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Sample records for aboriginal palliative care

  1. Improving palliative care outcomes for Aboriginal Australians: service providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Shaouli; Bessarab, Dawn; van Schaik, Katherine D; Aoun, Samar M; Thompson, Sandra C

    2013-07-23

    Aboriginal Australians have a lower rate of utilisation of palliative care services than the general population. This study aimed to explore care providers' experiences and concerns in providing palliative care for Aboriginal people, and to identify opportunities for overcoming gaps in understanding between them and their Aboriginal patients and families. In-depth, qualitative interviews with urban, rural and remote palliative care providers were undertaken in inpatient and community settings in Western Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers with QSR NVivo 10 software used to help manage data. Data analysis was informed by multiple theoretical standpoints, including the social ecological model, critical cultural theories and the 'cultural security' framework. Thematic analysis was carried out that identified patterns within data. Fifteen palliative care providers were interviewed. Overall they reported lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture and being uncertain of the needs and priorities of Aboriginal people during end-of-life care. According to several participants, very few Aboriginal people had an understanding of palliative care. Managing issues such as anger, denial, the need for non-medical support due to socioeconomic disadvantage, and dealing with crises and conflicts over funeral arrangements were reported as some of the tensions between Aboriginal patients and families and the service providers. Early referral to palliative care is important in demonstrating and maintaining a caring therapeutic relationship. Paramount to meeting the needs for Aboriginal patients was access to appropriate information and logistical, psychological and emotional support. These were often seen as essential but additional to standard palliative care services. The broader context of Aboriginal history and historical distrust of mainstream services was seen to impinge on Aboriginal people's willingness and

  2. Improving palliative care outcomes for Aboriginal Australians: service providers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aboriginal Australians have a lower rate of utilisation of palliative care services than the general population. This study aimed to explore care providers’ experiences and concerns in providing palliative care for Aboriginal people, and to identify opportunities for overcoming gaps in understanding between them and their Aboriginal patients and families. Methods In-depth, qualitative interviews with urban, rural and remote palliative care providers were undertaken in inpatient and community settings in Western Australia. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers with QSR NVivo 10 software used to help manage data. Data analysis was informed by multiple theoretical standpoints, including the social ecological model, critical cultural theories and the ‘cultural security’ framework. Thematic analysis was carried out that identified patterns within data. Results Fifteen palliative care providers were interviewed. Overall they reported lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture and being uncertain of the needs and priorities of Aboriginal people during end-of-life care. According to several participants, very few Aboriginal people had an understanding of palliative care. Managing issues such as anger, denial, the need for non-medical support due to socioeconomic disadvantage, and dealing with crises and conflicts over funeral arrangements were reported as some of the tensions between Aboriginal patients and families and the service providers. Conclusion Early referral to palliative care is important in demonstrating and maintaining a caring therapeutic relationship. Paramount to meeting the needs for Aboriginal patients was access to appropriate information and logistical, psychological and emotional support. These were often seen as essential but additional to standard palliative care services. The broader context of Aboriginal history and historical distrust of mainstream services was seen to

  3. Practical problems for Aboriginal palliative care service provision in rural and remote areas: equipment, power and travel issues.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Holewa, Hamish; McGrath, Zoe

    2007-07-01

    With regards to end-of-life care, there is scant published research that looks specifically at the provision of palliative care services for Indigenous people. In addition, for Indigenous people in the rural and remote areas there is only limited literature that focuses on the problems associated with geography. To address the hiatus in the literature on Aboriginal, rural and remote palliative care, the following article provides findings from a two-year research project, funded by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council (NH&MRC), which developed an innovative model for Indigenous palliative care. The data was collected through a qualitative methodology (descriptive phenomenology) which involved open-ended in-depth interviews, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. The sub-set of findings from the study presented in this paper examine issues in relation to the many practical obstacles in relation to palliative care service provision to Indigenous people in the rural and remote areas. The findings are a testament to the ingenuity and dedication of those who provide end-of-life care for Aboriginal peoples in rural and remote locations. The information about the many obstacles associated with equipment, power, transport, distance and telephone access provide important insights to inform the development of health policy planning and funding. The topic is specifically relevant to nurses as further findings from the study indicate that clinic and community nurses are key health professionals providing care to Indigenous people in the rural and remote areas.

  4. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be provided along with curative treatment. Improves Quality of Life Palliative care teams specialize in treating people suffering ... In short, palliative care will help improve your quality of life. Close Communication The palliative care team will also ...

  5. Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Swetz, Keith M; Kamal, Arif H

    2018-03-06

    Palliative care prioritizes symptom management and quality of life throughout the course of serious illness. Regardless of whether care is inpatient or outpatient, primary or subspecialty, a solid understanding of the basics of effective communication, symptom management, and end-of-life care is crucial. This article reviews these essentials and provides an overview of current evidence to support patient-centered palliative care.

  6. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  7. Palliative Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... a team of medical personnel — including doctors, pain management specialists, nurses, social workers, and therapists — palliative care helps prevent and relieve pain and suffering while also easing stress, anxiety, and the fear associated with serious illness. ...

  8. What is palliative care?

    MedlinePlus

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease and ...

  9. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... palliative care team works in conjunction with your oncology care team to manage your care and maintain ... among family member, caregivers, and members of the oncology care team. When is palliative care used in ...

  10. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000532.htm Palliative care - managing pain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses ...

  11. Palliative care in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Krongyuth, Panit; Campbell, Cathy L; Silpasuwan, Pimpan

    2014-12-01

    In Thailand, several barriers exist that prevent people with life-limiting illnesses from accessing good-quality palliative care, namely: lack of palliative care providers; lack of training and education for the palliative care workforce; and issues with availability and distribution of opioids. Without palliative care, people suffer needlessly during the last months of their life. This paper gives an analysis of these issues and provides recommendations for clinical practice, research and health policy that may help to alleviate these issues.

  12. Palliative Care in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Kunirova, Gulnara; Shakenova, Ainur

    2018-02-01

    In Kazakhstan, like most ex-Soviet Union countries palliative care began in the late 1990s with the opening of the Almaty Hospice in 1999. Since that time, several palliative care services have opened in urban centers, but there is little coverage in rural areas. Palliative care has grown because of the collaborative work of Parliament leaders, Ministry of Health, local governments officials, Public Health Higher School, National Center for Health Development, academic medical institutions, oncology and palliative care experts, NGOs, Soros Foundation Kazakhstan, and international experts. A National Palliative Care Strategy provides the legislative framework that mandates the components of palliative that must be available at no cost for patients living with cancer. Palliative care courses are provided in several of the medical universities and nursing schools with practical training in local hospices who also offer seminars each year to practicing health care professionals. There is no "palliative care" or "palliative medicine" specialty in the national classifier of specialties. There are a number of palliative care specialists who participated in various training courses outside Kazakhstan. Oral morphine is not registered or available in the country, and patients must depend on injectable opioids or patches. Going forward, additional policies, increased public awareness, education of health care professionals, access to oral opioids, and more inpatient, home care, and day care services are needed. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Palliative care and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  14. Palliative Care-Albania.

    PubMed

    Rama, Rudina; Çarçani, Valbona; Prifti, Fatmir; Huta, Kristo; Xhixha, Ali; Connor, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    Sixty percent of cancer patients are diagnosed with advanced stages of disease and those diagnosed in early stages face challenges to receive adequate treatment. Palliative care has had significant developments in recent years in Albania because of a close partnership with the Ministry of Health, local nonprofit organizations, and the Open Society Foundation Albania. In 2011, a five-year action plan for palliative care as one of four parts of the National Cancer Control Plan was approved. At the end of 2014, the first palliative care law was approved by Parliament. Palliative care by-laws, documents, standards, clinical protocols, and guidelines for adults and children have been developed. Training and education are being provided to primary care professionals. Curricula on palliative care have been developed for the faculty of medicine, nursing high schools, and social work. About 80% of essential medications used in palliative care are available in Albania, 50% of these are paid for and have some access restrictions, and meanwhile the opiophobia still remains an enormous barrier. In the last three years, significant progress has been made in service provision. From only one public palliative care service in 2013, there are now eight palliative care services in eight of the 11 regional hospitals. By the end of 2016, it is expected that palliative care services will be available in all regional hospitals in the country. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Palliative Care in Moldova.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Liliana; Pogonet, Vadim; Soltan, Viorel; Isac, Valerian

    2018-02-01

    The article describes the important steps of palliative care development in Moldova, the current status, main achievements and challenges to be addressed in the future. It covers background information, policy development, medicines access and availability, education, and training, as well as services' provision. Palliative care development in Moldova registered real progress in spite of frequent political changes at governmental levels and difficulties to ensure the continuity of the development process during the last 10 years. However, the unmet need for palliative care for patients with life-limiting illnesses from different disease and age groups remains high. Further effort is needed to increase the availability and access to opioid analgesics and other essential palliative care medications. Government commitment and support, together with adequate funding, trained and educated health care professionals, and easy access to and availability of medicines, are essential to ensure the successful implementation of palliative care services nationwide, and to deliver the most appropriate qualitative palliative care for patients. To speed up palliative care development, a national strategy on palliative care development should be considered. The authors took part and continue to be involved in different ways in palliative care development in the country. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. "What is Palliative Care?"

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Elissa; Carpenter, Brian D

    2017-04-01

    Americans rely on the Internet for health information, and people are likely to turn to online resources to learn about palliative care as well. The purpose of this study was to analyze online palliative care information pages to evaluate the breadth of their content. We also compared how frequently basic facts about palliative care appeared on the Web pages to expert rankings of the importance of those facts to understanding palliative care. Twenty-six pages were identified. Two researchers independently coded each page for content. Palliative care professionals (n = 20) rated the importance of content domains for comparison with content frequency in the Web pages. We identified 22 recurring broad concepts about palliative care. Each information page included, on average, 9.2 of these broad concepts (standard deviation [SD] = 3.36, range = 5-15). Similarly, each broad concept was present in an average of 45% of the Web pages (SD = 30.4%, range = 8%-96%). Significant discrepancies emerged between expert ratings of the importance of the broad concepts and the frequency of their appearance in the Web pages ( r τ = .25, P > .05). This study demonstrates that palliative care information pages available online vary considerably in their content coverage. Furthermore, information that palliative care professionals rate as important for consumers to know is not always included in Web pages. We developed guidelines for information pages for the purpose of educating consumers in a consistent way about palliative care.

  17. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ Handout for Patients and Families What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is ... life for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of ...

  18. Palliative or Comfort Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... team usually includes: Palliative care doctors and nurses Social workers and chaplains Pharmacists and nutritionists Counselors and others This team works with your doctor and other health care providers ...

  19. Palliative Care Texts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/palliativecaretexts.html Palliative Care Texts To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Free text messages to support you and your family during ...

  20. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000471.htm Palliative care - shortness of breath To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses ...

  1. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINR Home About Email Search En Español Palliative Care - Top Menu Show — Palliative Care - Top Menu Hide — ... and Frequently Asked Questions What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care is ...

  2. Palliative Care Development in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Davaasuren, Odontuya; Ferris, Frank D

    2018-02-01

    Since the year 2000, Mongolia has established the foundation measures for a national palliative care program and has made several significant achievements. Systematic reviews and observational studies on palliative care development in Mongolia have taken place over the past 16 years. Mongolia began palliative care development in 2000 with the creation of the Mongolian Palliative Care Society and the Palliative Care Department. Palliative care is included in the Mongolia's Health Law, Health Insurance Law, Social Welfare Law, National Cancer Control Program, and the National Program for Non-Communicable Diseases, and has approved Palliative Care Standards and Pain Management Guidelines. Palliative care education is included in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum in all medical universities. Six hospice units in Ulaanbaatar have 50 beds; each of the nine districts and all 21 provinces have up to four to five palliative beds, and there are 36 palliative care units, for a total 190 beds for three million people. In 2014, a pediatric palliative care inpatient unit was established with five beds. Essential drugs for palliative care have been available in Mongolia since 2015. The pharmaceutical company IVCO produces morphine, codeine, pethidine, and oxycodone in Ulaanbaatar. Mongolia has made real progress in integrating palliative care into the health system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Palliative Care in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sood, Abhinav; Dobbie, Krista; Wilson Tang, W H

    2018-04-19

    This review illustrates the dynamic role of palliative care in heart failure management and encapsulates the commonly utilized pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapeutic strategies for symptom palliation in heart failure. In addition, we provide our experience regarding patient care issues common to the domain of heart failure and palliative medicine which are commonly encountered by heart failure teams. Addition of palliative care to conventional heart failure management plan results in improvement in quality of life, anxiety, depression, and spiritual well-being among patients. Palliative care should not be confused with hospice care. Palliative care teams should be involved early in the care of heart failure patients with the aims of improving symptom palliation, discussing goals of care and improving quality of life without compromising utilization of evidence-based heart failure therapies. A consensus on the appropriate timing of involvement and evidence for many symptom palliation therapies is still emerging.

  4. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, S

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a model of integrated palliative care for children with life-limiting illnesses, with emphasis on collaboration of care over time among family, primary care providers, and several other groups of providers. Some of the unique aspects of caring for children related to normal developmental changes and the family unit are considered. Issues related to pain and to specific diseases are also reviewed.

  5. Palliative care in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Robyna Irshad

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan is a developing country of South East Asia, with all the incumbent difficulties currently being faced by the region. Insufficient public healthcare facilities, poorly regulated private health sector, low budgetary allocation for health, improper priority setting while allocating limited resources, have resulted essentially in an absence of palliative care from the healthcare scene. Almost 90% of healthcare expenditure is out of the patient's pocket with more than 45% of population living below the poverty line. All these factors have a collective potential to translate into an end-of-life care disaster as a large percentage of population is suffering from chronic debilitating/terminal diseases. So far, such a disaster has not materialised, the reason being a family based culture emphasising the care of the sick and old at home, supported by religious teachings. This culture is not limited to Pakistan but subsists in the entire sub-continent, where looking after the sick/elderly at home is considered to be the duty of the younger generation. With effects of globalisation, more and more older people are living alone and an increasing need for palliative care is being realised. However, there does not seem to be any plan on the part of the public or private sectors to initiate palliative care services. This paper seeks to trace the social and cultural perspectives in Pakistan with regards to accessing palliative care in the context of healthcare facilities available.

  6. Danish Palliative Care Database.

    PubMed

    Groenvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. The study population is all patients in Denmark referred to and/or in contact with SPC after January 1, 2010. The main variables in DPD are data about referral for patients admitted and not admitted to SPC, type of the first SPC contact, clinical and sociodemographic factors, multidisciplinary conference, and the patient-reported European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care questionnaire, assessing health-related quality of life. The data support the estimation of currently five quality of care indicators, ie, the proportions of 1) referred and eligible patients who were actually admitted to SPC, 2) patients who waited <10 days before admission to SPC, 3) patients who died from cancer and who obtained contact with SPC, 4) patients who were screened with European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionaire-Core-15-Palliative Care at admission to SPC, and 5) patients who were discussed at a multidisciplinary conference. In 2014, all 43 SPC units in Denmark reported their data to DPD, and all 9,434 cancer patients (100%) referred to SPC were registered in DPD. In total, 41,104 unique cancer patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010-2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data and patient completeness.

  7. Grief and Palliative Care: Mutuality

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Grief and palliative care are interrelated and perhaps mutually inclusive. Conceptually and practically, grief intimately relates to palliative care, as both domains regard the phenomena of loss, suffering, and a desire for abatement of pain burden. Moreover, the notions of palliative care and grief may be construed as being mutually inclusive in terms of one cueing the other. As such, the discussions in this article will center on the conceptualizations of the mutuality between grief and palliative care related to end-of-life circumstances. Specifically, the complementarity of grief and palliative care, as well as a controvertible view thereof, will be considered. PMID:25278758

  8. Palliative care of First Nations people

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Len; Linkewich, Barb; Cromarty, Helen; St Pierre-Hansen, Natalie; Antone, Irwin; Gilles, Chris

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To understand cross-cultural hospital-based end-of-life care from the perspective of bereaved First Nations family members. DESIGN Phenomenologic approach using qualitative in-depth interviews. SETTING A rural town in northern Ontario with a catchment of 23 000 Ojibway and Cree aboriginal patients. PARTICIPANTS Ten recently bereaved aboriginal family members. METHODS Semi-structured interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using crystallization and immersion techniques. Triangulation and member-checking methods were used to ensure trustworthiness. MAIN FINDINGS First Nations family members described palliative care as a community and extended family experience. They expressed the need for rooms and services that reflect this, including space to accommodate a larger number of visitors than is usual in Western society. Informants described the importance of communication strategies that involve respectful directness. They acknowledged that all hospital employees had roles in the care of their loved ones. Participants generally described their relatives’ relationships with nurses and the care the nurses provided as positive experiences. CONCLUSION Cross-cultural care at the time of death is always challenging. Service delivery and communication strategies must meet cultural and family needs. Respect, communication, appropriate environments, and caregiving were important to participants for culturally appropriate palliative care. PMID:19366951

  9. Palliative Care Development in Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Mukambetov, Aibek; Sabyrbekova, Taalaigul; Asanalieva, Lola; Sadykov, Ilim; Connor, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care began in Kyrgyzstan in 2005 as a pilot home-based care program in Osh Cancer Center and was supported by a small group of nurses and one physician from Scotland. In 2010, the Soros Foundation-Kyrgyzstan and the Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative began supporting work on palliative care policy, legislation, essential medicine availability, education, advocacy, and implementation. A Ministry of Health working group was established to lead this initiative, and technical assistance was provided by an international palliative care consultant. Work began with a national needs assessment, which identified the existing barriers to the provision of quality palliative care, and recommendations were made to the working group to address these challenges. Today, palliative care is included in many national health care policies and laws, a national palliative care association has been established, undergraduate medical and nursing education include elements of palliative care, oral morphine and fentanyl patches are now available in parts of the country, inpatient services exist in the National Cancer Center in Osh and Bishkek, two tuberculosis hospitals with multidrug resistant/extensively drug resistant, and home care services in Osh and Bishkek. Public information campaigns and advocacy activities continue to increase public awareness about palliative care and press government action. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  11. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Team Networking in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Spruyt, Odette

    2011-01-01

    “If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together”. African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members. PMID:21811361

  13. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  14. [Multiprofessional cooperation in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Falckenberg, Maja

    2007-04-01

    "Nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come." (Victor Hugo) Originally referring to the beginning of the enlightenment (reconnaissance) of the French revolution the transcription of this words regarding to German palliative Care structures would mean a tremendous effort. The meaning of the new idea is a holistic kind of care for patients with a chronic disease at the end of their lives, so that they can die as most self determined as possible at a location of their choice. The special aim of palliative care, the need of interdisciplinary cooperation leading to multidisciplinary solutions is pointed out. The meaning of palliative care team as a team with special communication skills in between the team and with further cooperating partners is described. Communication in palliative care means more than telling facts.

  15. Integrating palliative care into comprehensive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrahm, Janet L

    2012-10-01

    While there are operational, financial, and workforce barriers to integrating oncology with palliative care, part of the problem lies in ourselves, not in our systems. First, there is oncologists' "learned helplessness" from years of practice without effective medications to manage symptoms or training in how to handle the tough communication challenges every oncologist faces. Unless they and the fellows they train have had the opportunity to work with a palliative care team, they are unlikely to be fully aware of what palliative care has to offer to their patients at the time of diagnosis, during active therapy, or after developing advanced disease, or may believe that, "I already do that." The second barrier to better integration is the compassion fatigue many oncologists develop from caring for so many years for patients who, despite the oncologists' best efforts, suffer and die. The cumulative grief oncologists experience may go unnamed and unacknowledged, contributing to this compassion fatigue and burnout, both of which inhibit the integration of oncology and palliative care. Solutions include training fellows and practicing oncologists in palliative care skills (eg, in symptom management, psychological disorders, communication), preventing and treating compassion fatigue, and enhancing collaboration with palliative care specialists in caring for patients with refractory distress at any stage of disease. As more oncologists develop these skills, process their grief, and recognize the breadth of additional expertise offered by their palliative care colleagues, palliative care will become integrated into comprehensive cancer care.

  16. Palliative Care Scorecard.

    PubMed

    Kittelson, Sheri; Pierce, Read; Youngwerth, Jeanie

    2017-05-01

    In response to poor healthcare quality outcomes and rising costs, healthcare reform triple aim has increased requirements for providers to demonstrate value to payers, partners, and the public. Electronically automating measurement of the meaningful impact of palliative care (PC) programs on clinical, operational, and financial systems over time is imperative to the success of the field and the goal of development of this automated PC scorecard. The scorecard was organized into a format of quality measures identified by the Measuring What Matters (MWM) project that are defined as important to the team, automatically extracted from the electronic health record, valid, and can be impacted over time. The scorecard was initially created using University of Florida Health (UF) data, a new PC program, and successfully applied and implemented at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (CU), a second institution with a mature PC program. Clinical metrics are organized in the scorecard based on MWM and described in terms of the metric definition, rationale for selection, measure type (structure, process, or outcome), and whether this represents a direct or proxy measure. The process of constructing the scorecard helped identify areas within both systems for potential improvement in team structure, clinical processes, and outcomes. In addition, by automating data extraction, the scorecard decreases costs associated with manual data entry and extraction, freeing clinical staff to care for patients and increasing the value of PC delivered to patients.

  17. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    PubMed

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  18. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is Palliative Care Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Family Caregivers Glossary Menu Is Palliative Care Right for You? Answer the following questions to determine whether palliative care might be right for you or someone close to you. Remember, ...

  20. Disparities in acute in-hospital cardiovascular care for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal South Australians.

    PubMed

    Tavella, Rosanna; McBride, Katharine; Keech, Wendy; Kelly, Janet; Rischbieth, Amanda; Zeitz, Christopher; Beltrame, John F; Tideman, Philip A; Brown, Alex

    2016-09-05

    To assess differences in the rates of angiography and subsequent revascularisation for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal South Australians who presented with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS); to explore the reasons for any observed differences. Analysis of administrative data with logistic regression modelling to assess the relationship between Aboriginal status and the decision to undertake diagnostic angiography. A detailed medical record review of Aboriginal admissions was subsequently undertaken. Emergency ACS admissions to SA cardiac catheterisation hospitals, 2007-2012. 13 701 admissions of patients with an ACS, including 274 Aboriginal patients (2.1%). Rates of coronary angiography and revascularisation; documentation of justification for non-invasive management. After adjustment for age, comorbidities and remoteness, Aboriginal patients presenting with an ACS were significantly less likely than non-Aboriginal patients to undergo angiography (odds ratio [OR], 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.5; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the rates of revascularisation for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients who had undergone angiography. Reasons for Aboriginal patients not undergoing angiography included symptoms being deemed non-cardiac (16%), non-invasive test performed (8%), and discharge against medical advice (11%); the reasons were unclear for 36% of Aboriginal patients. After controlling for age and other factors, the rate of coronary angiography was lower among Aboriginal patients with an ACS in SA. The reasons for this disparity are complex, including patient-related factors and their preferences, as well as the appropriateness of the intervention. Improved consideration of the hospital experience of Aboriginal patients must be a priority for reducing health care disparities.

  1. Needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients residing in Australian residential aged-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Nicole J

    2011-08-01

    This review was undertaken to identify evidence-based practice guidelines to support the care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients residing in residential aged-care facilities. A systematic literature review was undertaken. An electronic search of online databases and subsequent manual retrieval process was undertaken to identify relevant reports and studies that explored interventions for care of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person. Very limited published material identified strategies necessary within residential aged care. Sixty-seven articles were considered for inclusion, and a subsequent review resulted in 34 being included due to direct alignment with the study aim. Strategies recommended within the review cover areas such as care, communication, palliative care, activities and the environment. Care for an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person in an Australian residential aged-care facility requires a collaborative and individual approach. Cultural safety principles should be maintained across a culturally competent workforce. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons in care is a significant experience that should not be considered 'routine' as there is much to consider in the care of this person and their community. © 2011 The Author. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  2. Extending specialist palliative care to all?

    PubMed

    Field, D; Addington-Hall, J

    1999-05-01

    How to extend palliative care services to all patients needing them is an issue currently exercising a range of bodies in contemporary Britain. This paper first considers the evidence regarding the needs of dying patients with long term conditions other than cancer and concludes that there is evidence to support their presumed need for palliative care. It then considers five potential barriers to extending specialist palliative care services to non-cancer patients in Britain. These are the skill base of current specialists in palliative care, difficulties in identifying candidates for specialist palliative care, the views of potential users of these services, resource implications and vested interests in present health service arrangements.

  3. The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance.

    PubMed

    Connor, Stephen R; Gwyther, Elizabeth

    2018-02-01

    The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA) is an international non-governmental organization registered as a charity in England and Wales that was established in 2008 following a series of international gatherings that highlighted the important need for palliative care to be included in global policy and health planning. The vision of the WHPCA is a world with universal access to hospice and palliative care. Its mission is to foster, promote and influence the delivery of affordable, quality palliative care. This article describes the evolution of the WHPCA and what it has been able to accomplish in the eight years since its formation. These accomplishments include effective advocacy with United Nations bodies, acceptance as a non-governmental organization in official relations with the World Health Organization and the UN Economic and Social Council, publication of many position papers on critical aspects of palliative care, publication of the Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life, development of toolkits for palliative care development, publication of the international edition of ehospice, and management of World Hospice and Palliative Care Day each year. Some of the many challenges to the growth and development of palliative care globally are described along with future plans. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Barriers to Access to Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Pippa

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advances in understanding the benefits of early integration of palliative care with disease management, many people living with a chronic life-threatening illness either do not receive any palliative care service or receive services only in the last phase of their illness. In this article, I explore some of the reasons for failure to provide palliative care services and recommend some strategies to overcome these barriers, emphasizing the importance of describing palliative care accurately. I provide language which I hope will help health care professionals of all disciplines explain what palliative care has to offer and ensure wider access to palliative care, early in the course of their illness. PMID:28469439

  5. Specialist palliative care nursing and the philosophy of palliative care: a critical discussion.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn; Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine

    2017-07-02

    Nursing is the largest regulated health professional workforce providing palliative care across a range of clinical settings. Historically, palliative care nursing has been informed by a strong philosophy of care which is soundly articulated in palliative care policy, research and practice. Indeed, palliative care is now considered to be an integral component of nursing practice regardless of the specialty or clinical setting. However, there has been a change in the way palliative care is provided. Upstreaming and mainstreaming of palliative care and the dominance of a biomedical model with increasing medicalisation and specialisation are key factors in the evolution of contemporary palliative care and are likely to impact on nursing practice. Using a critical reflection of the authors own experiences and supported by literature and theory from seminal texts and contemporary academic, policy and clinical literature, this discussion paper will explore the influence of philosophy on nursing knowledge and theory in the context of an evolving model of palliative care.

  6. Palliative Care: The Oldest Profession?

    PubMed

    Duffin, Jacalyn

    2014-01-01

    By the 1960s, the forces that had slowly turned medicine away from comfort toward a greater emphasis on cure had generated a need for better care of the dying and the chronically ill. With reference to the growth of peer-reviewed literature on palliative care, the history of this seemingly new specialty is traced through the hallmarks of professionalization to outline and document the changes in the leaders, the issues, the publications, and the treatment modalities over the last five decades. The focus is on Canada within an international context.

  7. Palliative Care Processes Embedded in the ICU Workflow May Reserve Palliative Care Teams for Refractory Cases.

    PubMed

    Mun, Eluned; Umbarger, Lillian; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina; Nakatsuka, Craig

    2018-01-01

    Palliative Care Teams have been shown to be instrumental in the early identification of multiple aspects of advanced care planning. Despite an increased number of services to meet the rising consultation demand, it is conceivable that the numbers of palliative care consultations generated from an ICU alone could become overwhelming for an existing palliative care team. Improve end-of-life care in the ICU by incorporating basic palliative care processes into the daily routine ICU workflow, thereby reserving the palliative care team for refractory situations. A structured, palliative care, quality-improvement program was implemented and evaluated in the ICU at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Hawaii. This included selecting trigger criteria, a care model, forming guidelines, and developing evaluation criteria. These included the early identification of the multiple features of advanced care planning, numbers of proactive ICU and palliative care family meetings, and changes in code status and treatment upon completion of either meeting. Early identification of Goals-of-Care, advance directives, and code status by the ICU staff led to a proactive ICU family meeting with resultant increases in changes in code status and treatment. The numbers of palliative care consultations also rose, but not significantly. Palliative care processes could be incorporated into a daily ICU workflow allowing for integration of aspects of advanced care planning to be identified in a systematic and proactive manner. This reserved the palliative care team for situations when palliative care efforts performed by the ICU staff were ineffective.

  8. Priorities for Evaluating Palliative Care Outcomes in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Bakitas, Marie; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Kamal, Arif; Maguire, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Defining the quality of intensive care unit (ICU) care when patients are dying is challenging. Palliative care has been recommended to improve outcomes of dying ICU patients; however, traditional ICU quality indicators do not always align with palliative care. Evidence suggests that some aspects of ICU care improve when palliative care is integrated; however, consensus is lacking concerning the outcomes that should be measured. Overcoming challenges to measuring palliative care will require consensus development and rigorous research on the best way to evaluate ICU palliative care services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Growing Pains: Palliative Care Making Gains

    Cancer.gov

    Palliative care has been shown to improve patient outcomes such as symptom management, quality of life, and patient and family satisfaction with care. The availability and role of palliative care varies tremendously, but acceptance among oncologists and other clinicians has never been greater.

  10. Palliative Care Eases Symptoms, Enhances Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... and more emotional support. Read More "Palliative Care" Articles Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… / Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support / Palliative Care Eases Symptoms, Enhances Lives Spring 2014 Issue: ... Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  11. Music Therapy in Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Warth, Marco; Keßler, Jens; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-11-13

    Music therapy has been used successfully for over 30 years as part of palliative care programs for severely ill patients. There is nonetheless a lack of high-quality studies that would enable an evidence-based evaluation of its psychological and physiological effects. In a randomized controlled trial, 84 hospitalized patients in palliative care were assigned to one of two treatment arms--music therapy and control. The music therapy intervention consisted of two sessions of live music-based relaxation exercises; the patients in the control group listened to a verbal relaxation exercise. The primary endpoints were self-ratings of relaxation, well-being, and acute pain, assessed using visual analog scales. Heart rate variability and health-related quality of life were considered as secondary outcomes. The primary data analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Analyses of covariance revealed that music therapy was more effective than the control treatment at promoting relaxation (F = 13.7; p <0.001) and well-being (F = 6.41; p = 0.01). This effect was supported by a significantly greater increase in high-frequency oscillations of the heart rate (F = 8.13; p = 0.01). Music therapy did not differ from control treatment with respect to pain reduction (F = 0.4; p = 0.53), but it led to a significantly greater reduction in the fatigue score on the quality-of-life scale (F = 4.74; p = 0.03). Music therapy is an effective treatment with a low dropout rate for the promotion of relaxation and well-being in terminally ill persons undergoing palliative care.

  12. Integrating palliative care into disease management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Emanuel, Linda; Alexander, Carla; Arnold, Robert M; Bernstein, Richard; Dart, Richard; Dellasantina, Christopher; Dykstra, Lee; Tulsky, James

    2004-12-01

    Palliative care should not be reserved for those who are close to dying; as a comprehensive approach to minimizing illness-related suffering, it is appropriate for patients with significant illness from the time of diagnosis on. The American Hospice Foundation Guidelines Committee's initiative aims to provide a practical approach for guideline writers and others to integrate palliative care into disease management and care services whenever it is relevant. A consensus approach was used to design recommendations for upgrading existing disease management and service guidelines to include palliative care. A template is described for identifying stages in disease management guidelines when integration of palliative care is appropriate: (1) Introductory sections to disease management guidelines should include prognosis and other disease consequences; (2) Diagnostic sections should include recommendations for conducting a whole patient assessment; (3) Treatment sections should include discernment of patient goals for care, continuous goal reassessment, palliative care interventions to reduce suffering as needed, and treatment decisions should include discussion of the type of expected improvement. Service guidelines should note the role of interdisciplinary team care as well as palliative care consultative or care services; (4) Sections that conclude the care provided to incurable patients should not end without recommendations on grief and bereavement care, and care during the last hours of living. The American Hospice Foundation Guidelines Committee recommends integration of relevant aspects of palliative care in introductory, diagnostic, treatment, and closing sections of management guidelines for all significant illnesses.

  13. Palliative Dental Care- A Boon for Debilitating

    PubMed Central

    Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Mpv, Prabhat; Gummadapu, Sarat; Salvadhi, Shyam Sundar

    2014-01-01

    World Health Organization defines “palliative care” as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care actually deals with patients at the terminal end stage of the disease. We always face a question why a dentist should be in a palliative team? What is the exact role of dentist? Dental treatment may not always be strenuous and curative, but also can focus on improving quality of life of the patient. Hence forth the present paper enlightens the importance of dentist role in palliative team. PMID:25121074

  14. Palliative care for respiratory disease: An education model of care.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Brynn; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    That palliative care improves quality of life for seriously ill patients and their families is well known - but how can healthcare providers ensure that the palliative needs of all patients are being assessed and addressed? A growing number of curricula in core palliative care practices have been developed to ensure that clinicians from all specialties and disciplines have the necessary training to manage pain and symptoms and discuss care goals with patients and families. Through broad-based training in core palliative care skills, combined with referral to specialty palliative care for high-need patients, providers can improve quality of life for their patients with respiratory disease.

  15. Comparison of the 1996 and 2001 census data for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal workers in health care occupations.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Emily; Baril, Mireille

    2008-01-01

    To meet the unique health needs of Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis), it is important to increase and encourage Aboriginal representation in health care. One Federal initiative, the Aboriginal Health Human Resource Initiative (AHHRI) at Health Canada, focuses on: (1) increasing the number of Aboriginal people working in health careers; (2) adapting health care educational curricula to support the development of cultural competencies; and (3) improving the retention of health care workers in Aboriginal communities. A health care system that focuses on understanding the unique challenges, concerns, and needs of Aboriginal people can better respond to this specific population, which suffers disproportionately from ill health in comparison to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. This report examines the supply of Aboriginal health care providers in Canada, based on geographic region, area of residence, Aboriginal identity, and occupation. Findings are drawn from the 1996 and 2001 censuses from Statistics Canada. Quantitative results provide a greater understanding of labour force characteristics of First Nation, Inuit, Métis, and non-Aboriginal health providers.

  16. Training Advanced Practice Palliative Care Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt

    1999-01-01

    Describes the role and responsibilities of advanced-practice nurses in palliative care and nursing's initiative in promoting high-quality care through the educational preparation of these nurses. (JOW)

  17. [Potential of specialized outpatient palliative care].

    PubMed

    Geist, M J P; Bardenheuer, H J; Weigand, M A; Frankenhauser, S; Kessler, J

    2018-05-01

    Palliative care patients with incurable advanced disease suffering from complex symptoms can receive specialized outpatient palliative care in addition to the existing ambulatory care system. Qualified physicians and nurses care for patients and their dependents in cooperation with other professionals. In addition to a 24/7 on-call service for emergencies or acute crises, patients and their dependents are offered regular visits.

  18. A National Palliative Care Strategy for Canada

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify barrier to achieving universal access to high quality palliative care in Canada, review published national strategies and frameworks to promote palliative care, examine key aspects that have been linked to successful outcomes, and make recommendations for Canada. Background: In 2014, the World Health Organization called on members to develop and implement policies to ensure palliative care is integrated into national health services. Methods: Rapid review supplemented by the author's personal files, outreach to colleagues within the international palliative care community, review of European Association for Palliative Care publications, and a subsequent search of the table of contents of the major palliative care journals. Results: Frameworks were found for 10 countries ranging from detailed and comprehensive multi-year strategies to more general approaches including laws guaranteeing access to palliative care services for “dying” patients or recommendations for the development of clinical infrastructure. Few formal evaluations were found minimal comparative data exist regarding the quality of care, access to palliative care services, timing of access in the disease trajectory, and patient and family satisfaction with care. Factors that appear to be associated with success include: 1) input and early involvement of senior policy makers; 2) comprehensive strategies that address major barriers to universal access and that involve the key constituents; 3) a focus on enhancing the evidence base and developing a national system of quality reporting; and 4) substantial and sustained government investment. Discussion: Comprehensive national strategies appear to improve access to high quality palliative care for persons with serious illness and their families. Such strategies require sustained government funding and address barriers related to infrastructure, professional and public education, workforce shortages, and an inadequate

  19. Palliative care in India: successes and limitations.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, M R; Venkateswaran, Chitra

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care in India is in a relatively early stage of development and consequently faces numerous problems. The extent of problems relating to the lack of such care is not well described for cancer or nonmalignant diseases. Opioid availability is seriously limited. Many inexpensive drugs are not readily available and some very expensive drugs are often prescribed, adding to the patients' burden. Enormous psychosocial needs often are neglected in busy clinics. The government's palliative care policy has not been implemented. There are clear needs for improvement in multiple areas that must be addressed as new services develop. A system based on outpatient care has proven cost-effective, empowering families to care for patients at home. Whenever possible, inpatient facility and home visits should be available for those who need them. Some measures of quality assurance should develop concurrent with growth of the palliative care movement. Successes and problems in the development of palliative care in India are discussed.

  20. Need for palliative care for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Carlini, Giulia; Tarquini, Daniela; Defanti, Carlo Alberto; Veronese, Simone; Pucci, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The new concept of palliative care supports the idea of palliation as an early approach to patients affected by disabling and life-limiting disease which focuses on the patient's quality of life along the entire course of disease. This model moves beyond the traditional concept of palliation as an approach restricted to the final stage of disease and widens the fields of intervention. There is a growing awareness of the importance of palliative care not only in oncological diseases but also in many other branches of medicine, and it appears particularly evident in the approach to many of the most frequent neurological diseases that are chronic, incurable and autonomy-impairing illnesses. The definition and implementation of palliative goals and procedures in neurology must take into account the specific features of these conditions in terms of the complexity and variability of symptoms, clinical course, disability and prognosis. The realization of an effective palliative approach to neurological diseases requires specific skills and expertise to adapt the concept of palliation to the peculiarities of these diseases; this approach should be realized through the cooperation of different services and the action of a multidisciplinary team in which the neurologist should play a central role to identify and face the patient's needs. In this view, it is paramount for the neurologist to be trained in these issues to promote the integration of palliative care in the care of neurological patients.

  1. Palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Krasner, Diane L; Kennedy, Bruce; Wardle, David; Moir, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    To provide information about palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: 1. Recognize study findings, assessment tools, and non-pharmacologic strategies used for patients with palliative wounds. 2. Summarize pharmacologic and dressing treatment strategies used for wound care management of palliative patients. The principles of palliative wound care should be integrated along the continuum of wound care to address the whole person care needs of palliative patients and their circles of care, which includes members of the patient unit including family, significant others, caregivers, and other healthcare professionals that may be external to the current interprofessional team. Palliative patients often present with chronic debilitating diseases, advanced diseases associated with major organ failure (renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or cardiac), profound dementia, complex psychosocial issues, diminished self-care abilities, and challenging wound-related symptoms. This article introduces key concepts and strategies for palliative wound care that are essential for interprofessional team members to incorporate in clinical practice when caring for palliative patients with wounds and their circles of care.

  2. International palliative care: Middle East experience as a model for global palliative care.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ramzi R; Charalambous, Haris A; Baider, Lea; Silbermann, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Care for elderly people with life-limiting illness cannot be delivered primarily by geriatricians or palliative care practitioners. The role of these clinicians is to help carers become adept in palliative care medicine. In a culture in which family ties run deep, the offer of palliative care from an outsider may be met with suspicion. The family bond in the Middle East is strong, but the emotional response to terminal illness may push families to request futile treatments, and physicians to comply. When palliative care is well developed and well understood, it provides a viable alternative to such extreme terminal measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Normativity unbound: liminality in palliative care ethics.

    PubMed

    Braude, Hillel

    2012-04-01

    This article applies the anthropological concept of liminality to reconceptualize palliative care ethics. Liminality possesses both spatial and temporal dimensions. Both these aspects are analyzed to provide insight into the intersubjective relationship between patient and caregiver in the context of palliative care. Aristotelian practical wisdom, or phronesis, is considered to be the appropriate model for palliative care ethics, provided it is able to account for liminality. Moreover, this article argues for the importance of liminality for providing an ethical structure that grounds the doctrine of double effect and overcomes the impasse of phronesis in the treatment of the terminally ill.

  4. Improving palliative care through effective communication.

    PubMed

    Wallace, P

    2001-02-01

    Effective communication in palliative care is instrumental in the development of the therapeutic relationship that should exist between patients and nurses, and the importance of it is well recognized by nurses working in this specialist practice area. This article examines the reason behind the need for effective communication, identifies systems of communication and explores the influence and value of contemporary communication theories and models in palliative care. It recommends that palliative care nurses develop a framework that will facilitate and give structure to the interview process with the aim of alleviating anxieties, encouraging situational control and promoting quality of life for patients.

  5. Perioperative Palliative Care Considerations for Surgical Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Sipples, Rebecca; Taylor, Richard; Kirk-Walker, Deborah; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Bakitas, Marie

    2017-02-01

    To explore the opportunities to incorporate palliative care into perioperative oncology patient management and education strategies for surgical oncology nurses. Articles related to palliative care and surgical oncology to determine the degree of integration, gaps, and implications for practice. Although evidence supports positive patient outcomes when palliative care is integrated in the perioperative period, uptake of palliative care into surgical settings is slow. Palliative care concepts are not adequately integrated into surgical and nursing education. With appropriate palliative care education and training, surgical oncology nurses will be empowered to foster surgical-palliative care collaborations to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Update in Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard A; Smith, Cardinale B; Coats, Heather; Gelfman, Laura P; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this update, presented at the 2017 Annual Assembly of the American Association of Palliative and Hospice Medicine (AAHPM) and the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), is to identify, summarize, and critique a sampling of research from the prior year that has the potential for marked impact on hospice and palliative clinical practice. Eight reports of original research published between January 1, 2016 and December 31, 2016 were identified through a systematic PubMed search using the terms "hospice" and "palliative care," a hand search of 22 leading healthcare journals, and discussion with experts in the field. Candidate articles were ranked based on the study's methodological quality, appeal to a breadth of palliative care clinicians across different settings, and potential clinical practice impact. We summarize the eight articles with the highest ratings and give recommendations for clinical practice.

  7. Advancing palliative care as a human right.

    PubMed

    Gwyther, Liz; Brennan, Frank; Harding, Richard

    2009-11-01

    The international palliative care community has articulated a simple but challenging proposition that palliative care is an international human right. International human rights covenants and the discipline of palliative care have, as common themes, the inherent dignity of the individual and the principles of universality and nondiscrimination. However, when we consider the evidence for the effectiveness of palliative care, the lack of palliative care provision for those who may benefit from it is of grave concern. Three disciplines (palliative care, public health, and human rights) are now interacting with a growing resonance. The maturing of palliative care as a clinical specialty and academic discipline has coincided with the development of a public health approach to global and community-wide health problems. The care of the dying is a public health issue. Given that death is both inevitable and universal, the care of people with life-limiting illness stands equal to all other public health issues. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) includes the right to health care and General Comment 14 (paragraph 34) CESCR stipulates that "States are under the obligation to respect the right to health by, inter alia, refraining from denying or limiting equal access for all persons, ... to preventive, curative and palliative health services." However, these rights are seen to be aspirational-rights to be achieved progressively over time by each signatory nation to the maximum capacity of their available resources. Although a government may use insufficient resources as a justification for inadequacies of its response to palliative care and pain management, General Comment 14 set out "core obligations" and "obligations of comparable priority" in the provision of health care and placed the burden on governments to justify "that every effort has nevertheless been made to use all available resources at its disposal in order to satisfy, as

  8. Development of a pediatric palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; Linn, Jill Burris; Korphage, Rebecca M; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Hubble, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has provided clinical recommendations for palliative care needs of children. This article outlines the steps involved in implementing a pediatric palliative care program in a Midwest pediatric magnet health care facility. The development of a Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team was supported by hospital administration and funded through grants. Challenges included the development of collaborative relationships with health care professionals from specialty areas. Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team services, available from the time of diagnosis, are provided by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals and individualized on the basis of needs expressed by each child and his or her family.

  9. Evaluation of palliative care nursing education seminars.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Virani, Rose; Paice, Judith A; Coyle, Nessa; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    More than 50 million people die each year around the world. Nurses are crucial in providing care to these individuals and their families as they spend the most time at the bedside with patients and families. Yet many nurses have received little or no education about palliative care. The Open Society Institute (OSI) and the Open Medical Institute (OMI) partnered with End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) to develop an international nursing palliative care curriculum. This international curriculum was implemented with two training courses held in Salzburg, Austria in October 2006 (n=38) and April 2008 (n=39) representing 22 Eastern European/Central Asian countries. Participants were asked to establish goals in disseminating the palliative care information when they returned to their country. The participants were mentored/followed for a 12-month period to evaluate their palliative care knowledge as well as challenges encountered. The participants provided excellent ratings for the training courses indicating that the courses were stimulating and met their expectations. The 12-month follow-up demonstrated many challenges (i.e., lack of funds, institutional support, fear of death), in advancing palliative care within each participant's setting/country as well as many examples of successful implementation. There is an urgent need for improved palliative care throughout the world. The ELNEC-International curriculum is designed to address the need for increased palliative care education in nursing. In order to improve the quality of life for those facing life-threatening illnesses around the world, ongoing support is needed for world-wide palliative care educational efforts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Update in Hospice and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nathan A; Horton, Jay R; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Smith, Cardinale B; Johnson, Kimberly S

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this update in hospice and palliative care is to summarize and critique research published between January 1 and December 31, 2014 that has a high potential for impact on clinical practice. To identify articles we hand searched 22 leading journals, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Fast Article Critical Summaries for Clinicians in Palliative Care. We also performed a PubMed keyword search using the terms "hospice" and "palliative care." We ranked candidate articles based on study quality, appeal to a breadth of palliative care clinicians, and potential for impact on clinical practice. In this manuscript we have summarized the findings of eight articles with the highest ratings and make recommendations for clinical practice based on the strength of the resulting evidence.

  11. Palliative care - fluid, food, and digestion

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000531.htm Palliative care - fluid, food, and digestion To use the sharing features on ... When Your Body Has Problems Handling Fluids and Food It is normal for a person who has ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  13. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ninr.nih.gov/researchandfunding/spotlight-on-end-of-life-research. A summary of The Science of Compassion: Future Directions in End-of-Life & Palliative Care Summit is available at http://www. ...

  14. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms "Palliative" and "Hospice".

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term "palliative care" has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term "supportive care" instead of "palliative care" in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than "palliative" and "hospice" are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term "palliative," while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term "hospice." Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms "palliative" and "hospice" (χ 2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ 2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon.

  15. Care in Nursing Facilities after Palliative Consult.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joan G; Berry, Patricia H; Ersek, Mary

    2018-04-01

    Despite hospital palliative care consultations during which goals of care are discussed in the context of poor prognoses, older adults are admitted to nursing homes for post-acute care where the focus is on rehabilitation. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to describe factors that influence discontinuity between a palliative care consult and nursing home care and explore the potential consequences of this discontinuity. Twelve adults (mean age of 80 years) were enrolled from one community hospital and nursing home in the mid-Atlantic United States. Semi-structured interviews and medical record reviews were used to elicit information about clinical course, care processes, and patient/family preferences at hospital discharge and up to four times after nursing home admission. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis techniques. Analysis revealed two themes: Inadequate Communication characterized by the lack of information about the palliative care consult after hospital discharge and Prognosis Incongruence evidenced by data demonstrating a discrepancy between hospital prognosis and nursing home care. Ongoing communication between settings to re-address goals of care, prognosis, and symptoms-the central tenets of palliative care-is lacking. Efforts to improve access to comprehensive palliative care delivery after hospitalization and during nursing home transitions are greatly needed.

