all the measures designed to minimize the risk to patients. For this reason, a close collaboration between cardiologist, radiotherapist and physicist is necessary.

  19. An unusual cause of cardiac arrest in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Tumkur, Anil; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Chacko, Biby

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual case of 24 year old male who was hospitalized for dental procedure and developed cardiac arrest 2 days after the procedure. The patient presented with swelling of buccal cavity for which a biopsy was taken. Two days after the procedure, apparently normal patient suddenly presented at mid night with VT and VF, which were intractable requiring multiple DC shocks. During this period arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe acidosis. The circumstances led us to suspect poisoning as one of the cause for his medical condition. We looked for commonly available toxins. One of the commonly available toxins is hand sanitizer which contains Isopropyl alcohol, glycerin and perfume. Due to prolonged cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmia patient had sustained hypoxic brain injury. Patient remained hemodynamically stable for next 9 days although his CNS status did not improve. Patient succumbed to sepsis on 9(th) day. Healthcare professionals should be aware of such possibilities and treat the patients at the earliest and put a check on the easy availability of IPA based hand sanitizers.

  20. Perioperative Hemoglobin Trajectory in Adult Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David A.; Tung, Hon-Ming Andrew; Slater, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Preoperative anemia and nadir hemoglobin (Hb) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been identified as significant risk factors for blood transfusion during cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to confirm the association between preoperative anemia, perioperative fluid management, and blood transfusion. In addition, the proportion of elective cardiac surgery patients presenting for surgery with anemia was identified to examine whether the opportunity exists for timely diagnosis and intervention. Data from referral until hospital discharge were comprehensively reviewed over a 12-month period for all nonemergency cardiac surgical patients operated on in our institution. Of the 342 patients identified, elective cases were referred a median of 35 days before preoperative clinic and operated on a median of 14 days subsequently. Subacute cases had a median of 3 days from referral to surgery. As per the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for anemia, 24.2% of elective and 29.6% of subacute patients were anemic. Blood transfusion was administered to 46.2% of patients during their admission. Transfusion was more likely in patients who were female (odds ratio [OR]: 2.45, 95%confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–4.70), had a low body mass index (BMI) (OR: .89, 95% CI: .84–.94), preoperative anemia (OR: 5.15, 95% CI: 2.59–10.24), or renal impairment (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.42–12.22). Hemodilution minimization strategies reduced the Hb fall during CPB, but not transfusion rates. This study identifies a high prevalence of preoperative anemia with sufficient time for elective referrals to undergo appropriate diagnosis and interventions. It also confirms that low red cell mass (anemia and low BMI) and renal impairment are predictors of perioperative blood transfusion. Perfusion strategies to reduce hemodilution are effective at minimizing the intraoperative fall in Hb concentration but did not influence transfusion rate. PMID:26543251

  1. Preoperative Optimization of the Heart Failure Patient Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Maxime; Liszkowski, Mark; Ducharme, Anique

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure patients who undergo cardiac surgery are exposed to significant perioperative complications and high mortality. We herein review the literature concerning preoperative optimization of these patients. Salient findings are that end-organ dysfunction and medication should be optimized before surgery. Specifically: (1) reversible causes of anemia should be treated and a preoperative hemoglobin level of 100 g/L obtained; (2) renal function and volume status should be optimized; (3) liver function must be carefully evaluated; (4) nutritional status should be assessed and cachexia treated to achieve a preoperative albumin level of at least 30 g/L and a body mass index > 20; and (5) medication adjustments performed, such as withholding inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system before surgery and continuing, but not starting, β-blockers. Levels of natriuretic peptides (brain natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal proBNP) provide additional prognostic value and therefore should be measured. In addition, individual patient's risk should be objectively assessed using standard formulas such as the EuroSCORE-II or Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk scores, which are simple and validated for various cardiac surgeries, including left ventricular assist device implantation. When patients are identified as high risk, preoperative hemodynamic optimization might be achieved with the insertion of a pulmonary artery catheter and hemodynamic-based tailored therapy. Finally, a prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pump might be considered in certain circumstances to decrease morbidity and even mortality, like in some high risk heart failure patients who undergo cardiac surgery, whereas routine preoperative inotropes are not recommended and should be reserved for patients in shock, except maybe for levosimendan.

  2. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  3. Ubiquitous Computing for Remote Cardiac Patient Monitoring: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Kambhatla, Kashyap; Hu, Fei; Lifson, Mark; Xiao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    New wireless technologies, such as wireless LAN and sensor networks, for telecardiology purposes give new possibilities for monitoring vital parameters with wearable biomedical sensors, and give patients the freedom to be mobile and still be under continuous monitoring and thereby better quality of patient care. This paper will detail the architecture and quality-of-service (QoS) characteristics in integrated wireless telecardiology platforms. It will also discuss the current promising hardware/software platforms for wireless cardiac monitoring. The design methodology and challenges are provided for realistic implementation. PMID:18604301

  4. [Sleep apnea syndrome in patients with cardiac disease].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazumi; Wada, Yuka; Aono, Takuya; Sugi, Gosuke; Ohta, Noriaki; Sueda, Shozo; Nomoto, Takahiko; Oshita, Akira

    2008-09-01

    We examined the incidence of sleep-apnea syndrome (SAS; 5 or more episodes of apnea/hypopnea in 1 hour) in 213 patients (152 male, 67.8 +/- 10.9 years) with various cardiac diseases by a modified sleep polygraph (morpheus; Teijin Pharma, Tokyo) from July 2005 to April 2007. Mild sleep disturbance was defined as 5< or = AHI<20, moderate sleep disturbance as 20< or = AHI<40, and severe sleep disturbance as 40< or = AHI. SAS was seen in 87.3% of the patients. This high incidence sharply contrasts with 7.5% reported in factory workers in Japan. Body mass index, though significant, was scarcely correlated with the severity of SAS (p<0.01). As sleep disturbance became severe, the proportion of an obstructive, central, and eventually mixed obstructive-central SAS increased. Although the overall severity was not different between different categories of cardiac diseases, obstructive-central SAS was seen far more frequent in congestive heart failure. Hypertension was closely associated with apnea/hypopnea. A tight correlation between SAS and various cardiac diseases was suggested.

  5. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  6. The experiences of patients undertaking a 'virtual' cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Banner, Davina; Lear, Scott; Kandola, Daman; Singer, Joel; Horvat, Dan; Bates, Joanna; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRP) are medically supervised, multidisciplinary programs that provide secondary prevention aimed at addressing risk factors and improving lifestyle behaviours for patients following an acute cardiac event. CRPs have been demonstrated to be a cost-effective and evidence-based mechanism to improve patient outcomes, but despite the known benefits of these programs, uptake remains poor. Poor attendance has been linked to many factors, but geographical accessibility is a key concern, since many CRPs are limited to hospitals in urban areas. The widespread availability of the Internet has made it possible to provide virtual health services to populations that may have previously been hard to access. This paper examines the qualitative findings from a 16-month mixed methods randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a virtual CRP (vCRP). The vCRP was revealed to be an accessible, appropriate, convenient and effective way to deliver cardiac rehabilitation services, with patients experiencing both clinical improvements and a high level of satisfaction. To understand the experience of patients undertaking the vCRP, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 22 participants. An analysis of the qualitative interviews revealed that the vCRP improved participants' access to healthcare professionals, supported them to make healthy choices, and enhanced feelings of accountability due to greater surveillance. Barriers to participation, such as computer literacy, and general perceptions of a vCRP were also examined. Further investigation into the use and long-term effectiveness of virtual programs across a broader range of healthcare settings is warranted, particularly in those with multiple chronic diseases and those located in rural and remote communities.

  7. Hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahdi; Faraoni, David

    2015-07-26

    Although red blood cells (RBCs) transfusion is sometimes associated with adverse reactions, anemia could also lead to increased morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. For these reasons, the definition of perioperative strategies that aims to detect and treat preoperative anemia, prevent excessive blood loss, and define "optimal" transfusion algorithms is crucial. Although the treatment with preoperative iron and erythropoietin has been recommended in some specific conditions, several controversies exist regarding the benefit-to-risk balance associated with these treatments. Further studies are needed to better define the indications, dosage, and route of administration for preoperative iron with or without erythropoietin supplementation. Although restrictive transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery have been shown to effectively reduce the incidence and the amount of RBCs transfusion without increase in side effects, some high-risk patients (e.g., symptomatic acute coronary syndrome) could benefit from higher hemoglobin concentrations. Despite all efforts made last decade, a significant amount of work remains to be done to improve hemoglobin optimization and transfusion strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  8. [Glucose-lowering therapy in patients with cardiac comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Meier, Juris J

    2015-04-01

    The risk for cardiovascular events, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia is significantly increased in patients with diabetes. Although poor glycaemic control has been associated with an increased cardiovascular event rate, aggressive glucose-lowering strategies have failed to improve cardiovascular endpoints or mortality. Therefore, treatment-associated adverse effects, especially hypoglycaemia and weight gain, must be carefully outbalanced against the potential benefits of better glycaemic control. Furthermore, certain drug-specific aspects must be considered: Pioglitazone is contraindicated in patients with heart failure, and DPP-4 inhibitors have recently been associated with an increased heart failure rate. Heart rate may increase during treatment with GLP-1 analogues. Only with metformin a reduction in cardiovascular endpoint has been demonstrated in patients with diabetes. Insulin and sulphonylureas have yielded neutral results in the available endpoint trials. Endpoint studies with GLP-1 analogues or SGLT-2 inhibitors have not yet been completed. These various drug-specific actions in the cardiovascular system need to be born in mind for the choice of the optimal glucose-lowering strategy in patients with cardiac comorbidities.

  9. Factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal people in Australia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Shaouli; Teng, Tiew-Hwa Katherine; Bessarab, Dawn; Aoun, Samar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives Delayed presentation of symptomatic cancer is associated with poorer survival. Aboriginal patients with cancer have higher rates of distant metastases at diagnosis compared with non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper examined factors contributing to delayed diagnosis of cancer among Aboriginal Australians from patient and service providers' perspectives. Methods In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted in two stages (2006–2007 and 2011). Inductive thematic analysis was assisted by use of NVivo looking around delays in presentation, diagnosis and referral for cancer. Participants Aboriginal patients with cancer/family members (n=30) and health service providers (n=62) were recruited from metropolitan Perth and six rural/remote regions of Western Australia. Results Three broad themes of factors were identified: (1) Contextual factors such as intergenerational impact of colonisation and racism and socioeconomic deprivation have negatively impacted on Aboriginal Australians' trust of the healthcare professionals; (2) health service-related factors included low accessibility to health services, long waiting periods, inadequate numbers of Aboriginal professionals and high staff turnover; (3) patient appraisal of symptoms and decision-making, fear of cancer and denial of symptoms were key reasons patients procrastinated in seeking help. Elements of shame, embarrassment, shyness of seeing the doctor, psychological ‘fear of the whole health system’, attachment to the land and ‘fear of leaving home’ for cancer treatment in metropolitan cities were other deterrents for Aboriginal people. Manifestation of masculinity and the belief that ‘health is women's domain’ emerged as a reason why Aboriginal men were reluctant to receive health checks. Conclusions Solutions to improved Aboriginal cancer outcomes include focusing on the primary care sector encouraging general practitioners to be proactive to suspicion of symptoms with appropriate

  10. Epileptic Patients are at Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias: A Novel Approach using QT-nomogram, Tachogram, and Cardiac Restitution Plots

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nimer, Marwan S.; Al-Mahdawi, Sura A.; Abdullah, Namir M.; Al-Mahdawi, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sudden death is reported in patients who had a history of epilepsy and some authors believed that is due to cardiac arrhythmias. Objectives: This study aimed to predict that the epileptic patients are at risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias by QT-nomogram, tachogram (Lorenz), and cardiac restitution plots. Methods: A total number of 71 healthy subjects (Group I) and 64 newly diagnosed epileptic patients (Group II) were recruited from Al-Yarmouk and Baghdad Teaching hospitals in Baghdad from March 2015 to July 2015 and included in this study. The diagnosis of epilepsy achieved clinically, electroencephalograph record and radio-images including computerized tomography and magnetic image resonance. At the time of entry into the study, an electrocardiography (ECG) was done, and the determinants of each ECG record were calculated. The QT-nomogram, tachogram, and cardiac restitution plots were used to identify the patients at risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Results: Significant prolonged corrected QT corrected (QTc) and JT corrected intervals were observed in female compared with male at age ≥50 years while the TQ interval was significantly prolonged in males of Group II. Eight patients of Group II had a significant pathological prolonged QTc interval compared with undetectable finding in Group I. QT nomogram did not disclose significant findings while the plots of Lorenz and restitution steepness disclose that the patients of Group II were vulnerable to cardiac arrhythmias. Abnormal ECG findings were observed in the age extremities (≤18 years and ≥50 years) in Group II compared with Group I. Conclusion: Utilization of QT-nomogram, restitution steepness, and tachogram plots is useful tools for detection subclinical vulnerable epileptic patient with cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28149075

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with an magnetic resonance imaging conditional permanent pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Andrew J.; Artis, Nigel J.; Sivananthan, U. Mohan; Pepper, Chris B.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as the optimum modality for cardiac imaging. An aging population and rising numbers of patients with permanent pacemakers means many such individuals may require cardiac MRI scanning in the future. Whilst the presence of a permanent pacemaker is historically regarded as a contra-indication to MRI scanning, pacemaker systems have been developed to limit any associated risks. No reports have been published regarding the use of such devices with cardiac MRI in a clinical setting. We present the safe, successful cardiac MRI scan of a patient with an MRI-conditional permanent pacing system. PMID:22355486

  12. Endoscopic Electrosurgery in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Kim, Sang-Woo; Ko, Sun-Hye; Lee, Yoon Bum; Hwang, Seawon; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Hye Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Yong-Seog; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) undergoing endoscopic electrosurgery (EE) are at a risk of electromagnetic interference (EMI). We aimed to analyze the effects of EE in CIED patients. Methods: Patients with CIED who underwent EE procedures such as snare polypectomy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) were retrospectively analyzed. Postprocedural symptoms as well as demographic and outpatient follow-up data were reviewed through medical records. Electrical data, including preprocedural and postprocedural arrhythmia records, were reviewed through pacemaker interrogation, 24-hour Holter monitoring, or electrocardiogram. Results: Fifty-nine procedures in 49 patients were analyzed. Fifty procedures were performed in 43 patients with a pacemaker, and nine were performed in six patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. There were one gastric and 44 colon snare polypectomies, five gastric and one colon ESDs, and eight ERCPs with EST. Fifty-five cases of electrical follow-up were noted, with two postprocedural changes not caused by EE. Thirty-one pacemaker interrogations had procedure recordings, with two cases of asymptomatic tachycardia. All patients were asymptomatic with no adverse events. Conclusions: Our study reports no adverse events from EE in patients with CIED, suggesting that this procedure is safe. However, because of the possibility of EMI, recommendations on EE should be followed. PMID:26867552

  13. The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study: rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Spaite, D W; Lyver, M B; Munkley, D P; Field, B J; Dagnone, E; Maloney, J P; Jones, G R; Luinstra, L G; Jermyn, B D; Ward, R; DeMaio, V J

    1998-08-01

    The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support Study represents the largest prehospital study yet conducted, worldwide. This study will involve more than 25,000 cardiac arrest, trauma, and critically ill patients over an 8-year period. The study will evaluate the incremental benefit of rapid defibrillation and prehospital Advanced Cardiac Life Support measures for cardiac arrest survival and the benefit of Advanced Life Support for patients with traumatic injuries and other critically ill prehospital patients. This article describes the OPALS study with regard to the rationale and methodology for cardiac arrest patients.

  14. Cardiac toxicity of trastuzumab in elderly patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Denegri, Andrea; Moccetti, Tiziano; Moccetti, Marco; Spallarossa, Paolo; Brunelli, Claudio; Ameri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is diagnosed in ≥ 65 year old women in about half of cases. Experts currently recommend that systemic therapy is offered to elderly patients with BC, if, based on their overall conditions and life expectancy, it can be reasonably anticipated that the benefits will outweigh the risks of treatment. Like for young subjects, the monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2), trastuzumab, represents a valid therapeutic option when BC over-expresses this receptor. Unfortunately, administration of trastuzumab is associated with the occurrence of left ventricular dysfunction and chronic heart failure (CHF), possibly because of interference with the homeostatic functions of HER-2 in the heart. Registry-based, retrospective analyses have reported an incidence of CHF around 25% in elderly women receiving trastuzumab compared with 10%–15% in those not given any therapy for BC, and the risk of CHF has been estimated to be two-fold higher in > 60–65 year old trastuzumab users vs. non-users. Extremely advanced age and preexisting cardiac disease have been shown to predispose to trastuzumab cardiotoxicity. Therefore, selection of older patients for treatment with trastuzumab should be primarily based on their general status and the presence of comorbidities; previous chemotherapy, especially with anthracyclines, should be also taken into account. Once therapy has started, efforts should be made to ensure regular cardiac surveillance. The role of selected biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin, or new imaging techniques (three-dimension, tissue Doppler echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging) is promising, but must be further investigated especially in the elderly. Moreover, additional studies are needed in order to better understand the mechanisms by which trastuzumab affects the old heart. PMID:27403145

  15. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Tahrani, Abd A; Stevens, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an often overlooked and common complication of diabetes mellitus. CAN is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CAN is complex and involves a cascade of pathways activated by hyperglycaemia resulting in neuronal ischaemia and cellular death. In addition, autoimmune and genetic factors are involved in the development of CAN. CAN might be subclinical for several years until the patient develops resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, postural hypotension, cardiac dysfunction and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During its sub-clinical phase, heart rate variability that is influenced by the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic tones can help in detecting CAN before the disease is symptomatic. Newer imaging techniques (such as scintigraphy) have allowed earlier detection of CAN in the pre-clinical phase and allowed better assessment of the sympathetic nervous system. One of the main difficulties in CAN research is the lack of a universally accepted definition of CAN; however, the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy has recently issued guidance for the diagnosis and staging of CAN, and also proposed screening for CAN in patients with diabetes mellitus. A major challenge, however, is the lack of specific treatment to slow the progression or prevent the development of CAN. Lifestyle changes, improved metabolic control might prevent or slow the progression of CAN. Reversal will require combination of these treatments with new targeted therapeutic approaches. The aim of this article is to review the latest evidence regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment for CAN. PMID:24567799

  16. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Tahrani, Abd A; Stevens, Martin J

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an often overlooked and common complication of diabetes mellitus. CAN is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CAN is complex and involves a cascade of pathways activated by hyperglycaemia resulting in neuronal ischaemia and cellular death. In addition, autoimmune and genetic factors are involved in the development of CAN. CAN might be subclinical for several years until the patient develops resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, postural hypotension, cardiac dysfunction and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During its sub-clinical phase, heart rate variability that is influenced by the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic tones can help in detecting CAN before the disease is symptomatic. Newer imaging techniques (such as scintigraphy) have allowed earlier detection of CAN in the pre-clinical phase and allowed better assessment of the sympathetic nervous system. One of the main difficulties in CAN research is the lack of a universally accepted definition of CAN; however, the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy has recently issued guidance for the diagnosis and staging of CAN, and also proposed screening for CAN in patients with diabetes mellitus. A major challenge, however, is the lack of specific treatment to slow the progression or prevent the development of CAN. Lifestyle changes, improved metabolic control might prevent or slow the progression of CAN. Reversal will require combination of these treatments with new targeted therapeutic approaches. The aim of this article is to review the latest evidence regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment for CAN.

  17. Study Protocol: establishing good relationships between patients and health care providers while providing cardiac care. Exploring how patient-clinician engagement contributes to health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians in South Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies that compare Indigenous Australian and non-Indigenous patients who experience a cardiac event or chest pain are inconclusive about the reasons for the differences in-hospital and survival rates. The advances in diagnostic accuracy, medication and specialised workforce has contributed to a lower case fatality and lengthen survival rates however this is not evident in the Indigenous Australian population. A possible driver contributing to this disparity may be the impact of patient-clinician interface during key interactions during the health care process. Methods/Design This study will apply an Indigenous framework to describe the interaction between Indigenous patients and clinicians during the continuum of cardiac health care, i.e. from acute admission, secondary and rehabilitative care. Adopting an Indigenous framework is more aligned with Indigenous realities, knowledge, intellects, histories and experiences. A triple layered designed focus group will be employed to discuss patient-clinician engagement. Focus groups will be arranged by geographic clusters i.e. metropolitan and a regional centre. Patient informants will be identified by Indigenous status (i.e. Indigenous and non-Indigenous) and the focus groups will be convened separately. The health care provider focus groups will be convened on an organisational basis i.e. state health providers and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Yarning will be used as a research method to facilitate discussion. Yarning is in congruence with the oral traditions that are still a reality in day-to-day Indigenous lives. Discussion This study is nestled in a larger research program that explores the drivers to the disparity of care and health outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians who experience an acute cardiac admission. A focus on health status, risk factors and clinical interventions may camouflage critical issues within a patient-clinician exchange. This approach may

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  19. [Pseudotumorous cardiac infiltration in a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orts, M; Ribera, J M; Calatrava, A; Larrouse, E; Catalán, R; Navarro, J T; Millá, F; Feliu, E

    1996-04-13

    Although cardiac infiltration is common in advanced stage of acute leukaemia, it is not usually diagnosed at life and it is extremely rare for it to become pseudotumoral. A 25-years-old patient with an acute monoblastic leukaemia who had a leukaemic infiltration which affected the main part of the left ventricle at the time of diagnosis, is referred. The heart infiltration was detected by a two dimension echocardiography. In spite of a massive infiltration, heart failure was not present and the left ventricle's ejection fraction was 50%. Even though chemotherapy was administered, the patient died four days after diagnosis due to septic shock of respiratory origin. The most relevant autopsy finding was a widespread pseudotumoral infiltration of the left ventricle, the back side of the right ventricle and the interventricular wall. The pseudotumoral infiltration of the heart by acute leukaemia is uncommon and must be differentiated from granulocytic sarcoma. The usefulness of the different diagnostic procedures is discussed.

  20. Metoprolol Improves Endothelial Function in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Majidinia, Maryam; Rasmi, Yousef; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Seyed-Mohammadzad, MirHossein; Saboory, Ehsan; Shirpoor, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction which is manifested by the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability, is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac syndrome X (CSX) and beta blockers are used for the treatment of this syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate effects of metoprolol, as a beta blocker, on endothelial function in CSX patients. The study included 25 CSX patients (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 55.36±10.31 years) who received metoprolol (50 mg BID) for one month. In addition, 25 healthy controls (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 54.32 ±9.27 years) were enrolled. Levels of endothelin-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in controls and CSX patients were measured, both at the baseline and after the treatment, by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CSX patients, at the baseline, levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 were significantly higher than those of the controls. In addition, levels of these biomarkers in CSX patients after the treatment significantly decreased compared to the baseline. In spite of similar tendency, these differences were not significant for endothelin-1. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy improves endothelial function. Thus, it may be a suggested choice for CSX treatment. However, further studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of metoprolol therapy for CSX patients. PMID:27980592

  1. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Reiter, Theresa; Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Gärtner, Florian C

    2016-11-22

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR-PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR.15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity.SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET- subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET- patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up.In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively.Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series.

  2. Somatostatin receptor based PET/CT in patients with the suspicion of cardiac sarcoidosis: an initial comparison to cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Malte; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Pelzer, Theo; Pizarro, Carmen; Skowasch, Dirk; Thomas, Lena; Schlesinger-Irsch, Ulrike; Thomas, Daniel; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is often challenging. Whereas cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are most commonly used to evaluate patients, PET/CT using radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands for visualization of inflammation might represent a more specific alternative. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of SSTR–PET/CT for detecting cardiac sarcoidosis in comparison to CMR. 15 patients (6 males, 9 females) with sarcoidosis and suspicion on cardiac involvement underwent SSTR-PET/CT imaging and CMR. Images were visually scored. The AHA 17-segment model of the left myocardium was used for localization and comparison of inflamed myocardium for both imaging modalities. In semi-quantitative analysis, mean (SUVmean) and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of affected myocardium were calculated and compared with both remote myocardium and left ventricular (LV) cavity. SSTR-PET was positive in 7/15, CMR in 10/15 patients. Of the 3 CMR+/PET− subjects, one patient with minor involvement (<25% of wall thickness in CMR) was missed by PET. The remaining two CMR+/PET− patients displayed no adverse cardiac events during follow-up. In the 17-segment model, PET/CT yielded 27 and CMR 29 positive segments. Overall concordance of the 2 modalities was 96.1% (245/255 segments analyzed). SUVmean and SUVmax in inflamed areas were 2.0±1.2 and 2.6±1.2, respectively. The lesion-to-remote myocardium and lesion-to-LV cavity ratios were 1.8±0.2 and 1.9±0.2 for SUVmean and 2.0±0.3 and 1.7±0.3 for SUVmax, respectively. Detection of cardiac sarcoidosis by SSTR-PET/CT is feasible. Our data warrant further analysis in larger prospective series. PMID:27780922

  3. Aboriginal Education and the Arts Policy (Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kaye

    This document outlines a policy for the art education of and about Aboriginal people. Teachers in art education should have an understanding of Aboriginal education issues, and developers of art programs should consult with Aboriginal people before beginning work on a program and continuously throughout development. Teachers should take into…

  4. Linguistic Aspects of Australian Aboriginal English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    It is probable that the majority of the 455 000 strong Aboriginal population of Australia speak some form of Australian Aboriginal English (AAE) at least some of the time and that it is the first (and only) language of many Aboriginal children. This means their language is somewhere on a continuum ranging from something very close to Standard…

  5. Aboriginal English Inside and Outside the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Ian G.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an analysis of five first-person oral narratives of Aboriginal children of Western Australia recorded outside the classroom. These narratives are compared with a first-person oral narrative of a non-Aboriginal child and with teacher-led interactions in the classes of which the Aboriginal children are members. (26 references) (Author/CK)

  6. Culturally Framing Aboriginal Literacy and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antone, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    More than just the development of reading and writing skills, Aboriginal literacy is a wholistic concept, with spiritual, physical, mental, and emotional aspects, involving relationships between self, community, nation, and creation. Models are presented for incorporating traditional Aboriginal knowledge and methodologies into Aboriginal learning…

  7. Preoperative risk factors of malnutrition for cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Donata, Ringaitienė; Dalia, Gineitytė; Vaidas, Vicka; Tadas, Žvirblis; Jūratė, Šipylaitė; Algimantas, Irnius; Juozas, Ivaškevičius

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition (MN) is prevalent in cardiac surgery, but there are no specific preoperative risk factors of MN. The aim of this study is to assess the clinically relevant risk factors of MN for cardiac surgery patients. Materials and methods. The nutritional state of the patients was evaluated one day prior to surgery using a bioelectrical impedance analysis phase angle (PA). Two groups of patients were generated according to low PA: malnourished and well nourished. Risk factors of MN were divided into three clinically relevant groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. Variables in each different group were entered into separate multivariate logistic regression models. Results. A total of 712 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were 65-year old men after a CABG procedure. Low PA was present in 22.9% (163) of patients. The analysis of disease-related factors of MN revealed the importance of heart functions (NYHA IV class OR: 3.073, CI95%: 1.416–6.668, p = 0.007), valve pathology (OR: 1.825, CI95%: 1.182–2.819, p = 0.007), renal insufficiency (OR: 4.091, CI95%: 1.995–8.389, p < 0.001) and body mass index (OR: 0.928, CI95%: 0.890–0.968, p < 0.001). Laboratory values related to MN were levels of haemoglobin (OR: 0.967, CI95%: 0.951–0.983, p < 0.001) and C-reactive protein (OR: 1.015, CI95%: 1.002–1.028, p = 0.0279). The lifestyle variables that qualified as risk factors concerned the intake of food (OR: 3.030, CI95%: 1.353–6.757, p = 0.007) and mobility (OR: 2.770, CI95%: 1.067–7.194, p = 0.036). Conclusions. MN risk factors comprise three different clinical groups: psychosocial and lifestyle factors, laboratory findings and disease-associated factors. The patients who are most likely to be malnourished are those with valve pathology, severe imparted heart function, insufficient renal function and high inflammatory markers. Also these patients have decreased mobility

  8. Pneumopericardium Leading to Cardiac Tamponade in a Patient with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, Ahmad; Ayub, Adil; Huang, Chyun-Yin; Rehmani, Sadiq; Al-Ayoubi, Adnan; Bhora, Faiz Y

    2016-12-01

    Pneumopericardium resulting in cardiac tamponade in patients with lung cancer is not documented. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung complicated by pneumopericardium and subsequent cardiac tamponade. The patient underwent an urgent pericardial window with rapid improvement in symptoms. We discuss the possible pathogenesis and treatment options for this rare condition.

  9. Cardiac arrest among patients with infections: causes, clinical practice and research implications.

    PubMed

    Leoni, D; Rello, J

    2016-11-27

    The incidence of sepsis is increasing, and the condition is now the leading cause of death in general intensive care units. Our review failed to identify studies of the causes of cardiac arrest among infected patients, even though non-cardiac causes represent 15% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and though one-third of events have positive blood cultures. Sudden cardiac arrest is the result of local damage to the heart and of the impact of systemic and pulmonary conditions on cardiac performance, and its danger is underestimated. Necropsy findings in sudden death often identify myocarditis as an unexpected cause. The role of hypoxaemia, severe pulmonary thromboembolism with subsequent pulseless cardiac activity, alterations of electrolytes and hydrogen concentrations, distort fluid distribution with reduced pre-load, direct myocyte damage and adverse cardiac effects related to antibiotic use need to be defined. Many cardiac arrests might be preventable. Because cardiopulmonary resuscitation is challenging and usually unsuccessful in patients with sepsis, research is needed to help predict which patients are at risk. Only half of pneumonia patients with cardiac arrest in the ward receive prior ECG monitoring. Telemedicine and non-invasive monitoring in the ward, avoidance of antibiotics associated with prolonged QT syndrome, and adequate haemodynamic resuscitation might be important in preventing in-hospital arrests among patients with infections.

  10. Genetics of cardiac disease in the small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M

    2010-07-01

    There is increasing evidence that many forms of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease in small animal patients are of familial origin. The large number of familial diseases in domestic purebred animals is thought to be associated with the desire to breed related animals to maintain a specific appearance and the selection of animals from a small group of popular founders (founder effect). Clinicians can use knowledge that a particular trait or disease may be inherited to provide guidance to owners and animal breeders to reduce the frequency of the trait. Even if the molecular cause is not known, identification of a pattern of inheritance and information on clinical screening can be useful for a breeder trying to make breeding decisions. Common forms of inheritance for veterinary diseases include autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, X-linked recessive, and polygenic. These genetic traits and their possible involvement in cardiac disease in small animals are discussed in this article.

  11. [Cardiac transplantation. Selection of patients and long-term results].

    PubMed

    Cabrol, C; Gandjbakhch, I; Pavie, A; Bors, V; Cabrol, A; Léger, P; Vaissier, E; Simmoneau, F; Chomette, G; Aupetit, B

    1987-12-01

    Performed for the first time in the world, in December 1967, by Barnard in Capetown, and for the first time in Europe by our team in April 1968, cardiac transplantation has now 20 years of clinical applications. A best selection of the recipients, a more precise selection of donors, refinements in surgical technique, a better and earlier diagnosis of post-operative complications, more effective therapeutic means especially cyclosporin, have brought us, from 1981, such major improvements that many teams were prompted to resume the procedure. In our experience of more than 400 transplants at La Pitié Hospital, a five-year follow-up shows that 70 p. cent of the patients are alive, having resumed a normal familial, social, professional and often sporting life. Much progress remains to be achieved, but this procedure now seems to be quite common if not routine, only limited by the insufficient number of donors.

  12. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: Role of MicroRNA Changes.

    PubMed

    Sardu, Celestino; Barbieri, Michelangela; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Pasquale; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Marfella, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two growing and related diseases in general population and particularly in elderly people. In selected patients affected by HF and severe dysfunction of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), with left bundle brunch block, the cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT) is the treatment of choice to improve symptoms, NYHA class, and quality of life. CRT effects are related to alterations in genes and microRNAs (miRs) expression, which regulate cardiac processes involved in cardiac apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis, and membrane channel ionic currents. Different studies have shown a different prognosis in T2DM patients and T2DM elderly patients treated by CRT-D. We reviewed the literature data on CRT-D effect on adult and elderly patients with T2DM as compared with nondiabetic patients.

  13. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: Role of MicroRNA Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sardu, Celestino; Barbieri, Michelangela; Rizzo, Maria Rosaria; Paolisso, Pasquale; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Marfella, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two growing and related diseases in general population and particularly in elderly people. In selected patients affected by HF and severe dysfunction of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), with left bundle brunch block, the cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT) is the treatment of choice to improve symptoms, NYHA class, and quality of life. CRT effects are related to alterations in genes and microRNAs (miRs) expression, which regulate cardiac processes involved in cardiac apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis, and membrane channel ionic currents. Different studies have shown a different prognosis in T2DM patients and T2DM elderly patients treated by CRT-D. We reviewed the literature data on CRT-D effect on adult and elderly patients with T2DM as compared with nondiabetic patients. PMID:26636106

  14. Predictors of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Handerson Nunes; Magedanz, Ellen Hettwer; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; dos Santos, Natalia Nunes; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Goldani, Marco Antonio; Petracco, João Batista; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk factors related to the development of stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods A historical cohort study. We included 4626 patients aged > 18 years who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, heart valve replacement surgery alone or heart valve surgery combined with coronary artery bypass grafting between January 1996 and December 2011. The relationship between risk predictors and stroke was assessed by logistic regression model with a significance level of 0.05. Results The incidence of stroke was 3% in the overall sample. After logistic regression, the following risk predictors for stroke were found: age 50-65 years (OR=2.11 - 95% CI 1.05-4.23 - P=0.036) and age >66 years (OR=3.22 - 95% CI 1.6-6.47 - P=0.001), urgent and emergency surgery (OR=2.03 - 95% CI 1.20-3.45 - P=0.008), aortic valve disease (OR=2.32 - 95% CI 1.18-4.56 - P=0.014), history of atrial fibrillation (OR=1.88 - 95% CI 1.05-3.34 - P=0.032), peripheral artery disease (OR=1.81 - 95% CI 1.13-2.92 - P=0.014), history of cerebrovascular disease (OR=3.42 - 95% CI 2.19-5.35 - P<0.001) and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes (OR=1.71 - 95% CI 1.16-2.53 - P=0.007). Mortality was 31.9% in the stroke group and 8.5% in the control group (OR=5.06 - 95% CI 3.5-7.33 - P<0.001). Conclusion The study identified the following risk predictors for stroke after cardiac surgery: age, urgent and emergency surgery, aortic valve disease, history of atrial fibrillation, peripheral artery disease, history of cerebrovascular disease and cardiopulmonary bypass time > 110 minutes. PMID:25140462

  15. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  16. Radiation exposure to operator and patients during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cho, J. H.; Park, S. J.; Kim, J. S.; On, Y. K.; Huh, J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the radiation exposure to operator and patient during cardiac electrophysiology study, radiofrequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures and to calculate the allowable number of cases per year. We carried out 9 electrophysiology studies, 40 radiofrequency catheter ablation and 11 cardiac device implantation procedures. To measure occupational radiation dose and dose-area product (DAP), 13 photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes (inside and outside lead glass), thyroids (inside and outside thyroid collar), chest (inside and outside lead apron), wrists, genital of the operator (inside lead apron), and 6 of photoluminescence glass dosimeters were placed at eyes, thyroids, chest and genital of the patient. Exposure time and DAP values were 11.7 ± 11.8 min and 23.2 ± 26.2 Gy cm2 for electrophysiology study; 36.5 ± 42.1 min and 822.4 ± 125.5 Gy cm2 for radiofrequency catheter ablation; 16.2 ± 9.3 min and 27.8 ± 16.5 Gy cm2 for cardiac device implantation procedure, prospectively. 4591 electrophysiology studies can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv), and 658-electrophysiology studies with radiofrequency catheter ablation can be carried out within the occupational exposure limit for the hands (500 mSv). 1654 cardiac device implantation procedure can be conducted within the occupational exposure limit for the eyes (150 mSv). The amounts of the operator and patient's radiation exposure were comparatively small. So, electrophysiology study, radio frequency catheter ablation and cardiac device implantation procedures are safe when performed with modern equipment and optimized protective radiation protect equipment.

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  18. Cardiac morbidity and mortality in deferoxamine- or deferiprone-treated patients with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; De Stefano, Piero; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Forni, Gian Luca; Gamberini, Maria Rita; Ghilardi, Roberta; Piga, Antonio; Romeo, Maria Antonietta; Zhao, Huaqing; Cnaan, Avital

    2006-05-01

    Deferoxamine (DFO) therapy has been associated with improved survival of thalassemia patients. However, cardiac disease remains the main cause of death in those patients. In 1995, the oral chelator deferiprone became available for clinical use. We compared the occurrence of cardiac disease in patients treated only with DFO and in those whose therapy was switched to deferiprone during the period of observation, from January 31, 1995, to December 31, 2003. All patients with thalassemia major treated in 7 Italian centers who were born between 1970 and 1993 and who had not experienced a cardiac event prior to January 1995 were included. DFO only was given to 359 patients, and 157 patients received deferiprone for part of the time. A total of 3,610 patient-years were observed on DFO and 750 on deferiprone. At baseline, the 2 groups were comparable for age and sex, while ferritin levels were significantly higher in patients switched to deferiprone. Fifty-two cardiac events, including 10 cardiac deaths, occurred during therapy with DFO. No cardiac events occurred during deferiprone therapy or within at least 18 months after the end of it. In the setting of a natural history study, deferiprone therapy was associated with significantly greater cardiac protection than deferoxamine in patients with thalassemia major.

  19. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Philip A.

    Australian Aboriginal ethnoastronomical traditions were recorded from a wide variety of sources in different periods. While the corpus of mythology concerning the heavens is diverse, it is unified by beliefs of a Skyworld as land with its own topography, containing plants and animals familiar to those living below. Spirits of the dead reside alongside the Creation Ancestors as celestial bodies in the Skyworld. Aboriginal hunter-gatherers used the regular movement of constellations and planets to measure time and to indicate the season, while unexpected change in the sky was seen as an omen.

  20. Smoking Cessation in Cardiac Patients: The Influence of Action Plans, Coping Plans and Self-Efficacy on Quitting Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac…

  1. Cultivating Aboriginal Cultures and Educating Aboriginal Children in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Karen; Kuo, Li Tsung Wen

    2007-01-01

    Many Americans believe that diversity issues are limited to the United States. The truth is, however, that many cultures struggle to recognize and foster cultural diversity. In this article, the authors have two aims: (1) to recognize various ethnic groups in Taiwan, in particular aboriginal groups; and (2) to inform educators about what they can…

  2. Australian Aboriginal Deaf People and Aboriginal Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des

    2013-01-01

    Many Australian Aboriginal people use a sign language ("hand talk") that mirrors their local spoken language and is used both in culturally appropriate settings when speech is taboo or counterindicated and for community communication. The characteristics of these languages are described, and early European settlers' reports of deaf…

  3. Evaluation of cardiac function using transthoracic echocardiography in patients with myocardial injury secondary to methomyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Keon; Cho, Nam Hyub; Kim, Oh Hyun; Go, Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Cha, Kyoung Chul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh; Cha, Yong Sung

    2015-07-01

    Generally, the mortality rate for cases of carbamate poisoning is low, but fatalities secondary to methomyl poisoning have been reported including a case report of cardiac toxicity following short-term exposure to methomyl. There have been no reports, however, regarding patterns of cardiac toxicity after exposure to methomyl. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of myocardial injury using a biochemical marker, troponin I (TnI), and evaluated cardiac function using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We conducted a retrospective review of 14 consecutive methomyl poisoning cases that were diagnosed and treated at the emergency department of the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013. On ECG analysis, ST depression and T-wave inversion were seen in five patients (35.7%) and one patient (7.1%), respectively. On cardiac biochemical marker analysis, initial TnI was elevated in 11 patients (78.6%). TTE was performed in nine patients among the 11 patients in whom TnI was found to be elevated. Of the nine patients that underwent TTE, three patients (33.3%) showed a reduced ejection fraction (EF), and RWMA was noted in two patients. There were two patients (22.2%) that had both reduced systolic function and RWMA. One patient did not regain normal systolic function on admission. None of the three patients with reduced EF received any specific treatment to support cardiac function. One patient expired due to pneumonia, and one patient was transferred as moribund. We followed up on 12 patients who survived to discharge for 6-44 months. One patient (8.3%) was died to follow-up, and 11 patients survived without any further complications. Methomyl exposure can cause direct myocardial injury and reversible cardiac dysfunction. Monitoring of TnI levels and TTE for evaluation of cardiac function may be useful in the workup of patients suffering from methomyl poisoning.

  4. Cardiac Involvement Classification and Therapeutic Management in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Abasse, Soumeth; Silverston, Katy

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. The clinical picture included peripheral muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy and chronic respiratory insufficiency. In this paper, the authors review cardiac involvement in patients with DMD, propose a cardiac impairment classification and discuss therapeutic management options.

  5. Cardiac transplantation in a patient with a single ventricle and transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Richenbacher, W E; Karwande, S V; Shaddy, R E; Renlund, D G; Bristow, M R; O'Connell, J B; Gay, W A

    1991-10-01

    The technical details of orthotopic cardiac transplantation in a 17-year-old man with a single ventricle and transposition of the great vessels are described. Special considerations in the evaluation and management of patients with complex congenital heart disease who are to undergo cardiac transplantation are delineated.

  6. Cardiac Involvement Classification and Therapeutic Management in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Abasse, Soumeth; Silverston, Katy

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. The clinical picture included peripheral muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy and chronic respiratory insufficiency. In this paper, the authors review cardiac involvement in patients with DMD, propose a cardiac impairment classification and discuss therapeutic management options. PMID:28269790

  7. Cardiac transplant in young female patient diagnosed with diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennasar, Guillermo; Carlevaris, Leandro; Secco, Anastasia; Romanini, Felix; Mamani, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) in a multifactorial and systemic, chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the connective tissue. We present this clinical case given the low prevalence of diffuse SS with early and progressive cardiac compromise in a young patient, and treatment with cardiac transplantation.

  8. Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Julie Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had…

  9. Preventing Long-Term Cardiac Damage in Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kelly

    Kawasaki disease is currently the leading cause of long-term cardiac damage in pediatric patients in the United States. Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on symptomatology and by ruling out other etiology. There is a significant need for an improved, standardized treatment protocol for patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and a more rapid initiation of treatment for these patients. Decreasing the cardiac damage caused by Kawasaki disease with timely diagnosis and treatment needs be a principal goal.

  10. Cardiac Monitoring in Patients with Syncope: Making that Elusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Rajesh; Chia, Pow-Li; Gula, Lorne J.; Klein, George J.; Skanes, Allan C.; Yee, Raymond; Krahn, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the cause of syncope is often a diagnostic challenge. At present, there is a myriad of ambulatory cardiac monitoring modalities available for recording cardiac rhythm during spontaneous symptoms. We provide a comprehensive review of these devices and discuss strategies on how to reach the elusive diagnosis based on current evidencebased recommendations. PMID:23228074

  11. Cardiac monitoring in patients with syncope: making that elusive diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Rajesh; Chia, Pow-Li; Gula, Lorne J; Klein, George J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Krahn, Andrew D

    2013-11-01

    Elucidating the cause of syncope is often a diagnostic challenge. At present, there is a myriad of ambulatory cardiac monitoring modalities available for recording cardiac rhythm during spontaneous symptoms. We provide a comprehensive review of these devices and discuss strategies on how to reach the elusive diagnosis based on current evidencebased recommendations.