  16. Successful chronic disease care for Aboriginal Australians requires cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw Teng; Lau, Phyllis; Pyett, Priscilla; Furler, John; Burchill, Marlene; Rowley, Kevin; Kelaher, Margaret

    2011-06-01

    To review the literature to determine the attributes of culturally appropriate healthcare to inform the design of chronic disease management (CDM) models for Aboriginal patients in urban general practice. A comprehensive conceptual framework, drawing on the Access to Care, Pathway to Care, Chronic Care, Level of Connectedness, and Cultural Security, Cultural Competency and Cultural Respect models, was developed to define the search strategy, inclusion criteria and appraisal methods for the literature review. Selected papers were reviewed in detail if they examined a chronic disease intervention for an Aboriginal population and reported on its evaluation, impacts or outcomes. In the 173 papers examined, only 11 programs met the inclusion criteria. All were programs conducted in rural and remote Aboriginal community-controlled health services. Successful chronic disease care and interventions require adequate Aboriginal community engagement, utilising local knowledge, strong leadership, shared responsibilities, sustainable resources and integrated data and systems. These success factors fitted within the conceptual framework developed. Research and development of culturally appropriate CDM models concurrently in both urban and rural settings will enable more rigorous evaluation, leading to stronger evidence for best practice. A partnership of mainstream and Aboriginal-controlled health services is essential to successfully 'close the gap'. Findings will inform and guide the development, implementation and evaluation of culturally appropriate CDM in mainstream general practice and primary care. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  17. Legal Support for Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Tamar; Burke-Shyne, Naomi; Hepford, Kiera

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care patients face legal issues that impact their quality of life. Legal support, embedded in holistic palliative care services, has developed globally over the last decade to address this. This article aims to trace the origins of legal support for palliative care patients, detail models of legal support, and describe achievements and challenges. The article draws on years of work in this area and the available literature. Common legal issues include disposing of property and drafting wills, planning for children, dealing with debt and securing social benefits, and addressing discrimination. Diverse approaches to integrating legal support include developing paralegal skills, accessing skilled legal advice, empowering patients and families, and building awareness of rights among health care workers. There is robust and growing acceptance of legal support as a key component of holistic palliative care, and many palliative care professionals are identifying and addressing the legal needs they encounter through mediation, guidance on basic rights, or referrals to a lawyer. Addressing legal problems can contribute to peace of mind, well-being, and the health of patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrating palliative care with usual care of diabetic foot wounds.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is a philosophy and a system for deciding care and can be used alone or integrated with usual chronic disease care. Palliative care encompasses end-of-life care. Palliative care aims to enhance quality of life, optimize function and manage symptoms including early in the course of chronic diseases. The purposes of this article are to outline palliative care and discuss how it can be integrated with usual care of diabetic foot wounds. Many people with diabetes who have foot wounds also have other comorbidities and diabetes complications such as cardiovascular and renal disease and depression, which affect medicine and other treatment choices, functional status, surgical risk and quality of life. Two broad of diabetic foot disease exist: those likely to heal but who could still benefit from integrated palliative care such as managing pain and those where healing is unlikely where palliation can be the primary focus. People with diabetes can die suddenly, although the life course is usually long with periods of stable and unstable disease. Many health professionals are reluctant to discuss palliative care or suggest people to document their end-of-life care preferences. If such preferences are not documented, the person might not achieve their desired death or place of death and health professionals and families can be confronted with difficult decisions. Palliative care can be integrated with usual foot care and is associated with improved function, better quality of life and greater patient and family satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care: Advancing Hospice and Palliative Care Worldwide.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Liliana; Radbruch, Lukas

    2018-02-01

    The International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) is a membership-based organization dedicated to the development and improvement of hospice and palliative care worldwide. The mission of IAHPC is to improve the quality of life of adults and children with life-threatening conditions and their families. The vision of IAHPC is universal access to high-quality palliative care, integrated into all levels of health care systems in a continuum of care with disease prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment, to assure that any patient's or family caregiver's suffering is relieved to the greatest extent possible. IAHPC focuses on the advancement of four areas of palliative care: education, access to medicines, health policies, and service implementation. IAHPC works on three levels: at the grass roots, developing resources, and educational strategies that enable health workers to provide cost-effective palliative care; at the national level, working with government representatives to improve national policies to ensure adequate care and access to medicines; and at the international level, advocating with the UN organizations to ensure that access to palliative care and to essential medicines for palliative care and pain treatment is stipulated and incorporated as an obligation of member states. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobile Technology Applications in Cancer Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Freire de Castro Silva, Sandro Luís; Gonçalves, Antônio Augusto; Cheng, Cezar; Fernandes Martins, Carlos Henrique

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices frequently used in other specialties can find great utility in palliative care. For healthcare professionals, the use of mobile technology not only can bring additional resources to the care, but it can actually radically change the cancer remote care practices. The Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) has developed the largest cancer home care program in Latin America, which currently benefits more than 500 patients. The purpose of this paper is to show the development of an ICT environment of mobile applications developed to support the palliative cancer care program at INCA.

  1. [Neonatal palliative care and culture].

    PubMed

    Bétrémieux, P; Mannoni, C

    2013-09-01

    The period of palliative care is a difficult time for parents and caregivers because they are all weakened by the proximity of death. First of all, because of religious and cultural differences, parents and families cannot easily express their beliefs or the rituals they are required to develop; second, this impossibility results in conflicts between the caregiver team and the family with consequences for both. Caregivers are concerned to allow the expression of religious beliefs and cultural demands because it is assumed that they may promote the work of mourning by relating the dead child to its family and roots. However, caregivers' fear not knowing the cultural context to which the family belongs and having inappropriate words or gestures, as sometimes families dare not, cannot, or do not wish to describe their cultural background. We attempt to differentiate what relates to culture and to religion and attempt to identify areas of potential disagreement between doctors, staff, and family. Everyone has to work with the parents to open a space of freedom that is not limited by cultural and religious assumptions. The appropriation of medical anthropology concepts allows caregivers to understand simply the obligations imposed on parents by their culture and/or their religion and open access to their wishes. Sometimes help from interpreters, mediators, ethnopsychologists, and religious representatives is needed to understand this reality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Palliative care pathways of older patients].

    PubMed

    Zubieta, Lourdes; Hébert, Réjean; Raîche, Michel

    To determine the palliative care pathways of older patients in Sherbrooke, Qc by examining their transfers to other facilities. This analysis was conducted by linking 3 databases: emergency department, hospitalizations and nursing homes. The study period ranged from January 2011 to December 2015. SPSS was used for statistical analysis. The study only included palliative care patients. 25% of patients waited less than 7 days for transfer, and 74% waited less than 3 weeks. 64.9% of patients were transferred to a long-term facility for dependent adults (LTF), 15.2% returned home or were transferred to private accommodation, and 15.9% were transferred to an intermediate care facility. One-half of patients subsequently changed facility, mainly those in homes or intermediate care. Palliative care patient bed occupation rates represented 1% of available bed-days and less than 2% of total beds for 86.4% of days. Only 12% of patients returned to hospital within 90 days after discharge. The number of beds occupied by palliative care patients does not seem to disrupt the hospital capacity. The majority of the palliative care patients were well managed, as reflected by the low readmission rate. Our results indicate good management of transfers and an adequate supply of long-term care facilities and home services.

  3. [For the betterment of home palliative care].

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Iiduka, Masashi

    2010-12-01

    The problems we have identified to overcome for a betterment of home palliative care were as follows:(1) Staffs' low level of knowledge and a lack of interest in home care, (2) Lack of cooperation between hospital and clinic, (3) Hard to keep the medical and caregiver staffs employed in the home care settings and a technical training is behind, (4) Insufficient cooperative networks for elderly care and welfare in the region, and (5) Misunderstanding of home palliative care by patient, family and people in the region. It is important to solve these problems one by one for a betterment of home palliative care. In this paper, we reported these problems through actual activities of our hospital and Iwaki city, and we propose to deal with them.

  4. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  5. Timeliness of antenatal care for mothers of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal infants in an urban setting.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Penelope; Comino, Elizabeth; Forbes, Andrew; Webster, Vana; Knight, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    To compare the timing of first hospital antenatal care visit by mothers of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal infants, and to identify the risk and protective factors associated with timeliness of accessing care, mothers who delivered at Campbelltown hospital between October 2005 and November 2006 were surveyed on the maternity ward. This survey was linked to hospital administrative data. Gestational age at first visit to a hospital-based antenatal clinic was compared for mothers of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal infants. Risks and protective factors associated with timing of antenatal care were also examined using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Data on 1520 deliveries were included in this study. Mothers of Aboriginal infants presented slightly later to hospital-based antenatal clinics than mothers of non-Aboriginal infants (median 15.6 weeks versus 14.0 weeks). This difference did not remain after adjustment for all risk and protective factors. The three significant factors remaining were: maternal smoking; not in paid employment; and residence in a disadvantaged suburb. The results may reflect the complex associations that exist between the clustering of disadvantage among families of Aboriginal infants. A multifaceted approach is required to improve the timeliness of hospital-based antenatal care for the mothers of Aboriginal infants.

  6. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  7. Palliative Care in Iran: Moving Toward the Development of Palliative Care for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Sajjadi, Moosa

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is the third leading cause of death in Iran and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. Patients' quality of life is altered rather enormously due to cancer, which doubles the importance of and the need for providing palliative care in Iran. Although many steps have been taken toward the development and providing of palliative care in Iran, there is still a large gap between the status quo and the desirable state. This study presents the current state of palliative care for cancer patients and discusses the barriers, challenges and outlook of palliative care in Iran. If infrastructural projects that have recently been launched prove successful, proper advancement toward the providing of palliative care services in Iran will then not far on the horizon. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Compassion fatigue in pediatric palliative care providers.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Mary T

    2007-10-01

    The experience of compassion fatigue is an expected and common response to the professional task of routinely caring for children at the end of life. Symptoms of compassion fatigue often mimic trauma reactions. Implementing strategies that span personal, professional, and organizational domains can help protect health care providers from the damaging effects of compassion fatigue. Providing pediatric palliative care within a constructive and supportive team can help caregivers deal with the relational challenges of compassion fatigue. Finally, any consideration of the toll of providing pediatric palliative care must be balanced with a consideration of the parallel experience of compassion satisfaction.

  9. Hope, Symptoms, and Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Lagman, Ruth; Parala, Armida; Patel, Chirag; Sanford, Tanya; Fielding, Flannery; Brumbaugh, Anita; Gross, James; Rao, Archana; Majeed, Sumreen; Shinde, Shivani; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2017-04-01

    Hope is important to patients with cancer. Identifying factors that influence hope is important. Anxiety, depression, fatigue, and pain are reported to impair hope. The objective of this study was to determine whether age, gender, marital status, duration of cancer, symptoms, or symptom burden measured by the sum of severity scores on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) correlated with hope measured by the Herth Hope Index (HHI). Patients with advanced cancer in a palliative care unit participated. Demographics including age, gender, marital status, cancer site, and duration of cancer were collected. Individuals completed the ESAS and HHI. Spearman correlation and linear regression were used to assess associations adjusting for gender (male vs female), age (< 65 vs ≥ 65 years), marital status (married or living with a partner vs other), and duration of cancer (≤ 12 vs > 12 months). One hundred and ninety-seven were participated in the study, of which 55% were female with a mean age of 61 years (standard deviation 11). Hope was not associated with gender, age, marital status, or duration of cancer. In univariable analysis, hope inversely correlated with ESAS score (-0.28), lack of appetite (-0.22), shortness of breath (-0.17), depression (-0.39), anxiety (-0.32), and lack of well-being (-0.33); only depression was clinically relevant. In multivariable analysis, total symptom burden weakly correlated with hope; only depression remained clinically significant. This study found correlation between symptom burden and hope was not clinically relevant but was so for depression. Among 9 ESAS symptoms, only depression had a clinically relevant correlation with hope.

  10. Owning solutions: a collaborative model to improve quality in hospital care for Aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed

    Durey, Angela; Wynaden, Dianne; Thompson, Sandra C; Davidson, Patricia M; Bessarab, Dawn; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2012-06-01

    Well-documented health disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter referred to as Aboriginal) and non-Aboriginal Australians are underpinned by complex historical and social factors. The effects of colonisation including racism continue to impact negatively on Aboriginal health outcomes, despite being under-recognised and under-reported. Many Aboriginal people find hospitals unwelcoming and are reluctant to attend for diagnosis and treatment, particularly with few Aboriginal health professionals employed on these facilities. In this paper, scientific literature and reports on Aboriginal health-care, methodology and cross-cultural education are reviewed to inform a collaborative model of hospital-based organisational change. The paper proposes a collaborative model of care to improve health service delivery by building capacity in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal personnel by recruiting more Aboriginal health professionals, increasing knowledge and skills to establish good relationships between non-Aboriginal care providers and Aboriginal patients and their families, delivering quality care that is respectful of culture and improving Aboriginal health outcomes. A key element of model design, implementation and evaluation is critical reflection on barriers and facilitators to providing respectful and culturally safe quality care at systemic, interpersonal and patient/family-centred levels. Nurses are central to addressing the current state of inequity and are pivotal change agents within the proposed model. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Consultation with specialist palliative care services in palliative sedation: considerations of Dutch physicians.

    PubMed

    Koper, Ian; van der Heide, Agnes; Janssens, Rien; Swart, Siebe; Perez, Roberto; Rietjens, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Palliative sedation is considered a normal medical practice by the Royal Dutch Medical Association. Therefore, consultation of an expert is not considered mandatory. The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation, however, is more stringent: it considers the use of palliative sedation without consulting an expert as injudicious and insists on input from a multi-professional palliative care team. This study investigates the considerations of Dutch physicians concerning consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services. Fifty-four physicians were interviewed on their most recent case of palliative sedation. Reasons to consult were a lack of expertise and the view that consultation was generally supportive. Reasons not to consult were sufficient expertise, the view that palliative sedation is a normal medical procedure, time pressure, fear of disagreement with the service and regarding consultation as having little added value. Arguments in favour of mandatory consultation were that many physicians lack expertise and that palliative sedation is an exceptional intervention. Arguments against mandatory consultation were practical obstacles that may preclude fulfilling such an obligation (i.e. lack of time), palliative sedation being a standard medical procedure, corroding a physician's responsibility and deterring physicians from applying palliative sedation. Consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services is regarded as supportive and helpful when physicians lack expertise. However, Dutch physicians have both practical and theoretical objections against mandatory consultation. Based on the findings in this study, there seems to be little support among Dutch physicians for the EAPC recommendations on obligatory consultation.

  12. Palliative Care Enrichment in Geropsychology Fellowships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Gerald; Nelson, Barbara J.

    1996-01-01

    Interviews with 6 of 10 Veterans' Affairs programs offering postdoctoral fellowships in geropsychology indicated that only 30% included palliative care or hospice training, despite the fact that the veteran population is likely to have an increasing need for terminal illness care. (SK)

  13. Top 10 things palliative care clinicians wished everyone knew about palliative care.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Kamdar, Mihir M; Carey, Elise C

    2013-08-01

    With a focus on improving quality of life for patients, palliative care is a rapidly growing medical subspecialty focusing on the care of patients with serious illness. Basic symptom management, discussions of prognostic understanding, and eliciting treatment goals are essential pieces in the practice of nearly all physicians. Nonetheless, many complex patients with a serious, life-threatening illness benefit from consultation with palliative care specialists, who are trained and experienced in complex symptom management and challenging communication interactions, including medical decision making and aligning goals of care. This article discusses the changing role of modern palliative care, addresses common misconceptions, and presents an argument for early integration of palliative care in the treatment of patients dealing with serious illness. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Quality Imperative for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Arif H.; Hanson, Laura C.; Casarett, David J.; Dy, Sydney M.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Lupu, Dale; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Palliative medicine must prioritize the routine assessment of the quality of clinical care we provide. This includes regular assessment, analysis, and reporting of data on quality. Assessment of quality informs opportunities for improvement and demonstrates to our peers and ourselves the value of our efforts. In fact, continuous messaging of the value of palliative care services is needed to sustain our discipline; this requires regularly evaluating the quality of our care. As the reimbursement mechanisms for health care in the United States shift from fee-for-service to fee-for-value models, palliative care will be expected to report robust data on quality of care. We must move beyond demonstrating to our constituents (including patients and referrers), “here is what we do,” and increase the focus on “this is how well we do it” and “let’s see how we can do it better.” It is incumbent on palliative care professionals to lead these efforts. This involves developing standardized methods to collect data without adding additional burden, comparing and sharing our experiences to promote discipline-wide quality assessment and improvement initiatives, and demonstrating our intentions for quality improvement on the clinical frontline. PMID:25057987

  15. Nurses' perceptions of hospice palliative care volunteers.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Hastings, Emily; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A total of 50 nurses (hospital and home care) responded to a survey designed to measure: (1) their attitudes toward, and knowledge of, hospice palliative care volunteers; (2) the types of tasks they felt it was appropriate for volunteers to perform; and (3) how valuable they felt different members of the hospice palliative care team are. In addition, they were asked to respond to some open-ended questions (eg, "Do you feel that it is appropriate for hospice palliative care volunteers to know patient medical information?"). The nurses' responses to the "Attitude/Knowledge" part of the survey revealed that they generally held positive attitudes toward volunteers. The majority of the nurses felt that it was appropriate for volunteers to perform most of the tasks listed, except for hands-on patient care. Nurses rated the value of nurses, family members, doctors, and pharmacists significantly higher than volunteers. Fifty-three percent of the nurses felt that volunteers should know patient medical information, and 77% thought that volunteers should have the opportunity to provide input regarding patient care. Also, 75% of the nurses felt that volunteers made their jobs easier, and 56% felt that volunteers should be included in team meetings. When asked to list the topics covered in a hospice palliative care volunteer training program, 73% of the nurses indicated that they were not sure or did not know what topics were covered, indicating a lack of knowledge regarding volunteer training.

  16. Palliative care nurses' views on euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Verpoort, Charlotte; Gastmans, Chris; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2004-09-01

    In debates on euthanasia legalization in Belgium, the voices of nurses were scarcely heard. Yet studies have shown that nurses are involved in the caring process surrounding euthanasia. Consequently, they are in a position to offer valuable ideas about this problem. For this reason, the views of these nurses are important because of their palliative expertise and their daily confrontation with dying patients. The aim of this paper is to report a study of the views of palliative care nurses about euthanasia. A grounded theory approach was chosen, and interviews were carried out with a convenience sample of 12 palliative care nurses in Flanders (Belgium). The data were collected between December 2001 and April 2002. The majority of the nurses were not a priori for or against euthanasia, and their views were largely dependent on the situation. What counted was the degree of suffering and available palliative options. Depending on the situation, we noted both resistance and acceptance towards euthanasia. The underlying arguments for resistance included respect for life and belief in the capabilities of palliative care; arguments underlying acceptance included the quality of life and respect for patient autonomy. The nurses commented that working in palliative care had a considerable influence on one's opinion about euthanasia. In light of the worldwide debate on euthanasia, it is essential to know how nurses, who are confronted with terminally ill patients every day, think about it. Knowledge of these views can also contribute to a realistic and qualified view on euthanasia itself. This can be enlightening to the personal views of caregivers working in a diverse range of care settings.

  17. An Innovative Role for Faith Community Nursing: Palliative Care Ministry.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Judy C

    Although the specialty of palliative nursing and palliative care continues to grow in hospital and outpatient settings, a paucity of home-based palliative services remains. This article discusses a new paradigm of faith-based palliative care ministry using faith community nurses (FCNs). Under the leadership of a palliative care doula (a nurse expert in palliative care), nurses in the faith community can offer critical support to those with serious illness. Models such as this provide stimulating content for FCN practice and opportunity to broaden health ministry within faith communities.

  18. Aboriginal experiences of cancer and care coordination: Lessons from the Cancer Data and Aboriginal Disparities (CanDAD) narratives.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Rachel; Micklem, Jasmine; Yerrell, Paul; Banham, David; Morey, Kim; Stajic, Janet; Eckert, Marion; Lawrence, Monica; Stewart, Harold B; Brown, Alex

    2018-04-24

    Aboriginal people with cancer experience worse outcomes than other Australians for a range of complex and interrelated reasons. A younger age at diagnosis, higher likelihood of more advanced cancer or cancer type with poorer prognosis, geographic isolation and cultural and language diversity mean that patient pathways are potentially more complex for Aboriginal people with cancer. In addition, variation in the quality and acceptability of care may influence cancer outcomes. This study sought to understand how care coordination influences Aboriginal people's experiences of cancer treatment. Interviews with 29 Aboriginal patients or cancer survivors, 11 carers and 22 service providers were carried out. Interviews were semi-structured and sought to elicit experiences of cancer and the health-care system. The manifest content of the cancer narratives was entered onto a cancer pathway mapping tool and underlying themes were identified inductively. The practice of cancer care coordination was found to address the needs of Aboriginal patients and their families/carers in 4 main areas: "navigating the health system"; "information and communication"; "things to manage at home"; and "cultural safety". The CanDAD findings indicate that, when the need for cancer care coordination is met, it facilitated continuity of care in a range of ways that may potentially improve cancer outcomes. However, the need remains unmet for many. Findings support the importance of dedicated care coordination to enable Aboriginal people to receive adequate and appropriate patient-centred care, so that the unacceptable disparity in cancer outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people can be addressed. © 2018 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Palliative care in Japan: a review focusing on care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    Providing palliative care in Japan is one of the most important health issues. Understanding palliative care delivery systems of other countries is useful when developing and modifying palliative care systems worldwide. This review summarizes the current status of palliative care in Japan, focusing on the structure and process development. Palliative care units and hospital palliative care consultation teams are the two main specialized palliative care services in Japan. The number of palliative care units is 215 (involved in 8.4% of all cancer deaths), and there are approximately 500 hospital palliative care teams. Conversely, specialized home care services are one of the most undeveloped areas in Japan. However, the government has been trying to develop more efficient home care services through modifying laws, healthcare systems, and multiple educational and cooperative projects. The numbers of palliative care specialists are increasing across all disciplines: cancer pain nurses (1365), palliative care nurses (1100), palliative care physicians (646), and palliative care pharmacists (238). Postgraduate education for physicians is performed via the special nationwide efforts of the Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education (PEACE) project - a 2-day program adopting a trainer-trainee strategy. Over 30,000 physicians have participated in the PEACE program. A total of 1298 and 544 physicians have completed a trainer course for palliative medicine and psycho-oncology, respectively. Multiple structure and process evaluation, bereaved family surveys in palliative care units, and patient and family evaluation in the regional palliative care program indicate many improvements. Palliative care in Japan has progressed rapidly, and the Cancer Control Act has played a very important role in developing palliative medicine. Challenges include developing a structure for palliative care in the community or regional

  20. The diverse landscape of palliative care clinics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander K; Thai, Julie N; Bakitas, Marie A; Meier, Diane E; Spragens, Lynn H; Temel, Jennifer S; Weissman, David E; Rabow, Michael W

    2013-06-01

    Many health care organizations are interested in instituting a palliative care clinic. However, there are insufficient published data regarding existing practices to inform the development of new programs. Our objective was to obtain in-depth information about palliative care clinics. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 20 outpatient palliative care practices in diverse care settings. The survey included both closed- and open-ended questions regarding practice size, utilization of services, staffing, referrals, services offered, funding, impetus for starting, and challenges. Twenty of 21 (95%) practices responded. Practices self-identified as: hospital-based (n=7), within an oncology division/cancer center (n=5), part of an integrated health system (n=6), and hospice-based (n=2). The majority of referred patients had a cancer diagnosis. Additional common diagnoses included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, neurologic disorders, and congestive heart failure. All practices ranked "pain management" and "determining goals of care" as the most common reasons for referrals. Twelve practices staffed fewer than 5 half-days of clinic per week, with 7 operating only one half-day per week. Practices were staffed by a mixture of physicians, advanced practice nurses or nurse practitioners, nurses, or social workers. Eighteen practices expected their practice to grow within the next year. Eleven practices noted a staffing shortage and 8 had a wait time of a week or more for a new patient appointment. Only 12 practices provide 24/7 coverage. Billing and institutional support were the most common funding sources. Most practices described starting because inpatient palliative providers perceived poor quality outpatient care in the outpatient setting. The most common challenges included: funding for staffing (11) and being overwhelmed with referrals (8). Once established, outpatient palliative care practices anticipate rapid growth. In this context, outpatient practices

  1. Five policies to promote palliative care for patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Meier, Diane E

    2013-10-01

    Patients with ESRD experience complex and costly care that does not always meet their needs. Palliative care, which focuses on improving quality of life and relieving suffering for patients with serious illnesses, could address a large unmet need among patients with ESRD. Strengthening palliative care is a top policy priority for health reform efforts based on strong evidence that palliative care improves value. This commentary outlines palliative care policies for patients with ESRD and is directed at policymakers, dialysis providers, nephrology professional societies, accreditation organizations, and funding agencies who play a key role in the delivery and determination of quality of ESRD care. Herein we suggest policies to promote palliative care for patients with ESRD by addressing key barriers, including the lack of access to palliative care, lack of capacity to deliver palliative care, and a limited evidence base. We also provide examples of how these policies could be implemented within the existing ESRD care infrastructure.

  2. Palliative care in Argentina: perspectives from a country in crisis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Gustavo G

    2003-01-01

    Argentina is a large South American country with a high prevalence of chronic disease-related mortality and a clear need for implementation of palliative care. Primary concerns related to palliative care are cultural, socio-economic and educational. Increasing poverty, patients and families receiving inadequate information about their diagnosis or prognosis, drug availability and costs, and insufficient knowledge by health care providers are obstacles to palliative care. Palliative care programs are developing throughout the country and methods by which they are meeting their needs are described. Several Argentinean palliative care initiatives are described and the role of the Pallium Latinomérica training program is discussed.

  3. Using Skype to support palliative care surveillance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how a novel yet important tool can facilitate family involvement in person-centred care, despite geographical distance. The author presents a case study as an in-depth example of the use of Skype in the context of palliative care at home. Skype enhanced family surveillance and symptom management, augmented shared decision making, provided a space for virtual bedside vigil, and ultimately provided the rapport necessary for optimal end of life care.

  4. Implementing a working together model for Aboriginal patients with acute coronary syndrome: an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working together to improve hospital care.

    PubMed

    Daws, Karen; Punch, Amanda; Winters, Michelle; Posenelli, Sonia; Willis, John; MacIsaac, Andrew; Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) contributes to the disparity in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Improving hospital care for Aboriginal patients has been identified as a means of addressing this disparity. This project developed and implemented a working together model of care, comprising an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse, providing care coordination specifically directed at improving attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services for Aboriginal Australians in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbourne. A quality improvement framework using a retrospective case notes audit evaluated Aboriginal patients' admissions to hospital and identified low attendance rates at cardiac rehabilitation services. A working together model of care coordination by an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse was implemented to improve cardiac rehabilitation attendance in Aboriginal patients admitted with ACS to the cardiac wards of the hospital. A retrospective medical records audit showed that there were 68 Aboriginal patients admitted to the cardiac wards with ACS from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011. A referral to cardiac rehabilitation was recorded for 42% of these. During the implementation of the model of care, 13 of 15 patients (86%) received a referral to cardiac rehabilitation and eight of the 13 (62%) attended. Implementation of the working together model demonstrated improved referral to and attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services, thereby, has potential to prevent complications and mortality. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC?: Aboriginal Australians experience disparities in access to recommended care for acute coronary syndrome. This may contribute to the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD?: This paper describes a model of care involving an Aboriginal Hospital Liaisons Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working

  5. Provision of Palliative Care Services by Family Physicians Is Common.

    PubMed

    Ankuda, Claire K; Jetty, Anuradha; Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Provision of palliative care services by primary care physicians is increasingly important with an aging population, but it is unknown whether US primary care physicians see themselves as palliative practitioners. This study used cross-sectional analysis of data from the 2013 American Board of Family Medicine Maintenance of Certification Demographic Survey. Of 10,894 family physicians, 33.1% (n = 3609) report providing palliative care. Those providing palliative care are significantly more likely to provide non-clinic-based services such as care in nursing homes, home visits, and hospice. Controlling for other characteristics, physicians reporting palliative care provision are significantly ( P < .05) more likely to be older, white, male, rural, and practicing in a patient-centered medical home. One third of family physicians recertifying in 2013 reported providing palliative care, with physician and practice characteristics driving reporting palliative care provision. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Palliative Care Leadership Centers Are Key To The Diffusion Of Palliative Care Innovation.

    PubMed

    Cassel, J Brian; Bowman, Brynn; Rogers, Maggie; Spragens, Lynn H; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    Between 2000 and 2015 the proportion of US hospitals with more than fifty beds that had palliative care programs tripled, from 25 percent to 75 percent. The rapid adoption of this high-value program, which is voluntary and runs counter to the dominant culture in US hospitals, was catalyzed by tens of millions of dollars in philanthropic support for innovation, dissemination, and professionalization in the palliative care field. We describe the dissemination strategies of the Center to Advance Palliative Care in the context of the principles of social entrepreneurship, and we provide an in-depth look at its hallmark training initiative, Palliative Care Leadership Centers. Over 1,240 hospital palliative care teams have trained at the Leadership Centers to date, with 80 percent of them instituting palliative care services within two years. We conclude with lessons learned about the role of purposeful technical assistance in promoting the rapid diffusion of high-value health care innovation.

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... can care start? • Receive services, like art or music therapy • Find ways to relax and play Palliative ... Nurses • Child life specialists • Respite providers • Art and music therapists • Chaplains • Case managers • Counselors • Home health aides • ...

  8. Distress, Stress and Solidarity in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deMontigny, Johanne

    1993-01-01

    Notes that role of psychologist on palliative care unit is to be there for terminally ill, their friends, and their families, both during the dying and the bereavement and for the caregiver team. Focuses on work of decoding ordinary words which for many patients hide painful past. Stresses necessity to remain open to unexpected. (Author/NB)

  9. Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association: integrating palliative care in public hospitals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zipporah

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya, cancers as a disease group rank third as a cause of death after infectious and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is about 37,000 new cases with an annual mortality of 28,000 cases (Kenya National Cancer Control Strategy 2010). The incidence of non-communicable diseases accounts for more than 50% of total hospital admissions and over 55% of hospital deaths (Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non Communicable Diseases 2015-2020). The prevalence of HIV is 6.8 (KIAS 2014). Most of these patients will benefit from palliative care services, hence the need to integrate palliative care services in the public healthcare system. The process of integrating palliative care in public hospitals involved advocacy both at the national level and at the institutional level, training of healthcare professionals, and setting up services within the hospitals that we worked with. Technical support was provided to each individual institution as needed. Eleven provincial hospitals across the country have now integrated palliative care services (Palliative Care Units) and are now centres of excellence. Over 220 healthcare providers have been trained, and approximately, over 30,000 patients have benefited from these services. Oral morphine is now available in the hospital palliative care units. As a success of the pilot project, Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) is now working with the Ministry of Health Kenya to integrate palliative care services in 30 other county hospitals across the country, thus ensuring more availability and access to more patients. Other developing countries can learn from Kenya's successful experience.

  10. The Attitudes of Indian Palliative-care Nurses and Physicians to Pain Control and Palliative Sedation.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Joris; Gupta, Harmala; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; den Branden, Stef Van; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians' attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem, provided the pain killers are properly titrated. Mild palliative sedation was considered acceptable. The interviewees disagreed whether palliative sedation can also be deep and continuous. Arguments mentioned against deep continuous palliative sedation were the conviction that it may cause unacceptable side effects, and impedes basic daily activities and social contacts. A few interviewees said that palliative sedation may hasten death. Due to fears and doubts regarding deep continuous palliative sedation, it may sometimes be too easily discarded as a treatment option for refractory symptoms.

  11. The Attitudes of Indian Palliative-care Nurses and Physicians to Pain Control and Palliative Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Gielen, Joris; Gupta, Harmala; Rajvanshi, Ambika; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; den Branden, Stef Van; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We wanted to assess Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians’ attitudes toward pain control and palliative sedation. Materials and Methods: From May to September 2008, we interviewed 14 physicians and 13 nurses working in different palliative-care programs in New Delhi, using a semi-structured questionnaire, and following grounded-theory methodology (Glaser and Strauss). Results: The interviewees did not consider administration of painkillers in large doses an ethical problem, provided the pain killers are properly titrated. Mild palliative sedation was considered acceptable. The interviewees disagreed whether palliative sedation can also be deep and continuous. Arguments mentioned against deep continuous palliative sedation were the conviction that it may cause unacceptable side effects, and impedes basic daily activities and social contacts. A few interviewees said that palliative sedation may hasten death. Conclusion: Due to fears and doubts regarding deep continuous palliative sedation, it may sometimes be too easily discarded as a treatment option for refractory symptoms. PMID:21633619

  12. Palliative Care in Advanced Cancer Patients: How and When?

    PubMed Central

    Yennurajalingam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Cancer patients develop severe physical and psychological symptoms as a result of their disease and treatment. Their families commonly suffer great emotional distress as a result of caregiving. Early palliative care access can improve symptom control and quality of life and reduce the cost of care. Preliminary results show that early palliative care access can also extend survival. Unfortunately, only a minority of cancer centers in the U.S. have the two most important resources for palliative care delivery: outpatient palliative care centers and inpatient palliative care units. In this article, we use a case presentation to discuss the impact of early palliative care access in light of the currently available evidence, and we recommend ways to improve early access to palliative care through education and research. PMID:22252934

  13. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    2017-01-01

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care delivery, the roles that nurses have in working with interdisciplinary teams to integrate a palliative approach, and the need for practice supports to facilitate that embedding and integration. PMID:27930401

  14. Community Pharmacists' Attitudes Toward Palliative Care: An Australian Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Lauren Y.; Tuffin, Penelope H.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pharmacists are among the most accessible health care professionals in the community, yet are often not involved in community palliative care teams. Objective: We investigated community pharmacists' attitudes, beliefs, feelings, and knowledge about palliative care as a first step towards determining how best to facilitate the inclusion of community pharmacists on the palliative care team. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Subjects: Community pharmacists around Australia were invited to participate; 250 completed surveys were returned. Measurements: A survey was constructed to measure pharmacists' knowledge and experience, emotions and beliefs about palliative care. Results: Pharmacists were generally positive about providing services and supports for palliative care patients, yet they also reported negative beliefs and emotions about palliative care. In addition, pharmacists had good knowledge of some aspects of palliative care, but misconceptions about other aspects. Pharmacists' beliefs and knowledge about palliative care predicted—and therefore underpinned—a positive attitude towards palliative care and the provision of services and supports for palliative care patients. Conclusion: The results provide evidence that pharmacists need training and support to facilitate their involvement in providing services and supports for palliative care patients, and highlight areas that training and support initiatives should focus on. PMID:24147876

  15. Community pharmacists' attitudes toward palliative care: an Australian nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Moira; Hewitt, Lauren Y; Tuffin, Penelope H R

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacists are among the most accessible health care professionals in the community, yet are often not involved in community palliative care teams. We investigated community pharmacists' attitudes, beliefs, feelings, and knowledge about palliative care as a first step towards determining how best to facilitate the inclusion of community pharmacists on the palliative care team. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Community pharmacists around Australia were invited to participate; 250 completed surveys were returned. A survey was constructed to measure pharmacists' knowledge and experience, emotions and beliefs about palliative care. Pharmacists were generally positive about providing services and supports for palliative care patients, yet they also reported negative beliefs and emotions about palliative care. In addition, pharmacists had good knowledge of some aspects of palliative care, but misconceptions about other aspects. Pharmacists' beliefs and knowledge about palliative care predicted--and therefore underpinned--a positive attitude towards palliative care and the provision of services and supports for palliative care patients. The results provide evidence that pharmacists need training and support to facilitate their involvement in providing services and supports for palliative care patients, and highlight areas that training and support initiatives should focus on.

  16. Developing a costing framework for palliative care services.

    PubMed

    Mosoiu, Daniela; Dumitrescu, Malina; Connor, Stephen R

    2014-10-01

    Palliative care services have been reported to be a less expensive alternative to traditional treatment; however, little is known about how to measure the cost of delivering quality palliative care. The purpose of this project was to develop a standardized method for measuring the cost of palliative care delivery that could potentially be replicated in multiple settings. The project was implemented in three stages. First, an interdisciplinary group of palliative care experts identified standards of quality palliative care delivery in the inpatient and home care services. Surveys were conducted of government agencies and palliative care providers to identify payment practices and budgets for palliative care services. In the second phase, unit costs were defined and a costing framework was designed to measure inpatient and home-based palliative care unit costs. The final phase was advocacy for inclusion of calculated costs into the national funding system. In this project, a reliable framework for determining the cost of inpatient and home-based palliative care services was developed. Inpatient palliative care cost in Romania was calculated at $96.58 per day. Home-based palliative care was calculated at $30.37 per visit, $723.60 per month, and $1367.71 per episode of care, which averaged 45 visits. A standardized methodology and framework for costing palliative care are presented. The framework allows a country or provider of care to substitute their own local costs to generate cost information relevant to the health-care system. In Romania, this allowed the palliative care provider community to advocate for a consistent payment system. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrative Approaches in Pediatric Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Shafto, Kate; Gouda, Suzanne; Catrine, Kris; Brown, Melanie L

    2018-06-13

    Pediatric palliative care is a field which focuses on caring for and treating the symptoms and distress typically associated with life-limiting illness. Integrative medicine is supported by evidence and aims to heal the whole person, including all aspects of one’s lifestyle. Therapies offered by integrative medicine often empower patients and families, allowing for a sense of control. This review addresses the merging of integrative medicine philosophy and modalities with the care given to children with life-limiting illness. We review an introduction to integrative medicine, trends in its incorporation in the healthcare setting, application to patients receiving palliative care and the management of specific symptoms. A case study is offered to illustrate these principles.

  18. The potential of palliative care for patients with respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Narsavage, Georgia L.; Chen, Yea-Jyh; Korn, Bettina; Elk, Ronit

    2017-01-01

    Based on the demonstrated effectiveness of palliative care in the alleviation of symptoms and enhancement of life quality, it is important to incorporate palliative care early in the respiratory disease trajectory. Quality palliative care addresses eight domains that are all patient and family centred. Palliative care interventions in respiratory conditions include management of symptoms such as dyspnoea, cough, haemoptysis, sputum production, fatigue and respiratory secretion management, especially as the end-of-life nears. A practical checklist of activities based on the domains of palliative care can assist clinicians to integrate palliative care into their practice. Clinical management of patients receiving palliative care requires consideration of human factors and related organisational characteristics that involve cultural, educational and motivational aspects of the patient/family and clinicians. Educational aims To explain the basic domains of palliative care applicable to chronic respiratory diseases. To review palliative care interventions for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. To outline a checklist for clinicians to use in practice, based on the domains of palliative care. To propose recommendations for clinical management of patients receiving palliative care for chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:29209422

  19. Enhancing palliative care delivery in a regional community in Australia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jane L; Davidson, Patricia M; Jackson, Debra; Kristjanson, Linda; Bennett, Margaret L; Daly, John

    2006-08-01

    Although access to palliative care is a fundamental right for people in Australia and is endorsed by government policy, there is often limited access to specialist palliative care services in regional, rural and remote areas. This article appraises the evidence pertaining to palliative care service delivery to inform a sustainable model of palliative care that meets the needs of a regional population on the mid-north coast of New South Wales. Expert consultation and an eclectic literature review were undertaken to develop a model of palliative care service delivery appropriate to the needs of the target population and resources of the local community. On the basis of this review, a local palliative care system that is based on a population-based approach to service planning and delivery, with formalized integrated network agreements and role delineation between specialist and generalist providers, has the greatest potential to meet the palliative care needs of this regional coastal community.

  20. Qualitative Research in Palliative Care: Applications to Clinical Trials Work.

    PubMed

    Lim, Christopher T; Tadmor, Avia; Fujisawa, Daisuke; MacDonald, James J; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin; Jackson, Vicki A; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; Hagan, Teresa; Park, Elyse R

    2017-08-01

    While vast opportunities for using qualitative methods exist within palliative care research, few studies provide practical advice for researchers and clinicians as a roadmap to identify and utilize such opportunities. To provide palliative care clinicians and researchers descriptions of qualitative methodology applied to innovative research questions relative to palliative care research and define basic concepts in qualitative research. Body: We describe three qualitative projects as exemplars to describe major concepts in qualitative analysis of early palliative care: (1) a descriptive analysis of clinician documentation in the electronic health record, (2) a thematic content analysis of palliative care clinician focus groups, and (3) a framework analysis of audio-recorded encounters between patients and clinicians as part of a clinical trial. This study provides a foundation for undertaking qualitative research within palliative care and serves as a framework for use by other palliative care researchers interested in qualitative methodologies.

  1. Strategies for Introducing Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care in Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-09-01

    Concern that patients will react negatively to the idea of palliative care is cited as a barrier to timely referral. Strategies to successfully introduce specialty palliative care to patients have not been well described. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists introduce outpatient specialty palliative care. We conducted a national qualitative interview study at six geographically diverse academic cancer centers with well-established palliative care clinics between September 2015 and March 2016. Thirty-four gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focusing on attitudes, experiences, and practices related to outpatient palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop and refine a coding framework. This analysis focuses on practices for introducing palliative care. Mean participant age was 47 years (standard deviation, 10 years). Mean interview length was 25 minutes (standard deviation, 7 minutes). Gynecologic oncologists described the following three main strategies for introducing outpatient specialty palliative care: focus initial palliative care referral on symptom management to dissociate palliative care from end-of-life care and facilitate early relationship building with palliative care clinicians; use a strong physician-patient relationship and patient trust to increase acceptance of referral; and explain and normalize palliative care referral to address negative associations and decrease patient fear of abandonment. These strategies aim to decrease negative patient associations and encourage acceptance of early referral to palliative care specialists. Gynecologic oncologists have developed strategies for introducing palliative care services to alleviate patient concerns. These strategies provide groundwork for developing system-wide best practice approaches to the presentation of palliative care referral.

  2. Flemish palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; Van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2012-09-01

    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated patient and considered it generally better not to administer artificial floods or fluids to such a patient. Two clusters were found: 58.5% belonged to the cluster of advocates of deep and continuous sedation and 41.5% belonged to the cluster of nurses restricting the application of deep and continuous sedation. These differences notwithstanding, overall the attitudes of the nurses are in accordance with the practice and policy of palliative sedation in Flemish palliative-care units.

  3. Improving forensic mental health care for Aboriginal Australians: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Durey, Angela; Wynaden, Dianne; Barr, Lesley; Ali, Mohammed

    2014-06-01

    Mental illnesses constitute a major burden of disease in Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders (hereafter Aboriginal Australians), who are also overrepresented in the prison system. A legacy of colonization compounds such prevalence, and is further exacerbated by the persistence of racial discrimination and insensitivity across many sectors, including health. This research completed in a Western Australian forensic mental health setting identifies non-Aboriginal health professionals' support needs to deliver high-quality, culturally-safe care to Aboriginal patients. Data were collected from health professionals using an online survey and 10 semistructured interviews. Survey and interview results found that ongoing education was needed for staff to provide culturally-safe care, where Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values were respected. The findings also support previous research linking Aboriginal health providers to improved health outcomes for Aboriginal patients. In a colonized country, such as Australia, education programmes that critically reflect on power relations privileging white Anglo-Australian cultural dominance and subjugating Aboriginal knowledge, beliefs, and values are important to identify factors promoting or compromising the care of Aboriginal patients and developing a deeper understanding of 'cultural safety' and its clinical application. Organizational commitment is needed to translate the findings to support non-Aboriginal health professionals deliver high-quality care to Aboriginal patients that is respectful of cultural differences. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  4. Providing pediatric palliative care: PACT in action.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Janet; Spengler, Emily; Wolfe, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    High-quality pediatric palliative care should be an expected standard in the United States, especially since the publication of the numerous position statements such as "Precepts of Palliative Care for Children and Adolescents and Their Families," a joint statement created by the Association of Pediatric Oncology Nurses, the National Association of Neonatal Nurses, and the Society of Pediatric Nurses. Although many barriers still exist, dedicated individuals and teams strive to promote models of excellence and improve care for children with life-threatening conditions and their families. The Pediatric Advanced Care Team, a joint project of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Children's Hospital, Boston, is one such interdisciplinary pediatric palliative care consultation service. Founded in 1997, we have grown and learned from formal study and our extensive clinical work with families, children, and our colleagues. This article describes our journey as an interdisciplinary team forging a new service within two renowned medical institutions in which historically the primary emphasis of care has been on cure and innovation. Although these values remain, our work has resulted in an increased acceptance of balancing treatment of the underlying disease or condition along with treatment of the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of the child and family through life or death. One of our goals is to help promote a balance of hope for cure with hope for comfort, dignity, and integrity for every child and family.

  5. Community Palliative Care Nurses' Challenges and Coping Strategies on Delivering Home-Based Pediatric Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Chong, LeeAi; Abdullah, Adina

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the experience of community palliative care nurses providing home care to children. A qualitative study was conducted at the 3 community palliative care provider organizations in greater Kuala Lumpur from August to October 2014. Data were collected with semistructured interviews with 16 nurses who have provided care to children and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Two categories were identified: (1) challenges nurses faced and (2) coping strategies. The themes identified from the categories are (1) communication challenges, (2) inadequate training and knowledge, (3) personal suffering, (4) challenges of the system, (5) intrapersonal coping skills, (6) interpersonal coping strategies, and (7) systemic supports. These results reinforces the need for integration of pediatric palliative care teaching and communication skills training into all undergraduate health care programs. Provider organizational support to meet the specific needs of the nurses in the community can help retain them in their role. It will also be important to develop standards for current and new palliative care services to ensure delivery of quality pediatric palliative care.

  6. Concordance in the Assessment of Effectiveness of Palliative Care between Patients and Palliative Care Nurses in Malaysia: A Study with the Palliative Care Outcome Scale

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Kwee Choy; Gupta, Esha Das; Poovaneswaran, Sangeetha; Then, Siaw Ling; Teo, Michelle Jia Jui; Gan, Teik Yiap; Thing, Joanne Hwei Yean

    2017-01-01

    Context: The Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS) is an easy-to-use assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of palliative care. There is no published literature on the use of POS as an assessment tool in Malaysia. Aim: To define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients with advanced cancers and their palliative care nurses using a Malay version of the POS. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the palliative care unit of the Hospital Tuanku Ja'afar Seremban, Malaysia, from February 2014 to June 2014. Subjects and Methods: We adapted and validated the English version of the 3-day recall POS into Malay and used it to define the concordance in the assessment of quality of life between patients and palliative care nurses. Forty patients with advanced stage cancers and forty palliative care nurses completed the Malay POS questionnaire. Statistical Analysis Used: The kappa statistical test was used to assess the agreement between patients and their palliative care nurses. Results: Slight to fair concordance was found in all items, except for one item (family anxiety) where there was no agreement. Conclusions: The Malay version of the POS was well accepted and reliable as an assessment tool for evaluation of the effectiveness of palliative care in Malaysia. Slight to fair concordance was shown between the patients and their palliative care nurses, suggesting the needs for more training of the nurses. PMID:28216862

  7. The Palliative Care Chaplain as Story Catcher.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rhonda S

    2018-01-01

    The role of the professional chaplain on the palliative care team in the health care setting formalizes the concern for the emotional, spiritual, and social well-being of the care recipients and their caregivers. The chaplain also has a peculiar role on the team, in that her most fundamental task is her intentional listening-and-hearing of the other person's story. One palliative chaplain introduces herself as a Story Catcher to care recipients, in an effort both to overcome the resistance some may have to her presence on the team and communicate her essential role and intent in providing spiritual care. This self-appointed sobriquet resonates with the author's embrace of the theory and practice of the late theologian, educator, and civil rights activist Nelle Morton, who coined the phrase "hearing into speech" to describe the process by which another person, through being truly heard and entering into a relationship with the hearer, claims her/his own truth, hope, and identity in the face of adversity. The chaplain as Story Catcher functions as the agent of healing and hope for those who choose to tell their stories and are heard, as they resist their illness and death rather than submit to its indignity. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care and factors that sustain their interest in palliative care. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The analysis strategy used a phenomenological approach and occurred concurrently rather than sequentially. All interview transcriptions were read independently by the researchers, who then compared and combined their analyses. Final analysis involved examining all interviews collectively, thus permitting relationships between and among central themes to emerge. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: The overriding theme was a common philosophy of palliative care focusing on acceptance of death, whole person care, compassion, communication, and teamwork. Participants' philosophies were shaped by their education and by professional and personal experiences. In addition, participants articulated personal and systemic factors currently affecting their practice of palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: Participants observed that primary care physicians should be responsible for their patients' palliative care within the context of interdisciplinary teams. For medical students to be knowledgeable and sensitive to the needs of dying patients, palliative care should be given higher priority in the curriculum. Finally, participants argued compellingly for transferring the philosophy of palliative care to the overall practice of medicine. PMID:9612588

  9. Inpatient Palliative Care Consultation and 30-Day Readmissions in Oncology.

    PubMed

    DiMartino, Lisa D; Weiner, Bryan J; Hanson, Laura C; Weinberger, Morris; Birken, Sarah A; Reeder-Hayes, Katherine; Trogdon, Justin G

    2018-01-01

    Prior research indicates that hospice and palliative care delivered in outpatient settings are associated with reduced hospital readmissions for cancer patients. However, little is known about how inpatient palliative care affects readmissions in oncology. To examine associations among inpatient palliative care consultation, hospice use (discharge), and 30-day readmissions among patients with solid tumor cancers. We identified all live discharges from a large tertiary cancer hospital between 2010 and 2016. Palliative care consult data were abstracted from medical charts and linked to hospital encounter data. Propensity scores were used to match palliative care consult to usual care encounters. Modified Poisson regression models estimated adjusted relative risk (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 30-day readmissions and hospice discharge. We compared predicted probabilities of readmission for palliative care consultation with hospice discharge, without hospice discharge, and usual care. Of 8085 eligible encounters, 753 involved a palliative care consult. The likelihood of having a 30-day readmission did not differ between palliative care consult and usual care groups (p > 0.05). However, the palliative care consult group was more likely than usual care to have a hospice discharge (aRR = 4.09, 95% CI: 3.07-5.44). The predicted probability of 30-day readmission was lower when palliative care consultation was combined with hospice discharge compared to usual care or consultation with discharge to nonhospice postacute care (p < 0.001). The effect of inpatient palliative care on readmissions in oncology is largely driven by hospice enrollment. Strategies that combine palliative care consultation with hospice discharge may decrease hospital readmissions and improve cancer care quality.