  12. Visibility and Voice: Aboriginal People Experience Culturally Safe and Unsafe Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hole, Rachelle D; Evans, Mike; Berg, Lawrence D; Bottorff, Joan L; Dingwall, Carlene; Alexis, Carmella; Nyberg, Jessie; Smith, Michelle L

    2015-12-01

    In Canada, cultural safety (CS) is emerging as a theoretical and practice lens to orient health care services to meet the needs of Aboriginal people. Evidence suggests Aboriginal peoples' encounters with health care are commonly negative, and there is concern that these experiences can contribute to further adverse health outcomes. In this article, we report findings based on participatory action research drawing on Indigenous methods. Our project goal was to interrogate practices within one hospital to see whether and how CS for Aboriginal patients could be improved. Interviews with Aboriginal patients who had accessed hospital services were conducted, and responses were collated into narrative summaries. Using interlocking analysis, findings revealed a number of processes operating to produce adverse health outcomes. One significant outcome is the production of structural violence that reproduces experiences of institutional trauma. Positive culturally safe experiences, although less frequently reported, were described as interpersonal interactions with feelings visibility and therefore, treatment as a "human being."

  13. [Management of aortic stenosis in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Labbé, Vincent; Ederhy, Stéphane; Szymkiewicz, Olga; Cohen, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis (valve area <1cm(2) or 0.6cm(2)/m(2) body surface area, and maximum jet velocity ≥4m/sec, and mean aortic pressure gradient ≥40mmHg) undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with symptoms (dyspnoea, angina, syncope, or heart failure). Before any surgery, clinical assessment should search for signs of aortic stenosis which justifies echocardiographic examination, particularly in the elderly. A systematic rest echocardiography with searching aortic stenosis should be considered in patients undergoing high risk surgery. The key points of pre-operative cardiac risk assessment are: assessment of the severity of aortic stenosis, measurement of the functional capacity, evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function, search of associated coronary artery disease, estimate of the surgical risk of cardiac events, and achievement of risk indices. In symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, only urgent non-cardiac surgery should be performed under careful haemodynamic monitoring. Aortic valve replacement should be considered before elective non-cardiac surgery. In asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve replacement should be considered before non-cardiac high risk surgery. Non-cardiac surgery at low/intermediate risk can be performed provided an adapted anaesthetic technique.

  14. Recent developments in the management of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Clements, Casey M; Murphy, Joseph G; Wright, R Scott

    2017-02-16

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in Europe and the United States. Many patients who are initially resuscitated die in the hospital, and hospital survivors often have substantial neurologic dysfunction. Most cardiac arrests are caused by coronary artery disease; patients with coronary artery disease likely benefit from early coronary angiography and intervention. After resuscitation, cardiac arrest patients remain critically ill and frequently suffer cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Early cardiopulmonary stabilization is important to prevent worsening organ injury. To achieve best patient outcomes, comprehensive critical care management is needed, with primary goals of stabilizing hemodynamics and preventing progressive brain injury. Targeted temperature management is frequently recommended for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to mitigate the neurologic injury that drives outcomes. Accurate neurologic assessment is central to managing care of cardiac arrest survivors and should combine physical examination with objective neurologic testing, with the caveat that delaying neurologic prognosis is essential to avoid premature withdrawal of supportive care. A combination of clinical findings and diagnostic results should be used to estimate the likelihood of functional recovery. This review focuses on recent advances in care and specific cardiac intensive care strategies that may improve morbidity and mortality for patients after cardiac arrest.

  15. Use of a MitraClip for severe mitral regurgitation in a cardiac transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Fayez S.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Severe mitral regurgitation (MR) in patients after cardiac transplant has not been well studied. Traditionally, patients have undergone corrective surgery. We report a 64-year-old man who presented with new heart failure symptoms 6 months after cardiac transplantation. He was found to have severe MR and underwent successful implantation of a MitraClip® with reduction of his MR to mild as well as improvement in his symptoms. Six months later he was still doing well, and a repeat echocardiogram showed good results. We found two previously reported cases using the MitraClip to treat severe MR in adult cardiac transplant patients. The MitraClip is a viable treatment option for MR in cardiac transplant patients despite their distorted anatomy.

  16. Current Practice and Recommendation for Presurgical Cardiac Evaluation in Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, P. Shanmuga

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing major noncardiac surgery justifies guidelines concerning preoperative cardiac evaluation. This is compounded by increasing chances for a volatile perioperative period if the underlying cardiac problems are left uncorrected prior to major noncardiac surgeries. Preoperative cardiac evaluation requires the clinician to assess the patient's probability to have CAD, severity and stability of CAD, placing these in perspective regarding the likelihood of a perioperative cardiac complication based on the planned surgical procedure. Coronary events like new onset ischemia, infarction, or revascularization, induce a high-risk period of 6 weeks, and an intermediate-risk period of 3 months before performing noncardiac surgery. This delay is unwarranted in cases where surgery is the mainstay of treatment. The objective of this review is to offer a comprehensive algorithm in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery and highlight the importance of myocardial perfusion imaging in risk stratifying these patients. PMID:25191106

  17. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  18. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sandra C; Haynes, Emma; Woods, John A; Bessarab, Dawn C; Dimer, Lynette A; Wood, Marianne M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Hamilton, Sandra J; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. Methods: The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Results: Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Conclusion: Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their Aboriginal patients

  19. Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy in patients with calcification within the cardiac silhouette.

    PubMed Central

    Wald, R W; Sternberg, L; Huckell, V F; Staniloff, H M; Feiglin, D H; Morch, J E

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintiscanning was performed in 22 patients with radiographically detected calcification within the cardiac silhouette. All but one of these scintigrams showed a localised area of increased activity similar to that ordinarily seen in acute myocardial infarction. Scintiscans in 3 patients after removal of the calcified aortic valve reverted to negative. It was concluded that this technique for acute infarct detection may yield false positive results in the presence of cardiac calcification. Images PMID:207292

  20. Reproducibility of cardiac power output and other cardiopulmonary exercise indices in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Seferovic, Petar M; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Brodie, David A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac power output is a direct measure of overall cardiac function that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the reproducibility of cardiac power output and other more commonly reported cardiopulmonary exercise variables in patients with chronic heart failure. Metabolic, ventilatory and non-invasive (inert gas re-breathing) central haemodynamic measurements were undertaken at rest and near-maximal exercise of the modified Bruce protocol in 19 patients with stable chronic heart failure. The same procedure was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Cardiac power output was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Resting central haemodynamic variables demonstrate low CV (coefficient of variation) (ranging from 3.4% for cardiac output and 5.6% for heart rate). The CV for resting metabolic and ventilatory measurements ranged from 8.2% for respiratory exchange ratio and 14.2% for absolute values of oxygen consumption. The CV of anaerobic threshold, peak oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and respiratory exchange ratio ranged from 3.8% (for anaerobic threshold) to 6.4% (for relative peak oxygen consumption), with minute ventilation having a CV of 11.1%. Near-maximal exercise cardiac power output and cardiac output had CVs of 4.1 and 2.2%, respectively. Cardiac power output demonstrates good reproducibility suggesting that there is no need for performing more than one cardiopulmonary exercise test. As a direct measure of cardiac function (dysfunction) and an excellent prognostic marker, it is strongly advised in the assessment of patients with chronic heart failure undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  1. Cost and effectiveness assessment of cardiac rehabilitation for dialysis patients following coronary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Rebecca; Culler, Steven; Kutner, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis patients have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. In the general population, cardiac rehabilitation is recommended as a standard component of care and is covered by Medicare for patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Previous investigation demonstrated survival benefit of cardiac rehabilitation in dialysis patients. This study investigated its impact on Medicare expenditure and its cost effectiveness. A cohort of 4,324 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who initiated chronic hemodialysis and underwent CABG between 1998 and 2004 was selected from the United States Renal Data System. Cardiac rehabilitation was defined by Current Procedural Terminology codes for monitored and nonmonitored exercise in Medicare claims data. Medicare expenditure included inpatient and outpatient claims with cost adjusted to 1998 dollars. At 42 months of follow-up after a 6-month entry period following CABG hospitalization discharge, cardiac rehabilitation at baseline was associated with higher cumulative Medicare expenditure, incurring a statistically nonsignificant increment of $2,904 (95% CI: −7,028, 11,940). During the same period, cardiac rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer cumulative lifetime, having an incremental benefit of 76 days (95% CI: 22, 129). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $13,887 per year of life saved, suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is highly cost-effective in ESRD patients following CABG. PMID:18650790

  2. Incidence, Predictors, and Clinical Outcomes of Postoperative Cardiac Tamponade in Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Surgery.

    PubMed

    You, Seng Chan; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Lee, Sak; Chang, Hyuck-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chang, Byung-Chul; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence, predictors, and clinical outcomes of cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery. A total of 556 patients who underwent heart valve surgery in a single tertiary center between January 2010 and March 2012 were studied. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) about 5 days after surgery and TTE was repeated regularly. Patients with suspected acute pericardial hemorrhage were excluded. Cardiac tamponade occurred in twenty-four (4.3%) patients and all underwent surgical or percutaneous pericardial drainage. The median time of pericardial drainage after surgery was 17 (interquartile range, IQR, 13-30) days. Infective endocarditis, mechanical valve replacement of aortic or mitral valve, and any amount of pericardial effusion (PE) on the first postoperative TTE were related to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade (all p<0.05). After multivariate adjustment, occurrence of cardiac tamponade was associated with any amount of PE on the first postoperative TTE (hazard ratio, HR, 14.00, p<0.001) and mechanical valve replacement (HR 2.69, p = 0.025). The mean hospital days in patients with cardiac tamponade was higher than those without (34.9 vs. 13.5, p = 0.031). After pericardial drainage, there was no echocardiographic recurrence of significant PE during a median of 34.8 (IQR 14.9-43.7) months after surgery. Cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery is not uncommon. Patients with any amount of PE at the first postoperative TTE or mechanical valve replacement should receive higher attention with regard to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade. Although it prolongs hospital stay, cardiac tamponade exhibits a benign clinical course without recurrence after timely intervention.

  3. Incidence, Predictors, and Clinical Outcomes of Postoperative Cardiac Tamponade in Patients Undergoing Heart Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    You, Seng Chan; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Darae; Cho, In Jeong; Lee, Sak; Chang, Hyuck-Jae; Ha, Jong-Won; Chang, Byung-Chul; Chung, Namsik

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the incidence, predictors, and clinical outcomes of cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery. A total of 556 patients who underwent heart valve surgery in a single tertiary center between January 2010 and March 2012 were studied. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) about 5 days after surgery and TTE was repeated regularly. Patients with suspected acute pericardial hemorrhage were excluded. Cardiac tamponade occurred in twenty-four (4.3%) patients and all underwent surgical or percutaneous pericardial drainage. The median time of pericardial drainage after surgery was 17 (interquartile range, IQR, 13–30) days. Infective endocarditis, mechanical valve replacement of aortic or mitral valve, and any amount of pericardial effusion (PE) on the first postoperative TTE were related to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade (all p<0.05). After multivariate adjustment, occurrence of cardiac tamponade was associated with any amount of PE on the first postoperative TTE (hazard ratio, HR, 14.00, p<0.001) and mechanical valve replacement (HR 2.69, p = 0.025). The mean hospital days in patients with cardiac tamponade was higher than those without (34.9 vs. 13.5, p = 0.031). After pericardial drainage, there was no echocardiographic recurrence of significant PE during a median of 34.8 (IQR 14.9–43.7) months after surgery. Cardiac tamponade after heart valve surgery is not uncommon. Patients with any amount of PE at the first postoperative TTE or mechanical valve replacement should receive higher attention with regard to the occurrence of cardiac tamponade. Although it prolongs hospital stay, cardiac tamponade exhibits a benign clinical course without recurrence after timely intervention. PMID:27855225

  4. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is associated with lower cardiac iron loading in chronically transfused thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Ricchi, Paolo; Meloni, Antonella; Spasiano, Anna; Neri, Maria Giovanna; Gamberini, Maria Rita; Cuccia, Liana; Caruso, Vincenzo; Gerardi, Calogera; D'Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Rosso, Rosamaria; Campisi, Saveria; Rizzo, Michele; Terrazzino, Fabrizia; Vangosa, Alessandra Briatico; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Missere, Massimiliano; Mangione, Maurizio; Positano, Vincenzo; Pepe, Alessia

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a large cohort of chronically transfused patients, whether the presence of extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) accounts for the typical patterns of cardiac iron distribution and/or cardiac function parameters. We retrospectively selected 1,266 thalassemia major patients who had undergone regular transfusions (611 men and 655 women; mean age: 31.3 ± 8.9 years, range: 4.2-66.6 years) and were consecutively enrolled within the Myocardial Iron Overload in Thalassemia network. The presence of EMH was evaluated based on steady-state free precession sequences; cardiac and liver iron overloads were quantified using a multiecho T2* approach; cardiac function parameters and pulmonary diameter were quantified using the steady-state free precession sequences; and myocardial fibrosis was evaluated using the late gadolinium enhancement technique. EMH was detected in 167 (13.2%) patients. The EMH+ patients had significantly lower cardiac iron overload than that of the EMH- patients (P = 0.003). The patterns of cardiac iron distribution were significantly different in the EMH+ and EMH- patients (P < 0.0001), with a higher prevalence of patients with no myocardial iron overload and heterogeneous myocardial iron overload and no significant global heart iron in the EMH+ group EMH+ patients had a significantly higher left ventricle mass index (P = 0.001) and a significantly higher pulmonary artery diameter (P = 0.002). In conclusion, in regularly transfused thalassemia patients, EMH was common and was associated with a thalassemia intermedia-like pattern of cardiac iron deposition despite regular transfusion therapy.

  5. Are patients with cardiac implants protected against electromagnetic interference in daily life and occupational environment?

    PubMed

    Napp, Andreas; Stunder, Dominik; Maytin, Melanie; Kraus, Thomas; Marx, Nikolaus; Driessen, Sarah

    2015-07-21

    Utilization of cardiac implants such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators is now commonplace among heart disease patients. The ever-increasing technological complexity of these devices is matched by the near omnipresent exposure to electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields (EMFs), both in everyday life and the occupational environment. Given that electromagnetic interferences (EMIs) are associated with potential risk in device patients, physicians are increasingly confronted with managing device patients with intermittent EMI and chronic occupational exposure. The current review aims to provide a contemporary overview of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices, their function and susceptibility of non-medical EMFs and provide recommendations for physicians caring for cardiac device patients presenting with EMI.

  6. Peri-operative Levosimendan in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: An Overview of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shi, William Y; Li, Sheila; Collins, Nicholas; Cottee, David B; Bastian, Bruce C; James, Allen N; Mejia, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, has recently emerged as a valuable agent in the peri-operative management of cardiac surgery patients. Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitising ionodilator. By binding to cardiac troponin C and reducing its calcium-binding co-efficient, it enhances myofilament responsiveness to calcium and thus enhances myocardial contractility without increasing oxygen demand. Current evidence suggests that levosimendan enhances cardiac function after cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with both normal and reduced left ventricular function. In addition to being used as post-operative rescue therapy for low cardiac output syndrome, a pre-operative levosimendan infusion in high risk patients with poor cardiac function may reduce inotropic requirements, the need for mechanical support, the duration of intensive care admissions as well as post-operative mortality. Indeed, it is these higher-risk patients who may experience a greater degree of benefit. Larger, multicentre randomised trials in cardiac surgery will help to elucidate the full potential of this agent.

  7. Cardiac amyloidosis in a heart transplant patient - A case report and retrospective analysis of amyloidosis evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kintsler, Svetlana; Jäkel, Jörg; Brandenburg, Vincent; Kersten, Katrin; Knuechel, Ruth; Röcken, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cardiac amyloidosis is a very rare cause of heart failure in heart transplant recipients but an important differential diagnosis in cases of progressive cardiac failure. We report a 72-year-old male patient with the diagnosis of senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) in a transplanted heart 15 years after transplantation by the initial diagnosis of the dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally performed immunohistochemical analysis with anti-transthyretin antibody of the cardiac biopsies of the last 15 years enabled the possibility to show the evolution of this disease with characteristic biphasic pattern. PMID:25674390

  8. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk.

  9. Cardiac haemangioma with coronary-pulmonary artery fistula in one patient.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongfei; Li, Weidong; Teng, Peng; Ni, Yiming

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac haemangioma and coronary-pulmonary artery fistula are both rare entities. We present the case of a 45-year-old symptomatic male patient with a rare cardiac cavernous haemangioma. During assessment, coronary-pulmonary artery fistula was diagnosed by computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the coronary artery. As far as we know, this is the first case in which cardiac haemangioma has been found to co-exist with coronary-pulmonary artery fistula. Surgery remains the most effective form of therapy. Meanwhile, in patients with heart issues, CTA of the coronary artery has its particularly advantages that can reduce the risk of a second operation and missed diagnosis. We also performed an electronic search of the published literature in English on cases of cardiac haemangioma.

  10. The Relation Between Variability of Intact Parathyroid Hormone, Calcium, and Cardiac Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Ozkan, Gulsum; Guvercin, Beyhan; Yavuz, Adnan

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-BMD) is a condition known to be associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The relation between calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) variability in HD patients and cardiac mortality is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation between variability in these parameters and cardiac mortality. Baseline demographic and biochemical parameters of 218 HD patients together with Ca values corrected with albumin and P values measured on a monthly basis and iPTH levels measured at 3-monthly intervals were recorded over 2 years. Standard deviation (SD) and smoothness index (SI) for each parameter were calculated to assess Ca, P, and iPTH variability. The relations between all parameters and cardiac mortality were then analyzed. Cardiac mortality was observed in 38 patients in the 2-year study period. Nonsurviving patients' ages, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP) levels, mean iPTH, and SD iPTH were significantly higher than those of surviving patients, while albumin levels, SI iPTH and SI Ca were significantly lower. Age, low albumin, high DBP, SI iPTH, and SI Ca were identified as independent predictors of cardiac mortality at multivariate analysis. Our study shows that Ca and iPTH variability affect cardiac mortality independently of mean and baseline values. When supported by further studies, the relation between Ca and iPTH variability and cardiac mortality in HD patients can lead to a new perspective in terms of prognosis and treatment planning.

  11. Usefulness of Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Imaging Using (123)Iodine-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy for Predicting Sudden Cardiac Death in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the human heart. Activation of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system is a cardinal pathophysiological abnormality associated with the failing human heart. Myocardial imaging using (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, can be used to investigate the activity of norepinephrine, the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system. Many clinical trials have demonstrated that (123)I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters predict cardiac adverse events, especially sudden cardiac death, in patients with heart failure. In this review, we summarize results from published studies that have focused on the use of cardiac sympathetic nerve imaging using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure.

  12. Aboriginal Gambling and Problem Gambling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Helen; Gainsbury, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of gambling-related problems amongst Aboriginal communities has been neglected by most public health strategies which concentrate on mainstream populations. Research indicates that rates of problem gambling are higher for Aboriginal groups than the general population. Specific cultural, familial, and social patterns influence…

  13. As We See...Aboriginal Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiffarm, Lenore A., Ed.

    For many years, Aboriginal knowledge was invalidated by Western ways of knowing. This collection of papers discusses ways of teaching, ways of knowing, and ways of being that have sustained Aboriginal people for over 500 years. The papers are: "Spirit Writing: Writing Circles as Healing Pedagogy" (Lenore A. Stiffarm); "Pedagogy from…

  14. Supporting Success: Aboriginal Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallop, Cynthia J.; Bastien, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    For most Aboriginal students in Canada, the term "success" in postsecondary education is more complicated than the mainstream notions of higher socioeconomic status and career advancement. Historically, "success" for Aboriginal peoples in postsecondary education was linked to issues of assimilation, since to be successful meant…

  15. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  16. Preparing Aboriginal Students for Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Krause, R.G.; Stephens, M.C.C.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Special Premedical Studies Program at the University of Manitoba and results of interviews with its graduates. This program prepares aboriginal students for admission to medical school. Six physicians and several other health professionals have graduated from the program. Respondents noted similarities in the needs of rural students and those of aboriginal students. PMID:21221337

  17. Aboriginal health promotion through addressing employment discrimination.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Angeline S; Paradies, Yin; Perry, Ryan; Kelaher, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The Localities Embracing and Accepting Diversity (LEAD) program aimed to improve the mental health of Aboriginal Victorians by addressing racial discrimination and facilitating social and economic participation. As part of LEAD, Whittlesea Council adopted the Aboriginal Employment Pathways Strategy (AEPS) to increase Aboriginal employment and retention within the organisation. The Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Training Program was developed to build internal cultural competency and skills in recruiting and retaining Aboriginal staff. Analysis of surveys conducted before (pre; n=124) and after (post; n=107) the training program indicated a significant increase in participant understanding across all program objectives and in support of organisational policies to improve Aboriginal recruitment and retention. Participants ended the training with concrete ideas about intended changes, as well as how these changes could be supported by their supervisors and the wider organisation. Significant resources have since been allocated to implementing the AEPS over 5 years. In line with principles underpinning the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-23, particularly the focus on addressing racism as a determinant of health, this paper explores the AEPS and training program as promising approaches to health promotion through addressing barriers to Aboriginal employment. Possible implications for other large organisations are also considered.

  18. No Aboriginal Students left Behind in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Sue-Jen; Hartzler-Miller, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    The project is motivated by Taiwan's huge gap of educational levels between the aborigines and the Hans. The low achievement of aboriginal students lies in factors related to problems in finance, health, and cultural difference, which contribute to their sense of self-deprecation. The purpose of the project is to provide early intervention and…

  19. Knowledge Building in an Aboriginal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The report on the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (1996), the Kelowna Accord announced in 2005 (five-billion dollars) followed by its demise in 2006, and the settlement in 2006 for Aboriginal survivors of residential schools (1.9 billion dollars), are but some of the recent high-profile indicators of the challenges to Canada in dealing with…

  20. Aboriginal Healing Foundation Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboriginal Healing Foundation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Aboriginal Healing Foundation (AHF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1998 with funding from the Canadian Government. Its mission is to support Aboriginal people in building sustainable healing processes that address the legacy of physical and sexual abuse in the residential school system, including intergenerational impacts. AHF…

  1. Insights on end-of-life ceremonial practices of Australian Aboriginal peoples.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Phillips, Emma

    2008-01-01

    The ceremonies surrounding death are extremely important to Aboriginal peoples and take precedence over all other activities. This article presents research findings on Aboriginal mortuary ceremonies in the hope that it will be useful for non-indigenous nurses working with Aboriginal peoples. A qualitative research methodology was used, whereby data were collected by conducting 72 open-ended interviews with patients, carers, Aboriginal health care workers, health care workers and interpreters in four geographical areas in the Northern Territory. A descriptive phenomenological approach was taken to the recording and analysis of the data. The findings reveal that traditional practices including the smoking ceremony (a spiritual ritual conducted in the deceased's living space with the rationale of driving the deceased's spirit away), painting ochre on all living spaces inhabited by the deceased, or alternatively of putting up "flags" (which is considered to drive away the deceased's spirit and also to notify to the community that this is the house of a deceased) and the death ceremony (which includes practices such as keeping the deceased's body in the home, painting the bodies of the mourners and bringing kinship communities together to share food, song and dance) are of great significance in many Aboriginal cultures. It is the authors' hope and expectation that an understanding of these rituals, and their significance for different cultural groups, will assist nurses by increasing their knowledge of Aboriginal cultural and ceremonial practices associated with caring for the deceased and so aid their important work in this area.

  2. Treatment of hypothyroidism in elderly patients and in patients with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2007-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is often associated with adverse cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol together with hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and other atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk factors. The changed hemodynamic characteristics result in reduced cardiac index, and the renal perfusion is impaired with hyponatremia, and low renin and aldosterone production. The ischemic abnormalities are probably related to long-term consequences of a slow development of hypothyroidism, while the hemodynamic changes can develop in very short-term hypothyroidism. Replacement of hypothyroidism with levothyroxine is associated with a normalization of basal metabolic rate. Most patients with preexisting angina experience a gradual amelioration of symptoms, but in some cases the initial therapy may precipitate an unrecognized ischemic state, worsen a preexisting angina, or even result in myocardial infarction. It is therefore advisable to start replacement slowly and if needed perform a stress test and/or coronary angiography before. It may also in some cases be necessary to monitor the patients closely in a hospital setting during initiation of levothyroxine. Elderly hypothyroid patients with unstable angina pose a particular challenging problem, especially if coronary vascular surgery is indicated. No increased risk of peri- or postoperative death has been noted in small studies, although more complications have been described. It may be relevant to treat the cardiac vascular occlusion before starting replacement with levothyroxine in some cases, after careful weighting of pros and cons in each individual case.

  3. Weeding out or Developing Capacity? Challenges for Aboriginal Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie

    2010-01-01

    Teacher education is critical to the development of Aboriginal teachers able to ensure success among Aboriginal learners and contribute to the preservation and renewal of Aboriginal communities. In a series of talking circles, six beginning Aboriginal teachers discussed their teacher preparation and their first years of practice. They expressed…

  4. Teacher Awareness and Understandings about Aboriginal English in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Vanderford, Samantha; Grote, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Repeated assessments of literacy skills have shown that Aboriginal students do not achieve at the same level as their non-Aboriginal peers. Many Aboriginal students speak Aboriginal English, a dialect different from the Standard Australian English used in schools. Research shows that it is crucial for educators in bidialectal contexts to be aware…

  5. Cardiac surgery in patients on antiplatelet and antithrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The widespread application of antithrombotic agents carries significant potential for inducing excessive peri-operative hemorrhage during cardiac surgery. Specific surgical and medical strategies can be employed to attenuate this bleeding. These antithrombotic agents and anti-hemorrhagic measures will be reviewed in depth.

  6. Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD)—developing an Advanced Cancer Data System for Aboriginal people in South Australia: a mixed methods research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yerrell, Paul Henry; Roder, David; Cargo, Margaret; Reilly, Rachel; Banham, David; Micklem, Jasmine May; Morey, Kim; Stewart, Harold Bundamurra; Stajic, Janet; Norris, Michael; Brown, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Australia, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People carry a greater burden of cancer-related mortality than non-Aboriginal Australians. The Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities Project aims to develop and test an integrated, comprehensive cancer monitoring and surveillance system capable of incorporating epidemiological and narrative data to address disparities and advocate for clinical system change. Methods and analysis The Advanced Cancer Data System will integrate routinely collected unit record data from the South Australian Population Cancer Registry and a range of other data sources for a retrospective cohort of indigenous people with cancers diagnosed from 1990 to 2010. A randomly drawn non-Aboriginal cohort will be matched by primary cancer site, sex, age and year at diagnosis. Cross-tabulations and regression analyses will examine the extent to which demographic attributes, cancer stage and survival vary between the cohorts. Narratives from Aboriginal people with cancer, their families, carers and service providers will be collected and analysed using patient pathway mapping and thematic analysis. Statements from the narratives will structure both a concept mapping process of rating, sorting and prioritising issues, focusing on issues of importance and feasibility, and the development of a real-time Aboriginal Cancer Measure of Experience for ongoing linkage with epidemiological data in the Advanced Cancer Data System. Aboriginal Community engagement underpins this Project. Ethics and dissemination The research has been approved by relevant local and national ethics committees. Findings will be disseminated in local and international peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. In addition, the research will provide data for knowledge translation activities across the partner organisations and feed directly into the Statewide Cancer Control Plan. It will provide a mechanism for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of

  7. Reconstructing the star knowledge of Aboriginal Tasmanians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantevoort, Michelle; Hamacher, Duane W.; Lischick, Savannah

    2016-12-01

    The canopy of stars is a central presence in the daily and spiritual lives of Aboriginal Tasmanians. With the arrival of European colonists, Tasmanian astronomical knowledge and traditions were interrupted and dispersed. Fragments can be found scattered in the ethnographic and historical record throughout the nineteenth century. We draw from these ethnohistorical documents to analyse and reconstruct Aboriginal astronomical knowledge in Tasmania. This analysis demonstrates that stars, the Milky Way, constellations, dark nebula, the Sun, Moon, meteors and aurorae held cultural, spiritual and subsistence significance for the Aboriginal cultures of Tasmania. We move beyond a monolithic view of Aboriginal astronomical knowledge in Tasmania, commonly portrayed in previous research, to lay the groundwork for future ethnographic and archaeological fieldwork with Aboriginal elders and communities.

  8. Excellent results of cardiac surgery in patients with previous liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Filsoufi, Farzan; Rahmanian, Parwis B; Castillo, Javier G; Karlof, Eva; Schiano, Thomas D; Adams, David H

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases requiring surgical therapy in patients with prior liver transplantation are rare. Little is known about the outcome of patients with liver allograft undergoing cardiac surgery. Herein we report our experience in this patient population with an emphasis on operative outcomes and mid-term survival. Between January 1998 and December 2004, 12 patients (mean +/- standard deviation age 68 +/- 9 years, 7 [58%] male) with previous liver transplantation who underwent cardiac surgery were identified. Main outcome measures were hospital mortality, postoperative complications, allograft function, and long-term survival. There was no in-hospital mortality. Three major complications (25%) occurred, including 1 each (8%) of respiratory failure, renal failure, and biliary leakage. All complications were resolved by the time of discharge. Allograft dysfunction determined by an increase of liver function parameters was noticed in 4 (33%) and recovered before discharge. The average length of stay in intensive care unit was 72 +/- 45 hours, and the mean length of stay in hospital was 22 +/- 17 days. One- and 5-year survival was 91% +/- 8% and 67% +/- 14%, respectively. Cardiac surgery can be performed safely in liver transplant recipients with extremely low mortality and acceptable morbidities. Allograft dysfunction is a common finding, but it is transient, with early functional recovery. Five-year survival of liver recipients undergoing cardiac procedures is similar to that of the general population undergoing cardiac surgery. Our data suggest that these patients should be considered for cardiac surgery in reference centers with expertise in complex cardiac procedures and perioperative management of these highly specific patients.

  9. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation. PMID:24714370

  10. Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot suffer from intra- and inter-ventricular cardiac dyssynchrony: a cardiac magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Linyuan; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Suever, Jonathan D.; Alhadad, Sudad; Prakash, Ashwin; Cecchin, Frank; Skrinjar, Oskar; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) frequently have right bundle branch block. To better understand the contribution of cardiac dyssynchrony to dysfunction, we developed a method to quantify left (LV), right (RV), and inter-ventricular dyssynchrony using standard cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods and results Thirty patients with rTOF and 17 healthy controls underwent cine CMR. Patients were imaged twice to assess inter-test reproducibility. Circumferential strain curves were generated with a custom feature-tracking algorithm for 12 LV and 12 RV segments in each of 4–7 short-axis slices encompassing the ventricles. Temporal offsets (TOs, in ms) of the strain curves relative to a patient-specific reference curve were calculated. The intra-ventricular dyssynchrony index (DI) for each ventricle was computed as the standard deviation of the TOs. The inter-ventricular DI was calculated as the difference in median RV and median LV TOs. Compared with controls, patients had a greater LV DI (21 ± 8 vs. 11 ± 5 ms, P < 0.001) and RV DI (60 ± 19 vs. 47 ± 17 ms, P = 0.02). RV contraction was globally delayed in patients, resulting in a greater inter-ventricular DI with the RV contracting 45 ± 25 ms later than the LV vs. 12 ± 29 ms earlier in controls (P < 0.001). Inter-test reproducibility was moderate with all coefficients of variation ≤22%. Both LV and RV DIs were correlated with measures of LV, but not RV, function. Conclusion Patients with rTOF have intra- and inter-ventricular dyssynchrony, which can be quantified from standard cine CMR. This new approach can potentially help determine the contribution of dyssynchrony to ventricular dysfunction in future studies. PMID:24996664

  11. Contribution of Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Services to improving Aboriginal health: an evidence review.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Megan Ann; Hunt, Jennifer; Scrimgeour, David J; Davey, Maureen; Jones, Victoria

    2017-03-07

    Objective Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Services (ACCHSs) deliver comprehensive, culturally appropriate primary health care to Aboriginal people and communities. The published literature acknowledging and supporting the roles of ACCHSs in improving Aboriginal health is limited. This paper seeks to collate and analyse the published evidence supporting the contribution of ACCHSs to improving the health of Aboriginal people.Methods A conceptual framework for exploring the contribution of ACCHSs was developed, drawing on the literature on the core functions of ACCHSs and the components of quality primary health care. This framework was used to structure the search strategy, inclusion criteria and analysis of the review.Results ACCHSs contribute to improving the health and well being of Aboriginal peoples through several pathways, including community controlled governance, providing employment and training, strengthening the broader health system and providing accessible, comprehensive primary health care.Conclusions ACCHSs make a range of important contributions to improving the health of Aboriginal peoples that are under-acknowledged. Consideration of the different ways ACCHSs contribute to improving Aboriginal health is of value in the design and evaluation of programs and policies that aim to improve the health of Aboriginal peoples.What is known about the topic? Aboriginal communities have long argued the vital role of ACCHSs in improving Aboriginal health.What does this paper add? This paper provides a comprehensive collation and analysis of the evidence supporting the contributions ACCHSs are making to improving Aboriginal health.What are the implications for practitioners? The conceptual framework and findings outlined in this paper illustrate that ACCHSs are making important contributions to improving Aboriginal health through several pathways. This information can be used to ensure actions to improve Aboriginal health are appropriate and effective

  12. Management of Gingival Overgrowth in a Cardiac Transplant Patient Using Laser-Assisted Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty.

    PubMed

    Maddi, Abhiram; Alluri, Leela Subhashini; Ciancio, Sebastian G

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO) is an oral clinical manifestation associated with certain medications such as immunosuppressants that are administered to organ transplant patients to prevent graft rejection. In patients with cardiac transplants, management of DIGO is critical. In such patients, plaque biofilm accumulation at the gingival interface might be detrimental as it may lead to transient bacteremia as well as systemic inflammation resulting in thromboembolic events. This case report describes the management of DIGO in a cardiac transplant recipient by change of immunosuppressant medication, non-surgical periodontal therapy and laser-assisted gingivectomy.

  13. Long-Term Survival Following Cardiac Arrest Without Implantable Defibrillator Protection in a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa; Ucar, Ozgul; Canbay, Alper; Cetin, Zehra Guven; Cicekcioglu, Hulya; Diker, Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the optimal therapy in patients with HCM, both for primary or secondary prevention of sudden death. Left ventricular systolic function in HCM is usually normal. However, in few patients, HCM has been reported to progress to a state that is characterized by left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction, resembling dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Although arrhythmias are common in HCM, advanced or complete atrioventricular block (AV) is very rare. This case report describes a HCM patient who progressed to DCM with advanced AV block and survived 31 years following cardiac arrest without ICD protection.

  14. The psychological effects of a videotape educational intervention on cardiac catheterization patients.

    PubMed

    Chair, Sek Ying; Chau, Mei Yi; Sit, Janet Wing Hung; Wong, Eliza Mei Ling; Chan, Aileen Wai Kiu

    2012-02-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of death and morbidity worldwide, and cardiac catheterization plays an essential role in its diagnostic evaluation. This quasi-experimental study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention with the use of videotape and pamphlet among the Chinese patient undergoing the cardiac catheterization, and explored the relationship between anxiety, uncertainty, and other psychological variables. One hundred and thirty two Chinese patients of diagnosed or suspected CAD preparing for the first-time catheterization were recruited. Anxiety level (the Chinese State Anxiety Inventory) and uncertainty (the Chinese version of Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale) were measured before the intervention and within 2 hours before receiving cardiac catheterization; while patients' satisfaction and perceived knowledge gain were measured at 20-24 hours after it. The mean age of the participants was 61.3 and 64.8% of them were male. The findings indicated that the use of videotape to prepare patients for the cardiac catheterization is effective in reducing the level of anxiety (p < 0.001) and the uncertainty (p < 0.001), as the patients experienced higher satisfaction and knowledge level after the educational intervention. Therefore, videotape education is suggested for cardiac catheterization care on top of the usual pamphlet education.

  15. Gender differences in cardiac patients: a longitudinal investigation of exercise, autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression.

    PubMed

    Hunt-Shanks, Tiffany; Blanchard, Christopher; Reid, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    Female cardiac patients frequently experience greater anxiety and depression and engage in less exercise when compared with their male counterparts. This study considered whether exercise had similar effects on male and female cardiac patients' autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression, and whether exercise behavior explained the gender difference in their affective functioning (e.g. autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression). Eight hundred one participants completed the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and the leisure score index (LSI) of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Female cardiac patients had greater autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression and reduced exercise when compared with male cardiac patients at all time points. Although exercise was significantly related to affective outcomes at various time points for both men and women, gender did not moderate any of the exercise/affective relationships, and exercise did not mediate any of the gender/affective relationships. Further research is needed to clarify the complex relationships between gender, exercise, and the affective functioning of cardiac patients.

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  17. Cardiac vagal control and dynamic responses to psychological stress among patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grossman, P; Watkins, L L; Wilhelm, F H; Manolakis, D; Lown, B

    1996-12-15

    Two groups of patients with coronary artery disease who differed in level of cardiac vagal control were compared in their cardiovascular responses to psychological stress. Patients with lower vagal control manifested increased reactions in diastolic blood pressure and rate-pressure product to mental stress and tended to have greater systemic vasoconstriction.

  18. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae-Hee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Ju Yong; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) may be considered as a rescue therapy for patients with refractory cardiac arrest. Identifying patients who might benefit from this potential life-saving procedure is crucial for implementation of ECPR. The objective of this study was to estimate the number of patients who fulfilled a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria and to evaluate the outcome of ECPR candidates treated with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods We performed an observational study using data from a prospective registry of consecutive adults (≥18 years) with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a tertiary hospital between January 2011 and December 2015. We developed a hypothetical set of ECPR criteria including age ≤75 years, witnessed cardiac arrest, no-flow time ≤5 minutes, low-flow time ≤30 minutes, refractory arrest at emergency department >10 minutes, and no exclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was the proportion of good neurologic outcome of ECPR-eligible patients. Results Of 568 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases, 60 cases (10.6%) fulfilled our ECPR criteria. ECPR was performed for 10 of 60 ECPR-eligible patients (16.7%). Three of the 10 patients with ECPR (30.0%), but only 2 of the other 50 patients without ECPR (4.0%) had a good neurologic outcome at 1 month. Conclusion ECPR implementation might be a rescue option for increasing the probability of survival in potentially hopeless but ECPR-eligible patients. PMID:27752631

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  1. Relation of Elevation in Cardiac Troponin I to Clinical Severity, Cardiac Dysfunction, and Pulmonary Congestion in Patients With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Masaki; Crago, Elizabeth A.; Suffoletto, Matthew S.; Hravnak, Marilyn; Frangiskakis, J. Michael; Kassam, Amin B.; Horowitz, Michael B.; Gorcsan, John

    2013-01-01

    An increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) occurs often after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its significance is not well understood. One hundred three patients with SAH were prospectively evaluated in the SAHMII Study to determine the relations of cTnI to clinical severity, systolic and diastolic cardiac function, pulmonary congestion, and length of intensive care unit stay. Echocardiographic ejection fraction, wall motion score, mitral inflow early diastolic (E) and mitral annular early (E′) velocities were assessed. Thirty patients (29%) had mildly positive cTnI (0.1 to 1.0 ng/ml), 24 (23%) had highly positive cTnI (>1.0 ng/ml), and 49 (48%) had negative cTnI (<0.1 ng/ml). Highly positive cTnI was associated with worse neurologic disease, longer intensive care unit stay, and slight depression of ejection fraction (51 ± 11% [p <0.05] vs 59 ± 8% and 63 ± 6% in mildly positive or negative cTnI groups, respectively). Highly positive cTnI was also associated with abnormal wall motion acutely (>1.31 ng/ml; 76% sensitivity, 91% specificity), which typically resolved within 5 to 10 days. Both mildly or highly positive cTnI were associated with acute diastolic dysfunction, with E/E′ of 17 ± 6 and 16 ± 6 (both p <0.05) vs 13 ± 4 in patients with negative cTnI. Prevalences of pulmonary congestion were 79% (p <0.05) in patients with highly positive cTnI, 53% (p <0.05) in patients with mildly positive cTnI, and 29% in cTnI-negative patients. In conclusion, highly positive cTnI with SAH was associated with clinical neurologic severity, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, and longer intensive care unit stay. Even mild increases in cTnI were associated with diastolic dysfunction and pulmonary congestion. PMID:19026312

  2. euHeart: personalized and integrated cardiac care using patient-specific cardiovascular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nic; de Vecchi, Adelaide; McCormick, Matthew; Nordsletten, David; Camara, Oscar; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Delingette, Hervé; Sermesant, Maxime; Relan, Jatin; Ayache, Nicholas; Krueger, Martin W.; Schulze, Walther H. W.; Hose, Rod; Valverde, Israel; Beerbaum, Philipp; Staicu, Cristina; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos; Hunter, Peter; Weese, Juergen; Lehmann, Helko; Chapelle, Dominique; Rezavi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The loss of cardiac pump function accounts for a significant increase in both mortality and morbidity in Western society, where there is currently a one in four lifetime risk, and costs associated with acute and long-term hospital treatments are accelerating. The significance of cardiac disease has motivated the application of state-of-the-art clinical imaging techniques and functional signal analysis to aid diagnosis and clinical planning. Measurements of cardiac function currently provide high-resolution datasets for characterizing cardiac patients. However, the clinical practice of using population-based metrics derived from separate image or signal-based datasets often indicates contradictory treatments plans owing to inter-individual variability in pathophysiology. To address this issue, the goal of our work, demonstrated in this study through four specific clinical applications, is to integrate multiple types of functional data into a consistent framework using multi-scale computational modelling. PMID:22670205

  3. Myocardial Ischemia Induces SDF-1α Release in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Sung; Jacobs, Denise; Emontzpohl, Christoph; Goetzenich, Andreas; Soppert, Josefin; Jarchow, Mareike; Schindler, Lisa; Averdunk, Luisa; Kraemer, Sandra; Marx, Gernot; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Pallua, Norbert; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Simons, David; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    In the present observational study, we measured serum levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) in 100 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at seven distinct time points including preoperative values, myocardial ischemia, reperfusion, and the postoperative course. Myocardial ischemia triggered a marked increase of SDF-1α serum levels whereas cardiac reperfusion had no significant influence. Perioperative SDF-1α serum levels were influenced by patients' characteristics (e.g., age, gender, aspirin intake). In an explorative analysis, we observed an inverse association between SDF-1α serum levels and the incidence of organ dysfunction. In conclusion, time of myocardial ischemia was identified as the key stimulus for a significant upregulation of SDF-1α, indicating its role as a marker of myocardial injury. The inverse association between SDF-1α levels and organ dysfunction association encourages further studies to evaluate its organoprotective properties in cardiac surgery patients.

  4. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  5. Prognostic significance of early cardiac index measurements in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Gueugniaud, P Y; Bertin-Maghit, M; Bouchard, C; Vilasco, B; Petit, P

    1994-12-01

    Invasive monitoring during early resuscitation was performed. To compare the heamodynamic results of severely burned patients, the results of 38 patients hospitalized between 1988 and 1991 in the burn centre of Lyon were retrospectively reviewed. Survivors and non-Survivors' data were compared. No difference existed between the two groups in age, unit burn score, fluid requirement and dose of dobutamine. Survivors had a significantly higher cardiac index, O2 delivery and systolic blood pressure index than non-survivors. It is suggested that the ability to sustain a high cardiac index in response to the burn injury plays a role in the outcome of the patients. There is an indication that dobutamine could have a beneficial effect in this way. Further studies are needed to confirm the benefit of the maintenance of high cardiac index levels by the pressors.

  6. Divine Love and Deep Connections: A Long-Term Followup of Patients Surviving Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Amy L.; Hall, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    We examined experiencing divine love as an indicator of affective spiritual growth in a prospective cohort of 200 patients surviving cardiac surgery. These patients previously completed two-wave preoperative interviews when standardized cardiac surgery data were also collected. The information included left ventricular ejection fraction, New York Heart Association Classification, baseline health (physical and mental), optimism, hope, religiousness, prayer coping, religious/spiritual coping, and demographics. We then measured divine love at 900 days postoperatively. Hierarchical linear regression indicated the direct effect of positive religious coping on experiences of divine love, controlling for other key variables. Postoperatively perceived spiritual support was entered at the final step as an explanatory factor, which appeared to mediate the coping effect. None of the other faith factors predicted divine love. Further research regarding divine love and spiritual support may eventually guide clinical attempts to support patients' spiritual growth as an independently relevant outcome of cardiac surgery. PMID:21748012

  7. Contextualising the social capital of Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal men in prison.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Lise; Treloar, Carla; Chambers, Georgina M; Butler, Tony; Guthrie, Jill

    2016-10-01

    Social capital is a valuable resource that has received little attention in the prison context. Differences in the construct and accessibility of bonding, bridging, and linking social capital exist for Aboriginal Australians in mainstream society, but were previously unexplored in prison. This study seeks to understand contextual differences of social capital for Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal men in prison. Thirty male inmates participated in qualitative interviews across three New South Wales (NSW) correctional centres. Interviews were completed between November 2014 and March 2015. Experiences of bonding and linking social capital varied among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal participants. Opportunities for bridging social capital were limited for all participants. There is greater scope for building bonding social capital among male inmates than either bridging or linking social capital. Bonding social capital, particularly among Aboriginal men in prison, should be utilised to promote health and other programs to inmates.

  8. Variation in Tracheal Reintubations Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery Across Washington State Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Dale, Christopher R.; Benkeser, David C.; Joffe, Aaron M.; Yanez, N. David; Treggiari, Miriam M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients requiring endotracheal reintubation have higher mortality, increased hospital length of stay and costs. To our knowledge, little is known about the variation in reintubation across hospitals among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) Examine the variation in reintubations across Washington State hospitals that perform cardiac surgery, and (2) Explore hospital and patient characteristics associated with variation in reintubation. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting All non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State Participants 15,103 patients undergoing CABG or valvular surgery between January 1, 2008 and September 30, 2011 Measurements and Main Results Patient and hospital characteristics were compared between hospitals that had a reintubation frequency ≥ 5% or < 5%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the odds of reintubation across the hospitals. We tested for heterogeneity of odds of reintubation across hospitals by performing a likelihood ratio test on the hospital factor. After adjusting for patient-level characteristics and procedure type, significant heterogeneity in reintubations across hospitals was present (p=0.005). Our exploratory analyses suggested that hospitals with lower reintubations were more likely to have greater acute care days and teaching ICUs. Conclusions After accounting for patient and procedure characteristics, significant heterogeneity in the relative odds of requiring reintubation was present across 16 non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State. Our findings suggest that greater hospital volume and ICU teaching status are associated with less reintubations. PMID:25802193

  9. Cardiac Catheterization in Pediatric Patients Supported by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A 15-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Boscamp, Nicholas S; Turner, Mariel E; Crystal, Matthew; Anderson, Brett; Vincent, Julie A; Torres, Alejandro J

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac catheterization is commonly performed in patients being supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We aimed to evaluate the safety, benefit, and outcomes of catheterization in pediatric patients supported by ECMO. Retrospective review of cardiac catheterizations performed in patients ≤18 years of age while on ECMO at a large tertiary care center between January 2000 and May 2015. A total of 55 catheterizations were performed on 51 patients during 53 unique ECMO courses. Indications for ECMO include ventricular dysfunction (22), cardiac arrest (20), inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass (7), and persistent cyanosis (4). Catheterizations included purely diagnostic studies (11), atrial septostomies (34), stenting of vessels or surgical shunts (6), adjustment of a stent (1), coil embolization (1), and endomyocardial biopsy (1). Septostomy was elective in 58.8% of cases (20) and emergent in 41.2% (14). Forty-six catheterizations had either surgical or catheter intervention during the same or subsequent study (83.6%). High severity complications occurred in three patients (5.6%), including one death due to hemothorax after pulmonary artery stent placement. There were no complications during patient transport. In total, 38 out of 53 (71.7%) ECMO courses resulted in decannulation, 29 (54.7%) patients survived to discharge from the hospital, and 25 (47.2%) were alive at follow-up. Cardiac catheterization can be safely performed on patients supported by ECMO. Cardiac catheterization is a critical tool in the early recognition, diagnosis, and direct treatment of hemodynamic/anatomic abnormalities in patients supported by ECMO.

  10. Perfectionism, Type D personality, and illness-related coping styles in cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Flett, Gordon L; Madan, Mina; Oh, Paul; Marzolini, Susan; Reitav, Jaan; Hewitt, Paul L; Sturman, Edward D

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the associations among trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, Type D personality, and illness-specific coping styles in 100 cardiac rehabilitation patients. Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale, the Type D Scale-14, and the Coping with Health Injuries and Problems Scale. Correlational analyses established that emotional preoccupation coping was associated with trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, and Type D personality. Perfectionism was linked with both facets of the Type D construct (negative emotionality and social inhibition). Our results suggest that perfectionistic Type D patients have maladaptive coping with potential negative implications for their cardiac rehabilitation outcomes.

  11. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P.; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery. PMID:28299184

  12. Cardiac Papillary Fibroelastoma: Single-Institution Experience with 14 Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In general, treatment for symptomatic and asymptomatic cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is surgical resection—particularly of left-sided lesions, because of the risk of systemic embolization. However, few institutions have enough experience with these tumors to validate this approach. We present our institutional experience with papillary fibroelastoma and discuss our current approach. We searched our institution's cardiac tumor database, identified all patients diagnosed with cardiac papillary fibroelastoma from 1992 through 2014, and recorded the clinical and pathologic characteristics of each case. We found 14 patients (mean age, 60.5 ± 12.3 yr) who had 18 lesions. Eleven patients (79%) were symptomatic; however, we could not always definitively associate their symptoms with a cardiac tumor. Most lesions were solitary and ≤1.5 cm in diameter; half involved the left side of the heart. All 18 lesions were surgically excised. There were no operative or 30-day deaths, and no patient needed valve replacement postoperatively. There was one late death; at one year, another 3 patients were lost to follow-up, and the others were alive without tumor recurrence. Because of the embolic risk inherent to intracardiac masses and our relatively good postoperative outcomes, we recommend the surgical resection of all left-sided papillary fibroelastomas in surgical candidates, and we discuss with patients the advisability of resecting right-sided lesions. PMID:27127431

  13. Cataract induction by administration of nitroglycerin in cardiac patients through imbalance in redox status

    PubMed Central

    El-Gharabawy, Rehab M; Ahmed, Amira S; Al-Najjar, Amal H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of nitroglycerin in the pathogenesis of cataract. Design Prospective study. Patient and methods This study was performed in adults from tertiary Saudi Arabian hospitals (34 males and 26 females in each group, aged from 40 to 60 years), who were divided into four groups with an equal number of subjects (control group, cardiac group, idiopathic cataract group, and a group of cardiac patients using nitroglycerin and with cataracts). Fasting glucose concentrations, blood glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profiles, and levels of nitrite, conjugated dienes (CD), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were determined. Results Treatment of cardiac patients with nitroglycerin produced an imbalance in their systemic redox status, leading to the development of cataracts, which was reflected by a significant increase in the levels of nitrite, CD, and TBARS and a significant decrease in SOD activity and GSH, compared with idiopathic cataract patients. The results of correlation studies and multiple regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between different biochemical parameters (GSH, SOD, TBARS, CD, and nitrite) in the blood and lens in both idiopathic cataract patients and cardiac patients treated with nitroglycerin. Conclusion The study points to the relative and predictive effects of nitric oxide derived from nitroglycerin in the development of cataract in the presence of the oxidative stress induced by nitroglycerin treatment. PMID:27729797

  14. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective.

    PubMed

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery.

  15. The Effect of Nutrition Consultation on Dietary Diversity Score of Cardiac Patients Referred to Cardiac Rehabilitation Research Center Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute during 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Sepideh; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Mehrabani, Sanaz; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Sajjadi, Firouzeh; Maghroun, Maryam; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Safavi, Seyyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dietary diversity score (DDS) measurement was used to assessment of diet quality in different disease like cardiovascular disease. One way to improve the cardiovascular patient's ability is cardiac rehabilitation program that include exercise training, nutrition consultation and psychological treatment. No study was designed to compare the DDS before and after dietary consultation among cardiac rehabilitation patients, so this study was designed to examine this purpose. Methods: Subjects were participated in the 2-month cardiac rehabilitation program. All patients that completed the cardiac rehabilitation program and 2 dietary records (before and after nutritional counseling in cardiac rehabilitation program) enrolled in study. Kant et al method was used for scoring dietary diversity. Data were analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS version 20). Wilcoxon test were used to compare DDS score for each subgroup and pair sample T test was used to compare total DDS after and before nutrition counseling. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The differences between DDS of grain, fruit, vegetable and meat before and after nutrition counseling were not significant (P = 0.635, P = 0.423, P = 0.826, P = 0.207 respectively), but differences of DDS for dairy and total DDS before and after nutrition counseling were significant (P = 0, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Dietary diversity was increased after nutrition counseling among patients with cardiac disease. PMID:27994822

  16. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    PubMed Central

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Ambekar, Smita; Singla, Rajiv; Joshi, Ansumali; Dhawan, Anju; Kumar, Neeta; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04). The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75). Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06). In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99). Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone. PMID:23869306

  17. Cardiac, skeletal, and ocular abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and in their relatives. Comparison with the cardiac abnormalities in patients with kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, L; Tredici, S; Mangiavacchi, M; Colombo, V; Mazzotta, G F; Sirtori, C R

    1984-01-01

    Polygraphic (including apexcardiograms and carotid pulse tracings) and M mode echocardiographic examinations were carried out in 34 symptomatic patients with Marfan's syndrome; similar studies were performed in 32 relatives and in 34 young patients with kyphoscoliotic disease. The purpose of these investigations was to determine the association between cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities and to identify specific patterns of disease with a poor prognosis. Polygraphic tests showed significant changes in all patients with Marfan's syndrome: 74% showed the apical systolic click and murmur of mitral valve prolapse; 48% had the diastolic murmur of aortic regurgitation; isolated mitral valve prolapse was found in 52%, 26% had isolated aortic regurgitation, and 22% had a combination of the two. Echocardiographic changes were also found in all patients: 79% had aortic root dilatation; 48% fluttering of the anterior mitral leaflet; 79% mitral valve prolapse, mostly pansystolic; 34% both mitral prolapse and aortic root dilatation; and 34% left ventricular dilatation. The severities of the cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities were not correlated. The high prevalence of mitral valve prolapse found in these patients, which did not vary with age or sex, was also present in their relatives: mitral prolapse was present in 38% and aortic dilatation, with or without regurgitation, in 14%. Four of the relatives had clearcut Marfan's syndrome, and at least four others a forme fruste. The metacarpal index was abnormal in 41% of the relatives; ocular abnormalities were rare. In kyphoscoliotic patients only an increase in the prevalence of mitral prolapse (18.2% in women, none in men) was found. These findings underline a complex pattern of association between cardiac, ocular, and skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and confirm an appreciable inheritability of several of the markers of the disease. Images PMID:6691872

  18. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  19. Are Ambient Ultrafine, Accumulation Mode, and Fine Particles Associated with Adverse Cardiac Responses in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Wojciech; Beckett, William; Hopke, Philip K; Oakes, David; Frampton, Mark W; Bisognano, John; Chalupa, David; Bausch, Jan; O’Shea, Karen; Wang, Yungang; Utell, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms underlying previously reported air pollution and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity associations remain poorly understood. Objectives: We examined associations between markers of pathways thought to underlie these air pollution and CV associations and ambient particle concentrations in postinfarction patients. Methods: We studied 76 patients, from June 2006 to November 2009, who participated in a 10-week cardiac rehabilitation program following a recent (within 3 months) myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Ambient ultrafine particle (UFP; 10–100 nm), accumulation mode particle (AMP; 100–500 nm), and fine particle concentrations (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) were monitored continuously. Continuous Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were made before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. A venous blood sample was collected and blood pressure was measured before sessions. Results: Using mixed effects models, we observed adverse changes in rMSSD [square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals], SDNN (standard deviation of all NN beat intervals), TpTe (time from peak to end of T-wave), heart rate turbulence, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen associated with interquartile range increases in UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at 1 or more lag times within the previous 5 days. Exposures were not associated with MeanNN, heart-rate–corrected QT interval duration (QTc), deceleration capacity, and white blood cell count was not associated with UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at any lag time. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation patients, particles were associated with subclinical decreases in parasympathetic modulation, prolongation of late repolarization duration, increased blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. It is possible that such changes could increase the risk of CV events in this susceptible population. PMID

  20. Stroke after cardiac surgery in a patient with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Alyas P; Schwartz, Carl; Singh, Arun K

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome have a high incidence of congenital heart disease that requires open-heart surgery. These patients may have gene deletions that affect cholesterol homeostasis, although no previous association has been made with premature atherosclerosis. Herein, we report a case of such a patient, who experienced a stroke after cardiac surgery because of what we believe to be premature intracerebral atherosclerosis.

  1. Role of Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management of Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has evolved into a major tool for the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of patients suffering from heart failure. Anatomical and structural imaging, functional assessment, T1 and T2 mapping tissue characterization and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have provided clinicians with tools to distinguish between non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathies and to identify the etiology of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. LGE is a useful tool to predict the likelihood of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with CAD and to guide the LV lead placement in those who qualify for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy. In addition, the presence of LGE and its extent in myocardial tissue relates to overall cardiovascular outcomes. Emerging roles for cardiac imaging in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are being studied and CMR continues to be among the most promising noninvasive imaging alternatives in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26041670

  2. Efficacy of medication directed by home-monitoring cardiac resynchronization therapy in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Zhang, Fei-fei; Peng, Xin-hui; Zhao, Dong-hua; Peng, Jian

    2014-03-01

    PATIENTS with chronic heart failure (CHF) have a high incidence of atrial/ventricular arrhythmias which seriously affect life span and quality of life. Cardiac re-synchronization therapy (CRT) can improve cardiac function and reverse myocardial remodeling, therefore improving the quality of life and reducing mortality. CRT with Home-Monitoring (HM) can be used to monitor cardiac arrhythmias and other heart physiological indexes such as intrathoracic impedance and hemodynamics. Through wireless satellites, the data from the patients are sent to a monitor center for analysis. Doctors can identify emergent information and make a rapid diagnosis based on the information stored in the monitor center. CRT with HM has been verified as a valid method to optimize drug treatment according to individual parameters.

  3. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart devices: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bandorski, Dirk; Keuchel, Martin; Brück, Martin; Hoeltgen, Reinhard; Wieczorek, Marcus; Jakobs, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Background and Study Aims. Capsule endoscopy is an established tool for investigation of the small intestine. Because of limited clinical experience in patients with cardiac devices, the Food and Drug Administration and the manufacturer recommended not to use capsule endoscopy in these patients. The vast majority of investigations did not reveal any interference between capsule endoscopy and cardiac devices. Methods. Studies investigating interference between CE and cardiac devices were analysed. For the review we considered studies published in English or German and indexed in Medline, as well as highly relevant abstracts. Results. In vitro and in vivo studies mainly revealed no interference between capsule endoscopy and cardiac devices. Technical data of capsule endoscopy (Given Imaging) reveal that interference with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator is impossible. Telemetry can interfere with CE video. Conclusion. The clinical use of capsule endoscopy (Given Imaging) is unproblematic in patients with cardiac pacemakers.

  4. Mortality prediction in Indian cardiac surgery patients: Validation of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Prachi; Geeta, Kanithi; Gopinath, Ramachandran; Durga, Padmaja

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Risk Stratification has an important place in cardiac surgery to identify high-risk cases and optimally allocate resources. Hence various risk scoring systems have been tried to predict mortality. The aim of the present study was to validate the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II (EuroSCORE II) in Indian cardiac surgical patients. Methods: After obtaining ethics committee clearance, data on EuroSCORE II variables were collected for all patients >18 years undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), valve surgery and mixed (CABG + valve) procedures between January 2011 and December 2012. Mortality prediction was done using the online calculator from the site www.euroscore.org. The calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was analysed using the Hosmer–Lemeshow test and discrimination was analysed by plotting receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) and calculating area under the curve (AUC). The analysis was done in the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and in mixed procedures. Results: The overall observed mortality was 5.7% in the total sample, 6.6% in CABG, 4.2% in valve surgeries and 10.2% in mixed procedures whereas the predicted mortality was 2.9%, 3.1%, 2.4%, 5.1% in total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. The significance (P value) of Hosmer–Lemeshow test was 0.292, 0.45, 0.56 and 1 for the total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively, indicating good calibration. The AUC of ROC was 0.76, 0.70, 0.83 and 0.78 for total sample, CABG, valve surgery and mixed procedure, respectively. Conclusion: Mortality of the sample was under-predicted by EuroSCORE II. Calibration of the EuroSCORE II model was good for total sample as well as for all surgical subcategories. Discrimination was good in the total sample and in the mixed procedure population, acceptable in CABG patients and excellent in valve surgeries. PMID:28250485

  5. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of elective PCI in patients with cardiac insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jiang-Xin; Zhong, Xiao-Lan; Chen, Sheng-Guo

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the safety and the efficacy of the treatment with elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with coronary heart disease complicated with cardiac insufficiency. We enrolled 217 patients diagnosed with chronic ischemic heart disease complicated with cardiac failure. According to the type of treatment they received, patients were divided into 3 groups: i) The conservative treatment group with 60 patients (they received standard medication); ii) the early PCI group with 82 cases (their condition was stabilized, surgical risk was assessed and PCI was taken as early as possible); and iii) the advanced PCI group with 75 cases (ischemic myocardium was corrected and then elective PCI was applied and for aggravated myocardial ischemia cases, PCI was applied after assessing the risk of surgery). Follow-up visits were set for approximately 3 years and clinical outcomes were compared. Our results showed that the survival time in the early PCI group was significantly prolonged and the survival rate was considerably increased during 3 years. Left ventricular ejection fraction in the early PCI group markedly increased and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter and pro-BNP level decreased significantly. The occurrence rates of perioperative complications in the early PCI group and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during the follow-up period were significantly reduced. Quality of life scores in the early PCI group markedly improved. We concluded that in patients with coronary heart disease complicated with cardiac insufficiency, early PCI treatment was safe and effective. PMID:28352338

  6. Cardiac transplantation in severely ill patients requiring intensive support in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, David; Wright, Christine; Mockus, Lorna; Yacoub, Magdi; Fox, Kim

    1988-01-01

    Sixty four patients were referred for cardiac transplantation from a single cardiac team at this hospital between October 1984 and December 1986. Of these patients, 33 were referred for urgent transplantation, all of whom required intensive treatment in hospital with intravenous infusions of cardiac drugs, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, peritoneal dialysis, ventilation, or any combination of these to sustain life. Of these 33 patients, six died while awaiting transplantation, one was removed from the waiting list for a transplant, and 26 received cardiac transplants. There were five deaths within 24 hours of operation and one death 10 days after the operation. Twenty of those who had surgery had a successful outcome of transplantation, but there was one late death 10 weeks postoperatively and a further death 31 months after surgery. Eighteen patients were alive and well 10 to 33 months (mean 19·4 months) after transplantation, with an overall survival rate after surgery of 69%. Provided that surgery can be performed before renal failure has progressed such that renal transplantation is necessary, the results are excellent (surgical survival 85·5%) and, we believe, justify the expenditure and staffing requirements necessary to treat these terminally ill patients. ImagesFIG 1FIG 2 PMID:3285954

  7. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  8. Indium-111 antimyosin scintigraphy to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Carrio, I.; Berna, L.; Ballester, M.; Estorch, M.; Obrador, D.; Cladellas, M.; Abadal, L.; Ginjaume, M.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 antimyosin scans were used to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac transplant rejection. The calculation of a myocardium to lung ratio (AM index) to quantify antimyosin uptake was performed. AM index in normal subjects (n = 8) at 48 hr postinjection was 1.46 +/- 0.04. In patients with suspected myocarditis (16 studies in 13 patients), AM index was 2.0 +/- 0.5 (p less than 0.001); suggesting a considerable incidence of ongoing cell damage in this group, despite the small proportion of positive right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (RVbx) (4/13). In patients studied after cardiac transplantation (37 studies in 17 patients), AM indexes correlated with RVbx. In patients with RVbx proven rejection (n = 14), AM index was 1.87 +/- 0.19 (p less than 0.001). In patients with RVbx showing infiltrates but not myocyte damage (n = 13), AM index was 1.80 +/- 0.27 (p = 0.02). In patients with normal RVbx (n = 10), AM index was 1.56 +/- 0.17 (p = NS versus controls; p = 0.001 versus those with positive RVbx). Calculated AM indexes correlated with graded visual analysis of the scans (r = 0.823; p = 0.001). Antimyosin scans are an appropriate method to assess myocardial damage in patients with suspected myocarditis and cardiac rejection.

  9. Effect of a cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise oscillatory ventilation in Japanese patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumitake; Adachi, Hitoshi; Tomono, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Iwamatsu, Koichi; Sakuma, Masashi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Oshima, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo

    2016-10-01

    Although exercise oscillatory ventilation has emerged as a potent independent risk factor for adverse prognosis in heart failure, it is not well known whether cardiac rehabilitation can improve oscillatory ventilation. In this study, we investigated the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation before and after cardiac rehabilitation in chronic heart failure patients with exercise oscillatory ventilation. Cardiac rehabilitation (5-month program) was performed in 26 patients with chronic heart failure who showed an oscillatory ventilation pattern during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). After the 5-month rehabilitation program was completed, the patients again underwent CPX. To determine the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation, the amplitude and cycle length of the oscillations were calculated and compared with several other parameters, including biomarkers that have established prognostic value in heart failure. At baseline before cardiac rehabilitation, both oscillation amplitude (R = 0.625, P < 0.01) and cycle length (R = 0.469, P < 0.05) were positively correlated with the slope of minute ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production. Plasma BNP levels were positively correlated with amplitude (R = 0.615, P < 0.01) but not cycle length (R = 0.371). Cardiac rehabilitation decreased oscillation amplitude (P < 0.01) but failed to change cycle length. The change in amplitude was positively correlated with the change in BNP levels (R = 0.760, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that only the change in amplitude was an independent predictor of the change in BNP levels (R = 0.717, P < 0.01). A 5-month cardiac rehabilitation program improves exercise oscillatory ventilation in chronic heart failure patients by reducing the oscillation amplitude. This effect is associated with a reduction of plasma BNP levels, potentially contributing to an improvement of heart failure.

  10. 'Connecting tracks': exploring the roles of an Aboriginal women's cancer support network.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-Briand, Beatriz; Bessarab, Dawn; Shahid, Shaouli; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-11-01

    Aboriginal Australians are at higher risk of developing certain types of cancer and, once diagnosed, they have poorer outcomes than their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Lower access to cancer screening programmes, deficiencies in treatment and cultural barriers contribute to poor outcomes. Additional logistical factors affecting those living in rural areas compound these barriers. Cancer support groups have positive effects on people affected by cancer; however, there is limited evidence on peer-support programmes for Aboriginal cancer patients in Australia. This paper explores the roles played by an Aboriginal women's cancer support network operating in a regional town in Western Australia. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 participants including Aboriginal and mainstream healthcare service providers, and network members and clients. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were subjected to inductive thematic analysis. Connecting and linking people and services was perceived as the main role of the network. This role had four distinct domains: (i) facilitating access to cancer services; (ii) fostering social interaction; (iii) providing a culturally safe space; and (iv) building relationships with other agencies. Other network roles included providing emotional and practical support, delivering health education and facilitating engagement in cancer screening initiatives. Despite the network's achievements, unresolved tensions around role definition negatively impacted on the working relationship between the network and mainstream service providers, and posed a threat to the network's sustainability. Different perspectives need to be acknowledged and addressed in order to build strong, effective partnerships between service providers and Aboriginal communities. Valuing and honouring the Aboriginal approaches and expertise, and adopting an intercultural approach are suggested as necessary to the way forward.

  11. Understanding Canada's Aboriginal Peoples: A Regional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Terry

    1993-01-01

    Reviews materials from history, anthropology, art, and journalism related Canada's aboriginal peoples. Uses a regional geography approach to present information. Includes an extensive annotated bibliography of resources for classroom teachers. (CFR)

  12. Aboriginal fractions: enumerating identity in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jennifer A

    2012-01-01

    Notions of identity in Taiwan are configured in relation to numbers. I examine the polyvalent capacities of enumerative technologies in both the production of ethnic identities and claims to political representation and justice. By critically historicizing the manner in which Aborigines in Taiwan have been, and continue to be, constructed as objects and subjects of scientific knowledge production through technologies of measuring, I examine the genetic claim made by some Taiwanese to be "fractionally" Aboriginal. Numbers and techniques of measuring are used ostensibly to know the Aborigines, but they are also used to construct a genetically unique Taiwanese identity and to incorporate the Aborigines within projects of democratic governance. Technologies of enumeration thus serve within multiple, and sometimes contradictory, projects of representation and knowledge production.

  13. Anesthetic challenges of patients with cardiac comorbidities undergoing major urologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. Number of this group of patients having to go through this procedure is constantly increasing, due to prolonged life, increased agressiveness of surgery and increased anesthesia’s safety. The anesthesiologist usually has to deal with several problems of the patient, such as hypertension, chronic heart failure, coronary artery disease, rhythm disturbances, intraoperative hemodymanic changes, intraoperative bleeding, perioperative fluid imbalance, and metabolic disturbances. A cardiac patient undergoing major urologic surgery is a complex case requiring a great attention by the anesthesiologist. The scope of this review article is to present the most frequent issues encountered with this group of patients, and to synthetically discuss the respective strategies and maneuvers during perioperative period, which is the major challenge for the anesthesiologist. PMID:24791166

  14. Current issues in implementing do-not-resuscitate orders for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, J; Canal-Fontcuberta, I; Martínez-Sellés, M

    2017-01-09

    Cardiovascular diseases are still the most common cause of death, and heart failure is the most common reason for hospitalization of patients older than 65 years. However, Cardiology attributes low importance to end-of-life care. Cardiac patients' perception of their disease's prognosis and the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation differ greatly from reality. The "do not resuscitate" order allows patients to pre-emptively express their rejection for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, thereby avoiding its potentially negative consequences. However, these orders are still underused and misinterpreted in cardiac patients. Most of these patients usually have no opportunity to have the necessary conversations with their attending physician on their resuscitation preferences. In this review, we performed an analysis of the causes that could explain this situation.

  15. Smoking cessation in cardiac patients: the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on quitting smoking.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac patients completed a baseline questionnaire (N = 245) assessing demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, intention, self-efficacy, relapse self-efficacy and action and coping plans. Six months later (N = 184) continued abstinence from smoking was assessed. Self-efficacy predicted intention to quit smoking and was an indirect predictor of continued abstinence, through intention. Intention to quit smoking and making action plans both directly influenced continued abstinence. Future interventions to facilitate smoking cessation in cardiac patients should put strong emphasis on enhancing self-efficacy and on making specific action plans to increase the likelihood of smoking cessation.

  16. Developing patient-specific anatomic models for validation of cardiac ablation guidance procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David, III; Rettmann, Maryam; Cameron, Bruce; Camp, Jon; Robb, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Image-guided cardiac ablation has the potential to decrease procedure times and improve clinical outcome for patients with cardiac arrhythmias. There are several proposed methods for integrating patient-specific anatomy into the cardiac ablation procedure; however, these methods require thorough validation. One of the primary challenges in validation is determining ground truth as a standard for comparison. Some validation protocols have been developed for animals models and even in patients; however, these methods can be costly to implement and may increase the risk to patients. We have developed an approach to building realistic patient-specific anatomic models at a low-cost in order to validate the guidance procedure without introducing additional risk to the patients. Using a pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography scan, the blood pool of the left and right atria of a patient are segmented semi-manually. In addition, several anatomical landmarks are identified in the image data. The segmented atria and landmarks are converted into a polygonalized model which is used to build a thin-walled patient-specific blood pool model in a stereo-lithography system. Thumbscrews are inserted into the model at the landmarks. The entire model is embedded in a platinum silicone material which has been shown to have tissue-mimicking properties relative to ultrasound. Once the pliable mold has set, the blood pool model is extracted by dissolving the rigid material. The resulting physical model correctly mimics a specific patient anatomy with embedded fiducals which can be used for validation experiments. The patient-specific anatomic model approach may also be used for pre-surgical practice and training of new interventionalists.

  17. Bortezomib-induced congestive cardiac failure in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay; Pandey, Anvita; Sethi, Sumit

    2012-06-01

    Bortezomib therapy is known to be associated with neurological side effects and thrombocytopenia. Its cardiac side effects are however not well known. The patient, a 70-year-old woman, with a previous history of myocardial infarction and subsequent coronary stenting, was detected to have multiple myeloma stage IIIa. She was started on Inj. Bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2)) and Tab. Dexamethasone 40 mg on a weekly basis. She showed good response to therapy. Three days after administration of the 22nd dose of bortezomib, she presented to the hospital with congestive cardiac failure. Echocardiography revealed a drop in the left ventricular ejection fraction from pretreatment levels of 45-50 to 25%. Patient was treated medically for left ventricular failure secondary to a suspected ischemic etiology. Coronary angiography revealed non-critical coronary artery disease with patent right coronary artery and left circumflex stents. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels that were initially raised 4,030 pg/ml (<125 pg/ml) declined to 2,280 pg/ml a week later and subsequently normalized over the next 2 weeks. The patient responded well to treatment and was then discharged. The left ventricular ejection normalized over the next 3 months. Cardiac side effects of bortezomib are not well reported. Elderly patients and those with preexisting cardiac conditions could be at increased cardiovascular risk. Since this risk increases once a cumulative dose of 20 mg/m(2) has been administered, patients need to be monitored more intensively once this threshold has been attained. Increased awareness of these cardiac side effects is necessary for patients' safety.

  18. A Controlled Trial of Hospital versus Home-Based Exercise in Cardiac Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Heather M.; Smith, Kelly M.; Kodis, Jennifer; McKelvie, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effect of 6-month hospital-based exercise training versus 6-month monitored home-based training in cardiac rehabilitation patients following surgery, investigating which conferred the greatest physical, quality of life, and social support benefits. Home-based training resulted in improvements in exercise performance as great as those…

  19. Private Prayer and Optimism in Middle-Aged and Older Patients Awaiting Cardiac Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Amy L.; Peterson, Christopher; Bolling, Steven F.; Koenig, Harold

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the use of private prayer among middle-aged and older patients as a way of coping with cardiac surgery and prayer's relationship to optimism. Design and Methods: The measure of prayer included three aspects: (a) belief in the importance of private prayer, (b) faith in the efficacy of prayer on the basis of previous…

  20. Cardiac characterization of 16 patients with large NF1 gene deletions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, R; Mir, T S; Kluwe, L; Jett, K; Kentsch, M; Mueller, G; Kehrer-Sawatzki, H; Friedman, J M; Mautner, V-F

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cardiac features of patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and large deletions of the NF1 gene region. The study participants were 16 patients with large NF1 deletions and 16 age- and sex-matched NF1 patients without such deletions. All the patients were comprehensively characterized clinically and by echocardiography. Six of 16 NF1 deletion patients but none of 16 non-deletion NF1 patients have major cardiac abnormalities (p = 0.041). Congenital heart defects (CHDs) include mitral insufficiency in two patients and ventricular septal defect, aortic stenosis, and aortic insufficiency in one patient each. Three deletion patients have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Two patients have intracardiac tumors. NF1 patients without large deletions have increased left ventricular (LV) diastolic posterior wall thickness (p < 0.001) and increased intraventricular diastolic septal thickness (p = 0.001) compared with a healthy reference population without NF1, suggestive of eccentric LV hypertrophy. CHDs and other cardiovascular anomalies are more frequent among patients with large NF1 deletion and may cause serious clinical complications. Eccentric LV hypertrophy may occur in NF1 patients without whole gene deletions, but the clinical significance of this finding is uncertain. All patients with clinical suspicion for NF1 should be referred to a cardiologist for evaluation and surveillance.

  1. A genomic history of Aboriginal Australia.

    PubMed

    Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Westaway, Michael C; Muller, Craig; Sousa, Vitor C; Lao, Oscar; Alves, Isabel; Bergström, Anders; Athanasiadis, Georgios; Cheng, Jade Y; Crawford, Jacob E; Heupink, Tim H; Macholdt, Enrico; Peischl, Stephan; Rasmussen, Simon; Schiffels, Stephan; Subramanian, Sankar; Wright, Joanne L; Albrechtsen, Anders; Barbieri, Chiara; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Eriksson, Anders; Margaryan, Ashot; Moltke, Ida; Pugach, Irina; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Levkivskyi, Ivan P; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Ni, Shengyu; Racimo, Fernando; Sikora, Martin; Xue, Yali; Aghakhanian, Farhang A; Brucato, Nicolas; Brunak, Søren; Campos, Paula F; Clark, Warren; Ellingvåg, Sturla; Fourmile, Gudjugudju; Gerbault, Pascale; Injie, Darren; Koki, George; Leavesley, Matthew; Logan, Betty; Lynch, Aubrey; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A; McAllister, Peter J; Mentzer, Alexander J; Metspalu, Mait; Migliano, Andrea B; Murgha, Les; Phipps, Maude E; Pomat, William; Reynolds, Doc; Ricaut, Francois-Xavier; Siba, Peter; Thomas, Mark G; Wales, Thomas; Wall, Colleen Ma'run; Oppenheimer, Stephen J; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Durbin, Richard; Dortch, Joe; Manica, Andrea; Schierup, Mikkel H; Foley, Robert A; Lahr, Marta Mirazón; Bowern, Claire; Wall, Jeffrey D; Mailund, Thomas; Stoneking, Mark; Nielsen, Rasmus; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Excoffier, Laurent; Lambert, David M; Willerslev, Eske

    2016-10-13

    The population history of Aboriginal Australians remains largely uncharacterized. Here we generate high-coverage genomes for 83 Aboriginal Australians (speakers of Pama-Nyungan languages) and 25 Papuans from the New Guinea Highlands. We find that Papuan and Aboriginal Australian ancestors diversified 25-40 thousand years ago (kya), suggesting pre-Holocene population structure in the ancient continent of Sahul (Australia, New Guinea and Tasmania). However, all of the studied Aboriginal Australians descend from a single founding population that differentiated ~10-32 kya. We infer a population expansion in northeast Australia during the Holocene epoch (past 10,000 years) associated with limited gene flow from this region to the rest of Australia, consistent with the spread of the Pama-Nyungan languages. We estimate that Aboriginal Australians and Papuans diverged from Eurasians 51-72 kya, following a single out-of-Africa dispersal, and subsequently admixed with archaic populations. Finally, we report evidence of selection in Aboriginal Australians potentially associated with living in the desert.

  2. Predicted risks of radiogenic cardiac toxicity in two pediatric patients undergoing photon or proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hodgkin disease (HD) and medulloblastoma (MB) are common malignancies found in children and young adults, and radiotherapy is part of the standard treatment. It was reported that these patients who received radiation therapy have an increased risk of cardiovascular late effects. We compared the predicted risk of developing radiogenic cardiac toxicity after photon versus proton radiotherapies for a pediatric patient with HD and a pediatric patient with MB. Methods In the treatment plans, each patient’s heart was contoured in fine detail, including substructures of the pericardium and myocardium. Risk calculations took into account both therapeutic and stray radiation doses. We calculated the relative risk (RR) of cardiac toxicity using a linear risk model and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values using relative seriality and Lyman models. Uncertainty analyses were also performed. Results The RR values of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient were 7.27 (proton) and 8.37 (photon), respectively; the RR values for the MB patient were 1.28 (proton) and 8.39 (photon), respectively. The predicted NTCP values for the HD patient were 2.17% (proton) and 2.67% (photon) for the myocardium, and were 2.11% (proton) and 1.92% (photon) for the whole heart. The predicted ratios of NTCP values (proton/photon) for the MB patient were much less than unity. Uncertainty analyses revealed that the predicted ratio of risk between proton and photon therapies was sensitive to uncertainties in the NTCP model parameters and the mean radiation weighting factor for neutrons, but was not sensitive to heart structure contours. The qualitative findings of the study were not sensitive to uncertainties in these factors. Conclusions We conclude that proton and photon radiotherapies confer similar predicted risks of cardiac toxicity for the HD patient in this study, and that proton therapy reduced the predicted risk for the MB patient in this study. PMID:23880421

  3. The effects of nuclear magnetic resonance on patients with cardiac pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlicek, W.; Geisinger, M.; Castle, L.; Borkowski, G.P.; Meaney, T.F.; Bream, B.L.; Gallagher, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging on six representative cardiac pacemakers was studied. The results indicate that the threshold for initiating the asynchronous mode of a pacemaker is 17 gauss. Radiofrequency levels are present in an NMR unit and may confuse or possibly inhibit demand pacemakers, although sensing circuitry is normally provided with electromagnetic interference discrimination. Time-varying magnetic fields can generate pulse amplitudes and frequencies to mimic cardiac activity. A serious limitation in the possibility of imaging a patient with a pacemaker would be the alteration of normal pulsing parameters due to time-varying magnetic fields.

  4. Aboriginal Education as Cultural Brokerage: New Aboriginal Teachers Reflect on Language and Culture in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchen, Julian; Cherubini, Lorenzo; Trudeau, Lyn; Hodson, Janie M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a Talking Circle of six beginning Aboriginal teachers who discussed their roles as teachers. Participants criticized teacher education programs for not preparing them to teach in ways that are respectful of Aboriginal languages and culture. They discussed the importance of coming to know themselves and their culture. The…

  5. How Aboriginal Peer Interactions in Upper Primary School Sport Support Aboriginal Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kickett-Tucker, Cheryl S.

    2008-01-01

    This ethnographic study tested the hypothesis that positive social interactions in sport will contribute positively to the Aboriginal identity of urban, Australian Aboriginal children. Nine male and female children aged 11-12 years were observed and interviewed. Significant responses were extracted and meanings were identified and grouped into…

  6. Differences between Values of Australian Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerald J.; White, Colin

    1994-01-01

    Examines differences in the values of 112 aboriginal university students and 106 nonaboriginal students at an Australian university. Aboriginal students placed more emphasis on values associated with tradition, conformity, and security, and less on values associated with achievement, self-direction, stimulation, hedonism, and benevolence. Results…

  7. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia after Cardiac Surgery: An Analysis of 52 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gucu, Arif; Toktas, Faruk; Erdolu, Burak; Ozyazıcıoglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a rare but serious complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence, outcome, and perioperative risk factors of AMI in the patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods. From January 2005 to May 2013, all patients who underwent cardiac surgery were screened for participation, and patients with registered gastrointestinal complications were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed. Results. The study included 6013 patients, of which 52 (0.86%) patients suffered from AMI, 35 (67%) of whom died. The control group (150 patients) was randomly chosen from among cases undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Preoperative parameters including age (P = 0.03), renal insufficiency (P = 0.004), peripheral vascular disease (P = 0.04), preoperative inotropic support (P < 0.001), poor left ventricular ejection fraction (P = 0.002), cardiogenic shock (P = 0.003), and preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support (P = 0.05) revealed significantly higher levels in the AMI group. Among intra- and postoperative parameters, CPB time (P < 0.001), dialysis (P = 0.04), inotropic support (P = 0.007), prolonged ventilator time (P < 0.001), and IABP support (P = 0.007) appeared significantly higher in the AMI group than the control group. Conclusions. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment should be initiated as early as possible in any patient suspected of AMI, leading to dramatic reduction in the mortality rate. PMID:24288499

  8. The Influence of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jun; Qian, Ju; Cheng, Hao; Ji, Fuhai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dexmedetomidine may have benefits on the clinical outcomes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine versus other perioperative medications to determine the influence of perioperative dexmedetomidine on cardiac surgery patients. Methods Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine, another medication, or a placebo were retrieved from EMBASE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index. Results A total of 1702 patients in 14 studies met the selection criteria among 1,535 studies that fit the research strategy. Compared to other medications, dexmedetomidine has combined risk ratios of 0.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15, 0.55, P = 0.0002) for ventricular tachycardia, 0.35 (95% CI 0.20, 0.62, P = 0.0004) for postoperative delirium, 0.76 (95% CI 0.55, 1.06, P = 0.11) for atrial fibrillation, 1.08 (95% CI 0.74, 1.57, P = 0.69) for hypotension, and 2.23 (95% CI 1.36, 3.67, P = 0.001) for bradycardia. In addition, dexmedetomidine may reduce the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Conclusions This meta-analysis revealed that the perioperative use of dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery can reduce the risk of postoperative ventricular tachycardia and delirium, but may increase the risk of bradycardia. The estimates showed a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation, shorter length of ICU stay and hospitalization, and increased risk of hypotension with dexmedetomidine. PMID:27049318

  9. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  10. Functional and hemodynamic cardiac determinants of exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Yoran M; Bugatti, Silvia; Damman, Kevin; Willemsen, Suzan; Hartog, Jasper W L; Metra, Marco; Sipkens, Johannes S; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-11-01

    Decreased exercise capacity is the main symptom in patients with heart failure (HF). We assessed the association among noninvasively determined maximal cardiac output at exercise, systolic and diastolic cardiac functions at rest, and peak oxygen uptake (pVo(2)) exercise capacity in patients with congestive HF. We studied 102 patients 62 ± 11 years of age with New York Heart Association class II to IV stable HF and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction <45%. All patients underwent echocardiography and a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test for evaluation of pVo(2) corrected for fat-free mass. During the cardiopulmonary exercise test, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively and continuously using Nexfin HD. Fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) was associated in an univariate linear regression analysis with peak exercise cardiac index (CI) (beta 0.511, p <0.001), LV end-diastolic pressure estimates (peak early diastolic filling velocity/early diastolic tissue velocity [E/e'], beta -0.363, p = 0.001), and right ventricular function (tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, beta 0.393, p <0.001). In multivariate analysis peak exercise CI (beta 0.380, p = 0.001), but not cardiac output or LV ejection fraction at rest, was an independent predictor of pVo(2). Other independent predictors of pVo(2) were E/e' (beta -0.276, p = 0.009) and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (beta 0.392, p <0.001), also when adjusted for age and gender. In conclusion, peak CI is an independent predictor of fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) in patients with systolic HF. Of all echocardiographic parameters at rest, right ventricular function and E/e' were independently and significantly associated with pVo(2), whereas LV ejection fraction at rest was not.

  11. Melioidosis and Aboriginal seasons in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Jacups, Susan P; Ward, Linda; Currie, Bart J

    2008-12-01

    Melioidosis, an infection due to the environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic to Southeast Asia and northern Australia, with cases strongly correlated with the monsoonal wet season. We hypothesized that seasonal variation in the mode of acquisition, informed by traditional knowledge, would result in variations in disease characteristics as well as disease incidence. We explored the seasonal variation in acute, culture-confirmed melioidosis using local Aboriginal definitions of seasons in presentations to the Royal Darwin Hospital, the referral centre for the Top End of the Northern Territory, Australia. In 387 patients, we observed an increased proportion of patients with pneumonia (60%) and severe sepsis (25%) associated with presentations in the wet seasons Gunumeleng (October-December) and Gudjewg (January-March) compared with the drier seasons Wurrgeng (June August) and Gurrung (August-October) (pneumonia 26%, severe sepsis 13%). This observation supports the hypothesis that in the wet seasons there may be changes in the mode and/or magnitude of exposure to B. pseudomallei, with a shift from percutaneous inoculation to aerosol inhalation, for instance.

  12. Electrocardiographic Presentation, Cardiac Arrhythmias, and Their Management in β-Thalassemia Major Patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    Beta-thalassemia major (β-TM) is a genetic hemoglobin disorder characterized by an absent synthesis of globin chains that are essential for hemoglobin formation, causing chronic hemolytic anemia. Clinical management of thalassemia major consists in regular long-life red blood cell transfusions and iron chelation therapy to remove iron introduced in excess with transfusions. Iron deposition in combination with inflammatory and immunogenic factors is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in these patients. Heart failure and arrhythmias, caused by myocardial siderosis, are the most important life-limiting complications of iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients. Cardiac complications are responsible for 71% of global death in the beta-thalassemia major patients. The aim of this review was to describe the most frequent electrocardiographic abnormalities and arrhythmias observed in β-TM patients, analyzing their prognostic impact and current treatment strategies.