  10. Supportive and palliative care of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Salman; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2007-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. An estimated 32,300 patients will die of pancreatic cancer in year 2006. It is the tenth most common malignancy in the United States. Despite recent advances in pathology, molecular basis and treatment, the overall survival rate remains 4% for all stages and races. Palliative care represents an important aspect of care in patient with pancreatic malignancy. Identifying and treating disease related symptomology are priorities. As a physician taking care of these patients it is essential to know these symptoms and treatment modalities. This review discusses symptom management and supportive care strategies. Common problems include pain, intestinal obstruction, biliary obstruction, pancreatic insufficiency, anorexia-cachexia and depression. Success is needed in managing these symptoms to palliate patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is a model illness to learn the palliative and supportive management in cancer patient. It is important for oncologists to recognize the importance of control measures and supportive measures that can minimize the symptoms of advanced disease and side effects of cancer treatment.

  11. [Pain Management in Palliative Care].

    PubMed

    Steins, Martin B; Eschbach, Corinna; Villalobos, Matthias; Thomas, Michael

    2017-05-01

    A consistent pain management together with treatment of dyspnoea belongs to the main issues in symptom control in particular in palliative thoracic oncology. Together with the medicamentous therapy the psychologic and social circumstances of the affected patients have to be considered as factors influencing the experience of pain. The therapeutic fundament according to the WHO guideline for cancer pain is the opiate based medicamentous adjustment combined with non-opioids. In principle, this should be performed preferably orally, as simply as possible, according to a fix drug schedule and individually adjusted to the needed dosage. Breakthrough pain has to be treated with rapidly efficacious, non-retarded analgetics. The typical adverse reaction profile for opiates like constipation and initial nausea should be considered prophylactically by applying concurrent medication with adjuvants. Co-analgesic drugs like anticonvulsiva or corticosteroids could support the analgetic effect and are used preferably in case of neuropathic pain. Primary aim in analgesic therapy is to achieve the best possible pain reduction and hence to safeguard quality of life. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Aromatherapy and massage in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Susie

    1995-01-02

    Aromatherapy and massage have gained wide popularity among nurses in clinical practice in recent years. Many nurses in palliative care settings are using these therapies with the assumption that they improve patients' quality of life, but no research has yet investigated their effectiveness. A study was set up to assess the effects of massage and aromatherapy massage on cancer patients receiving palliative care. Patients received three full body massages over a 3-week period, with or without the essential oil Roman Chamomile. The measurements used were the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Post-test scores for all patients improved. These were statistically significant in the aromatherapy group on the RSCL physical symptom subscale, quality of life subscale and state anxiety scale. Responses to the post-therapy questionnaire indicate that patients consider the massage or aromatherapy to be beneficial in reducing anxiety, tension, pain and depression.

  13. Cultural safety and midwifery care for Aboriginal women - A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angela E; Middleton, Philippa F; Fereday, Jennifer A; Pincombe, Jan I

    2016-04-01

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander(1) women face considerable health disparity in relation to their maternity health outcomes when compared to non-Aboriginal women. Culture and culturally appropriate care can contribute to positive health outcomes for Aboriginal women. How midwives provide culturally appropriate care and how the care is experienced by the women is central to this study. To explore the lived experiences of midwives providing care in the standard hospital care system to Aboriginal women at a large tertiary teaching hospital. An interpretive Heideggerian phenomenological approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with thirteen volunteer midwives which were transcribed, analysed and presented informed by van Manen's approach. Thematic analysis revealed six main themes: "Finding ways to connect with the women", "building support networks - supporting with and through Aboriginal cultural knowledge", "managing the perceived barriers to effective care", "perceived equity is treating women the same", "understanding culture" and "assessing cultural needs - urban versus rural/remote Aboriginal cultural needs". The midwives in this study have shared their stories of caring for Aboriginal women. They have identified communication and building support with Aboriginal health workers and families as important. They have identified perceived barriers to the provision of care, and misunderstanding around the interpretation of cultural safety in practice was found. Suggestions are made to support midwives in their practice and improve the experiences for Aboriginal women. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Call for Integrated and Coordinated Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Integrated palliative care is viewed as having the potential to improve service coordination, efficiency, and quality outcomes for patients and family carers. However, the majority of Canadians do not have access to regional, comprehensive, integrated palliative care. Work needs to be directed toward planning palliative care services that is integrated into the healthcare and social care system. To further this goal, it is important to have a conceptual understanding of the meaning of integrated care and its expression in organizational models for the provision of palliative care. PMID:29283874

  15. Mindfulness for palliative care patients. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Riera, Rachel

    2017-12-01

    Nineteen million adults worldwide are in need of palliative care. Of those who have access to it, 80% fail to receive an efficient management of symptoms. To assess the effectiveness and safety of mindfulness meditation for palliative care patients. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, PEDro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Opengrey, ClinicalTrials.gov and WHO-ICTRP. No restriction of language, status or date of publication was applied. We considered randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing any mindfulness meditation scheme vs any comparator for palliative care. Cochrane Risk of Bias (Rob) Table was used for assessing methodological quality of RCTs. Screening, data extraction and methodological assessments were performed by two reviewers. Mean differences (MD) (confidence intervals of 95% (CI 95%)) were considered for estimating effect size. Quality of evidence was appraised by GRADE. Four RCTs, 234 participants, were included. All studies presented high risk of bias in at least one RoB table criteria. We assessed 4 comparisons, but only 2 studies showed statistically significant difference for at least one outcome. 1. Mindfulness meditation (eight weeks, one session/week, daily individual practice) vs control: statistically significant difference in favour of control for quality of life - physical aspects. 2. Mindfulness meditation (single 5-minute session) vs control: benefit in favour of mindfulness for stress outcome in both time-points. None of the included studies analysed safety and harms outcomes. Although two studies have showed statistically significant difference, only one showed effectiveness of mindfulness meditation in improving perceived stress. This study focused on one single session of mindfulness of 5 minutes for adult cancer patients in palliative care, but it was considered as possessing high risk of bias. Other schemes of mindfulness meditation did not show benefit in any outcome evaluated (low and very low quality evidence). © 2017 John Wiley

  16. Assessment of a Statewide Palliative Care Team Training Course: COMFORT Communication for Palliative Care Teams.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Ferrell, Betty; Goldsmith, Joy; Ragan, Sandra L; Paice, Judith

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased attention to communication skill training in palliative care, few interprofessional training programs are available and little is known about the impact of such training. This study evaluated a communication curriculum offered to interprofessional palliative care teams and examined the longitudinal impact of training. Interprofessional, hospital-based palliative care team members were competitively selected to participate in a two-day training using the COMFORT(TM SM) (Communication, Orientation and options, Mindful communication, Family, Openings, Relating, Team) Communication for Palliative Care Teams curriculum. Course evaluation and goal assessment were tracked at six and nine months postcourse. Interprofessional palliative care team members (n = 58) representing 29 teams attended the course and completed course goals. Participants included 28 nurses, 16 social workers, 8 physicians, 5 chaplains, and one psychologist. Precourse surveys assessed participants' perceptions of institution-wide communication performance across the continuum of care and resources supporting optimum communication. Postcourse evaluations and goal progress monitoring were used to assess training effectiveness. Participants reported moderate communication effectiveness in their institutions, with the weakest areas being during bereavement and survivorship care. Mean response to course evaluation across all participants was greater than 4 (scale of 1 = low to 5 = high). Participants taught an additional 962 providers and initiated institution-wide training for clinical staff, new hires, and volunteers. Team member training improved communication processes and increased attention to communication with family caregivers. Barriers to goal implementation included a lack of institutional support as evidenced in clinical caseloads and an absence of leadership and funding. The COMFORT(TM SM) communication curriculum is effective palliative care communication

  17. Palliative care and pediatric surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Inserra, Alessandro; Narciso, Alessandra; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Messina, Raffaella; Crocoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Survival rate for childhood cancer has increased in recent years, reaching as high as 70% in developed countries compared with 54% for all cancers diagnosed in the 1980s. In the remaining 30%, progression or metastatic disease leads to death and in this framework palliative care has an outstanding role though not well settled in all its facets. In this landscape, surgery has a supportive actor role integrated with other welfare aspects from which are not severable. The definition of surgical palliation has moved from the ancient definition of noncurative surgery to a group of practices performed not to cure but to alleviate an organ dysfunction offering the best quality of life possible in all the aspects of life (pain, dysfunctions, caregivers, psychosocial, etc.). To emphasize this aspect a more modern definition has been introduced: palliative therapy in whose context is comprised not only the care assistance but also the plans of care since the onset of illness, teaching the matter to surgeons in training and share paths. Literature is very poor regarding surgical aspects specifically dedicated and all researches (PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane) with various meshing terms result in a more oncologic and psychosocial effort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors affecting rural volunteering in palliative care - an integrated review.

    PubMed

    Whittall, Dawn; Lee, Susan; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    To review factors shaping volunteering in palliative care in Australian rural communities using Australian and International literature. Identify gaps in the palliative care literature and make recommendations for future research. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Proquest, Scopus, Sage Premier, Wiley online, Ovid, Cochran, Google Scholar, CINAHL and Informit Health Collection. The literature was synthesised and presented in an integrated thematic narrative. Australian Rural communities. While Australia, Canada, the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) are leaders in palliative care volunteer research, limited research specifically focuses on volunteers in rural communities with the least occurring in Australia. Several interrelated factors influence rural palliative care provision, in particular an increasingly ageing population which includes an ageing volunteer and health professional workforce. Also current and models of palliative care practice fail to recognise the innumerable variables between and within rural communities such as distance, isolation, lack of privacy, limited health care services and infrastructure, and workforce shortages. These issues impact palliative care provision and are significant for health professionals, volunteers, patients and caregivers. The three key themes of this integrated review include: (i) Geography, ageing rural populations in palliative care practice, (ii) Psychosocial impact of end-end-of life care in rural communities and (iii) Palliative care models of practice and volunteering in rural communities. The invisibility of volunteers in rural palliative care research is a concern in understanding the issues affecting the sustainability of quality palliative care provision in rural communities. Recommendations for future Australian research includes examination of the suitability of current models of palliative care practice in addressing the needs of rural communities; the recruitment

  19. A palliative care needs assessment of rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fink, Regina M; Oman, Kathleen S; Youngwerth, Jeanie; Bryant, Lucinda L

    2013-06-01

    Palliative care services are lacking in rural hospitals. Implementing palliative care services in rural and remote areas requires knowledge of available resources, specific barriers, and a commitment from the hospital and community. The purpose of the study was to determine awareness, knowledge, barriers, and resources regarding palliative care services in rural hospitals. A descriptive survey design used an investigator-developed needs assessment to survey 374 (40% response rate) health care providers (chief executive officers, chiefs of medical staff, chief nursing officers, and social worker directors) at 236 rural hospitals (<100 beds) in seven Rocky Mountain states. Significant barriers to integrating palliative care exist: lack of administrative support, mentorship, and access to palliative care resources; inadequate basic knowledge about palliative care strategies; and limited training/skills in palliative care. Having contractual relationships with local hospices is a key facilitator. Respondents (56%) want to learn more about palliative care, specifically focusing on pain management, communication techniques, and end-of-life care issues. Webinar and online courses were suggested as strategies to promote long distance learning. It is imperative for quality of care that rural hospitals have practitioners who are up to date on current evidence and practice within a palliative care framework. Unique challenges exist to implementing palliative care services in rural hospitals. Opportunities for informing rural areas focus around utilizing existing hospice resources and relationships, and favoring Web-based classes and online courses. The development of a multifaceted intervention to facilitate education about palliative care and cultivate palliative care services in rural settings is indicated.

  20. The Changing Role of Palliative Care in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Aslakson, Rebecca A.; Curtis, J. Randall; Nelson, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Palliative care is an interprofessional specialty as well as an approach to care by all clinicians caring for patients with serious and complex illness. Unlike hospice, palliative care is based not on prognosis but on need and is an essential component of comprehensive care for critically ill patients from the time of ICU admission. In this clinically focused article, we review evidence of opportunities to improve palliative care for critically ill adults, summarize strategies for ICU palliative care improvement, and identify resources to support implementation. Data Sources We searched the MEDLINE database from inception through January 2014. We also searched the Reference Library of The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU Project website sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Center to Advance Palliative Care, which is updated monthly. We hand-searched reference lists and author files. Study Selection Selected studies included all English-language articles concerning adult patients using the search terms "intensive care" or "critical care" with "palliative care," "supportive care," "end-of-life care," or "ethics." Data Extraction After examination of peer-reviewed original scientific articles, consensus statements, guidelines, and reviews resulting from our literature search, we made final selections based on author consensus. Data Synthesis Existing evidence is organized to address: 1) opportunities to alleviate physical and emotional symptoms, improve communication, and provide support for patients and families; 2) models and specific interventions for improving ICU palliative care; 3) available resources for ICU palliative care improvement; and 4) ongoing challenges and targets for future research. Key domains of ICU palliative care have been defined and operationalized as measures of quality. There is increasing recognition that effective integration of palliative care during acute and chronic critical illness may help patients and

  1. Does educating patients about the Early Palliative Care Study increase preferences for outpatient palliative cancer care? Findings from Project EMPOWER.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael; Perry, Laura M; Gramling, Robert; Epstein, Ronald M; Duberstein, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Randomized controlled trials, especially the Early Palliative Care Study (Temel et al., 2010), have shown that early outpatient palliative cancer care can improve quality of life for patients with advanced cancer or serious symptoms. However, fear and misconceptions drive avoidance of palliative care. Drawing from an empowerment perspective, we examined whether educating patients about evidence from the Early Palliative Care Study would increase preferences for palliative care. A sample of 598 patients with prostate, breast, lung, colon/rectal, skin, and other cancer diagnoses completed an Internet-mediated experiment using a between-group prepost design. Intervention participants received a summary of the Early Palliative Care Study; controls received no intervention. Participants completed baseline and posttest assessments of preferences of palliative care. Analyses controlled for age, gender, education, cancer type, presence of metastases, time since diagnosis, and baseline preferences. As hypothesized, the intervention had a favorable impact on participants' preferences for outpatient palliative cancer care relative to controls (d = 1.01, p < .001), while controlling for covariates. Intervention participants came to view palliative care as more efficacious (d = 0.79, p < .001) and less scary (d = 0.60, p < .001) and exhibited stronger behavioral intentions to utilize outpatient palliative care if referred (d = 0.60, p < .001). Findings were comparable in patients with metastatic disease, those with less education, and those experiencing financial strain. Educating patients about the Early Palliative Care Study increases preferences for early outpatient palliative care. This research has implications for future studies aimed at improving quality of life in cancer by increasing palliative care utilization. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Crul, B J; van Weel, C

    2001-10-20

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally ill patients with a progressive fatal disease, especially cancer patients. Due to increasing national and international criticism of both the practice of euthanasia (assumed to be too liberal) and the lack of attention devoted to structured palliative care in the Netherlands, the Dutch government decided to improve the structure of palliative care. The government's viewpoint is based on the assumption that good palliative care that includes adequate pain control benefits patient care and might eventually lead to fewer requests for euthanasia. The improvements to palliative care should be realised by means of improvements in the structure, training and knowledge. Six academic medical clusters have been designated as Centres for the Development of Palliative Care (Dutch acronym: COPZ) for a 5-year period. Each COPZ must develop the various aspects needed to improve palliative care within the region it serves and ensure that its activities are carefully coordinated with those in the other centres. Research will focus on measuring the efficacy of palliative care as well as ethical and epidemiological aspects. A government committee will assess the appropriateness of the activities undertaken by each of the centres.

  3. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-05

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. [Organization of palliative medicine in the clinic and ambulatory care].

    PubMed

    Jonen-Thielemann, I

    1998-01-01

    To describe the idea of palliative medicine and its forms of organization in the inpatient and outpatient sectors, and in particular to describe the projects for palliative medicine at the University of Cologne, specifying costs and the 1996 statistics of the palliative care unit. Palliative medicine comprises the alleviative treatment, nursing and accompaniment of the incurably ill in the far advanced stage of disease, including the physical, mental, psychic, spiritual and social domains. The underlying concept is "to live until you die" and dying in dignity at the natural end of life. Facilities for palliative medicine in the hospital: palliative care unit, palliative care sector, palliative care consultation service; forms of organization in the outpatient sector: home care service, domiciliary palliative care service and outpatient hospice; independent facilities: hospices-inpatient and part-inpatient. Costs of palliative treatment in the projects of the University of Cologne: palliative care unit: 457.33 DM for one patient per day, 12,092.20 DM average costs per patient admission in 1996 (n = 186); home care service: 200.00 DM flat rate per patient per day; inpatient hospice in Cologne-Heimersdorf: 300.00 DM for one patient per day (home care service and hospice entail additional costs for medical treatment, medication and nursing accessories). Palliative medicine is expensive; only a few patients have the benefit of this; relatives may suppose to be relieved of the burden of their responsibilities; however: the severely ill and dying patients of the hospital experience the best possible care at home or in a "family atmosphere"; gain in experience of palliative medicine and multiplier function, research; awaking our society to thoughts of their own hour of death and what comes after it.

  5. Evaluation of Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Karen Lynn; Rafalson, Lisa; Mariano, Kathleen; Michalek, Arthur

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated current hospital-based palliative care programs using recommendations from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) as a framework. Seven hospitals located in Buffalo, New York were included based on the existence of a hospital-based palliative care program. Data was collected from August through October of 2013 by means of key informant interviews with nine staff members from these hospitals using a guide comprised of questions based on CAPC's recommendations. A gap analysis was conducted to analyze the current state of each hospital's program based upon CAPC's definition of a quality palliative care program. The findings identify challenges facing both existing/evolving palliative care programs, and establish a foundation for strategies to attain best practices not yet implemented. This study affirms the growing availability of palliative care services among these selected hospitals along with opportunities to improve the scope of services in line with national recommendations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Measuring patients' experiences with palliative care: the Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Claessen, Susanne J J; Francke, Anneke L; Sixma, Herman J; de Veer, Anke J E; Deliens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    The Consumer Quality Index Palliative Care (CQ-index PC) is a structured questionnaire for measuring the quality of palliative care from the perspective of care users. CQ-indices assess which care aspects need quality improvement by relating answers about actual care experiences to answers about the importance of certain aspects of care. To improve the chance that the new instrument has good content validity, a literature study and individual and group discussions were performed, and a steering committee was consulted to establish the instrument's face and content validity. The questionnaire was administered to patients with a life expectancy of 6 months or less and/or who were receiving palliative treatment. Descriptive analyses were carried out on the items about actual care experiences and the importance of care aspects, and on 'need for improvement' scores. 15 care organisations participated. 133 patients met the inclusion criteria (net response n=85). Patients considered the following aspects the most important: 'offering help in good time in acute situations', 'caregivers having the necessary expertise' and 'caregivers taking the patient seriously'. The three care aspects with the highest 'need for improvement' scores were: 'support when the patient feels depressed', 'support when the patient is anxious' and 'support when the patient has shortness of breath'. The CQ-index PC provides opportunities for care organisations to assess which care aspects have the highest priority for quality improvement within their organisation. Further research is needed to assess whether the instrument has enough discriminative power to assess differences between organisations.

  7. Cultural and spiritual considerations in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Long, Carol O

    2011-10-01

    Culture is a fundamental part of one's being. Spirituality is integrated with culture and both play a significant role in a person's journey through life. Yet, culture and spirituality are often misunderstood and may not seem to be important in healthcare settings. For adults with cancer and their families, this cannot be ignored. This paper reviews The Purnell Model of Cultural Competence as a framework for considering culture and spirituality in healthcare and discusses the importance of acknowledging and incorporating practices that support culture and spirituality in healthcare settings. Examples of how to include cultural and spiritual care in palliative and end-of-life care in healthcare settings are provided.

  8. Palliative Care: Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Palliative Care Video Tells a Mother's Story of Caring Support Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents YouTube embedded video: http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/-hOBYFS_Z68 ...

  9. Public awareness of palliative care in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Caroline; Tishelman, Carol; Benkel, Inger; Fürst, Carl Johan; Molander, Ulla; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Sauter, Sylvia; Lindqvist, Olav

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of palliative care (PC) in a general Swedish population. We developed an e-survey based on a similar study conducted in Northern Ireland, consisting of 10 questions. Closed questions were primarily analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were subject to inductive qualitative analysis. The study utilized a population sample of 7684 persons aged 18-66, of which 2020 responded, stratified by gender, age and region. Most participants reported 'no' ( n = 827, 41%) or 'some' ( n = 863, 43%) awareness of PC. Being female or older were associated with higher levels of awareness, as was a university-level education, working in a healthcare setting and having a friend or family member receiving PC. Most common sources of knowledge were the media, close friends and relatives receiving PC, as well as working in a healthcare setting. Aims of PC were most frequently identified as 'care before death', 'pain relief', 'dignity' and a 'peaceful death'. The preferred place of care and death was one's own home. The main barriers to raising awareness about PC were fear, shame and taboo, along with perceived lack of information and/or personal relevance. The term 'palliative care' was said to be unfamiliar by many. A number of strategies to enhance awareness and access to PC were suggested, largely reflecting the previously identified barriers. This survey found limited awareness of palliative care in an adult sample of the Swedish general public ≤ 66 years, and points to a more widespread disempowerment surrounding end-of-life issues.

  10. Mapping the scope of occupational therapy practice in palliative care: A European Association for Palliative Care cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Eva, Gail; Morgan, Deidre

    2018-05-01

    Occupational therapists play an integral role in the care of people with life-limiting illnesses. However, little is known about the scope of occupational therapy service provision in palliative care across Europe and factors influencing service delivery. This study aimed to map the scope of occupational therapy palliative care interventions across Europe and to explore occupational therapists' perceptions of opportunities and challenges when delivering and developing palliative care services. A 49-item online cross-sectional survey comprised of fixed and free text responses was securely hosted via the European Association for Palliative Care website. Survey design, content and recruitment processes were reviewed and formally approved by the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyse data. Setting/respondents: Respondents were European occupational therapists whose caseload included palliative care recipients (full-time or part-time). In total, 237 valid responses were analysed. Findings demonstrated a consistency in occupational therapy practice in palliative care between European countries. Clinician time was prioritised towards indirect patient care, with limited involvement in service development, leadership and research. A need for undergraduate and postgraduate education was identified. Organisational expectations and understanding of the scope of the occupational therapy role constrain the delivery of services to support patients and carers. Further development of occupational therapy in palliative care, particularly capacity building in leadership and research activities, is warranted. There is a need for continuing education and awareness raising of the role of occupational therapy in palliative care.

  11. The Palliative Care Journey in Kenya and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kamonyo, Emmanuel S

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other physical, psychosocial, and spiritual problems. This update is aimed at examining palliative care development/achievements and challenges in Kenya and Uganda and the role of various actors in palliative care establishment in the region. It assesses the policy environment, progress in education, access to essential medicines, palliative care implementation efforts, and legal and human rights work. East African nations have huge disease burdens, both communicable and noncommunicable. HIV and cancer are the major causes of mortality in Kenya and Uganda and put huge demands on the health care system and on the country's economies. All these conditions will require palliative care services as the disease burden increases. Unfortunately, for many African countries, accessing palliative care services, including access to pain relief, remains very limited resulting in serious suffering for patients and their families. The interventions in Kenya and Uganda help palliative care organizations engage with their respective governments to ensure that the social and legal barriers impeding access to palliative care services are removed. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Palliative and end of life care in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, K; Weiss, A; O'Connor, E; Kaya, E

    2017-12-01

    Palliative care is an interprofessional approach that focuses on quality of life of patients who are facing life-threatening illness. Palliative care is consistently associated with improvements in advance care planning, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of life, symptom burden, and lower healthcare utilization. Most transplant patients have advanced chronic disease, significant symptom burden, and mortality awaiting transplant. Transplantation introduces new risks including perioperative death, organ rejection, infection, renal insufficiency, and malignancy. Numerous publications over the last decade identify that palliative care is well-suited to support these patients and their caregivers, yet access to palliative care and research within this population are lacking. This review describes palliative care and summarizes existing research supporting palliative intervention in advanced organ failure and transplant populations. A proposed model to provide palliative care in parallel with disease-directed therapy in a transplant program has the potential to improve symptom burden, quality of life, and healthcare utilization. Further studies are needed to elucidate specific benefits of palliative care for this population. In addition, there is a tremendous need for education, specifically for clinicians, patients, and families, to improve understanding of palliative care and its benefits for patients with advanced disease. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Research Priorities in Geriatric Palliative Care: Multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Zulman, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract With global aging and scientific advances extending survival, the number of adults experiencing multiple chronic conditions has grown substantially and is projected to increase by another third between 2000 and 2030. Among the many challenges posed by multimorbidity, some of the most pressing include how to characterize and measure comorbid conditions, understand symptoms and illness burden, and provide person-centered care in the context of competing health care priorities and increasing complexity. In this white paper emanating from a National Institute on Aging supported conference to discuss research gaps at the geriatrics–palliative care interface, the authors review common definitions of multimorbidity; describe the association between multimorbidity and quality of life, functional status, quality of care, and health care utilization; note content and methodological gaps in multimorbidity evidence; and make recommendations regarding research priorities in this area of expanding public health impact. PMID:23777331

  14. New concepts in palliative care in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Cristina Bueno Terzi; Yankaskas, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Some patients admitted to an intensive care unit may face a terminal illness situation, which usually leads to death. Knowledge of palliative care is strongly recommended for the health care providers who are taking care of these patients. In many situations, the patients should be evaluated daily as the introduction of further treatments may not be beneficial to them. The discussions among health team members that are related to prognosis and the goals of care should be carefully evaluated in collaboration with the patients and their families. The adoption of protocols related to end-of-life patients in the intensive care unit is fundamental. A multidisciplinary team is important for determining whether the withdrawal or withholding of advanced care is required. In addition, patients and families should be informed that palliative care involves the best possible care for that specific situation, as well as respect for their wishes and the consideration of social and spiritual backgrounds. Thus, the aim of this review is to present palliative care as a reasonable option to support the intensive care unit team in assisting terminally ill patients. Updates regarding diet, mechanical ventilation, and dialysis in these patients will be presented. Additionally, the hospice-model philosophy as an alternative to the intensive care unit/hospital environment will be discussed. PMID:28977262

  15. Supporting Aboriginal Women to Quit Smoking: Antenatal and Postnatal Care Providers' Confidence, Attitudes, and Practices.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, Flora; Daly, Justine; Dowe, Sarah; Bourke, Alex; Gillham, Karen; Freund, Megan

    2017-05-01

    Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies have investigated the amount or type of smoking cessation care that staff from Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal services provide to clients who smoke or staff confidence to do so. This study examined Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal staff confidence, perceived role and delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women and characteristics associated with provision of such care. Staff from 11 Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Services and eight Aboriginal Child and Family Health services in the Hunter New England Local Health District in Australia completed a cross-sectional self-reported survey (n = 67, response rate = 97.1%). Most staff reported they assessed clients' smoking status most or all of the time (92.2%). However, only a minority reported they offered a quitline referral (42.2%), provided follow-up support (28.6%) or provided nicotine replacement therapy (4.7%) to most or all clients who smoked. Few staff felt confident in motivating clients to quit smoking (19.7%) and advising clients about using nicotine replacement therapy (15.6%). Staff confident with talking to clients about how smoking affected their health had significantly higher odds of offering a quitline referral [OR = 4.9 (1.7-14.5)] and quitting assistance [OR = 3.9 (1.3-11.6)] to clients who smoke. Antenatal and postnatal staff delivery of smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal women or mothers with young Aboriginal children could be improved. Programs that support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal providers to deliver smoking cessation care to clients are needed. Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staff have multiple opportunities to assist Aboriginal women to quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum. However, staff confidence and practices of offering various forms of smoking cessation support to pregnant Aboriginal

  16. Flemish palliative care nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Joris; van den Branden, Stef; van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2009-10-01

    To adequately measure the attitudes of Flemish palliative care nurses toward euthanasia, and assess the relationship between these attitudes and demographic factors and the (perceived) influence of experience in palliative care on death anxiety. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n=589) employed in palliative care in Flanders, Belgium: 70.5% of the nurses (n=415) responded. A majority of the nurses supported the Belgian law regulating euthanasia but also believed that most euthanasia requests disappear as soon as a patient experiences the benefits of good palliative care. Three clusters were discovered: staunch advocates of euthanasia (150 nurses, 41.1%); moderate advocates of euthanasia (135 nurses, 37%); and (moderate) opponents of euthanasia (80 nurses, 21.9%). An absolute opposition between advocates and opponents of euthanasia was not observed. A statistically significant relationship was found between the euthanasia clusters and years of experience in palliative care, and (perceived) influence of experience in palliative care on anxiety when a patient dies. Flemish palliative care nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia are nuanced and contextual. By indicating that most euthanasia requests disappear as soon as a patient experiences the benefits of good palliative care, the nurses applied a 'palliative filter' a standard procedure in the case of a euthanasia request.

  17. Public awareness of palliative care in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Westerlund, Caroline; Benkel, Inger; Fürst, Carl Johan; Molander, Ulla; Rasmussen, Birgit H.; Sauter, Sylvia; Lindqvist, Olav

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of palliative care (PC) in a general Swedish population. Design: We developed an e-survey based on a similar study conducted in Northern Ireland, consisting of 10 questions. Closed questions were primarily analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were subject to inductive qualitative analysis. Subjects: The study utilized a population sample of 7684 persons aged 18–66, of which 2020 responded, stratified by gender, age and region. Results: Most participants reported ‘no’ (n = 827, 41%) or ‘some’ (n = 863, 43%) awareness of PC. Being female or older were associated with higher levels of awareness, as was a university-level education, working in a healthcare setting and having a friend or family member receiving PC. Most common sources of knowledge were the media, close friends and relatives receiving PC, as well as working in a healthcare setting. Aims of PC were most frequently identified as ‘care before death’, ‘pain relief’, ‘dignity’ and a ‘peaceful death’. The preferred place of care and death was one’s own home. The main barriers to raising awareness about PC were fear, shame and taboo, along with perceived lack of information and/or personal relevance. The term ‘palliative care’ was said to be unfamiliar by many. A number of strategies to enhance awareness and access to PC were suggested, largely reflecting the previously identified barriers. Conclusions: This survey found limited awareness of palliative care in an adult sample of the Swedish general public ≤ 66 years, and points to a more widespread disempowerment surrounding end-of-life issues. PMID:29301481

  18. 78 FR 53152 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Palliative Care: Conversations Matter Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...; Comment Request: Palliative Care: Conversations Matter Evaluation SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section... must be requested in writing. Proposed Collection: Palliative Care: Conversations Matter Evaluation... Use of Information Collection: NINR developed Palliative Care: Conversations Matter, a pediatric...

  19. Barriers to Optimal Palliative Care of Lung Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Rebecca E.; Curtis, J. Randall; Nelson, Judith E.; Efferen, Linda; Hadjiliadis, Denis; Levine, Deborah J.; Meyer, Keith C.; Padilla, Maria; Strek, Mary; Varkey, Basil

    2013-01-01

    Background: The provision of effective palliative care is of great importance to patients awaiting lung transplantation. Although the prospect of lung transplantation provides hope to patients and their families, these patients are usually very symptomatic from their underlying disease. Methods: An e-mail questionnaire was sent to members of the American College of Chest Physicians’ Transplant NetWork and the Pulmonary Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT). The survey included questions about barriers to providing palliative care, the availability of palliative care services, and recommended strategies to improve palliative care for lung transplant candidates. Results: The 158 respondents represented approximately 65% of transplant programs in the ISHLT registry. Respondents were in practice a mean of 11.3 (± 9) years, 70% were pulmonologists, 17% were surgeons, and 13% were other care providers. Barriers were classified into domains including patient factors, family factors, physician factors, and institutional/transplant program/lung allocation system factors. Significant patient/family barriers included unrealistic patient/family expectations about survival, unwillingness to plan end-of-life care, concerns about abandonment or inappropriate care after enrollment in a palliative care program, and family disagreements about care goals. For institutional/program/allocation system barriers, only the requirement for weight loss or gain to meet program-specific BMI requirements was identified. Significant physician barriers included competing time demands and the seemingly contradictory goals of transplant vs palliative care. Strategies recommended to improve palliative care included routine advance care planning for patients awaiting transplantation, access to palliative care specialists, training of transplant physicians in symptom management, and regular meetings among transplant physicians, nurses, patients, and

  20. Anger in palliative care: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Philip, J; Gold, M; Schwarz, M; Komesaroff, P

    2007-01-01

    Anger in patients and families is a common problem in the care of persons with advanced disease. Whereas it is widely accepted that anger may be a justifiable reaction to significant illness and loss, it frequently creates difficulties for the doctors involved in care. In particular, there is often a personal impact on the doctor at whom anger is directed. This paper examines results of qualitative research with palliative care workers in the context of the broader published literature and the authors' clinical experiences. The ability to interact effectively with angry patients is a skill that is often learned with experience and is extremely useful in both transforming the patients' reaction into a more creative emotion and in developing a therapeutic relationship. Despite conscientious efforts, however, a few patients continue to be angry. A practical approach to anger, useful for the clinician directly involved in care, is outlined along with some strategies to adopt in the face of persistent anger.

  1. Poverty Reduction in India through Palliative Care: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Cathy; Thyle, Ann; Duomai, Savita; Manak, Manju

    2017-01-01

    EMMS International and Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) implemented a pilot project, poverty reduction in India through palliative care (PRIPCare). A total of 129 interviews with patients and family enrolled in palliative care at three EHA hospitals (in Fatehpur, Lalitpur and Utraula) and staff discussions established that 66% of palliative care patients had lost livelihoods due to illness, 26% of patients' families had members who had lost livelihoods due to the illness, 98% of enrolled households had debts, 59% had loans for which they had sold assets, 69% of households took out debt after their family member fell ill, many patients do not know about government benefits and lack necessary documents, many village headmen require bribes to give people access to benefits, and many bereaved women and children lose everything. Palliative care enabled 85% of patients and families to spend less on medicines, 31% of patients received free medicines, all patients reduced use of out-patient departments (OPDs), 20% reduced use of inpatient departments (IPDs), and therefore spent less on travel, 8% of patients had started earning again due to improved health, members of 10% of families started earning again, and one hospital educated 171 village headmen and increased by 5% the number of patients and their families receiving government benefits. If only 0.7% of needy adults are receiving palliative care, these benefits could be delivered to 143 times more families, targeted effectively at poverty reduction. Palliative care has great scope to reduce that most desperate poverty in India caused by chronic illness. This article concerns a study by the UK NGO EMMS International and Indian NGO EHA, to assess whether palliative care reduces household poverty. EHA staff had noticed that many patients spend a lot on ineffective treatment before joining palliative care, many families do not know their entitlement to government healthcare subsidies or government pensions, and many

  2. From pregnancy to palliative care: advancing professional midwifery practice?

    PubMed

    Peacock, Valerie; Price, Jayne; Nurse, Sharon

    2015-11-01

    Historically midwives may have not considered palliative care as a part of their professional role. Enhanced technologies and antenatal screening have broadened the boundaries of care. However do midwives truly embrace the philosophy of palliative care into their practice? This paper presents the discussion round a case study that demonstrates the evolving area of advanced practice: perinatal palliative care. What we highlight is that midwives in fact have an important collaborative role to play in ensuring that palliative care for the baby and family starts as soon as a life-limiting condition is recognised, thus ensuring best care and support are provided for those parents and families for whom pregnancy sadly leads to palliative care. Five key lessons for practice are outlined.

  3. Function of local networks in palliative care: a Dutch view.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht-Van de Sande, C V M Vahedi; van der Rijt, C C D; Visser, A Ph; ten Voorde, M A; Pruyn, J F A

    2005-08-01

    Although network formation is considered an effective method of stimulating the integrated delivery of palliative care, scientific evidence on the usefulness of network formation is scarce. In 1998 the Ministry of Health of The Netherlands started a 5-year stimulation program on palliative care by founding and funding six regional Centres for the Development of Palliative Care. These centers were structured around pivotal organizations such as university hospitals and comprehensive cancer centers. As part of the stimulation program a locoregional network model was introduced within each center for the Development of Palliative Care to integrate palliative care services in the Dutch health care system. We performed a study on network formation in the southwestern area of The Netherlands with 2.4 million inhabitants. The study aimed to answer the following questions: (1) how do networks in palliative care develop, which care providers participate and how do they function? (2) which are the achievements of the palliative care networks as perceived by their participants? (3) which are the success factors of the palliative care networks according to their participants and which factors predict the achievements? Between September 2000 and January 2004 eight local palliative care networks in the region of the Center for Development of Palliative Care-Rotterdam (southwestern area of The Netherlands) were closely followed to gain information on their characteristics and developmental course. At the start of the study semistructured interviews were held with the coordinators of the eight networks. The information from these interviews and from the network documents were used to constitute a questionnaire to assess the opinions and experiences of the network participants. According to the vast majority of responders, the most important reason to install the networks was the lack of integration between the existing local health care services. The networks were initiated to

  4. Defining palliative care in cystic fibrosis: A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Dellon, E P; Goggin, J; Chen, E; Sabadosa, K; Hempstead, S E; Faro, A; Homa, K

    2018-05-01

    The goal of palliative care is to improve quality of life for people with serious illness. We aimed to create a cystic fibrosis (CF)-specific definition of palliative care. A working group of 36 CF care providers, researchers, palliative care providers, quality improvement experts, individuals with CF, and CF caregivers completed a series of questionnaires to rate the value of each of 22 attributes of palliative care, rank top attributes to construct definitions of palliative care, and then rate proposed definitions. An average of 28 participants completed each of four questionnaires, with consistent distribution of stakeholder roles across questionnaires. Many identified overlaps in routine CF care and palliative care and highlighted the importance of a definition that feels relevant across the lifespan. Modified Delphi methodology was used to define palliative care in CF. The definition will be used as the foundation for development of CF-specific palliative care guidelines. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Complementary approaches to palliative oncological care.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Simone B; Cassileth, Barrie R

    2003-01-01

    The popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased tremendously in recent years. Thus, it is imperative to distinguish between alternative therapies that can be dangerous and complementary therapies that are primarily palliative and augment conventional treatment. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's Integrative Medicine Service offers complementary therapies to patients in an attempt to improve quality of life and provide symptom management. In addition to clinical services, it also provides education to health care professionals and the public and performs clinical and laboratory research on complementary modalities and the antitumor properties of botanicals. If CAM is to be accepted by mainstream medicine, research must be done usingstandard research methodologies.

  6. Enhancing Palliative Care Education in Medical School Curricula: Implementation of the Palliative Education Assessment Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Emily B.; Meekin, Sharon Abele; Fins, Joseph J.; Fleischman, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated a project to catalyze New York State medical schools to develop and implement strategic plans for curricular change to enhance palliative care education. Found that the project's process of self-assessment and curriculum mapping with the Palliative Education Assessment Tool, along with strategic planning for change, appears to have…

  7. Current Status of Palliative Care, Education, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; Elk, Ronit; Ferrell, Betty; Morrison, R. Sean; von Gunten, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Palliative and end-of-life care is changing in the United States. This dynamic field is improving the care for patients with serious and life-threatening cancer through creation of national guidelines for quality care, multidisciplinary educational offerings, research endeavors, and resources made available to clinicians. Barriers to implementing quality palliative care across cancer populations include a rapidly expanding population of older adults who will need cancer care and a decrease in the workforce available to give care. Ways to integrate current palliative care knowledge into care of patients include multidisciplinary national education and research endeavors, and clinician resources. Acceptance of palliative care as a recognized medical specialty provides a valuable resource for improvement of care. While the evidence base for palliative care is only beginning, national research support has assisted in providing support to build the knowledge foundation for appropriate palliative care. Opportunities are available for clinicians to understand and apply appropriate palliative and end-of-life care to patients with serious and life-threatening cancers. PMID:19729681

  8. Role of the physiotherapist in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Marcant, D; Rapin, C H

    1993-02-01

    Physiotherapists, whether trained in intensive care or internal medicine, must be attentive to patients at the end of their lives. Palliative-care physiotherapy requires basic training in rehabilitation techniques; the integration of a rehabilitation professional in a caregivers team; a profound communication with the patient, leading to an effective accompaniment and direct response to the patient's needs; and recognition of the patient's functional needs. The involvement of the physiotherapist can extend to the very end of life. In a series of 56 geriatric patients (35 suffering from cancer, 21 from other pathologic conditions) who died at the Center of Continuous Care, 44 (79%) had a treatment of respiratory physiotherapy until their last 24 hr.

  9. The WHO collaborating centre for public health palliative care programs: an innovative approach of palliative care development.

    PubMed

    Ela, Sara; Espinosa, Jose; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Lasmarías, Cristina; Beas, Elba; Mateo-Ortega, Dolors; Novellas, Anna; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    The designation of the Catalan Institute of Oncology (Barcelona, Spain) as World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Public Health Palliative Care Programmes (WHOCC-ICO) in February 2008 turns the institution into the first ever center of international reference in regards to palliative care implementation from a public health perspective. The center aims to provide support to countries willing to develop palliative care programs, to identify models of success, to support WHO's policies, and to generate and spread evidence on palliative care. This article describes the WHOCC-ICO's contribution in the implementation of public health palliative care programs and services. The center's main features and future actions are emphasized. At the end of the initial four-year designation period, the organization evaluates the task done to reach its objectives. Such global assessment would take forward the quality of the institution, and generate a revision of its terms of reference for the next designation period. Based on new evidence, the center has recently decided to expand its scope by adopting a community-wide chronic care approach which moves beyond cancer and focuses on the early identification of patients with any chronic disease in need of palliative care. Moreover, the center advocates the development of comprehensive models of care that address patients' psychosocial needs. This center's new work plan includes additional significant innovations, such as the startup of the first chair of palliative care in Spain. Such a whole new approach responds to the main challenges of current palliative care.

  10. The palliative care knowledge questionnaire for PEACE: reliability and validity of an instrument to measure palliative care knowledge among physicians.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yoko; Morita, Tatsuya

    2013-11-01

    In Japan, a nationwide palliative care education program for primary palliative care (the Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education: PEACE) was established in 2008. Effective delivery of such programs relies on adequate evaluations of program efficacy; however, such an instrument does not exist. This study aimed to develop and validate a measurement tool to quantify knowledge level of physicians about broader areas of palliative care, by which the effect of an education program could be measured. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire survey with a group of 801 conveniently sampled physicians in October 2010. To examine the test-retest reliability of items and domains, the questionnaire was reissued two weeks after the first survey was completed. This study used psychometric methods, including item response theory, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group validity. The response rate was 54% (n=434). We included 33 items across the following 9 domains: (1) philosophy of palliative care, (2) cancer pain, (3) side effects of opioids, (4) dyspnea, (5) nausea and vomiting, (6) psychological distress, (7) delirium, (8) communication regarding palliative care, and (9) community-based palliative care. For these items, the intraclass correlation was 0.84 and the Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 (KR-20) test of internal consistency was 0.87. There was a significant difference in the scores between palliative care specialists and other physicians. We successfully validated a newly developed palliative care knowledge questionnaire to evaluate PEACE effectiveness (PEACE-Q). The PEACE-Q could be useful for evaluating both palliative care knowledge among physicians and education programs in primary palliative care.

  11. Managing expectations: Providing palliative care in aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Lane, Heather; Philip, Jennifer

    2015-06-01

    To explore the views and experiences of staff from RACFs and community palliative care services (CPCSs) on providing palliative and end-of-life care in RACFs. Qualitative exploratory interviews and focus groups were conducted with staff working in two RACFs and two CPCSs, and, following data saturation, a thematic analysis undertaken. 15 RACF and 15 CPCS staff participated. The overarching theme was of managing expectations in the provision of care. This included low expectations of the care available in RACFs, tensions in addressing complex decision-making and concurrent administrative expectations, and differences between views of RACF and CPCS staff regarding their respective roles. Improved understanding of the needs of RACF staff will improve the care of residents and, in turn, reduce hospitalisations. © 2013 ACOTA.

  12. Late referral to palliative care services in Korea.

    PubMed

    Baek, Young Ji; Shin, Dong Wook; Choi, Jin Young; Kang, Jina; Mo, Ha Na; Kim, Yang Hyeok; Kim, Sohee; Jung, Kyu Won; Joo, Jisoo; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2011-04-01

    Although timely referral to palliative care services can help improve quality of life by minimizing patient and family suffering during a life-threatening illness, it remains unclear whether patients in Korea who suffer from advanced cancer are referred to palliative care services in a timely manner. We aimed to investigate the timeliness of patient referral to palliative care services in Korea by examining the duration of survival after enrollment and identify the factors contributing to earlier or later referral. Patient- and episode-level data were collected from 3867 terminal cancer patients, who were registered in 34 inpatient palliative care services designated by the Ministry of Health, Welfare, and Family Affairs. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine factors associated with the duration of survival after enrollment in palliative care services. The median duration of survival after enrollment in palliative care services was 18 days. Male sex, liver cancer diagnosis, poor performance status, being covered by National Health Insurance, and being married were significantly associated with shorter duration of survival after enrollment, whereas a prostate cancer diagnosis was associated with longer survival. Korean terminal cancer patients are referred to palliative care very late, and the timing appears to be influenced by some socioeconomic and medical factors. Interventions, such as physician education and establishing palliative care teams, are required to promote earlier referrals in Korea. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are Undergraduate Nurses Taught Palliative Care during Their Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Field, David

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 46 of 108 nurse educators in the United Kingdom indicated that diploma students received a mean of 7.8 hours and degree students 12.2 hours of palliative care training. Although 82% believed it should be a core component, 67% had difficulty finding qualified teachers. Palliative care knowledge was not formally assessed in most…

  14. Muslim physicians and palliative care: attitudes towards the use of palliative sedation.

    PubMed

    Muishout, George; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Wiegers, Gerard; Popp-Baier, Ulrike

    2018-05-08

    Muslim norms concerning palliative sedation can differ from secular and non-Muslim perceptions. Muslim physicians working in a Western environment are expected to administer palliative sedation when medically indicated. Therefore, they can experience tension between religious and medical norms. To gain insight into the professional experiences of Muslim physicians with palliative sedation in terms of religious and professional norms. Interpretative phenomenological study using semi-structured interviews to take a closer look at the experiences of Muslim physicians with palliative sedation. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed by means of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Ten Muslim physicians, working in the Netherlands, with professional experience of palliative sedation. Two main themes were identified: professional self-concept and attitudes towards death and dying. Participants emphasized their professional responsibility when making treatment decisions, even when these contravened the prevalent views of Islamic scholars. Almost all of them expressed the moral obligation to fight their patients' pain in the final stage of life. Absence of acceleration of death was considered a prerequisite for using palliative sedation by most participants. Although the application of palliative sedation caused friction with their personal religious conceptions on a good death, participants followed a comfort-oriented care approach corresponding to professional medical standards. All of them adopted efficient strategies for handling of palliative sedation morally and professionally. The results of this research can contribute to and provide a basis for the emergence of new, applied Islamic ethics regarding palliative sedation.