  13. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients With Infantile Spasm and the Effect of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Kocabas, Abdullah; Duman, Özgür; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Haspolat, Senay; Kardelen, Fırat

    2016-02-01

    Infantile spasm is an age-dependent epileptic-encephalopathy syndrome. Cardiac autonomic function is frequently altered in epilepsy. In this study, we examined heart rate variability in patients with infantile spasm before and after treatment. Nineteen patients with infantile spasm and 13 healthy comparisons were enrolled in the study. Cardiac rhythm was recorded with a Holter device for 24 hours before adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (Synacthen depot) and B6 vitamin administration and 1 month after treatment. Heart rate variability analysis found lower heart rate variability parameters in patients with infantile spasm at the onset of the syndrome, prior to treatment with ACTH. The time domain parameters of heart rate variability values showed a statistically significant increase following ACTH treatment. Our data suggest that patients with infantile spasm exhibit lower heart rate variability parameters, and the treatment of spasms with ACTH and B6 together diminished the autonomic dysfunction in our cohort.

  14. Myocardial Scintigraphy in the Evaluation of Cardiac Events in Patients without Typical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Smanio, Paola Emanuela Poggio; Silva, Juliana Horie; Holtz, João Vitor; Ueda, Leandro; Abreu, Marilia; Marques, Carlindo; Machado, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the world and in Brazil. Myocardial scintigraphy is an important noninvasive method for detecting ischemia in symptomatic patients, but its use in asymptomatic ones or those with atypical symptoms is yet to be defined. Objective To verify the presence of major cardiac events in asymptomatic patients or those with atypical symptoms (atypical chest pain or dyspnea) that underwent myocardial scintigraphy (MS), over a period of 8 years. Secondary objectives were to identify cardiac risk factors associated with myocardial scintigraphy abnormalities and possible predictors for major cardiac events in this group. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study using the medical records of 892 patients that underwent myocardial scintigraphy between 2005 and 2011 and who were followed until 2013 for assessment of major cardiac events and risk factors associated with myocardial scintigraphy abnormalities. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher’s exact test, logistic regression and Kaplan-Meyer survival curves, with statistical significance being set at p ≤ 0.05. Results Of the total sample, 52.1% were men, 86.9% were hypertensive, 72.4% had hyperlipidemia, 33.6% were diabetic, and 12.2% were smokers; 44.5% had known coronary artery disease; and 70% had high Framingham score, 21.8% had moderate and 8% had low risk. Of the myocardial scintigraphies, 58.6% were normal, 26.1% suggestive of fibrosis and 15.3% suggestive of ischemia. At evolution, 13 patients (1.5%) had non-fatal myocardial infarction and six individuals (0.7%) died. The group with normal myocardial scintigraphy showed longer period of time free of major cardiac events, non-fatal myocardial infarction (p = 0.036) and death. Fibrosis in the myocardial scintigraphy determined a 2.4-fold increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction and five-fold higher risk of death (odds ratio: 2.4 and 5.7, respectively; p = 0.043). Conclusion The

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers in cardiac asymptomatic patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linkedrecessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. Cardiac dysfunction is a classical complication in this disease. Most DMD patients remain asymptomatic for years in spite of the progression of cardiac dysfunction because of their limited daily activities. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers may delay the onset and the progression of cardiac dysfunction and have to be recommended earlier in this disease.

  16. Aboriginal community controlled health services: leading the way in primary care.

    PubMed

    Panaretto, Kathryn S; Wenitong, Mark; Button, Selwyn; Ring, Ian T

    2014-06-16

    The national Closing the Gap framework commits to reducing persisting disadvantage in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia, with cross-government-sector initiatives and investment. Central to efforts to build healthier communities is the Aboriginal community controlled health service (ACCHS) sector; its focus on prevention, early intervention and comprehensive care has reduced barriers to access and unintentional racism, progressively improving individual health outcomes for Aboriginal people. There is now a broad range of primary health care data that provides a sound evidence base for comparing the health outcomes for Indigenous people in ACCHSs with the outcomes achieved through mainstream services, and these data show: models of comprehensive primary health care consistent with the patient-centred medical home model; coverage of the Aboriginal population higher than 60% outside major metropolitan centres; consistently improving performance in key performance on best-practice care indicators; and superior performance to mainstream general practice. ACCHSs play a significant role in training the medical workforce and employing Aboriginal people. ACCHSs have risen to the challenge of delivering best-practice care and there is a case for expanding ACCHSs into new areas. To achieve the best returns, the current mainstream Closing the Gap investment should be shifted to the community controlled health sector.

  17. [Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Hou, Kyokushin; Hori, Junichi; Taniguchi, Narumi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yachiku, Sunao; Azumi, Makoto; Osanai, Hiroaki

    2003-09-01

    We report a case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for ureteral stone in patient with implanted cardiac pacemaker. A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for left back pain due to left single ureteral stone (13 x 7 mm) in 2002. A permanent cardiac pacemaker has been implanted for sick sinus syndrome in 1997. After evaluation for cardiac function and pacemaker function by a cardiologist and a pacemaker technician, SWL (MFL 5000, Dornier) was performed without changing pacemaker mode (DDD mode). Shock waves were incorrectly exposed a few time triggered by arterial pacing amplitude, but no cardiovascular event or malfunction of the pacemaker was occurred during or after SWL. The ureteral stone was successfully fragmented with 2,400 shock waves (24 kV) and the fragments were delivered immediately.

  18. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P < 0.001). No difference was found in the association of EuroSCORE with the domains of the health-related quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk.

  19. Direct measurement of a patient's entrance skin dose during pediatric cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lue; Mizuno, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Mari; Goto, Takahisa; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Miyamoto, Yuka; Tsuboi, Koji; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Children with complex congenital heart diseases often require repeated cardiac catheterization; however, children are more radiosensitive than adults. Therefore, radiation-induced carcinogenesis is an important consideration for children who undergo those procedures. We measured entrance skin doses (ESDs) using radio-photoluminescence dosimeter (RPLD) chips during cardiac catheterization for 15 pediatric patients (median age, 1.92 years; males, n = 9; females, n = 6) with cardiac diseases. Four RPLD chips were placed on the patient's posterior and right side of the chest. Correlations between maximum ESD and dose–area products (DAP), total number of frames, total fluoroscopic time, number of cine runs, cumulative dose at the interventional reference point (IRP), body weight, chest thickness, and height were analyzed. The maximum ESD was 80 ± 59 (mean ± standard deviation) mGy. Maximum ESD closely correlated with both DAP (r = 0.78) and cumulative dose at the IRP (r = 0.82). Maximum ESD for coiling and ballooning tended to be higher than that for ablation, balloon atrial septostomy, and diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, we directly measured ESD using RPLD chips and found that maximum ESD could be estimated in real-time using angiographic parameters, such as DAP and cumulative dose at the IRP. Children requiring repeated catheterizations would be exposed to high radiation levels throughout their lives, although treatment influences radiation dose. Therefore, the radiation dose associated with individual cardiac catheterizations should be analyzed, and the effects of radiation throughout the lives of such patients should be followed. PMID:24968708

  20. Phonemic awareness and early spelling skills in urban Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Corinne J; Masterson, Julie J

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the phonological awareness and early spelling skills of 10 Australian Aboriginal and 10 non-Aboriginal children in their first year of schooling at urban schools. Phonological awareness was assessed using a standardized test (the Queensland University Inventory of Literacy), and children completed a standard spelling task that required them to generate spelling attempts in response to 12 line drawings of familiar animals. Spelling was analysed using the Spelling Scoring Sensitivity procedure. All children performed within the normal range for scores on the QUIL. However, as a group, Aboriginal children performed more poorly than their non-Aboriginal peers. Statistically significant differences were found on the subtests non-word spelling, non-word reading, and phoneme segmentation. Both formal scoring and informal observations were used to examine the spelling skills of participants. Possible explanations of the differences between groups are discussed in terms of health and cultural factors, and implications for the education of Aboriginal children are suggested.

  1. Perioperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio as a predictor of poor cardiac surgery patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Patelarou, Athina; Theologou, Stavros; Argiriou, Mihalis; Chatziefstratiou, Anastasia A; Katzilieri, Christina; Brokalaki, Hero

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the perioperative neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and cardiac surgery patient outcomes. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study of 145 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in a tertiary hospital of Athens, Greece, from January to March 2015, was conducted. By using a structured short questionnaire, this study reviewed the electronic hospital database and the medical and nursing patient records for data collection purposes. The statistical significance was two-tailed, and p-values <0.05 were considered significant. The statistical analysis was performed with Mann–Whitney U test and Spearman’s correlation coefficient, by using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (IBM SPSS 21.0 for Windows). Results The increased preoperative levels of NLR were associated with significantly higher mortality, both in-hospital (p=0.001) and 30-day (p=0.002), prolonged postoperative hospital length of stay (LOS), both in the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU) (p=0.002), and in-hospital (p=0.018), and likewise with delayed tracheal extubation (p≤0.001). Furthermore, patients with elevated NLR during the second postoperative day had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (p=0.018), increased incidence of pneumonia (p=0.022), higher probability of readmission to the ICU (p=0.002), prolonged ICU LOS (p≤0.001), and delayed tracheal extubation (p≤0.001). Conclusion Increased perioperative NLR seems to be associated with significantly higher mortality and morbidity in cardiac surgery patients. At the same time, NLR is a significant and inexpensive biomarker for the early identification of patients at high risk for complications. In addition, NLR levels could lead clinicians to perform measures for the optimal therapeutic patient approach. PMID:28243161

  2. The place of thoracic abdominal ultrasound influencing survival of patients in traumatic cardiac arrest imminence

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Gugonea, G; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma has become the most frequent cause of death in industrialized countries and, for this reason, the fastness of a diagnostic approach and the precocity of the proper treatment are both essential and best influenced by the trauma team collaboration and the existence of a specific algorithm in which each specialist has a definite place and role. In the first stage time of a proposed specific algorithm, the vital stage, which covers the primary survey, the trauma team has not more than 5 min. (ideally) to complete airway, breathing, circulation lesions with vital potential. The ultrasound exam is placed in this stage, which is nothing more than a completion of the primary survey maneuvers, which are exclusively clinical. Two groups of patients were compared in our study; one which was named A, represented by severe traumatized patients admitted between January 2003 and December 2006 and the other one which was named B, with severe traumatized patients admitted between January 2007 and December 2012. The second group was treated by using the modified algorithm. Although the differences were not statistically significant because of the small number of survivors, the modified algorithm was evidently superior in patients with and without cardiac arrest. If we take into account that 48 of the 261 patients survived a cardiac arrest event (although only 9 of them were discharged), the advantages of this type of algorithm are even more obvious. In lot A, 21 patients survived a cardiac arrest, of whom only 4 were discharged. Performing an ultrasound examination during the first step of the algorithm used in the study is essential regardless of trauma causes, particularly hypovolemia. For both groups of patients with and without cardiac arrest, the percentage of patients who received ultrasound increased in the group that received a modified algorithm. PMID:26664484

  3. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-02-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications.

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Schizophrenia and Their Healthy Relatives – A Small Review

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The majority of excess mortality among people with schizophrenia seems to be caused by cardiovascular complications, and in particular, coronary heart disease. In addition, the prevalence of heart failure and arrhythmias is increased in this population. Reduced efferent vagal activity, which has been consistently described in these patients and their healthy first-degree relatives, might be one important mechanism contributing to their increased cardiac mortality. A decrease in heart rate variability and complexity was often shown in unmedicated patients when compared to healthy controls. In addition, faster breathing rates, accompanied by shallow breathing, seem to influence autonomic cardiac functioning in acute unmedicated patients substantially. Moreover, low-physical fitness is a further and independent cardiac risk factor present in this patient population. Interestingly, new studies describe chronotropic incompetence during physical exercise as an important additional risk factor in patients with schizophrenia. Some studies report a correlation of the autonomic imbalance with the degree of positive symptoms (i.e., delusions) and some with the duration of disease. The main body of psychiatric research is focused on mental aspects of the disease, thereby neglecting obvious physical health needs of these patients. Here, a joint effort is needed to design interventional strategies in everyday clinical settings to improve physical health and quality of life. PMID:26157417

  5. Cardiac magnetic field map topology quantified by Kullback-Leibler entropy identifies patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirdewan, A.; Gapelyuk, A.; Fischer, R.; Koch, L.; Schütt, H.; Zacharzowsky, U.; Dietz, R.; Thierfelder, L.; Wessel, N.

    2007-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common primary inherited cardiac muscle disorder, defined clinically by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. The detection of affected patients remains challenging. Genetic testing is limited because only in 50%-60% of all HCM diagnoses an underlying mutation can be found. Furthermore, the disease has a varied clinical course and outcome, with many patients having little or no discernible cardiovascular symptoms, whereas others develop profound exercise limitation and recurrent arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death. Therefore prospective screening of HCM family members is strongly recommended. According to the current guidelines this includes serial echocardiographic and electrocardiographic examinations. In this study we investigated the capability of cardiac magnetic field mapping (CMFM) to detect patients suffering from HCM. We introduce for the first time a combined diagnostic approach based on map topology quantification using Kullback-Leibler (KL) entropy and regional magnetic field strength parameters. The cardiac magnetic field was recorded over the anterior chest wall using a multichannel-LT-SQUID system. CMFM was calculated based on a regular 36 point grid. We analyzed CMFM in patients with confirmed diagnosis of HCM (HCM, n =33, 43.8±13 years, 13 women, 20 men), a control group of healthy subjects (NORMAL, n =57, 39.6±8.9 years; 22 women and 35 men), and patients with confirmed cardiac hypertrophy due to arterial hypertension (HYP, n =42, 49.7±7.9 years, 15 women and 27 men). A subgroup analysis was performed between HCM patients suffering from the obstructive (HOCM, n =19) and nonobstructive (HNCM, n =14) form of the disease. KL entropy based map topology quantification alone identified HCM patients with a sensitivity of 78.8% and specificity of 86.9% (overall classification rate 84.8%). The combination of the KL parameters with a regional field strength parameter improved the overall

  6. Determinants of prolonged intensive care unit stay in patients after cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kapadohos, Theodore; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas; Vasileiadis, Ioannis; Nanas, Serafeim; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Karabinis, Andreas; Marathias, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Background Prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay of patients after cardiac surgery has a major impact on overall cost and resource utilization. The aim of this study was to identify perioperative factors which prolong stay in ICU. Methods All adult patients from a single, specialized cardiac center who were admitted to the ICU after cardiac surgery during a 2-month period were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative use of drugs, intraoperative variables, and postoperative course were recorded. Hemodynamic and blood gas measurements were recorded at four time intervals during the first 24 postoperative hours. Routine hematologic and biochemical laboratory results were recorded preoperatively and in the first postoperative hours. Results During the study period 145 adult patients underwent cardiac surgery: 65 (45%) underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 38 (26%) valve surgery, 26 (18%) combined surgery and 16 (11%) other types of cardiac operation. Seventy nine (54%) patients had an ICU stay of less than 24 hours. Random forests analysis identified four variables that had a major impact on the length of stay (LOS) in ICU; these variables were subsequently entered in a logistic regression model: preoperative hemoglobin [odds ratio (OR) =0.68], duration of aortic clamping (OR =1.01) and ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure to inspired oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2) (OR =0.99) and blood glucose during the first four postoperative hours (OR =1.02). ROC curve analysis showed an AUC =0.79, P<0.001, 95% CI: 0.71–0.86. Conclusions Low preoperative hemoglobin, prolonged aortic clamping time and low PaO2/FiO2 ratio and blood glucose measured within the first postoperative hours, were strongly related with prolonged LOS in ICU. PMID:28203408

  7. Evaluation of two methods for continuous cardiac output assessment during exercise in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Hareld M C; Thijssen, Eric J M; Schep, Goof; Sleutjes, Boudewijn T H M; De Vries, Wouter R; Hoogeveen, Adwin R; Wijn, Pieter F F; Doevendans, Pieter A F M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of two techniques for the continuous assessment of cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF): a radial artery pulse contour analysis method that uses an indicator dilution method for calibration (LiDCO) and an impedance cardiography technique (Physioflow), using the Fick method as a reference. Ten male CHF patients (New York Heart Association class II-III) were included. At rest, cardiac output values obtained by LiDCO and Physioflow were compared with those of the direct Fick method. During exercise, the continuous Fick method was used as a reference. Exercise, performed on a cycle ergometer in upright position, consisted of two constant-load tests at 30% and 80% of the ventilatory threshold and a symptom-limited maximal test. Both at rest and during exercise LiDCO showed good agreement with reference values [bias +/- limits of agreement (LOA), -1% +/- 28% and 2% +/- 28%, respectively]. In contrast, Physioflow overestimated reference values both at rest and during exercise (bias +/- LOA, 48% +/- 60% and 48% +/- 52%, respectively). Exercise-related within-patient changes of cardiac output, expressed as a percent change, showed for both techniques clinically acceptable agreement with reference values (bias +/- LOA: 2% +/- 26% for LiDCO, and -2% +/- 36% for Physioflow, respectively). In conclusion, although the limits of agreement with the Fick method are pretty broad, LiDCO provides accurate measurements of cardiac output during rest and exercise in CHF patients. Although Physioflow overestimates cardiac output, this method may still be useful to estimate relative changes during exercise.

  8. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; Ernst, Olivier; Rose, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation.

  9. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation. PMID:28257476

  10. An algorithm for use of prasugrel (effient) in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Julio; Morrow, David; Resnic, Frederic; Manica, Andre; Kirshenbaum, James; Cannon, Christopher; Croce, Kevin

    2010-12-01

    An algorithm for use of Prasugrel (Effient) in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention at the Brigham and Women's Hospital is presented. Our algorithm, which is in the process of being implemented, is consistent with published and generally accepted standards of care and is based on data from the pivotal Trial to Assess Improvement in Therapeutic Outcomes by Optimizing Platelet Inhibition with Prasugrel-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TRITON-TIMI) 38, which compared clopidogrel with prasugrel in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Areas of focus include analysis of the benefit of prasugrel over clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome patients and appropriate selection of patients for prasugrel treatment.

  11. Is overhydration in peritoneal dialysis patients associated with cardiac mortality that might be reversible?

    PubMed Central

    Oei, Elizabeth; Paudel, Klara; Visser, Annemarie; Finney, Hazel; Fan, Stanley L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the relationship between overhydration (OH) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and cardiac mortality. METHODS OH, as measured by body composition monitor (BCM), is associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients. BCM has been used to guide treatment on the assumption that correcting OH will improve cardiac morbidity and mortality although data demonstrating causality that is reversible is limited. We wished to determine if OH in PD patients predicted cardiac mortality, and if there was a correlation between OH and cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) levels. Finally, we wished to determine if improving OH values would lead to a decrement in cTnT. All prevalent PD patients over the study period of 57 mo who had contemporaneous BCM and cTnT measurements were followed irrespective of transplantation or PD technique failure. We also studied a cohort of patients with who had severe OH (> +2L). The Fresenius Body Composition Monitor was used to obtain hydration parameters. cTnT levels were done as part of routine clinical care. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20.0. RESULTS There were 48 deaths in the 336 patients. The patients that died from cardiac or non-cardiac causes were similar with respect to their age, incidence of diabetes mellitus, gender, ethnicity and cause of renal failure. However, the patients with cardiac causes of death had significantly shorter dialysis vintage (10.3 mo vs 37.0 mo, P < 0.0001) and were significantly more overhydrated by BCM measurement (2.95 L vs 1.35 L, P < 0.05). The mean (standard error of the means) hydration status of the 336 patients was +1.15 (0.12) L and the median [interquartile range (IQR)] cTnT level was 43.5 (20-90) ng/L. The cTnT results were not normally distributed and were therefore transformed logarithmically. There was a statistically significant correlation between Log (cTnT) with the OH value (Spearman r value 0.425, P < 0.0001). We identified a sub-group of patients that were severely overhydrated

  12. Patient-specific volume conductor modeling for non-invasive imaging of cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, B; Hanser, F; Seger, M; Fischer, G; Modre-Osprian, R; Tilg, B

    2008-01-01

    We propose a general workflow to numerically estimate the spread of electrical excitation in the patients' hearts. To this end, a semi-automatic segmentation pipeline for extracting the volume conductor model of structurally normal hearts is presented. The cardiac electrical source imaging technique aims to provide information about the spread of electrical excitation in order to assist the cardiologist in developing strategies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. The volume conductor models of eight patients were extracted from cine-gated short-axis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The non-invasive estimation of electrical excitation was compared with the CARTO maps. The development of a volume conductor modeling pipeline for constructing a patient-specific volume conductor model in a fast and accurate way is one essential step to make the technique clinically applicable.

  13. Effects of oral premedication on cognitive status of elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Javed M; Schweiger, Marc; Vallurupalli, Neelima; Bellantonio, Sandra; Cook, James R

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedatives and analgesics are often administered to achieve conscious sedation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Appropriate concerns have been raised regarding post procedure delirium related to peri-procedural medication in the elderly. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of premedication on new onset delirium and procedural care in elderly patients. Methods Patients ≥ 70 years old and scheduled for elective cardiac catheterization were randomly assigned to receive either oral diphenhydramine and diazepam (25 mg/5 mg) or no premedication. All patients underwent a mini mental state exam and delirium assessment using confusion assessment method prior to the procedure and repeated at 4 h after the procedure and prior to discharge. Patients' cooperation during the procedure and ease of post-procedure were measured using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The degree of alertness was assessed immediately on arrival to the floor, and twice hourly afterwards using Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAA/S). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 77 years, and 47 patients received premedication prior to the procedure. None of the patients in either group developed delirium. Patients' cooperation and the ease of procedure was greater and pain medication requirement less both during and after the procedure in the pre-medicated group (P < 0.05 for both). Nurses reported an improvement with patient management in the pre-medicated group (P = 0.08). Conclusions In conclusion, premedication did not cause delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The reduced pain medication requirement, perceived procedural ease and post procedure management favors premedication in elderly patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. PMID:26089850

  14. Cangrelor in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: the BRIDGE study.

    PubMed

    Voeltz, Michele D; Manoukian, Steven V

    2013-07-01

    The benefit of long-term dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients with acute coronary syndromes, drug-eluting stents and those at high risk for thromboembolic events has been well established in a number of well-designed randomized controlled studies. Current research in this area has focused on the development of novel antiplatelet agents for clinical use. The BRIDGE trial evaluated the use of cangrelor as a bridge to coronary artery bypass graft surgery in patients receiving extended DAPT. The BRIDGE trial results confirm the efficacy and safety of cangrelor in this population. This study is novel as it attempts to address the lapse in thienopyridine therapy required for many surgical and invasive procedures. The future of antiplatelet agents, particularly cangrelor, must also focus on bridging for high-risk patients undergoing noncoronary artery bypass graft surgical procedures. Overall, the BRIDGE trial represents a significant advance for patients appropriate for long-term DAPT.

  15. Life associated with fear and worry: A major concern among the cardiac valve-replaced patients

    PubMed Central

    Taghadosi, Mohsen; Memarian, Robabeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few attempts were made for alleviating the physical/psychological problems among the cardiac valve–replaced patients and no comprehensive study was done based on the experiences of such patients. This study was undertaken to describe the stressful experiences of the heart valve-replaced patients. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study performed during 2012-2013 with a content analysis approach, 13 patients from Tehran and Kashan therapeutic centers participated. The study sampling was accomplished with purposeful sampling using a semi-structured interview that continued until data saturat ion. All interviews were recorded, and were immediately handwritten word by word and finally typewritten. Description and analysis of the data were done by Graneheim and Lundman content analysis. Results: One hundred and seventy-five primary codes were derived among the 680 codes taken from the participants interviewed. Using abstract and deep perception of the categories, 14 subcategories and 5 themes were derived. The themes are as follows: worry of care conditions, worry of life with the ongoing condition of having prosthetic cardiac valve, worry regarding the instability in life, fear of hospital, and fear of unknown factors. Each theme consisted of special subsidiary themes with specific functions. Conclusions: The main themes of fear and worry about on losing the valve were identified and introduced in the cardiac valve-replaced patients. As the nature and function of these themes are different in different societies, recognition and discrete definition of them are necessary for care planning and promotion. PMID:25709701

  16. [Anesthetic management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the perioperative management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The presence of a history or signs of heart failure and un-diagnosed DCM preoperatively, may be associated with an increased risk during non-cardiac surgery. In these patients, preoperative assessment of LV function, including echocardiography, and assessment of an individual's capacity to perform a spectrum of common daily tasks may be recommended to quantify the severity of systolic function. It is important to prevent low cardiac output and arrhythmia for the perioperative management of patients with DCM. Sympathetic hyperactivity often causes atrial or ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which could worsen systemic hemodynamics in these patients. In particular, the prevention of life-threatening arrhythmia, such as, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation is important. To prevent perioperative low output syndrome, inotropic support, using catecholamines or phosphodiesterase inhibitors with or without vasodilators should be performed under careful monitoring. It is desirable to use a pulmonary-artery catheter during moderate to high risk surgery, because the optimum level of left ventricular pre-load is very narrow in these patients. Every effort must be made to detect postoperative heart failure by careful monitoring, including PAC, and physical examination.

  17. Clinical benefits of a metabolic approach in the cardiac rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Romualdo; Lacalaprice, Francesca; Faccenda, Ernesto; Volpe, Loretta

    2006-09-04

    Patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation may benefit from combining trimetazidine with exercise training because both treatments produce synergic benefits on the cardiovascular system. There is evidence that trimetazidine improves left ventricular (LV) function in patients with ischemic and diabetic cardiomyopathy by shifting the cellular energy substrate reference from fatty acids to glucose oxidation, and that this effect is associated with a better outcome. Recently, results have demonstrated that trimetazidine improves radial artery endothelium-dependent relaxation related to its antioxidant properties. Similarly, exercise training has been demonstrated to improve diastolic filling and systolic function in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, in relation to enhanced perfusion and contractility of dysfunctional myocardium. Patients with viable myocardium, in theory, should have the greatest benefits because trimetazidine improves contractility of dysfunctional hibernating/stunned myocardium, whereas exercise has documented efficacy in improving endothelial vasomotor response of coronary arteries, stimulating coronary collateral circulation and small vessel growth, improving LV function, and increasing functional capacity. At present, there are no published reports about the efficacy of the combination of trimetazidine with exercise training. In this article, we discuss the rationale for using trimetazidine in cardiac rehabilitation, the identification of patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation who might benefit the most from the addition of trimetazidine to standard therapy, and the documented benefits.

  18. What Limits Cardiac Performance during Exercise in Normal Subjects and in Healthy Fontan Patients?

    PubMed Central

    La Gerche, André; Gewillig, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is an important determinant of health but is significantly reduced in the patient with a univentricular circulation. Normal exercise physiology mandates an increase in pulmonary artery pressures which places an increased work demand on the right ventricle (RV). In a biventricular circulation with pathological increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and/or reductions in RV function, exercise-induced augmentation of cardiac output is limited. Left ventricular preload reserve is dependent upon flow through the pulmonary circulation and this requires adequate RV performance. In the Fontan patient, the reasons for exercise intolerance are complex. In those patients with myocardial dysfunction or other pathologies of the circulatory components, it is likely that these abnormalities serve as a limitation to cardiac performance during exercise. However, in the healthy Fontan patient, it may be the absence of a sub-pulmonary pump which limits normal increases in pulmonary pressures, trans-pulmonary flow requirements and cardiac output. If so, performance will be exquisitely dependent on pulmonary vascular resistance. This provides a potential explanation as to why pulmonary vasodilators may improve exercise tolerance. As has recently been demonstrated, these agents may offer an important new treatment strategy which directly addresses the physiological limitations in the Fontan patient. PMID:20871839

  19. Safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices is sometimes a risky procedure. Thus MRI in these patients should be performed when it is the only examination able to help with the diagnosis. Moreover the diagnostic benefit must outweigh the risks. Coronary artery stents, prosthetic cardiac valves, metal sternal sutures, mediastinal vascular clips, and epicardial pacing wires are not contraindications for MRI, in contrast to pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Appropriate patient selection and precautions ensure MRI safety. However it is commonly accepted that although hundreds of patients with pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have undergone safe MRI scanning, it is not a safe procedure. Currently, heating of the pacemaker lead is the major problem undermining MRI safety. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there are currently neither "MRI-safe" nor "MRI-compatible" pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. In this article we review the international literature in regard to safety during MRI of patients with implanted cardiac prostheses and metallic cardiovascular electronic devices.

  20. Cardiac prosthesis as an advanced surgical therapy for end-stage cardiac patients: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Takatani, S

    2000-09-01

    This paper reviews the current status and future perspectives of the artificial heart research that was started in 1957 by Akutsu and Kolff. During the 1960's, although not much progress was made in increasing animal survival time with artificial hearts, clinical applications were already made for both a ventricular assist device in 1962 and total artificial heart (TAH) in 1969 followed by a second TAH application in 1981. Both TAH applications were done as bridges to heart transplantation. Meanwhile, the animal survival time improved during the 1970's because of the availability of better biomaterials, better understanding of the circulatory system, and improvement in surgical techniques. Continuous flow pumps were also investigated during the 1970's, which demonstrated feasibility for chronically supporting circulation in healthy animals. Four permanent cases of TAH application were done early 1980's for patients who could not be the candidates for heart transplantation. Although the patients were tethered to the external drive-console, one of them survived for nearly two years. Complications due to thromboembolism and infection were the major causes of death in these patients. The patients' quality of life was questionable and the permanent application of the TAH was then stopped to make improvements in the system in terms of implantability and biocompatibility. During the 1980's, efforts were then switcthed to development of totally implantable VAD and TAH systems, which led to the first discharge of a VAD patient from the hospital in 1992. In the early 1990's, implantable electric VADs, Novacor and ThermoCardio System (TCI), became available to support the circulation of end-stage cardiac patients until a donor heart could be found. The transplantation rate of the VAD patients ranged around 70% with the average waiting time of 80 to 100 days. The number of patients transplanted with VADs are more than 5000 and those with the pneumatic TAH exceed 200. Because

  1. Computer Modelling for Better Diagnosis and Therapy of Patients by Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pluijmert, Marieke; Lumens, Joost; Potse, Mark; Delhaas, Tammo; Auricchio, Angelo; Prinzen, Frits W

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical or computer models have become increasingly popular in biomedical science. Although they are a simplification of reality, computer models are able to link a multitude of processes to each other. In the fields of cardiac physiology and cardiology, models can be used to describe the combined activity of all ion channels (electrical models) or contraction-related processes (mechanical models) in potentially millions of cardiac cells. Electromechanical models go one step further by coupling electrical and mechanical processes and incorporating mechano-electrical feedback. The field of cardiac computer modelling is making rapid progress due to advances in research and the ever-increasing calculation power of computers. Computer models have helped to provide better understanding of disease mechanisms and treatment. The ultimate goal will be to create patient-specific models using diagnostic measurements from the individual patient. This paper gives a brief overview of computer models in the field of cardiology and mentions some scientific achievements and clinical applications, especially in relation to cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). PMID:26835103

  2. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  3. Heart Rate Variability for Early Detection of Cardiac Iron Deposition in Patients with Transfusion-Dependent Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Silvilairat, Suchaya; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Saekho, Suwit; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron overload cardiomyopathy remains the major cause of death in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging is costly yet effective in detecting cardiac iron accumulation in the heart. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to evaluate cardiac autonomic function and is depressed in cases of thalassemia. We evaluated whether HRV could be used as an indicator for early identification of cardiac iron deposition. Methods One hundred and one patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia were enrolled in this study. The correlation between recorded HRV and hemoglobin, non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), serum ferritin and cardiac T2* were evaluated. Results The median age was 18 years (range 8–59 years). The patient group with a 5-year mean serum ferritin >5,000 ng/mL included significantly more homozygous β-thalassemia and splenectomized patients, had lower hemoglobin levels, and had more cardiac iron deposit than all other groups. Anemia strongly influenced all domains of HRV. After adjusting for anemia, neither serum ferritin nor NTBI impacted the HRV. However cardiac T2* was an independent predictor of HRV, even after adjusting for anemia. For receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, only mean ferritin in the last 12 months and the average of the standard deviation of all R-R intervals for all five-minute segments in the 24-hour recording were predictors for cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, with area under the ROC curve of 0.961 (p<0.0001) and 0.701 (p = 0.05), respectively. Conclusions Hemoglobin and cardiac T2* as significant predictors for HRV indicate that anemia and cardiac iron deposition result in cardiac autonomic imbalance. The mean ferritin in the last 12 months could be useful as the best indicator for further evaluation of cardiac risk. The ability of serum ferritin to predict cardiac risk is stronger than observed in other thalassemia cohorts. HRV might be a

  4. Explaining aboriginal/non-aboriginal inequalities in postseparation violence against Canadian women: application of a structural violence approach.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jeanette Somlak; Malcoe, Lorraine Halinka; Pulkingham, Jane

    2013-08-01

    Adopting a structural violence approach, we analyzed 2004 Canadian General Social Survey data to examine Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal inequalities in postseparation intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. Aboriginal women had 4.12 times higher odds of postseparation IPV than non-Aboriginal women (p < .001). Coercive control and age explained most of this inequality. The final model included Aboriginal status, age, a seven-item coercive control index, and stalking, which reduced the odds ratio for Aboriginal status to 1.92 (p = .085) and explained 70.5% of the Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal inequality in postseparation IPV. Research and action are needed that challenge structural violence, especially colonialism and its negative consequences.

  5. Mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis classified by the Child-Pugh score.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Kirolos A; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Kranenburg, Guido; de Heer, Frederiek; Kluin, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a known risk factor for postoperative mortality in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Clinical assessment of liver cirrhosis using the widely accepted Child-Pugh (CP) score is thus vital for evaluation of surgical options and perioperative care. However, detailed mortality rates as a consequence of liver cirrhosis are unclear. This review aimed to stratify the risk of short-term (<30 days) and overall (up to 10 years) mortality after cardiac surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis, classified by the CP score. Thus, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed by two independent investigators for studies published up to February 2014, in which mortality in cirrhotic patients, classified by the CP classification, undergoing cardiac surgery was evaluated postoperatively. A total of 993 articles were identified. After critical appraisal of 21 articles, 19 were selected for final analysis. Weighted short-term mortality of cirrhotic patients undergoing cardiac surgery was 19.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.4-22.5%]. Across the different CP groups, short-term mortality appeared to be 9.0% (95% CI: 6.6-12.2%), 37.7% (95% CI: 30.8-44.3%) and 52.0% (95% CI: 33.5-70.0%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. Weighted overall mortality within 1 year was 42.0% (95% CI: 36.0-48.3%) in all cirrhotic patients. Subdivided in groups, overall mortality within that 1 year was 27.2% (95% CI: 20.9-34.7%), 66.2% (95% CI: 54.3-76.3%) and 78.9% (95% CI: 56.1-92.1%) in Groups A, B and C, respectively. In conclusion, short-term mortality is considerably increased in patients with liver cirrhosis CP class B and C. Overall mortality is significantly high in all classes of liver cirrhosis.

  6. The Rainbow/Holistic Approach to Aboriginal Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Ningwakwe Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Aboriginal literacy programs in Canada are using literacy as a means of reclaiming Aboriginal languages and a positive cultural identity. The Rainbow/Holistic Approach to Aboriginal literacy uses seven ways of knowing, each corresponding to a color. The approach recognizes that spirit, heart, mind, and body equally contribute to a life of balance,…

  7. Supporting Educational Success for Aboriginal Students: Identifying Key Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The academic difficulties experienced by many Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) students in Canada have been well-documented. Indicators such as school persistence and post-secondary enrollment are typically far lower for Aboriginal students as a group compared to non-Aboriginal students. Identifying facilitators of success is key to…

  8. The Coercive Sterilization of Aboriginal Women in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stote, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the coercive sterilization of Aboriginal women in legislated and non-legislated form in Canada. I provide an historical and materialist critique of coercive sterilization. I argue for coercive sterilization to be understood as one of many policies employed to undermine Aboriginal women, to separate Aboriginal peoples from…

  9. Decolonizing Aboriginal Education in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Elizabeth Ann; Lunney-Borden, Lisa; Murray-Orr, Anne; Toney, Denise; Meader, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Concerned by the need to decolonize education for Aboriginal students, the authors explore philosophies of Indigenous ways of knowing and those of the 21st century learning movement. In their efforts to propose a way forward with Aboriginal education, the authors inquire into harmonies between Aboriginal knowledges and tenets of 21st century…

  10. Decolonization, Reinhabitation and Reconciliation: Aboriginal and Place-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Aboriginal/Indigenous education is being increasingly emphasized in Faculties of Education across Canada. Through self-study as an instructor of a mandatory course in Aboriginal education in a Faculty of Education, the author is exploring the use of local, place-based education in the fostering of cross-cultural understanding of Aboriginal and…

  11. Aboriginal Early Childhood Education in Canada: Issues of Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Cottrell, Michael; Pelletier, Terrance R.; Pearce, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we provide a literature synthesis pertaining to the state of Aboriginal early childhood education in Canada. We identify key features of quality Aboriginal early childhood programs. The background and significance of early childhood education for Aboriginal peoples is explicated. Cultural compatibility theory is employed as the…

  12. A Handbook for Aboriginal Parents of Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowchief-McHugh, Daphne; Yellowhorne-Breaker, Kathy; Weasel Fat-White, Freda

    To develop this handbook, three Aboriginal teachers gathered extensive data through workshops; questionnaires; and research with Elders, Aboriginal parents, teachers, advocates, and others who work first-hand with children with special needs. The handbook opens by presenting the traditional Aboriginal perspective on disabled children--that they…

  13. Patient position alters attenuation effects in multipinhole cardiac SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Dedicated cardiac cameras offer improved sensitivity over conventional SPECT cameras. Sensitivity gains are obtained by large numbers of detectors and novel collimator arrangements such as an array of multiple pinholes that focus on the heart. Pinholes lead to variable amounts of attenuation as a source is moved within the camera field of view. This study evaluated the effects of this variable attenuation on myocardial SPECT images. Methods: Computer simulations were performed for a set of nine point sources distributed in the left ventricular wall (LV). Sources were placed at the location of the heart in both an anthropomorphic and a water-cylinder computer phantom. Sources were translated in x, y, and z by up to 5 cm from the center. Projections were simulated with and without attenuation and the changes in attenuation were compared. A LV with an inferior wall defect was also simulated in both phantoms over the same range of positions. Real camera data were acquired on a Discovery NM530c camera (GE Healthcare, Haifa, Israel) for five min in list-mode using an anthropomorphic phantom (DataSpectrum, Durham, NC) with 100 MBq of Tc-99m in the LV. Images were taken over the same range of positions as the simulations and were compared based on the summed perfusion score (SPS), defect width, and apparent defect uptake for each position. Results: Point sources in the water phantom showed absolute changes in attenuation of ≤8% over the range of positions and relative changes of ≤5% compared to the apex. In the anthropomorphic computer simulations, absolute change increased to 20%. The changes in relative attenuation caused a change in SPS of <1.5 for the water phantom but up to 4.2 in the anthropomorphic phantom. Changes were larger for axial than for transverse translations. These results were supported by SPS changes of up to six seen in the physical anthropomorphic phantom for axial translations. Defect width was also seen to significantly increase. The

  14. MR Imaging in Patients with Cardiac Pacemakers and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Torsten; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fischbach, Katharina; Kolb, Christof; Luechinger, Roger; Wiegand, Uwe; Lotz, Joachim; Eitel, Ingo; Gutberlet, Matthias; Thiele, Holger; Schild, Hans H; Kelm, Malte; Quick, Harald H; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Barkhausen, Jörg; Bänsch, Dietmar

    2017-02-15

    This joint consensus paper of the German Roentgen Society and the German Cardiac Society provides physical and electrophysiological background information and specific recommendations for the procedural management of patients with cardiac pacemakers (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) undergoing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The paper outlines the responsibilities of radiologists and cardiologists regarding patient education, indications, and monitoring with modification of MR sequences and PM/ICD reprogramming strategies being discussed in particular. The aim is to optimize patient safety and to improve legal clarity in order to facilitate the access of SM/ICD patients to MR imaging. Key Points:  · Conventional PM and ICD systems are no longer an absolute but rather a relative contraindication for performing an MR examination. Procedural management includes the assessment of the individual risk/benefit ratio, comprehensive patient informed consent about specific risks and "off label" use, extensive PM/ICD-related and MR-related safety precautions to reduce these risks to the greatest extent possible, as well as adequate monitoring techniques.. · MR conditional pacemaker and ICD systems have been tested and approved for MR examination under specific conditions ("in-label" use). Precise understanding of and compliance with the terms of use for the specific pacemaker system are essential for patient safety.. · The risk for an ICD patient during MR examinations is to be considered significantly higher compared to PM patients due to the higher vulnerability of the structurally damaged myocardium and the higher risk of irreversible damage to conventional ICD systems. The indication for a MR examination of an ICD patient should therefore be determined on a stricter basis and the expected risk/benefit ratio should be critically reviewed.. · This complex subject requires close collaboration between radiology and cardiology.. Citation Format

  15. Progression of isolated aortic stenosis: analysis of 29 patients having more than 1 cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Nestico, P F; DePace, N L; Kimbiris, D; Hakki, A H; Khanderia, B; Iskandrian, A S; Segal, B

    1983-11-01

    Factors related to progression of nonrheumatic aortic stenosis (AS) were analyzed in 29 adult patients who underwent serial hemodynamic studies over a mean of 71 months. AS was congenital in 8 patients and degenerative in 21. The patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the change in aortic valve area between the 2 studies. Twelve patients had a greater than or equal to 25% reduction in aortic valve area (Group I) and 17 patients had less than 25% decrease in aortic valve area (Group II). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in age, interval between studies, cardiac output, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left ventricular peak systolic pressure and origin of AS (congenital or degenerative). Group I patients had significantly larger initial aortic valve areas than did Group II patients (1.3 +/- 0.9 cm2 versus 0.8 +/- 0.4 cm2, p = 0.02). Also, the initial peak transaortic pressure gradients were lower in Group I than in Group II (27 +/- 19 versus 58 +/- 38 mm Hg, p = 0.01). Group I patients had a significantly greater increase in pressure gradient and a greater reduction in cardiac output than did Group II patients (24 +/- 21 mm Hg in Group I versus -0.1 +/- 24.5 mm Hg in Group II, p = 0.01, and -1.0 +/- 1.3 liters/min in Group I versus 0.10 +/- 1.4 liters/min in Group II, p = 0.03). Thus, AS progressed in 41% of a selected group of patients who underwent repeated cardiac catheterization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Classification of cardiac patient states using artificial neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Kannathal, N; Acharya, U Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min; Sadasivan, PK; Krishnan, SM

    2003-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a nonstationary signal; therefore, the disease indicators may occur at random in the time scale. This may require the patient be kept under observation for long intervals in the intensive care unit of hospitals for accurate diagnosis. The present study examined the classification of the states of patients with certain diseases in the intensive care unit using their ECG and an Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) classification system. The states were classified into normal, abnormal and life threatening. Seven significant features extracted from the ECG were fed as input parameters to the ANN for classification. Three neural network techniques, namely, back propagation, self-organizing maps and radial basis functions, were used for classification of the patient states. The ANN classifier in this case was observed to be correct in approximately 99% of the test cases. This result was further improved by taking 13 features of the ECG as input for the ANN classifier. PMID:19649222

  17. Alkaline Phosphatase: A Biomarker of Cardiac Function in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Makil, Elizabeth S; Tang, Xinyu; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Collins, R Thomas

    2017-02-09

    Myocardial dysfunction and heart failure are common in pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been suggested as a biomarker for myocardial dysfunction after Fontan operation. We hypothesized that pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction requiring orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) have diminished AP compared to normal. A retrospective review was performed in all patients who underwent OHT at Arkansas Children's Hospital between January 2007 and October 2012. Anatomic diagnoses, therapeutic interventions, and ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were recorded. Z scores for AP levels in the study group were determined by comparing the observed AP levels to age- and gender-matched normative values. T tests were performed to compare the mean AP Z score prior to and after OHT. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. During the study period, 124 OHTs were performed. Complete study data were available and analyzed from 71/124 patients (mean age at OHT 3.9 years; 51% female). The mean AP Z score was significantly lower in the study group prior to OHT compared to normal (p < 0.0001). The initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy prior to OHT was associated with a significant increase in AP and the ventricular EF (p < 0.001 for both). Treatment with milrinone was associated with an increase in EF. AP is significantly lower in pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction prior to OHT compared to normal. AP increases significantly after the initiation of therapies to improve myocardial function. Diminished AP is an indicator of myocardial dysfunction in pediatric patients.

  18. High Patient Satisfaction with Deep Sedation for Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Münkler, Paula; Attanasio, Philipp; Parwani, Abdul Shokor; Huemer, Martin; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Wutzler, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    Patients' satisfaction with invasive procedures largely relies on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort. The necessity for intraprocedural sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias for technical reasons is widely accepted, but data on patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with the procedural sedation are scarce. We have assessed patients' pain and discomfort during and after the procedure using a standardized questionnaire. One-hundred seventeen patients who underwent catheter ablation answered a standardized questionnaire on periprocedural perception of pain and discomfort after different anesthetic protocols with propofol/midazolam with and without additional piritramide and ketamine/midazolam. Patients report a high level of satisfaction with periprocedural sedation with 83% judging sedation as good or very good. The majority of patients was unconscious of the whole procedure and did not recollect experiencing pain. Procedural pain was reported by 7.7% of the patients and 16% reported adverse effects, e.g. postprocedural nausea and episodes of headache. The results of our study show, that deep sedation during catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias is generally well tolerated and patients are satisfied with the procedure. Yet, a number of patients reports pain or adverse events. Therefore, studies comparing different sedation strategies should be conducted in order to optimize sedation and analgesia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Culture-based literacy and Aboriginal health.

    PubMed

    Smylie, Janet; Williams, Lewis; Cooper, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary report of the Aboriginal content of the Language and Culture theme at the Canadian Public Health Association's Second Canadian Conference on Literacy and Health. Our key premise is that Indigenous conceptualizations of literacy need to build on Indigenous understandings and perspectives. We support this premise through a review of the relevant literature in the disciplines of Aboriginal literacy, Indigenous education, health literacy, health promotion, and knowledge translation and our synthesis of the presentations, workshops, and discussions at the meeting. Key emergent themes include: the unique and culturally determined ways in which Aboriginal peoples and their languages conceptualize learning, education, and health; and the recognition that self-determination of language and learning are human rights. Aboriginal concepts of and approaches to literacy naturally link to and overlap with Aboriginal concepts of and approaches to health. The paper includes an overview of gaps in the field and an example of the way that research and practice can be brought together in the context of one First Nations community.

  20. Association of cardiac troponin I with disease severity and outcomes in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Martínez, Mariella; Ayers, Colby; Mishkin, Joseph D; Bartolome, Sonja B; García, Christine K; Torres, Fernando; Drazner, Mark H; de Lemos, James A; Turer, Aslan T; Chin, Kelly M

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies have identified cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as an important marker in pulmonary hypertension (PH) prognosis. However, traditional assays are limited by poor sensitivity, even among patients at high risk. cTnI was measured in 255 PH patients using a new highly sensitive (hs) assay. Other measures included demographics, creatinine, 6-minute walk distance, hemodynamics, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and B-type natriuretic peptide level. The association between cTnI and survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. cTnI was detectable with the hs assay in 95% of the patients with a median level of 6.9 pg/ml (IQR 2.7-12.6 pg/ml). Higher cTnI levels associated with higher levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, shorter 6-minute walk distance, and more severe hemodynamic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. During a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 60 individuals died. Unadjusted event rates increased across higher cTnI quartiles (3, 5, 13, 17 events/100 person-years, respectively, p trend = 0.002). cTnI in the fourth (vs first) quartile remained associated with death in a final stepwise multivariable model that included clinical variables and hemodynamics (adjusted hazard ratio 5.3, 95% confidence interval 1.8-15.6). In conclusion, cTnI levels, detectable with a novel hs assay, identify patients with PH who have more severe hemodynamic and cardiac structural abnormalities and provide novel and independent prognostic information. This hs assay has the potential to detect more at-risk patients and improve current risk-stratification algorithms.

  1. 012. Impact of smoking status on preoperative profile and on postoperative outcome in cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Ampatzidou, Fotini; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Kechagioglou, George; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros; Sileli, Maria; Vlachou, Athanasia; Ignatiadis, Agisilaos; Drossos, George

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aim of our retrospective study is to investigate the impact of smoking status on preoperative profile and on postoperative outcome. Methods A total of 964 patients underwent cardiac surgery procedures from May 2012 to September 2014. Patients were divided in three categories based on their preoperative smoking status: nonsmokers (Group A, n=282), current smokers (Group B, n=15) and ex-smokers (Group C, n=667). The following preoperative patients’ characteristics were recorded: age, body mass index (BMI), obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Euroscore II (predictive score), diabetes mellitus and ejection fraction (EF). Postoperative adverse events and mortality were also recorded: use of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP), low cardiac output syndrome, atrial fibrillation, acute kidney injury, re-intubation, acute respiratory failure managed by noninvasive ventilation, pneumonia, prolonged mechanical ventilation (>48 hours), stroke and death. Statistical analysis based on one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) method while differences between groups were analyzed by the post hoc test. COPD and non-COPD percentages were analyzed by the χ2 test. Results No statistical significant correlation in postoperative adverse events and mortality was found between the groups. The only exception was the use of IABP which was more common in patients with a history of smoking (P<0.05). Statistical significant correlation was revealed in the following preoperative patients’ profile characteristics: age (P<0.01), COPD (P=0.011) and EF (P=0.011). Conclusions According to our findings, preoperative smoking status has no impact on postoperative outcome in cardiac surgery patients. Patients with a history of smoking who underwent cardiac surgery procedures are younger, have lower ejection fraction and COPD is more common.

  2. [Cardiac safety of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient--a case report].

    PubMed

    Karakuła-Juchnowicz, Hanna; Próchnicki, Michał; Kiciński, Paweł; Olajossy, Marcin; Pelczarska-Jamroga, Agnieszka; Dzikowski, Michał; Jaroszyński, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Since electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was introduced as treatment for psychiatric disorders in 1938, it has remained one of the most effective therapeutic methods. ECT is often used as a "treatment of last resort" when other methods fail, and a life-saving procedure in acute clinical states when a rapid therapeutic effect is needed. Mortality associated with ECT is lower, compared to the treatment with tricyclic antidepressants, and comparable to that observed in so-called minor surgery. In the literature, cases of effective and safe electroconvulsive therapy have been described in patients of advanced age, with a burden of many somatic disorders. However, cases of acute cardiac episodes have also been reported during ECT. The qualification of patients for ECT and the selection of a group of patients at the highest risk of cardiovascular complications remains a serious clinical problem. An assessment of the predictive value of parameters of standard electrocardiogram (ECG), which is a simple, cheap and easily available procedure, deserves special attention. This paper reports a case of a 74-year-old male patient treated with ECT for a severe depressive episode, in the context of cardiologic safety. Both every single ECT session and the full course were assessed to examine their impact on levels of troponin T, which is a basic marker of cardiac damage, and selected ECG parameters (QTc, QRS). In the presented case ECT demonstrated its high general and cardiac safety with no negative effect on cardiac troponin (TnT) levels, corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, or other measured ECG parameters despite initially increased troponin levels, the patient's advanced age, the burden of a severe somatic disease and its treatment (anticancer therapy).

  3. [Serum/tissue interleukin-6 concentrations and constitutional abnormalities in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Saji, T; Matsuo, N; Shiono, N; Yokomuro, H; Watanabe, Y; Takanashi, Y; Komatsu, H

    1993-09-01

    Immunological features and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma were studied. The patients' age ranged from 11 years old to 57 years old; all 4 patients were female. Case 1, an 11-year-old female patient with myxoma located in the right ventricle, was considered to be a familial case. Her mother had myxomas in the right and left atrium, and had undergone removal of both tumors 3 years before. Peripheral blood examination revealed various inflammatory parameters in all of these patients. White blood cell (WBC) count was over 8,000/cmm in 3 of the 4 patients, positive CRP was found in 2 patients, IgG was higher than 1,500 mg/dl in 3 patients, positive anti-nuclear antibody was seen in 1 patient, and positive rheumatoid factor was identified in 1 patient. The OKT 4/8 ratio of lymphocyte subpopulation was 4.65 in one patient. The lymphocyte mitogenic response to PHA was increased in 2 patients. Serum IL-6 increased in 3 of 4 patients, and returned to normal within 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The IL-6 concentration in the homogenized sample remarkably increased in all 4 patients. Tumors larger than 4 cm contained higher tissue IL-6 concentrations than those smaller than 2 cm. The cultured myxoma cells produced abundant IL-6 in the culture medium supernatant. We conclude that inflammatory signs and immunological abnormalities are common in patients with large cardiac myxoma, and, in addition, serum IL-6 levels may increase in such patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Validity of Type D personality in Iceland: association with disease severity and risk markers in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Svansdottir, Erla; Karlsson, Hrobjartur D; Gudnason, Thorarinn; Olason, Daniel T; Thorgilsson, Hordur; Sigtryggsdottir, Unnur; Sijbrands, Eric J; Pedersen, Susanne S; Denollet, Johan

    2012-04-01

    Type D personality has been associated with poor prognosis in cardiac patients. This study investigated the validity of the Type D construct in Iceland and its association with disease severity and health-related risk markers in cardiac patients. A sample of 1,452 cardiac patients completed the Type D scale (DS14), and a subgroup of 161 patients completed measurements for the five-factor model of personality, emotional control, anxiety, depression, stress and lifestyle factors. The Icelandic DS14 had good psychometric properties and its construct validity was confirmed. Prevalence of Type D was 26-29%, and assessment of Type D personality was not confounded by severity of underlying coronary artery disease. Regarding risk markers, Type D patients reported more psychopharmacological medication use and smoking, but frequency of previous mental problems was similar across groups. Type D is a valid personality construct in Iceland, and is associated with health-related risk markers, but not cardiac disease severity.

  5. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Rosane Maria; Zanini, Maurice; Ferrari, Juliana Nery; Silva, César Augusto; Farias, Leonardo Fontanive; Comel, João Carlos; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Santos, Antonio Cardoso; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard. PMID:24759952

  6. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  7. Knowledge, Awareness and Self-Care Practices of Hypertension among Cardiac Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Muhammad; Haseeb, Abdul; Lashkerwala, Sehan Siraj; Zahid, Ibrahim; Siddiq, Khadijah; Saad, Muhammad; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Shahnawaz, Waqas; Ahmed, Bilal; Yaqub, Aimen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The most prevalent form of hypertension is systolic blood pressure (SBP) and it is considered to be predisposing risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The objective of the study was to assess self-care practices, knowledge and awareness of hypertension, especially related to SBP among cardiac hypertensive patients. Methodology: A Cross sectional study was conducted on 664 cardiac hypertensive patients, which were selected by non-probability convenience sampling from cardiology outpatient department of three tertiary care hospitals. Face to face interviews were conducted using a pre designed questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed by SPSS (V17). Results: 81.8%, did not know that hypertension is defined as high blood pressure. 97.1% of the sample population did not know that top measurement of blood pressure was referred to as systolic and only 25.0% correctly recognized normal systolic blood pressure to be less than 140mmHg. 7.4% of the patients consulted their doctor for hypertension once or twice in a month. Risk factor for high blood pressure most commonly identified by the participants was too much salt intake Conclusions: The results state that there is an inadequate general knowledge of hypertension among cardiac patients and they do not recognise the significance of elevated SBP levels. There is a need to initiate programs that create community awareness regarding long term complications of uncontrolled hypertension, particularly elevated SBP levels so that there is an improvement in self-care practices of the cardiacpatients. PMID:26383212

  8. Universal access: but when? Treating the right patient at the right time: access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, William; Arthur, Heather; Stokes, Helen; Morrin, Louise; Beaton, Louise

    2006-09-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society formed an Access to Care Working Group ('Working Group') in the spring of 2004. The mandate of the group was to use the best science and information to establish reasonable triage categories and safe wait times for access to common cardiovascular services and procedures. The present commentary presents the rationale for benchmarks for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services. The Working Group's search for evidence included: a full literature review of the efficacy of CR, and the factors affecting access and referral to CR; a review of existing guidelines for access to CR; and a national survey of 14 CR programs across Canada undertaken in May 2005 to solicit information on referral to, and wait times for, CR. The Working Group also reviewed the results of The Ontario Cardiac Rehabilitation Pilot Project (2002) undertaken by the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, which reported the average and median wait times for CR. Some international agencies have formulated their own guidelines relating to the optimal wait time for the onset of CR. However, due to the limited amount of supporting literature, these guidelines have generally been formed as consensus statements. The Canadian national survey showed that few programs had guidelines for individual programs. The Cardiac Care Network of Ontario pilot project reported that the average and median times from a cardiac event to the intake into CR were 99 and 70 days, respectively. The national survey of sampled CR programs also revealed quite remarkable differences across programs in terms of the length of time between first contact to first attendance and to commencement of exercise. Programs that required a stress test before program initiation had the longest wait for exercise initiation. Some patients need to be seen within a very short time frame to prevent a marked deterioration in their medical or psychological state. In some cases, early intervention and advocacy may reduce the risk

  9. A State-Observer for Patient Status in Cardiac Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    can offer vital non- measurable information in real-time. Suitable state - observers or estimation algorithms can calculate patient pa- rameters and...the high complexity of the model classical design methods for state - observers are not applicable. Nevertheless, by periodically matching the

  10. Closing the Education Gap: A Case for Aboriginal Early Childhood Education in Canada, a Look at the Aboriginal Headstart Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Mai

    2011-01-01

    This paper raises awareness concerning the education gap between Aboriginal youth and the non-Aboriginal youth population in Canada. It argues that the historical consequences of colonialism that resulted in diminished sense of self-worth, self-determination, and culture have placed Aboriginals at the low-end of the socio-economic strata. This…

  11. Primary oral health service provision in Aboriginal Medical Services-based dental clinics in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Estie; Perera, Irosha; Tennant, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Australians living in rural and remote areas have poorer access to dental care. This situation is attributed to workforce shortages, limited facilities and large distances to care centres. Against this backdrop, rural and remote Indigenous (Aboriginal) communities in Western Australia seem to be more disadvantaged because evidence suggests they have poorer oral health than non-Indigenous people. Hence, provision of dental care for Aboriginal populations in culturally appropriate settings in rural and remote Western Australia is an important public health issue. The aim of this research was to compare services between the Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS)-based clinics and a typical rural community clinic. A retrospective analysis of patient demographics and clinical treatment data was undertaken among patients who attended the dental clinics over a period of 6 years from 1999 to 2004. The majority of patients who received dental care at AMS dental clinics were Aboriginal (95.3%), compared with 8% at the non-AMS clinic. The rate of emergency at the non-AMS clinic was 33.5%, compared with 79.2% at the AMS clinics. The present study confirmed that more Indigenous patients were treated in AMS dental clinics and the mix of dental care provided was dominated by emergency care and oral surgery. This indicated a higher burden of oral disease and late utilisation of dental care services (more focus on tooth extraction) among rural and remote Indigenous people in Western Australia.

  12. MicroRNA transcriptome profiling in cardiac tissue of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Diederik W D; Mulders, Joyce; Ten Cate, Folkert J; Michels, Michelle; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G; da Costa Martins, Paula A; van der Velden, Jolanda; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2013-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is predominantly caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. One of the most frequent affected genes is MYBPC3, which encodes the thick filament protein cardiac myosin binding protein C. Despite the prevalence of HCM, disease pathology and clinical outcome of sarcomeric mutations are largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs) could play a role in the disease process. To determine which miRNAs were changed in expression, miRNA arrays were performed on heart tissue from HCM patients with a MYBPC3 mutation (n=6) and compared with hearts of non-failing donors (n=6). 532 out of 664 analyzed miRNAs were expressed in at least one heart sample. 13 miRNAs were differentially expressed in HCM compared with donors (at p<0.01, fold change ≥ 2). The genomic context of these differentially expressed miRNAs revealed that miR-204 (fold change 2.4 in HCM vs. donor) was located in an intron of the TRPM3 gene, encoding an aspecific cation channel involved in calcium entry. RT-PCR analysis revealed a trend towards TRPM3 upregulation in HCM compared with donor myocardium (fold change 2.3, p=0.078). In silico identification of mRNA targets of differentially expressed miRNAs showed a large proportion of genes involved in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor signaling and we showed reduced phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I in the HCM myocardium when compared with donor. HCM patients with MYBPC3 mutations have a specific miRNA expression profile. Downstream mRNA targets reveal possible involvement in cardiac signaling pathways.

  13. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

  14. Hand-held echocardiography in the setting of pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery: results from a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Ilaria; Mega, Simona; Goffredo, Costanza; Patti, Giuseppe; Chello, Massimo; Di Sciascio, Germano

    2015-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is not a routine test in the pre-operative cardiac evaluation of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery but may be considered in those with known heart failure and valvular heart disease or complaining cardiac symptoms. In this setting, hand-held echocardiography (HHE) could find a potential application as an alternative to standard echocardiography in selected patients; however, its utility in this context has not been investigated. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the conclusiveness of HHE compared to standard echocardiography in this subset of patients. 100 patients scheduled for non-cardiac surgery were randomized to receive a standard exam with a Philips Ie33 or a bedside evaluation with a pocket-size imaging device (Opti-Go, Philips Medical System). The primary endpoint was the percentage of satisfactory diagnosis at the end of the examination referred as conclusiveness. Secondary endpoints were the mean duration time and the mean waiting time to perform the exams. No significant difference in terms of conclusiveness between HHE and standard echo was found (86 vs 96%; P = 0.08). Mean duration time of the examinations was 6.1 ± 1.2 min with HHE and 13.1 ± 2.6 min with standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). HHE resulted in a consistent save of waiting time because it was performed the same day of clinical evaluation whereas patients waited 10.1 ± 6.1 days for a standard echocardiography (P < 0.001). This study suggests the potential role of HHE for pre-operative evaluation of selected patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, since it provided similar information but it was faster and earlier performed compared to standard echocardiography.

  15. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Device Implantation in a Patient with Cardiogenic Shock under Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyunghee; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Park, Seung-Jung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kang, Jiseok; Joh, Hyun Sung; Shin, Sun Hye

    2017-01-01

    65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with acute decompensated heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and severe mitral regurgitation. Electrocardiography revealed a typical left bundle branch block and atrial fibrillation. Her condition deteriorated despite administering high-doses of inotropes and vasopressors. Pending a decision to therapy, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was performed when the patient underwent a cardiogenic shock. Although the hemodynamic status stabilized with ECMO support, weaning the patient from ECMO was not possible. Thus, we decided to perform cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator implantation as a “rescue” therapy. Five days post-implantation, the patient was successfully weaned from ECMO. PMID:28154601

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  17. Evaluation of ventricular wall stress and cardiac function in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Scardulla, Francesco; Rinaudo, Antonino; Pasta, Salvatore; Scardulla, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a heart disease characterized by both left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction, leading to cardiac remodeling and ultimately heart failure. We aimed to investigate the effect of dilated cardiomyopathy on the pump performance and myocardial wall mechanics using patient-specific finite element analysis. Results evinced pronounced end-systolic wall stress on left ventricular wall of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy as compared to that of normal hearts. In dilated cardiomyopathy, both end-diastolic and end-systolic pressure-volume relationships of left ventricle and right ventricle were shifted to the right compared to controls, suggesting reduced myocardial contractility. We hereby propose that finite element analysis represents a useful tool to assess the myocardial wall stress and cardiac work, which are responsible for progressive left ventricular deterioration and poor clinical course.

  18. Atrioventricular conduction in patients with clinical indications for transvenous cardiac pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S I; Smith, L K; Aoresty, J M; Voukydis, P; Morkin, E

    1975-01-01

    Eighty patients with clinical indications for cardiac pacing had atrioventricular conduction analysed by His bundle study. The indications for cardiac pacing included high grade atrioventricular block, sick sinus node syndrome without tachycardia, bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, unstable bilateral bundle-branch block, and uncontrolled ventricular irritability. Complete heart block, Wenckeback block (Mobitz I), and 2:1 block were noted proximal and distal to the His bundle. Mobitz II block only occurred distal to the His bundle. Of special interest were the high incidence of distal conduction abnormalities by His bundle analysis (40/80, 50%), the re-establishment of normal atrioventricular conduction in acutely ill patients with recent evidence of heart block, and the high incidence of intraventricular conduction disturbances on standard electrocardiogram (48/80, 60%). Images PMID:1148056

  19. Modeling the emergency cardiac in-patient flow: an application of queuing theory.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Arnoud M; van Rossum, A C; Visser, M C; Koole, G M

    2007-06-01

    This study investigates the bottlenecks in the emergency care chain of cardiac in-patient flow. The primary goal is to determine the optimal bed allocation over the care chain given a maximum number of refused admissions. Another objective is to provide deeper insight in the relation between natural variation in arrivals and length of stay and occupancy rates. The strong focus on raising occupancy rates of hospital management is unrealistic and counterproductive. Economies of scale cannot be neglected. An important result is that refused admissions at the First Cardiac Aid (FCA) are primarily caused by unavailability of beds downstream the care chain. Both variability in LOS and fluctuations in arrivals result in large workload variations. Techniques from operations research were successfully used to describe the complexity and dynamics of emergency in-patient flow.

  20. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Broch, Ole; Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1-9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1-9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  1. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1–9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1–9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:28116294

  2. Accidental arterial puncture during right internal jugular vein cannulation in cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Madan Mohan; Arun, Venkitaramanan; Wala, Al-Ajmi Ahmed; Al-Bahrani, Maher Jaffer; Jayatilaka, Cheskey Manoj; Nishant, Arora Ram

    2016-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this study was to compare the incidence of accidental arterial puncture during right internal jugular vein (RIJV) cannulation with and without ultrasound guidance (USG). The secondary end points were to assess if USG improves the chances of successful first pass cannulation and if BMI has an impact on incidence of arterial puncture and the number of attempts that are to be made for successful cannulation. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study performed at a single tertiary cardiac care center. Material and methods: 255 consecutive adult and pediatric cardiac surgical patients were included. In Group I (n = 124) USG was used for the right internal jugular vein cannulation and in Group II (n = 81) it was not used. There were 135 adult patients and 70 pediatric patients. Statistical analysis: Demographic and categorical data were analyzed using Student ‘t’ test and chi- square test was used for qualitative variables. Results: The overall incidence of accidental arterial puncture in the entire study population was significantly higher when ultrasound guidance was not used (P < 0.001). In subgroup analysis, incidence of arterial puncture was significant in both adult (P = 0.03) and pediatric patients (P < 0.001) without USG. First attempt cannulation was more often possible in pediatric patients under USG (P = 0.03). In adult patients USG did not improve first attempt cannulation except in underweight patients. Conclusions: USG helped in the avoidance of inadvertent arterial puncture during RIJV cannulation and simultaneously improved the chances of first attempt cannulation in pediatric and in underweight adult cardiac surgical patients. PMID:27716688

  3. Association of hypothyroidism with adverse events in patients with heart failure receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay K; Vegh, Eszter; Orencole, Mary; Miller, Alexandra; Blendea, Dan; Moore, Stephanie; Lewis, Gregory D; Singh, Jagmeet P; Parks, Kimberly A; Heist, E Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Hypothyroidism is associated with an adverse prognosis in cardiac patients in general and in particular in patients with heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of hypothyroidism on patients with HF receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Additionally, the impact of level of control of hypothyroidism on risk of adverse events after CRT implantation was also evaluated. We included consecutive patients in whom a CRT device was implanted from April 2004 to April 2010 at our institution with sufficient follow-up data available for analysis; 511 patients were included (age 68.5±12.4 years, women 20.4%); 84 patients with a clinical history of hypothyroidism, on treatment with thyroid hormone repletion or serum thyroid-stimulating hormone level≥5.00 μU/ml, were included in the hypothyroid group. The patients were followed for up to 3 years after implant for a composite end point of hospitalization for HF, left ventricular assist device placement, or heart transplant and cardiac death; 215 composite end point events were noted in this period. In a multivariate model, hypothyroidism (hazard ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.027 to 2.085, p=0.035), female gender (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.428 to 0.963, p=0.032), and creatinine (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.145 to 1.382, p<0.001) were significantly associated with occurrence of the composite end point; 53.6% of patients with hypothyroidism at baseline developed the composite end point compared with 39.8% of those with euthyroidism (p=0.02). In conclusion, hypothyroidism is associated with a worse prognosis after CRT implantation.

  4. The Impact of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Stanchina, Michael L.; Ellison, Kristin; Malhotra, Atul; Anderson, Maria; Kirk, Malcolm; Benser, Michael E.; Tosi, Christine; Carlisle, Carol; Millman, Richard P.; Buxton, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to improve cardiac function and reduce Cheyne-Stokes respiration but has not been evaluated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In this pilot study, we investigated the impact of both CRT and CRT plus increased rate pacing in heart failure (ie, congestive heart failure [CHF]) patients with OSA. We hypothesized that through increased cardiac output CRT/pacing would reduce obstructive events and daytime symptoms of sleepiness. Methods Full polysomnograms were performed on CHF patients who were scheduled for CRT, and those patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5 events per hour were approached about study enrollment. Patients had a pre-CRT implant baseline echocardiogram and an echocardiogram a mean (± SEM) duration of 6.6 ± 1.4 months post-CRT implant; polysomnography; and responded to the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire, the Epworth sleepiness scale, and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. An additional third polysomnography was performed combining CRT with a pacing rate of 15 beats/min above the baseline sleeping heart rate within 1 week of the second polysomnography. Assessments for the change in cardiac output during the polysomnography were performed using circulation time to pulse oximeter as a surrogate. Results Twenty-four patients were screened, and 13 patients (mean age, 68.6 years; body mass index, 28.7 kg/m2) had evidence of OSA. The mean AHI decreased from 40.9 ± 6.4 to 29.5 ± 5.9 events per hour with CRT (p = 0.04). The mean baseline ejection fraction was 22 ± 1.7% and increased post-CRT to 33.6 ± 2.0% (p < 0.05). The reduction in AHI with CRT closely correlated with a decrease in circulation time (r = 0.89; p < 0.001) with CRT. Increased rate pacing made no additional impact on the AHI or circulation time. CRT had a limited impact on sleep architecture or daytime symptom scores. Conclusions CRT improved cardiac function and

  5. The curious case of a cardiac tamponade in the hypertensive patient presenting as abdominal fullness.

    PubMed

    Li, William; Subedi, Rogin; Madhira, Bhaskara

    2017-01-19

    Cardiac tamponade is a medical emergency consisting of an accumulation of fluid in the pericardial space which is rapidly progressing and fatal. Because cardiac tamponade is ultimately a clinical diagnosis, mindful consideration for atypical presentations is essential for the reduction of mortality in the acute setting. Our patient was a 77year-old female admitted after presenting with general malaise, weakness, somnolence, altered mental status and urinary incontinence found to have CML (chronic myeloid leukemia) on confirmatory bone marrow biopsy after suspicions arose from a leukocytosis of 34,000 cells per mcL with 85% neutrophils and elevated blasts (8%). Initial vital signs revealed mild tachycardia, mild tachypnea and blood pressure elevated to 162/84mm Hg along with a temperature of 38.7°C and oxygen saturation of 96% on 2l by nasal cannula. She received the standard of care for a community acquired pneumonia and was started on treatment with decitabine as further work-up was unremarkable. An abdominal CT performed for abdominal fullness later displayed a large pericardial effusion. Repeat echocardiography exhibited right atrial diastolic collapse, inferior vena cava dilatation (IVC) without inspiratory collapse >50% and the large pericardial effusion consistent with tamponade. The blood pressure remained hypertensive until she suddenly went into cardiac arrest after being intubated for a pericardial window and expired. Our case highlights the need to keep cardiac tamponade as a differential in the hypertensive individual with abdominal complaints as atypical presentations can obscure diagnosis, delay treatment and increase mortality.

  6. Anaesthesia Application for Cardiac Denervation in a Patient with Long QT Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Koçulu, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is a congenital disorder that is characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiograms and a propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, which may lead to syncope, cardiac arrest or sudden death. Cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension diseases have additional risks in anaesthesia management. In this study, we emphasize on one lung ventilation, pacemaker-implantable cardioverter–defibrillator and the anaesthesia management process in a patient with long QT syndrome, cardiomyopathy and pulmonary hypertension who underwent thoracic sympathectomy. PMID:27366557

  7. Cardiac Migration of Endogenous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Lucke, Caroline; Escher, Felicitas; Van Linthout, Sophie; Kühl, Uwe; Miteva, Kapka; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi). Methods. In 29 patients with (n = 23) or without (n = 6) CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB), transcardiac gradients (TCGs) of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD90+ cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025–0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC) and as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD105+ cells for 0.019 [0.0026–0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% (P < 0.01) transcardiac reduction of circulating MSC in patients with CMi, correlating with the extent of cardiac inflammation (P < 0.05, multivariate analysis). A strong correlation was found between the TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45−CD34−CD90+CD105+) in EMB (r = −0.73, P < 0.005). SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P < 0.005, multivariate analysis). Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation. PMID:25814787

  8. [Massive cardiac lipomatosis, an autopsy finding in a patient with sudden death].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón-de Lucas, Ester; García-Fernández, Eugenia; Carpio, Carlos; Alcolea, Sergio; Martínez-Abad, Yolanda; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2016-06-17

    The fat replacement of myocardial cells is a degenerative process that usually affects the right ventricle and is found in 50% of the elderly. The problem arises when this degeneration occurs to a massive degree, a differential diagnosis with other pathologies being necessary. We present the case of a patient who died suddenly and a massive cardiac lipomatosis was found on autopsy, as the only explanation of the outcome.

  9. The politics of evaluating Aboriginal Health Services.

    PubMed

    Moodie, R

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of Aboriginal Health Services (AHSs) has become a topic of importance to service providers and governments in recent years. This paper examines some of the difficulties AHSs have in conducting evaluation and presents an example of an inappropriate evaluation methodology as proposed by the Commonwealth Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA) in 1986. The paper examines the contradictory nature of the DAA proposal and the mistrust it has engendered in many AHSs. It then highlights some of the political difficulties in developing meaningful national and community health objectives as a basis for sound evaluation of health services. The paper concludes by identifying some of the processes whereby more appropriate evaluation methodologies might be developed and suggests that negotiation and consultation with the Aboriginal communities and their health services are imperative to successful evaluation.

  10. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: a comprehensive care approach to reduce risk.

    PubMed

    Pun, Patrick H; Middleton, John P

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a major problem in hemodialysis patients, and our understanding of this disease is underdeveloped. The lack of a precise definition tailored for use in the hemodialysis population limits the reliability of epidemiologic reports. Efforts should be directed toward an accurate classification of all deaths that occur in this vulnerable population. The traditional paradigm of disease pathophysiology based on known cardiac risk factors appears to be inadequate to explain the magnitude of sudden cardiac death risk in chronic kidney disease, and numerous unique cofactors and exposures appear to determine risk in this population. Well-designed cohort studies will be needed for a basic understanding of disease pathophysiology and risk factors, and randomized intervention trials will be needed before best management practices can be implemented. This review examines available data to describe the characteristics of the high-risk patient and suggests a comprehensive common sense approach to prevention using existing cardiovascular medications and reducing and monitoring potential dialysis-related arrhythmic triggers. Other unproven cardiovascular therapies such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators should be used on a case-by-case basis, with recognition of the associated hazards that these devices carry among hemodialysis patients.

  11. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring in patients with bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery: Observational case series

    PubMed Central

    Aktuerk, Dincer; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Luckraz, Heyman; Garnham, Andrew; Khazi, Fayaz Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with significant bilateral carotid artery stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery have an increased risk of stroke and death. The optimal management strategy remains inconclusive, and the available evidence does not support the superiority of one strategy over another. Materials and Methods: A number of noninvasive strategies have been developed for minimizing perioperative stroke including continuous real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The number of patients presenting with this combination (bilateral significant carotid stenosis requiring urgent cardiac surgery) in any single institution will be small and hence there is a lack of large randomized studies. Results: This case series describes our early experience with NIRS in a select group of patients with significant bilateral carotid stenosis undergoing urgent cardiac surgery (n = 8). In contrast to other studies, this series is a single surgeon, single center study, where the entire surgery (both distal ends and proximal ends) was performed during single aortic clamp technique, which effectively removes several confounding variables. NIRS monitoring led to the early recognition of decreased cerebral oxygenation, and corrective steps (increased cardiopulmonary bypass flow, increased pCO2, etc.,) were taken. Conclusion: The study shows good clinical outcome with the use of NIRS. This is our “work in progress,” and we aim to conduct a larger study. PMID:26750675

  12. Survival of patients with spinal cord injury after cardiac arrest in Department of Veterans Affairs hospital: Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Deborah; Carter, William E; Cifu, David X; Carne, William

    2014-01-01

    Survivability characteristics after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the population with spinal cord injury (SCI) are unclear but may be useful for advanced care planning discussions with patients. Retrospective evaluation from records of all SCI patients over 10 yr at a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest was performed. Demographic data and other common measurements were recorded. Thirty-six male subjects were identified, and only two patients survived to discharge (5.5% survival rate), both of whom were admitted for nonacute issues and were asymptomatic shortly before the cardiac arrest. The mean age at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest was 62.4 yr, with a mean time from cardiac arrest to death of 3.02 d. No significant demographic parameters were identified. Overall, SCI likely portends worse outcome for acutely ill patients in the situation of a cardiac arrest. Conclusions are limited by sample size.

  13. Successful resuscitation of a patient who developed cardiac arrest from pulsed saline bacitracin lavage during thoracic laminectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven B; Deshur, Mark; Khavkin, Yevgeniy; Karaikovic, Elden; Vender, Jeffery

    2008-06-01

    A patient with a history of T12 burst fracture caused by a fall, and with progressive weakness and sensory loss in the left leg, survived a cardiac arrest after pulsed saline bacitracin lavage irrigation during a posterior spinal fusion.

  14. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  15. Concordance of Brain and Core Temperature in Comatose Patients After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Coppler, Patrick J; Marill, Keith A; Okonkwo, David O; Shutter, Lori A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Rittenberger, Jon C; Callaway, Clifton W; Elmer, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Comatose patients after cardiac arrest should receive active targeted temperature management (TTM), with a goal core temperature of 32-36°C for at least 24 hours. Small variations in brain temperature may confer or mitigate a substantial degree of neuroprotection, which may be lost at temperatures near 37°C. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between brain and core temperature after cardiac arrest through direct, simultaneous measurement of both. We placed intracranial monitors in a series of consecutive patients hospitalized for cardiac arrest at a single tertiary care facility within 12 hours of return of spontaneous circulation to guide postcardiac arrest care. We compared the absolute difference between brain and core (esophageal or rectal) temperature measurements every hour for the duration of intracranial monitoring and tested for a lag between brain and core temperature using the average square difference method. Overall, 11 patients underwent simultaneous brain and core temperature monitoring for a total of 906 hours of data (Median 95; IQR: 15-118 hours per subject). On average, brain temperature was 0.34C° (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31-0.37) higher than core temperature. In 7% of observations, brain temperature exceeded the measured core temperature ≥1°C. Brain temperature lagged behind core temperature by 0.45 hours (95% CI = -0.27-1.27 hours). Brain temperature averages 0.34°C higher than core temperature after cardiac arrest, and is more than 1°C higher than core temperature 7% of the time. This phenomenon must be considered when carrying out TTM to a goal core temperature of <36°C.

  16. Rifampin blood and tissue levels in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Armstrong, B C; Kline, B J

    1982-01-01

    Single 600-mg capsules of rifampin were given orally to 26 patients as prophylaxis during cardiac valve replacement. Antibiotic concentrations were measured in blood (serum or plasma) and tissue (excised cardiac valve). The serum or plasma levels of rifampin in 18 patients who ingested this drug 2 h before they received preoperative opiates and anticholinergics intramuscularly were not significantly different from the levels in four normal volunteers who received the drug. These levels were 15.9 +/- 6.5 micrograms/ml (mean +/- standard deviation) 2 h after drug administration, 7.1 +/- 4.3 micrograms/ml 8 h after drug administration and 2 h after a mean of 1.4 h on cardiopulmonary bypass, and 1.6 +/- 1.6 micrograms/ml 24 h after drug ingestion. The valve tissue level was 3.8 +/- 2.7 micrograms/g (mean +/- standard deviation; n = 10). This value was 65% of the simultaneous serum and plasma levels and 31% of the peak serum and plasma levels. Eight patients who were given rifampin at the same time that they received other preoperative medications had significantly lower blood levels than the 18 patients who received rifampin 2 h earlier (P less than 0.001). No rifampin was detected in valves from seven of these patients. Decreased rifampin absorption due to simultaneous administration with opiates and anticholinergics was the probable reason for the low plasma and serum levels observed. These data suggest that, if properly dosed, rifampin administered orally gives high blood and valve tissue levels, which are affected minimally by cardiopulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery. PMID:7103459

  17. Predictive accuracy of dynamic risk factors for aboriginal and non-aboriginal sex offenders: an exploratory comparison using STABLE-2007.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Leslie; Babchishin, Kelly M; Blais, Julie

    2012-09-01

    Although Aboriginal offenders are overrepresented in Canadian prisons, there is limited research examining the extent to which commonly used risk factors and risk scales are applicable to Aboriginals. Aboriginal (n = 88) and non-Aboriginal (n = 509) sex offenders on community supervision were compared on the dynamic risk factors of STABLE-2007. Data on sexual, violent, any crime, and any recidivism (including breaches) were collected with an average follow-up of 3.4 years. Aboriginal offenders scored significantly higher than non-Aboriginal offenders on STABLE-2007 total scores and on several items measuring general criminality. STABLE-2007 did not significantly predict recidivism with Aboriginal offenders (although it did for non-Aboriginals). The general antisociality items were generally significantly less predictive for Aboriginals than non-Aboriginals, whereas items assessing sexual self-regulation and relationship stability predicted similarly for both groups. These exploratory results suggest that Aboriginal sex offenders are a higher-needs group but that some STABLE-2007 items are not predictive with this population.

  18. Pan-Cardiac Cycle Fixed Mitral Valve Opening in an LVAD Patient Presenting with Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Andrew J; Sohn, Jina; Grazette, Luanda; Fong, Michael W; Bowdish, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) who underwent an elective cholecystectomy and abruptly decompensated on postoperative day 9. We highlight the uncommon echocardiogram finding of mitral valve leaflets fixed widely open throughout the cardiac cycle during an LVAD suction event. Bedside echocardiographic confirmation of a suction event enabled the rapid diagnosis and intervention for hemorrhagic shock before blood tests and radiographic results were available. Acoustic image quality can be limited in LVAD patients, and awareness of this uncommon finding may increase specificity for the echocardiographic diagnosis of LVAD suction events.

  19. Cardiac complications of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sandhu, Paul; Boobes, Khlaed; Hatahet, Kamel; Raza, Farhan; Boobes, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of the death in dialysis patients. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are associated with lower mortality and are viewed as the desired access option in most patients with advanced kidney disease needing dialysis. However, AVFs have significant and potentially deleterious effects on cardiac functions particularly in the setting of preexisting heart disease. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review to what is known about the impact of AVFs on: congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease.

  20. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis.

  1. An augmented reality system for patient-specific guidance of cardiac catheter ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Ector, Joris; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present a system to assist in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias by catheter ablation. A patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical model, constructed from magnetic resonance images, is merged with fluoroscopic images in an augmented reality environment that enables the transfer of electrocardiography (ECG) measurements and cardiac activation times onto the model. Accurate mapping is realized through the combination of: a new calibration technique, adapted to catheter guided treatments; a visual matching registration technique, allowing the electrophysiologist to align the model with contrast-enhanced images; and the use of virtual catheters, which enable the annotation of multiple ECG measurements on the model. These annotations can be visualized by color coding on the patient model. We provide an accuracy analysis of each of these components independently. Based on simulation and experiments, we determined a segmentation error of 0.6 mm, a calibration error in the order of 1 mm and a target registration error of 1.04 +/- 0.45 mm. The system provides a 3-D visualization of the cardiac activation pattern which may facilitate and improve diagnosis and treatment of the arrhytmia. Because of its low cost and similar advantages we believe our approach can compete with existing commercial solutions, which rely on dedicated hardware and costly catheters. We provide qualitative results of the first clinical use of the system in 11 ablation procedures.

  2. "If you don't believe it, it won't help you": use of bush medicine in treating cancer among Aboriginal people in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the use of bush medicine and traditional healing among Aboriginal Australians for their treatment of cancer and the meanings attached to it. A qualitative study that explored Aboriginal Australians' perspectives and experiences of cancer and cancer services in Western Australia provided an opportunity to analyse the contemporary meanings attached and use of bush medicine by Aboriginal people with cancer in Western Australia Methods Data collection occurred in Perth, both rural and remote areas and included individual in-depth interviews, observations and field notes. Of the thirty-seven interviews with Aboriginal cancer patients, family members of people who died from cancer and some Aboriginal health care providers, 11 participants whose responses included substantial mention on the issue of bush medicine and traditional healing were selected for the analysis for this paper. Results The study findings have shown that as part of their healing some Aboriginal Australians use traditional medicine for treating their cancer. Such healing processes and medicines were preferred by some because it helped reconnect them with their heritage, land, culture and the spirits of their ancestors, bringing peace of mind during their illness. Spiritual beliefs and holistic health approaches and practices play an important role in the treatment choices for some patients. Conclusions Service providers need to acknowledge and understand the existence of Aboriginal knowledge (epistemology) and accept that traditional healing can be an important addition to an Aboriginal person's healing complementing Western medical treatment regimes. Allowing and supporting traditional approaches to treatment reflects a commitment by modern medical services to adopting an Aboriginal-friendly approach that is not only culturally appropriate but assists with the cultural security of the service. PMID:20569478

  3. Chronic disease, medications and lifestyle: perceptions from a regional Victorian Aboriginal community

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor medication management may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of Aboriginal people in Australia. Yet while there is extensive literature about the perceptions of healthcare providers on this issue, there is limited information on the perceptions of Aboriginal people themselves. Objectives: To investigate the perceptions of a group of Aboriginal people attending a Victorian regional Aboriginal Health Service (AHS) with diagnosed medical conditions requiring medications, of their lifestyle, disease management and medication usage. Methods: Data was collected through one to one in depth interviews using a semi-structured ‘yarning’ process. Twenty patients were invited to participate in the study and were interviewed by Aboriginal Health Workers in a culturally appropriate manner. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: Our results show that the majority of participants perceived that changes in lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, and smoking cessation would help improve their health. Most patients reported having been counselled on their medicines, and while the majority reported adherence and acknowledgement of the efficacy of their medicines, there was a lack of clarity regarding long term maintenance on regimens. Finally, while the majority reported taking over the counter products, some did not see the need to inform their doctor about this, or chose not to. Conclusion: Chronic illness was perceived as common in families and community. Patients relied mostly on their health care professionals as sources for their drug information. Patients may have benefited from further counselling in the area of complementary and other over the counter medicines, as well as on the necessity of maintenance of regimes for chronic disease management. Finally, lifestyle changes such as dietary improvements and smoking cessation were identified as areas that may

  4. The clinical application of pulse contour cardiac output and intrathoracic volume measurements in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky A; Braaf, Sandra C

    2006-08-01

    Cardiac output (CO) determination by pulmonary artery (PA) catheter has increasingly been criticised within the literature due to its invasive nature and poor correlation between the pressure measurements and intravascular volume status in mechanically ventilated patients. Consequently, alternative less invasive technologies to PA catheterisation are emerging within intensive care. One such novel technology are pulse contour CO (PCCO) systems. They establish comprehensive and continuous haemodynamic monitoring utilising a central venous catheter (CVC) and an arterial line. Furthermore, a key feature of this technology is its ability to produce intrathoracic volume measurements which may provide a better estimation of cardiac preload as well as indicate the presence and severity of pulmonary oedema. This article aims to discuss the theoretical basis and clinical application of PCCO systems, how PCCO systems differ from PA catheters and how the intrathoracic volume measurements are derived. Understanding these advanced concepts will ensure that clinicians are able to employ this innovative monitoring technology more effectively.