  15. Commissioning of specialist palliative care services in England.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Harriet; Finlay, Ilora; Downman, Maxwell; Dumas, James

    2018-03-01

    Some failures in end-of-life care have been attributed to inconsistent provision of palliative care across England. We aimed to explore the variation in commissioning of services by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) using a data collection exercise. We sent a Freedom of Information request in the form of an open questionnaire to all 209 CCGs in England to assess their commissioning of palliative and end-of-life care services, mainly focused on the provision of specialist palliative care services. 29 CCGs provided information about the number of patients with some form of palliative care needs in their population. For specialist palliative care services, CCGs allocated budgets ranging from £51.83 to £2329.19 per patient per annum. 163 CCGs (77.90%) currently commission 7-day admission to their specialist palliative care beds. 82.84% of CCGs commission 7-day specialist palliative care services in patients' own homes and out-of-hours services rely heavily on hospice provision. 64 CCGs (31.37%) commission pain control teams, the majority of whom only operate in regular working hours. 68.14% of CCGs reported commissioning palliative care education of any sort for healthcare professionals and 44.85% of CCGs had no plans to update or review their palliative care services. The most important finding from this exercise is that the information CCGs hold about their population and services is not standardised. However, information based on data that are more objective, for example, population and total budget for palliative care, demonstrate wide variations in commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Implementation of a palliative care team in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Rosemary A; Ward-Smith, Peggy; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Korphage, Rebecca M; Hubble, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for best practice from the American Academy of Pediatrics include the availability of palliative care for children with life-threatening or life-limiting health care conditions. The uniqueness of the both the pediatric population and a pediatric health care setting requires changing the culture that previously has provided only curative or hospice care to these individuals. Methods to provide palliative care alongside of treatment and coordination of these efforts must be multidisciplinary and include family members.

  17. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Suboptimal palliative sedation in primary care: an exploration.

    PubMed

    Pype, Peter; Teuwen, Inge; Mertens, Fien; Sercu, Marij; De Sutter, An

    2018-02-01

    Palliative sedation is a therapeutic option to control refractory symptoms in terminal palliative patients. This study aims at describing the occurrence and characteristics of suboptimal palliative sedations in primary care and at exploring the way general practitioners (GPs) experience suboptimal palliative sedation in their practice. We conducted a mixed methods study with a quantitative prospective survey in primary care and qualitative semi-structured interviews with GPs. The research team defined suboptimal palliative sedation as a time interval until deep sleep >1.5 h and/ or >2 awakenings after the start of the unconsciousness. Descriptive statistics were calculated on the quantitative data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. We registered 63 palliative sedations in 1181 home deaths, 27 forms were completed. Eleven palliative sedations were suboptimal: eight due to the long time span until deep sleep; three due the number of unintended awakenings. GPs' interview analysis revealed two major themes: the shifting perception of failure and the burden of responsibility. Suboptimal palliative sedation occurs frequently in primary palliative care. Efficient communication towards family members is needed to prevent them from having unrealistic expectations and to prevent putting pressure on the GP to hasten the procedure. Sharing the burden of decision-making during the procedure with other health care professionals might diminish the heavy responsibility as perceived by GPs.

  19. Palliative care and the intensive care nurses: feelings that endure.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Natyele Rippel; Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira do; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Jung, Walnice; Martins, Sabrina Regina; Fontes, Moisés Dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    to know the feelings of nurses regarding palliative care in adult intensive care units. qualitative study, which adopted the theoretical framework of Social Representations, carried out with 30 nurses of the state of Santa Catarina included by Snowball sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted from April to August 2015, organized and analyzed through the Collective Subject Discourse. the results showed how central ideas are related to feelings of comfort, frustration, insecurity and anguish, in addition to the feeling that the professional training and performance are focused on the cure. the social representations of nurses regarding the feelings related to palliative care are represented mainly by negative feelings, probably as consequence of the context in which care is provided.

  20. Improving delivery of health care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

    PubMed

    Attwood, Lucy; Rodrigues, Sarah; Winsor, Josephine; Warren, Shirley; Biviano, Lyn; Gunasekera, Hasantha

    2015-05-01

    To identify opportunities to improve health-care delivery for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children requiring hospital admission and to determine their characteristics. We analysed all documentation of admissions of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children to a tertiary paediatric hospital in 2010. We reviewed the medical records to determine whether the Aboriginal status of patients was known, whether Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and their families were reviewed by Aboriginal staff during admission and whether basic health-care quality indicators were met, including documentation of anthropometry, ear examination findings, immunisation status and catch-up immunisation delivery. In 2010, 543 (2%) patients admitted to the institution were identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander: 140/538 (26.0%) were from the first decile (most disadvantaged) on Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas index. Of all admitted children, 148/543 (27.3%) were referred to Aboriginal health professionals during admission, more when length of stay was greater than 7 days (61% vs. 23%, P < 0.001). There was documentation of weight in 533/543 (98.2%), ear examinations in 64/543 (11.8%), immunisations being not up to date in 126/543 (23%), catch-up immunisation given in 7/126 (5.6%), Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status in 8/543 (1.5%) medical and 1/543 (0.2%) nursing discharge summaries. We have identified several opportunities to improve culturally appropriate health-care delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children admitted to hospital, including improved recognition of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status of patients, improved access to Aboriginal health professionals and increased performance and documentation of basic anthropometry, ear examination and immunisation catch-up. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian

  1. Core attitudes of professionals in palliative care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steffen T; Ramsenthaler, Christina; Bausewein, Claudia; Krischke, Norbert; Geiss, Gerlinde

    2009-08-01

    Self-awareness of one's own reactions towards patients and their relatives is of paramount importance for all professionals in palliative care. 'Core attitude' describes the way in which a person perceives himself and the world, and forms the basis for his actions and thoughts. The aim of this study is to explore what core attitude means for palliative care professionals and whether there is a specific core attitude in palliative care. Qualitative study with 10 face-to-face in-depth interviews with experts in palliative care (nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists, chaplain) in Germany. Core attitude in palliative care can be best described with the following three domains: 1) personal characteristics; 2) experience of care; and 3) competence in care. Authenticity is the most important characteristic of professionals, along with honesty and mindfulness. Core attitude primarily becomes apparent in the relationship with the patient. Perception and listening are key competences. The experts emphasized the universality of the core attitude in the care of ill people. They stressed the importance and relevance of teaching core attitudes in palliative care education. In the field of palliative care, core attitude consists predominately of authenticity, manifests itself in relationships, and requires a high degree of perceptiveness.

  2. Family conference in palliative care: concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rudval Souza da; Trindade, Géssica Sodré Sampaio; Paixão, Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2018-01-01

    to analyze the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the family conference concept. Walker and Avante's method for concept analysis and the stages of the integrative review process, with a selection of publications in the PubMed, Cinahl and Lilacs databases focusing on the family conference theme in the context of palliative care. the most cited antecedents were the presence of doubts and the need to define a care plan. Family reunion and working instrument were evidenced as attributes. With respect to consequents, to promote the effective communication and to establish a plan of consensual action were the most remarkable elements. the scarcity of publications on the subject was observed, as well as and the limitation of the empirical studies to the space of intensive therapy. Thus, by analyzing the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the concept it was possible to follow their evolution and to show their efficacy and effectiveness as a therapeutic intervention.

  3. Continuous Palliative Sedation for Existential Distress? A Survey of Canadian Palliative Care Physicians' Views.

    PubMed

    Voeuk, Anna; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Fainsinger, Robin; Huot, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Palliative sedation can be used for refractory symptoms during end-of-life care. However, continuous palliative sedation (CPS) for existential distress remains controversial due to difficulty determining when this distress is refractory. The aim was to determine the opinions and practices of Canadian palliative care physicians regarding CPS for existential distress. A survey focusing on experience and views regarding CPS for existential distress was sent to 322 members of the Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians. Eighty-one surveys returned (accessible target, 314), resulting in a response rate of 26%. One third (31%) of the respondents reported providing CPS for existential distress. On a 5-point Likert-type scale, 40% of participants disagreed, while 43% agreed that CPS could be used for existential distress alone. Differing opinions exist regarding this complex and potentially controversial issue, necessitating the education of health-care professionals and increased awareness within the general public.

  4. Leadership Development Initiative: Growing Global Leaders… Advancing Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Frank D; Moore, Shannon Y; Callaway, Mary V; Foley, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    The International Palliative Care Leadership Development Initiative (LDI) was a model demonstration project that aimed to expand the global network of palliative care leaders in low- and moderate-resource countries who are well positioned to apply their new leadership skills. Thirty-nine palliative medicine physicians from 25 countries successfully completed the two-year curriculum that included three thematic residential courses, mentorship, and site visits by senior global palliative care leaders and personal projects to apply their new leadership skills. The focus on self-reflection, leadership behaviors and practices, strategic planning, high-level communication, and teaching skills led to significant personal and professional transformation among the participants, mentors, and the LDI team. The resulting residential course curriculum and the personal leadership stories and biosketches of the leaders are now available open access at IPCRC.net. Already, within their first-year postgraduation, the leaders are using their new leadership skills to grow palliative care capacity through significant changes in policy, improved opioid/other medication availability, new and enhanced educational curricula and continuing education activities, and development/expansion of palliative care programs in their organizations and regions. We are not aware of another palliative care initiative that achieves the global reach and ripple effect that LDI has produced. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Coordination of palliative cancer care in the community: "unfinished business".

    PubMed

    Brazil, Kevin; Bainbridge, Daryl; Sussman, Jonathan; Whelan, Tim; O'Brien, Mary Ann; Pyette, Nancy

    2009-07-01

    This study assessed the degree to which services in south-central Ontario, Canada, were coordinated to meet the supportive care needs of palliative cancer patients and their families. Programs within the region that were identified as providing supportive care to palliative cancer patients and their families were eligible to participate in the study. Program administrators participated in a semi-structured interview and direct-care providers completed a survey instrument. Administrators from 37 (97%) of 38 eligible programs and 109 direct-care providers representing 26 (70%) programs participated in the study. Most administrator and direct-care respondents felt that existing services in the community were responsive to palliative care patients' individual needs. However, at a system level, most respondents in both groups felt that required services were not available and that resources were inadequate. The most frequently reported unmet supportive care need identified by both respondent groups was psychological/social support. Most administrator (69%) and direct-care (64%) respondents felt that palliative care services were not available when needed. The majority of administrator and direct-care respondents were satisfied with the exchange of patient information within and between programs, although direct-care staff identified a deficit in information transferred on palliative care patients' social/psychological status. The study demonstrated the value of a theory-based approach to evaluate the coordination of palliative cancer care services. The findings revealed that service programs faced significant challenges in their efforts to provide coordinated care.

  6. Strategies for Development of Palliative Care From the Perspectives of General Population and Health Care Professionals: A Japanese Outreach Palliative Care Trial of Integrated Regional Model Study.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Saran; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Eguchi, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    This study primarily aimed to identify future actions required to promote palliative care in Japan. The future actions regarded as effective by the general population were "improve physicians' skill in palliative care" (61%), "create a counseling center for cancer" (61%), and "improve nurses' skill in palliative care" (60%). In contrast, future actions regarded as effective by the health care professionals were "set up a Web site that provides information about cancer" (72%), "promote consultation with specialists in palliative care" (71%), and "open an outpatient department specializing in palliative care" (70%). The results suggest (1) development and maintenance of settings; (2) enhancement of palliative care education and training programs for health care providers; and (3) improvement in distributing information about cancer and regional palliative care resources to the general population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  8. Palliative sedation in end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this review was to present and comment on recent data published on palliative sedation in palliative and end-of-life care. Palliative sedation is a medical procedure used to deal with the refractory symptoms occurring in the advanced stages of cancer. It has clinical, nursing, relational and ethical implications, making it a highly sensitive issue. Over the last 12 months, a number of authors have published interesting new findings on different areas of palliative sedation, that is prevalence, indications, monitoring, duration and choice of drugs. In particular, a clear definition of palliative sedation and of its more pronounced form, deep continuous sedation (DCS), has emerged. It has been confirmed that, when performed in the correct way and with the right aims, palliative sedation does not have a detrimental impact on survival. Recent findings confirm that palliative sedation is an integral part of a medical palliative care approach and is needed in certain clinical situations. It is a legitimate clinical practice from any ethical point of view. While oncologists should have a basic knowledge of the procedure, its in depth study is a core competency for palliative care physicians.

  9. Antenatal emotional wellbeing screening in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care services in Australia.

    PubMed

    Gausia, Kaniz; Thompson, Sandra; Nagel, Tricia; Rumbold, Alice; Connors, Christine; Matthews, Veronica; Boyle, Jacqueline; Schierhout, Gill; Bailie, Ross

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which antenatal emotional wellbeing (EW) assessments are undertaken in primary health care (PHC) centres and factors associated with completion of EW screening. Medical records of 797 pregnant women from 36 PHC centres in five states (NSW, QLD, SA, WA and NT) were audited. Overall, 85% of the women were Aboriginal. The proportion of women with documented screening for EW varied from 5 to 38% between states (mean 17%). Aboriginal women were four times more likely (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR = 4.13, 95% CI = 2.46-6.92) to not be screened for antenatal EW than non-Aboriginal women. Aboriginality, <4 antenatal visits, absence of an antenatal and birth care plan, and lack of counselling on financial support were independently linked with no screening of EW. Provision of training for health service providers and further research on appropriate screening tools for Aboriginal women are needed to help redress this gap.

  10. Sharing is Caring: Minimizing the Disruption with Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Shannon, Robert P; Presutti, Richard J

    2018-03-13

    There is an upward trend incidence of multiple chronic life-limiting conditions with a well-documented associated impact on patients and their caregivers. When patients approach the end of life, they are often faced with a challenging multidimensional burden while navigating a complex health care system. Patients and families/caregivers are faced with daily decisions, often with little or no frame of reference or medical knowledge. The "what, how, when, and where" puzzle during this challenging time can be overwhelming for patients and their families, and when clinicians do not contemplate this associated workload's impact on patients and caregivers' capacity for self-care, patients and caregivers scramble to find compensatory solutions, often putting their health care at lower priority. This consequently warrants the underlying importance of palliative care and integrating it into the patients' health care plans earlier. There is increasing evidence from recent trials that supported implementing national policies regarding the early integration of palliative care and its role in improving the quality of life, increasing survival, and supporting patients' and caregivers' values when making decisions about their health care while possibly minimizing the burden of illness. The mission of palliative care is to assess, anticipate, and alleviate the challenges and suffering for patients and their caregivers by providing well-constructed approaches to disease-related physical treatments as well as psychological, financial, and spiritual aspects. Communication among all participants (the patient, family/caregivers, and all involved health care professionals) ought to be timely, thorough, and patient-centric. Palliative medicine arguably represents an example of shared decision-making (SDM)-facilitating a patient-centered, informed decision-making through an empathic conversation that is supported by clinicians' expertise and the best available evidence that takes patients

  11. Palliative Care for Patients with Nonmalignant Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nishkarsh; Garg, Rakesh; Kumar, Vinod; Bharati, Sachidanand Jee; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2017-01-01

    Nonmalignant respiratory diseases are chronic and life-limiting conditions that need holistic palliative care. Such patients not only have a variety of physical symptoms such as dyspnea, pain, cough, depression, and anxiety, but also have a number of psychosocial and spiritual issues, which are not addressed to by us. This leads to a poor quality of life. Hence, these patients require supportive palliative care to relieve their sufferings, but unfortunately such care is not available to them in our country. In this article, we have tried to discuss the barriers to the provision of palliative care to such patients and suggested some measures to overcome them. PMID:28827944

  12. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Tracey; Porter, Sam

    2017-08-01

    Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therapy for palliative care. In keeping with the realist approach, we examined all relevant literature to develop theories that could explain how music therapy works. A total of 51 articles were included in the review. Music therapy was found to have a therapeutic effect on the physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual suffering of palliative care patients. We also identified program mechanisms that help explain music therapy's therapeutic effects, along with facilitating contexts for implementation. Music therapy may be an effective nonpharmacological approach to managing distressing symptoms in palliative care patients. The findings also suggest that group music therapy may be a cost-efficient and effective way to support staff caring for palliative care patients. We encourage others to continue developing the evidence base in order to expand our understanding of how music therapy works, with the aim of informing and improving the provision of music therapy for palliative care patients.

  13. Children’s palliative care now! Highlights from the second ICPCN conference on children’s palliative care, 18–21 May 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Downing, J; Kiman, R; Boucher, S; Nkosi, B; Steel, B; Marston, C; Lascar, E; Marston, J

    2016-01-01

    The International Children’s Palliative Care Network held its second international conference on children’s palliative care in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from the 18th–21st May 2016. The theme of the conference was ‘Children’s Palliative Care…. Now!’ emphasising the need for palliative care for children now, as the future will be too late for many of them. Six pre-conference workshops were held, addressing issues connected to pain assessment and management, adolescent palliative care, ethics and decision-making, developing programmes, the basics of children’s palliative care, and hidden aspects of children’s palliative care. The conference brought together 410 participants from 40 countries. Plenary, concurrent, and poster presentations covered issues around the status of children’s palliative care, genetics, perinatal and neonatal palliative care, the impact of children’s palliative care and the experiences of parents and volunteers, palliative care as a human right, education in children’s palliative care, managing complex pain in children, spiritual care and when to initiate palliative care. The ‘Big Debate’ explored issues around decision-making and end of life care in children, and gave participants the opportunity to explore a sensitive and thought provoking topic. At the end of the conference, delegates were urged to sign the Commitment of Buenos Aires which called for governments to implement the WHA resolution and ensure access to palliative care for neonates, children and their families, and also commits us as palliative care providers to share all that we can and collaborate with each other to achieve the global vision of palliative care for all children who need it. The conference highlighted the ongoing issues in children’s palliative care and participants were continually challenged to ensure that children can access palliative care NOW. PMID:27610193

  14. Integrated palliative care is about professional networking rather than standardisation of care: A qualitative study with healthcare professionals in 19 integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries

    PubMed Central

    den Herder-van der Eerden, Marlieke; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen; Preston, Nancy; Linge-Dahl, Lisa; Radbruch, Lukas; Van Beek, Karen; Menten, Johan; Busa, Csilla; Csikos, Agnes; Vissers, Kris; van Gurp, Jelle; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Background: Integrated palliative care aims at improving coordination of palliative care services around patients’ anticipated needs. However, international comparisons of how integrated palliative care is implemented across four key domains of integrated care (content of care, patient flow, information logistics and availability of (human) resources and material) are lacking. Aim: To examine how integrated palliative care takes shape in practice across abovementioned key domains within several integrated palliative care initiatives in Europe. Design: Qualitative group interview design. Setting/participants: A total of 19 group interviews were conducted (2 in Belgium, 4 in the Netherlands, 4 in the United Kingdom, 4 in Germany and 5 in Hungary) with 142 healthcare professionals from several integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries. The majority were nurses (n = 66; 46%) and physicians (n = 50; 35%). Results: The dominant strategy for fostering integrated palliative care is building core teams of palliative care specialists and extended professional networks based on personal relationships, shared norms, values and mutual trust, rather than developing standardised information exchange and referral pathways. Providing integrated palliative care with healthcare professionals in the wider professional community appears difficult, as a shared proactive multidisciplinary palliative care approach is lacking, and healthcare professionals often do not know palliative care professionals or services. Conclusion: Achieving better palliative care integration into regular healthcare and convincing the wider professional community is a difficult task that will take time and effort. Enhancing standardisation of palliative care into education, referral pathways and guidelines and standardised information exchange may be necessary. External authority (policy makers, insurance companies and professional bodies) may be needed to support integrated

  15. Integrated palliative care is about professional networking rather than standardisation of care: A qualitative study with healthcare professionals in 19 integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries.

    PubMed

    den Herder-van der Eerden, Marlieke; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen; Payne, Sheila; Preston, Nancy; Linge-Dahl, Lisa; Radbruch, Lukas; Van Beek, Karen; Menten, Johan; Busa, Csilla; Csikos, Agnes; Vissers, Kris; van Gurp, Jelle; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2018-06-01

    Integrated palliative care aims at improving coordination of palliative care services around patients' anticipated needs. However, international comparisons of how integrated palliative care is implemented across four key domains of integrated care (content of care, patient flow, information logistics and availability of (human) resources and material) are lacking. To examine how integrated palliative care takes shape in practice across abovementioned key domains within several integrated palliative care initiatives in Europe. Qualitative group interview design. A total of 19 group interviews were conducted (2 in Belgium, 4 in the Netherlands, 4 in the United Kingdom, 4 in Germany and 5 in Hungary) with 142 healthcare professionals from several integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries. The majority were nurses ( n = 66; 46%) and physicians ( n = 50; 35%). The dominant strategy for fostering integrated palliative care is building core teams of palliative care specialists and extended professional networks based on personal relationships, shared norms, values and mutual trust, rather than developing standardised information exchange and referral pathways. Providing integrated palliative care with healthcare professionals in the wider professional community appears difficult, as a shared proactive multidisciplinary palliative care approach is lacking, and healthcare professionals often do not know palliative care professionals or services. Achieving better palliative care integration into regular healthcare and convincing the wider professional community is a difficult task that will take time and effort. Enhancing standardisation of palliative care into education, referral pathways and guidelines and standardised information exchange may be necessary. External authority (policy makers, insurance companies and professional bodies) may be needed to support integrated palliative care practices across settings.

  16. The missing link in Aboriginal care: resource accounting.

    PubMed

    Ashton, C W; Duffie-Ashton, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Resource accounting principles provide more effective planning for Aboriginal healthcare delivery through driving best management practices, efficacious techniques for long-term resource allocation, transparency of information and performance measurement. Major improvements to Aboriginal health in New Zealand and Australia were facilitated in the context of this public finance paradigm, rather than cash accounting systems that remain the current method for public departments in Canada. Multiple funding sources and fragmented delivery of Aboriginal healthcare can be remedied through similar adoption of such principles.

  17. Mapping the scope of occupational therapy practice in palliative care: A European Association for Palliative Care cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Eva, Gail; Morgan, Deidre

    2018-01-01

    Background: Occupational therapists play an integral role in the care of people with life-limiting illnesses. However, little is known about the scope of occupational therapy service provision in palliative care across Europe and factors influencing service delivery. Aim: This study aimed to map the scope of occupational therapy palliative care interventions across Europe and to explore occupational therapists’ perceptions of opportunities and challenges when delivering and developing palliative care services. Design: A 49-item online cross-sectional survey comprised of fixed and free text responses was securely hosted via the European Association for Palliative Care website. Survey design, content and recruitment processes were reviewed and formally approved by the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyse data. Setting/respondents: Respondents were European occupational therapists whose caseload included palliative care recipients (full-time or part-time). Results: In total, 237 valid responses were analysed. Findings demonstrated a consistency in occupational therapy practice in palliative care between European countries. Clinician time was prioritised towards indirect patient care, with limited involvement in service development, leadership and research. A need for undergraduate and postgraduate education was identified. Organisational expectations and understanding of the scope of the occupational therapy role constrain the delivery of services to support patients and carers. Conclusion: Further development of occupational therapy in palliative care, particularly capacity building in leadership and research activities, is warranted. There is a need for continuing education and awareness raising of the role of occupational therapy in palliative care. PMID:29756556

  18. Exploring undergraduate midwifery students' readiness to deliver culturally secure care for pregnant and birthing Aboriginal women.

    PubMed

    Thackrah, Rosalie D; Thompson, Sandra C; Durey, Angela

    2015-04-16

    Culturally secure health care settings enhance accessibility by Aboriginal Australians and improve their satisfaction with service delivery. A culturally secure health service recognises and responds to the legitimate cultural rights of the recipients of care. Focus is upon the health care system as well as the practice and behaviours of the individuals within it. In an attempt to produce culturally secure practitioners, the inclusion of Aboriginal content in health professional programs at Australian universities is now widespread. Studies of medical students have identified the positive impact of this content on knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people but relatively little is known about the responses of students in other health professional education programs. This study explored undergraduate midwifery students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people, and the impact of Aboriginal content in their program. The study surveyed 44 students who were in their first, second and third years of a direct entry, undergraduate midwifery program at a Western Australian (WA) university. The first year students were surveyed before and after completion of a compulsory Aboriginal health unit. Second and third year students who had already completed the unit were surveyed at the end of their academic year. Pre- and post-unit responses revealed a positive shift in first year students' knowledge and attitudes towards Aboriginal people and evidence that teaching in the unit was largely responsible for this shift. A comparison of post-unit responses with those from students in subsequent years of their program revealed a significant decline in knowledge about Aboriginal issues, attitudes towards Aboriginal people and the influence of the unit on their views. Despite this, all students indicated a strong interest in more clinical exposure to Aboriginal settings. The inclusion of a unit on Aboriginal health in an undergraduate midwifery program has been shown to

  19. Palliative care volunteerism across the healthcare system: A survey study.

    PubMed

    Vanderstichelen, Steven; Houttekier, Dirk; Cohen, Joachim; Van Wesemael, Yanna; Deliens, Luc; Chambaere, Kenneth

    2018-05-01

    Volunteers fulfil several roles in supporting terminally ill people and their relatives and can positively influence quality of care. Healthcare in many countries faces resource constraints and some governments now expect communities to provide an increasing proportion of palliative care. However, systematic insights into volunteer presence, tasks and training and organisational challenges for volunteerism are lacking. Describe organised volunteerism in palliative direct patient care across the Flemish healthcare system (Belgium). A cross-sectional postal survey using a self-developed questionnaire was conducted with 342 healthcare organisations. The study included full population samples of palliative care units, palliative day-care centres, palliative home care teams, medical oncology departments, sitting services, community home care services and a random sample of nursing homes. Responses were obtained for 254 (79%) organisations; 80% have volunteers providing direct patient care. Psychosocial, signalling and existential care tasks were the most prevalent volunteer tasks. The most cited organisational barriers were finding suitable (84%) and new (80%) volunteers; 33% of organisations offered obligatory training (75% dedicated palliative care, 12% nursing homes). Differences in volunteer use were associated with training needs and prevalence of organisational barriers. Results suggest potential for larger volunteer contingents. The necessity of volunteer support and training and organisational coordination of recruitment efforts is emphasised. Organisations are encouraged to invest in adequate volunteer support and training. The potential of shared frameworks for recruitment and training of volunteers is discussed. Future research should study volunteerism at the volunteer level to contrast with organisational data.

  20. [Palliative care: an example of Comparative Effectiveness Research?].

    PubMed

    Schmacke, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) seeks to establish treatment objectives and concepts striving to achieve patient relevant progress in therapy on the basis of published evidence. Using the example of palliative medicine and palliative care, respectively, it will be demonstrated that these two are under-researched areas of care. In addition, it will become clear that the success of this interdisciplinary treatment concept for the seriously ill must be weighed in the light of traditional clinical research - far beyond the cancer diagnosis. The current distinction between curative and palliative research and care urgently needs to be reconsidered. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. A Survey of Hospice and Palliative Care Physicians Regarding Palliative Sedation Practices.

    PubMed

    Lux, Michael R; Protus, Bridget McCrate; Kimbrel, Jason; Grauer, Phyllis

    2017-04-01

    Patients nearing the end of life may experience symptoms that are refractory to standard therapeutic options. Physicians may consider palliative sedation to relieve intolerable suffering. There is limited clinical literature regarding preferred medications for palliative sedation. To determine the preferred medications physicians use when implementing palliative sedation. An Internet-based, cross-sectional survey of hospice and palliative care physicians in the United States. A link to the survey was e-mailed to 3130 physician members of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, of which 381 physicians completed the survey. Physicians were not required to answer all questions. Nearly all (n = 335, 99%) respondents indicated that palliative sedation may be used (acceptable by 73% [n = 248] for refractory symptoms and acceptable by 26% [n = 87] only for imminently dying patients). Seventy-nine percent (n = 252) believed that opioids should not be used to induce palliative sedation but should be continued to provide pain control. Midazolam was the most commonly selected first-line choice for palliative sedation (n = 155, 42%). The most commonly reported second-line agents for the induction of palliative sedation were lorazepam, midazolam (for those who did not select midazolam as first-line agent), and phenobarbital with a reported preference of 20% (n = 49), 19% (n = 46), and 17% (n = 40), respectively. Of the physicians surveyed, 99% (n = 335) felt that palliative sedation is a reasonable treatment modality. Midazolam was considered a drug of choice for inducing and maintaining sedation, and opioids were continued for pain control.

  2. Increasing Access to Palliative Care Services in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Caitlin Marie

    The Institute of Medicine's report, Dying in America, highlights the critical need for the widespread implementation of palliative care to improve end-of-life care. Approximately 20% of all deaths in America occur during or shortly after an intensive care unit (ICU) admission; therefore, it is important for critical care units to have systems in place to facilitate patient access to palliative care services. The aim of this quality improvement (QI) project was to develop and implement a palliative care screening tool using evidence-based triggers to help increase the proportion of palliative care consultations in the ICU setting. A QI project was designed and implemented in a 14-bed medical-surgical ICU in the southeastern United States using the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle. A palliative care screening tool was developed by an interdisciplinary team of key stakeholders in the ICU using evidence-based triggers, and staff were educated on the intervention. The proportion of ICU patients who received a palliative care consultation was compared preintervention and postintervention to determine whether the QI project contributed to an increased proportion of palliative care consultations. The proportion of palliative care consultations among patients admitted to the ICU by the pulmonary critical care team increased from 1 of 10 preintervention to 3 of 10 postintervention, resulting in a promising increase in patients receiving palliative care services consistent with evidence-based recommendations. The use of an evidence-based screening tool to trigger palliative care consultation in the ICU setting can aid in increasing the proportion of critical care patients who receive a palliative care referral. The increase in the proportion of palliative care referrals by the pulmonary critical care service warrants expansion of the intervention to include additional medical subspecialists who frequently admit patients in this ICU setting. Further assessment of the intervention is

  3. Paperbark and pinard: A historical account of maternity care in one remote Australian Aboriginal town.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Sarah; Belton, Suzanne; McGrath, Ann; Saggers, Sherry; Narjic, Concepta Wulili

    2015-12-01

    Maternity care in remote areas of the Australian Northern Territory is restricted to antenatal and postnatal care only, with women routinely evacuated to give birth in hospital. Using one remote Aboriginal community as a case study, our aim with this research was to document and explore the major changes to the provision of remote maternity care over the period spanning pre-European colonisation to 1996. Our research methods included historical ethnographic fieldwork (2007-2013); interviews with Aboriginal women, Aboriginal health workers, religious and non-religious non-Aboriginal health workers and past residents; and archival review of historical documents. We identified four distinct eras of maternity care. Maternity care staffed by nuns who were trained in nursing and midwifery serviced childbirth in the local community. Support for community childbirth was incrementally withdrawn over a period, until the government eventually assumed responsibility for all health care. The introduction of Western maternity care colonised Aboriginal birth practices and midwifery practice. Historical population statistics suggest that access to local Western maternity care may have contributed to a significant population increase. Despite population growth and higher demand for maternity services, local maternity services declined significantly. The rationale for removing childbirth services from the community was never explicitly addressed in any known written policy directive. Declining maternity services led to the de-skilling of many Aboriginal health workers and the significant community loss of future career pathways for Aboriginal midwives. This has contributed to the current status quo, with very few female Aboriginal health workers actively providing remote maternity care. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integration of Palliative Care in the Context of Rapid Response

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Mathews, Kusum S.; Weissman, David E.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J. Randall; Frontera, Jennifer A.; Gabriel, Michelle; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Weiss, Stefanie P.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Lustbader, Dana R.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) can effectively foster discussions about appropriate goals of care and address other emergent palliative care needs of patients and families facing life-threatening illness on hospital wards. In this article, The Improving Palliative Care in the ICU (IPAL-ICU) Project brings together interdisciplinary expertise and existing data to address the following: special challenges for providing palliative care in the rapid response setting, knowledge and skills needed by RRTs for delivery of high-quality palliative care, and strategies for improving the integration of palliative care with rapid response critical care. We discuss key components of communication with patients, families, and primary clinicians to develop a goal-directed treatment approach during a rapid response event. We also highlight the need for RRT expertise to initiate symptom relief. Strategies including specific clinician training and system initiatives are then recommended for RRT care improvement. We conclude by suggesting that as evaluation of their impact on other outcomes continues, performance by RRTs in meeting palliative care needs of patients and families should also be measured and improved. PMID:25644909

  5. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience

    PubMed Central

    Groeneveld, E Iris; Cassel, J Brian; Bausewein, Claudia; Csikós, Ágnes; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Ryan, Karen; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Eychmueller, Steffen; Gudat Keller, Heike; Allan, Simon; Hasselaar, Jeroen; García-Baquero Merino, Teresa; Swetenham, Kate; Piper, Kym; Fürst, Carl Johan; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from them. Aim: To assess national models and methods for financing and reimbursing palliative care. Design: Initial literature scoping yielded limited evidence on the subject as national policy documents are difficult to identify, access and interpret. We undertook expert consultations to appraise national models of palliative care financing in England, Germany, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. These represent different levels of service development and a variety of funding mechanisms. Results: Funding mechanisms reflect country-specific context and local variations in care provision. Patterns emerging include the following: Provider payment is rarely linked to population need and often perpetuates existing inequitable patterns in service provision. Funding is frequently characterised as a mixed system of charitable, public and private payers. The basis on which providers are paid for services rarely reflects individual care input or patient needs. Conclusion: Funding mechanisms need to be well understood and used with caution to ensure best practice and minimise perverse incentives. Before we can conduct cross-national comparisons of costs and impact of palliative care, we need to understand the funding and policy context for palliative care in each country of interest. PMID:28156188

  6. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, E Iris; Cassel, J Brian; Bausewein, Claudia; Csikós, Ágnes; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Ryan, Karen; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Eychmueller, Steffen; Gudat Keller, Heike; Allan, Simon; Hasselaar, Jeroen; García-Baquero Merino, Teresa; Swetenham, Kate; Piper, Kym; Fürst, Carl Johan; Murtagh, Fliss Em

    2017-04-01

    Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from them. To assess national models and methods for financing and reimbursing palliative care. Initial literature scoping yielded limited evidence on the subject as national policy documents are difficult to identify, access and interpret. We undertook expert consultations to appraise national models of palliative care financing in England, Germany, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. These represent different levels of service development and a variety of funding mechanisms. Funding mechanisms reflect country-specific context and local variations in care provision. Patterns emerging include the following: Provider payment is rarely linked to population need and often perpetuates existing inequitable patterns in service provision. Funding is frequently characterised as a mixed system of charitable, public and private payers. The basis on which providers are paid for services rarely reflects individual care input or patient needs. Funding mechanisms need to be well understood and used with caution to ensure best practice and minimise perverse incentives. Before we can conduct cross-national comparisons of costs and impact of palliative care, we need to understand the funding and policy context for palliative care in each country of interest.

  7. Common threads? Palliative care service developments in seven European countries.

    PubMed

    Clark, D; ten Have, H; Janssens, R

    2000-11-01

    Since the late 1960s hospice and palliative care services have been developing in many European countries. Although attention has been given to patterns of development in specific national contexts, so far we lack a comparative understanding of how these services are organized and delivered. Such a comparison poses certain practical and methodological difficulties. It does, however, allow a wider view of the current provision of palliative care in Europe, together with a consideration of implications for the future. We report on an analysis of palliative care developments in seven European countries which gave attention to early origins, patterns of provision, and structural and policy integration. We conclude that, despite different processes of development, the emergent discipline of palliative care now finds its most congenial home within the structures of the formal health care system. Accordingly, inequities between the seven countries can be more clearly identified, posing continuing challenges to policy makers and planners who operate with a European perspective.

  8. Ideology and Palliative Care: Moral Hazards at the Bedside.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Rosamond; Strain, James J

    2018-01-01

    Palliative care has had a long-standing commitment to teaching medical students and other medical professionals about pain management, communication, supporting patients in their decisions, and providing compassionate end-of-life care. Palliative care programs also have a critical role in helping patients understand medical conditions, and in supporting them in dealing with pain, fear of dying, and the experiences of the terminal phase of their lives. We applaud their efforts to provide that critical training and fully support their continued important work in meeting the needs of patients and families. Although we appreciate the contributions of palliative care services, we have noted a problem involving some palliative care professionals' attitudes, methods of decisionmaking, and use of language. In this article we explain these problems by discussing two cases that we encountered.

  9. How do physicians learn to provide palliative care?

    PubMed

    Schulman-Green, Dena

    2003-01-01

    Medical interns, residents, and fellows are heavily involved in caring for dying patients and interacting with their families. Due to a lack of formal medical education in the area, these house staff often have a limited knowledge of palliative care. The purpose of this study was to determine how, given inadequate formal education, house staff learn to provide palliative care. Specifically, this study sought to explore the extent to which physicians learn to provide palliative care through formal medical education, from physicians and other hospital staff, and by on-the-job learning. Twenty physicians were interviewed about their medical education and other learning experiences in palliative care. ATLAS/ti software was used for data coding and analysis. Analysis of transcripts indicated that house staff learn little to nothing through formal education, to varying degrees from attending physicians and hospital staff, and mostly on the job and by making mistakes.

  10. Human nature: a foundation for palliative care.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Beverly J B

    2008-04-01

    The Aristotelian-Thomist philosopher holds that human intellectual knowledge is possible because of the order in the world and natural human capacities. It is the position of this paper that there is a shared human form or nature that unites all humanity as members of the same kind. Moral treatment is due to every human being because they are human, and is not based upon expression of abilities. Humans have substantial dynamic existence in the world, an existence which overflows in expressive relationships. As both patient and health professional are human, human nature forms the natural foundation of health care. This paper looks towards human nature for moral guidance. The therapeutic relationship is seen as a part of the interpersonal moral space formed by human relationality, which tends towards community - in this case, the healthcare system. The therapeutic relationship is also a source of moral responsibility, as illness makes the patient vulnerable, while knowledge and nursing capacities generate in the nurse a duty to care. Nursing theory serves to connect philosophical reflection and nursing practice. Imogene King's conceptual system and theory of Goal Attainment is the theory that follows from the perspective of human person being presented. This synthesis of philosophy and theory is developed with the goal of shedding light on healthcare decisions in palliative care. The article concludes with the acknowledgement that the complexity of contextualized individual decisions requires the insight and discipline of the moral practitioner, and provides some thoughts on how education, development, and refinement transform an individual into a nurse.

  11. Cross cultural research in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Field, Annette; Maher, Paul; Webb, David

    2002-01-01

    Hospices within Australia, such as the Sacred Heart Hospice (SHH) at Darlinghurst, have over many years proven to be highly successful in meeting the needs of persons who require palliative care and addressing the concerns raised by their families. However, health professionals have increasingly recognised that caring for persons who are from a Non-English Speaking Background (NESB) and for their families requires giving them special consideration because of their different cultural needs. This project involved reviewing all inpatient files of the SHH over a three year period (1 October 1994 to 30 September 1997) and quantitatively reviewing all inpatient files of NESB inpatients during this period. Following this review, the researchers coordinated a focus group that comprised various health professionals from SHH and other health and community services and representatives of four non-English speaking countries--Greece, Italy, the former USSR, and China. These countries had the highest representation of inpatients during the three-year term covered by the research project. The project identified a number of specific strategies aimed at providing a more culturally sensitive health care service to NESB inpatients.

  12. Poverty Reduction in India through Palliative Care: A Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Cathy; Thyle, Ann; Duomai, Savita; Manak, Manju

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: EMMS International and Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) implemented a pilot project, poverty reduction in India through palliative care (PRIPCare). A total of 129 interviews with patients and family enrolled in palliative care at three EHA hospitals (in Fatehpur, Lalitpur and Utraula) and staff discussions established that 66% of palliative care patients had lost livelihoods due to illness, 26% of patients' families had members who had lost livelihoods due to the illness, 98% of enrolled households had debts, 59% had loans for which they had sold assets, 69% of households took out debt after their family member fell ill, many patients do not know about government benefits and lack necessary documents, many village headmen require bribes to give people access to benefits, and many bereaved women and children lose everything. Palliative care enabled 85% of patients and families to spend less on medicines, 31% of patients received free medicines, all patients reduced use of out-patient departments (OPDs), 20% reduced use of inpatient departments (IPDs), and therefore spent less on travel, 8% of patients had started earning again due to improved health, members of 10% of families started earning again, and one hospital educated 171 village headmen and increased by 5% the number of patients and their families receiving government benefits. If only 0.7% of needy adults are receiving palliative care, these benefits could be delivered to 143 times more families, targeted effectively at poverty reduction. Palliative care has great scope to reduce that most desperate poverty in India caused by chronic illness. Context: This article concerns a study by the UK NGO EMMS International and Indian NGO EHA, to assess whether palliative care reduces household poverty. Aims: EHA staff had noticed that many patients spend a lot on ineffective treatment before joining palliative care, many families do not know their entitlement to government healthcare subsidies or

  13. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sandra C; Haynes, Emma; Woods, John A; Bessarab, Dawn C; Dimer, Lynette A; Wood, Marianne M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Hamilton, Sandra J; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. Methods: The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Results: Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Conclusion: Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their Aboriginal patients

  14. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Sandra C; Haynes, Emma; Woods, John A; Bessarab, Dawn C; Dimer, Lynette A; Wood, Marianne M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Hamilton, Sandra J; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2016-01-01

    The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their Aboriginal patients and work at multiple levels both outside and

  15. Palliative care for adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Wolfe, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer represent a unique and challenging group of patients with distinct developmental and psychosocial needs that may be unrecognized or unmet during their cancer experience. Palliative care refers to the total care of a patient, regardless of his or her disease status, and aims to improve quality of life by controlling symptoms and alleviating physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering. Integrating palliative care into standard oncology practice for AYAs is therefore valuable, if not imperative, in improving their overall cancer experience. In this review, we aimed to describe the scope, benefits, and challenges of palliative care for AYA oncology patients. We provide a broad impression of the existing literature describing or investigating palliative care in this population. Put together, the evidence suggests that palliative care is not only needed, but can also be critically beneficial to patients, families, and health care professionals alike. As we increase public and professional awareness of the needs and applications of palliative care for AYA patients with cancer, we will ultimately enable better psychosocial outcomes of the AYA patients and their larger communities. PMID:21523753

  16. Health care professionals' attitudes regarding palliative care for patients with chronic heart failure: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Ziehm, Jeanette; Farin, Erik; Seibel, Katharina; Becker, Gerhild; Köberich, Stefan

    2016-08-15

    Even though struggling with similar symptom burden, patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) receive less palliative care than patients suffering from malignant diseases. Researchers have found that this might be related to lack of knowledge about palliative care, insufficient interprofessional communication as well as the cyclic course of disease which makes accurate prognosis difficult. However, research findings have shown that patients with CHF benefit from palliative care. As there are no studies for the German health care system this study aimed to assess health care professionals' attitudes regarding palliative care of CHF patients in order to identify barriers and facilitators for this patient group and hence to develop recommendations for improvement of CHF patients' access to palliative care in Germany. Problem-centered interviews with 23 health care professionals involved in care of CHF patients (nurses: hospital, outpatient, heart failure, PC; physicians: hospital and resident cardiologists, general practitioners) were conducted and analysed according to Mayring's qualitative content analysis. Most interviewees perceived a need for palliative care for CHF patients. Regarding barriers patients', public's, and professionals' lack of knowledge of palliative care and CHF; shortcomings in communication and cooperation of different professional groups; inability of cardiology to accept medical limits; difficult prognosis of course of disease; and patients' concerns regarding palliative care were described. Different attitudes regarding appropriate time of initiation of palliative care for CHF patients (late vs. early) were found. Furthermore, better communication and closer cooperation between different professional groups and medical disciplines as well as better education about palliative care and CHF for professionals, patients, and public were cited. Palliative care for CHF patients is a neglected topic in both practice and research and should receive

  17. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  18. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  19. European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation: an ethical discussion.

    PubMed

    Juth, Niklas; Lindblad, Anna; Lynöe, Niels; Sjöstrand, Manne; Helgesson, Gert

    2010-09-13

    The aim of this paper is to critically discuss some of the ethically controversial issues regarding continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life that are addressed in the EAPC recommended framework for the use of sedation in palliative care. We argue that the EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on the ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. It is unclear what constitutes refractory symptoms and what the relationship is between refractory symptoms and intolerable suffering, which in turn makes it difficult to determine what are necessary and sufficient criteria for palliative sedation at the end of life, and why. As regards the difference between palliative sedation at the end of life and so-called slow euthanasia, the rationale behind stressing the difference is insufficiently demonstrated, e.g. due to an overlooked ambiguity in the concept of intention. It is therefore unclear when palliative sedation at the end of life amounts to abuse and why. The EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on some ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. In this text, we identify and discuss these issues in the hope that an ensuing discussion will clarify the EAPC's standpoint.

  20. Palliative Care Professional Development for Critical Care Nurses: A Multicenter Program.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Noort, Janice; Pearson, Diana; Boyle, Deborah; Grywalski, Michelle; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Moore, Eric; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Mitchell, William; Edmonds, Kyle; Fairman, Nathan; Joseph, Denah; MacMillan, John; Milic, Michelle M; Miller, Monica; Nakagawa, Laura; O'Riordan, David L; Pietras, Christopher; Thornberry, Kathryn; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2017-09-01

    Integrating palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) requires involvement of bedside nurses, who report inadequate education in palliative care. To implement and evaluate a palliative care professional development program for ICU bedside nurses. From May 2013 to January 2015, palliative care advanced practice nurses and nurse educators in 5 academic medical centers completed a 3-day train-the-trainer program followed by 2 years of mentoring to implement the initiative. The program consisted of 8-hour communication workshops for bedside nurses and structured rounds in ICUs, where nurse leaders coached bedside nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. Primary outcomes were nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills in surveys, and nurses' identification of palliative care needs during coaching rounds. Each center held at least 6 workshops, training 428 bedside nurses. Nurses rated their skill level higher after the workshop for 15 tasks (eg, responding to family distress, ensuring families understand information in family meetings, all P < .01 vs preworkshop). Coaching rounds in each ICU took a mean of 3 hours per month. For 82% of 1110 patients discussed in rounds, bedside nurses identified palliative care needs and created plans to address them. Communication skills training workshops increased nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills. Coaching rounds supported nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. [eLearning service for home palliative care].

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fukushima, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    In order to support the home palliative care learning, we made the eLearning service for home palliative care (beta version) and tried to teach the palliative care to the medical staffs in the community. The various learners (such as nurses, pharmacists and the like) accessed to the online learning and used this eLearning service. After the learners finished eLearning for home palliative care, some questionnaires were distributed to the learners and analyzed by us. The analysis of questionnaires revealed that almost all were satisfied with our eLearning services. Especially the learners were not only interested in using the skills of opioids and the management of pain control, but they had a good cognition for the usage of opioids.

  2. Why Palliative Care for Children is Preferable to Euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brian S

    2016-02-01

    Recent laws in Europe now allow for pediatric euthanasia. The author reviews some rationale for caution, and addresses why ensuring the availability of pediatric palliative care is an important step before allowing pediatric euthanasia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Overcoming recruitment challenges in palliative care clinical trials.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; Lodato, Jordan E; Currow, David C; Abernethy, Amy P

    2013-11-01

    Palliative care is increasingly viewed as a necessary component of cancer care, especially for patients with advanced disease. Rigorous clinical trials are thus needed to build the palliative care evidence base, but clinical research-especially participant recruitment-is difficult. Major barriers include (1) patient factors, (2) "gatekeeping," and (3) ethical concerns. Here we discuss an approach to overcoming these barriers, using the Palliative Care Trial (PCT) as a case study. The PCT was a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial randomized controlled trial (RCT) of different service delivery models to improve pain control in the palliative setting. It used a recruitment protocol that fused evidence-based strategies with principles of "social marketing," an approach involving the systematic application of marketing techniques. Main components included (1) an inclusive triage algorithm, (2) information booklets targeting particular stakeholders, (3) a specialized recruitment nurse, and (4) standardization of wording across all study communications. From an eligible pool of 607 patients, the PCT enrolled 461 patients over 26 months. Twenty percent of patients referred to the palliative care service were enrolled (76% of those eligible after screening). Several common barriers were minimized; among those who declined participation, family disinterest was uncommon (5%), as was the perception of burden imposed (4%). Challenges to clinical trial recruitment in palliative care are significant but not insurmountable. A carefully crafted recruitment and retention protocol can be effective. Our experience with designing and deploying a social-marketing-based protocol shows the benefits of such an approach.

  4. Comfort experience in palliative care: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Adriana; Parola, Vitor; Escobar-Bravo, Miguel; Apóstolo, João

    2016-08-02

    Palliative care aims to provide maximum comfort to the patient. However it is unknown what factors facilitate or hinder the experience of comfort, from the perspective of inpatients of palliative care units. This lack of knowledge hinders the development of comfort interventions adjusted to these patients. The aim of this research is to describe the comfort and discomfort experienced by inpatients at palliative care units. A phenomenological descriptive study was undertaken. Ten inpatients were recruited from a Spanish palliative care unit and seven from a Portuguese palliative care unit. Data were collected using individual interviews and analysed following the method of Giorgi. Four themes reflect the essence of the lived experience: The Palliative Care as a response to the patient's needs with advanced disease, attempt to naturalize advanced disease, confrontation with their own vulnerability, openness to the spiritual dimension. Informants revealed that they experience comfort through humanized care, differentiated environment, symptomatic control, hope and relationships. The discomfort emerges from the losses and powerlessness against their situation. Even if such findings may seem intuitive, documenting them is essential because it invites us to reflect on our convictions about what it means to be comfortable for these patients, and allows incorporating this information in the design of focused interventions to maximize the comfort experience.

  5. Opportunities for Palliative Care in Public Health.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Liliana; Pastrana, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In May 2014, the World Health Assembly, of the World Health Organization (WHO), unanimously adopted a palliative care (PC) resolution, which outlines clear recommendations to the United Nations member states, such as including PC in national health policies and in the undergraduate curricula for health care professionals, and highlights the critical need for countries to ensure that there is an adequate supply of essential PC medicines, especially those needed to alleviate pain. This resolution also carries great challenges: Every year over 20 million patients (of which 6% are children) need PC at the end of life (EOL). However, in 2011, approximately three million patients received PC, and only one in ten people in need is currently receiving it. We describe this public health situation and systems failure, the history and evolution of PC, and the components of the WHO public health model. We propose a role for public health for PC integration in community settings to advance PC and relieve suffering in the world.

  6. 'To die with dignity': an update on Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Significant developments have occurred in the discipline of palliative care in the modern era. This paper shall explore those developments, challenge some widely held misconceptions about the role and daily practice of the discipline, highlight the growing recognition of the role of palliative care in non-malignant diseases, briefly discuss innovations in symptom management and reflect on the underlying principles, maturation and challenges faced by the discipline. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Characteristics and Outcomes of Psychology Referrals in Palliative Care Department.

    PubMed

    Ann-Yi, Sujin; Bruera, Eduardo; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane D; Agosta, Monica; Williams, Janet L; Balankari, Vishidha Reddy; Carmack, Cindy L

    2018-06-06

    Psychologists can provide unique contributions to interdisciplinary palliative care. Despite research indicating high distress in palliative care cancer patients, little has been reported regarding the feasibility and practice of psychology in this setting. To review the integration of clinical psychology practice in a palliative care department at a major comprehensive cancer center. Retrospective chart review of 1940 unique cancer patients (6451 total patient contacts) referred for psychology services provided by clinical psychologists in palliative care from 9/1/2013 to 2/29/2016. Psychologists provided services to 1644 in-patients (24% of palliative care in-patients) and 296 out-patients (19% of palliative care out-patients). The majority (85%) received services in the in-patient setting. Most patients were female (57%) and white (68%) with a variety of cancer diagnoses. Adjustment disorders were the most prevalent in both settings with significant differences in other DSM-5 diagnoses by service location (p<0.0001). Psychological assessment (86%) and supportive expressive counseling (79%) were the most frequent services provided in the initial consult. Duration of initial visit was significantly longer in out-patient (median=60 minutes) compared to in-patient setting (median=40 minutes) (p<.0001). No significant differences were noted between settings regarding the median number of counseling sessions per patient; however, the majority (70%) only received 1 or 2 sessions. Over time, total patient encounters increased in the in-patient setting (p<0.0001), while session lengths in both settings significantly decreased (p<0.0001). Palliative care psychology services successfully integrated into an interdisciplinary palliative care department and rapidly grew in both in-patient and out-patient settings. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 'Race' matters: racialization and egalitarian discourses involving Aboriginal people in the Canadian health care context.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sannie Y; Browne, Annette J

    2008-04-01

    The major purpose of this paper is to examine how 'race' and racialization operate in health care. To do so, we draw upon data from an ethnographic study that examines the complex issues surrounding health care access for Aboriginal people in an urban center in Canada. In our analysis, we strategically locate our critical examination of racialization in the 'tension of difference' between two emerging themes, namely the health care rhetoric of 'treating everyone the same,' and the perception among many Aboriginal patients that they were 'being treated differently' by health care providers because of their identity as Aboriginal people, and because of their low socio-economic status. Contrary to the prevailing discourse of egalitarianism that paints health care and other major institutions as discrimination-free, we argue that 'race' matters in health care as it intersects with other social categories including class, substance use, and history to organize inequitable access to health and health care for marginalized populations. Specifically, we illustrate how the ideological process of racialization can shape the ways that health care providers 'read' and interact with Aboriginal patients, and how some Aboriginal patients avoid seeking health care based on their expectation of being treated differently. We conclude by urging those of us in positions of influence in health care, including doctors and nurses, to critically reflect upon our own positionality and how we might be complicit in perpetuating social inequities by avoiding a critical discussion of racialization.

  9. Effectiveness of "palliative care information booklet" in enhancing nurses' knowledge.

    PubMed

    David, Anita; Banerjee, Sonali

    2010-09-01

    Patients diagnosed with a disease like cancer require not only physical control of disease but also they need psychological reassurance, social and spiritual support in coming to terms with their disease. Nurses working in the specialized cancer hospitals play a significant role in the care of terminally ill patients. They must be knowledgeable, skilled and sensitive to the needs of these patients and their families in order to provide active, holistic care. In this study, we attempted to assess the level of knowledge about palliative care among nurses working in the oncology department using a self administered structured questionnaire and also to assess the effectiveness of information booklet designed on various aspects of palliative care on their knowledge. Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India. The design adopted for this study was One Group pretest - posttest, pre - experimental design. Hundred nurses working in Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India were selected by using the non probability purposive sampling technique. A structured self administered questionnaire was prepared and administered as a pretest. An information booklet was developed pertaining to the general concepts of palliative care, care components (physical, social, emotional and spiritual) and role of the nurse in palliative care and it was given to the participants. As a post test, the same questionnaire was re-administered after four days to the same study subjects. Pretest and post test knowledge scores were compared and the findings were analyzed statistically. Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for Social Science package. The post test scores were significantly higher than the pretest knowledge scores, which indicate that the developed information booklet regarding palliative care was highly effective in enhancing the knowledge levels of the nurses. The information booklet was effective in enriching the knowledge of nurses on palliative care. Enhancing

  10. Facilitating advance care planning in community palliative care: conversation starters across the client journey.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Jeanine; Street, Annette F

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of a tool for palliative care nurses to initiate and facilitate advance care planning (ACP) conversations in community palliative care practice. Seven community palliative care services located across Australia participated in a multi-site action research project. Data included participant observation, individual and focus group interviews with palliative care health professionals, and medical record audit. A directed content analysis used a pre-established palliative care practice framework of referral, admission, ongoing management, and terminal/discharge care. From this framework a Conversation Starter Tool for ACP was developed. The Tool was then used in orientation and continuing nurse education programmes. It provided palliative care nurses the opportunity to introduce and progress ACP conversations.

  11. When and Why Do Neonatal and Pediatric Critical Care Physicians Consult Palliative Care?

    PubMed

    Richards, Claire A; Starks, Helene; O'Connor, M Rebecca; Bourget, Erica; Lindhorst, Taryn; Hays, Ross; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2018-06-01

    Parents of children admitted to neonatal and pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) are at increased risk of experiencing acute and post-traumatic stress disorder. The integration of palliative care may improve child and family outcomes, yet there remains a lack of information about indicators for specialty-level palliative care involvement in this setting. To describe neonatal and pediatric critical care physician perspectives on indicators for when and why to involve palliative care consultants. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 attending physicians from neonatal, pediatric, and cardiothoracic ICUs in a single quaternary care pediatric hospital. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content and thematic analyses. We identified 2 themes related to the indicators for involving palliative care consultants: (1) palliative care expertise including support and bridging communication and (2) organizational factors influencing communication including competing priorities and fragmentation of care. Palliative care was most beneficial for families at risk of experiencing communication problems that resulted from organizational factors, including those with long lengths of stay and medical complexity. The ability of palliative care consultants to bridge communication was limited by some of these same organizational factors. Physicians valued the involvement of palliative care consultants when they improved efficiency and promoted harmony. Given the increasing number of children with complex chronic conditions, it is important to support the capacity of ICU clinical teams to provide primary palliative care. We suggest comprehensive system changes and critical care physician training to include topics related to chronic illness and disability.

  12. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Quality assessment of palliative home care in Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Gianlorenzo; Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio; Limonta, Fabrizio; Floriani, Maddalena; Pellegrini, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of end-of-life care, represented by a large number of units caring for dying patients, of different types of organizations motivates the importance of measure the quality of provided care. Despite the law 38/2010 promulgated to remove the barriers and provide affordable access to palliative care, measurement, and monitoring of processes of home care providers in Italy has not been attempted. Using data drawn by an institutional voluntary observatory established in Italy in 2013, collecting home palliative care units caring for people between January and December 2013, we assess the degree to which Italian home palliative care teams endorse a set of standards required by the 38/2010 law and best practices as emerged from the literature. The evaluation strategy is based on Rasch analysis, allowing to objectively measuring both performances of facilities and quality indicators' difficulty on the same metric, using 14 quality indicators identified by the observatory's steering committee. Globally, 195 home care teams were registered in the observatory reporting globally 40 955 cured patients in 2013 representing 66% of the population of home palliative care units active in Italy in 2013. Rasch analysis identifies 5 indicators ("interview" with caregivers, continuous training provided to medical and nursing staff, provision of specialized multidisciplinary interventions, psychological support to the patient and family, and drug supply at home) easy to endorse by health care providers and 3 problematic indicators (presence of a formally established Local Network of Palliative care in the area of reference, provision of the care for most problematic patient requiring high intensity of the care, and the percentage of cancer patient dying at Home). The lack of Local Network of Palliative care, required by law 38/2010, is, at the present, the main barrier to its application. However, the adopted methodology suggests that a clear roadmap for health facilities

  14. Reflections on palliative care from the jewish and islamic tradition.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Michael; Baddarni, Kassim; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Spiritual care is a vital part of holistic patient care. Awareness of common patient beliefs will facilitate discussions about spirituality. Such conversations are inherently good for the patient, deepen the caring staff-patient-family relationship, and enhance understanding of how beliefs influence care decisions. All healthcare providers are likely to encounter Muslim patients, yet many lack basic knowledge of the Muslim faith and of the applications of Islamic teachings to palliative care. Similarly, some of the concepts underlying positive Jewish approaches to palliative care are not well known. We outline Jewish and Islamic attitudes toward suffering, treatment, and the end of life. We discuss our religions' approaches to treatments deemed unnecessary by medical staff, and consider some of the cultural reasons that patients and family members might object to palliative care, concluding with specific suggestions for the medical team.

  15. Reflections on Palliative Care from the Jewish and Islamic Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Michael; Baddarni, Kassim; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Spiritual care is a vital part of holistic patient care. Awareness of common patient beliefs will facilitate discussions about spirituality. Such conversations are inherently good for the patient, deepen the caring staff-patient-family relationship, and enhance understanding of how beliefs influence care decisions. All healthcare providers are likely to encounter Muslim patients, yet many lack basic knowledge of the Muslim faith and of the applications of Islamic teachings to palliative care. Similarly, some of the concepts underlying positive Jewish approaches to palliative care are not well known. We outline Jewish and Islamic attitudes toward suffering, treatment, and the end of life. We discuss our religions' approaches to treatments deemed unnecessary by medical staff, and consider some of the cultural reasons that patients and family members might object to palliative care, concluding with specific suggestions for the medical team. PMID:22203878

  16. Palliative care development in the Asia-Pacific region: an international survey from the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kuriya, Meiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Agar, Meera; Choi, Youn Seon; Goh, Cynthia; Lingegowda, K B; Lim, Richard; Liu, Rico K Y; MacLeod, Roderick; Ocampo, Rhodora; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Phungrassami, Temsak; Nguyen, Yen-Phi; Tsuneto, Satoru

    2017-03-01

    Although palliative care is an important public healthcare issue worldwide, the current situation in the Asia-Pacific region has not been systematically evaluated. This survey aimed to clarify the current status of palliative care in the Asia-Pacific region. Questionnaires were sent to a representative physician of each member country/region of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN). The questionnaire examined palliative care service provision, information regarding physician certification in palliative care, the availability of essential drugs for palliative care listed by the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care (IAHPC) and the regulation of opioid-prescribing practice. Of the 14 member countries/regions of the APHN, 12 (86%) responded. Some form of specialist palliative care services had developed in all the responding countries/regions. Eight member countries/regions had physician certifications for palliative care. Most essential drugs for palliative care listed by the IAHPC were available, whereas hydromorphone, oxycodone and transmucosal fentanyl were unavailable in most countries/regions. Six member countries/regions required permission to prescribe and receive opioids. The development of palliative care is in different stages across the surveyed countries/regions in the Asia-Pacific region. Data from this survey can be used as baseline data for monitoring the development of palliative care in this region. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Development and challenges of palliative care in Indonesia: role of psychosomatic medicine.

    PubMed

    Putranto, Rudi; Mudjaddid, Endjad; Shatri, Hamzah; Adli, Mizanul; Martina, Diah

    2017-01-01

    To summarize the current status of palliative care and the role of psychosomatic medicine in Indonesia. Palliative care is not a new issue in Indonesia, which has been improving palliative care since 1992 and developed a palliative care policy in 2007 that was launched by the Indonesian Ministry of Health. However, the progress has been slow and varied across the country. Currently, palliative care services are only available in a few major cities, where most of the facilities for cancer treatment are located. Psychosomatic medical doctors have advantages that contribute to palliative care because of their special training in communication skills to deal with patients from the standpoints of both mind and body. Palliative care services in Indonesia are established in some hospitals. Future work is needed to build capacity, advocate to stakeholders, create care models that provide services in the community, and to increase the palliative care workforce. Psychosomatic medicine plays an important role in palliative care services.

  18. Opioid errors in inpatient palliative care services: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Nicole; Shaw, Tim; Rowett, Debra; Lapkin, Samuel; Phillips, Jane L

    2018-06-01

    Opioids are a high-risk medicine frequently used to manage palliative patients' cancer-related pain and other symptoms. Despite the high volume of opioid use in inpatient palliative care services, and the potential for patient harm, few studies have focused on opioid errors in this population. To (i) identify the number of opioid errors reported by inpatient palliative care services, (ii) identify reported opioid error characteristics and (iii) determine the impact of opioid errors on palliative patient outcomes. A 24-month retrospective review of opioid errors reported in three inpatient palliative care services in one Australian state. Of the 55 opioid errors identified, 84% reached the patient. Most errors involved morphine (35%) or hydromorphone (29%). Opioid administration errors accounted for 76% of reported opioid errors, largely due to omitted dose (33%) or wrong dose (24%) errors. Patients were more likely to receive a lower dose of opioid than ordered as a direct result of an opioid error (57%), with errors adversely impacting pain and/or symptom management in 42% of patients. Half (53%) of the affected patients required additional treatment and/or care as a direct consequence of the opioid error. This retrospective review has provided valuable insights into the patterns and impact of opioid errors in inpatient palliative care services. Iatrogenic harm related to opioid underdosing errors contributed to palliative patients' unrelieved pain. Better understanding the factors that contribute to opioid errors and the role of safety culture in the palliative care service context warrants further investigation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. [The palliative treatment plan as basis for informed decisions in palliative or emergency care].

    PubMed

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Feichtner, Angelika; Medicus, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    Acute vital crisis in end-of-life situations may result in a person being hospitalized and thus, expelled from his intimate environment, which aggravates the continuity of care. This entails a heavy burden for patients and necessitates an emergency medical services (EMS) call without recognizable benefit in many cases. Crisis episodes frequently mark the beginning of the dying process. Advance care planning or end-of-life care in elderly patients can help prevent such situations and ensure high contentment of patients, families and caregivers. Frequently, the question arises whether the burden arising from further hospitalization or from certain medical treatment options is reasonably balanced by the potential benefits of the steps taken. In such comprehensive care settings a custom-tailored palliative treatment plan may serve as an instrument for advance care planning. A palliative treatment plan set up by a physician together with a caregiver helps ensure that acute problems can be solved quickly and satisfactorily in the patient's customary surroundings. If EMS assistance is still needed, the emergency physician has written information on the patient's situation and can act quickly to meet the patient's immediate needs. This also means that EMS personnel must be properly trained in providing palliative care. In this way the palliative treatment plan can help caregivers continue to care for patients in their intimate surroundings.

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kjørstad, Odd Jarle; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg

    2013-02-19

    The criteria for refraining from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in palliative care cancer patients are based on patients' right to refuse treatment and the duty of the treating personnel not to exacerbate their suffering and not to administer futile treatment. When is cardiopulmonary resuscitation futile in these patients? Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed for the period 1989-2010 on the results of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in advanced cancer patients and on factors that affected the results of CPR when special mention was made of cancer. The searches yielded 333 hits and 18 included articles: four meta-analyses, eight retrospective clinical studies, and six review articles. Cancer patients had a poorer post-CPR survival than non-cancer patients. Survival declined with increasing extent of the cancer disease. Widespread and therapy-resistant cancer disease coupled with a performance status lower than WHO 2 or a PAM score (Pre-Arrest Morbidity Index) of above 8 was regarded as inconsistent with survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is futile for in-hospital cancer patients with widespread incurable disease and poor performance status.

  1. Physicians' opinions on palliative care and euthanasia in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Georges, Jean-Jacques; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Maas, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    In recent decades significant developments in end-of-life care have taken place in The Netherlands. There has been more attention for palliative care and alongside the practice of euthanasia has been regulated. The aim of this paper is to describe the opinions of physicians with regard to the relationship between palliative care and euthanasia, and determinants of these opinions. Cross-sectional. Representative samples of physicians (n = 410), relatives of patients who died after euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS; n = 87), and members of the Euthanasia Review Committees (ERCs; n = 35). Structured interviews with physicians and relatives of patients, and a written questionnaire for the members of the ERCs. Approximately half of the physicians disagreed and one third agreed with statements describing the quality of palliative care in The Netherlands as suboptimal and describing the expertise of physicians with regard to palliative care as insufficient. Almost two thirds of the physicians disagreed with the suggestion that adequate treatment of pain and terminal care make euthanasia redundant. Having a religious belief, being a nursing home physician or a clinical specialist, never having performed euthanasia, and not wanting to perform euthanasia were related to the belief that adequate treatment of pain and terminal care could make euthanasia redundant. The study results indicate that most physicians in The Netherlands are not convinced that palliative care can always alleviate all suffering at the end of life and believe that euthanasia could be appropriate in some cases.

  2. Managing family centered palliative care in aged and acute settings.

    PubMed

    Street, Annette Fay; Love, Anthony; Blackford, Jeanine

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on the management of family centered palliative care in different aged care and acute Australian inpatient settings, following the integration of palliative care with mainstream services. Eighty-eight semistructured interviews were conducted and 425 questionnaires (Palliative Care Practices Questionnaire--PCPQ) were returned, completed from 12 regional and metropolitan locations. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using QSR NVivo and mean PCPQ scores from the four settings were compared. Scores on items from the PCPQ related to family centered care confirmed the analyses. Interviews revealed that factors contributing to the level of support for families offered in the various settings included the core business of the unit; the length of stay of the patients or residents; the acuity or symptom burden; and the coordinated involvement of the multidisciplinary team. Strategies for improving supportive family care are proposed.

  3. Negotiating futility, managing emotions: nursing the transition to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Wootton, Julia; Yates, Patsy; Hardy, Janet

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for patients during the transition from life-prolonging care to palliative care. This is an area of nursing prone to emotional difficulty, interpersonal complexity, and interprofessional conflict. It is situated within complex social dynamics, including those related to establishing and accepting futility and reconciling the desire to maintain hope. Here, drawing on interviews with 20 Australian nurses, we unpack their accounts of nursing the transition to palliative care, focusing on the purpose of nursing at the point of transition; accounts of communication and strategies for representing palliative care; emotional engagement and burden; and key interprofessional challenges. We argue that in caring for patients approaching the end of life, nurses occupy precarious interpersonal and interprofessional spaces that involve a negotiated order around sentimental work, providing them with both capital (privileged access) and burden (emotional suffering) within their day-to-day work. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. 'Gotta be sit down and worked out together': views of Aboriginal caregivers and service providers on ways to improve dementia care for Aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kate; Flicker, Leon; Shadforth, Geraldine; Carroll, Emily; Ralph, Naomi; Atkinson, David; Lindeman, Melissa; Schaper, Frank; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; LoGiudice, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is five-fold more prevalent among Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal Australians. Despite this, the quality of care available to people living with dementia in remote Aboriginal communities is poor. The objective of this study was to determine ways to overcome factors affecting the successful delivery of services to Aboriginal people with dementia living in remote communities, and to their families and communities. This qualitative research took place in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia. Data collection occurred in three stages: (1) interviews with service providers to identify the services available; (2) interviews with the caregivers of Aboriginal people living with dementia and community-based care workers; and (3) focus groups with community representatives and community care staff. Each stage was concluded when no new themes emerged. At each stage the transcribed information was analysed and joint interpretation identified common themes. In total, 42 service providers, 31 caregivers and community-based care workers were interviewed and 3 focus groups were conducted. Obstacles to accessing quality care were mentioned and recommendations on ways to improve care were made. The key themes that emerged were caregiver role, perspectives of dementia, community and culturally-appropriate care, workforce, education and training, issues affecting remote communities and service issues. Detailed information on how each theme affects the successful delivery of dementia care is provided. These research findings indicate that people living with dementia and their caregivers in remote Aboriginal communities are struggling to cope. They are requesting and require better community care. Implementing a culturally safe model of dementia care for remote Aboriginal communities that encompasses the recommendations made and builds on the strengths of the communities could potentially deliver the required improvements to dementia care for this population.

  5. Siblings caring for and about pediatric palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Gaab, Erin M; Owens, Glynn R; MacLeod, Roderick D

    2014-01-01

    The experiences of young people who have siblings with life-limiting illnesses are not well understood. The study proposed to identify the concerns of siblings of pediatric palliative care (PPC) patients. Semistructured interviews were administered to participants and analyzed using qualitative inductive thematic analysis. Study subjects were 18 siblings of PPC patients aged 9 to 22 living in the Auckland area. The siblings of PPC patients held concerns about their siblings' impending death and desires to be involved in their lives and care. Siblings may benefit from opportunities to be involved in conversations about mortality and the care of their ill sibling. They are able to express their concerns and help provide care to PPC patients.

  6. [Palliative care in Primary Care: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Gonzalez-Losada, J; Chávez-Díaz, B

    2013-10-01

    We present a case of a patient diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme refractory to treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumour and unfortunately the most aggressive, with an estimated mortality of about 90% in the first year after diagnosis. In our case the patient had reached a stage of life where quality of life was importsnt, with palliative care being the only recourse. The family is the mainstay in the provision of care of terminally ill patients, and without their active participation it would be difficult to achieve the objectives in patient care. We must also consider the family of the terminally ill in our care aim, as its members will experience a series of changes that will affect multiple areas where we should take action. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Using a supportive care framework to understand and improve palliative care among cancer patients in Africa.

    PubMed

    Busolo, David S; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2016-06-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality are increasing in Africa, which is leading to greater demands for palliative care. There has been little progress in terms of research, pain management, and policies related to palliative care. Palliative care in Africa is scarce and scattered, with most African nations lacking the basic services. To address these needs, a guiding framework that identifies care needs and directs palliative care services could be utilized. Therefore, using the supportive care framework developed by Fitch (Fitch, 2009), we here review the literature on palliative care for patients diagnosed with cancer in Africa and make recommendations for improvement. The PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Medline databases were searched. Some 25 English articles on research from African countries published between 2004 and 2014 were selected and reviewed. The reviewed literature was analyzed and presented using the domains of the supportive care framework. Palliative care patients with cancer in Africa, their families, and caregivers experience increasing psychological, physical, social, spiritual, emotional, informational, and practical needs. Care needs are often inadequately addressed because of a lack of awareness as well as deficient and scattered palliative care services and resources. In addition, there is sparse research, education, and policies that address the dire situation in palliative care. Our review findings add to the existing body of knowledge demonstrating that palliative care patients with cancer in Africa experience disturbing care needs in all domains of the supportive care framework. To better assess and address these needs, holistic palliative care that is multidomain and multi-professional could be utilized. This approach needs to be individualized and to offer better access to services and information. In addition, research, education, and policies around palliative care for cancer

  8. Evaluating palliative care needs in Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    Silbermann, Michael; Fink, Regina M; Min, Sung-Joon; Mancuso, Mary P; Brant, Jeannine; Hajjar, Ramzi; Al-Alfi, Nesreen; Baider, Lea; Turker, Ibrahim; ElShamy, Karima; Ghrayeb, Ibtisam; Al-Jadiry, Mazin; Khader, Khaled; Kav, Sultan; Charalambous, Haris; Uslu, Ruchan; Kebudi, Rejin; Barsela, Gil; Kuruku, Nilgün; Mutafoglu, Kamer; Ozalp-Senel, Gulsin; Oberman, Amitai; Kislev, Livia; Khleif, Mohammad; Keoppi, Neophyta; Nestoros, Sophia; Abdalla, Rasha Fahmi; Rassouli, Maryam; Morag, Amira; Sabar, Ron; Nimri, Omar; Al-Qadire, Mohammad; Al-Khalaileh, Murad; Tayyem, Mona; Doumit, Myrna; Punjwani, Rehana; Rasheed, Osaid; Fallatah, Fatimah; Can, Gulbeyaz; Ahmed, Jamila; Strode, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Cancer incidence in Middle Eastern countries, most categorized as low- and middle-income, is predicted to double in the next 10 years, greater than in any other part of the world. While progress has been made in cancer diagnosis/treatment, much remains to be done to improve palliative care for the majority of patients with cancer who present with advanced disease. To determine knowledge, beliefs, barriers, and resources regarding palliative care services in Middle Eastern countries and use findings to inform future educational and training activities. Descriptive survey. Fifteen Middle Eastern countries; convenience sample of 776 nurses (44.3%), physicians (38.3%) and psychosocial, academic, and other health care professionals (17.4%) employed in varied settings. Palliative care needs assessment. Improved pain management services are key facilitators. Top barriers include lack of designated palliative care beds/services, community awareness, staff training, access to hospice services, and personnel/time. The nonexistence of functioning home-based and hospice services leaves families/providers unable to honor patient wishes. Respondents were least satisfied with discussions around advance directives and wish to learn more about palliative care focusing on communication techniques. Populations requiring special consideration comprise: patients with ethnic diversity, language barriers, and low literacy; pediatric and young adults; and the elderly. The majority of Middle Eastern patients with cancer are treated in outlying regions; the community is pivotal and must be incorporated into future plans for developing palliative care services. Promoting palliative care education and certification for physicians and nurses is crucial; home-based and hospice services must be sustained.

  9. International recommendations for outpatient palliative care and prehospital palliative emergencies – a prospective questionnaire-based investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the international recommendations and current practices for the treatment and prevention of palliative emergencies. The primary goal of the study was to gather information from experts on their nationally practised concepts. Methods One hundred and fifty self-report surveys were distributed by email to selected leading experts (palliative and emergency medical care) in Europe, North and South America, Africa, Asia, and Australia. An expert in this context was defined as an author of an article that was ranked by three reviewers as relevant to outpatient palliative and emergency medical . Results The total response rate was 61% (n = 92 experts). Survey responses were obtained from 35 different countries. The following standards in the treatment of palliative emergencies were recommended: (1) early integration of “Palliative Care Teams” (PCTs) and basic outpatient palliative care systems, (2) end-of-life discussions, (3) defined emergency medical documents, drug boxes, and “Do not attempt resuscitation” orders and (4) emergency medical training (physicians and paramedics). Conclusions This study detected structurally and nationally differences in outpatient palliative care regarding the treatment of palliative emergencies. Accordingly, these differences should be discussed and adapted to the respective specifications of individual single countries. A single established outpatient palliative emergency medical care concept may be the basis for an overall out-of-hospital palliative care system. PMID:23432905

  10. Estimation of Need for Palliative Care among Noncancer Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Sarkar, Sonali; Dubashi, Biswajit; Adinarayanan, S

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care services, until recently, were mainly restricted to cancer patients with incurable diseases. Hence, evaluative studies of palliative care are sparse in areas other than oncology. To estimate what proportion of patients attending the Departments of Neurology, Cardiology, and Nephrology of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry, required palliative care and to identify the palliative care needs of those patients. This was an exploratory descriptive study conducted in the three departments of JIPMER. There was no predetermined sample size for the study. The participants were all adult inpatients and outpatients who were in need of palliative care in the departments of Cardiology, Nephrology, and Neurology on the day of study. Percentage distribution was used to analyze the categorical variables such as education, gender, age, patients in need of palliative care, and their needs. The study showed that one in ten non-cancer patients in tertiary care hospitals may require palliative care services. Apart from issues in physical domain, a substantial proportion of participants also had issues in the psychological, emotional, and financial domains. This study highlights the need for incorporation and initiation of palliative care services in other non-cancer specialties in tertiary care hospitals to ensure holistic management of such cases. Counseling service has also to be rendered as part of palliative care since a good share of the patients had psychological and emotional issues.

  11. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer: The Danish Palliative Care Trial.

    PubMed

    Groenvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Nielsen, Jan Bjoern; Pedersen, Lise; Sjøgren, Per; Strömgren, Annette Sand; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Fayers, Peter; Higginson, Irene J; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2017-10-01

    Beneficial effects of early palliative care have been found in advanced cancer, but the evidence is not unequivocal. To investigate the effect of early specialist palliative care among advanced cancer patients identified in oncology departments. The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients with advanced cancer were screened for palliative needs. Patients with scores exceeding a predefined threshold for problems with physical, emotional or role function, or nausea/vomiting, pain, dyspnoea or lack of appetite according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were eligible. The primary outcome was the change in each patient's primary need (the most severe of the seven QLQ-C30 scales) at 3- and 8-week follow-up (0-100 scale). Five sensitivity analyses were conducted. Secondary outcomes were change in the seven QLQ-C30 scales and survival. Totally 145 patients were randomised to early specialist palliative care versus 152 to standard care. Early specialist palliative care showed no effect on the primary outcome of change in primary need (-4.9 points (95% confidence interval -11.3 to +1.5 points); p = 0.14). The sensitivity analyses showed similar results. Analyses of the secondary outcomes, including survival, also showed no differences, maybe with the exception of nausea/vomiting where early specialist palliative care might have had a beneficial effect. We did not observe beneficial or harmful effects of early specialist palliative care, but important beneficial effects cannot be excluded.

  12. Barriers to providing palliative care in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Brazil, Kevin; Bédard, Michel; Krueger, Paul; Taniguchi, Alan; Kelley, Mary Lou; McAiney, Carrie; Justice, Christopher

    2006-04-01

    To assess challenges in providing palliative care in long-term care (LTC) facilities from the perspective of medical directors. Cross-sectional mailed survey. A questionnaire was developed, reviewed, pilot-tested, and sent to 450 medical directors representing 531 LTC facilities. Responses were rated on 2 different 5-point scales. Descriptive analyses were conducted on all responses. All licensed LTC facilities in Ontario with designated medical directors. Medical directors in the facilities. Demographic and practice characteristics of physicians and facilities, importance of potential barriers to providing palliative care, strategies that could be helpful in providing palliative care, and the kind of training in palliative care respondents had received. Two hundred seventy-five medical directors (61%) representing 302 LTC facilities (57%) responded to the survey. Potential barriers to providing palliative care were clustered into 3 groups: facility staff's capacity to provide palliative care, education and support, and the need for external resources. Two thirds of respondents (67.1%) reported that inadequate staffing in their facilities was an important barrier to providing palliative care. Other barriers included inadequate financial reimbursement from the Ontario Health Insurance Program (58.5%), the heavy time commitment required (47.3%), and the lack of equipment in facilities (42.5%). No statistically significant relationship was found between geographic location or profit status of facilities and barriers to providing palliative care. Strategies respondents would use to improve provision of palliative care included continuing medical education (80.0%), protocols for assessing and monitoring pain (77.7%), finding ways to increase financial reimbursement for managing palliative care residents (72.1%), providing educational material for facility staff (70.7%), and providing practice guidelines related to assessing and managing palliative care patients (67

  13. Paediatric Palliative Care and Intellectual Disability--A Unique Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duc, Jacqueline K.; Herbert, Anthony Robert; Heussler, Helen S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Paediatric palliative care is a nuanced area of practice with additional complexities in the context of intellectual disability. There is currently minimal research to guide clinicians working in this challenging area of care. Method: This study describes the complex care of children with life-limiting conditions and intellectual…

  14. Palliative sedation, not slow euthanasia: a prospective, longitudinal study of sedation in Flemish palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Patricia; Menten, Johan; Schotsmans, Paul; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Palliative sedation remains a much debated and controversial issue. The limited literature on the topic often fails to answer ethical questions concerning this practice. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients who are being sedated for refractory symptoms in palliative care units (PCUs) from the time of admission until the day of death. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive design was used to assess data in eight PCUs. The total sample consisted of 266 patients. Information on demographics, medication, food and fluid intake, decision making, level of consciousness, and symptom experience were gathered by nurses and researchers three times a week. If patients received palliative sedation, extra information was gathered. Of all included patients (n=266), 7.5% received palliative sedation. Sedation started, on average, 2.5 days before death and for half of these patients, the form of sedation changed over time. At the start of sedation, patients were in the end stage of their illness and needed total care. Patients were fully conscious and had very limited oral food or fluid intake. Only three patients received artificial fluids at the start of sedation. Patients reported, on average, two refractory symptoms, the most important ones being pain, fatigue, depression, drowsiness, and loss of feeling of well-being. In all cases, the patient gave consent to start palliative sedation because of increased suffering. This study revealed that palliative sedation is only administered in exceptional cases where refractory suffering is evident and for those patients who are close to the ends of their lives. Moreover, this study supports the argument that palliative sedation has no life-shortening effect. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Burnout among physicians in palliative care: Impact of clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Dréano-Hartz, Soazic; Rhondali, Wadih; Ledoux, Mathilde; Ruer, Murielle; Berthiller, Julien; Schott, Anne-Marie; Monsarrat, Léa; Filbet, Marilène

    2016-08-01

    Burnout syndrome is a work-related professional distress. Palliative care physicians often have to deal with complex end-of-life situations and are at risk of presenting with burnout syndrome, which has been little studied in this population. Our study aims to identify the impact of clinical settings (in a palliative care unit (PCU) or on a palliative care mobile team (PCMT)) on palliative care physicians. We undertook a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire that included the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and we gathered sociodemographic and professional data. The questionnaire was sent to all 590 physicians working in palliative care in France between July of 2012 and February of 2013. The response rate was 61, 8% after three reminders. Some 27 (9%) participants showed high emotional exhaustion, 12 (4%) suffered from a high degree of depersonalization, and 71 (18%) had feelings of low personal accomplishment. Physicians working on a PCMT tended (p = 0.051) to be more likely to suffer from emotional exhaustion than their colleagues. Physicians working on a PCMT worked on smaller teams (fewer physicians, p < 0.001; fewer nonphysicians, p < 0.001). They spent less time doing research (p = 0.019), had fewer resources (p = 0.004), and their expertise seemed to be underrecognized by their colleagues (p = 0.023). The prevalence of burnout in palliative care physicians was low and in fact lower than that reported in other populations (e.g., oncologists). Working on a palliative care mobile team can be a more risky situation, associated with a lack of medical and paramedical staff.

  16. Palliative care in northern Tanzania: doing a lot with a little.

    PubMed

    Bond, Melissa J; Knopp, Andrea

    2018-06-02

    The number of people in need of palliative care is growing worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The World Health Organization recognises palliative care as a basic human right, but there are many challenges for delivering palliative care in low- and middle-income countries. In the African continent, the African Palliative Care Association (APCA) provides guidance for political advocacy for developing palliative care programmes and has developed the APCA Palliative Outcome Score (POS), an evidence-based tool for measuring outcomes of palliative care. This article focuses on palliative care delivery in Shirati, Tanzania, located in the Rorya District in the Mara Region in northern Tanzania, highlighting the impressive work done with limited resources and despite many challenges. Recommendations for future research include evaluation of outcomes using the APCA POS, the application of mobile technology, and governmental advocacy for increased access to opioid medications, which have shown promise in broadening the reach of palliative care in the East African Community.

  17. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-09-01

    To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers' professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16-19 years in 23 services and 23-35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers' contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers' roles. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Method Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. Setting UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Participants Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Main outcomes Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers’ professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. Results A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16–19 years in 23 services and 23–35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. Conclusions This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers’ contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers’ roles. PMID:24644170

  19. Hospice and Palliative Care in China: Development and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuhan; Gu, Youhui; Yu, Wenhua

    2018-01-01

    Hospice and palliative care have been demonstrated to improve quality of life, shorten hospital stays, and save costs. As a developing country, faced with a rapidly aging population and an increasing number of patients with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer, China has made great progress in promoting hospice and palliative care during the past few decades. A trained nurse can play a significant role in promoting quality hospice and palliative care by providing care, coordinating a multidisciplinary team, calling for policy support, and raising public awareness. It is critical for nurses to clearly understand the development and challenges that currently exist in the country. With this awareness, nurses will improve their ability to recognize and address patients’ and families’ needs, resulting in quality, dignified, and individualized end-of-life care. PMID:29379830

  20. Telemedicine and Palliative Care: an Increasing Role in Supportive Oncology.

    PubMed

    Worster, Brooke; Swartz, Kristine

    2017-06-01

    With the emergence of telemedicine as a routine form of care in various venues, the opportunities to use technology to care for the most vulnerable, most ill cancer patients are extremely appealing. Increasingly, evidence supports early integration of palliative care with standard oncologic care, supported by recent NCCN guidelines to increase and improve access to palliative care. This review looks at the use of telemedicine to expand access to palliative care as well as provide better care for patients and families where travel is difficult, if not impossible. When telemedicine has been used, often in Europe, for palliative care, the results show improvements in symptom management, comfort with care as well as patient and family satisfaction. One barrier to use of telemedicine is the concerns with technology and technology-related complications in population that is often elderly, frail and not always comfortable with non-face-to-face physician care. There remain significant opportunities to explore this intersection of supportive care and telemedicine.

  1. Palliative care for advanced dementia: Knowledge and attitudes of long-term care staff.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Yu; Hu, Sophia H; Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Long, Carol O; Chang, Chia-Chi; Liu, Megan F

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care for advanced dementia and their associations with demographics among nursing staff, including nurses and nursing assistants, in long-term care settings. Nursing facilities are places where persons with dementia die; therefore, providing quality end-of-life care to residents with advanced dementia is crucial. To date, little attention has been paid to palliative care practice for patients with advanced dementia. A descriptive, cross-sectional, survey design was used. In total, a sample of 300 nurses (n = 125) and nursing assistants (n = 175) working in long-term care settings in Taiwan participated in this study. Two instruments were administered: demographic characteristics and responses to the Questionnaire of Palliative Care for Advanced Dementia. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Overall, the nurses and nursing assistants had moderate mean scores for both knowledge of and attitudes regarding palliative care for advanced dementia. Additionally, nursing staff who were nurses with greater work experience and those who had received palliative care and hospice training had greater knowledge of palliative care. In addition, nursing staff who had received dementia care training and who had worked in nursing homes had higher levels of positive attitudes towards palliative care. This study indicates the need to provide nurses and nursing assistants with more information about palliative care practice for people with advanced dementia. Particularly, providing education to those who are nursing assistants, who have less working experience, who have not received palliative and dementia care training, and who have not worked in nursing homes can improve overall nursing staff knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care. Continuing education in principles of palliative care for advanced dementia is necessary for currently practicing nursing staff and

  2. Improving Palliative Care Team Meetings: Structure, Inclusion, and "Team Care".

    PubMed

    Brennan, Caitlin W; Kelly, Brittany; Skarf, Lara Michal; Tellem, Rotem; Dunn, Kathleen M; Poswolsky, Sheila

    2016-07-01

    Increasing demands on palliative care teams point to the need for continuous improvement to ensure teams are working collaboratively and efficiently. This quality improvement initiative focused on improving interprofessional team meeting efficiency and subsequently patient care. Meeting start and end times improved from a mean of approximately 9 and 6 minutes late in the baseline period, respectively, to a mean of 4.4 minutes late (start time) and ending early in our sustainability phase. Mean team satisfaction improved from 2.4 to 4.5 on a 5-point Likert-type scale. The improvement initiative clarified communication about patients' plans of care, thus positively impacting team members' ability to articulate goals to other professionals, patients, and families. We propose several recommendations in the form of a team meeting "toolkit." © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Islamic theology and the principles of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Al-Shahri, Mohammad Zafir

    2016-12-01

    It is well established that provision of palliative care is a human right for the patients and their families going through the suffering associated with a life-threatening illness. The holistic nature of palliative care, dictated by the multifaceted suffering experienced by patients, calls for giving due consideration to the cultural and spiritual background of the target population. Similarly, the paramount impact of Islamic wholeness on Muslims' perceptions, beliefs, and way of living makes it necessary for non-Muslim palliative care professionals who are caring for Muslim patients to increase their awareness about the parts of Islamic theology pertinent to the principles of palliative care. This would include a basic knowledge of the Islamic faith and how Muslims view and cope with the calamity of a life-threatening condition along with the suffering associated with it. Equally important are issues related to the management of symptoms using agents that are normally strictly prohibited by Islamic teachings, including opioids, brain stimulants, and cannabinoids. The current review briefly discusses the Islamic perspectives pertinent to a Muslim patient's journey throughout the palliative care experience, onward to a safe passing, and beyond.

  4. The palliative care in heart failure trial: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Tulsky, James A; Granger, Bradi B; Anstrom, Kevin J; Adams, Patricia A; Dodson, Gwen C; Fiuzat, Mona; Johnson, Kimberly S; Patel, Chetan B; Steinhauser, Karen E; Taylor, Donald H; O'Connor, Christopher M; Rogers, Joseph G

    2014-11-01

    The progressive nature of heart failure (HF) coupled with high mortality and poor quality of life mandates greater attention to palliative care as a routine component of advanced HF management. Limited evidence exists from randomized, controlled trials supporting the use of interdisciplinary palliative care in HF. PAL-HF is a prospective, controlled, unblinded, single-center study of an interdisciplinary palliative care intervention in 200 patients with advanced HF estimated to have a high likelihood of mortality or rehospitalization in the ensuing 6 months. The 6-month PAL-HF intervention focuses on physical and psychosocial symptom relief, attention to spiritual concerns, and advanced care planning. The primary end point is health-related quality of life measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy with Palliative Care Subscale score at 6 months. Secondary end points include changes in anxiety/depression, spiritual well-being, caregiver satisfaction, cost and resource utilization, and a composite of death, HF hospitalization, and quality of life. PAL-HF is a randomized, controlled clinical trial that will help evaluate the efficacy and cost effectiveness of palliative care in advanced HF using a patient-centered outcome as well as clinical and economic end points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of palliative care services in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Zubairi, Hijab; Tulshian, Priyanka; Villegas, Sarah; Nelson, Brett D; Ouma, Kennedy; Burke, Thomas F

    2017-04-01

    The need for palliative care services is rapidly increasing due to the rising number of patients with non-communicable diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the current availability and barriers to palliative care and healthcare worker knowledge and perceptions on palliative pain control in western Kenya. An evidence-based 40-question assessment tool was conducted between October 2015 and February 2016 in Siaya County, western Kenya. All level 4 and 5 facilities (e.g., regional and district hospitals) were assessed, as well as a selection of lower-level facilities chosen via convenience sampling, stratified by facility level (e.g., dispensaries, health centers, and health clinics). A key informant at each of 22 facilities was surveyed and included 1 medical officer (5%), 12 clinical officers (55%), and 9 nurses (41%). Key themes included training and education, awareness of palliative care and hospice, services provided, and pain control. All 22 providers had heard of palliative care and 4 (18%) had received formal training. Fourteen (64%) providers knew that morphine was on the World Health Organization (WHO) essential medication list, 8 (36%) had previously prescribed opioids, and 5 (23%) had prescribed them for palliation. Provider concerns for opioid use included its addictive properties (59%), appropriate dosing (9%), cost (5%), side effects (9%), and availability (5%). Palliative care and hospice services were identified by providers as important components in the management of chronic illnesses in western Kenya. Further provider education as well as increased access to pain medications including opioids is necessary to improve the care of patients in western Kenya.

  6. Barriers in Palliative Care: Means to Integrate It into Health Care Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khudeir, Hamzeh

    2017-01-01

    Although palliative care has significant and positive effects on patients and their families, as it is scientifically proven, however, it is not a permanent part of health care mainstream. The aim of this systematic literature review was to describe barriers in palliative care that stops it from becoming a permanent component of healthcare…

  7. Aboriginal community controlled health services: leading the way in primary care.

    PubMed

    Panaretto, Kathryn S; Wenitong, Mark; Button, Selwyn; Ring, Ian T

    2014-06-16

    The national Closing the Gap framework commits to reducing persisting disadvantage in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia, with cross-government-sector initiatives and investment. Central to efforts to build healthier communities is the Aboriginal community controlled health service (ACCHS) sector; its focus on prevention, early intervention and comprehensive care has reduced barriers to access and unintentional racism, progressively improving individual health outcomes for Aboriginal people. There is now a broad range of primary health care data that provides a sound evidence base for comparing the health outcomes for Indigenous people in ACCHSs with the outcomes achieved through mainstream services, and these data show: models of comprehensive primary health care consistent with the patient-centred medical home model; coverage of the Aboriginal population higher than 60% outside major metropolitan centres; consistently improving performance in key performance on best-practice care indicators; and superior performance to mainstream general practice. ACCHSs play a significant role in training the medical workforce and employing Aboriginal people. ACCHSs have risen to the challenge of delivering best-practice care and there is a case for expanding ACCHSs into new areas. To achieve the best returns, the current mainstream Closing the Gap investment should be shifted to the community controlled health sector.

  8. Trends of earlier palliative care consultation in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sanders; Sigel, Keith; Goldstein, Nathan E; Wisnivesky, Juan; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    2018-06-06

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology recommends that all patients with metastatic disease receive dedicated palliative care (PC) services early in their illness, ideally via interdisciplinary care teams. We investigated the time trends of specialty palliative care consultations from the date of metastatic cancer diagnosis among patients receiving palliative radiation therapy (PRT). A shorter time interval between metastatic diagnosis and first PC consultation suggests earlier involvement of palliative care in a patient's life with metastatic cancer. In this IRB-approved retrospective analysis, patients treated with PRT for solid tumors (bone and brain) at a single tertiary care hospital between 2010 and 2016 were included. Cohorts were arbitrarily established by metastatic diagnosis within approximately two-year intervals: (1) 1/1/2010-3/27/2012; (2) 3/28/2012-5/21/2014; and (3) 5/22/2014-12/31/2016. Cox-proportional hazards regression modelling was used to compare trends of PC consultation among cohorts. Of 284 patients identified, 184 patients received PC consultation, whereas 15 patients died before receiving a PC consult. Median follow-up time until an event or censor was 257 days (range: 1,900). Patients in the most recent cohort had a shorter median time to first PC consult (57 days) compared to those in the first (374 days) and second (186 days) cohorts. On multivariable analysis, patients in the third cohort were more likely to undergo a PC consultation earlier in their metastatic illness (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2,2.8). Over a six-year period, palliative care consultation occurred earlier for metastatic patients treated with PRT at our institution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The importance of measuring customer satisfaction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Adriana; Attanasio, Gennaro; Scarcella, Francesco; Sangalli, Luisa; Scopa, Anna; Genualdo, Alessandra; Quici, Stefano; Nazzicone, Giulia; Ricciotti, Maria Adelaide; La Commare, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades, palliative care has been more and more focused on the evaluation of patients' and families' satisfaction with care. However, the evaluation of customer satisfaction in palliative care presents a number of issues such as the presence of both patients and their families, the frail condition of the patients and the complexity of their needs, and the lack of standard quality indicators and appropriate measurement tools. In this manuscript, we critically review existing evidence and literature on the evaluation of satisfaction in the palliative care context. Moreover, we provide - as a practical example - the preliminary results of our experience in this setting with the development of a dedicated tool for the measurement of satisfaction.

  10. The growth of palliative care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark T; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care has been one of the most rapidly growing fields of health care in the United States in the past decade. The benefits of palliative care have now been shown in multiple clinical trials, with increased patient and provider satisfaction, equal or better symptom control, more discernment of and honoring choices about place of death, fewer and less intensive hospital admissions in the last month of life, less anxiety and depression, less caregiver distress, and cost savings. The cost savings come from cost avoidance, or movement of a patient from a high cost setting to a lower cost setting. Barriers to expanded use include physician resistance, unrealistic expectations of patients and families, and lack of workforce. The future of palliative care includes more penetration into other fields such as nephrology, neurology, and surgery; further discernment of the most effective and cost-effective models; and establishment of more outpatient services.