  5. Is coronary vein angioplasty necessary to provide cardiac resynchronization in selected patients? A case report.

    PubMed

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sosnowski, Cezary; Zajac, Dariusz; Ruzyłło, Witold; Szwed, Hanna

    2008-09-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become a recommended method for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and cardiac dyssynchrony. In some cases, CRT implantation procedure can be complicated because of anatomic and technical reasons. Some reports describe balloon angioplasty of stenotic heart veins as a method to achieve the target vessel. We present a case of a 58-year-old male with permanent atrial fibrillation and CHF who was referred for CRT. During the implantation of the pacemaker, the diaphragmatic obstacle in coronary sinus (CS) has been passed after many attempts using a balloon catheter with no inflation. The aim of the report is to discuss, in short, the real necessity of venous angioplasty in the CS bed during CRT implantation.

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrollment and the Impact of Systematic Nursing Interventions for Postmyocardial Infarction and Stent Patients.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joan A Cebrick

    2016-08-01

    A randomized experimental design was used to determine the most effective intervention for enhancing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) enrollment for postmyocardial infarction and stent patients. The 104 subjects (70 males and 34 females; 23-87 years old) were patients with a discharge diagnosis of a myocardial infarction followed by a percutaneous coronary intervention, which included a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and the placement of one or more coronary stents. Regardless of the intervention, patients who received face-to-face nursing interventions were more likely to enroll in CR than were patients who had indirect interventions, χ(2)(3) = 32.84, p < .001. Patients who experienced an entrance interview were most likely to enroll, χ(2)(1) = 86.80, p < .001. Direct logistic regression determined that the full model was statistically significant for all predictors, χ(2)(5), 105.56, p < .001, with the strongest predictor, the entrance interview, having an odds ratio of 1.73.

  7. Attitudes about racism, medical mistrust, and satisfaction with care among African American and white cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    LaVeist, T A; Nickerson, K J; Bowie, J V

    2000-01-01

    The authors examine determinants of satisfaction with medical care among 1,784 (781 African American and 1,003 white) cardiac patients. Patient satisfaction was modeled as a function of predisposing factors (gender, age, medical mistrust, and perception of racism) and enabling factors (medical insurance). African Americans reported less satisfaction with care. Although both black and white patients tended not to endorse the existence of racism in the medical care system, African American patients were more likely to perceive racism. African American patients were significantly more likely to report mistrust. Multivariate analysis found that the perception of racism and mistrust of the medical care system led to less satisfaction with care. When perceived racism and medical mistrust were controlled, race was no longer a significant predictor of satisfaction.

  8. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  9. "They treated me like crap and I know it was because I was Native": The healthcare experiences of Aboriginal peoples living in Vancouver's inner city.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Ashley; Fleming, Kim; Markwick, Nicole; Morrison, Tracey; Lagimodiere, Louise; Kerr, Thomas

    2017-01-26

    There is growing evidence that Aboriginal peoples often experience healthcare inequalities due to racism. However, research exploring the healthcare experiences of Aboriginal peoples who use illicit substances is limited, and research rarely accounts for how multiple accounts of stigma intersect and contribute to the experiences of marginalized populations. Our research aimed to explore the healthcare experiences of Aboriginal peoples who use illicit drugs and or illicit alcohol (APWUID/A) living in Vancouver's inner city. Using Indigenous methodologies, a community research team comprised of APWUID/A led the study design, data collection and analysis. Peer-facilitated talking circles explored community members' experiences accessing healthcare services and patient-provider encounters. Using an intersectionality framework, our research demonstrated how healthcare inequalities among Aboriginal peoples are perpetuated by systemic racism and discrimination. Stigmatizing racial stereotypes were perceived to negatively influence individual attitudes and clinical practice. Participants' experiences of medical dismissal often resulted in disengagement from care or delay in care. The findings suggest healthcare providers must understand the structural and historical forces that influence racial disparities in healthcare and personal attitudes in clinical practice. Adequate clinical protocols for pain management within the context of illicit substance use are urgently needed. The valuation of Aboriginal peoples and cultures within healthcare is paramount to addressing the health gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians.

  10. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  11. [The use of central acting analgesic nefopam in postoperative analgesia in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    Eremenko, A A; Sorokina, L S; Pavlov, M V

    2013-01-01

    A prospective, randomized, comparative study was conducted. 3 analgesia protocols were used: 1) patient controlled analgesia (PCA) with trimeperidine in combination with a nefopam constant infusion; 2) PCA with trimeperidine in combination with a nefopam bolus; 3) PCA with trimeperidine separately during early postoperative period in cardiac surgery patients. The study included 60 patients agedf rom 40 to 65 years of age (20 patients in each group). The analgesia efficacy was evaluated with a 5-point verbal rating scale (VRS) for pain intensity and inspiratory lung capacity (ILC), measured with incentive spirometer. The safety of nefopam during early postoperative period in cardiac surgery patients was shown. The combination of nefopam and trimeperidine led to a more pronounced analgetic effect. Trimeperidine consumption was significantly lower in nefopam groups than in the group of isolated PCA. Wholly adverse effects were associated with trimeperidine and were dose-related The incidence of nausea, vomiting, dizziness, weakness, bowel paresis was significantly higher in isolated PCA group than in the other two groups.

  12. Manipulating parallel circuits: the perioperative management of patients with complex congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, John; Eyskens, Benedicte; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Gewillig, Marc

    2003-08-01

    In all patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the effective delivery of oxygen to the tissues is of paramount importance. In the patient with relatively normal cardiac structures, the pulmonary and systemic circulations are relatively independent of each other. In the patient with a functional single ventricle, the pulmonary and systemic circulations are dependent on the same pump. As a consequence of this interdependency, the haemodynamic changes following complex palliative procedures, such as the Norwood operation, can be difficult to understand. Comparison of the newly created surgical connections to a simple set of direct current electrical circuits may help the practitioner to successfully care for the patient. In patients undergoing complex palliations, the pulmonary and systemic circulations can be compared to two circuits in parallel. Manipulations of variables, such as resistance or flow, in one circuit, can profoundly affect the performance of the other circuit. A large pulmonary flow might result in a large increase in the saturation of haemoglobin with oxygen returning to the heart via the pulmonary veins at the expense of a decreased systemic flow. Accurate balancing of these parallel circulations requires an appreciation of all interventions that can affect individual components of both circulations.

  13. Adaptive servo ventilation improves cardiac dysfunction and prognosis in chronic heart failure patients with Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    PubMed

    Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Shimizu, Takeshi; Owada, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuichi; Iwaya, Shoji; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Makiko; Hoshino, Yasuto; Sato, Takamasa; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2011-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is often observed in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) is effective for CSR, it remains unclear whether ASV improves the cardiac function and prognosis of patients with CHF and CSR.Sixty patients with CHF and CSR (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 38.7%, mean apnea hypopnea index 36.8 times/hour, mean central apnea index 19.1 times/hour) were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: 23 patients treated with ASV (ASV group) and 37 patients treated without ASV (Non-ASV group). Measurement of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and echocardiography were performed before, 3 and 6 months after treatments in each group. Patients were followed-up for cardiac events (cardiac death and re-hospitalization) after discharge. In the ASV group, NYHA functional class, BNP levels, cardiac systolic and diastolic function were significantly improved with ASV treatment for 6 months. In contrast, none of these parameters changed in the Non-ASV group. Importantly, Kaplan-Meier analysis clearly demonstrated that the event-free rate was significantly higher in the ASV group than in the Non-ASV group.Adaptive servo ventilation improves cardiac function and prognosis in patients with chronic heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

  14. Cabergoline therapy and the risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with hyperprolactinemia: a meta-analysis from clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Bogazzi, F; Manetti, L; Raffaelli, V; Lombardi, M; Rossi, G; Martino, E

    2008-12-01

    Dopamine agonists have been associated with increased risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Whether these drugs might be harmful for patients with hyperprolactinemia is still unsettled. Occasional case reports and 7 studies on the relationship between cabergoline and cardiac valve regurgitation have been published so far. Overall, cabergoline has been considered a safe therapy, although some studies suggested an increased prevalence of cardiac valve regurgitation. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the effects of cabergoline on cardiac valve regurgitation. Eligible studies were all trials using cabergoline in patients with either tumor or non-tumor hyperprolactinemia. Our search was updated to October 2008. Pooled data from the 6 selected studies showed that treatment with cabergoline was associated with increased risk of tricuspid valve regurgitation (fixed effects: prevalence ratio=1.40; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-1.67); on the contrary, patients treated with cabergoline and control subjects did not differ in prevalence of aortic or mitral valve regurgitation. This meta-analysis shows that patients with hyperprolactinemia treated with cabergoline are at increased risk of regurgitation of the tricuspid valve. However, regurgitation was only an echocardiographic finding since no patient had symptoms of valvular disease. This meta-analysis underscores that echocardiography is recommended in all patients with hyperprolactinemia who are candidate to be treated with or are under cabergoline therapy; monitoring cardiac valves is also recommended although precise follow- up for these patients will be likely provided by future longitudinal studies.

  15. Understanding Australian Aboriginal Tertiary Student Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Bennell, Debra; Anderson, Roz; Cooper, Inala; Forrest, Simon; Exell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a study of the experiences of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students, this paper presents an overview of the specific needs of these students as they enter and progress through their tertiary education. Extracts from a set of case studies developed from both staff and student interviews and an online…

  16. Community Control and Self-Determination in Aboriginal Education Research: The Changed Roles, Relationships and Responsibilities of Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Researchers and Aboriginal Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Shayne; Stewart, Ian

    This paper examines ongoing changes related to appropriate methods and practices in Aboriginal educational research, including community control of research based on the principle of self-determination. This assertion of control includes the redefinition of relationships in the research process; appropriate initiation of research projects;…

  17. Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed to renew the relationship between the Canadian government and the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, this action plan contains a statement of reconciliation, a statement of renewal, and four key objectives for action. First, renewing partnerships includes community-based healing to address the negative effects of the residential schools…

  18. Developing a Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bow, Catherine; Christie, Michael; Devlin, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuating fortunes of Northern Territory bilingual education programs in Australian languages and English have put at risk thousands of books developed for these programs in remote schools. In an effort to preserve such a rich cultural and linguistic heritage, the Living Archive of Aboriginal Languages project is establishing an open access,…

  19. Native Americans and Aboriginal Australian Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    Aboriginal Australians represent 1.5% of Australia's population, nearly double the percentage of native people in the U.S. population. While indigenous peoples throughout the world share common similarities, particularly contemporary issues and their spiritual regard for nature, many aspects of their lifestyles are different, such as governance,…

  20. Aboriginal Knowledge Traditions in Digital Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael

    2005-01-01

    According to Manovich (2001), the database and the narrative are natural enemies, each competing for the same territory of human culture. Aboriginal knowledge traditions depend upon narrative through storytelling and other shared performances. The database objectifies and commodifies distillations of such performances and absorbs them into data…

  1. Developmental milestones among Aboriginal children in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Leanne; Kohen, Dafna; Miller, Anton

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Windows of achievement provide age ranges for the attainment of early developmental skills. Group-specific research is warranted given that development may be influenced by social or cultural factors. OBJECTIVES: To examine developmental milestones for Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nation children in Canada, based on developmental domains collected from the 2006 Aboriginal Children’s Survey. Sociodemographic and health predictors of risk for developmental delay were also examined. RESULTS: The ranges in which children achieve certain developmental milestones are presented. Gross motor and self-help skills were found to be achieved earlier (across the three Aboriginal groups), whereas language skills were achieved slightly later than in Canadian children in general. Furthermore, health factors (eg, low birth weight, chronic health conditions) were associated with late achievement of developmental outcomes even when sociodemographic characteristics were considered. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that the timing of milestone achievement may differ for Aboriginal children, highlighting the importance of establishing culturally specific norms and standards rather than relying on those derived from general populations. This information may be useful for practitioners and parents interested in identifying the age ranges for development, as well as age ranges indicating potential for developmental risk and opportunities for early intervention among Aboriginal children. PMID:24855426

  2. Australian Aboriginal Language Early Childhood Education Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Tony

    This report discusses the provision of culturally appropriate early childhood programs in Australian Aboriginal language in Australia, and the education of teachers for these programs. The first section of the report examines the education of indigenous peoples in the context of the current Australian education system. Evidence in support of the…

  3. Micmac Indians Present Aboriginal Rights Claim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northian, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Nova Scotia's Micmac Indian leaders presented their claim for aboriginal rights to the Federal Government April 25, 1977 in an historic and symbolic ceremony on their home ground at the Eskasoni Reserve. The article discusses this event and some of the Micmacs' demands. (NQ)

  4. Governance and Aboriginal Claims in Northern Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozzetto, Don

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on problems of organization and governance that may follow settlement of Canadian aboriginal land claims. Compares financial problems, cultural issues such as subsistence lifestyles, and intergovernmental relations following the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, and Western Arctic (Inuvialuit)…

  5. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  6. Risk factor paradox in the occurrence of cardiac arrest in acute coronary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Silvia Aguiar; Timóteo, Ana Teresa; Nogueira, Marta Afonso; Belo, Adriana; Ferreira, Rui Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare patients without previously diagnosed cardiovascular risk factors) and patients with one or more risk factors admitted with acute coronary syndrome. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients admitted with first episode of acute coronary syndrome without previous heart disease, who were included in a national acute coronary syndrome registry. The patients were divided according to the number of risk factors, as follows: 0 risk factor (G0), 1 or 2 risk factors (G1 - 2) and 3 or more risk factors (G ≥ 3). Comparative analysis was performed between the three groups, and independent predictors of cardiac arrest and death were studied. Results A total of 5,518 patients were studied, of which 72.2% were male and the mean age was 64 ± 14 years. G0 had a greater incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with the left anterior descending artery being the most frequently involved vessel, and a lower prevalence of multivessel disease. Even though G0 had a lower Killip class (96% in Killip I; p < 0.001) and higher ejection fraction (G0 56 ± 10% versus G1 - 2 and G ≥ 3 53 ± 12%; p = 0.024) on admission, there was a significant higher incidence of cardiac arrest. Multivariate analysis identified the absence of risk factors as an independent predictor of cardiac arrest (OR 2.78; p = 0.019). Hospital mortality was slightly higher in G0, although this difference was not significant. By Cox regression analysis, the number of risk factors was found not to be associated with mortality. Predictors of death at 1 year follow up included age (OR 1.05; p < 0.001), ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.94; p = 0.003) and ejection fraction < 50% (OR 2.34; p < 0.001). Conclusion Even though the group without risk factors was composed of younger patients with fewer comorbidities, better left ventricular function and less extensive coronary disease, the absence of risk factors was an independent predictor of cardiac arrest. PMID

  7. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care.

  8. Assessing cardiac and liver iron overload in chronically transfused patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Sherif M; Liem, Robert I; Rigsby, Cynthia K; Labotka, Richard J; DeFreitas, R Andrew; Thompson, Alexis A

    2016-11-01

    Transfusional iron overload represents a substantial challenge in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) who receive chronic or episodic red blood cell transfusions. Iron-induced cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of death in other chronically transfused populations but rarely seen in SCD. Study objectives were to: (i) examine the extent of myocardial and hepatic siderosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronically transfused SCD patients, and (ii) evaluate the relationship between long-term (over the 5 years prior to enrolment) mean serum ferritin (MSF), spot-ferritin values and liver iron content (LIC) measured using MRI and liver biopsy. Thirty-two SCD patients (median age 15 years) with transfusional iron overload were recruited from two U.S. institutions. Long-term MSF and spot-ferritin values significantly correlated with LIC by MRI-R2* (r = 0·77, P < 0·001; r = 0·82, P < 0·001, respectively). LIC by MRI-R2* had strong positive correlation with LIC by liver biopsy (r = 0·98, P < 0·001) but modest inverse correlation with cardiac MRI-T2* (r = -0·41, P = 0·02). Moderate to severe transfusional iron overload in SCD was not associated with aberrations in other measures of cardiac function based on echocardiogram or serum biomarkers. Our results suggest that SCD patients receiving chronic transfusions may not demonstrate significant cardiac iron loading irrespective of ferritin trends, LIC and erythropoiesis suppression.

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression improves pain and perceived control in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Lynn V; McGuire, Anthony; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Chen, Belinda; Bodán, Rebecca C; Czer, Lawrence S; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression after cardiac surgery (CS) is associated with increased pain and decreased sleep quality. While cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) aimed at depression is effective in relieving depressive symptoms after cardiac surgery, little is known about its ability to ameliorate other common postoperative problems that affect recovery and quality of life. Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of CBT for depression on pain severity, pain interference, sleep, and perceived control in patients recovering from CS. Methods Depressed patients recovering from CS were randomized to receive either eight weeks of CBT or usual care. At baseline and post-intervention, patients completed questionnaires for depressive symptoms, pain, sleep, and perceived control. Group comparisons were conducted using t-tests or chi square analysis. Repeated measures analysis was used to assess the effect of the intervention in changes over time. Results The sample (n=53) included 16.9% women and had a mean age of 67.8±9.2 years. CBT for depression increased perceived control (p<0.001) and decreased pain interference (p=0.02) and pain severity (p=0.03). Group effects remained significant (p<0.05) for perceived control and pain interference and a trend was observed for pain severity (p<0.10) after controlling for variables that differed at baseline. There were no group differences in sleep disturbance over time. Conclusions A depression-focused CBT intervention yields benefits in other common postoperative problems, specifically improved perceived control and decreased pain in depressed cardiac surgery patients. PMID:26115954

  10. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Early Progressive Renal Decline in Patients with Nonmacroalbuminuric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Steven; Cherney, David Z.I.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lovblom, Leif E.; Ficociello, Linda H.; Smiles, Adam M.; Warram, James H.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicts future adverse renal outcomes in the general population. This study sought to determine its relationship with early progressive renal decline in type 1 diabetes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A subset of participants with normoalbuminuria (n=204) or microalbuminuria (n=166) from the First Joslin Kidney Study underwent assessment for cardiac autonomic neuropathy using heart rate variability during baseline visits performed from January 1991 to April 1992. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was defined as an R-R variation (mean circular resultant) <20. Participants also had baseline and follow-up measurement of eGFR. Early progressive renal decline was evaluated according to two definitions: early GFR loss (slope of eGFR estimated by cystatin C <−3.3%/year) and incident advanced CKD (stage ≥3, defined by eGFR [calculated by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease method] <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Association with baseline cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed by adjusted logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards. Results Among the 370 participants, 47 (13%) had baseline cardiac autonomic neuropathy, 51 (14%) had early GFR loss, and 68 (18%) had incident advanced CKD over a median 14-year follow-up. Early GFR loss occurred in 15 (32%) of the 47 patients with baseline autonomic neuropathy and in 32 (10%) of the 323 without baseline autonomic neuropathy (P<0.001). Baseline autonomic neuropathy was strongly associated with odds of early GFR loss (adjusted odds ratio, 4.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.65 to 10.12; P=0.002). Incident advanced CKD was observed in 22 (47%) of those with baseline autonomic neuropathy and 46 (14%) of those without baseline autonomic neuropathy (P<0.001). Autonomic neuropathy was independently associated with incident advanced CKD (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 5.30; P=0.002). Conclusions Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was a strong

  11. The relationship between positive end expiratory pressure and cardiac index in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Wassim H; Carson, Shannon S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and cardiac index in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods This is a secondary cross-sectional analysis of the FACTT multi-center randomized controlled trial enrolling adult patients within 48 hours of ARDS onset. Patients randomized to the pulmonary artery catheter arm, who had PEEP and cardiac index measurements performed within a short period of each other during the first 3 days of the FACTT study enrollment were included in this study. Since FACTT had a 2×2 factorial design, half of the patients were in a ‘liberal fluids’ study arm, and the other half were in a ‘conservative fluids’ study arm. Results The final study population (833 measurements or observations, in 367 patients) was comparable to the original overall FACTT study population. The mean PEEP level used was 8.2 ± 3.4 cm H2O, and the mean cardiac index was 4.2 ± 1.2 liters/minute/m2. There was no association between PEEP and cardiac index in patients with ARDS, even when adjusted for APACHE score, age, fluid study arm in FACTT, and sepsis. Conclusion In patients with ARDS who are managed with liberal or conservative fluid management protocols, PEEP is not associated with lower cardiac index. PMID:23993772

  12. Prognostic significance of elevated troponin in non-cardiac hospitalized patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amna N; Blonde, Ken; Hackam, Daniel; Iansavichene, Alla; Mrkobrada, Marko

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac biomarker troponin can be elevated in patients without a primary cardiac diagnosis and may have prognostic value. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the prevalence and prognostic significance of elevated troponin levels in patients admitted to hospital without a primary cardiac diagnosis. Literature search was done using MEDLINE (1946 to November 2012), EMBASE (1974 to Week 45, 2012), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (November 2012). Two independent investigators reviewed full-text studies for final inclusion. We included studies of patients admitted without a primary cardiac diagnosis. Eligible studies compared adverse outcomes in patients with normal versus elevated troponin levels. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Elevated troponin was associated with increased in-hospital and 30-day mortality (25 studies, 7255 patients, OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.90-5.19, P < 0.0001). Elevated troponin was also associated with increased risk of long-term mortality at 6 months (9 studies, 5368 patients, OR 4.21, 95% CI 1.84-9.64, P < 0.00001). Troponin is an independent predictor of short-term mortality with a pooled adjusted OR of 2.36, 95% CI 1.47-3.76, P < 0.0003. In conclusion, elevated troponin in non-cardiac patients is independently associated with increased mortality.

  13. Dysfunction of pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlong; Tu, Weifeng; Dai, Jianqiang; Lv, Qing; Yang, Xiaoqi

    2011-01-01

    The pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous functions were compared in elderly, non-cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without diabetes mellitus (NDM). A group of 30 unpremedicated elderly patients scheduled to undergo elective non-cardiac surgery were studied, including 15 DM patients and 15 NDM patients. Each component of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the frequency domain was monitored with Holter during the nights of the day before and on 1st and 2nd day after operation. After surgery, total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) significantly decreased as compared to the baseline values before operation in both groups (p<0.05). The LF/HF ratio was significantly changed in DM group but did not change in NDM group. On the 2nd postoperative day, TP, HF, LF and VLF in DM group were further decreased as compared to those on the 1st postoperative day and were significantly lower than those in NDM group (p<0.01 or 0.05), but these indices in NDM group did not show significant decreases. Surgery induced the cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction in elderly patients not only with DM but also without diabetes. On the 2nd postoperative day, the disturbances of cardiac autonomic nervous activity were more sever in DM patients, compared to the 1st postoperative day, but was not significantly more sever than in the NDM patients.

  14. An Algorithm for use of Prasugrel (Effient) in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Julio; Morrow, David; Resnic, Frederic; Manica, Andre; Kirshenbaum, James; Cannon, Christopher; Croce, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm for use of Prasugrel (Effient) in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital is presented. Our algorithm, which is in the process of being implemented, is consistent with published and generally accepted standards of care and is based on data from the pivotal Trial to Assess Improvement in Therapeutic Outcomes by Optimizing Platelet Inhibition with Prasugrel-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TRITON-TIMI) 38, which compared clopidogrel to prasugrel in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing PCI. Areas of focus include analysis of the benefit of prasugrel over clopidogrel in ACS patients and appropriate selection of patients for prasugrel treatment. PMID:21119336

  15. [CERTAIN PROBLEMS OF DIAGNOSTICS OF CHRONIC CARDIAC INSUFFICIENCY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Karoli, N A; Borodkin, A V; Rebrov, A P

    2015-01-01

    Apnea is a commonest complaint in aged patients. It may be due to chronic cardiac insufficiency (CCI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The prevalence of CCI in the general populations and among 65 year old subjects is 1.8 and 6-10% respectively, decompensation being the most frequent cause of hospitalization of elderly patients. Different authors report CCI in 30-62% of the elderly patients with COPD. Combination of CCI and COPD create difficulties for diagnostics and treatment due to late detection of CCI, common risk factors and pathogenetic features of the two conditions their similar clinical picture. This paper is designed to consider methods of CCI diagnostics in patients with COPD. Special emphasis is laid on the thorough analysis of medical histories, specific laboratory tests (BNP NT-proBNP), and instrumental methods (echocardiogram, MRI, spirography, X-ray studies).

  16. Scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic innervation in patients with essential hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Hamada, M.; Shigematsu, Y.; Sumimoto, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Hiwada, K. )

    1991-01-01

    To assess the regional cardiac adrenergic innervation in patients with essential hypertension (EHT), simultaneous iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123I)MIBG) and thallium-201 (201Tl) myocardial imagings were performed in five patients with EHT, seven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and seven normal subjects. Short axial images at rest were divided into five segments: anterior, septal, posterior, lateral, and apical segments. Percent regional uptake (%RU) of 201Tl except the septal segment in patients with EHT showed no significant difference. However, the %RU of (123I)MIBG at posterior, lateral, and apical segments was significantly lower than that at anterior and septal segments in EHT. This intraimage heterogeneity of (123I)MIBG was also observed in HCM. These results suggest that there is a difference in regional adrenergic innervation of the left ventricle with myocardial hypertrophy.

  17. Combined survival analysis of cardiac patients by a Cox PH model and a Markov chain.

    PubMed

    Shauly, Michal; Rabinowitz, Gad; Gilutz, Harel; Parmet, Yisrael

    2011-10-01

    The control and treatment of dyslipidemia is a major public health challenge, particularly for patients with coronary heart diseases. In this paper we propose a framework for survival analysis of patients who had a major cardiac event, focusing on assessment of the effect of changing LDL-cholesterol level and statins consumption on survival. This framework includes a Cox PH model and a Markov chain, and combines their results into reinforced conclusions regarding the factors that affect survival time. We prospectively studied 2,277 cardiac patients, and the results show high congruence between the Markov model and the PH model; both evidence that diabetes, history of stroke, peripheral vascular disease and smoking significantly increase hazard rate and reduce survival time. On the other hand, statin consumption is correlated with a lower hazard rate and longer survival time in both models. The role of such a framework in understanding the therapeutic behavior of patients and implementing effective secondary and primary prevention of heart diseases is discussed here.

  18. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning.

  19. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  20. Aetiology of preoperative anaemia in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery-the challenge of pillar one of Patient Blood Management.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J; Sinha, R; Robinson, K; Scotland, V; Cardone, D

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative anaemia is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Whilst there is a strong association with increased morbidity and mortality, it is currently unclear whether treatment of anaemia leads to patient benefit. This retrospective study aimed to determine the aetiology of preoperative anaemia in a cohort of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery over two years at a tertiary hospital. Laboratory data obtained at the preoperative assessment clinic visit were assessed to stratify patients into four groups-iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), possible IDA, anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) and non-anaemic patients with low ferritin according to the 'Preoperative haemoglobin assessment and optimisation template' of the Australian Patient Blood Management (PBM) Guidelines. Of patients with preoperative anaemia, 23.1% had IDA, 6.6% had possible IDA and 70.3% had possible ACD. Of the patients with possible ACD, 30% had a ferritin <100 µg/l, representing limited iron stores or coexisting absolute iron deficiency in the setting of chronic disease. In addition, 46.2% of those with possible ACD had iron studies indicative of functional iron deficiency. Time between assessment and surgery was as little as one day in a third of patients and in only 7% was it more than seven days. Our findings indicate that about one-third of our patients with preoperative anaemia had evidence of iron deficiency, a potentially reversible cause of anaemia. In addition, a significant number had either limited iron stores that may render them iron deficient by surgery, or a functional iron deficiency.

  1. Follow-up in patients with congenital cardiac disease more complex than haemodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Per Morten; Mengshoel, Anne Marit; Frydenlund, Aina; Sørbye, Øystein; Thaulow, Erik

    2004-08-01

    The objective of the study was to assess behavioural and emotional problems, as well as physical capacity, in children and adolescents with congenital cardiac disease. From the database of Paediatric Heart Section, Children's Clinic, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, we identified 430 patients whose parents received questionnaires using the Child Behaviour Check-List. The response rate was 75.8%. In addition, the parents received a questionnaire focusing on special issues with regard to physical activity. Parents of children and adolescents with congenital cardiac diseases reported significantly more behavioural problems than did a reference population and boys were scored higher compared to girls. Analysis showed a significant impact of physical capacity on the score representing total problems, as well as scores for externalising and internalising behaviour. Compared to a reference population, parents of children and adolescents with congenital cardiac disease score their children higher on most scales when rated using the Child Behaviour Check-List. The type of diagnosis did not affect the scores reflecting the total problem. The main factor of impact on behavioural problems was, as evaluated by the parents, the physical capacity of the children.

  2. Safety advantage of modified minimally invasive cardiac surgery for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Matsushita, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Shiori; Tambara, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Taira; Morita, Terumasa; Inaba, Hirotaka; Kuwaki, Kenji; Amano, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) using a small surgical incision in children provides less physical stress. However, concern about safety due to the small surgical field has been noted. Recently, the authors developed a modified MICS procedure to extend the surgical field. This report assesses the safety and benefit of this modified procedure by comparing three procedures: the modified MICS (group A), conventional MICS (group B), and traditional open heart surgery (group C). A retrospective analysis was performed with 111 pediatric patients (age, 0-9 years; weight, 5-30 kg) who underwent cardiac surgery for simple cardiac anomaly during the period 1996-2010 at Juntendo University Hospital. The modified MICS method to extend the surgical view has been performed since 2004. A skin incision within 5 cm was made below the nipple line, and the surgical field was easily moved by pulling up or down using a suture or a hemostat. The results showed no differences in terms of gender, age, weight, or aortic cross-clamp time among the groups. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in mean time before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), CPB time, operation time, and bleeding. According to the indices, modified MICS was similar to traditional open surgery and shorter time or lower bleeding volume than conventional MICS. No major mortality or morbidity occurred. In conclusion, the modified MICS procedure, which requires no special techniques, was as safe as conventional open heart surgery and even reduced perioperative morbidity.

  3. Reversible Motor Paralysis and Early Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Receiving Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy.

    PubMed

    Amao, Rie; Imamura, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Yasuo; Noguchi, Satoko; Kinoshita, Osamu; Yamauchi, Haruo; Ono, Minoru; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-02

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is sometimes complicated with brain impairment because of a microthrombosis caused by decreased left ventricular contraction or reduced brain circulation. Some patients may recover after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. However, little is known about the perioperative therapeutic strategy in patients suffering from such complications, particularly from a cardiac rehabilitation viewpoint. We report on a 58-year-old male patient with a previous history of poliomyelitis and a light paralysis in the left upper extremity, who suffered left hemiplegia with no evidence of stroke after hemodynamic deterioration. The combination therapy of perioperative cardiac rehabilitation and LVAD therapy improved his left hemiplegia as well as activities of daily living, and the patient was discharged on foot on postoperative day 72 after briefing the family on LVAD home management. Early initiation of cardiac rehabilitation before LVAD implantation may be a key for the smooth discharge and resocialization of patients suffering from brain impairment complicated with advanced HF.

  4. Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hajibagheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients’ sleep quality. PMID:26835463

  5. Evaluation of Hemoglobin A1c Criteria to Assess Preoperative Diabetes Risk in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Sima; Zrull, Christina A.; Patil, Preethi V.; Jha, Leena; Kling-Colson, Susan C.; Gandia, Kenia G.; DuBois, Elizabeth C.; Plunkett, Cynthia D.; Bodnar, Tim W.; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) has recently been recommended for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and diabetes risk (prediabetes). Its performance compared with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h post-glucose load (2HPG) is not well delineated. We compared the performance of A1C with that of FPG and 2HPG in preoperative cardiac surgery patients. Methods Data from 92 patients without a history of diabetes were analyzed. Patients were classified with diabetes or prediabetes using established cutoffs for FPG, 2HPG, and A1C. Sensitivity and specificity of the new A1C criteria were evaluated. Results All patients diagnosed with diabetes by A1C also had impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes by other criteria. Using FPG as the reference, sensitivity and specificity of A1C for diagnosing diabetes were 50% and 96%, and using 2HPG as the reference they were 25% and 95%. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying prediabetes with FPG as the reference were 51% and 51%, respectively, and with 2HPG were 53% and 51%, respectively. One-third each of patients with prediabetes was identified using FPG, A1C, or both. When testing A1C and FPG concurrently, the sensitivity of diagnosing dysglycemia increased to 93% stipulating one or both tests are abnormal; specificity increased to 100% if both tests were required to be abnormal. Conclusions In patients before cardiac surgery, A1C criteria identified the largest number of patients with diabetes and prediabetes. For diagnosing prediabetes, A1C and FPG were discordant and characterized different groups of patients, therefore altering the distribution of diabetes risk. Simultaneous measurement of FGP and A1C may be a more sensitive and specific tool for identifying high-risk individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:21854260

  6. Utility of Traditional Circulating and Imaging-Based Cardiac Biomarkers in Patients with Predialysis CKD

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Gates; Jain, Nishank; de Lemos, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP), are commonly used to diagnose acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure exacerbation in symptomatic patients. Levels of these biomarkers are frequently chronically elevated in asymptomatic patients with ESRD who are receiving maintenance dialysis. Other imaging biomarkers commonly encountered in nephrologists’ clinical practice, such as coronary artery calcium measured by computed tomography, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness, are also frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with ESRD. This article critically reviews the limited observational data on associations between cTnT, BNP, NT-pro-BNP, coronary artery calcium, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness with cardiovascular events and death in non–dialysis-dependent patients with CKD. Although sufficient evidence suggests that these biomarkers may be used for prognostication, the diagnostic utility of cTnT, BNP, and NT-pro-BNP remain challenging in patients with CKD. Decreased renal clearance may affect the plasma levels of these biomarkers, and upper reference limits were originally derived in patients without CKD. Until better data are available, higher cutoffs, or a rise in level compared with previous values, have been proposed to help distinguish acute myocardial infarction from chronic elevations of cTnT in symptomatic patients with CKD. Additionally, it is not known whether these biomarkers are modifiable and amenable to interventions that could change hard clinical outcomes in patients with CKD not yet undergoing long-term dialysis. PMID:25403922

  7. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Aspirin-Treated Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Gremmel, Thomas; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is mainly generated by cleavage of CD40L from the surface of activated platelets, and therefore considered a platelet activation marker. Although the predictive value of sCD40L for ischemic events has been demonstrated in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), studies on the association of sCD40L with cardiovascular outcomes in lower risk populations yielded heterogeneous results. We therefore sought to investigate factors influencing sCD40L levels, and the predictive value of sCD40L for long-term ischemic events in unselected, aspirin-treated patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. sCD40L was determined by a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 682 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Two-year follow-up data were obtained from 562 patients. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel was associated with significantly lower levels of sCD40L and lower platelet surface expressions of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa compared to aspirin monotherapy (all p≤0.01). Hypertension was linked to lower plasma concentrations of sCD40L, whereas female sex, increasing high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hematocrit were associated with higher sCD40L concentrations (all p<0.05). sCD40L levels were similar in patients without and with the primary endpoint in the overall study population (p = 0.4). Likewise, sCD40L levels did not differ significantly between patients without and with the secondary endpoints (both p≥0.4). Similar results were obtained when only patients with angiographically-proven coronary artery disease (n = 459), stent implantation (n = 205) or ACS (n = 125) were analyzed. The adjustment for differences in patient characteristics by multivariate regression analyses did not change the results. ROC curve analyses did not reveal cut-off values for sCD40L for the prediction of the primary or secondary endpoints. In conclusion, plasma sCD40L levels are

  8. Knowledge translation lessons from an audit of Aboriginal Australians with acute coronary syndrome presenting to a regional hospital

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Emma; Hohnen, Harry; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Scalley, Benjamin D; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Translation of evidence into practice by health systems can be slow and incomplete and may disproportionately impact disadvantaged populations. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death among Aboriginal Australians. Timely access to effective medical care for acute coronary syndrome substantially improves survival. A quality-of-care audit conducted at a regional Western Australian hospital in 2011–2012 compared the Emergency Department management of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal acute coronary syndrome patients. This audit is used as a case study of translating knowledge processes in order to identify the factors that support equity-oriented knowledge translation. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of the audit team and further key stakeholders with interest/experience in knowledge translation in the context of Aboriginal health. Interviews were analysed for alignment of the knowledge translation process with the thematic steps outlined in Tugwell’s cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation framework. Results: In preparing the audit, groundwork helped shape management support to ensure receptivity to targeting Aboriginal cardiovascular outcomes. Reporting of audit findings and resulting advocacy were undertaken by the audit team with awareness of the institutional hierarchy, appropriate timing, personal relationships and recognising the importance of tailoring messages to specific audiences. These strategies were also acknowledged as important in the key stakeholder interviews. A follow-up audit documented a general improvement in treatment guideline adherence and a reduction in treatment inequalities for Aboriginal presentations. Conclusion: As well as identifying outcomes such as practice changes, a useful evaluation increases understanding of why and how an intervention worked. Case studies such as this enrich our understanding of the complex human factors, including individual attributes

  9. The Public Health Implications of the Use and Misuse of Tobacco among the Aboriginals in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Orisatoki, Rotimi

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking among the Aboriginal populations is a major public health issue in Canada. It remains a major contributory risk factor to the poor health status as well as years of potential life lost seen among the indigenous people. The use of tobacco has a spiritual importance to the people as a means of making connection to the Creator, but unfortunately tobacco smoking has taken a recreational aspect which has little or no connection with Aboriginal spirituality. The non-traditional use of tobacco is believed by the Elders to be disrespectful to the Aboriginal culture and traditional way of life. There is an increase in rate of use of smokeless tobacco as well as smoking of tobacco among the youth with increase in percentage among females. There are socioeconomic implications as well as adverse health effects of the misuse of tobacco on the Aboriginal people that need to be addressed. The healthcare professionals have a unique role in helping patients to reduce tobacco use within the community through programs that are culturally sensitive and relevant. Successful strategies requires general support from the community and it is very important that some of that support comes from community leaders, including spiritual, professional, administrative and elected policy makers. PMID:23283033

  10. The public health implications of the use and misuse of tobacco among the Aboriginals in Canada.

    PubMed

    Orisatoki, Rotimi

    2012-10-28

    Tobacco smoking among the Aboriginal populations is a major public health issue in Canada. It remains a major contributory risk factor to the poor health status as well as years of potential life lost seen among the indigenous people. The use of tobacco has a spiritual importance to the people as a means of making connection to the Creator, but unfortunately tobacco smoking has taken a recreational aspect which has little or no connection with Aboriginal spirituality. The non-traditional use of tobacco is believed by the Elders to be disrespectful to the Aboriginal culture and traditional way of life. There is an increase in rate of use of smokeless tobacco as well as smoking of tobacco among the youth with increase in percentage among females. There are socioeconomic implications as well as adverse health effects of the misuse of tobacco on the Aboriginal people that need to be addressed. The healthcare professionals have a unique role in helping patients to reduce tobacco use within the community through programs that are culturally sensitive and relevant. Successful strategies requires general support from the community and it is very important that some of that support comes from community leaders, including spiritual, professional, administrative and elected policy makers.

  11. Use of Cardiac Computed Tomography for Ventricular Volumetry in Late Postoperative Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jin; Mun, Da Na; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yun, Tae-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as an alternative to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for ventricular volumetry. However, the clinical use of cardiac CT requires external validation. Methods Both cardiac CT and MRI were performed prior to pulmonary valve implantation (PVI) in 11 patients (median age, 19 years) who had undergone total correction of tetralogy of Fallot during infancy. The simplified contouring method (MRI) and semiautomatic 3-dimensional region-growing method (CT) were used to measure ventricular volumes. Results All volumetric indices measured by CT and MRI generally correlated well with each other, except for the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LV-ESVI), which showed the following correlations with the other indices: the right ventricular end-diastolic volume index (RV-EDVI) (r=0.88, p<0.001), the right ventricular end-systolic volume index (RV-ESVI) (r=0.84, p=0.001), the left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LV-EDVI) (r=0.90, p=0.001), and the LV-ESVI (r=0.55, p=0.079). While the EDVIs measured by CT were significantly larger than those measured by MRI (median RV-EDVI: 197 mL/m2 vs. 175 mL/m2, p=0.008; median LV-EDVI: 94 mL/m2 vs. 92 mL/m2, p=0.026), no significant differences were found for the RV-ESVI or LV-ESVI. Conclusion The EDVIs measured by cardiac CT were greater than those measured by MRI, whereas the ESVIs measured by CT and MRI were comparable. The volumetric characteristics of these 2 diagnostic modalities should be taken into account when indications for late PVI after tetralogy of Fallot repair are assessed. PMID:28382264

  12. Cardiac sympathetic activity in chronic heart failure: cardiac (123)I-mIBG scintigraphy to improve patient selection for ICD implantation.

    PubMed

    Verschure, D O; van Eck-Smit, B L F; Somsen, G A; Knol, R J J; Verberne, H J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease with a growing incidence in the Netherlands. This growing incidence is related to increased life expectancy, improvement of survival after myocardial infarction and better treatment options for heart failure. As a consequence, the costs related to heart failure care will increase. Despite huge improvements in treatment, the prognosis remains unfavourable with high one-year mortality rates. The introduction of implantable devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) has improved the overall survival of patients with chronic heart failure. However, after ICD implantation for primary prevention in heart failure a high percentage of patients never have appropriate ICD discharges. In addition 25-50 % of CRT patients have no therapeutic effect. Moreover, both ICDs and CRTs are associated with malfunction and complications (e. g. inappropriate shocks, infection). Last but not least is the relatively high cost of these devices. Therefore, it is essential, not only from a clinical but also from a socioeconomic point of view, to optimise the current selection criteria for ICD and CRT. This review focusses on the role of cardiac sympathetic hyperactivity in optimising ICD selection criteria. Cardiac sympathetic hyperactivity is related to fatal arrhythmias and can be non-invasively assessed with (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanide ((123)I-mIBG) scintigraphy. We conclude that cardiac sympathetic activity assessed with (123)I-mIBG scintigraphy is a promising tool to better identify patients who will benefit from ICD implantation.

  13. Effect of mediastinal irradiation on cardiac function of patients treated during childhood and adolescence for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.M.; Gingell, R.L.; Pearce, J.; Panahon, A.M.; Ghoorah, J.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the frequency of cardiac dysfunction in patients treated during childhood or adolescence with mediastinal irradiation for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 28 patients underwent cardiac evaluation 19 to 182 months (median, 90 months) after the completion of radiation therapy. No patient had symptoms of cardiac disease. All were normotensive. All patients had a normal cardiothoracic ratio. There were no abnormalities of voltage or rhythm in the ECGs. The left ventricular end diastolic volume was increased in 19.2% of patients, none of whom had evidence of impaired left ventricular function. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was increased in 15.3% of patients. No patient had a decreased LVEF. Pericardial thickening was demonstrated on echocardiograms from 12 of 28 patients (42.9%). Thickening was more frequent among those patients observed for 72 or more months (47.1%; eight of 17) than among those with shorter periods of follow-up (36.4%; four of 11). This study demonstrates that cardiac dysfunction is an infrequent sequela of mediastinal irradiation following treatment using an equally weighted, anterior-posterior technique. Longitudinal study of these patients will be necessary to determine the clinical significance and evolution of the occult pericardial thickening that was identified.