  11. A team approach in palliative care: enhancing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Susan L; Horner, Arlene; Eidsness, LuAnn; Young, Sandy; Wright, Chris; Robinson, Michael

    2002-07-01

    While most Americans envision a "good death" as one occurring quickly and painlessly at home surrounded by loved ones, many people do not die in this fashion. Palliative care focuses on holistic treatment of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, and strives to improve quality of life for patients and families at end-of-life (EOL). This hospital-based study examines the extent to which a palliative care consultant team makes a difference in EOL for patients and families. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 50 hospitalized patients referred to an interdisciplinary palliative care consulting team at a South Dakota tertiary hospital during 2001. Various palliative care interventions were introduced during the course of hospitalization, and data were collected two days later to see if quality of life had improved. Statistically significant improvements were found in pain levels, non-pain symptom management, numerous psychosocial measures of quality of life, change in code status, and perceptions of communication and treatment during hospitalization. The study demonstrates that consultations with a palliative care team are beneficial and enhance the EOL experience for patients and families.

  12. Developing rural palliative care: validating a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Mary Lou; Williams, Allison; DeMiglio, Lily; Mettam, Hilary

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to validate a conceptual model for developing palliative care in rural communities. This model articulates how local rural healthcare providers develop palliative care services according to four sequential phases. The model has roots in concepts of community capacity development, evolves from collaborative, generalist rural practice, and utilizes existing health services infrastructure. It addresses how rural providers manage challenges, specifically those related to: lack of resources, minimal community understanding of palliative care, health professionals' resistance, the bureaucracy of the health system, and the obstacles of providing services in rural environments. Seven semi-structured focus groups were conducted with interdisciplinary health providers in 7 rural communities in two Canadian provinces. Using a constant comparative analysis approach, focus group data were analyzed by examining participants' statements in relation to the model and comparing emerging themes in the development of rural palliative care to the elements of the model. The data validated the conceptual model as the model was able to theoretically predict and explain the experiences of the 7 rural communities that participated in the study. New emerging themes from the data elaborated existing elements in the model and informed the requirement for minor revisions. The model was validated and slightly revised, as suggested by the data. The model was confirmed as being a useful theoretical tool for conceptualizing the development of rural palliative care that is applicable in diverse rural communities.

  13. Care of the Critically Ill Burn Patient. An Overview from the Perspective of Optimizing Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ray, Daniel E; Karlekar, Mohana B; Crouse, Donnelle L; Campbell, Margaret; Curtis, J Randall; Edwards, Jeffrey; Frontera, Jennifer; Lustbader, Dana R; Mosenthal, Anne C; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Weissman, David E; Boss, Renee D; Brasel, Karen J; Nelson, Judith E

    2017-07-01

    Burn specialists have long recognized the need for and have role modeled a comprehensive approach incorporating relief of distress as part of care during critical illness. More recently, palliative care specialists have become part of the healthcare team in many U.S. hospitals, especially larger academic institutions that are more likely to have designated burn centers. No current literature describes the intersection of palliative care and burn care or integration of primary and specialist palliative care in this unique context. This Perspective gives an overview of burn care; focuses on pain and other symptoms in burn intensive care unit settings; addresses special needs of critically ill burned patients, their families, and clinicians for high-quality palliative care; and highlights potential benefits of integrating primary and specialist palliative care in burn critical care. MEDLINE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched, and an e-mail survey was used to obtain information from U.S. Burn Fellowship Program directors about palliative medicine training. The Improving Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit Project Advisory Board synthesized published evidence with their own research and clinical experience in preparing this article. Mortality and severe morbidity for critically ill burned patients remains high. American Burn Association guidelines lay the foundation for a robust system of palliative care delivery, embedding palliative care principles and processes in intensive care by burn providers. Understanding basic burn care, challenges for symptom management and communication, and the culture of the particular burn unit, can optimize quality and integration of primary and specialist palliative care in this distinctive setting.

  14. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  15. Education, implementation, and policy barriers to greater integration of palliative care: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Melissa D; Hasselaar, Jeroen; Garralda, Eduardo; van der Eerden, Marlieke; Stevenson, David; McKendrick, Karen; Centeno, Carlos; Meier, Diane E

    2016-03-01

    Early integration of palliative care into the management of patients with serious disease has the potential to both improve quality of life of patients and families and reduce healthcare costs. Despite these benefits, significant barriers exist in the United States to the early integration of palliative care in the disease trajectory of individuals with serious illness. To provide an overview of the barriers to more widespread palliative care integration in the United States. A literature review using PubMed from 2005 to March 2015 augmented by primary data collected from 405 hospitals included in the Center to Advance Palliative Care's National Palliative Care Registry for years 2012 and 2013. We use the World Health Organization's Public Health Strategy for Palliative Care as a framework for analyzing barriers to palliative care integration. We identified key barriers to palliative care integration across three World Health Organization domains: (1) education domain: lack of adequate education/training and perception of palliative care as end-of-life care; (2) implementation domain: inadequate size of palliative medicine-trained workforce, challenge of identifying patients appropriate for palliative care referral, and need for culture change across settings; (3) policy domain: fragmented healthcare system, need for greater funding for research, lack of adequate reimbursement for palliative care, and regulatory barriers. We describe the key policy and educational opportunities in the United States to address and potentially overcome the barriers to greater integration of palliative care into the healthcare of Americans with serious illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. A Community Needs Assessment for the Development of an Interprofessional Palliative Care Training Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coats, Heather; Paganelli, Tia; Starks, Helene; Lindhorst, Taryn; Starks Acosta, Anne; Mauksch, Larry; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2017-03-01

    There is a known shortage of trained palliative care professionals, and an even greater shortage of professionals who have been trained through interprofessional curricula. As part of an institutional Palliative Care Training Center grant, a core team of interprofessional palliative care academic faculty and staff completed a state-wide palliative care educational assessment to determine the needs for an interprofessional palliative care training program. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and results of our community needs assessment of interprofessional palliative care educational needs in Washington state. We approached the needs assessment through a cross-sectional descriptive design by using mixed-method inquiry. Each phase incorporated a variety of settings and subjects. The assessment incorporated multiple phases with diverse methodological approaches: a preparatory phase-identifying key informants; Phase I-key informant interviews; Phase II-survey; and Phase III-steering committee endorsement. The multiple phases of the needs assessment helped create a conceptual framework for the Palliative Care Training Center and developed an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. The input from key informants at multiple phases also allowed us to define priority needs and to refine an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. This curriculum will provide an interprofessional palliative care educational program that crosses disciplinary boundaries to integrate knowledge that is beneficial for all palliative care clinicians. The input from a range of palliative care clinicians and professionals at every phase of the needs assessment was critical for creating an interprofessional palliative care curriculum.

  17. An instrument to measure nurses' knowledge in palliative care: Validation of the Spanish version of Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Palliative care is nowadays essential in nursing care, due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in final stages of their life. Nurses need to acquire specific knowledge and abilities to provide quality palliative care. Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses is a questionnaire that evaluates their basic knowledge about palliative care. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN) is useful to evaluate basic knowledge about palliative care, but its adaptation into the Spanish language and the analysis of its effectiveness and utility for Spanish culture is lacking. Purpose To report the adaptation into the Spanish language and the psychometric analysis of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses. Method The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses-Spanish Version (PCQN-SV) was obtained from a process including translation, back-translation, comparison with versions in other languages, revision by experts, and pilot study. Content validity and reliability of questionnaire were analyzed. Difficulty and discrimination indexes of each item were also calculated according to Item Response Theory (IRT). Findings Adequate internal consistency was found (S-CVI = 0.83); Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.67 and KR-20 test result of 0,72 reflected the reliability of PCQN-SV. The questionnaire had a global difficulty index of 0,55, with six items which could be considered as difficult or very difficult, and five items with could be considered easy or very easy. The discrimination indexes of the 20 items, show us that eight items are good or very good while six items are bad to discriminate between good and bad respondents. Discussion Although in shows internal consistency, reliability and difficulty indexes similar to those obtained by versions of PCQN in other languages, a reformulation of the items with lowest content validity or discrimination indexes and those showing difficulties with their comprehension is an aspect to take into account in order to improve the

  18. An instrument to measure nurses' knowledge in palliative care: Validation of the Spanish version of Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Chover-Sierra, Elena; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio; Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care is nowadays essential in nursing care, due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in final stages of their life. Nurses need to acquire specific knowledge and abilities to provide quality palliative care. Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses is a questionnaire that evaluates their basic knowledge about palliative care. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN) is useful to evaluate basic knowledge about palliative care, but its adaptation into the Spanish language and the analysis of its effectiveness and utility for Spanish culture is lacking. To report the adaptation into the Spanish language and the psychometric analysis of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses-Spanish Version (PCQN-SV) was obtained from a process including translation, back-translation, comparison with versions in other languages, revision by experts, and pilot study. Content validity and reliability of questionnaire were analyzed. Difficulty and discrimination indexes of each item were also calculated according to Item Response Theory (IRT). Adequate internal consistency was found (S-CVI = 0.83); Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.67 and KR-20 test result of 0,72 reflected the reliability of PCQN-SV. The questionnaire had a global difficulty index of 0,55, with six items which could be considered as difficult or very difficult, and five items with could be considered easy or very easy. The discrimination indexes of the 20 items, show us that eight items are good or very good while six items are bad to discriminate between good and bad respondents. Although in shows internal consistency, reliability and difficulty indexes similar to those obtained by versions of PCQN in other languages, a reformulation of the items with lowest content validity or discrimination indexes and those showing difficulties with their comprehension is an aspect to take into account in order to improve the PCQN-SV. The PCQN-SV is a useful Spanish language

  19. Exploring community nurses' perceptions of life review in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Ian; Parker, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    This exploratory study aimed to identify community nurses' understanding of life review as a therapeutic intervention for younger people requiring palliative care. The objectives set out to: (i) Describe the participants' understanding of reminiscence and life review (ii) Detail their current ideas regarding a structured approach to using life review in the community setting. (iii) Outline their understanding of the possible advantages and limitations of life review in relation to palliative care. (iv) Identify future training requirements. The literature review illustrated how the eighth developmental stage of Erikson's theory, ego-integrity vs. despair, is a 'crisis' often faced by older people entering the final stage of life. Life review is considered a useful therapeutic intervention in the resolution of this crisis. Younger terminally ill people in the palliative stage of an illness may face the same final crises due to their reduced lifespan. Therefore, this study explored the benefits and limitations of life review as an intervention in palliative care. The study used a purposive sample of community nurses responsible for delivering generic and specialist palliative care. A qualitative method of data collection in the form of three focus group interviews was used. Subsequent data were manually analysed, categorized and coded with associations between the themes identified. The findings suggested that community nurses have limited knowledge pertaining to the use of life review and tend to confuse the intervention with reminiscence. Furthermore, they believed that life review could potentially cause harm to practitioners engaged in listening to another person's life story. However, the participants concur that with appropriate training they would find life review a useful intervention to use in palliative care. The results led to the identification of a number of key recommendations: Community nurses require specific education in the technicalities of life

  20. [Palliative sedation at a university palliative care unit--a descriptive analysis].

    PubMed

    Hopprich, A; Günther, L D; Laufenberg-Feldmann, R; Reinholz, U; Weber, M

    2016-04-01

    Palliative sedation (pS) is indicated in the presence of end-stage disease with treatment-refractory symptoms not tolerable for the patient. We investigated the practice of pS at a university palliative care unit. Before starting pS the following data were documented: indication and decision making, type of sedation, life expectancy evaluated by the physician using the palliative prognostic index. Over the time of pS communication skills, depth of sedation, relief in symptoms, substitution of fluid and nutrition and used medications were collected. During evaluation time 99 patients died. 34 patients received pS (34 %). All patients suffered from cancer. Indications for palliative sedation were: terminal restlessness (56 %), dyspnea (39 %), pain (32 %), psychological distress (15 %), agitated delir (9 %), vomiting (3 %) and bleeding (3 %) (multiple nominations possible). In 31 cases (91 %) nurses were included for decision making. In 33 cases continuous sedation were initiated immediately (median duration 27.5 hours). The most applied medication was midazolam (94 %), sometimes combined with neuroleptics (44 %) and propofol (15 %). 91 % of the patients additionally received opioids. Artificial fluid was substituted in two cases. Palliative sedation started in the median 27.5 hours before death. The final physician assessment revealed complete symptom relief in 12 patients (35 %), very strong symptom relief in 20 patients (59 %) and moderate symptom relief in 2 patients (6 %). pS was successfully used as last resort for relief of treatment-refractory symptoms in one third of decedents at the investigated palliative care unit. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. How to Manage Hospital-Based Palliative Care Teams Without Full-Time Palliative Care Physicians in Designated Cancer Care Hospitals: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Akihiro; Kishino, Megumi; Nakazawa, Yoko; Yotani, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    To clarify how highly active hospital palliative care teams can provide efficient and effective care regardless of the lack of full-time palliative care physicians. Semistructured focus group interviews were conducted, and content analysis was performed. A total of 7 physicians and 6 nurses participated. We extracted 209 codes from the transcripts and organized them into 3 themes and 21 categories, which were classified as follows: (1) tips for managing palliative care teams efficiently and effectively (7 categories); (2) ways of acquiring specialist palliative care expertise (9 categories); and (3) ways of treating symptoms that are difficult to alleviate (5 categories). The findings of this study can be used as a nautical chart of hospital-based palliative care team (HPCT) without full-time PC physician. Full-time nurses who have high management and coordination abilities play a central role in resource-limited HPCTs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. New legislation on palliative care and pain in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bistre, Sara

    2009-01-01

    International policy initiatives have called for recognition of pain management and palliative care as basic humans rights. This paper describes the rationale for and realization of major changes in Mexican health law to help assure availability of such services to the citizenry of that nation. The necessity for appropriate symptom control and safeguards against inappropriate initiation or cessation of care are defined.

  3. Engaging Australian Aboriginal narratives to challenge attitudes and create empathy in health care: a methodological perspective.

    PubMed

    Wain, Toni; Sim, Moira; Bessarab, Dawn; Mak, Donna; Hayward, Colleen; Rudd, Cobie

    2016-06-02

    Unconscious bias and negative attitudes towards minority groups have detrimental effects on the way health care is, or is not, provided to these groups. Recognition of racist attitudes and behaviours as well as understanding clients' experiences of health and health care are pivotal to developing better health care strategies to positively impact on the quality and safety of care provided to Indigenous people. Indigenous research demands inclusive research processes and the use of culturally appropriate methodologies. This paper presents a methodological account of collecting narratives which accurately and respectfully reflect Aboriginal Australians' experiences with health care in Western Australia. The purpose of these narratives is to provide health students and professionals with an opportunity to 'walk-in the shoes' of Aboriginal people where face-to-face interaction is not feasible. With the incorporation of Indigenous peoples' voices being an important link in cultural safety, the project was led by an Indigenous Reference group, who encouraged active participation of Aboriginal people in all areas of the project. Using a phenomenological approach and guided by the Indigenous Reference group, yarning data collection was implemented to collect stories focusing on Aboriginal people's experiences with health care services. An open-access, on-line website was established to host education resources developed from these "yarns". Yarning provided a rich source of information on personal experiences and encouraged the story provider to recognise their facilitative role in the research process. While the methodology used in this project was lengthy and labour-intensive it afforded a respectful manner for story collection and highlighted several innate flaws when Western methods are applied to an Indigenous context. Engagement of an Indigenous Reference Group was pivotal to designing an appropriate methodology that incorporated the voices of Aboriginal people in a

  4. Cultural and religious considerations in pediatric palliative care

    PubMed Central

    WIENER, LORI; MCCONNELL, DENICE GRADY; LATELLA, LAUREN; LUDI, ERICA

    2012-01-01

    Objective A growing multicultural society presents healthcare providers with a difficult task of providing appropriate care for individuals who have different life experiences, beliefs, value systems, religions, languages, and notions of healthcare. This is especially vital when end-of-life care is needed during childhood. There is a dearth of literature addressing cultural considerations in the pediatric palliative care field. As members of a specific culture often do not ascribe to the same religious traditions, the purpose of this article was to explore and review how culture and religion informs and shapes pediatric palliative care. Method Comprehensive literature searches were completed through an online search of nine databases for articles published between 1980 and 2011: PsychINFO, MEDLINE®, Journal of Citation Reports-Science Edition, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL®, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), EBSCO, and Ovid. Key terms included: culture, transcultural, spiritual, international, ethnic, customs or religion AND end-of-life, palliative care, death, dying, cancer, or hospice, and children, pediatrics, or pediatric oncology. Reference lists in the retrieved articles were examined for additional studies that fit the inclusion criteria, and relevant articles were included for review. In addition, web-based searches of specific journals were conducted. These included, but were not limited to: Qualitative Health Research, Psycho-Oncology, Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Omega, Social Work in Health Care, and Journal of Palliative Medicine. Results Thirty-seven articles met eligibility criteria. From these, seven distinct themes emerged that have implications for pediatric palliative care. These include the role of culture in decision-making, faith and the involvement of clergy, communication (spoken and unspoken language), communicating to children

  5. A Home-Based Palliative Care Consult Service for Veterans.

    PubMed

    Golden, Adam G; Antoni, Charles; Gammonley, Denise

    2016-11-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a home-based palliative care consult service for Veterans with advanced illness. A retrospective chart review was performed on 73 Veterans who received a home-based palliative care consult. Nearly one-third were 80 years of age or older, and nearly one-third had a palliative diagnosis of cancer. The most common interventions of the consult team included discussion of advance directives, completion of a "do not resuscitate" form, reduction/stoppage of at least 1 medication, explanation of diagnosis, referral to home-based primary care program, referral to hospice, and assessment/support for caregiver stress. The home-based consult service was therefore able to address clinical and psychosocial issues that can demonstrate a direct benefit to Veterans, families, and referring clinicians. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Development and efficacy of music therapy techniques within palliative care.

    PubMed

    Clements-Cortés, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Music therapy is increasingly becoming an intervention used in palliative care settings around the globe. While the specialty of palliative care music therapy is relatively young having emerged in the late 1980s, there is a strong and growing body of evidence demonstrating its efficacy in assisting a variety of issues common at end-of-life. There are multiple music therapy techniques that are implemented with clients in palliative care and they can be categorized in four broad areas: receptive, creative, recreative and combined. These techniques will be presented with respect to their development by clinicians as supported by the descriptive and research literature. Information is also provided on the use of music therapy in facilitating the grieving and bereavement process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Integration of Palliative Care in Chronic Critical Illness Management

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E; Hope, Aluko A

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is an essential component of comprehensive care for all patients with chronic critical illness, including those receiving restorative or life-sustaining therapies. Core elements include alleviation of symptom distress, communication about care goals, alignment of treatment with the patient’s values and preferences, transitional planning, and family support. Here we address strategies for assessment and management of symptoms, including pain, dyspnea, and depression, and for assisting patients to communicate while endotracheally intubated. We also discuss approaches to optimize communication among clinicians, patients, and families about care goals. Challenges for supporting families and planning for transitions between care settings are identified, while the value of interdisciplinary input is emphasized. We review “consultative” and “integrative” models for integrating palliative care and restorative critical care. Finally, we highlight key ethical issues that arise in the care of chronically critically ill patients and their families. PMID:22663973

  8. 'Busyness' and the preclusion of quality palliative district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Luker, Karen; Walshe, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Ethical care is beginning to be recognised as care that accounts for the views of those at the receiving end of care. However, in the context of palliative and supportive district nursing care, the patients' and their carers' views are seldom heard. This qualitative research study explores these views. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care, and 13 of their carers. Participants were recruited via community nurses and hospices between September 2010 and October 2011. Post-structural discourse analysis is used to examine how discourses operate on a moral level. One discourse, 'busyness', is argued to preclude a moral form of nursing care. The discourse of friendship is presented to contrast this. Discussion explores Gallagher's 'slow ethics' and challenges the currently accepted ways of measuring to improve quality of care concluding that quality cannot be measured.

  9. Aboriginal Health Care and Bioethics: A Reflection on the Teaching of the Seven Grandfathers.

    PubMed

    Kotalik, Jaro; Martin, Gerry

    2016-05-01

    Contemporary bioethics recognizes the importance of the culture in shaping ethical issues, yet in practice, a process for ethical analysis and decision making is rarely adjusted to the culture and ethnicity of involved parties. This is of a particular concern in a health care system that is caring for a growing Aboriginal population. We raise the possibility of constructing a bioethics grounded in traditional Aboriginal knowledge. As an example of an element of traditional knowledge that contains strong ethical guidance, we present the story of the Gifts of the Seven Grandfathers. We note a resemblance of this Ojibway teaching to virtue ethics in European traditions, but we suggest that there are also important differences in how these two traditions are currently presented. We hope that further engagement with a variety of indigenous moral teachings and traditions could improve health care involving Aboriginal patients and communities, and enrich the discipline of bioethics.

  10. Palliative Care: The Relief You Need When You're Experiencing Symptoms of Serious Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Have a Serious Illness PALLIATIVE CARE: Improving quality of life when you’re seriously ill. Dealing with any ... your pain and other symptoms and improve your quality of life. Palliative care is a central part of treatment ...

  11. Palliative Care: Increasing the Quality of Life for Patients and Families...

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Palliative Care Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… Past Issues / Spring 2014 ... you as comfortable as possible and improve your quality of life. You don't have to be in hospice ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care Resources for You | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for You Follow us Pediatric Palliative Care Resources for You Dealing with a serious illness can ... of Nursing Research (NINR) offers pediatric palliative care resources to help you, your family, and your health ...

  13. The rose of Sharon: what is the ideal timing for palliative care consultation versus ethics consultation?

    PubMed

    La Via, Jennifer; Schiedermayer, David

    2012-01-01

    Ethics committees and palliative care consultants can function in a complementary fashion, seamlessly and effectively. Ethics committees can "air" and help resolves issues, and palliative care consultants can use a low-key, longitudinal approach.

  14. [Achievement and Future Direction of the PEACE Project - A National Education Project for Palliative Care Education].

    PubMed

    Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    Although palliative care is assuming an increasingly important role in patient care, most physicians did not learn to provide palliative care during their medical training. To address these serious deficiencies in physician training in palliative care, government decided to provide basic palliative education program for all practicing cancer doctors as a national policy namely Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education(PEACE). The program was 2-days workshop based on adult learning theory and focusing on symptom management and communication. In this 9 years, 4,888 educational workshop has been held, and 93,250 physicians were trained. In prospective observational study, both knowledges and difficulties practicing palliative care were significantly improved. In 2017, the new palliative care education program will be launched including combined program of e-learning and workshop to provide tailor made education based on learner's readiness and educational needs in palliative care.

  15. How to Get It -- Step 2: Meet the Palliative Care Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Provider 3. Meet the Team Palliative Care Team The palliative care team will spend a lot of time with you ... your goals. But what should you ask the team during the meeting? Here are some suggestions: What ...

  16. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  17. Cannabis in End-of-Life Care: Examining Attitudes and Practices of Palliative Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Luba, Rachel; Earleywine, Mitch; Farmer, Stacey; Slavin, Melissa

    2018-05-01

    Medical cannabis research has become quite extensive, with indications ranging from glaucoma to chemotherapy-induced nausea. Despite increased interest in cannabis' potential medical uses, research barriers, cannabis legislation, stigma, and lack of dissemination of data contribute to low adoption for some medical populations. Of interest, cannabis use appears low in palliative care settings, with few guidelines available to palliative care providers. The present study sought to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and practices of palliative care providers regarding the use of cannabis for terminally ill patients. Palliative care providers (N = 426) completed a one-time online survey assessing these attitudes, beliefs, and practices. Results demonstrated that palliative care providers endorse cannabis for a wide range of palliative care symptoms, end-of-life care generally, and as an adjuvant medication. Nevertheless, the gap between these beliefs and actual recommendation or prescription appears vast. Many who support the use of cannabis in palliative care do not recommend it as a treatment. These data suggest recommendations for healthcare providers and palliative care organizations.

  18. Palliative care in Parkinson's disease: implications for neuroscience nursing.

    PubMed

    Bunting-Perry, Lisette K

    2006-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease affecting 1.5 million Americans. The modern success of pharmacology and deep-brain stimulation surgery to treat the motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia provide PD patients with longer lives and increased motor functioning. However, in the moderate and advanced stages of disease, the therapeutic benefits of pharmacology diminish and motor symptoms are more complicated to treat. The nonmotor symptoms of PD receive little attention in clinical settings, although they can lead to disability and caregiver burden. The Center to Advance Palliative Care advocates applying the principles of palliative care to chronic disease. Likewise, the World Health Organization has redefined palliative care to include life-threatening illness. The Parkinson's Disease Model of Care (PDMC) takes the precepts of palliative care and presents a model for the neuroscience nurse to use in individual care planning across the trajectory of disease. The PDMC guides the nurse in providing relief from suffering for PD patients and their families, from diagnosis through bereavement, with an emphasis on advance care planning.

  19. Access to palliative care and hospice in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zerzan, J; Stearns, S; Hanson, L

    2000-11-15

    Nursing homes are the site of death for many elderly patients with incurable chronic illness, yet dying nursing home residents have limited access to palliative care and hospice. The probability that a nursing home will be the site of death increased from 18.7% in 1986 to 20.0% by 1993. Dying residents experience high rates of untreated pain and other symptoms. They and their family members are isolated from social and spiritual support. Hospice improves end-of-life care for dying nursing home residents by improving pain control, reducing hospitalization, and reducing use of tube feeding, but it is rarely used. For example, in 1997 only 13% of hospice enrollees were in nursing homes while 87% were in private homes, and 70% of nursing homes had no hospice patients. Hospice use varies by region, and rates of use are associated with nursing home administrators' attitudes toward hospice and contractual obligations. Current health policy discourages use of palliative care and hospice for dying nursing home residents. Quality standards and reimbursement rules provide incentives for restorative care and technologically intensive treatments rather than labor-intensive palliative care. Reimbursement incentives, contractual requirements, and concerns about health care fraud also limit its use. Changes in health policy, quality standards, and reimbursement incentives are essential to improve access to palliative care and hospice for dying nursing home residents. JAMA. 2000;284:2489-2494.

  20. Why we need more poetry in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Davies, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-23

    Although many well-known poems consider illness, loss and bereavement, medicine tends to view poetry more as an extracurricular than as a mainstream pursuit. Within palliative care, however, there has been a long-standing interest in how poetry may help patients and health professionals find meaning, solace and enjoyment. The objective of this paper is to identify the different ways in which poetry has been used in palliative care and reflect on their further potential for education, practice and research. A narrative review approach was used, drawing on searches of the academic literature through Medline and on professional, policy and poetry websites to identify themes for using poetry in palliative care. I identified four themes for using poetry in palliative care. These concerned (1) leadership, (2) developing organisational culture, (3) the training of health professionals and (4) the support of people with serious illness or nearing the end of life. The academic literature was mostly made up of practitioner perspectives, case examples or conceptual pieces on poetry therapy. Patients' accounts were rare but suggested poetry can help some people express powerful thoughts and emotions, create something new and feel part of a community. Poetry is one way in which many people, including patients and palliative care professionals, may seek meaning from and make sense of serious illnesses and losses towards the end of life. It may have untapped potential for developing person-centred organisations, training health professionals, supporting patients and for promoting public engagement in palliative care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. [Implementing the Cross-Disciplinary Subject Palliative Care - Lecture's Perspective].

    PubMed

    Isermeyer, Leonie; Ilse, Benjamin; Marx, Gabriella; Seidemann, Stephanie; Jünger, Jana; Nauck, Friedemann; Alt-Epping, Bernd

    2017-11-01

    Introduction  In 2009, palliative care was introduced as a mandatory subject in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Germany. Despite all efforts to integrate this subject into the curriculum, research suggests substantial differences and deficits in the quality of education between the medical schools. The aim of this research was to find out promoting as well as impedimental aspects of implementing palliative care in the medical training program. By this, a suitable framework in terms of content and structure for palliative care teaching should be extracted. Methods  We performed guided interviews with 15 of the in total 36 lecturers responsible for the implementation of palliative care teaching at their respective medical schools. We focused on content, design and methods of implementation within the palliative care curriculum. Data was evaluated by content analysis according to Meuser and Nagel. Results  We found that a lack of recognition of this subject within the medical faculties, coupled with entrenched structures of an already packed syllabus, were considered to be most relevant for the given heterogeneity in the implementation process. Deficits in personnel, financial and time resources also contributed to the perceived deficits. Faced with these difficulties, inner- and cross-faculty teamwork and support, extracurricular activities as well as external funds have proven to be important resources. Discussion  To promote the implementation process, medical faculties need established palliative care structures that meet the interests and needs of the students more effectively. Analysis of structural needs (for instance, the amount of apprenticeships and teachings units) would be an important step to prove political claims. Moreover, the development of suitable and resource-saving teaching and assessment methods should be promoted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. [Evaluation of 12 pilot projects to improve outpatient palliative care].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Wolf, G; Elsner, F; Lindena, G; Hilgers, R-D; Heussen, N; Rolke, R; Ostgathe, C; Radbruch, L

    2013-12-01

    With a priority programme the German Cancer Aid supported the development of quality-assured outpatient palliative care to cover the whole country. The 12 regional pilot projects funded with the aim to improve outpatient palliative care in different models and different frameworks were concurrently monitored and evaluated. The supported projects, starting and ending individually, documented all patients who were cared for using HOPE (Hospice and palliative care evaluation) and MIDOS (Minimal documentation system for palliative patients). Total data were analyzed for 3239 patients decriptively. In addition to the quantitative data the experiences of the projects were recorded in a number of workshops (2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012). In particular, the experiences reported in the final meeting in July 2012 were considered for this article as well as the final reports for the German Cancer Aid. In the quantitative evaluation 85.6% of 3239 palliative care patients had a cancer diagnosis. In all model projects the goal of a network with close cooperation of primary providers, social support, and outpatient and inpatient specialist services has been achieved. For all projects, the initial financing of the German Cancer Aid was extremely important, because contracts with health insurance funds were negotiated slowly, and could then be built on the experiences with the projects. The participants of the project-completion meeting emphasized the need to carry out a market analysis before starting palliative care organizations considering the different regional structures and target groups of patients. Education, training and continuing education programs contribute significantly to the network. A reliably funded coordination center/case management across all institutions is extremely important. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Community-Based Palliative Care and Advance Care Planning Documentation: Evidence from a Multispecialty Group.

    PubMed

    Tai-Seale, Ming; Yang, Yan; Dillon, Ellis; Tapper, Sharon; Lai, Steve; Yu, Peter; Allore, Heather; Ritchie, Christine

    2018-02-01

    With the growing public demand for access to critical health data across care settings, it is essential that advance care planning (ACP) information be included in the electronic health record (EHR) so that multiple clinicians can access it and understand individuals' preferences for end-of-life care. Community-based palliative care programs often incorporate ACP services. This study examined whether a community-based palliative care program is associated with digitally extractable ACP documentation in the EHR. Observational study using propensity score-weighted generalized estimation equations to examine patterns of digitally extractable ACP documentation. Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF), a multispecialty ambulatory healthcare system in northern California. Individuals aged 65 and older with serious illnesses between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014 (N = 3,444). Community-based palliative care program in PAMF. Digitally extractable ACP in EHR. We found that only 14% (n = 483) of individuals with serious illnesses had digitally extractable ACP in electronic health records. Of the 6% of individuals receiving palliative care, 65% had ACP, versus 11% of those not receiving palliative care. Study results showed a strong positive association between palliative care and ACP. Only a small percentage of individuals with serious illnesses had ACP documentation in the EHR. Individuals with serious illnesses infrequently used palliative care delivered by board-certified palliative care specialists. Palliative care service use was associated with higher rates of ACP after controlling for organizational and individual characteristics using a propensity score weighting method. Scalable interventions targeted at non-palliative care clinicians for universal access to ACP are needed. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. [Ideas about a "good death" in Palliative Care Nursing].

    PubMed

    Steffen-Bürgi, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    In the modern hospice movement and in Palliative Care, helping severely ill and dying patients to have a "good end of life" and a "good death" has high priority. The concept of a "good death" reflects the corresponding ideal of a "good dying". This concept analy-sis aimed at clarifying the current understanding of the characteristics of a "good death" as well as at presenting a coherent theoretical and ideational basis. The meaning of an ideal death as a point of reference and leitmotif in structuring palliative and hospice care, the theoretical background, and the components of a "good death" will be described in this article.

  5. Valuing local diversity in palliative care: translating the concept.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sharon; Hickey, Deb

    The contemporary challenges associated with addressing diversity, ethnicity, equality and accessibility in today's healthcare economy, sometimes lead to a reactive response where service providers strive to apply these concepts in practice. This article describes establishing a group that could engage with the broadest spectrum of the local community in ways that would make a lasting and meaningful difference to the local population, including how individuals and groups engage with and access palliative care services. The Valuing Local Diversity in Palliative Care Group was formed in May 2006. The group, whose membership is composed of statutory and voluntary services and members of various community groups, has promoted some innovative and creative partnerships.

  6. Addressing HIV/AIDS among Aboriginal People using a Health Status, Health Determinants and Health Care Framework: A Literature Review and Conceptual Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowgesic, Earl

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To describe the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among Aboriginal populations using a mixed methods approach (i.e. quantitative and qualitative methods); (2) to examine the individual-level and community-level relationships between HIV/AIDS, health determinants, and health care (e.g. diagnosis, access to treatment and health services planning); and (3) to explore innovative solutions to address HIV/AIDS among Aboriginal populations based upon research and infrastructure (e.g. partnerships, data sources and management, health indicators and culture) and policy (i.e. self-determination of Aboriginal Peoples). Methods Literature review and conceptual analysis using a health status, health determinants and health care framework. Results In comparison to non-Aboriginal persons, HIV infection is higher among Aboriginal persons, is more directly attributable to unique risk factors and socio-demographic characteristics, and yields more adverse health outcomes. Culture, poverty and self-determination are determinants of health for Aboriginal populations. Aboriginal people have inadequate primary care and, in particular, specialist care. It is necessary to include traditional Aboriginal approaches and culture when addressing Aboriginal health while understanding competing paradigms between modern medicine and Aboriginal traditions. Conclusion There is a need for self-determination of Aboriginal Peoples in order to improve the health of Aboriginal communities and those living with HIV/AIDS. Research and policy affecting Aboriginal people should be of the highest quality and based upon Aboriginal community relevance and involvement. PMID:27398110

  7. Palliative Care Gaps in Providing Psychological Treatment: A Review of the Current State of Research in Multidisciplinary Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Elissa; Niknejad, Bahar; Reid, M C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with advanced illness often have high rates of psychological symptoms. Many multicomponent palliative care intervention studies have investigated the efficacy of overall symptom reduction; however, little research has focused explicitly on how interventions address psychological symptoms associated with serious illness. The current study reviewed 59 multicomponent palliative care intervention articles and analyzed the mental health components of palliative care interventions and their outcomes in order to better understand the current state of psychological care in palliative care. The majority of articles (69.5%) did not provide any details regarding the psychological component delivered as part of the palliative care intervention. Most (54.2%) studies did not specify which provider on the team was responsible for providing the psychological intervention. Studies varied regarding the type of outcome measure utilized; multi-symptom assessment scales were used in 54.2% of studies, mental health scales were employed in 25.4%, quality of life and distress scales were used in 16.9%, and no psychological scales were reported in 28.8%. Fewer than half the studies (42.4%) documented a change in a psychological outcome. The majority of analyzed studies failed to describe how psychological symptoms were identified and treated, which discipline on the team provided the treatment, and whether psychological symptoms improved as a result of the intervention. Future research evaluating the effects of palliative care interventions on psychological symptoms will benefit from using reliable and valid psychological outcome measures and providing specificity regarding the psychological components of the intervention and who provides it.

  8. Organization and evaluation of generalist palliative care in a Danish hospital.

    PubMed

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Jarlbaek, Lene

    2015-05-06

    Hospitals have a responsibility to ensure that palliative care is provided to all patients with life-threatening illnesses. Generalist palliative care should therefore be acknowledged and organized as a part of the clinical tasks. However, little is known about the organization and evaluation of generalist palliative care in hospitals. Therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the organization and evaluation of generalist palliative care in a large regional hospital by comparing results from existing evaluations. Results from three different data sets, all aiming to evaluate generalist palliative care, were compared retrospectively. The data-sets derived from; 1. a national accreditation of the hospital, 2. a national survey and 3. an internal self-evaluation performed in the hospital. The data were triangulated to investigate the organization and evaluation of palliative care in order to identify concordances and/or discrepancies. The triangulation indicated poor validity of the results from existing methods used to evaluate palliative care in hospitals. When the datasets were compared, several discrepancies occurred with regard to the organization and the performance of generalist palliative care. Five types of discrepancies were found in 35 out of 56 sections in the fulfilment of the national accreditation standard for palliative care. Responses from the hospital management and the department managements indicated that generalist palliative care was organized locally--if at all--within the various departments and with no overall structure or policy. This study demonstrates weaknesses in the existing evaluation methods for generalist palliative care and highlights the lack of an overall policy, organization and goals for the provision of palliative care in the hospital. More research is needed to focus on the organization of palliative care and to establish indicators for high quality palliative care provided by the hospital. The lack of valid indicators

  9. Evaluating Palliative Care Resources Available to the Public Using the Internet and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Claudio, Celeste H; Dizon, Zoelle B; October, Tessie W

    2018-01-01

    Accessible information about palliative care available to the public on the Internet is growing. We do not know whether this information is consistent with the current accepted definition of palliative care. To identify resources on the Internet and social media regarding palliative care and evaluate the information conveyed. A cross-sectional study of "palliative care" search results. Top 10 Google websites, top 10 most viewed YouTube videos, and social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, were searched. The most popular Google websites were mostly from national organizations promoting palliative care, whose definitions of palliative care consistently mention "quality of life" and "relief from symptoms and stress." None of the websites mentioned children, and 77% cited palliative care as treatment for cancer with less focus on other diseases. No personal stories were included in Google websites, while 60% of YouTube videos included personal stories. Five main themes were generated from 266 YouTube video comments analyzed. The most common theme was emotionality, of which 91% were positive statements. Facebook and Twitter were mostly used by health-care professionals and not the public. Palliative care resources are mostly positive and consistent with the current definition of palliative care. Major Internet search engines such as Google and YouTube provide valuable insight into information the public receives about palliative care. Future development of Internet resources on palliative care should consider including children and emphasizing palliative care for all life-limiting illnesses.

  10. Palliative Care Disincentives in CKD: Changing Policy to Improve CKD Care.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Manjula Kurella; O'Hare, Ann M; Lin, Eugene; Holdsworth, Laura M; Malcolm, Elizabeth; Moss, Alvin H

    2018-06-01

    The dominant health delivery model for advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States, which focuses on provision of dialysis, is ill-equipped to address many of the needs of seriously ill patients. Although palliative care may address some of these gaps in care, its integration into advanced CKD care has been suboptimal due to several health system barriers. These barriers include uneven access to specialty palliative care services, underdeveloped models of care for seriously ill patients with advanced CKD, and misaligned policy incentives. This article reviews policies that affect the delivery of palliative care for this population, discusses reforms that could address disincentives to palliative care, identifies quality measurement issues for palliative care for individuals with advanced CKD and ESRD, and considers potential pitfalls in the implementation of new models of integrated palliative care. Reforming health care delivery in ways that remove policy disincentives to palliative care for patients with advanced CKD and ESRD will fill a critical gap in care. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treating nausea and vomiting in palliative care: a review

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul; Miller, Jeanna; Nikolova, Tanya; Tickoo, Roma

    2011-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are portrayed in the specialist palliative care literature as common and distressing symptoms affecting the majority of patients with advanced cancer and other life-limiting illnesses. However, recent surveys indicate that these symptoms may be less common and bothersome than has previously been reported. The standard palliative care approach to the assessment and treatment of nausea and vomiting is based on determining the cause and then relating this back to the “emetic pathway” before prescribing drugs such as dopamine antagonists, antihistamines, and anticholinergic agents which block neurotransmitters at different sites along the pathway. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of this approach is meager, and may be in part because relevance of the neuropharmacology of the emetic pathway to palliative care patients is limited. Many palliative care patients are over the age of 65 years, making these agents difficult to use. Greater awareness of drug interactions and QTc prolongation are emerging concerns for all age groups. The selective serotonin receptor antagonists are the safest antiemetics, but are not used first-line in many countries because there is very little scientific rationale or clinical evidence to support their use outside the licensed indications. Cannabinoids may have an increasing role. Advances in interventional gastroenterology are increasing the options for nonpharmacological management. Despite these emerging issues, the approach to nausea and vomiting developed within palliative medicine over the past 40 years remains relevant. It advocates careful clinical evaluation of the symptom and the person suffering it, and an understanding of the clinical pharmacology of medicines that are available for palliating them. PMID:21966219

  12. Medication management for community palliative care patients and the role of a specialist palliative care pharmacist: A qualitative exploration of consumer and health care professional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Lisha; Weeks, Greg; Eastman, Peter; George, Johnson

    2018-05-01

    Pharmacists have a key role to play in optimisation of medication regimens and promotion of medication safety. The role of specialist pharmacists as part of the multidisciplinary palliative care team, especially in the primary care setting, is not widely recognised. To explore the perspectives of stakeholders about the gaps in the current model of community palliative care services in relation to medication management and to assess their opinions pertaining to the role of a specialist palliative care pharmacist in addressing some of those gaps. Qualitative study utilising three focus groups involving 20 stakeholders. Thematic analysis was carried out using a framework approach and interpreted in the context of the Chronic Care Model for improving primary care for patients with chronic illness. Setting was a large regional Australian palliative care service. Participants included palliative care consumers and clinicians specifically patients, caregivers, physicians, nurses and pharmacists. Five major themes emerged from the focus groups: access to resources, medicines and information; shared care; challenges of polypharmacy; informal caregiver needs and potential roles of a palliative care pharmacist. Gaps in access to medicines/resources, training for generalist practitioners, communication between treating teams and lack of support for patients and carers were cited as factors adversely impacting medication management in community-based palliative care. While community-based palliative care is an essential aspect of meeting the health care demands of an ageing society, the current model has several gaps and limitations. An appropriately qualified and skilled pharmacist within the palliative care team may help to address some of the gaps in relation to medication access and appropriateness.

  13. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation.

    PubMed

    Alfaya Góngora, Maria Del Mar; Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-03-30

    To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources.

  14. Intercultural palliative care: do we need cultural competence?

    PubMed

    Gunaratnam, Yasmin

    2007-10-01

    Recognition of the importance of 'cultural competence' is now central to health care policy and to nurse education and training across the international spectrum. Detailed engagement with models of cultural competence is comparatively recent in palliative care nursing. This article presents the findings from a development project on elders and carers from 'minority ethnic' groups, funded by the Department of Health, to increase awareness of palliative care and to improve understanding of the needs of these groups of service users. The article describes the experiences of nurses involved in the delivery of palliative care who were interviewed in focus groups as a part of the project. It draws attention to the complicated relationships between cultural knowledge and practice and to the non-rational and visceral dimensions of intercultural care. These aspects of nursing are marginalised in current approaches to cultural competence, which emphasise the rational acquisition and application of cultural knowledge and skills by practitioners. It is suggested that recognition of these marginalised experiences can contribute to the development of new approaches to intercultural nursing that are also more attuned to the ethos and values of palliative care.

  15. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation

    PubMed Central

    Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. Methods: A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. Results: The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Conclusion: Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources. PMID:27226663

  16. Association Between Palliative Care and Patient and Caregiver Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kavalieratos, Dio; Corbelli, Jennifer; Zhang, Di; Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas; Ernecoff, Natalie C.; Hanmer, Janel; Hoydich, Zachariah P.; Ikejiani, Dara Z.; Klein-Fedyshin, Michele; Zimmermann, Camilla; Morton, Sally C.; Arnold, Robert M.; Heller, Lucas; Schenker, Yael

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The use of palliative care programs and the number of trials assessing their effectiveness have increased. OBJECTIVE To determine the association of palliative care with quality of life (QOL), symptom burden, survival, and other outcomes for people with life-limiting illness and for their caregivers. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL to July 2016. STUDY SELECTION Randomized clinical trials of palliative care interventions in adults with life-limiting illness. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Two reviewers independently extracted data. Narrative synthesis was conducted for all trials. Quality of life, symptom burden, and survival were analyzed using random-effects meta-analysis, with estimates of QOL translated to units of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–palliative care scale (FACIT-Pal) instrument (range, 0–184 [worst-best]; minimal clinically important difference [MCID], 9 points); and symptom burden translated to the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) (range, 0–90 [best-worst]; MCID, 5.7 points). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Quality of life, symptom burden, survival, mood, advance care planning, site of death, health care satisfaction, resource utilization, and health care expenditures. RESULTS Forty-three RCTs provided data on 12 731 patients (mean age, 67 years) and 2479 caregivers. Thirty-five trials used usual care as the control, and 14 took place in the ambulatory setting. In the meta-analysis, palliative care was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in patient QOL at the 1- to 3-month follow-up (standardized mean difference, 0.46; 95%CI, 0.08 to 0.83; FACIT-Pal mean difference, 11.36] and symptom burden at the 1- to 3-month follow-up (standardized mean difference, −0.66; 95%CI, −1.25 to −0.07; ESAS mean difference, −10.30). When analyses were limited to trials at low risk of bias (n = 5), the association between palliative care and QOL was attenuated

  17. What Makes a Good Palliative Care Physician? A Qualitative Study about the Patient’s Expectations and Needs when Being Admitted to a Palliative Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Masel, Eva K; Kitta, Anna; Huber, Patrick; Rumpold, Tamara; Unseld, Matthias; Schur, Sophie; Porpaczy, Edit; Watzke, Herbert H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to examine a) patients’ knowledge of palliative care, b) patients’ expectations and needs when being admitted to a palliative care unit, and c) patient’s concept of a good palliative care physician. Methods The study was based on a qualitative methodology, comprising 32 semistructured interviews with advanced cancer patients admitted to the palliative care unit of the Medical University of Vienna. Interviews were conducted with 20 patients during the first three days after admission to the unit and after one week, recorded digitally, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using NVivo 10 software, based on thematic analysis enhanced with grounded theory techniques. Results The results revealed four themes: (1) information about palliative care, (2) supportive care needs, (3) being treated in a palliative care unit, and (4) qualities required of palliative care physicians. The data showed that patients lack information about palliative care, that help in social concerns plays a central role in palliative care, and attentiveness as well as symptom management are important to patients. Patients desire a personal patient-physician relationship. The qualities of a good palliative care physician were honesty, the ability to listen, taking time, being experienced in their field, speaking the patient’s language, being human, and being gentle. Patients experienced relief when being treated in a palliative care unit, perceived their care as an interdisciplinary activity, and felt that their burdensome symptoms were being attended to with emotional care. Negative perceptions included the overtly intense treatment. Conclusions The results of the present study offer an insight into what patients expect from palliative care teams. Being aware of patient’s needs will enable medical teams to improve professional and individualized care. PMID:27389693

  18. What Is Needed to Prepare Speech Pathologists to Work in Adult Palliative Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Ashleigh; Breen, Lauren J.; Cocks, Naomi

    2018-01-01

    Background: Speech pathologists have a pivotal role in palliative care, assisting patients with swallowing and communication disorders, yet very little is known about the preparedness of speech pathologists to work in this field. Aims: To investigate the preparedness of speech pathologists for working in palliative care. The term 'palliative care'…

  19. Generalist palliative care in hospital - Cultural and organisational interactions. Results of a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbaek, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-06-01

    It can be challenging to provide generalist palliative care in hospitals, owing to difficulties in integrating disease-oriented treatment with palliative care and the influences of cultural and organisational conditions. However, knowledge on the interactions that occur is sparse. To investigate the interactions between organisation and culture as conditions for integrated palliative care in hospital and, if possible, to suggest workable solutions for the provision of generalist palliative care. A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was chosen using two independent studies: a quantitative study, in which three independent datasets were triangulated to study the organisation and evaluation of generalist palliative care, and a qualitative, ethnographic study exploring the culture of generalist palliative nursing care in medical departments. A Danish regional hospital with 29 department managements and one hospital management. Two overall themes emerged: (1) 'generalist palliative care as a priority at the hospital', suggesting contrasting issues regarding prioritisation of palliative care at different organisational levels, and (2) 'knowledge and use of generalist palliative care clinical guideline', suggesting that the guideline had not reached all levels of the organisation. Contrasting issues in the hospital's provision of generalist palliative care at different organisational levels seem to hamper the interactions between organisation and culture - interactions that appear to be necessary for the provision of integrated palliative care in the hospital. The implementation of palliative care is also hindered by the main focus being on disease-oriented treatment, which is reflected at all the organisational levels. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  1. Patterns of Palliative Care Referral in Patients Admitted With Heart Failure Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Wiskar, Katie J; Celi, Leo Anthony; McDermid, Robert C; Walley, Keith R; Russell, James A; Boyd, John H; Rush, Barret

    2018-04-01

    Palliative care is recommended for advanced heart failure (HF) by several major societies, though prior studies indicate that it is underutilized. To investigate patterns of palliative care referral for patients admitted with HF exacerbations, as well as to examine patient and hospital factors associated with different rates of palliative care referral. Retrospective nationwide cohort analysis utilizing the National Inpatient Sample from 2006 to 2012. Patients referred to palliative care were compared to those who were not. Patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of HF requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) were included. A cohort of non-HF patients with metastatic cancer was created for temporal comparison. Between 2006 and 2012, 74 824 patients underwent MV for HF. A referral to palliative care was made in 2903 (3.9%) patients. The rate of referral for palliative care in HF increased from 0.8% in 2006 to 6.4% in 2012 ( P < .01). In comparison, rate of palliative care referral in patients with cancer increased from 2.9% in 2006 to 11.9% in 2012 ( P < .01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, higher socioeconomic status (SES) was associated with increased access to palliative care ( P < .01). Racial differences were also observed in rates of referral to palliative care. The use of palliative care for patients with advanced HF increased during the study period; however, palliative care remains underutilized in this setting. Patient factors such as race and SES affect access to palliative care.

  2. Evaluating an holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice.

    PubMed

    McIlfatrick, Sonja; Hasson, Felicity

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate a holistic assessment tool for palliative care practice. This included identifying patients' needs using the holistic tool and exploring the usability, applicability and barriers and facilitators towards implementation in practice. The delivery of effective holistic palliative care requires a careful assessment of the patients' needs and circumstances. Whilst holistic assessment of palliative care needs is advocated, questions exist around the appropriateness of tools to assist this process. Mixed-method research design. Data collection involved an analysis of piloted holistic assessments undertaken using the tool (n = 132) and two focus groups with healthcare professionals (n = 10). The tool enabled health professionals to identify and gain an understanding of the needs of the patients, specifically in relation to the physical healthcare needs. Differences, however, between the analysis of the tool documentation and focus group responses were identified in particular areas. For example, 59 (68·8%) respondents had discussed preferred priorities of care with the patient; however, focus group comments revealed participants had concerns around this. Similarly, whilst over half of responses (n = 50; 57·5%) had considered a prognostic clinical indicator for the patient as an action, focus group results indicated questions around healthcare professionals' knowledge and perceived usefulness of such indicators. Positive aspects of the tool were that it was easy to understand and captured the needs of individuals. Negative aspects of the tool were that it was repetitive and the experience of assessors required consideration. The tool evaluation identified questions regarding holistic assessment in palliative care practice and the importance of communication. A holistic assessment tool can support patient assessment and identification of patients' needs in the 'real world' of palliative care practice, but the 'tool' is merely an aid to assist professionals to

  3. [Implementation of a palliative care concept in a geriatric acute care hospital].

    PubMed

    Hagg-Grün, U; Lukas, A; Sommer, B-N; Klaiber, H-R; Nikolaus, T

    2010-12-01

    To integrate palliative care patients into an acute geriatric ward requires extensive and continuous education and preparation of all participating professionals. It can be a lengthy process to integrate palliative care concepts despite cooperation of the hospital administration. The group of patients to be integrated differs from the patients of regular geriatric wards because of a higher percentage of relatively young oncologic patients and they differ from a regular palliative ward because about 50% are non-oncologic patients, while the average age is much higher than in normal palliative care. It is possible to integrate specialized palliative care into a regular geriatric ward. Patients admitted without palliative intention will benefit the most from ward-integrated palliative care if the treatment aim turns this way. Ward-integrated palliative care can be an integral part of treating geriatric patients in addition to acute geriatric medicine, rehabilitation, and prevention. It can also provide caretakers and patients with the benefits from continuity of treatment and care.

  4. Oral health care in remote Kimberley Aboriginal communities: the characteristics and perceptions of dental volunteers.

    PubMed

    Patel, J; Hearn, L; Slack-Smith, L M

    2015-09-01

    Aboriginal Australians face significant disparities in oral health and this is particularly the case in remote communities where access to dental services can be difficult. Using volunteers to provide dental care in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia is a novel approach. This study comprised an anonymous online survey of volunteers working with the Kimberley Dental Team (KDT). The survey had a response fraction of 66% and explored volunteer demographic characteristics, factors that motivated their involvement, perceptions of oral health among Aboriginal communities, and barriers and enablers to oral health in remote Aboriginal communities. Volunteers were more likely to be female, middle-aged and engaged in full-time employment. The two most common reasons reported for volunteering were to assist the community and visit the Kimberley region. Education and access to reliable, culturally appropriate care were perceived as enablers to good oral health for Aboriginal people in the Kimberley while limited access to services, poor nutrition and lack of government support were cited as barriers. Volunteers providing dental services to remote areas in Western Australia had a diverse demographic profile. However, they share similar motivating factors and views on the current barriers and enablers to good oral health in remote Aboriginal communities. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Systematic Review of Palliative Care in the Rural Setting.

    PubMed

    Bakitas, Marie A; Elk, Ronit; Astin, Meka; Ceronsky, Lyn; Clifford, Kathleen N; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Emanuel, Linda L; Fink, Regina M; Kvale, Elizabeth; Levkoff, Sue; Ritchie, Christine; Smith, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Many of the world's population live in rural areas. However, access and dissemination of the advances taking place in the field of palliative care to patients living in rural areas have been limited. We searched 2 large databases of the medical literature and found 248 relevant articles; we also identified another 59 articles through networking and a hand search of reference lists. Of those 307 articles, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were grouped into the following subcategories: intervention (n = 4), needs assessment (n = 2), program planning (n = 3), program evaluation (n = 4), education (n = 7), financial (n = 8), and comprehensive/systematic literature reviews (n = 11). We synthesized the current state of rural palliative care research and practice to identify important gaps for future research. Studies were conducted in the United States, Australia, Canada, Africa, Sweden, and India. Two randomized control trials were identified, both of which used telehealth approaches and had positive survival outcomes. One study demonstrated positive patient quality of life and depression outcomes. Research to guide rural palliative care practice is sparse. Approaches to telehealth, community- academic partnerships, and training rural health care professionals show promise, but more research is needed to determine best practices for providing palliative care to patients living in rural settings.

  6. Launching a palliative care homepage: the Edmonton experience.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J; Macmillan, A; Bruera, E

    1997-11-01

    The Internet, with its graphical subdivision, the World Wide Web (WWW). has become a powerful tool for the dissemination of information and for communication. This paper discusses the authors' experiences with creating, launching and maintaining an official publication on the Internet by the Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program and the Division of Palliative Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada. It describes the content and format of the homepage and the process of publication. Over a six-month period there were 892 visits to the site and 84 separate items of correspondence to the site's editors. Of these correspondence items, 36 were requesting further information regarding clinical and other programme information. Sixty-nine of the 84 communications came from North America and Europe. The pattern of readership is briefly discussed as are some of the potential advantages and challenges when utilizing this electronic medium. To promote the dissemination of reliable information on the Internet, the authors encourage other palliative care groups and organizations to publish on the WWW. The URL is http:/(/)www.palliative.org (previously http:/(/)www.caritas.ab.ca/approximately palliate).

  7. Development and Implementation of a Pediatric Palliative Care Program in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Megan; Thabet, Chloé

    2018-01-01

    Palliative care is recognized as an important component of care for children with cancer and other life-limiting conditions. In resource limited settings, palliative care is a key component of care for children with cancer and other life-limiting conditions. Globally, 98% of children who need palliative care live in low- or middle-income countries, where there are very few palliative care services available. There is limited evidence describing the practical considerations for the development and implementation of sustainable and cost-effective palliative care services in developing countries. Our aim is to describe the key considerations and initiatives that were successful in planning and implementing a hospital-based pediatric palliative care service specifically designed for a resource-limited setting. Bangabandu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) is a tertiary referral hospital in Bangladesh. Local palliative care services are very limited and focused on adult patients. In partnership with World Child Cancer, a project establishing a pediatric palliative care service was developed for children with cancer at BSMMU. We describe four key elements which were crucial for the success of this program: (1) raising awareness and sensitizing hospital administrators and clinical staff about pediatric palliative care; (2) providing education and training on pediatric palliative care for clinical staff; (3) forming a pediatric palliative care team; and (4) collecting data to characterize the need for pediatric palliative care. This model of a hospital-based pediatric palliative care service can be replicated in other resource-limited settings and can be expanded to include children with other life-limiting conditions. The development of pilot programs can generate interest among local physicians to become trained in pediatric palliative care and can be used to advocate for the palliative care needs of children.

  8. Palliating inside the lines: The effects of borders and boundaries on palliative care in rural Canada.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Melissa; Crooks, Valorie A; Castleden, Heather; Schuurman, Nadine; Skinner, Mark; Williams, Allison

    2016-11-01

    We draw lines to divide our world into specific places, territories, and categories. Although borders and boundaries are dynamic and socially constructed, their existence creates many broad impacts on our lives by geographically distinguishing between groups (e.g., us/them; here/there; inside/outside) at various scales from the national down to the personal spaces of the individual. Particularly, borders and boundaries can be used to define a variety of differing spaces such as the familial, social, economic, political, as well as issues of access - including access to health services. Despite the implicit connection between borders, boundaries, and health, little research has investigated this connection from a health geography perspective. As such, this secondary thematic analysis contributes to addressing this notable gap by examining how borders and boundaries are experienced and perceived to impact access to palliative care in rural Canada from the perspectives of the formal and informal providers of such care. Drawing upon data from qualitative interviews (n = 40) with formal and informal palliative caregivers residing in four different rural Canadian communities, five forms of borders and boundaries were found to directly impact care delivery/receipt: political; jurisdictional; geographical; professional; and cultural. Implicitly and explicitly, participants discussed these borders and boundaries while sharing their experiences of providing palliative care in rural Canada. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for palliative care in rural Canada, while also emphasizing the need for more health geography, and related social science, researchers to recognize the significance of borders and boundaries in relation to health and healthcare delivery. Lastly, we emphasize the transferability of these findings to other health sectors, geographical settings, and disciplines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  10. Implementation issues relevant to outpatient neurology palliative care.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Benzi M; Persenaire, Michael J; Holden, Samantha K; Palmer, Laura T; Redwine, Hannah; Berk, Julie; Anderson, C Alan; Filley, Christopher M; Kutner, Jean; Miyasaki, Janis; Carter, Julie

    2017-11-29

    There is growing interest in the application of palliative care principles to improve care for patients and families affected by neurologic diseases. We developed an interdisciplinary outpatient clinic for patients and families affected by neurologic disorders to better address the problems faced by our highest need patients. We have developed and improved this program over the past three years and share several of our most important lessons as well as ongoing challenges and areas where we see our clinic evolving in the future. We provide a description of our clinic logistics, including key steps in the initiation of the clinic, and provide descriptions from similar clinics at other institutions to demonstrate some of the variability in this growing field. We also provide results from a formal one-year quality improvement project and a one-year retrospective study of patients attending this clinic. Our clinic has grown steadily since its inception and maintains high satisfaction ratings from patients, caregivers, and referring providers. To maintain standardized and efficient care we have developed materials for patients and referring physicians as well as checklists and other processes used by our interdisciplinary team. Feedback from our quality improvement project helped define optimal visit duration and refine communication among team members and with patients and families. Results from our chart review suggest our clinic influences advance care planning and place of death. Common referral reasons include psychosocial support, complex symptom management, and advance care planning. Current challenges for our clinic include developing a strategy for continued growth, creating a sustainable financial model for interdisciplinary care, integrating our services with disease-specific sections, improving primary palliative care knowledge and skills within our referral base, and building effective alliances with community neurologists, geriatrics, primary care, nursing

  11. Increased access to palliative care and hospice services: opportunities to improve value in health care.

    PubMed

    Meier, Diane E

    2011-09-01

    A small proportion of patients with serious illness or multiple chronic conditions account for the majority of health care spending. Despite the high cost, evidence demonstrates that these patients receive health care of inadequate quality, characterized by fragmentation, overuse, medical errors, and poor quality of life. This article examines data demonstrating the impact of the U.S. health care system on clinical care outcomes and costs for the sickest and most vulnerable patients. It also defines palliative care and hospice, synthesizes studies of the outcomes of palliative care and hospice services, reviews variables predicting access to palliative care and hospice services, and identifies those policy priorities necessary to strengthen access to high-quality palliative care. Palliative care and hospice services improve patient-centered outcomes such as pain, depression, and other symptoms; patient and family satisfaction; and the receipt of care in the place that the patient chooses. Some data suggest that, compared with the usual care, palliative care prolongs life. By helping patients get the care they need to avoid unnecessary emergency department and hospital stays and shifting the locus of care to the home or community, palliative care and hospice reduce health care spending for America's sickest and most costly patient populations. Policies focused on enhancing the palliative care workforce, investing in the field's science base, and increasing the availability of services in U.S. hospitals and nursing homes are needed to ensure equitable access to optimal care for seriously ill patients and those with multiple chronic conditions. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  12. Increased Access to Palliative Care and Hospice Services: Opportunities to Improve Value in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Diane E

    2011-01-01

    Context: A small proportion of patients with serious illness or multiple chronic conditions account for the majority of health care spending. Despite the high cost, evidence demonstrates that these patients receive health care of inadequate quality, characterized by fragmentation, overuse, medical errors, and poor quality of life. Methods: This article examines data demonstrating the impact of the U.S. health care system on clinical care outcomes and costs for the sickest and most vulnerable patients. It also defines palliative care and hospice, synthesizes studies of the outcomes of palliative care and hospice services, reviews variables predicting access to palliative care and hospice services, and identifies those policy priorities necessary to strengthen access to high-quality palliative care. Findings: Palliative care and hospice services improve patient-centered outcomes such as pain, depression, and other symptoms; patient and family satisfaction; and the receipt of care in the place that the patient chooses. Some data suggest that, compared with the usual care, palliative care prolongs life. By helping patients get the care they need to avoid unnecessary emergency department and hospital stays and shifting the locus of care to the home or community, palliative care and hospice reduce health care spending for America's sickest and most costly patient populations. Conclusions: Policies focused on enhancing the palliative care workforce, investing in the field's science base, and increasing the availability of services in U.S. hospitals and nursing homes are needed to ensure equitable access to optimal care for seriously ill patients and those with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:21933272

  13. Gaps in Provision of Primary and Specialty Palliative Care in the Acute Care Setting by Race and Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Elizabeth; Hope, Aluko A; Allyn, Katherine; Szalkiewicz, Elissa; Gary, Brittany; Gong, Michelle N

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has identified a large unmet need in provision of specialist-level palliative care services in the hospital. How much of this gap is filled by primary palliative care provided by generalists or nonpalliative specialists has not been quantified. Estimates of racial and ethnic disparities have been inconsistent. The objective of this study was to 1) estimate primary and specialty palliative care delivery and to measure unmet needs in the inpatient setting and 2) explore racial and ethnic disparities in palliative care delivery. This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study of 55,658 adult admissions to two acute care hospitals in the Bronx in 2013. Patients with palliative care needs were identified by criteria adapted from the literature. The primary outcomes were delivery of primary and specialist-level palliative care. In all, 18.5% of admissions met criteria for needing palliative care. Of those, 18% received specialist-level palliative care, an estimated 30% received primary palliative care, and 37% had no evidence of palliative care or advance care planning. Black and Hispanic patients were not less likely to receive specialist-level palliative care (adjusted odds ratio [OR] black patients = 1.18, 95% CI 0.98, 1.42; adjusted OR Hispanic patients = 1.24, 95% CI 1.04, 1.48), but they were less likely to receive primary palliative care (adjusted OR black patients = 0.41, 95% CI 0.20, 0.84; adjusted OR Hispanic patients = 0.48, 95% CI 0.25, 0.94). Even when considering primary and specialty palliative care, hospitalized patients have a high prevalence of unmet palliative care need. Further research is needed understand racial and ethnic disparities in palliative care delivery. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Palliative sedation in advanced cancer patients hospitalized in a specialized palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Parra Palacio, Santiago; Giraldo Hoyos, Clara Elisa; Arias Rodríguez, Camilo; Mejía Arrieta, Daniel; Vargas Gómez, John Jairo; Krikorian, Alicia

    2018-03-29

    To describe the practice of palliative sedation (PS) in patients with advanced cancer in a specialized palliative care (PC) unit in Colombia. Descriptive prospective study including all adults with cancer hospitalized under PS in a cancer institute between January and July 2015 in Colombia. Variables examined were diagnosis, physical functioning, symptoms at the start of sedation, medications and dosages used, and type, level, and time of sedation. Descriptive and correlational statistics were obtained. Sixty-six patients were included, 70% of which were women. The patients had an average age of 61 years (range 24-87), and 74% had a Karnofsky Index (KI) of 50% or less. The most frequent diagnosis was breast cancer (22%), and 82% had metastatic cancer. The prevalence of palliative sedation was 2% and the most common symptoms indicating it were dyspnea (59%), delirium (45%), and pain (32%). All patients received midazolam as a sedative. The average time between the interval start and culmination of sedation was 44 h. There was a significant and inverse relationship between functionality and time under sedation. Palliative sedation is a valid therapeutic option for refractory symptoms causing suffering. The results correspond to international reports and guidelines, which suggests that PS is tailored to the needs of the individual patient while maintaining a high scientific standard, even in a context where PC is under development. However, further development of strategies and clear indications towards the use of PS in Colombia are needed, given its still scarce use.

  15. Requests from professional care providers for consultation with palliative care consultation teams.

    PubMed

    Groot, Marieke M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J; Courtens, Annemie M; Kuin, Annemieke; van der Linden, Barbara A; van Zuylen, Lia; Crul, Ben J P; Grol, Richard P T M

    2005-11-01

    Professional care providers need a substantial basis of competence and expertise to provide appropriate palliative care. Little is known about the problems professionals experience in their palliative care provision in daily practice or about the nature of the advice and support they request from experts. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which professionals requested assistance from palliative care consultation teams and the reasons behind these requests to trace any gaps they experience in the provision of palliative care. As part of a large national palliative care development programme, we studied requests for consultation made by professional care providers over a 2-year period. The requests for consultation were recorded on a specially developed standard registration form and classified according to 11 domains relevant to palliative care. Professional care providers requested 4351 consultations on account of 8413 specific problems in 11 quality-of-life and quality-of-care domains. The distribution of problems over these domains was unbalanced: 42.2% of the specific problems were physical, while the percentages of psychological, pharmacological and organizational problems were 7.7, 12.5 and 12.8%, respectively. In contrast, issues of a spiritual nature or concerned with daily functioning were raised infrequently (1.1 and 0.9%). Details of the specific problems in all the domains are described in the text and tables. The results of our study form a valid basis on which to develop and implement improvements in palliative care. We recommend that future well-founded policies for palliative care should incorporate palliative care consultation as well as educational and organizational interventions.

  16. Palliative Care Specialist Consultation Is Associated With Supportive Care Quality in Advanced Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walling, Anne M; Tisnado, Diana; Ettner, Susan L; Asch, Steven M; Dy, Sydney M; Pantoja, Philip; Lee, Martin; Ahluwalia, Sangeeta C; Schreibeis-Baum, Hannah; Malin, Jennifer L; Lorenz, Karl A

    2016-10-01

    Although recent randomized controlled trials support early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer, the specific processes of care associated with these findings and whether these improvements can be replicated in the broader health care system are uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of palliative care consultation and its association with specific processes of supportive care in a national cohort of Veterans using the Cancer Quality ASSIST (Assessing Symptoms Side Effects and Indicators of Supportive Treatment) measures. We abstracted data from 719 patients' medical records diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, or pancreatic cancer in 2008 over a period of three years or until death who received care in the Veterans Affairs Health System to evaluate the association of palliative care specialty consultation with the quality of supportive care overall and by domain using a multivariate regression model. All but 54 of 719 patients died within three years and 293 received at least one palliative care consult. Patients evaluated by a palliative care specialist at diagnosis scored seven percentage points higher overall (P < 0.001) and 11 percentage points higher (P < 0.001) within the information and care planning domain compared with those without a consult. Early palliative care specialist consultation is associated with better quality of supportive care in three advanced cancers, predominantly driven by improvements in information and care planning. This study supports the effectiveness of early palliative care consultation in three common advanced cancers within the Veterans Affairs Health System and provides a greater understanding of what care processes palliative care teams influence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. [Hypnosis to fight against pain and anxiety in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Quintini, Didier; Vitale, Claire; Gaide, Michelle; Surdej, Frédérique; Salas, Sébastien

    2017-12-01

    In our society, hypnosis sometimes has a negative, distorted image. For several years now it has become more widespread in the healthcare field and its use has increased in caring for symptoms such as pain and anxiety. It can be of great help in palliative situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical

  19. When Hospice Fails: The Limits of Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Barbara J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines feasibility of palliative approach for all patients, showing reasonable people may refuse even the most exemplary care for themselves or an incompetent relative. Medical realities and alleviation of pointless suffering necessitate that policymakers consider other options, including "active" euthanasia, consistent with patient…

  20. Criteria for successful multiprofessional cooperation in palliative care teams.

    PubMed

    Jünger, S; Pestinger, M; Elsner, F; Krumm, N; Radbruch, L

    2007-06-01

    Team work is considered a central component of palliative care. Within this comparatively young field of medicine, the emergence of new institutions (eg, palliative care units) highlights the challenge of establishing a completely new team. This study focuses on the factors, which enhance both the success and outcome criteria of good team work from the perception of team members in a palliative care unit. The palliative care team at the University Hospital of Aachen (n = 19) was interviewed 1 year after the unit's startup by the means of semistructured interviews. Interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Factors crucial to cooperation in the team members' views were close communication, team philosophy, good interpersonal relationships, high team commitment, autonomy and the ability to deal with death and dying. Moreover, close communication was by far the most frequently mentioned criteria for cooperation. Team performance, good coordination of workflow and mutual trust underpin the evaluation of efficient team work. Inefficient team work is associated with the absence of clear goals, tasks and role delegation, as well as a lack of team commitment. In a new team, close communication is particularly important for staff as they reorientate themselves to the dynamics of a new peer group. The results confirm the overwhelming importance of clarity, commitment and close, positive exchange among team members for successful team work.

  1. The Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes towards the Palliative Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayed, Ahmad; Sayej, Sumaya; Harazneh, Lubna; Fashafsheh, Imad; Eqtait, Faeda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Palliative care (PC) is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems like physical, psychosocial and…

  2. A cultural analysis of New Zealand palliative care brochures.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mary Louisa; Berryman, Kay; Oetzel, John; Iti, Tiwai; Reddy, Rangimahora

    2016-12-01

    Low utilization of palliative care services by Māori remains despite increases in services designed to meet Māori needs. The purpose of this study is to explore palliative care information brochures in the context of Māori principles of well-being and communication protocols, and health literacy. We examined 99 brochures from palliative care services in New Zealand and held two focus groups with 12 Māori elders (kaumātua) and extended family (whanau) members. Taking a cultural-discursive approach incorporating Māori worldviews, we analysed textual and conceptual features of the brochures. The findings centred on cultural connection and disconnection within the brochures and serve as a critique of the prominent messages currently presented in these brochures. The findings raise questions about the capacity of agencies to convey culturally resonant messages to kaumātua and their whānau. We identify implications of palliative care brochures for health literacy of provider organizations as well as kaumātua and whanau. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Design of a Postgraduate Course in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriaansen, Marian J. M.; Frederiks, Carla M. A.

    2002-01-01

    A postgraduate course on palliative nursing includes four class sessions and four peer review meetings in which students discuss case studies and assignments. The course is intended to prepare nurses for the bureaucratic, biomedical, social-therapeutic, and informal roles of terminal care. (SK)

  4. Issues in Rural Palliative Care: Views from the Countryside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Carole A.; Pesut, Barbara; Bottorff, Joan L.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Growing concern exists among health professionals over the dilemma of providing necessary health care for Canada's aging population. Hospice palliative services are an essential need in both urban and rural settings. Rural communities, in particular, are vulnerable to receiving inadequate services due to their geographic isolation.…

  5. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  6. Palliative care volunteerism among college students in Canada.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Tomes, Jennifer; Brennan, Michelle; Fawcett, Catherine; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The goal of Study 1 was to investigate whether young Canadian adults were interested in becoming involved in palliative care volunteer work. After reading a brief description of what volunteering in a palliative care environment typically involves, participants (undergraduate students) were asked to indicate whether they would be interested in this kind of volunteer experience and to provide a written explanation of their answer. Of the 105 participating students, only 39 (37.1 percent) expressed an interest in volunteering, while 66 (62.9 percent) were not interested. Not surprisingly, the results revealed that significantly more females than males were interested in palliative care volunteer work (45.9 percent and 25.0 percent, respectively). The most common reason students gave for wanting to become a palliative care volunteer was to help others; the reason given most often for not wanting to volunteer was that it would be too emotionally demanding. It is important to note that prior to taking part in this study the majority of the participating students (75.9 percent) did not know what palliative care was. The goal of Study 2 was to investigate undergraduate students' interest in volunteering in a nursing home, in a classroom, and at a food bank. Of the 111 participating students, 74 (66.7 percent) expressed an interest in volunteering at a food bank and in a nursing home, and 89 (80.2 percent) were interested in becoming a classroom volunteer. Together, the results of Studies 1 and 2 support the view that young people in Canada (especially males) are not interested in becoming involved in the care of dying persons. However, the results also indicate that they are very interested in volunteering with other populations (e.g., the elderly, school children) and in other settings (e.g., food bank).

  7. Promoting palliative care worldwide through international nursing education.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Pam; Paice, Judith; Coyle, Nessa; Coyne, Patrick; Smith, Thomas; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-10-01

    Many challenges exist when providing international education to those who care for people at the end of life. Though issues related to culture and language may vary, the one commonality that crosses all nations is that its people die. In general, societies seek to provide the best care they are trained to give. Many have few resources to provide this care well. Traditions of the past influence norms and dictate policies and procedures of the present. Since its inception in 2000, the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Project has provided palliative care education to nurses and other members of the interdisciplinary team in six of the seven continents. This article describes the efforts of this project to improve education around the globe, with the goal of providing excellent, compassionate palliative care, irrespective of location, financial status, political views, religion, race, and/or ethnicity. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Diabetic Foot Care: Developing Culturally Appropriate Educational Tools for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jennifer; Obersteller, Elizabeth A.; Rennie, Linda; Whitbread, Cherie

    2001-01-01

    Participatory research in Australia's Northern Territory sought opinions from nurses, general practitioners, Aboriginal health workers, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders on the development of culturally relevant foot care education for Indigenous people with diabetes. They decided to use a visual approach (posters and flip charts) to…

  9. Communication as a core skill of palliative surgical care.

    PubMed

    Miner, Thomas J

    2012-03-01

    Excellence as a surgeon requires not only the technical and intellectual ability to effectively take care of surgical disease but also an ability to respond to the needs and questions of patients. This article provides an overview of the importance of communication skills in optimal surgical palliation and offers suggestions for a multidisciplinary team approach, using the palliative triangle as the ideal model of communication and interpersonal skills. This article also discusses guidelines for advanced surgical decision making and outlines methods to improve communication skills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The views of patients with brain cancer about palliative care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Vierhout, M; Daniels, M; Mazzotta, P; Vlahos, J; Mason, W P; Bernstein, M

    2017-12-01

    Palliative care, a specialty aimed at providing optimal care to patients with life-limiting and chronic conditions, has several benefits. Although palliative care is appropriate for neurosurgical conditions, including brain cancer, few studies have examined the views of brain cancer patients about palliative care. We aimed to explore the thoughts of brain cancer patients about palliative care, their opinions about early palliative care, and their preferred care setting. Semi-structured interviews and the qualitative research methodologies of grounded theory were used to explore perceptions of palliative care on the part of 39 brain cancer outpatients. Seven overarching actions emerged: ■Patients would prefer to receive palliative care in the home.■Increased time with caregivers and family are the main appeals of home care.■Patients express dissatisfaction with brief and superficial interactions with health care providers.■Patients believe that palliative care can contribute to their emotional well-being.■Patients are open to palliative care if they believe that it will not diminish optimism.■There is a preconceived idea that palliative care is directly linked to active dying, and that supposed link generates fear in some patients.■Patients prefer to be educated about palliative care as an option early in their illness, even if they are fearful of it. Overall, when educated about the true meaning of palliative care, most patients express interest in accessing palliative care services. Although the level of fear concerning palliative care varies in patients, most recognize the associated benefits.

  11. Shelter-based palliative care for the homeless terminally ill.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Coyle, Doug

    2006-03-01

    The homeless have high rates of mortality, but live in environments not conducive to terminal care. Traditional palliative care hospitals may be reluctant to accept such patients, due to behavior or lifestyle concerns. The Ottawa Inner City Health Project (OICHP) is a pilot study to improve health care delivery to homeless adults. This is a retrospective analysis of a cohort of terminally ill homeless individuals and the effectiveness of shelter-based palliative care. As proof of principle, a cost comparison was performed. 28 consecutive homeless terminally ill patients were admitted and died at a shelter-based palliative care hospice. Demographics, diagnoses at admission and course were recorded. Burden of illness was assessed by medical and psychiatric diagnoses, addictions, Karnofsky scale and symptom management. An expert panel was convened to identify alternate care locations. Using standard costing scales, direct versus alternate care costs were compared. 28 patients had a mean age 49 years; average length of stay 120 days. DIAGNOSES: liver disease 43%, HIV/AIDS 25%, malignancy 25% and other 8%. Addiction to drugs or alcohol and mental illness in 82% of patients. Karnofsky performance score mean 40 +/- 16.8. Pain management with continuous opiates in 71%. The majority reunited with family. Compared to alternate care locations, the hospice projected 1.39 million dollars savings for the patients described. The homeless terminally ill have a heavy burden of disease including physical illness, psychiatric conditions and addictions. Shelter-based palliative care can provide effective end-of-life care to terminally ill homeless individuals at potentially substantial cost savings.

  12. [Palliative care and end-of-life patients in emergency situations. Recommendations on optimization of out-patient care].

    PubMed

    Wiese, C H R; Vagts, D A; Kampa, U; Pfeiffer, G; Grom, I-U; Gerth, M A; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2011-02-01

    At the end of life acute exacerbations of medical symptoms (e.g. dyspnea) in palliative care patients often result in emergency medical services being alerted. The goals of this study were to discuss cooperation between emergency medical and palliative care structures to optimize the quality of care in emergencies involving palliative care patients. For data collection an open discussion of the main topics by experts in palliative and emergency medical care was employed. Main outcome measures and recommendations included responses regarding current practices related to expert opinions and international literature sources. As the essential points of consensus the following recommendations for optimization of care were named: (1) integration of palliative care in the emergency medicine curricula for pre-hospital emergency physicians and paramedics, (2) development of outpatient palliative care, (3) integration of palliative care teams into emergency medical structures, (4) cooperation between palliative and emergency medical care, (5) integration of crisis intervention into outpatient palliative emergency medical care, (6) provision of emergency plans and emergency medical boxes, (7) provision of palliative crisis cards and do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) orders, (8) psychosocial aspects concerning palliative emergencies and (9) definition of palliative patients and their special situation by the physician responsible for prior treatment. Prehospital emergency physicians are confronted with emergencies in palliative care patients every day. In the treatment of these emergencies there are potentially serious conflicts due to the different therapeutic concepts of palliative medical care and emergency medical services. This study demonstrates that there is a need for regulated criteria for the therapy of palliative patients and patients at the end of life in emergency situations. Overall, more clinical investigations concerning end-of-life care and unresponsive

  13. Palliative Care Psychiatry: Update on an Emerging Dimension of Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fairman, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care psychiatry is an emerging subspecialty field at the intersection of Palliative Medicine and Psychiatry. The discipline brings expertise in understanding the psychosocial dimensions of human experience to the care of dying patients and support of their families. The goals of this review are (1) to briefly define palliative care and summarize the evidence for its benefits, (2) to describe the roles for psychiatry within palliative care, (3) to review recent advances in the research and practice of palliative care psychiatry, and (4) to delineate some steps ahead as this sub-field continues to develop, in terms of research, education, and systems-based practice. PMID:23794027

  14. Design of a nationwide survey on palliative care for end-stage heart failure in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Yuma; Oishi, Shogo; Sugano, Yasuo; Sakashita, Akihiro; Kotooka, Norihiko; Suzuki, Makoto; Higo, Taiki; Yumino, Dai; Takada, Yasuko; Maeda, Seiko; Yamabe, Saori; Washida, Koichi; Takahashi, Tomonori; Ohtani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi; Sato, Yukihito

    2018-02-01

    The term palliative care has historically been associated with support for individuals with advanced incurable cancer, so cardiologists and cardiac nurses may be unfamiliar with its principles and practice. However, palliative care is now a part of end-stage heart failure management. We conducted the first nationwide survey to investigate the status of palliative care for heart failure in Japan. A self-reported questionnaire was mailed to all Japanese Circulation Society - authorized cardiology training hospitals (n=1004) in August 2016. The response deadline was December 2016. The survey focused on the following topics: basic information about the facility and multidisciplinary team, patient symptoms for palliative care, positive outcomes after providing palliative care, drug therapy as palliative care for patients with heart failure, advance care planning with patients and their families, and impediments to providing palliative care to patients with heart failure. The results of the survey will be reported in detail elsewhere. Current guidelines on palliative care do not specifically address what team members should be involved, what drugs should be used, or when palliative care should be started. This survey collected information to improve the quality of palliative care and provide more specialized palliative care within the limits of resources. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Survey of Consumer Informatics for Palliation and Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Corn, Milton; Gustafson, David H.; Harris, Linda M.; Kutner, Jean S.; McFarren, Ann E.; Shad, Aziza T.

    2012-01-01

    Context Palliation in patient care is under-utilized in part because many patients have insufficient knowledge about this management option. Information technology can improve awareness by providing access to numerous sources of trustworthy information. Evidence Acquisition To estimate what a patient interested in palliation might find online, online resources were searched in July 2010, using terms relevant to palliation. PubMed was searched for publications relevant to discussed topics. Evidence Synthesis Search engines returned vast numbers of hits, and identifying trustworthy sites was difficult. Products judged as trustworthy were classified as information, decision tool, or extended interaction tool. Sites with useful educational material were relatively plentiful; decision guides and interactive tools were much rarer. Available consumer informatics did not address well some terminal illnesses, and some subpopulations such as children, nor was there sufficient attention to literacy levels or principles of instructional design. Online or published information about usage numbers, effectiveness, and cost/benefit considerations was scant. Many sectors, including commercial, government, healthcare, research, and wellness/advocacy groups, have created consumer informatics for palliation. Conclusions Online information about palliation is available, although identifying trustworthy sources can be problematic. General information sites are relatively plentiful, but more tools for decision making, and interaction would increase value of web resources. More attention to literacy levels, instructional principles, and needs of special populations would improve products. Research to measure usage of such tools, ability to influence behavior, and cost/benefit issues is needed. PMID:21521592

  16. Usage Patterns of a Mobile Palliative Care Application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haipeng; Liu, David; Marks, Sean; Rickerson, Elizabeth M; Wright, Adam; Gordon, William J; Landman, Adam

    2018-06-01

    Fast Facts Mobile (FFM) was created to be a convenient way for clinicians to access the Fast Facts and Concepts database of palliative care articles on a smartphone or tablet device. We analyzed usage patterns of FFM through an integrated analytics platform on the mobile versions of the FFM application. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the usage data from FFM as a way to better understand user behavior for FFM as a palliative care educational tool. This is an exploratory, retrospective analysis of de-identified analytics data collected through the iOS and Android versions of FFM captured from November 2015 to November 2016. FFM App download statistics from November 1, 2015, to November 1, 2016, were accessed from the Apple and Google development websites. Further FFM session data were obtained from the analytics platform built into FFM. FFM was downloaded 9409 times over the year with 201,383 articles accessed. The most searched-for terms in FFM include the following: nausea, methadone, and delirium. We compared frequent users of FFM to infrequent users of FFM and found that 13% of all users comprise 66% of all activity in the application. Demand for useful and scalable tools for both primary palliative care and specialty palliative care will likely continue to grow. Understanding the usage patterns for FFM has the potential to inform the development of future versions of Fast Facts. Further studies of mobile palliative care educational tools will be needed to further define the impact of these educational tools.

  17. Knowledge, Internal, and Environmental Factors on Environmental Care Behaviour among Aboriginal Students in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Norshariani Abd

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the contribution of predictor factors (i.e. knowledge about the environment as well as internal and environmental factors) on environmental care behaviour among aboriginal students. The knowledge about the environment that was investigated in this research includes environmental knowledge and environmental action knowledge.…

  18. Acceptance of dying: a discourse analysis of palliative care literature.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Camilla

    2012-07-01

    The subject of death denial in the West has been examined extensively in the sociological literature. However, there has not been a similar examination of its "opposite", the acceptance of death. In this study, I use the qualitative method of discourse analysis to examine the use of the term "acceptance" of dying in the palliative care literature from 1970 to 2001. A Medline search was performed by combining the text words "accept or acceptance" with the subject headings "terminal care or palliative care or hospice care", and restricting the search to English language articles in clinical journals discussing acceptance of death in adults. The 40 articles were coded and analysed using a critical discourse analysis method. This paper focuses on the theme of acceptance as integral to palliative care, which had subthemes of acceptance as a goal of care, personal acceptance of healthcare workers, and acceptance as a facilitator of care. For patients and families, death acceptance is a goal that they can be helped to attain; for palliative care staff, acceptance of dying is a personal quality that is a precondition for effective practice. Acceptance not only facilitates the dying process for the patient and family, but also renders care easier. The analysis investigates the intertextuality of these themes with each other and with previous texts. From a Foucauldian perspective, I suggest that the discourse on acceptance of dying represents a productive power, which disciplines patients through apparent psychological and spiritual gratification, and encourages participation in a certain way to die. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. National Trends (2009-2013) for Palliative Care Utilization for Patients Receiving Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Goyal, Abhinav; Kakkera, Krishna; Harrington, Sarah; Corwin, Howard L

    2018-05-04

    Patients requiring mechanical ventilation have high morbidity and mortality. Providing palliative care services has been suggested as a way to improve comprehensive management of critically ill patients. We examined the trend in the utilization of palliative care among adults who require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Primary objectives were to determine the trend in palliative care utilization over time, predictors for palliative care utilization, and palliative care impact on hospital length of stay. Retrospective, cross-sectional study. The National Inpatient Sample data between 2009 and 2013 was used for this study. Adults (age ≥ 18 yr) who underwent prolonged mechanical ventilation (≥ 96 consecutive hr) were studied. Palliative care and mechanical ventilation were identified using the corresponding International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification, codes. A total of 1,751,870 hospitalizations with prolonged mechanical ventilation were identified between 2009 and 2013. The utilization of palliative care increased yearly from 6.5% in 2009 to 13.1% in 2013 (p < 0.001). Among the mechanically ventilated patients who died, palliative care increased from 15.9% in 2009 to 33.3% in 2013 (p < 0.001). Median hospital length of stay for patients with and without palliative care was 13 and 17 days, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients discharged to either short- or long-term care facilities had a shorter length of stay if palliative care was provided (15 vs 19 d; p < 0.001). The factors associated with a higher palliative care utilization included older age, malignancy, larger hospitals in urban areas, and teaching hospitals. Non-Caucasian race was associated with lower palliative care utilization. Among patients who undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation, palliative care utilization is increasing, particularly in patients who die during hospitalization. Using palliative care for mechanically ventilated patients who are discharged to

  20. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  1. Cultural competency and diversity among hospice palliative care volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, Maja

    2012-05-01

    This case study examines the current state of cultural competence in hospice and palliative care in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Because of changing demographic trends and ethnic minorities underutilizing hospice palliative care services, this research examined the current state of culturally competent care in a hospice setting, and the challenges to providing culturally competent care in a hospice in the GTA. A case study was conducted with a hospice and included in-depth interviews with 14 hospice volunteers. The findings reveal that volunteers encountered cultural clashes when their level of cultural competency was weak. Second, volunteers revealed there was a lack of adequate cultural competency training with their hospice, and finally, there was a lack of ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity among the hospice volunteers.

  2. Audio-visual communication and its use in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Nessa; Khojainova, Natalia; Francavilla, John M; Gonzales, Gilbert R

    2002-02-01

    The technology of telemedicine has been used for over 20 years, involving different areas of medicine, providing medical care for the geographically isolated patients, and uniting geographically isolated clinicians. Today audio-visual technology may be useful in palliative care for the patients lacking access to medical services due to the medical condition rather than geographic isolation. We report results of a three-month trial of using audio-visual communications as a complementary tool in care for a complex palliative care patient. Benefits of this system to the patient included 1) a daily limited physical examination, 2) screening for a need for a clinical visit or admission, 3) lip reading by the deaf patient, 4) satisfaction by the patient and the caregivers with this form of communication as a complement to telephone communication. A brief overview of the historical prospective on telemedicine and a listing of applied telemedicine programs are provided.

  3. Palliative Care Edema: Patient Population, Causal Factors, and Types of Edema Referred to a Specialist Palliative Care Edema Service.

    PubMed

    Real, Shirley; Cobbe, Sinead; Slattery, Sinead

    2016-07-01

    Edema in palliative care patients is a common symptom, however, the research base for all aspects of its care is extremely poor. To evaluate a specialist palliative care edema service in order to report on the patient population referred, the types of edema encountered, and the causes of edema. Prior to study, three different edema types were described for evaluation: lymphedema, nonlymphatic edema, and a combination of the two. Retrospective chart evaluation was completed from August 2013 through January 2014. Patients with edema assessed by the specialist palliative care physiotherapy edema service. Sixty-three cases were included, comprising 10.5% of all new palliative care referrals during the study period. Ninety-two percent (n = 58) had a diagnosis of cancer and 57% (n = 36) were female. Age ranged from 45-97 years. The most common edema type was a mixed edema (46%, n = 29), followed by lymphedema (27%, n = 18) and nonlymphatic edema (16%, n = 10). Lymphorrhea occurred in 9.5% of cases. The most common reasons for edema, based on clinical opinion, were blocked lymphatics (33%) and dependency from immobility (27%). The most common site for edema was in the lower limbs (89%, n = 56). The time lapse from the last treatment to death ranged from 1-225 days. Having a mixed edema type or lymphorrhea was a relatively poor prognostic sign. This is the first study to describe in detail the occurrence of edema in palliative care patients. Edema may be present for many months prior to death making the search for effective treatments imperative.

  4. Palliative Cancer Care in Brazil: The Perspective of Nurses and Physicians.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelle M; Büscher, Andreas; Moreira, Marléa Chagas

    Palliative care is a recent development in health worldwide. In Brazil, a growing number of people with cancer require palliative care, emphasizing the need for investment in this aspect of health to increase the quality of life of patients during the dying process. As a developing country, Brazil lacks knowledge regarding the themes, material and financial resources, and policies of palliative care. The aim of this study was to provide insights into the Brazilian palliative care system from the perspectives of nurses and physicians. This was a descriptive and qualitative study, conducted at the palliative care unit of the Instituto Nacional de Câncer in Brazil. Twelve professionals, among them 8 nurses and 4 physicians, were interviewed in November 2013. The data were analyzed using the thematic analysis method. Ethical aspects were respected. The perspectives of the participants were characterized by 3 themes regarding the initial phase of development of palliative cancer care in Brazil: (1) controversies about when palliative cancer care should be initiated, (2) the World Health Organization recommendations and current practices, and (3) the need to invest in palliative cancer care education in Brazil. The development of palliative care is in the initial stages, and there is a possibility for growth due to recent advances. Knowledge about these challenges to palliative care could contribute to the development of strategies, such as the establishment of service organizations and networks, as well as educational and political investments for the advancement of palliative care.

  5. Palliative Care Exposure in Internal Medicine Residency Education: A Survey of ACGME Internal Medicine Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Asher; Nam, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, the need for palliative care services will be paramount and yet training for palliative care physicians is currently inadequate to meet the current palliative care needs. Nonspecialty-trained physicians will need to supplement the gap between supply and demand. Yet, no uniform guidelines exist for the training of internal medicine residents in palliative care. To our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed to evaluate how internal medicine residencies currently integrate palliative care into their training. In this study, we surveyed 338 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited internal medicine program directors. We queried how palliative care was integrated into their training programs. The vast majority of respondents felt that palliative care training was "very important" (87.5%) and 75.9% of respondents offered some kind of palliative care rotation, often with a multidisciplinary approach. Moving forward, we are hopeful that the data provided from our survey will act as a launching point for more formal investigations into palliative care education for internal medicine residents. Concurrently, policy makers should aid in palliative care instruction by formalizing required palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

  6. Palliative Care Training in Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Fellowships: A National Survey of Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Larrieux, Gregory; Wachi, Blake I; Miura, John T; Turaga, Kiran K; Christians, Kathleen K; Gamblin, T Clark; Peltier, Wendy L; Weissman, David E; Nattinger, Ann B; Johnston, Fabian M

    2015-12-01

    Despite previous literature affirming the importance of palliative care training in surgery, there is scarce literature about the readiness of Surgical Oncology and hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) fellows to provide such care. We performed the first nationally representative study of surgical fellowship program directors' assessment of palliative care education. The aim was to capture attitudes about the perception of palliative care and disparity between technical/clinical education and palliative care training. A survey originally used to assess surgical oncology and HPB surgery fellows' training in palliative care, was modified and sent to Program Directors of respective fellowships. The final survey consisted of 22 items and was completed online. Surveys were completed by 28 fellowship programs (70 % response rate). Only 60 % offered any formal teaching in pain management, delivering bad news or discussion about prognosis. Fifty-eight percent offered formal training in basic communication skills and 43 % training in conducting family conferences. Resources were available, with 100 % of the programs having a palliative care consultation service, 42 % having a faculty member with recognized clinical interest/expertise in palliative care, and 35 % having a faculty member board-certified in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Our data shows HPB and surgical oncology fellowship programs are providing insufficient education and assessment in palliative care. This is not due to a shortage of faculty, palliative care resources, or teaching opportunities. Greater focus one valuation and development of strategies for teaching palliative care in surgical fellowships are needed.

  7. [Participation of radiotherapy in interdisciplinary palliative care units--challenge and chance].

    PubMed

    Momm, Felix; Becker, Gerhild; Ewald, Hermann; Baumgartner, Johann; Adamietz, Irenäus A; Frommhold, Hermann

    2004-02-01

    In Germany, a sufficient system of palliative care does not exist. Possibilities for participation of radiooncologists in the further development of this promising part of medical action are reported. Experiences from interdisciplinary work in the field of palliative care are described. This experience is communicated for use in the actual discussion about the future of palliative care in Germany, especially in the field of radiooncology. A palliative care unit can only work in a team of different professions, which means different physicians, but also nurses, social workers, psychologists or pastors. A palliative care unit will benefit from working with radiooncologists as well as radiooncologists will do from working in the field of palliative care. In times of growing interest in and need for palliative care, radiooncologists should actively participate in the development of palliative care units in Germany. The aim of this participation should be to reasonably arrange the treatment of incurably ill patients with the chances of modern radiotherapy. Another aim should be to improve the treatment of "classic" radiation oncology patients by ideas of palliative care. The further development of palliative care in Germany should not take place without the participation of radiooncologists. This will meet the interests of palliative care and radiotherapy and-most importantly-the patients' interests.