  14. Psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in exercising and sedentary coronary artery disease patients: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, A.; Araújo, C.G.S.; Nardi, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical exercise has been shown to favorably influence mood and anxiety; however, there are few studies regarding psychiatric aspects of physically active patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and cardiac anxiety in sedentary and exercising CAD patients. A total sample of 119 CAD patients (74 men) were enrolled in a case-control study. The subjects were interviewed to identify psychiatric disorders and responded to the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire. In the exercise group (N = 60), there was a lower prevalence (45 vs 81%; P < 0.001) of at least one psychiatric diagnosis, as well as multiple comorbidities, when compared to the sedentary group (N = 59). Considering the Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, sedentary patients presented higher scores compared to exercisers (mean ± SEM = 55.8 ± 1.9 vs 37.3 ± 1.6; P < 0.001). In a regression model, to be attending a medically supervised exercise program presented a relevant potential for a 35% reduction in cardiac anxiety. CAD patients regularly attending an exercise program presented less current psychiatric diagnoses and multiple mental-related comorbidities and lower scores of cardiac anxiety. These salutary mental effects add to the already known health benefits of exercise for CAD patients. PMID:23011407

  15. Electric impedance platelet aggregometry in cardiac surgery patients: A comparative study of two technologies.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina; Crapelli, Giulia Beatrice; Ranucci, Matteo; Meloni, Silvia; Pistuddi, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Platelet function tests are suggested to assess platelet reactivity before cardiac and major non-cardiac surgery. Different point-of-care platelet function tests are available. Among these, electric impedance platelet aggregometry (EIPA) (Multiplate®, MP) is one of the most widely used techniques. Recently, a new EIPA system (Rotem Platelet®, RP) was released. This is a comparative study of platelet function measured with MP and RP. Fifty cardiac surgery patients were admitted to this study. All the patients received a preoperative platelet function test with both the MP and the RP; for each technology, two tests were performed: the ADPtest (investigating P2Y12 receptor platelet reactivity) and the TRAPtest (investigating the thrombin-dependent platelet reactivity). ADP-based platelet reactivity values demonstrated a significant (p = 0.019) correlation between the MP and the RP; and a marginally significant (p = 0.042) correlation for TRAP-based tests. The Bland-Altman analysis of the ADPtest demonstrated a positive bias of 5.94 units (MP > RP) and a percentage error of 88%. For the TRAPtest, there was a positive bias of 12 units (MP > RP) and a percentage error of 89%. In patients who were preoperatively treated with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, only the MP ADPtest was positively associated with the days from drug discontinuation (p = 0.003). Platelet function assessment with RP greatly differs from the equivalent MP measure, and no correction value can be applied due to the low level of precision. This applies both to ADPtest and TRAPtest. The MP ADPtest is more reliable for platelet reactivity after discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor inhibitors.

  16. Melatonin treatment in the prevention of postoperative delirium in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek; Torok, Pavol; Kolarcik, Peter; Kolesar, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiac surgery delirium is a severe complication. The circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion has been shown to be altered postoperatively. Aim of the study It was hypothesized that restoring normal sleeping patterns with a substance that is capable of resynchronizing circadian rhythm such as exogenous administration of melatonin may possibly reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium. Material and methods This paper represents a prospective clinical observational study. Two consecutive groups of 250 consecutive patients took part in the study. Group A was the control group and group B was the melatonin group. In group B, the patients received prophylactic melatonin treatment. The main objectives were to observe the incidence of delirium, to identify any predictors of delirium, and to compare the two groups based on the delirium incidence. Results The incidence of delirium was 8.4% in the melatonin group vs. 20.8% in the control group (p = 0.001). Predictors of delirium in the melatonin group were age (p = 0.001) and higher EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age and EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.014) were predictors of postoperative delirium. Comparing the groups, the main predictors of delirium were age (p = 0.001), EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001), cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p = 0.001), aortic cross-clamping (ACC) time (p = 0.008), sufentanil dose (p = 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.033). Conclusions Administration of melatonin significantly decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin should be considered in every patient scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:26336494

  17. Transaxillary Subpectoral Placement of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices in Young Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joo Hyun; Kim, Chae Min; Song, Seung Yong; Uhm, Jae Sun; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background The current indications of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have expanded to include young patients with serious cardiac risk factors, but CIED placement has the disadvantage of involving unsightly scarring and bulging of the chest wall. A collaborative team of cardiologists and plastic surgeons developed a technique for the subpectoral placement of CIEDs in young female patients via a transaxillary approach. Methods From July 2012 to December 2015, subpectoral CIED placement via an axillary incision was performed in 10 young female patients, with a mean age of 25.9 years and mean body mass index of 20.1 kg/m2. In the supine position, with the patient's shoulder abducted, an approximately 5-cm linear incision was made along one of the deepest axillary creases. The submuscular plane was identified at the lateral border of the pectoralis major, and the dissection continued over the clavipectoral fascia until the subpectoral pocket could securely receive a pulse generator. Slight upward dissection also exposed an entrance to the subclavian vein, allowing the cardiology team to gain access to the vein. One patient with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent augmentation mammoplasty and CIED insertion simultaneously. Results One case of late-onset device infection occurred. All patients were highly satisfied with the results and reported that they would recommend the procedure to others. Conclusions With superior aesthetic outcomes compared to conventional methods, the subpectoral placement of CIEDs via a transaxillary approach is an effective, single-incision method to hide operative scarring and minimize bulging of the device, and is particularly beneficial for young female or lean patients. PMID:28194345

  18. Evaluation of early cardiac dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with or without anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Barutcu, A; Aksu, F; Ozcelik, F; Barutcu, C A E; Umit, G E; Pamuk, O N; Altun, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to use transthoracic Doppler echocardiographic (TTE) imaging methods to identify cardiac dysfunction, an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in terms of cardiac effects. This study involved 80 patients: a study group (n = 50) and control group (n = 30). They were categorized into four subgroups: anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) (+) (n = 14) and aCL (-) (n = 36); systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) ≥ 6 (n = 15) and SLEDAI < 6 (n = 35); disease period ≥ 5 years (n = 21) and disease period < 5 years (n = 29); major organ involvement (+) (n = 19), major organ involvement (-) (n = 31). The ratio of mitral peak velocity of early filling to early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E/E') for the study group was found to be higher than the control (p < 0.01). Systolic septal motion velocity (Ssm) was lower in the study group compared with the control (p < 0.01). Left atrium (LA) dimension was greater in the study group than the control (p < 0.01). Ssm was found to be lower in the aCL (+) patients compared with the control and aCL (-) groups (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). LA dimension was greater in the aCL (+) and (-) groups compared with the control, (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively) and aCL groups compared with each other (p < 0.05). The E/E' ratio for the aCL (+) and (-) groups was found to be greater than the control (p < 0.05). In the study, both the Ssm and the late diastolic septal velocity (sA') was found to be lower in the SLEDAI ≥ 6 group compared with SLEDAI<6 group, (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively). LA dimension was statistically greater in the SLEDAI ≥ 6 group compared with the SLEDAI <6 group (p < 0.001). E' and early diastolic septal velocity (sE') were statistically lower in the disease period >5 years group compared with the disease period <5 years group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Carrying out regular scans with TTE

  19. Massive air embolism from continuous venovenous haemofiltration causing electromechanical dissociation in a cardiac surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Ku, Lisa; Weinberg, Laurence; Seevanayagam, Siven; Baldwin, Ian; Opdam, Helen; Doolan, Laurie

    2012-06-01

    Venous air embolism is a rare but life-threatening complication of continuous venovenous haemofiltration. We report a case of massive venous air embolism associated with haemofiltration in a 75-year-old man after complicated cardiac surgery. Haemofiltration circuitry and air detector alarms are not infallible and air embolism should be considered in patients receiving such therapy who develop cardiopulmonary instability. We discuss our early intervention, which focused on restoration of the circulation, prevention of further air entry, retrieval of air and supportive care. The use of transoesophageal echocardiography for diagnosis of air embolism and to aid the insertion of a pulmonary artery catheter for air aspiration was essential for management.

  20. Anesthetic Management of the Adult Patient with Concomitant Cardiac and Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Radosevich, Misty A; Brown, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Several common diseases of the cardiac and pulmonary systems and the interactions of the two in disease and anesthetic management are discussed. Management of these disease processes in isolation is reviewed and how the management of one organ system impacts another is then explored. For example, in a patient with acute lung injury and right heart failure, lung-protective ventilation may directly conflict with strategies to minimize right heart afterload. Such challenging clinical scenarios require appreciation of each disease entity, their appropriate management, and the balance between competing priorities.

  1. Experience With the Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator in Patients at High Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Michael; Quick, Silvio; Pfluecke, Christian; Rottstädt, Fabian; Szymkiewicz, Steven J.; Ringquist, Steven; Strasser, Ruth H.; Speiser, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. Methods: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. Results: Ninety-four patients (1.6%) were treated by the WCD in response to ventricular tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation. The incidence rate was 8.4 (95% confidence interval, 6.8–10.2) per 100 patient-years. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation had an incidence rate of 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 12.2–29.0) per 100 patient-years. In contrast, an incidence rate of 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–10.3) was observed in the remaining cardiac diagnosis groups, including dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Among 120 shocked patients, 112 (93%) survived 24 hours after treatment, whereas asystole was observed in 2 patients (0.03%) with 1 resulting death. ConclusionS: This large cohort represents the first nationwide evaluation of WCD use in patients outside the US healthcare system and confirms the overall value of the WCD in German treatment pathways. PMID:27458236

  2. Predicting the outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients using multiple biomarkers and suspension microarray assays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chang, Wei-Tien; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis for cardiac arrest is still challenging. Combining biomarkers from diverse pathophysiological pathways may provide reliable indicators for the severity of injury and predictors of long-term outcomes. We investigated the feasibility of using a multimarker strategy with key independent biomarkers to improve the prediction of outcomes in cardiac arrest. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with sustained return of spontaneous circulation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken at 2 and 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Suspension microarray assays were used to test 21 different biomarkers. A total of 99 patients were enrolled, 45 of whom survived to hospital discharge. We identified 11 biomarkers that, when combined with clinical variables and factors of APACHE II score and history of arrhythmia, were independent determinants for outcome of in-hospital mortality (concordance = 0.9249, standard error = 0.0779). Three biomarkers combined with APACHE II and age were independent determinants for favorable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve, 0.938; 95% confidence interval, 0.854 ~ 1.0). In conclusion, a systemic multiple biomarker approach using suspension microarray assays can identify independent predictors and model the outcomes of cardiac arrest patients during the post-cardiac arrest period. PMID:27256246

  3. Knowledge translation in the context of Aboriginal health.

    PubMed

    Estey, Elizabeth; Kmetic, Andrew; Reading, Jeffrey

    2008-06-01

    Interest in the concept of knowledge translation (KT), one of the many terms used to describe the process(es) through which knowledge is transformed into action, is increasingly prevalent in the mainstream health literature. Despite a pressing need, little has been done to address the implications of evolving theories and strategies for KT in an Aboriginal context. The authors attempt to narrow the gap by reviewing the literature on Aboriginal KT and exploring ways to extend this work by engaging with the Aboriginal health research literature and the KT literature. They argue that the inclusion of multiple perspectives and an examination of the social and political context in which Aboriginal KT takes shape are important for the conceptual development of Aboriginal KT. This article is particularly relevant for those involved at the interface between nursing practice and efforts to improve Aboriginal health.

  4. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kelli Maria Souza; de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; de Santana Filho, Valter Joviniano; da Silva Junior, Walderi Monteiro; Araújo Filho, Amaro Afrânio; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Cacau, Lucas de Assis Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors) at three different times: preoperatively (M1), the day of discharge (M2) and hospital discharge (M3). Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1), with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline. PMID:25372909

  5. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  6. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-08-03

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms.

  7. Cardiac arrest during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in a bariatric patient with drug-associated long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M

    2011-01-01

    Obese patients often may demonstrate an acquired prolonged QTc interval due to alteration in cardiac physiology, electrolyte disturbances, and/or medication use. Intraoperatively, bariatric surgery may further contribute additional cardiac stressors to obese patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS). We present a case report of an obese woman with LQTS who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and sustained an intraoperative cardiac arrest. We discuss identification, prevention, and treatment strategies for LQTS in the bariatric surgery patient.

  8. Cardiac Care Assistance using Self Configured Sensor Network—a Remote Patient Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma Dhulipala, V. R.; Kanagachidambaresan, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Pervasive health care systems are used to monitor patients remotely without disturbing the normal day-to-day activities in real-time. Wearable physiological sensors required to monitor various significant ecological parameters of the patients are connected to Body Central Unit (BCU). Body Sensor Network (BSN) updates data in real-time and are designed to transmit alerts against abnormalities which enables quick response by medical units in case of an emergency. BSN helps monitoring patient without any need for attention to the subject. BSN helps in reducing the stress and strain caused by hospital environment. In this paper, mathematical models for heartbeat signal, electro cardio graph (ECG) signal and pulse rate are introduced. These signals are compared and their RMS difference-fast Fourier transforms (PRD-FFT) are processed. In the context of cardiac arrest, alert messages of these parameters and first aid for post-surgical operations has been suggested.

  9. Comparison of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Combined with Relaxation and Meditation Techniques on Reduction of Depression and Anxiety of Cardiovascular Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delui, Mahdy Hassanzadeh; Yari, Maliheh; khouyinezhad, Gholamreza; Amini, Maral; Bayazi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in developed countries. Most cardiac rehabilitation programs include psychological interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation techniques in cardiac patients including psychological-physical interventions such as Meditation and Relaxation. We enrolled 45 patients with CVD and depression. The patients were allocated to 3 groups (Relaxation, Meditation and Control). There was a significant reduction on depression, systolic blood pressure and heart rate in the Meditation group compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that meditation techniques have better outcomes in cardiac patients for improving depression, reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate than relaxation techniques. PMID:24179555

  10. [Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and 2:1 atrioventricular block].

    PubMed

    Conte, Giulio; Coppini, Lucia; Demola, Maria Antonietta; Zardini, Marco; Ardissino, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) is a rare congenital heart disease with an atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial discordance in which the morphological right ventricle supports the systemic circulation and the morphological tricuspid valve is the systemic atrioventricular valve. Heart rhythm disturbances and ventricular dysfunction related to electromechanical dyssynchrony are common in adult congenital heart disease patients with a systemic right ventricle. Thus, these patients may require conventional pacemaker implantation, which in the presence of ventricular dysfunction and conduction disease may further compromise cardiac performance. Indeed, cardiac resynchronization therapy may be an effective treatment option for these patients. We report the case of a patient with CCTGA and moderate depression of systemic ventricular systolic function who developed a 2:1 atrioventricular block and was treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  11. The missing link in Aboriginal care: resource accounting.

    PubMed

    Ashton, C W; Duffie-Ashton, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Resource accounting principles provide more effective planning for Aboriginal healthcare delivery through driving best management practices, efficacious techniques for long-term resource allocation, transparency of information and performance measurement. Major improvements to Aboriginal health in New Zealand and Australia were facilitated in the context of this public finance paradigm, rather than cash accounting systems that remain the current method for public departments in Canada. Multiple funding sources and fragmented delivery of Aboriginal healthcare can be remedied through similar adoption of such principles.

  12. Tools for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death: A review of the literature in different patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathi, Loheetha; Pavri, Behzad B.

    2014-01-01

    While various modalities to determine risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have been reported in clinical studies, currently reduced left ventricular ejection fraction remains the cornerstone of SCD risk stratification. However, the absolute burden of SCD is greatest amongst populations without known cardiac disease. In this review, we summarize the evidence behind current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use for the prevention of SCD in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). We also evaluate the evidence for risk stratification tools beyond clinical guidelines in the general population, patients with IHD, and patients with other known or suspected medical conditions. PMID:24568833

  13. Butorphanol premedication to facilitate invasive monitoring in cardiac surgery patients before induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Nath, Soumya Shanker; Banerjee, Sudipto; Tripathi, Mamta

    2009-01-01

    Cannulations (peripheral vein, radial artery and jugular vein) performed for invasive monitoring before induction of anaesthesia in cardiac surgery patients may be associated with stress and anxiety. The efficacy and safety of butorphanol premedication was assessed in setting up of invasive monitoring. The study was a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled one with 70 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. In group-1 patients (n = 35) (placebo) intramuscular saline was administered 1-2 hours before the surgery in equivalent volume to butorphanol. In group-2 (n = 35) butorphanol (1, 1.5 and 2 mg for three body weight groups < 40 kg, 41-60 kg and> 60 kg, respectively) was administered 1-2 hours before surgery. Observer blinded for medication recorded the sedation score, pupil size and pain after each cannulation using visual analogue score (VAS). Student's 't' test and Chi-square test for proportions, Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric data was carried out. The median pain score of cannulation in group-2 (butorphanol) in the hand (10 mm) and neck (20 mm) were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than group-1 (placebo) patients (hand = 30 mm and neck = 40 mm). Pain during neck cannulation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced (VAS < 30 mm) in patients with the pupil size of < 2.5 mm. Since the pain during neck cannulation was more than pain during hand cannulations in both the groups, we conclude that the intensity of pain depends also upon the site of cannulation. Besides the analgesic effect of butorphanol, its sedative effect helped to effectively decrease the pain during neck cannulation in conscious patients.

  14. Usefulness of clinical and electrocardiographic data for predicting adverse cardiac events in patients with myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Robert; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has been associated with an increased risk of sudden death, either by heart block or malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Identifying patients at risk remains difficult and no consensus has been reached regarding the best approach for follow-up and prevention of sudden death. OBJECTIVES: To identify noninvasive clinical and electrocardiographic predictors of adverse cardiac events in patients with DM1. METHODS: Clinical and serial electrocardiographic data on 428 patients with a DNA-proven diagnosis of DM1, followed during a mean period of 11.7 years, were reviewed. Variables associated with adverse cardiac events were identified. RESULTS: Eleven patients (2.6%) experienced sudden death and 13 (3.0%) required implantation of a pacemaker. On univariate analysis, adverse events were associated with advancing age, prolongation of the PR, QRS and corrected QT (QTc) intervals, as well as the degree of neuromuscular impairment. No such relationship was found with the extent of genetic anomaly (number of cytosine-thymine-guanine repeats). However, multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards models showed that only baseline PR and QTc intervals were significantly linked to the end points of sudden death or pacemaker implantation; the age-adjusted RR was 3.7 (95% CI 1.5 to 8.6) if baseline PR was 200 ms or longer (P=0.003), and 3.0 (95% CI 1.0 to 8.8) if the baseline QTc was 450 ms or longer (P=0.047). CONCLUSIONS: In a large unselected cohort of 428 patients with DM1, the cumulative incidence of sudden death was relatively low, and the delayed conduction on surface electrocardiogram was found to be potentially helpful for identifying patients at risk for sudden death or pacemaker implantation. PMID:19214296

  15. Patient-centered imaging: shared decision making for cardiac imaging procedures with exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Berman, Daniel S; Min, James K; Hendel, Robert C; Gerber, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cullom, S James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal W; Dorbala, Sharmila; Fazel, Reza; Garcia, Ernest V; Gibbons, Raymond J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R; Raff, Gilbert L; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A; Shaw, Leslee J

    2014-04-22

    The current paper details the recommendations arising from an NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium held in November 2012, aiming to identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Symposium participants, working in 3 tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3 mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written informed consent. However, a protocol effective dose >20 mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization.

  16. Patient-Centered Imaging: Shared Decision Making for Cardiac Imaging Procedures with Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.; Hendel, Robert C.; Gerber, Thomas C.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Cullom, S. James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal; Dorbala, Sharmila; Garcia, Ernest V.; Gibbons, Raymond J.; Halliburton, Sandra S.; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V.; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R.; Fazel, Reza; Raff, Gilbert L.; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Background An NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium was held in November 2012 to address these issues. Methods Symposium participants, working in three tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Results Use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written consent. However, a protocol effective dose <20mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. Conclusions The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  17. Effects of pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass on biochemical markers and kidney function in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Jafari, Naser; Hasanpour, Mohammad; Sahandifar, Soheil; Ghafari, Masoud; Alaei, Vahed

    2013-01-01

    For several years there is no conclusive guideline on the effectiveness of pulsatile or non-pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pulsatile versus continuous perfusion on the myocardial release of the cardiac biochemical markers including, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), cardiac creatine kinase (CK-MB), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and also kidney function tests including: blood urea nitrogen test (BUN) and creatinine test (Cr) in patients that underwent both pulsatile and non-pulsatile methods before and after heart surgeries. A total of 80 patients were enrolled in this study, 40 patients in each pulsatile and non-pulsatile group. Venous blood samples were drown from each patient in two groups before operation and after operation at, 24, 48, and 72 h and analyzed separately for CPK, its cardiac isoenzyme (CK-MB), LDH, BUN and Cr. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to preoperative parameters such as sex, age, and body surface area. Our study shows that the effect of pulsatile perfusion on cardiac and kidney function is better than the non-pulsatile method.

  18. Scintigraphic evidence for cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in long-term IDDM patients with and without ECG-based autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schnell, O; Kirsch, C M; Stemplinger, J; Haslbeck, M; Standl, E

    1995-11-01

    To analyse the presence and extent of global and regional distributions of cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in long-term insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) without myocardial perfusion abnormalities (99mTc-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile study), 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy was performed in two clinically-comparable groups (20 diabetic patients with and 22 diabetic patients without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy). For comparison nine control subjects without heart disease were investigated. Only six diabetic patients (27%) without and one diabetic patient (5%) with ECG-based autonomic neuropathy were found to have a uniform homogeneous uptake of 123I-MIBG, in contrast to a uniform homogeneous uptake in all control subjects. The uptake of 123I-MIBG in the posterior myocardium of diabetic patients was smaller than in the anterior, lateral and septal myocardium (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In addition, diabetic patients with cardiac autonomic neuropathy (> or = two of five age-related cardiac reflex tests abnormal) demonstrated a more reduced uptake in the global, lateral and posterior myocardium than diabetic patients without (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.001). A correlation between global or regional myocardial 123I-MIBG uptake, however, and duration of diabetes, HbA1c, body mass index or QT interval length was not observed. Our study demonstrates that cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation is common in long-term IDDM even in patients without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy and that the posterior myocardium is predominantly affected. We conclude that 123I-MIBG scintigraphy is a promising approach to further elucidate the pattern and natural history of myocardial dysinnervation in IDDM.

  19. Prediction of oxygen consumption in cardiac rehabilitation patients performing leg ergometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, John Gershwin

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, to determine the validity of the ACSM leg ergometry equation in the prediction of steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2) in a heterogeneous population of cardiac patients. Second, to determine whether a more accurate prediction equation could be developed for use in the cardiac population. Thirty-one cardiac rehabilitation patients participated in the study of which 24 were men and 7 were women. Biometric variables (mean +/- sd) of the participants were as follows: age = 61.9 +/- 9.5 years; height = 172.6 +/- 1.6 cm; and body mass = 82.3 +/- 10.6 kg. Subjects exercised on a MonarchTM cycle ergometer at 0, 180, 360, 540 and 720 kgm ˙ min-1. The length of each stage was five minutes. Heart rate, ECG, and VO2 were continuously monitored. Blood pressure and heart rate were collected at the end of each stage. Steady state VO 2 was calculated for each stage using the average of the last two minutes. Correlation coefficients, standard error of estimate, coefficient of determination, total error, and mean bias were used to determine the accuracy of the ACSM equation (1995). The analysis found the ACSM equation to be a valid means of estimating VO2 in cardiac patients. Simple linear regression was used to develop a new equation. Regression analysis found workload to be a significant predictor of VO2. The following equation is the result: VO2 = (1.6 x kgm ˙ min-1) + 444 ml ˙ min-1. The r of the equation was .78 (p < .05) and the standard error of estimate was 211 ml ˙ min-1. Analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between means for actual and predicted VO2 values for each equation. The analysis found the ACSM and new equation to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO2 during unloaded pedaling. Furthermore, the ACSM equation was found to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO 2 during the first loaded stage of exercise. When the accuracy of the ACSM and new equations were compared based on

  20. Arrhythmias in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electrical Devices after Implantation of a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew N; Kremers, Walter K; Duval, Sue; Sakaguchi, Scott; John, Ranjit; Eckman, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) for advanced heart failure is increasing, and the role of cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIED) is unclear. Prior studies of the incidence of arrhythmias and shocks are frequently limited by ascertainment. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were examined with a previous CIED who were implanted with a CF-LVAD. Medical history, medications, and CIED data from device interrogations were gathered. A cardiac surgery control group (n = 38) was obtained to control for surgical factors. Several clinically significant events increased after LVAD implantation: treated-zone ventricular arrhythmias (VA; p < 0.01), monitored-zone VA (p < 0.01), antitachycardia pacing (ATP)-terminated episodes (p < 0.01), and shocks (p = 0.01), although administered shocks later decreased (p < 0.01). Presence of a preimplant VA was associated with postoperative VA (odds ratio [OR]: 4.31; confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-12.3, p < 0.01). Relative to cardiac surgery, LVAD patients experienced more perioperative events (i.e., monitored VAs and shocks, p < 0.01 and p = 0.04). Neither implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks before implant nor early or late postimplant arrhythmias or shocks predicted survival (p = 0.07, p = 0.55, and p = 0.55). Our experience demonstrates time-dependent effects on clinically significant arrhythmias after LVAD implantation, including evidence that early LVAD-related arrhythmias may be caused by the unique arrhythmogenic effects of VAD implant.

  1. Troponin I as a prognostic marker of cardiac events in asymptomatic hemodialysis patients using a sensitive troponin I assay.

    PubMed

    Gaiki, Meghana R; DeVita, Maria V; Michelis, Michael F; Panagopoulos, Georgia; Rosenstock, Jordan L

    2012-12-01

    Elevated troponin T is known to be a prognostic marker for long-term cardiac events and mortality in asymptomatic end-stage renal disease patients. There are conflicting data in this regard with respect to troponin I (TnI). We recently showed a high incidence of elevated TnI levels in asymptomatic hemodialysis (HD) patients using a new generation sensitive TnI assay. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the prognostic value of TnI, as measured with this new assay, as a marker for outcomes in HD patients over a 2-year follow-up period. Fifty-one asymptomatic HD patients were enrolled, and pre-dialysis TnI levels were checked once monthly over 3 consecutive months. Patients were considered to be in the TnI positive group if TnI level on any of the three draws was ≥0.035 ng/ml. All patients were followed for a period of 2 years. The primary end points were acute coronary syndrome, coronary revascularization, sudden death, or cardiac arrest. The secondary end point was all-cause mortality. Elevated TnI levels were found in 51% (26/51) of patients in our cohort. One TnI positive patient was subsequently lost to follow up. There were 6 cardiac events over 2 years, all of which were in the troponin positive group (6/25 or 24%). The presence of a positive TnI at baseline was significantly associated with future cardiac events (p=0.022). A prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) was also significantly related to future cardiac events (p=0.010). No patient with negative TnI at baseline developed a cardiac event, while 45.5% of those with both a positive TnI and a history of CAD had an event. Fourteen deaths occurred over 2 years, 8 in TnI positive and 6 in the negative group. All-cause mortality was not associated with elevated TnI levels at baseline. We found a significant association between positive TnI and subsequent cardiac events in asymptomatic HD patients followed for 2 years. TnI levels, as measured with a sensitive assay, may be useful in assessing

  2. Everyday cognitive functioning in cardiac patients: relationships between self-report, report of a significant other and cognitive test performance.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Peter C; Smith, Geoff; Ernest, Christine S; Murphy, Barbara M; Worcester, Marian U C; Higgins, Rosemary O; Le Grande, Michael R; Goble, Alan J; Andrewes, David; Tatoulis, James

    2010-01-01

    Candidates for cardiac bypass surgery often experience cognitive decline. Such decline is likely to affect their everyday cognitive functioning. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiac patients' ratings of their everyday cognitive functioning against significant others' ratings and selected neuropsychological tests. Sixty-nine patients completed a battery of standardised cognitive tests. Patients and significant others also completed the Everyday Function Questionnaire independently of each other. Patient and significant other ratings of patients' everyday cognitive difficulties were found to be similar. Despite the similarities in ratings of difficulties, some everyday cognitive tasks were attributed to different processes. Patients' and significant others' ratings were most closely associated with the neuropsychological test of visual memory. Tests of the patients' verbal memory and fluency were only related to significant others' ratings. Test scores of attention and planning were largely unrelated to ratings by either patients or their significant others.

  3. Evidence of a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement due to ACAD9 mutations: Report on nine patients.

    PubMed

    Dewulf, Joseph P; Barrea, Catherine; Vincent, Marie-Françoise; De Laet, Corinne; Van Coster, Rudy; Seneca, Sara; Marie, Sandrine; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is a mitochondrial protein involved in oxidative phosphorylation complex I biogenesis. This protein also exhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) activity. ACAD9-mutated patients have been reported to suffer from primarily heart, muscle, liver, and nervous system disorders. ACAD9 mutation is suspected in cases of elevated lactic acid levels combined with complex I deficiency, and confirmed by ACAD9 gene analysis. At least 18 ACAD9-mutated patients have previously been reported, usually displaying severe cardiac involvement. We retrospectively studied nine additional patients from three unrelated families with a wide spectrum of cardiac involvement between the families as well as the patients from the same families. All patients exhibited elevated lactate levels. Deleterious ACAD9 mutations were identified in all patients except one for whom it was not possible to recover DNA. To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports on isolated mild ventricular hypertrophy due to ACAD9 mutation in a family with moderate symptoms during adolescence. This report also confirms that dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in conjunction with ACAD9 mutation and that some patients may respond clinically to riboflavin treatment. Of note, several patients suffered from patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), with one exhibiting a complex congenital heart defect. It is yet unknown whether these cardiac manifestations were related to ACAD9 mutation. In conclusion, this disorder should be suspected in the presence of lactic acidosis, complex I deficiency, and any cardiac involvement, even mild.

  4. Radiofrequency ablation of numerous premature ventricular contractions in a cardiac resynchronisation therapy patient: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Farkowski, Michał Mirosław; Chwyczko, Tomasz; Sterliński, Maciej; Syska, Paweł; Szwed, Hanna; Pytkowski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    We present a case study of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and a cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device who was repeatedly hospitalised due to heart failure (HF) exacerbations. A successful radiofrequency ablation of numerous premature ventricular contractions enabled the proper action of CRT and stabilised the patient's condition in NYHA II without HF subsequent hospitalisations during a 30 month follow-up.

  5. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  6. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-19

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  7. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  8. The risk factors and prognostic implication of acute pulmonary edema in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-hyun; Kim, Joonghee; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Taeyun; Kim, Kyuseok; Jo, You Hwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Yu Jin; Hwang, Seung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary edema is frequently observed after a successful resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Currently, its risk factors and prognostic implications are mostly unknown. Methods Adult OHCA patients with a presumed cardiac etiology who achieved sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in emergency department were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the severity of consolidation on their initial chest X-ray (group I, no consolidation; group II, patchy consolidations; group III, consolidation involving an entire lobe; group IV, total white-out of any lung). The primary objective was to identify the risk factors of developing severe pulmonary edema (group III or IV). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between long-term prognosis and the severity of pulmonary edema. Results One hundred and seven patients were included. Total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors of developing severe pulmonary edema with their odds ratio (OR) being 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.04; per 1 minute) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.07; per 1 mmHg), respectively. The long term prognosis was significantly poor in patients with severe pulmonary edema with a OR for good outcome (6-month cerebral performance category 1 or 2) being 0.22 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.79) in group III and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.63) in group IV compared to group I. Conclusion The duration of CPR and initial pCO2 level were both independent predictors for the development of severe pulmonary edema after resuscitation in emergency department. The severity of the pulmonary edema was significantly associated with long-term outcome. PMID:27752581

  9. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  10. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Poenisch, Falk; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Sheu, Tommy; Chang, Joe Y.; Memon, Nada; Mohan, Radhe; Rozner, Marc A.; Dougherty, Anne H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving

  11. Decreased Cardiac Vagal Control in Drug-Naïve Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin-An; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry BJ; Lu, Ru-Band

    2013-01-01

    Objective Decreased cardiac vagal control (CVC) has been proposed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the results are mixed. Analyses with larger sample sizes and better methodology are needed. Methods Thirty-two drug-naïve survivors with current PTSD, 32 survivors without PTSD and 192 matched controls were recruited for a case-control analysis. We used the PTSD checklist-civilian version (PCL-C) to assess posttraumatic symptoms severity. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) parameters. Frequency-domain indices of HRV were obtained. The obtained results were evaluated in association with personality traits assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ). Results PTSD patients exhibited decreased LF-HRV and HF-HRV as compared to survivors without PTSD and to matched controls. The PTSD symptoms severity was associated with reduced mean RR intervals, Var-HRV, LF-HRV and HF-HRV. The harm avoidance score (which has been suggested to be associated with serotonergic activity) was negatively correlated with Var-HRV, LF-HRV and HF-HRV. Conclusion These data suggest that PTSD is accompanied by decreased CVC, highlighting the importance of assessing HRV in PTSD patients. In view of the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases in these vulnerable individuals, one might consider the treatment to restore their autonomic function while reducing PTSD symptoms. PMID:23798959

  12. Alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    White, Kamila S; McDonnell, Cassandra J; Gervino, Ernest V

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine independent and combined influences of alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity on chest pain and life interference in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Theories of NCCP posit a central role for emotion in the experience of chest pain, however, studies have not examined how alexithymia characterized by a difficulty identifying or verbalizing emotions, may influence this relationship. This study examined 231 patients (56% females, M age=50 years) with chest pain seeking cardiac evaluation, who showed no abnormalities during exercise tolerance testing. Forty percent (40%) scored at or above the moderate range of alexithymia. Whereas health care utilization was associated with elevated alexithymia among men, health care utilization was associated with elevated anxiety sensitivity among women. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that alexithymia and anxiety sensitivity were both uniquely and independently associated with pain severity and life interference due to pain. Alexithymia-pain links were stronger for men compared to women. Secondary analyses conducted with a subsample suggest that alexithymia may be increasingly stable over time (i.e., 18-month follow-up). Findings are largely congruent with theoretical models of NCCP showing that personality and emotional factors are important in this medically unexplained syndrome.

  13. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Simona M; Kiss, Rudolf; Hekkert, Sacco te Lintel; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J M; Risby, Terence H; Marczin, Nandor

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (> 30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (> 10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene.

  14. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Simona M.; Kiss, Rudolf; te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J. M.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (>30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (>10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene. PMID:25128523

  15. Correlation between myocardial fibrosis and restrictive cardiac physiology in patients undergoing retransplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Jon A; Itagaki, Brandon K; Razi, Rabia R; Patel, Jignesh K; Chai, Wanxing; Kawano, Matthew A; Goldstein, Zachary; Kittleson, Michelle M; Fishbein, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    After cardiac transplant, there is often development of restrictive cardiac physiology. Little is known about the factors that contribute to this physiology and its correlation with pathology. Heart retransplantation provides a valuable opportunity to further understand this relationship. In this study, we investigated the correlation of myocardial fibrosis and restrictive physiology, and possible risk factors utilizing data from all retransplants at our center. A retrospective review of the 30 patients who underwent retransplantation at our institution between 1994 and 2004 was performed. Hemodynamic and imaging data were reviewed for the presence of restrictive physiology. Pathology reports were reviewed for the presence of myocardial fibrosis in the explanted hearts. The cohort with restrictive physiology preceding redo heart transplant had significantly more patients exhibiting myocardial fibrosis compared with the non-restrictive physiology group (94.1% vs. 15.4%, p < 0.001). We found no difference in the immunosuppressive regimen, history of rejection, and reason for transplant. In our study, we observed that myocardial fibrosis is an important contributor to the development of restrictive physiology. Further work needs to be done for risk stratification and the mechanism of fibrosis development.

  16. Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Shaban; Aljundi, Amer H. S.; Kasem, Mohamed; Alhashemi, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited knowledge about the predictors of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Furthermore, few reports addressed the role of time in therapeutic range (TTR) that could reflect the safety and efficacy of anticoagulation therapy. We aimed to assess factors that affect the quality of anticoagulation therapy utilizing TTR in patients with NVAF. A retrospective observational study was conducted for patients with NVAF who were maintained on warfarin >6 months at a tertiary cardiac care hospital. Patients were categorized according to the TTR status (≥65% vs. <65%). A total of 241 eligible patients were identified. A high-quality anticoagulation based on TTR values ≥65% was found in 157 (65.1%) patients; the remaining (34.9%) patients represented the low-quality anticoagulation group (TTR <65%). Demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable in the two TTR groups. Both groups were comparable in terms of warfarin dose and medications use. When compared to patients with high-quality anticoagulation, patients in the low-quality anticoagulation group were more likely to seek outpatient warfarin clinic visits more frequently (22.3 ± 5.5 vs. 18 ± 4.4, P = 0.001) and to have higher rate of polypharmacy (57.1% vs. 42%, P = 0.03). Of note, patients in both groups had similar major bleeding events (P = 0.41). After adjusting for age and sex, polypharmacy use was a predictor of poor coagulation control (odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–3.33; P = 0.03). In NVAF patients, TTR is generally high in our cohort. Patients with polypharmacy and frequent clinic visits have lower TTR. High-quality oral anticoagulation could be achieved through optimizing TTR without a significant risk of major bleeding. PMID:28217549

  17. Use of Closed Incision Management with Negative Pressure Therapy for Complex Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with major comorbidities undergoing complex cardiothoracic surgery, incision management is critical. This retrospective review evaluated negative pressure over closed sternal incisions in cardiac patients with multiple comorbidities within 30 days post-median sternotomy. Methods: Records of post-sternotomy patients treated with Prevena™ Incision Management System (KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, TX), a closed incision negative pressure therapy (ciNPT), were reviewed from September 2010 through September 2014. Data collected included demographics, major comorbidities, types of surgery, relevant medical history, incision length, therapy duration, time to follow-up, and incision complications. Descriptive statistics were computed for continuous variables, frequency, and percentages for categorical variables. Results: Twenty-seven patients were treated with ciNPT between September 2010 and September 2014. The mean patient age was 62.5 (SD 7.9), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 38.5 (SD 4.4) kg/m2. Risk factors included obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, 27/27; 100%), diabetes (25/27; 92.6%), hypertension (16/27; 59.3%), and 20/27 patients (74%) had ≥ 5 comorbidities. Mean ciNPT duration was 5.6 (SD 0.9) days. Within 30 days post-surgery, 21/27 (77.8%) patients had intact incisions with good reapproximation. Two patients experienced minor dehiscences; four cases of superficial cellulitis were treated and resolved. One patient with a dehiscence was readmitted for intravenous antibiotics and five patients were managed successfully with antibiotics as outpatients. All patients had intact incisions with good skin approximation at final follow-up. Conclusions: In this retrospective study of post-sternotomy patients at high risk of developing complications, ciNPT over closed sternal incisions resulted in favorable outcomes within 30 days of surgery. PMID:27026831

  18. ECG changes of cardiac origin in elderly patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Taherinia, Ali; Sharifi, Mohamad Davood; Ramezani, Javad; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simultaneous electrocardiographic (ECG) changes are seen in hemorrhagic brain events even in the absence of associated myocardial infarction (MI). This study was designed to assess the role of ECG changes to predict true MI in patients with hemorrhagic brain trauma. Methods: Data of 153 patients with traumatic brain injury and concomitant ECG changes were recorded. Enzyme study was performed for the patients, and a cardiologist confirmed the diagnosis of MI. Results: Overall, 83 females and 70 males older than 50 years of age were enrolled in the study. The most common type of hemorrhagic brain event was subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the most common ECG change was an inverted T wave. MI was confirmed in 15 (9.8%) patients. Patients with intracranial hemorrhage had significantly (p= 0.023) higher rates of associated MI than other types of brain hemorrhages. ST segment elevation was found to have a positive predictive value of 71.4% in males and 25% in females in terms of diagnosing a true MI associated with hemorrhagic brain events. Conclusion: Although simultaneous cardiac changes are seen after sympathetic over- activity in brain hemorrhages, regular ECG screening of elder patients with traumatic brain injury is suggested, particularly in patients with intracranial hemorrhages. PMID:26913269

  19. Views of cardiac-valve prosthesis patients and their dentists on anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lippert, S; Gutschik, E

    1994-06-01

    By administering a questionnaire to 253 patients with cardiac-valve prostheses (89.3% responding), and another to 136 of their attending dentists (79% responding), the level of knowledge among both groups of anticoagulant therapy in connection with dental treatment was investigated. The cardiothoracic department monitored all anticoagulation therapies. Of the anticoagulated patients, 96.6% were able to state their medication (94.1% received phenprocoumon); and of 86 dentists with patients on anticoagulation treatment, 94% were aware of their patients' medication. All 20 dentists stating that their patients did not receive anticoagulants were correct. The great majority (98%) of the dentists employed a special measure to reduce the risk of bleeding associated with invasive dental procedures, most commonly (86%) referring patients to their general practitioner or hospital department for adjustment of the anticoagulant therapy. Around 60% of the dentists considered extractions and operations to require measures to reduce the risk of bleeding complications. We recommend referral of patients to the attending physician for adjustment of anticoagulation to a target International Normalized Ratio (INR) of 4.0 or possibly 3.0 before undergoing dental procedures involving the risk of bleeding. Additional reduction of the bleeding risk can be obtained by local application of an inhibitor of fibrinolysis (tranexamic acid).

  20. Long-term cardiac changes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was evaluate the late-onset repercussions of heart alterations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after a 13-year follow up. Methods A historical prospective study was carried out involving the analysis of data from the charts of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of lupus in follow up since 1998. The 13-year evolution was systematically reviewed and tabulated to facilitate the interpretation of the data. Results Forty-eight patient charts were analyzed. Mean patient age was 34.5 ± 10.8 years at the time of diagnosis and 41.0 ± 10.3 years at the time of the study (45 women and 3 men). Eight deaths occurred in the follow-up period (two due to heart problems). Among the alterations found on the complementary exams, 46.2% of cases demonstrated worsening at reevaluation and four patients required a heart catheterization. In these cases, coronary angioplasty was performed due to the severity of the obstructions and one case required a further catheterization, culminating in the need for surgical myocardial revascularization. Conclusion The analysis demonstrated progressive heart impairment, with high rates of alterations on conventional complementary exams, including the need for angioplasty or revascularization surgery in four patients. These findings indicate the need for rigorous cardiac follow up in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:23635330

  1. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  2. Serum 25(OH)D Is a 2-Year Predictor of All-Cause Mortality, Cardiac Death and Sudden Cardiac Death in Chest Pain Patients from Northern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A.; León De La Fuente, Ricardo A.; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjoern; Brede, Cato; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D status is assessed by determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in serum. Methods We assessed the prognostic utility of 25(OH)D in 982 chest-pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from Salta, Northern Argentina. 2-year follow-up data including all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death were analyzed in quartiles of 25(OH)D, applying univariate and multivariate analysis. Results There were statistically significant changes in seasonal 25(OH)D levels. At follow-up, 119 patients had died. The mean 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower among patients dying than in long-term survivors, both in the total population and in patients with a troponin T (TnT) release (n = 388). When comparing 25(OH)D in the highest quartile to the lowest quartile in a multivariable Cox regression model for all-cause mortality, the hazard ratio (HR) for cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in the total population was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.19–0.73), p = 0.004, 0.23 (95% CI, 0.08–0.67), p = 0.007, and 0.32 (95% CI, 0.11–0.94), p = 0.038, respectively. In patients with TnT release, the respective HR was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.10–0.54), p = 0.001, 0.18 (95% CI, 0.05–0.60), p = 0.006 and 0.25 (95% CI, 0.07–0.89), p = 0.033. 25(OH)D had no prognostic value in patients with no TnT release. Conclusion Vitamin D was shown to be a useful biomarker for prediction of mortality when obtained at admission in chest pain patients with suspected ACS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01377402 PMID:22970121

  3. Preoperative intra-aortic balloon pumping in high-risk cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chooza

    2012-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumping increases myocardial oxygen supply and decreases myocardial oxygen demand by inflation and deflation of the balloon. This leads to increased perfusion of the coronary arteries during diastole. This technology has been used for critically ill cardiac patients for more than 30 years. The literature suggests that preoperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump can be effective in high-risk coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Preoperative benefits of this technology may yield positive outcomes in terms of hemodynamic effect, decreased length of stay in both the intensive care unit and the hospital, and the reduction of complications. However, the intra-aortic balloon pump must be used with a profound understanding of proper mechanism and function, monitoring, and observation for potential complications. This requires excellent critical care nursing management.

  4. Ranolazine: Electrophysiologic Effect, Efficacy, and Safety in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Assadi, Hamid; Heidary, Shahriar; Shenasa, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Ranolazine is currently approved as an antianginal agent in patients with chronic angina (class IIA). Ranolazine exhibits antiarrhythmic effects that are related to its multichannel blocking effect, predominantly inhibition of late sodium (late INa) current and the rapid potassium rectifier current (IKr), as well as ICa, late ICa, and INa-Ca. It also suppresses the early and delayed after depolarizations. Ranolazine is effective in the suppression of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias (off-label use) without significant proarrhythmic effect. Currently, ongoing trials are evaluating the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in patients with cardiac arrhythmias; preliminary results suggest that ranolazine, when used alone or in combination with dronedarone, is safe and effective in reducing atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine is not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an antiarrhythmic agent.

  5. Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Anders; Nagle, Nano; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Pollard, Martin O; Ayub, Qasim; Wilcox, Stephen; Wilcox, Leah; van Oorschot, Roland A H; McAllister, Peter; Williams, Lesley; Xue, Yali; Mitchell, R John; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-03-21

    Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C(∗), present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia.

  6. Combining simulated patients and simulators: pilot study of hybrid simulation in teaching cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Hendrik; Weissenstein, Anne; Ligges, Sandra; Möller, David; Becker, Jan C; Marschall, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    Auscultation torsos are widely used to teach position-dependent heart sounds and murmurs. To provide a more realistic teaching experience, both whole body auscultation mannequins and torsos have been used in clinical examination skills training at the Medical Faculty of the University of Muenster since the winter term of 2008-2009. This training has since been extended by simulated patients, which are normal, healthy subjects who have undergone attachment of the electronic components of the auscultation mannequins to their chests to mimic pathophysiological conditions ("hybrid models"). The acceptance of this new learning method was examined in the present pilot study. In total, 143 students in their second preclinical year who were participating in auscultation training were randomized into an intervention group (hybrid models) and a control group (auscultation mannequins). One hundred forty-two (99.3%) of these students completed a self-assessment Likert-scale questionnaire regarding different teaching approaches (where 1 = "very poor" to 100 = "very good"). The questionnaire focused on the "value of learning" of different teaching approaches. Direct comparison showed that students evaluated the hybrid models to be significantly more effective than the auscultation mannequins (median: 83 vs. 64, P < 0.001). The cardiac auscultation training was generally assessed positively (median: 88). Additionally, verbal feedback was obtained from simulated patients and tutors (trained students who had successfully passed the course a few semesters earlier). Personal feedback showed high satisfaction from student tutors and simulated patients. Hybrid simulators for teaching cardiac auscultation elucidated positive responses from students, tutors, and simulated patients.

  7. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: an in-depth review.

    PubMed

    Green, Darren; Roberts, Paul R; New, David I; Kalra, Philip A

    2011-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients, accounting for death in up to one-quarter of this population. Unlike in the general population, coronary artery disease and heart failure often are not the underlying pathologic processes for SCD; accordingly, current risk stratification tools are inadequate when assessing these patients. Factors assuming greater importance in hemodialysis patients may include left ventricular hypertrophy, electrolyte shift, and vascular calcification. Knowledge regarding SCD in hemodialysis patients is insufficient, in part reflecting the lack of an agreed-on definition of SCD in this population, although epidemiologic studies suggest the most common times for SCD to occur are toward the end of the long 72-hour weekend interval between dialysis sessions and in the 12 hours immediately after hemodialysis. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that the dialysis procedure itself may have important implications for SCD. Supporting this is recognition that hemodialysis is associated with both ventricular arrhythmias and dynamic electrocardiographic changes. Importantly, echocardiography and electrocardiography may show changes that are modifiable by alterations to dialysis prescription. The most effective preventative strategy in the general population, implanted cardioverter-defibrillator devices, are less effective in the presence of chronic kidney disease and have not been studied adequately in dialysis patients. Last, many dialysis patients experience SCD despite not fulfilling current criteria for implantation, making appropriate allocation of defibrillators uncertain.

  8. Supervised training with wireless monitoring of ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clemens; Baumbach, Christian; Willemsen, Detlev; Nee, Oliver; Gorath, Torsten; Hein, Andreas; Scheffold, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a tele-rehabilitation application for training cardiac patients. It uses a modified ergometer bicycle with a set of wireless sensors. While the patient is exercising, the ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation are monitored constantly and automatically. If sensor values exceed pre-defined thresholds, the patient receives an alarm. As a result the training will either be stopped or continued at a reduced load, depending on the severity of the alarm. To measure user acceptance, we introduced the system to 13 members of staff and four patients, who trained on the system every day during their stay in hospital. A total of 39 training sessions were completed. In 27% of the exercise sessions an ECG connection could not be established and in 23%, blood pressure measurement failed. However, there were no failures to measure oxygen saturation. The overall acceptance of the patient's graphical user interface (GUI) was excellent. The doctor's GUI with its functions received an overall score of 1.5 on a scale of 1 to 4 (usefulness 1.6, usability 1.3 and operability 1.6). The SAPHIRE tele-rehabilitation system operated properly and was well accepted by patients and doctors.

  9. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the cardiac chambers in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Uchida, Yasumi; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Tomaru, Takanobu; Miwa, Atsuko; Hirose, Junichi; Sasaki, Michihiko; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Tsubouchi, Hiroyuki

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in fiberoptic technology enables us to observe the cardiac chambers percutaneously in various categories of heart disease. We applied cardioscopy in 4 patients with HCM. Two of them presented excessive or good left ventricular function and no history of congestive heart failure (CHF). The other two patients showed reduced left ventricular function with a history of CHF. Cardioscopy was successfully performed in all patients. In patients with excessive or good left ventricular function, the color of the endocardial surface was light brown mixed with white. The trabeculae were significantly thick and contracted vigorously. In patients with reduced left ventricular function, the color was whiter, and the thickness and contraction of the trabeculae were reduced obviously. Myocardial biopsy revealed that interstitial fibrosis was prominent in the latters. These results indicate that (1) cardioscopy is safe and useful for evaluation of the internal surface of the ventricle in patients with HCM, and (2) cardioscopic characteristics of the ventricle are closely related to histopathological features.

  10. Cardiac pathology after valve replacement by disc prosthesis. A study of 61 necropsy patients.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W C; Fishbein, M C; Golden, A

    1975-05-01

    Clinical and necropsy observations are described in 61 patients who had one or more cardiac valves replaced with a discoid prosthesis of the Hufnagel type. The most common (31 percent) cause of death among the 45 patients who died early (less than 65 days after operation) appeared to be prosthetic disproportion; that is, the prothesis was too big for the aorta or ventricular cavity into which it was inserted so that inadequate space was present between the margins of the disc and the endocardium of ventricle or intima of aorta. Prosthetic thrombosis occurred in only 3 of the 45 patients who died early, but poppet movement appeared considerably altered in each. In contrast, thrombi were observed on a prosthesis in 14 of the 16 patients who died late (4 to 47 months [average 21] postoperatively), but in none did the thrombi appear of sufficient size to alter poppet function. Escessive bleeding occurred in 11 (24 percent) of the 45 early deaths and was primarily related to the insertion of a patch in the root of the aorta. Uncorrected valvular disease either by itself or by its ability to alter function of the prosthesis appeared responsible for death in 6 (13 percent) of the 45 patients who died early and in 2 (6 percent) of the 16 who died late. Insertion of a mitral poppet disc in a patient with uncorrected aortic regurgitation, even of mild degree, may be hazardous because the aortic regurgitant jet stream may interfere with proper function of the mitral disc. Likewise, insertion of a poppet disc only in the aortic valve position in a patient with combined aortic and mitral regurgitation may considerably increase the degree of mitral incompetence because the aortic prosthesis is intrinsically obstructive. Disc wear or variance was observed in all but one prosthesis in place for more than 1 year. Although hemolytic anemia of significant degree was not observed in any of the 16 patients who died late, the occurrence of renal hemosiderosis in 13 of the 16 patients

  11. Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac dyssynchrony in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zi-Ming; Wang, Bin; Ye, Zhou; Wang, Yong; Nanda, Navin C; Xie, Ming-Xing

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigated the application of echocardiography to evaluation of cardiac dyssynchrony in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). A total of 348 consecutive CHF patients who were admitted for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) and presented with low ejection fraction (EF) and wide QRS duration were enrolled in this study, along with 388 healthy individuals. Dyssynchrony was assessed based on filling time ratio (FT/RR), left ventricular pre-ejection delay (PED), interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), longitudinal opposing wall delay (LOWD) and radial septal to posterior wall delay (RSPWD). Response to CRT was defined as a ≥15% increase in EF. The results showed that FT/RR was decreased while PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD were increased in the CHF group compared with the control group (P<0.01). In the CHF group, FT/RR was negatively correlated with the QRS duration, LV end-diastolic diameter (LVESd), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV end-systolic volume (LVESV) (P<0.01), but positively with the LVEF (P<0.01). Additionally, PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD were positively correlated with the QRS duration, LVESd, LVEDV and LVESV (P<0.01), but negatively with the LVEF (P<0.01). The CHF group was divided into three subgroups according to the varying degrees of LVEF. FT/RR decreased successively from the LVEF-1 group to the LVEF-2 group to the LVEF-3 group, while the PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD successively increased in the same order (P<0.01). The CHF group was divided into three subgroups according to the varying degrees of QRS duration, and FT/RR decreased successively in a sequence from the QRS-1 group to the QRS-2 group to the QRS-3 group, while the PED, IVMD, LOWD and RSPWD successively increased in the same order (P<0.01). Speckle tracking radial dyssynchrony ≥130 ms was predictive of an EF response in patients in QRS-1 group (78% sensitivity, 83% specificity), those in QRS-2 group (83% sensitivity, 77% specificity) and in QRS-3 group (89

  12. Correlation between endogenous polyamines in human cardiac tissues and clinical parameters in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Meana, Clara; Rubín, José Manuel; Bordallo, Carmen; Suárez, Lorena; Bordallo, Javier; Sánchez, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Polyamines contribute to several physiological and pathological processes, including cardiac hypertrophy in experimental animals. This involves an increase in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity and intracellular polyamines associated with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) increases. The aim of the study was to establish the role of these in the human heart in living patients. For this, polyamines (by high performance liquid chromatography) and the activity of ODC and N(1)-acetylpolyamine oxidases (APAO) were determined in the right atrial appendage of 17 patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation to correlate with clinical parameters. There existed enzymatic activity associated with the homeostasis of polyamines. Left atria size was positively associated with ODC (r = 0.661, P = 0.027) and negatively with APAO-N(1) -acetylspermine (r = -0.769, P = 0.026), suggesting that increased levels of polyamines are associated with left atrial hemodynamic overload. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and heart rate were positively associated with spermidine (r = 0.690, P = 0.003; r = 0.590, P = 0.021) and negatively with N(1)-acetylspermidine (r = -0.554, P = 0.032; r = -0.644, P = 0.018). LVEF was negatively correlated with cAMP levels (r = -0.835, P = 0.001) and with cAMP/ODC (r = -0.794, P = 0.011), cAMP/spermidine (r = -0.813, P = 0.001) and cAMP/spermine (r = -0.747, P = 0.003) ratios. Abnormal LVEF patients showed decreased ODC activity and spermidine, and increased N(1) -acetylspermidine, and cAMP. Spermine decreased in congestive heart failure patients. The trace amine isoamylamine negatively correlated with septal wall thickness (r = -0.634, P = 0.008) and was increased in cardiac heart failure. The results indicated that modifications in polyamine homeostasis might be associated with cardiac function and remodelling. Increased cAMP might have a deleterious effect on function. Further studies should confirm these findings and the involvement of

  13. "Syndrome myxoma": a subset of patients with cardiac myxoma associated with pigmented skin lesions and peripheral and endocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Vidaillet, H J; Seward, J B; Fyke, F E; Su, W P; Tajik, A J

    1987-01-01

    From January 1954 to December 1985 cardiac myxoma was diagnosed in 75 patients at the Mayo Clinic. The clinical presentation was typical in 70 cases and was referred to as "sporadic myxoma". Forty four other cases of cardiac myxomas (five from the Mayo Clinic) presented with a combination of distinctive clinical features and these cases are described as "syndrome myxoma". The patients with syndrome myxoma were younger (mean age, 25 vs 56 years) and had unusual skin freckling (68%), associated benign non-cardiac myxomatous tumours (57%), endocrine neoplasms (30%), and a high frequency of familial cardiac myxoma (25%) and familial endocrine tumours (14%). The two types of cardiac tumour were different (syndrome vs sporadic): atrial location, 87% vs 100%; ventricular location, 13% vs 0%; single tumour, 50% vs 99%; multiple tumours, 50% vs 1%; and recurrent tumour, 18% vs 0%. It is concluded that patients with syndrome myxoma represent a distinctive subgroup in which there are important clinical, surgical, and genetic implications. More importantly, syndrome myxoma appears to be only one expression of a much larger disease entity. Images Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 4 PMID:3566983

  14. Abnormal cardiac enzymes in systemic sclerosis: a report of four patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vasta, B; Flower, V; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C; Brown, S; Korendowych, E; McHugh, N J; Pauling, J D

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is heterogeneous and can include primary involvement of the myocardium, pericardium and coronary arteries or be secondary to cardiac complications of pulmonary and renal disease. Primary cardiac involvement in SSc is uncommon but can result in ventricular dysfunction, organ failure, arrhythmias and death. It can remain clinically silent and the prevalence is likely to be under-reported. We report four cases of SSc associated with a raised serum troponin T (TnT), in a proportion of whom cardiac MRI myocardial abnormalities were detected. These cases highlight the heterogeneity of cardiac involvement in SSc, the role of cardiac MRI and promising biochemical responses to immunosuppression. Cardiac biomarkers such as TnT may be useful screening tools to identify subclinical cardiac disease and assess response to therapeutic intervention.

  15. Prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in employable patients after acute coronary event in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Annett; Heidler, Maria-Dorothea; Haubold, Kathrin; Schikora, Martin; Reibis, Rona; Wegscheider, Karl; Jöbges, Michael; Völler, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate cognitive function in patients is a prerequisite for successful implementation of patient education and lifestyle coping in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Although the association between cardiovascular diseases and cognitive impairments (CIs) is well known, the prevalence particularly of mild CI in CR and the characteristics of affected patients have been insufficiently investigated so far. Methods In this prospective observational study, 496 patients (54.5 ± 6.2 years, 79.8% men) with coronary artery disease following an acute coronary event (ACE) were analyzed. Patients were enrolled within 14 days of discharge from the hospital in a 3-week inpatient CR program. Patients were tested for CI using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) upon admission to and discharge from CR. Additionally, sociodemographic, clinical, and physiological variables were documented. The data were analyzed descriptively and in a multivariate stepwise backward elimination regression model with respect to CI. Results At admission to CR, the CI (MoCA score < 26) was determined in 182 patients (36.7%). Significant differences between CI and no CI groups were identified, and CI group was associated with high prevalence of smoking (65.9 vs 56.7%, P = 0.046), heavy (physically demanding) workloads (26.4 vs 17.8%, P < 0.001), sick leave longer than 1 month prior to CR (28.6 vs 18.5%, P = 0.026), reduced exercise capacity (102.5 vs 118.8 W, P = 0.006), and a shorter 6-min walking distance (401.7 vs 421.3 m, P = 0.021) compared to no CI group. The age- and education-adjusted model showed positive associations with CI only for sick leave more than 1 month prior to ACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.673, 95% confidence interval 1.07–2.79; P = 0.03) and heavy workloads (OR 2.18, 95% confidence interval 1.42–3.36; P < 0.01). Conclusion The prevalence of CI in CR was considerably high, affecting more than one-third of cardiac patients. Besides age and education

  16. Discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients in AlHada Armed Forces Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Hibshi, Sana M.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.; Assery, Mansour K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of medical information discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients at AlHada Armed Forces Hospital in Taif and to identify the factors contributing to these information discrepancies. Materials and Methods: The study applied a descriptive retrospective medical and dental records review of a stratified proportional sample of 289 cardiac patients, which was extracted from 1154 cardiac patients who visited both the cardiology and dental clinics at the AlHada Armed Forces Hospital between 2007 and June 2012. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19. Results: The main results of this study are the following: The mean and standard deviation of patient's age was 56 ± 16.9, female patients represented 47.8% of the study population. A total of 78.5% of dental records were documented by dental residents whereas 48.4% of the dentists had more than 6 years of experience. Two hundred and seventy-nine (96.5%) of the 289 dental records had medical information discrepancies compared to the corresponding medical records. One hundred percent of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatic fever cases were not documented in the dental records followed by 93% of medications, 92% of stroke, and 88.5% of hyperlipidemia, whereas the least prevalent were cardiac disease (26%) and diabetes mellitus (22.2%). Conclusion: Approximately 75% of the patients who directly or indirectly accessed the dental services showed discrepancies. The researcher concludes that critical information gaps exist between dental and medical records that mostly attributed to system level problems. A well-established model for efficient communication among medical and dental care providers caring for cardiac patients does not appear to exist. The absence of such a model can threaten the overall health of patients. PMID:28032050

  17. Patient-Specific Simulation of Cardiac Blood Flow From High-Resolution Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Henriksson, Lilian; Persson, Anders; Karlsson, Matts; Ebbers, Tino

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac hemodynamics can be computed from medical imaging data, and results could potentially aid in cardiac diagnosis and treatment optimization. However, simulations are often based on simplified geometries, ignoring features such as papillary muscles and trabeculae due to their complex shape, limitations in image acquisitions, and challenges in computational modeling. This severely hampers the use of computational fluid dynamics in clinical practice. The overall aim of this study was to develop a novel numerical framework that incorporated these geometrical features. The model included the left atrium, ventricle, ascending aorta, and heart valves. The framework used image registration to obtain patient-specific wall motion, automatic remeshing to handle topological changes due to the complex trabeculae motion, and a fast interpolation routine to obtain intermediate meshes during the simulations. Velocity fields and residence time were evaluated, and they indicated that papillary muscles and trabeculae strongly interacted with the blood, which could not be observed in a simplified model. The framework resulted in a model with outstanding geometrical detail, demonstrating the feasibility as well as the importance of a framework that is capable of simulating blood flow in physiologically realistic hearts.

  18. [Transradial percutaneous approach for cardiac catheterization in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown].

    PubMed

    Magariños, Eduardo; Solioz, Germán; Cermesoni, Gabriel; Koretzky, Martín; Carnevalini, Mariana; González, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The percutaneous punction of the radial artery for catheterization procedures has gained acceptance lately. This was a consequence of achieving results similar to the femoral approach, with the benefits of a lower rate of complications and increased comfort for the patients post procedure. Recently it has gained an additional impulse with the better prognosis obtained in acute coronary syndromes. In this trial we have evaluated if the feasibility, results and advantages related with the use of the radial artery percutaneous approach to perform catheterization procedures, continues when used in patients who have had a previous brachial artery cutdown. Out of a total of 1356 percutaneous radial accesses, 53 were in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown. Through this access 71 catheterization procedures were performed, achieving access success in 96.2% (51/53) of the punctions. Once the access success was obtained, 93.6% (44/47) of the diagnostic procedures and 100% (24/24) of the therapeutics procedures were successful. During hospitalization, in this group of patients, no major adverse cardiac events occurred and there was a 1.4% (1/71) rate of minor events. At seven days follow up, no new complications were recorded. Although this is a small group, we believe that it is enough to show that percutaneous punctions of the radial artery to perform catheterization procedures, in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown, are feasible, allowing high access and procedure success rates, with a low frequency of complications.

  19. Cardiac Failure in a Trisomy 9 Patient Undergoing Anesthesia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Riley, Cara J; Moore, Timothy; Eagelston, Lauren; Burkett, Dale; Auerbach, Scott; Ing, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    A 27-year-old female with Trisomy 9 mosaicism presented to Children's Hospital Colorado for outpatient dental surgery under general anesthesia. The patient's past medical history was also significant for premature birth, gastroesophageal reflux, scoliosis and kyphosis, obesity, and developmental delay. Per her mother's report, the patient had no cardiac issues. She had undergone multiple previous general anesthetics, some of which documented respiratory complications such as laryngospasm, bronchospasm, and possible aspiration. During this anesthetic, the patient became hypotensive on induction, with sluggish response to intravenous fluids, glycopyrrolate, and ephedrine. Her electrocardiogram demonstrated what appeared to be left bundle branch block at baseline, with possible ST segment changes after induction. Due to her abnormal reaction to the induction and subsequent treatment for hypotension, an echocardiogram was performed. The patient was found to have an ejection fraction of 25%-30%. The anesthetic was uneventful for the remainder of the procedure, and following recovery, the patient was admitted by the heart failure team for further care.

  20. Troponin T in Patients with Traumatic Chest Injuries with and without Cardiac Involvement: Insights from an Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Ismail; El-Menyar, Ayman; Dabdoob, Wafer; Abdulrahman, Yassir; Siddiqui, Tarriq; Atique, Sajid; Arumugam, Suresh Kumar; Latifi, Rifat; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serum troponin T (TnT) is a common marker of myocardial injury. However, its implication in the absence of clinical evidence of cardiac reason is not well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the implications of positive TnT in traumatic chest injury (TCI) patients regardless of the cardiac involvement. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of all TCI patients admitted to level 1 trauma center between 2008 and 2011. Patients who underwent TnT testing were divided into two groups: Group 1 (positive TnT) and Group 2 (negative TnT). The two groups were analyzed and compared, and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of TnT positivity and mortality. Results: Out of 993 blunt TCI patients, 19.3% had positive TnT (Group 1). On comparison to Group 2, patients in Group 1 were 5 years younger and more likely to have head, cardiac, hepatic, splenic, and pelvic injuries, in addition to lung contusion. Positive TnT was associated with higher Injury Severity Score (ISS) (P = 0.001), higher chest Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) (P = 0.001), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.03). In addition, Group 1 patients were more likely to undergo chest tube insertion, exploratory laparotomy, mechanical ventilation, and tracheostomy. Twenty patients had cardiac involvement, and of them 14 had positive TnT. Among 973 patients who showed no evidence of cardiac involvement, 178 had positive TnT (18.3%). There were 104 deaths (60% in Group 1). On multivariate regression analysis, the predictors of hospital mortality were positive TnT, head injury, and high ISS, whereas, the predictors of TnT positivity were cardiac, hepatic, and pelvic injuries; higher ISS; and age. Conclusions: Positive TnT in blunt TCI patients is a common challenge, particularly in polytrauma cases. Patients with positive TnT tend to have the worst outcome even in the absence of clinical evidence of acute cardiac involvement. Positive TnT is

  1. Management of patients with prosthetic heart valves during non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Bernard D

    2004-01-01

    Non-cardiac surgery in patients with prosthetic heart valves poses the particular hazards of infective endocarditis, increased bleeding risk and the possibility of acute/subacute valve thrombosis or systemic thromboembolism associated with interrupted anticoagulation. Management is complicated by the absence of randomised trials examining peri-operative anticoagulation management. Thromboembolic risk increases substantially when oral anticoagulation is discontinued and valve thrombosis may be inapparent for 1-2 months. This delayed diagnosis makes it difficult to identify the inciting event, either clinically or in experimental trials. Furthermore, the absence of early post-operative events may falsely suggest that peri-operative anticoagulation was safe and adequate. The approach to management therefore remains controversial. Seamless oral anticoagulation is preferred whenever possible and this is safe for a range of minor procedures, including cardiac catheterisation, dental and ophthalmic surgery. Major surgical procedures require withdrawal of oral anticoagulation before surgery to lower the international normalised ratio (INR) to <1.5 and maintained anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin which should be started when the INR is <2.5 in high risk patients and <2.0 in those at lower risk. The evidence to support the safety of low molecular weight heparins in this situation is scanty and despite its widespread promulgation this approach is NOT recommended. Oral anticoagulation is then resumed post-operatively, though therapeutic levels are not achieved for several days. The determination of which patients require prolonged overlap of heparin and oral anticoagulants is difficult. Clinical judgement is required but these regimes are strongly recommended for those at highest risk of thromboembolism. With strict adherence to these guidelines, the incidence of major complications is low.

  2. The Natural History of Cardiac and Pulmonary Function Decline in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Rolando; Fritz, Anto; Hagar, Yolanda; Boice, Braden; Skalsky, Andrew; Hwang, HoSun; Beckett, Laurel; McDonald, Craig; Gupta, Munish

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of scoliosis progression, pulmonary and cardiac function in a series of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Objective To determine whether operative treatment of scoliosis decreases the rate of pulmonary function loss in patients with DMD. Summary of Background Data It is generally accepted that surgical intervention should be undertaken in DMD scoliosis once curve sizes reach 35 degrees to allow intervention before critical respiratory decline has occurred. There are conflicting reports, however, regarding the effect of scoliosis stabilization on the rate of pulmonary function decline when compared to non operative cohorts. Methods We reviewed spinal radiographs, echocardiograms, and spirometry, hospital, and operative records of all patients seen at our tertiary referral center from July 1, 1992 to June 1, 2007 Data was recorded to Microsoft Excel and analyzed with SAS and R statistical processing software. Results The percent predicted forced vital capacity (PPFVC) decreased 5% /year prior to operation. The mean PPFVC was 54% (sd=21%) prior to operation with a mean postoperative PPFVC of 43% (sd=14%). Surgical treatment was associated with a 12% decline in PPFVC independent of other treatment variables. PPFVC after operation declined at a rate of 1% per year and while this rate was lower, it was not significantly different than the rate of decline present prior to operation (p=0.18). Cardiac function as measured by left ventricular fractional shortening declined at a rate of 1%/year with most individuals exhibiting an LVFS rate of >30 prior to operation. Conclusion Operative treatment of scoliosis in DMD using the Luque Galveston method was associated with a reduction of FVC related to operation. The rate of pulmonary function decline after operation was not significantly reduced when compared to the rate of preoperative FVC decline. PMID:21289561

  3. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  4. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos têm demonstrado a acurácia diagnóstica e o valor prognóstico da ecocardiografia com estresse f

  5. Aboriginal English: Some Grammatical Features and Their Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    Aboriginal English has been documented in widely separated parts of Australia and, despite some stylistic and regional variation, is remarkably consistent across the continent, and provides a vehicle for the common expression of Aboriginal identity. There is, however, some indeterminacy in the way in which the term is used in much academic and…

  6. Intellectual Disability in Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In mid-2001, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in Australia was approximately 458,500 people (2.4% of the national population). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia experience disadvantage compared to non-Indigenous Australians in a number of areas, including greater prevalence of health risk factors, early…

  7. Research: Documenting an Urban/Rural Aboriginal Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Margaret R.

    During research on cultural differences in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pedagogy, it became obvious that the lack of an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander cultural typology was impeding research progress. The author's cultural heritage group, the Malara People, a subgroup of the Bandjalang People of northern New South Wales,…

  8. Residential Schools: Impact on Aboriginal Students' Academic and Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Rosemary; Josefowitz, Nina; Cole, Ester

    2006-01-01

    Government commissions have demonstrated that residential schools' ability to educate aboriginal students was compromised by widespread problems including (a) inadequate curriculum, staffing, instruction time, and parental involvement; (b) racism; (c) prohibition against the use of aboriginal language; and (d) maltreatment. This article uses…

  9. An Exploratory Study of Binge Drinking in the Aboriginal Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardman, Dennis; Quantz, Darryl

    2005-01-01

    There is little research available on binge drinking among the Aboriginal population. Between March and June 2004, 15 Aboriginal persons participated in a semi-structured interview related to their binge drinking behaviors. The majority of participants were women and described a family history of alcoholism and childhood abuse. Factors that…

  10. The Ancestor Project: Aboriginal Computer Education through Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Marla; Biin, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the ANCESTOR program is to use digital storytelling as a means of promoting an interest in technology careers for Aboriginal learners, as well as increasing cultural literacy. A curriculum was developed and first tested with Aboriginal students at the LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School near Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Based on feedback…

  11. Aspirations of Adult Learners in Aboriginal Family Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jason; Fraehlich, Cheryl; Debassige, Brent

    2012-01-01

    There is a gap in the literature on the experiences of Aboriginal adults who have made the transition into education and employment after moving to an urban community. Staff of three Aboriginal inner-city family services agencies participated in an interview that included the question: What changes do you see in your employment and education?…

  12. Seeding Success: Schools That Work for Aboriginal Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munns, Geoff; O'Rourke, Virginia; Bodkin-Andrews, Gawaian

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a large mixed methods research project that investigated the conditions of success for Aboriginal school students. The article presents the qualitative case study component of the research. It details the work of four schools identified as successful for Aboriginal students with respect to social and academic outcomes, and…

  13. Aboriginal Street-involved Youth Experience Elevated Risk of Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brittany; Alfred, Gerald Taiaiake; Fleming, Kim; Nguyen, Paul; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Past research has identified risk factors associated with incarceration among adult Aboriginal populations; however, less is known about incarceration among street-involved Aboriginal youth. Therefore, we undertook this study to longitudinally investigate recent reports of incarceration among a prospective cohort of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Data were collected from a cohort of street-involved, drug-using youth from September 2005 to May 2013. Multivariate generalized estimating equation analyses were employed to examine the potential relationship between Aboriginal ancestry and recent incarceration. Results Among our sample of 1050 youth, 248 (24%) reported being of aboriginal ancestry, and 378 (36%) reported being incarcerated in the previous six months at some point during the study period. In multivariate analysis controlling for a range of potential confounders including drug use patterns and other risk factors, Aboriginal ancestry remained significantly associated with recent incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12–1.86). Conclusions Even after adjusting for drug use patterns and other risk factors associated with incarceration, this study found that Aboriginal street-involved youth were still significantly more likely to be incarcerated than their non-Aboriginal peers. Given the established harms associated with incarceration these findings underscore the pressing need for systematic reform including culturally appropriate interventions to prevent Aboriginal youth from becoming involved with the criminal justice system. PMID:26390949

  14. Aboriginal Pygmalion in Australia: An Open and Closed Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, B.

    1978-01-01

    Racism in Australian schools is indicated by an attitude survey which reveals that teachers from traditional classrooms believe that Aboriginal students will do less well than White students, whereas teachers from an open school predict that Aboriginal children should do as well as White children, given equal ability. (Author/EB)

  15. Aboriginal Education at Two Australian Schools: Under One Dream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hones, Donald F.

    2005-01-01

    In this article the author shares his experience visiting two schools that serve Aboriginal children in the state of Queensland, Australia: (1) Cherbourg State School in central Queensland; and (2) Kuranda State School in the Far North. Prior to his visit he had learned somewhat of Australia's troubled history regarding Aboriginal education, a…

  16. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy in the International Year of Astronomy 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, R. P.

    2010-10-01

    Each of the 400 different Aboriginal cultures in Australia has a distinct mythology, and its own ceremonies and art forms, some of which have a strong astronomical component. Sadly, the Australian media tend to focus on negative aspects of contemporary Aboriginal culture, and very few non-Aboriginal people in the wider Australian community are aware of the intellectual depth of traditional Aboriginal cultures. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 seemed an excellent opportunity to tell the wider public about Aboriginal astronomy, so that they might understand something of the depth and complexity of traditional Aboriginal cultures. This article describes some of the challenges and successes of this programme, and the impact that this work has had on Australian perceptions of Aboriginal culture, helping to build a bridge across the cultures. It also describes the achievement of an unexpected and unplanned goal: the inclusion of Aboriginal astronomy opened up astronomy to a section of the population who had never before intentionally attended a talk on science.

  17. Identity and Culture Shock: Aboriginal Children and Schooling in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Gisela; Eckermann, Anne-Katrin

    1996-01-01

    Observes the activities and characteristics of Aboriginal children in an Aboriginal school and compares these to the culture shock and alienation experienced when they transfer to a mainstream school. Identifies five major stressors of culture shock as mechanical differences, communication, attitudes and beliefs, customs, and isolation. (MJP)

  18. Creating Community: A Roundtable on Canadian Aboriginal Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eigenbrod, Renate, Ed.; Episkenew, Jo-Ann, Ed.

    This book contains 13 essays on Canadian Aboriginal literature. Topics include literary criticism, pedagogical issues, and the experiences of Native authors and of faculty teaching Aboriginal literature in mainstream institutions. Entries are: (1) "Natives on Native Literature: What Do We Rightly Write? Or: Shot Headfirst from the Canon"…

  19. Aboriginal Language Standardisation Project: Progress Report, 2000. Literacy Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Toronto. Literacy and Basic Skills Section.

    The Aboriginal Language Standardisation (ALS) Project's task is to develop quality literacy materials in order to help preserve aboriginal languages of Canada. The Canadian Assembly of First Nations, a group of tribal leaders, recently called for the establishment of standards for written and oral languages by approving terminology, developing…

  20. A Pedagogical Model for Engaging Aboriginal Children with Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackling, Mark; Byrne, Matt; Gower, Graeme; Anderson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Aboriginal children experience social and educational disadvantage and many are not engaged with schooling or learning, which results in significantly lower levels of educational attainment. The Aboriginal Education Program delivered by Scitech to remote Western Australian schools has been shown to significantly increase student ratings of their…

  1. Relationships Matter: Supporting Aboriginal Graduate Students in British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidgeon, Michelle; Archibald, Jo-ann; Hawkey, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    The current Canadian landscape of graduate education has pockets of presence of Indigenous faculty, students, and staff. The reality is that all too often, Aboriginal graduate students are either among the few, or is the sole Aboriginal person in an entire faculty. They usually do not have mentorship or guidance from an Indigenous faculty member…

  2. Task Force on Aboriginal Peoples in Federal Corrections. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of the Solicitor General, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This report presents the findings and recommendations of the Canadian Task Force on the Reintegration of Aboriginal Offenders as Law-Abiding Citizens. This task force was established in March 1987 by the Canadian federal government to examine and recommend changes for improving services to help incarcerated Aboriginals achieve successful social…

  3. Imaginative Education Engages Aboriginal Learners in Prince Rupert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, George

    2009-01-01

    Ten years ago, only 10% of the aboriginal students attending the public school of Prince Rupert took down their diploma of secondary studies. Across British Columbia, only 47 percent of the Aboriginal students who entered Grade 8 in 2003 have since completed high school, compared to 79 percent for all students in the province, an inequity that…

  4. Becoming Aboriginal: Experiences of a European Woman in Kamchatka's Wilderness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churikova, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    A Russian woman describes how living in remote Kamchatka helped her develop an aboriginal perspective. Chopping wood, hauling water, gathering food, alternately homeschooling her children and sending them to an ecological school, and interacting with local aboriginal people taught her the importance of conserving natural resources and living in…

  5. 50 CFR 230.4 - Aboriginal subsistence whaling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aboriginal subsistence whaling. 230.4 Section 230.4 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WHALING WHALING PROVISIONS § 230.4 Aboriginal subsistence whaling. (a)...

  6. Becoming "Real" Aboriginal Teachers: Attending to Intergenerational Narrative Reverberations and Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mary; Chester, Jerri-Lynn; Flett, Brenda Mary; Joe, Lucy; Marshall, Laura; Moore, Dorothy; Paul, Khea; Paynter, Florence; Williams, Jennifer; Huber, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Our paper, and the inquiry from which it emerges, is situated in world-wide concern to increase the numbers of Aboriginal teachers in schools. In Canada, the population of Aboriginal young people is rapidly increasing. Yet, at the same time, the gap between the attainment of a university credential in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations is…

  7. Tertiary Success for the Aboriginal Student: The Numerous Factors Impacting on the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eltchelebi, Wadda

    This paper presents an overview of Aboriginal education in the state of Victoria, Australia, as a frame for the role of the Aboriginal Tertiary Support Unit (ATSU) at La Trobe University, Bendigo. At the elementary and secondary levels, Aboriginal advocacy and support are provided by the Victorian Aboriginal Education Association, which promotes…

  8. Stolen from Our Embrace: The Abduction of First Nations Children and the Restoration of Aboriginal Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Suzanne; Crey, Ernie

    A deliberate policy to separate and forcibly assimilate Aboriginal First Nations children into the mainstream has pervaded every era of Aboriginal history in Canada. Each era saw a new reason to take Aboriginal children away from their homes, placing them in residential schools, foster care, or non-Aboriginal adoptive families. In the words of…

  9. Prevalence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Maria B; Voaklander, Donald C; Stickland, Michael K; King, Malcolm; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Rowe, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have considerable potential for inequities in diagnosis and treatment, thereby affecting vulnerable groups. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate differences in asthma and COPD prevalence between adult Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, specialized databases and the grey literature up to October 2011 were searched to identify epidemiological studies comparing asthma and COPD prevalence between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal adult populations. Prevalence ORs (PORs) and 95% CIs were calculated in a random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: Of 132 studies, eight contained relevant data. Aboriginal populations included Native Americans, Canadian Aboriginals, Australian Aboriginals and New Zealand Maori. Overall, Aboriginals were more likely to report having asthma than non-Aboriginals (POR 1.41 [95% CI 1.23 to 1.60]), particularly among Canadian Aboriginals (POR 1.80 [95% CI 1.68 to 1.93]), Native Americans (POR 1.41 [95% CI 1.13 to 1.76]) and Maori (POR 1.64 [95% CI 1.40 to 1.91]). Australian Aboriginals were less likely to report asthma (POR 0.49 [95% CI 0.28 to 0.86]). Sex differences in asthma prevalence between Aboriginals and their non-Aboriginal counterparts were not identified. One study compared COPD prevalence between Native and non-Native Americans, with similar rates in both groups (POR 1.08 [95% CI 0.81 to 1.44]). CONCLUSIONS: Differences in asthma prevalence between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations exist in a variety of countries. Studies comparing COPD prevalence between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations are scarce. Further investigation is needed to identify and account for factors associated with respiratory health inequalities among Aboriginal peoples. PMID:23248798

  10. Overhydration Is a Strong Predictor of Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients – Independently of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jotterand Drepper, Valérie; Kihm, Lars P.; Kälble, Florian; Diekmann, Christian; Seckinger, Joerg; Sommerer, Claudia; Zeier, Martin; Schwenger, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    Background Overhydration is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis patients and has been shown to be associated with mortality. However, it still remains unclear whether overhydration per se is predictive of mortality or whether it is mainly a reflection of underlying comorbidities. The purpose of our study was to assess overhydration in peritoneal dialysis patients using bioimpedance spectroscopy and to investigate whether overhydration is an independent predictor of mortality. Methods We analyzed and followed 54 peritoneal dialysis patients between June 2008 and December 2014. All patients underwent bioimpedance spectroscopy measurement once and were allocated to normohydrated and overhydrated groups. Overhydration was defined as an absolute overhydration/extracellular volume ratio > 15%. Simultaneously, clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory data were assessed. Heart failure was defined either on echocardiography, as a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, or clinically according to the New York Heart Association functional classification. Patient survival was documented up until December 31st 2014. Factors associated with mortality were identified and a multivariable Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results Apart from higher daily peritoneal ultrafiltration rate and cumulative diuretic dose in overhydrated patients, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups, in particular with respect to gender, body mass index, comorbidity and cardiac medication. Mortality was higher in overhydrated than in euvolemic patients. In the univariate analysis, increased age, overhydration, low diastolic blood pressure, raised troponin and NTproBNP, hypoalbuminemia, heart failure but not CRP were predictive of mortality. After adjustment, only overhydration, increased age and low diastolic blood pressure remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Overhydration remains an

  11. The efficacy of smoking cessation therapies in cardiac patients: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Mark J; Blum, Lisa M; Filion, Kristian B; Rinfret, Stephane; Pilote, Louise; Paradis, Gilles; Joseph, Lawrence; Gervais, André; O’Loughlin, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Several meta-analyses have examined the efficacy of smoking cessation therapies in the general population. However, little is known about the efficacy of these therapies in cardiac patients. Therefore, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to determine the efficacy of behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation in cardiac patients. METHODS: The medical literature was systematically reviewed to identify smoking cessation RCTs in cardiac patients. Only RCTs that reported smoking abstinence at six or 12 months were included. Smoking abstinence was examined based on the ‘most rigorous criterion’, defined as the most conservative outcome reported in any given RCT. RESULTS: Eleven behavioural therapy RCTs that enrolled 2105 patients and four pharmacotherapy RCTs that enrolled 1542 patients were identified. RCTs differed in the type of behavioural therapy administered as well as the total length and duration of the intervention. RCTs differed in the type of pharmacotherapy administered (one nicotine patch RCT, one nicotine gum RCT and two bupropion RCTs). Behavioural therapy was associated with a significantly higher proportion of smoking abstinence than usual care (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.37 to 2.85]). Pharmacotherapies were more efficacious than placebo (pooled OR 1.72 [95% CI 1.15 to 2.57]). CONCLUSIONS: Both behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy are more efficacious than usual care for smoking cessation in cardiac patients. The present meta-analysis highlights the need for head-to-head RCTs to identify which smoking cessation therapy is preferred in cardiac patients as well as RCTs examining the efficacy of combined behavioural and pharmacotherapies. PMID:20151052

  12. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  13. Temporary Transvenous Cardiac Pacing in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Predicts Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Yasir; Perez-Verdia, Alejandro; Jenkins, Leigh A.; Sehli, Shermila; Paige, Robert L.; Nugent, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporary pacemakers (TP) are used in emergency situations for severe bradyarrhythmias secondary to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to non-AMI related cardiac disorders. TP have been studied previously in AMI patients treated with thrombolytic therapy; limited information is available on current outcomes in AMI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods We reviewed the indications, complications, and mortality associated with TP insertion over a four year period (2003 - 2007) at a university hospital. Results Seventy-three temporary pacemakers were inserted (47 men, 26 women) during this period. The mean age was 65.2 years. TP were used in 29 AMI patients (39.7 % of total) and 44 non-AMI patients (60.3% of total). The duration of TP use was 2.6 ± 0.4 days in the whole cohort, 2.46 % of all AMI patients (29/1180) admitted during this period required a TP. Six of these patients requiring a TP required a permanent pacemaker. Eight patients with AMI and a TP died (27.6%). In contrast 8.9 % of AMI patients not requiring a TP died (P < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the AMI and non-AMI groups in the duration of temporary pacing (2.4 ± 0.6 days vs. 2.8 ± 0.4 days), in complications (27.6% vs. 29.5%), or in mortality (27.6% vs. 15.9%). The need for a permanent pacemaker (PPM) differed significantly between the AMI and non-AMI patients (20.7% vs. 54.5%; P < 0.05). Conclusion Our results indicate that AMI patients infrequently require a TP and that approximately 20% of these patients require a PPM. These results suggest that early revascularization of the conduction system with current interventional techniques has decreased the need for TP in AMI patients. However, this group requires more intensive monitoring as the mortality rate in this group of patients is significantly higher than the other AMI patients not requiring TP.

  14. Characterization of 2 genetic variants of Na(v) 1.5-arginine 689 found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jousset, Florian; Kucera, Jan P; Shestak, Anna; Makarov, Leonid M; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Hundreds of genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene coding for the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5, have been described in patients with cardiac channelopathies as well as in individuals from control cohorts. The aim of this study was to characterize the biophysical properties of 2 naturally occurring Na(v) 1.5 variants, p.R689H and p.R689C, found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and in control individuals. In addition, this study was motivated by the finding of the variant p.R689H in a family with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. When expressed in HEK293 cells, most of the sodium current (I(Na)) biophysical properties of both variants were indistinguishable from the wild-type (WT) channels. In both cases, however, an ∼2-fold increase of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive late I(Na) was observed. Action potential simulations and reconstruction of pseudo-ECGs demonstrated that such a subtle increase in the late I(Na) may prolong the QT interval in a nonlinear fashion. In conclusion