  8. Palliative Care in Vietnam: Long-Term Partnerships Yield Increasing Access.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Thinh, Dang Huy Quoc; Khanh, Quach Thanh; Huyen, Hoang Thi Mong; Tuan, Tran Diep; The, Than Ha Ngoc; Cuong, Do Duy; Thuan, Tran Van; Yen, Nguyen Phi; Van Anh, Pham; Cham, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Doyle, Kathleen P; Yen, Nguyen Thi Hai; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care began in Vietnam in 2001, but steady growth in palliative care services and education commenced several years later when partnerships for ongoing training and technical assistance by committed experts were created with the Ministry of Health, major public hospitals, and medical universities. An empirical analysis of palliative care need by the Ministry of Health in 2006 was followed by national palliative care clinical guidelines, initiation of clinical training for physicians and nurses, and revision of opioid prescribing regulations. As advanced and specialist training programs in palliative care became available, graduates of these programs began helping to establish palliative care services in their hospitals. However, community-based palliative care is not covered by government health insurance and thus is almost completely unavailable. Work is underway to test the hypothesis that insurance coverage of palliative home care not only can improve patient outcomes but also provide financial risk protection for patients' families and reduce costs for the health care system by decreasing hospital admissions near the end of life. A national palliative care policy and strategic plan are needed to maintain progress toward universally accessible cost-effective palliative care services. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost Savings from Palliative Care Teams and Guidance for a Financially Viable Palliative Care Program

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ian M; Robinson, Chessie; Huq, Sakib; Philastre, Martha; Fine, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the cost savings of palliative care (PC) and identify differences in savings according to team structure, patient diagnosis, and timing of consult. Data Sources Hospital administrative records on all inpatient stays at five hospital campuses from January 2009 through June 2012. Study Design The analysis matched PC patients to non-PC patients (separately by discharge status) using propensity score methods. Weighted generalized linear model regressions of hospital costs were estimated for the matched groups. Data Collection Data were restricted to patients at least 18 years old with inpatient stays of between 7 and 30 days. Variables available included patient demographics, primary and secondary diagnoses, hospital costs incurred for the inpatient stay, and when/if the patient had a PC consult. Principal Findings We found overall cost savings from PC of $3,426 per patient for those dying in the hospital. No significant cost savings were found for patients discharged alive; however, significant cost savings for patients discharged alive could be achieved for certain diagnoses, PC team structures, or if consults occurred within 10 days of admission. Conclusions Appropriately selected and timed PC consults with physician and RN involvement can help ensure a financially viable PC program via cost savings to the hospital. PMID:25040226

  10. Elements of effective palliative care models: a rapid review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Population ageing, changes to the profiles of life-limiting illnesses and evolving societal attitudes prompt a critical evaluation of models of palliative care. We set out to identify evidence-based models of palliative care to inform policy reform in Australia. Method A rapid review of electronic databases and the grey literature was undertaken over an eight week period in April-June 2012. We included policy documents and comparative studies from countries within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) published in English since 2001. Meta-analysis was planned where >1 study met criteria; otherwise, synthesis was narrative using methods described by Popay et al. (2006). Results Of 1,959 peer-reviewed articles, 23 reported systematic reviews, 9 additional RCTs and 34 non-randomised comparative studies. Variation in the content of models, contexts in which these were implemented and lack of detailed reporting meant that elements of models constituted a more meaningful unit of analysis than models themselves. Case management was the element most consistently reported in models for which comparative studies provided evidence for effectiveness. Essential attributes of population-based palliative care models identified by policy and addressed by more than one element were communication and coordination between providers (including primary care), skill enhancement, and capacity to respond rapidly to individuals’ changing needs and preferences over time. Conclusion Models of palliative care should integrate specialist expertise with primary and community care services and enable transitions across settings, including residential aged care. The increasing complexity of care needs, services, interventions and contextual drivers warrants future research aimed at elucidating the interactions between different components and the roles played by patient, provider and health system factors. The findings of this review are limited by its

  11. Palliative Care Development in European Care Homes and Nursing Homes: Application of a Typology of Implementation.

    PubMed

    Froggatt, Katherine; Payne, Sheila; Morbey, Hazel; Edwards, Michaela; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Gambassi, Giovanni; Pasman, H Roeline; Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-06-01

    The provision of institutional long-term care for older people varies across Europe reflecting different models of health care delivery. Care for dying residents requires integration of palliative care into current care work, but little is known internationally of the different ways in which palliative care is being implemented in the care home setting. To identify and classify, using a new typology, the variety of different strategic, operational, and organizational activities related to palliative care implementation in care homes across Europe. We undertook a mapping exercise in 29 European countries, using 2 methods of data collection: (1) a survey of country informants, and (2) a review of data from publically available secondary data sources and published research. Through a descriptive and thematic analysis of the survey data, we identified factors that contribute to the development and implementation of palliative care into care homes at different structural levels. From these data, a typology of palliative care implementation for the care home sector was developed and applied to the countries surveyed. We identified 3 levels of palliative care implementation in care homes: macro (national/regional policy, legislation, financial and regulatory drivers), meso (implementation activities, such as education, tools/frameworks, service models, and research), and micro (palliative care service delivery). This typology was applied to data collected from 29 European countries and demonstrates the diversity of palliative care implementation activity across Europe with respect to the scope, type of development, and means of provision. We found that macro and meso factors at 2 levels shape palliative care implementation and provision in care homes at the micro organizational level. Implementation at the meso and micro levels is supported by macro-level engagement, but can happen with limited macro strategic drivers. Ensuring the delivery of consistent and high

  12. [Palliative care in the intensive cardiac care unit: a new competence for the cardiac intensivist].

    PubMed

    Romanò, Massimo; Bertona, Roberta; Zorzoli, Federica; Villani, Rosvaldo

    2017-10-01

    Admissions to the intensive care unit at the end of life of patients with chronic non-malignant diseases are increasing. This involves the need for the development of palliative care culture and competence, also in the field of intensive cardiology. Palliative care should be implemented in the treatment of all patients with critical stages of disease, irrespective of prognosis, in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life.This review analyzes in detail the main clinical, ethical and communicational issues to move toward the introduction of basics of palliative care in cardiac intensive care units. It outlines the importance of shared decision-making with the patient and his family, with special attention to withholding/withdrawing of life-sustaining treatments, palliative sedation, main symptom control, patient and family psychological support.

  13. Palliative care and human rights in patient care: an Armenia case study.

    PubMed

    Barros de Luca, Gabriela; Zopunyan, Violeta; Burke-Shyne, Naomi; Papikyan, Anahit; Amiryan, Davit

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines palliative care within the human rights in patient care framework, which clarifies state obligations and addresses the rights of both patients and providers. In the context of palliative care, these rights extend beyond the right to health and include patient rights to freedom from torture, cruel and inhuman treatment, non-discrimination and equality, bodily integrity, privacy and confidentiality, information, and right to a remedy. They also encompass provider rights to decent working conditions, freedom of association, and due process. The paper then looks at a case study of Armenia, acknowledging how the government's commitment to palliative care, combined with awareness raising and advocacy by human rights organizations, created an enabling environment for the realization of human rights in patient care in the context of palliative care.

  14. [Communication strategies used by health care professionals in providing palliative care to patients].

    PubMed

    Trovo de Araújo, Monica Martins; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to verify the relevance and utilization of communication strategies in palliative care. This is a multicenter qualitative study using a questionnaire, performed from August of 2008 to July of 2009 with 303 health care professionals who worked with patients receiving palliative care. Data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Most participants (57.7%) were unable to state at least one verbal communication strategy, and only 15.2% were able to describe five signs or non-verbal communication strategies. The verbal strategies most commonly mentioned were those related to answering questions about the disease/treatment. Among the non-verbal strategies used, the most common were affective touch, looking, smiling, physical proximity, and careful listening. Though professionals have assigned a high degree of importance to communication in palliative care, they showed poor knowledge regarding communication strategies. Final considerations include the necessity of training professionals to communicate effectively in palliative care.

  15. Barriers to providing palliative care in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Kevin; Bédard, Michel; Krueger, Paul; Taniguchi, Alan; Kelley, Mary Lou; McAiney, Carrie; Justice, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess challenges in providing palliative care in long-term care (LTC) facilities from the perspective of medical directors. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. A questionnaire was developed, reviewed, pilot-tested, and sent to 450 medical directors representing 531 LTC facilities. Responses were rated on 2 different 5-point scales. Descriptive analyses were conducted on all responses. SETTING All licensed LTC facilities in Ontario with designated medical directors. PARTICIPANTS Medical directors in the facilities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic and practice characteristics of physicians and facilities, importance of potential barriers to providing palliative care, strategies that could be helpful in providing palliative care, and the kind of training in palliative care respondents had received. RESULTS Two hundred seventy-five medical directors (61%) representing 302 LTC facilities (57%) responded to the survey. Potential barriers to providing palliative care were clustered into 3 groups: facility staff’s capacity to provide palliative care, education and support, and the need for external resources. Two thirds of respondents (67.1%) reported that inadequate staffing in their facilities was an important barrier to providing palliative care. Other barriers included inadequate financial reimbursement from the Ontario Health Insurance Program (58.5%), the heavy time commitment required (47.3%), and the lack of equipment in facilities (42.5%). No statistically significant relationship was found between geographic location or profit status of facilities and barriers to providing palliative care. Strategies respondents would use to improve provision of palliative care included continuing medical education (80.0%), protocols for assessing and monitoring pain (77.7%), finding ways to increase financial reimbursement for managing palliative care residents (72.1%), providing educational material for facility staff (70.7%), and providing practice

  16. [Hospice and palliative care in the outpatient department].

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, M; Tsuneto, S

    2000-10-01

    In the medical environment, information disclosure to patients and respect of autonomy have spread rapidly. Today, many terminally-ill cancer patients wish to spend as much time at home as possible. In such situations the patient who has been informed that curative treatments are no longer expected to be beneficial can now hope to receive home care and visiting care from hospice/palliative care services. The essential concepts of hospice/palliative care are symptom management, communication, family care and a multidisciplinary approach. These concepts are also important in the outpatient department. In particular, medical staff need to understand and utilize management strategies for common symptoms from which terminally-ill cancer patients suffer (ex. cancer pain, anorexia/fatigue, dyspnea, nausea/vomiting, constipation, hypercalcemia and psychological symptoms). They also need to know how to use continuous subcutaneous infusion for symptom management in the patients last few days. The present paper explains the clinical practices of hospice/palliative care in the outpatient department. Also discussed is support of individual lives so that maximum QOL is provided for patients kept at home.

  17. Practices in Human Dignity in Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Üstün, Çağatay; Uzelli Yilmaz, Derya

    Respecting and valuing an individual's existential dignity forms the basis of nursing and medical practice and of nursing care. The objective of the study was to determine the approach to human dignity that nurses and physicians have while providing palliative care. This qualitative study was performed using a phenomenological research design. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted in 9 nurses and 5 physicians with human dignity approach in palliative care. Following the qualitative Colaizzi method of analyzing the data, the statements made by the nurses and physicians during the interviews were grouped under 8 categories. Consistent with the questionnaire format, 8 themes and 43 subthemes of responses were determined describing the human dignity of the nurse and the physicians. The results of the study showed that in some of the decisions and practices of the nurses giving nursing care and physicians giving medical care to palliative care patients, while they displayed ethically sensitive behavior, on some points, they showed approaches that violated human dignity and showed lack of awareness of ethical, medical, and social responsibilities.

  18. Palliative care for Parkinson's disease: Patient and carer's perspectives explored through qualitative interview.

    PubMed

    Fox, Siobhan; Cashell, Alison; Kernohan, W George; Lynch, Marie; McGlade, Ciara; O'Brien, Tony; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Foley, Mary J; Timmons, Suzanne

    2017-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for non-malignant illnesses, including Parkinson's disease. However, past research with healthcare workers highlights unmet palliative needs in this population and referral rates to Specialist Palliative Care are low. Some healthcare workers perceive a 'fear' in their patients about introducing palliative care. However, less is known about the views of people with Parkinson's disease and their carers about palliative care. (1) To explore the palliative care and related issues most affecting people with Parkinson's disease and their families and (2) to examine perceptions about/understanding of palliative care. This was a qualitative study; semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. A total of 31 people participated, both people with Parkinson's disease ( n = 19) and carers ( n = 12), across three Movement Disorder Clinics in the Republic of Ireland. People with Parkinson's disease and their carers were unfamiliar with the term palliative care. When informed of the role of palliative care, most felt that they would benefit from this input. People with Parkinson's disease and carers experienced a high illness burden and wanted extra support. Crises requiring Specialist Palliative Care involvement may occur at diagnosis and later, with advancing illness. Participants wanted more information about palliative care and especially further supports to address their psychosocial needs. A holistic palliative care approach could address the complex physical and psychosocial symptoms experienced by people with Parkinson's disease and their carers, and people with Parkinson's disease and their carers are open to palliative care. Further research needs to explore how palliative care can be introduced into the routine care for people with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Palliative care for homeless people: a systematic review of the concerns, care needs and preferences, and the barriers and facilitators for providing palliative care.

    PubMed

    Klop, Hanna T; de Veer, Anke J E; van Dongen, Sophie I; Francke, Anneke L; Rietjens, Judith A C; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2018-04-24

    Homeless people often suffer from complex and chronic comorbidities, have high rates of morbidity and die at much younger ages than the general population. Due to a complex combination of physical, psychosocial and addiction problems at the end of life, they often have limited access to palliative care. Both the homeless and healthcare providers experience a lot of barriers. Therefore, providing palliative care that fits the needs and concerns of the homeless is a challenge to healthcare providers. This systematic review aims to summarize evidence about the concerns, palliative care needs and preferences of homeless people, as well as barriers and facilitators for delivering high quality palliative care. PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched up to 10 May 2016. Included were studies about homeless people with a short life expectancy, their palliative care needs and the palliative care provided, that were conducted in Western countries. Data were independently extracted by two researchers using a predefined extraction form. Quality was assessed using a Critical Appraisal instrument. The systematic literature review was based on the PRISMA statement. Twenty-seven publications from 23 different studies met the inclusion criteria; 15 studies were qualitative and eight were quantitative. Concerns of the homeless often related to end-of-life care not being a priority, drug dependence hindering adequate care, limited insight into their condition and little support from family and relatives. Barriers and facilitators often concerned the attitude of healthcare professionals towards homeless people. A respectful approach and respect for dignity proved to be important in good quality palliative care. A patient-centred, flexible and low-threshold approach embodying awareness of the concerns of homeless people is needed so that appropriate palliative care can be provided timely. Training, education and experience of professionals can help to

  20. The development of hospital-based palliative care services in public hospitals in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gwyther, L; Krause, R; Cupido, C; Stanford, J; Grey, H; Credé, T; De Vos, A; Arendse, J; Raubenheimer, P

    2018-02-01

    With the recent approval of a South African (SA) National Policy Framework and Strategy for Palliative Care by the National Health Council, it is pertinent to reflect on initiatives to develop palliative care services in public hospitals. This article reviews the development of hospital-based palliative care services in the Western Cape, SA. Palliative care services in SA started in the non-governmental sector in the 1980s. The first SA hospital-based palliative care team was established in Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital in 2001. The awareness of the benefit of palliative care in the hospital setting led to the development of isolated pockets of excellence providing palliative care in the public health sector in SA. This article describes models for palliative care at tertiary, provincial and district hospital level, which could inform development of hospital-based palliative care as the national policy for palliative care is implemented in SA.

  1. Communication that heals: mindful communication practices from palliative care leaders.

    PubMed

    Omilion-Hodges, Leah M; Swords, Nathan M

    2016-01-01

    Though research has begun to highlight the centrality of communication in palliative care, studies have yet to focus on the use of mindful communication. Mindful communication is associated with increases in patient care and decreases in physician burnout. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews the authors sought mindful communication practices from palliative care leaders in American Hospital Association Circle of Life® award-wining units. Four key mindful communication practices emerged: Know your audience, ask questions, discard scripts, and recognize your role. The discussion articulates how key mindful communication practices may be used as a stage model, where key practices may be used individually or in concert, by sole practitioners or within interdisciplinary teams and by new and seasoned clinicians. Theoretical contributions and areas for future inquiry are also discussed.

  2. Life is uncertain. death is certain. Buddhism and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Masel, Eva K; Schur, Sophie; Watzke, Herbert H

    2012-08-01

    It is part of a palliative care assessment to identify patients' spiritual needs. According to Buddhism, suffering is inherent to all human beings. Advice on how suffering can be reduced in the course of serious illness might be helpful to patients with incurable and progressive diseases. Palliative care could benefit from Buddhist insights in the form of compassionate care and relating death to life. Buddhist teachings may lead to a more profound understanding of incurable diseases and offer patients the means by which to focus their minds while dealing with physical symptoms and ailments. This might not only be beneficial to followers of Buddhism but to all patients. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Music therapy in an integrated pediatric palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Wang, Hua; Curtis, Charlotte; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    National experts have recommended that children with life-limiting illnesses receive integrated palliative and medical care. These programs offer a variety of services, including music therapy. Using survey data from parents whose were enrolled in Florida's Partners in Care: Together for Kids (PIC:TFK) program, this study investigates parents' experiences with music therapy. About 44% of children with life-limiting illnesses and 17% of their siblings used music therapy. For children who used music therapy, multivariate results suggest that their parents were 23 times as likely to report satisfaction with the overall PIC:TFK program (P < .05) versus parents whose children did not use music therapy. Pediatric palliative care programs should include music therapy, although recruiting licensed music therapists may be challenging.

  4. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  5. Caregiver resilience in palliative care: a research protocol.

    PubMed

    Limardi, Stefano; Stievano, Alessandro; Rocco, Gennaro; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-02-01

    To describe a research protocol designed to formulate a conceptual framework of informal caregiver resilience in palliative care. Resilience is the ability to adapt or to improve one's own conditions following experiences of adversity. The end-of-life care provided by informal caregivers is a form of adversity because it entails objective difficulties, emotional involvement and deep levels of introspection that have been stimulated by the death event. Resilience has not yet been addressed in association with end-of-life care. This is a multicentre cross-sectional study. We will administer a questionnaire to a sample of informal end-of-life caregivers to collect data about the main psychological, behavioural and healthcare factors that impact resilience. Data analysis will include descriptive and correlational statistical techniques, multiple linear regressions and structural equation modelling. Data will be collected in multiple palliative care centres and statistical analysis will be carried out using software: SPSS version 19.0 and MPlus version 7.3. The study is supported by a grant from the Centre of Excellence for Nursing Scholarship in Italy (Research Grant number 2.13.10) that was awarded in March 2013. The study seeks to identify the predictive, mediating and moderating roles of select variables: caregivers' self-efficacy, burdens of caregiving, depression and resilience. The results of this analysis will impact the theoretical study of resilience in palliative care and will have practical implications for interventions aimed at supporting caregivers through healthcare teams. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Preference for Palliative Care in Cancer Patients: Are Men and Women Alike?

    PubMed

    Saeed, Fahad; Hoerger, Michael; Norton, Sally A; Guancial, Elizabeth; Epstein, Ronald M; Duberstein, Paul R

    2018-03-23

    Men and those with low educational attainment are less likely to receive palliative care. Understanding these disparities is a high priority issue. In this study of advanced cancer patients, we hypothesized that men and those with lower levels of educational attainment would have less favorable attitudes toward palliative care. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 383 patients at study entry in the Values and Options in Cancer Care (VOICE) clinical trial. Patients were asked about their preferences for palliative care if their oncologist informed them that further treatment would not be helpful. Palliative care was defined as "comfort care" that focuses on "quality of life, but not a cure." Response options were definitely no, possibly no, unsure, possibly yes, and definitely yes. Those preferring palliative care (definitely or possibly yes) were compared to all others. Predictors were patient gender and education level. Covariates included age, race, disease aggressiveness, and financial strain. Women were more likely [odds ratio (95% CI)] than men to prefer palliative care [3.07 (1.80-5.23)]. The effect of education on preferences for palliative care was not statistically significant [0.85 (0.48-1.48)]. Significant gender differences in patients' preferences for palliative care could partially account for gender disparities in end-of-life care. Interventions to promote palliative care among men could reduce these disparities. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Resources for Educating, Training, and Mentoring All Physicians Providing Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Downar, James

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a rapid review of the published literature and available resources for educating Canadian physicians to provide palliative and end-of-life care. Several key messages emerge from the review. First, there are many palliative care educational resources already available for Canadian physicians. Second, the many palliative care education resources are often not used in physician training. Third, we know that some palliative care educational interventions are inexpensive and scalable, while others are costly and time-consuming; we know very little about which palliative care educational interventions impact physician behavior and patient care. Fourth, two palliative care competency areas in particular can be readily taught: symptom management and communication skill (e.g., breaking bad news and advance care planning). Fifth, palliative care educational interventions are undermined by the "hidden curriculum" in medical education; interventions must be accompanied by continuing education and faculty development to create lasting change in physician behavior. Sixth, undergraduate and postgraduate medical training is shifting from a time-based training paradigm to competency-based training and evaluation. Seventh, virtually every physician in Canada should be able to provide basic palliative care; physicians in specialized areas of practice should receive palliative care education that is tailored to their area, rather than generic educational interventions. For each key message, one or more implications are provided, which can serve as recommendations for a framework to improve palliative care as a whole in Canada.

  8. The clinical, operational, and financial worlds of neonatal palliative care: A focused ethnography.

    PubMed

    Williams-Reade, Jackie; Lamson, Angela L; Knight, Sharon M; White, Mark B; Ballard, Sharon M; Desai, Priti P

    2015-04-01

    Due to multiple issues, integrated interdisciplinary palliative care teams in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may be difficult to access, sometimes fail to be implemented, or provide inconsistent or poorly coordinated care. When implementing an effective institution-specific neonatal palliative care program, it is critical to include stakeholders from the clinical, operational, and financial worlds of healthcare. In this study, researchers sought to gain a multidisciplinary perspective into issues that may impact the implementation of a formal neonatal palliative care program at a tertiary regional academic medical center. In this focused ethnography, the primary researcher conducted semistructured interviews that explored the perspectives of healthcare administrators, finance officers, and clinicians about neonatal palliative care. The perspectives of 39 study participants informed the identification of institutional, financial, and clinical issues that impact the implementation of neonatal palliative care services at the medical center and the planning process for a formal palliative care program on behalf of neonates and their families. Healthcare professionals described experiences that influenced their views on neonatal palliative care. Key themes included: (a) uniqueness of neonatal palliative care, (b) communication and conflict among providers, (c) policy and protocol discrepancies, and (d) lack of administrative support. The present study highlighted several areas that are challenging in the provision of neonatal palliative care. Our findings underscored the importance of recognizing and procuring resources needed simultaneously from the clinical, operational, and financial worlds in order to implement and sustain a successful neonatal palliative care program.

  9. Fatigue in palliative care patients -- an EAPC approach.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Lukas; Strasser, Florian; Elsner, Frank; Gonçalves, Jose Ferraz; Løge, Jon; Kaasa, Stein; Nauck, Friedemann; Stone, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in palliative care patients, reported in .80% of cancer patients and in up to 99% of patients following radio- or chemotherapy. Fatigue also plays a major role in palliative care for noncancer patients, with large percentages of patients with HIV, multiple sclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or heart failure reporting fatigue. This paper presents the position of an expert working group of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), evaluating the available evidence on diagnosis and treatment of fatigue in palliative care patients and providing the basis for future discussions. As the expert group feels that culture and language influence the approach to fatigue in different European countries, a focus was on cultural issues in the assessment and treatment of fatigue in palliative care. As a working definition, fatigue was defined as a subjective feeling of tiredness, weakness or lack of energy. Qualitative differences between fatigue in cancer patients and in healthy controls have been proposed, but these differences seem to be only an expression of the overwhelming intensity of cancer-related fatigue. The pathophysiology of fatigue in palliative care patients is not fully understood. For a systematic approach, primary fatigue, most probably related to high load of proinflammatory cytokines and secondary fatigue from concurrent syndromes and comorbidities may be differentiated. Fatigue is generally recognized as a multidimensional construct, with a physical and cognitive dimension acknowledged by all authors. As fatigue is an inherent word only in the English and French language, but not in other European languages, screening for fatigue should include questions on weakness as a paraphrase for the physical dimension and on tiredness as a paraphrase for the cognitive dimension. Treatment of fatigue should include causal interventions for secondary fatigue and symptomatic treatment with

  10. [Management of infections in palliative and terminal cancer care].

    PubMed

    Sochor, M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cancer are highly susceptible to infections. There is a lack of evidencebased guidelines or protocols for their management in palliative and endoflife care. To define an optimal dia-gnostic approach and therapeutic management of infections in patients with palliative and terminal cancer care. Along with thromboembolic disease and cancer progression, infections are the most frequent causes of death in oncology. Besides the impact on mortality, they are accompanied with a myriad of symptoms decreasing the quality of life. High incidence of infectons is due to a malignancy itself, the oncolgical therapy and host factors. There is a lack of evidencebased guidelines and protocols for the therapy of infections in palliative and terminal cancer care. Most of available studies are retrospective in nature, with diverse methods and cohorts. Incidence of infections in these patient oscillates between 16- 55% in specialized palliative units, and rises up to 83% in acute care hospitals. From the epidemiologic viewpoint, urinary (39- 42%) and respiratory infections (22- 36%) are the most frequent cases, followed by soft tissue and skin infections (6- 12%) and bacteremias (5- 14%). At present, the antibio-tic treatment does not seem to have a positive impact on the survival rate. Symptom control antibio-tic therapy as a means of symptom control still remains controversial, since it meets this purpose only in a few percents of studies. The most successful is the symtom control in urinary tract infections (60- 79%), in contrast to other sites of infection (30- 43%). In the last week of life there the symptom control is achieved only in 10% of patient. One should always consider the prognosis, actual preformance status and patients preferences when it comes to the management of dia-gnostics and therapy of infections. If the prognosis counts in weeks or months the dia-gnostics and therapy should not differ from the approach to any other oncological patient

  11. Patients' perceptions of palliative care: adaptation of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective instrument for use in palliative care, and description of patients' perceptions of care received.

    PubMed

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Rystedt, Ingrid; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2015-11-02

    Instruments specific to palliative care tend to measure care quality from relative perspectives or have insufficient theoretical foundation. The instrument Quality from the Patient's Perspective (QPP) is based on a model for care quality derived from patients' perceptions of care, although it has not been psychometrically evaluated for use in palliative care. The aim of this study was to adapt the QPP for use in palliative care contexts, and to describe patients' perceptions of the care quality in terms of the subjective importance of the care aspects and the perceptions of the care received. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014 which included 191 patients (73% response rate) in late palliative phase at hospice inpatient units, hospice day-care units, wards in nursing homes that specialized in palliative care and homecare districts, all in Norway. An explorative factor analysis using principal component analysis, including data from 184 patients, was performed for psychometric evaluation. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha and paired t-tests were used to describe patients' perceptions of their care. The QPP instrument was adapted for palliative care in four steps: (1) selecting items from the QPP, (2) modifying items and (3) constructing new items to the palliative care setting, and (4) a pilot evaluation. QPP instrument specific to palliative care (QPP-PC) consists of 51 items and 12 factors with an eigenvalue ≥1.0, and showed a stable factor solution that explained 68.25% of the total variance. The reliability coefficients were acceptable for most factors (0.79-0.96). Patients scored most aspects of care related to both subjective importance and actual care received as high. Areas for improvement were symptom relief, participation, continuity, and planning and cooperation. The QPP-PC is based on a theoretical model of quality of care, and has its roots in patients' perspectives. The instrument was

  12. Visibility and Voice: Aboriginal People Experience Culturally Safe and Unsafe Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hole, Rachelle D; Evans, Mike; Berg, Lawrence D; Bottorff, Joan L; Dingwall, Carlene; Alexis, Carmella; Nyberg, Jessie; Smith, Michelle L

    2015-12-01

    In Canada, cultural safety (CS) is emerging as a theoretical and practice lens to orient health care services to meet the needs of Aboriginal people. Evidence suggests Aboriginal peoples' encounters with health care are commonly negative, and there is concern that these experiences can contribute to further adverse health outcomes. In this article, we report findings based on participatory action research drawing on Indigenous methods. Our project goal was to interrogate practices within one hospital to see whether and how CS for Aboriginal patients could be improved. Interviews with Aboriginal patients who had accessed hospital services were conducted, and responses were collated into narrative summaries. Using interlocking analysis, findings revealed a number of processes operating to produce adverse health outcomes. One significant outcome is the production of structural violence that reproduces experiences of institutional trauma. Positive culturally safe experiences, although less frequently reported, were described as interpersonal interactions with feelings visibility and therefore, treatment as a "human being." © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Impact of Oncologists’ Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Care on Patients’ Access to Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Cerana, Maria Agustina; Park, Minjeong; Hess, Kenneth; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unclear how oncologists’ attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) care affect the delivery of care. The present study examined the association between oncologists’ EOL care attitudes and (a) timely specialist palliative care referral, (b) provision of supportive care, and (c) EOL cancer treatment decisions. Methods. We randomly surveyed 240 oncology specialists at our tertiary care cancer center to assess their attitudes toward EOL care using a score derived from the Jackson et al. qualitative conceptual framework (0 = uncomfortable and 8 = highly comfortable with EOL care). We determined the association between this score and clinicians’ report of specialist palliative care referral, provision of supportive care, and EOL cancer treatment decisions. Results. Of the 182 respondents (response rate of 76%), the median composite EOL care score was 6 (interquartile range, 5–7). A higher EOL score was significantly associated with solid tumor oncology (median 7 vs. 6 for hematologic oncology; p = .003), a greater willingness to refer patients with newly diagnosed cancer to specialist palliative care (median, 7 vs. 6; p = .01), greater comfort with symptom management (median, 6 vs. 5; p = .01), and provision of counseling (median, 7 vs. 4; p < .001) but not with cancer treatment decisions. We observed a gradient effect, with higher scores associated with a greater proportion of patients referred to palliative care (score 0–4, 27%; 5, 31%; 6, 32%; 7, 35%; and 8, 45%; p = .007). Conclusion. Greater comfort with EOL care was associated with higher rates of specialist palliative care referral and self-reported primary palliative care delivery. More support and education are needed for oncologists who are less comfortable with EOL care. Implications for Practice: In the present survey of oncology specialists, most reported that they were comfortable with end-of-life (EOL) care, which was in turn, associated with greater provision of primary palliative

  14. Impact of Oncologists' Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Care on Patients' Access to Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Cerana, Maria Agustina; Park, Minjeong; Hess, Kenneth; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    It is unclear how oncologists' attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) care affect the delivery of care. The present study examined the association between oncologists' EOL care attitudes and (a) timely specialist palliative care referral, (b) provision of supportive care, and (c) EOL cancer treatment decisions. We randomly surveyed 240 oncology specialists at our tertiary care cancer center to assess their attitudes toward EOL care using a score derived from the Jackson et al. qualitative conceptual framework (0 = uncomfortable and 8 = highly comfortable with EOL care). We determined the association between this score and clinicians' report of specialist palliative care referral, provision of supportive care, and EOL cancer treatment decisions. Of the 182 respondents (response rate of 76%), the median composite EOL care score was 6 (interquartile range, 5-7). A higher EOL score was significantly associated with solid tumor oncology (median 7 vs. 6 for hematologic oncology; p = .003), a greater willingness to refer patients with newly diagnosed cancer to specialist palliative care (median, 7 vs. 6; p = .01), greater comfort with symptom management (median, 6 vs. 5; p = .01), and provision of counseling (median, 7 vs. 4; p < .001) but not with cancer treatment decisions. We observed a gradient effect, with higher scores associated with a greater proportion of patients referred to palliative care (score 0-4, 27%; 5, 31%; 6, 32%; 7, 35%; and 8, 45%; p = .007). Greater comfort with EOL care was associated with higher rates of specialist palliative care referral and self-reported primary palliative care delivery. More support and education are needed for oncologists who are less comfortable with EOL care. In the present survey of oncology specialists, most reported that they were comfortable with end-of-life (EOL) care, which was in turn, associated with greater provision of primary palliative care and higher rates of referral to specialist palliative care. The results of

  15. Differences between early and late involvement of palliative home care in oncology care: A focus group study with palliative home care teams.

    PubMed

    Dhollander, Naomi; Deliens, Luc; Van Belle, Simon; De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen

    2018-05-01

    To date, no randomised controlled trials on the integration of specialised palliative home care into oncology care have been identified. Information on whether existing models of integrated care are applicable to the home care system and how working procedures and skills of the palliative care teams might require adaptation is missing. To gain insight into differences between early and late involvement and the effect on existing working procedures and skills as perceived by palliative home care teams. Qualitative study - focus group interviews. Six palliative home care teams in Flanders, Belgium. Participants included physicians, nurses and psychologists. Differences were found concerning (1) reasons for initiation, (2) planning of care process, (3) focus on future goals versus problems, (4) opportunity to provide holistic care, (5) empowerment of patients and (6) empowerment of professional caregivers. A shift from a medical approach to a more holistic approach is the most noticeable. Being involved earlier also results in a more structured follow-up and in empowering the patient to be part of the decision-making process. Early involvement creates the need for transmural collaboration, which leads to the teams taking on more supporting and coordinating tasks. Being involved earlier leads to different tasks and working procedures and to the need for transmural collaboration. Future research might focus on the development of an intervention model for the early integration of palliative home care into oncology care. To develop this model, components of existing models might need to be adapted or extended.

  16. Communication about palliative care: A phenomenological study exploring patient views and responses to its discussion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anna; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Philip, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Communication about palliative care is a complex task frequently delayed until otherwise unavoidable. There is a need for discussion of palliative care to be viewed as a distinct communication task that is guided by empirical data. However, little is known of patient views and responses to these encounters. To explore patient views surrounding communication about palliative care and their responses to its discussion. Cross-sectional, prospective, exploratory qualitative design, involving narrative-style interviews and underpinned by an interpretative phenomenological framework. Purposively sampled, English-speaking, adult patients with advanced cancer ( n = 30) recruited from cancer services at a tertiary metropolitan hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Three major themes evolved. (1) Death as unspeakable: death was expressed using only implicit, ambiguous or technical terms and perceived to be outside the parameters of medical interactions. (2) Palliative care as a euphemism for death: the term 'palliative care' was perceived to be used by health professionals as a tool to talk about dying and understood by patients as a euphemism for death. (3) Palliative care as unspeakable: 'palliative care' was personified by patients to mean not just death, but my death, in turn, also becoming unspeakable. This study provides important new patient insights and responses to the discussion of palliative care. Results demonstrate that the task of discussing palliative care remains complex, difficult and limited by our language. Greater consistency, sensitivity and sophistication are required when talking about palliative care to patients who may benefit from this care.

  17. Palliative Care Use Among Patients With Solid Cancer Tumors: A National Cancer Data Base Study.

    PubMed

    Osagiede, Osayande; Colibaseanu, Dorin T; Spaulding, Aaron C; Frank, Ryan D; Merchea, Amit; Kelley, Scott R; Uitti, Ryan J; Ailawadhi, Sikander

    2018-07-01

    Palliative care has been increasingly recognized as an important part of cancer care but remains underutilized in patients with solid cancers. There is a current gap in knowledge regarding why palliative care is underutilized nationwide. To identify the factors associated with palliative care use among deceased patients with solid cancer tumors. Using the 2016 National Cancer Data Base, we identified deceased patients (2004-2013) with breast, colon, lung, melanoma, and prostate cancer. Data were described as percentages. Associations between palliative care use and patient, facility, and geographic characteristics were evaluated through multivariate logistic regression. A total of 1 840 111 patients were analyzed; 9.6% received palliative care. Palliative care use was higher in the following patient groups: survival >24 months (17% vs 2%), male (54% vs 46%), higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score (16% vs 8%), treatment at designated cancer programs (74% vs 71%), lung cancer (76% vs 28%), higher grade cancer (53% vs 24%), and stage IV cancer (59% vs 13%). Patients who lived in communities with a greater percentage of high school degrees had higher odds of receiving palliative care; Central and Pacific regions of the United States had lower odds of palliative care use than the East Coast. Patients with colon, melanoma, or prostate cancer had lower odds of palliative care than patients with breast cancer, whereas those with lung cancer had higher odds. Palliative care use in solid cancer tumors is variable, with a preference for patients with lung cancer, younger age, known insurance status, and higher educational level.

  18. Physician Reimbursement for Critical Care Services Integrating Palliative Care for Patients Who Are Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Weissman, David E.; Hays, Ross M.; Mosenthal, Anne C.; Mulkerin, Colleen; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Ray, Daniel E.; Bassett, Rick; Boss, Renee D.; Brasel, Karen J.; Campbell, Margaret L.; Cortez, Therese B.; Curtis, J. Randall

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced illness often spend time in an ICU, while nearly one-third of patients with advanced cancer who receive Medicare die in hospitals, often with failed ICU care. For most, death occurs following the withdrawal or withholding of life-sustaining treatments. The integration of palliative care is essential for high-quality critical care. Although palliative care specialists are becoming increasingly available, intensivists and other physicians are also expected to provide basic palliative care, including symptom treatment and communication about goals of care. Patients who are critically ill are often unable to make decisions about their care. In these situations, physicians must meet with family members or other surrogates to determine appropriate medical treatments. These meetings require clinical expertise to ensure that patient values are explored for medical decision making about therapeutic options, including palliative care. Meetings with families take time. Issues related to the disease process, prognosis, and treatment plan are complex, and decisions about the use or limitation of intensive care therapies have life-or-death implications. Inadequate reimbursement for physician services may be a barrier to the optimal delivery of high-quality palliative care, including effective communication. Appropriate documentation of time spent integrating palliative and critical care for patients who are critically ill can be consistent with the Current Procedural Terminology codes (99291 and 99292) for critical care services. The purpose of this article is to help intensivists and other providers understand the circumstances in which integration of palliative and critical care meets the definition of critical care services for billing purposes. PMID:22396564

  19. The palliative care scorecard as an innovative approach in long-term care

    PubMed Central

    Esslinger, Adelheid Sussanne; Alzinger, Dagmar; Rager, Edeltraud

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In long-term care facilities professional concepts for palliative care are of great interest as individual needs of clients (residents, relatives, and friends) are in the focus of services. Case Within a long-term care facility of the Red Cross Organization in Germany, we developed a palliative care concept in 2008. It is integrated in the strategy of the whole organization. As the strategic management concept is based on the balanced scorecard, we introduced a palliative care scorecard. The facility offers 200 places for residents. It has established 27 strategic targets to achieve. One of these is to provide individual care. Another one is to integrate relatives of residents. One more deals with the integration of volunteers. We decided to implement a palliative care concept within the target system (e.g. develop individual pain therapy, create and coordinate interdisciplinary palliative care teams). Results The case shows how it is possible to integrate and strengthen the subject of palliative care within the existing management system of the organization. In order to translate the concept into action, it will be necessary to change the organizational culture into an ‘open minded house’. This especially means that all members of the organization have to be trained and sensitized for the matters of care at the end of life. Conclusion The development and implementation of an integrated concept of palliative care, which fits into the existing management system, is the base of a sustainable offer of specialized care for the residents and their social network. Therefore, not only the quality of care and life of the clients, but also the surviving of the facility on the market of care will be assured.

  20. Behavioral risk factors of constipation in palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Dzierżanowski, Tomasz; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    Constipation is frequently encountered in palliative care patients and remains a significant therapeutic problem. The etiology of constipation is multifactorial. Nutritional and behavioral factors are considered common causes of constipation; however, their impact has not yet been assessed precisely. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between the frequency of bowel movements (FoBM) and risk factors of constipation in palliative care patients. A cohort retrospective study was performed in three palliative care centers, including outpatient, home, and inpatient care cancer patients using questionnaires on bowel dysfunction symptoms, behavioral risk factors, and opioid use. The inclusion criterion was adult patients examined on the day of admission. The exclusion criterion was Karnofsky performance status score ≤20. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to measure the statistical dependence between two variables and frequency analysis was performed using the chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test. Two hundred thirty-seven valid questionnaires were collected. We found the correlation between FoBM and insufficient food and fluid intake (p < 0.0001), as well as for inadequate conditions of privacy (p = 0.0008), dependency on a caregiver (p = 0.0059), and the patient's overall performance status (p = 0.013). We did not manage to prove bed rest as the independent risk factor of constipation. The main risk factors of constipation in palliative care patients appeared to be insufficient fluid and food intake, inadequate conditions of privacy, dependency on a caregiver, as well as poor general performance status.

  1. Current status of palliative care services in Indonesia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Rochmawati, Erna; Wiechula, Rick; Cameron, Kate

    2016-06-01

    To review healthcare literature in relation to the provision of palliative care in Indonesia and to identify factors that may impact on palliative care development. People living with life-limiting illness benefit from access to palliative care services to optimize quality of life. Palliative care services are being expanded in developing countries but in Indonesia such services are in their infancy with many patients with life-limiting illnesses having access to appropriate health care compromised. Relevant healthcare databases including CINAHL, PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus were searched using the combinations of search terms: palliative care, terminal care, end-of-life care, Indonesia and nursing. A search of grey literature including Internet sites was also carried out. Nine articles were included in the review. Facilitating factors supporting the provision of palliative care included: a culture of strong familial support, government policy support, volunteering and support from regional organizations. Identified barriers to palliative care provision were a limited understanding of palliative care among healthcare professionals, the challenging geography of Indonesia and limited access to opioid medications. There are facilitators and barriers that currently impact on the development of palliative care in Indonesia. Strategies that can be implemented to improve palliative care include training of nurses and doctors in the primary care sector, integrating palliative care in undergraduate medical and nursing curriculum and educating family and community about basic care. Nurses and doctors who work in primary care can potentially play a role in supporting and educating family members providing direct care to patients with palliative needs. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  2. Paediatric Palliative Care in Resource-Poor Countries

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Sue; Daniels, Alex; Nkosi, Busi

    2018-01-01

    There is a great need for paediatric palliative care (PPC) services globally, but access to services is lacking in many parts of the world, particularly in resource-poor settings. Globally it is estimated that 21.6 million children need access to palliative care, with 8.2 needing specialist services. PC has been identified as important within the global health agenda e.g., within universal health coverage, and a recent Lancet commission report recognised the need for PPC. However, a variety of challenges have been identified to PPC development globally such as: access to treatment, access to medications such as oral morphine, opiophobia, a lack of trained health and social care professionals, a lack of PPC policies and a lack of awareness about PPC. These challenges can be overcome utilising a variety of strategies including advocacy and public awareness, education, access to medications, implementation and research. Examples will be discussed impacting on the provision of PPC in resource-poor settings. High-quality PPC service provision can be provided with resource-poor settings, and there is an urgent need to scale up affordable, accessible, and quality PPC services globally to ensure that all children needing palliative care can access it. PMID:29463065

  3. Time to bring down the twin towers in poor Aboriginal hospital care: addressing institutional racism and misunderstandings in communication.

    PubMed

    Durey, A; Thompson, S C; Wood, M

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in Aboriginal health have been slow. Research demonstrates ongoing discrimination towards Aboriginal Australians based on race, including in health services, leads to poor health outcomes. Using an eclectic methodology based on observations and discussions with health practitioners experienced in working with Aboriginal patients, this paper identifies how cross-cultural misunderstandings undermine the quality of care to Aboriginal patients in hospital and offers suggestions for improving practice. It also explores the concept of institutional racism and challenges doctors to reflect on their role in perpetuating power imbalances. We argue that physicians and healthcare providers need to do more than just deliver evidence-based interventions, by critically reflecting on their own attitudes to and practices with Aboriginal Australians and work collectively to effect systemic change which creates a more inclusive and safe environment for all people accessing healthcare. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Reporting Characteristics of Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Analysis of Research Publications in Palliative Care Journals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles) were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model. PMID:21633623

  5. Attachment Theory and Spirituality: Two Threads Converging in Palliative Care?

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper. PMID:24319482

  6. Attachment theory and spirituality: two threads converging in palliative care?

    PubMed

    Loetz, Cécile; Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  7. European Association for Palliative Care: Forging a Vision of Excellence in Palliative Care in Central and Eastern European and Former Soviet Union Countries.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Lukas; Ling, Julie; Hegedus, Katalin; Larkin, Philip

    2018-02-01

    The European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) represents many thousands of health care workers and volunteers working in or with an interest in palliative care. In 2016, the EAPC has individual members from 48 nations across the world, and collective members from 57 national palliative care associations in 32 European countries. Throughout its history, the EAPC has produced guidance on a range of palliative care issues. The biennial congresses and research congresses and the comprehensive Web site (www.eapcnet.eu) are renowned and well utilized platforms for dissemination and exchange of palliative care information. The EAPC has also published a newsletter specifically for Eastern European and Central Asian countries that has been available in both English and Russian from 2005 to 2012. In addition, for a period of time, a Russian Web site (www.eapcspeaksrussian.eu) was also available. A survey of palliative care in Central and Eastern European nations sponsored by Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative found that in most countries, the national language is preferred rather than using English or Russian for the provision of information. Accordingly, the EAPC Web site provides translations of white papers, position papers, and blog posts in a number of languages. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Palliative Care Training in Cardiology Fellowship: A National Survey of the Fellows.

    PubMed

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Kaushal, Shivtej; Peltier, Wendy; Johnston, Fabian M

    2018-02-01

    To address perspectives of cardiology fellows on the current state of palliative education and palliative and hospice resource utilization within their fellowship experiences. We conducted an online national survey of cardiology fellows during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Survey questions aimed to assess perceived importance of palliative care education, level of palliative care education during fellowship, and the structure of palliative care support at respondent institutions. Responses were collected anonymously. A total of 519 programs, including subspecialty programs, were contacted. We received 365 responses, a number that represents roughly 14% of all cardiology fellows nationwide during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Fellows reported discordance in the quality of education between general cardiology and palliative care principles as it relates to care of the patient approaching the end of life. Fellows infrequently received explicit training nor were observed or mentored in delivering end-of-life discussions. Respondents reported an underutilization of palliative care and hospice resources during fellowship training and also a perception that attending faculty were not routinely addressing goals of care. Our survey results highlight a need for enhanced palliative care and end-of-life training experiences for cardiology fellows and also suggest underutilization of hospice and palliative care resources for patients with advanced cardiac diseases. These findings create a platform for future work that might: (1) confirm this training deficit, (2) lead to exploration of educational models that could reconcile this deficit, and (3) potentially help improve palliative care support for patients and families facing advanced heart disease.

  9. Physician Perspectives on Palliative Care for Children with Advanced Heart Disease: A Comparison between Pediatric Cardiology and Palliative Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Balkin, Emily Morell; Sleeper, Lynn A; Kirkpatrick, James N; Swetz, Keith M; Coggins, Mary Katherine; Wolfe, Joanne; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2018-06-01

    While the importance of pediatric palliative care (PPC) for children with life-threatening illness is increasingly recognized, little is known about physicians' attitudes toward palliative care for children with heart disease. To compare the perspectives of PPC physicians and pediatric cardiologists regarding palliative care in pediatric heart disease. Cross-sectional web-based surveys. Responses from 183 pediatric cardiologists were compared to those of 49 PPC physicians (response rates 31% [183/589] and 28% [49/175], respectively). Forty-eight percent of PPC physicians and 63% of pediatric cardiologists agreed that availability of PPC is adequate (p = 0.028). The majority of both groups indicated that PPC consultation occurs "too late." Compared with pediatric cardiologists, PPC physicians reported greater competence in all areas of advance care planning, communication, and symptom management. PPC physicians more often described obstacles to PPC consultation as "many" or "numerous" (42% vs. 7%, p < 0.001). PPC physicians overestimated how much pediatric cardiologists worry about PPC introducing inconsistency in approach (60% vs. 11%, p < 0.001), perceive lack of added value from PPC (30% vs. 7%, p < 0.001), believe that PPC involvement will undermine parental hope (65% vs. 44%, p = 0.003), and perceive that PPC is poorly accepted by parents (53% vs. 27%, p < 0.001). There are significant differences between pediatric cardiologists and PPC physicians in perception of palliative care involvement and perceived barriers to PPC consultation. An intervention that targets communication and exchange of expertise between PPC and pediatric cardiology could improve care for children with heart disease.

  10. Dealing sensitively with sexuality in a palliative care context.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Jan; Baldwin, Moyra A

    2008-01-01

    Sexuality is integral to a person's identity and is encompassed in holistic palliative care. Current directives emphasize psychosocial support that is sensitive to a variety of issues, including sexuality, and offer community nurses the mandate to facilitate expressing sexuality. Nurses fail to address sexuality for a variety of reasons. Appreciating patients' individuality and avoiding making assumptions are some of the requirements to enabling expression of sexuality. Nurses need wisdom and determination to discuss such issues, and it is important that they recognize opportunities and cues as they arise. This article provides an examination of the issues surrounding sexuality outlining an approach that captures' constant attention to details. This guides the 'what', 'how' and 'why' sexuality in palliative care can be addressed. Ethics and safety aspects are briefly discussed and implications for practice suggested. Educating staff and focused education for the patient can positively influence sexuality and individuals' quality of life.

  11. Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann-Claire

    2012-12-01

    Community palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in 'real time'. This paper is guided by Heidegger's approach to technologies and Habermas' insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient information add to nursing's professional responsibilities. This qualitative research interprets data from interviews with twenty community palliative care nurses about clients' legal rights to informational privacy and confidentiality. It explores nurses' views of their nursing responsibilities regarding clients' legal rights, liability issues, bureaucratic monitoring and enforcement procedures. It concludes that nurses and clients are construed as legal subjects entrenched in legal relations that have magnified since these nurses began using PDAs in 2005/2006. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Effective leadership within hospice and specialist palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Barker, L

    2000-01-01

    In this study the Repertory Grid interview technique was used to investigate constructs of leadership held by a group of male and female senior managers from within hospice and Specialist Palliative Care Units (SPCUs) in the UK. The themes that emerged were compared with those from existing research models of leadership. Men and women in these roles describe different constructs of effective leadership. The women's constructs that emerged were predominantly transformational, whilst the men's were predominantly transactional. Themes were also identified in this study, which differed from previous studied, i.e. those of political and environment awareness and the valuing of others' views regardless of their status. These themes do not feature highly in other research, and may be in response to the environment within which hospice and specialist palliative care functions.

  13. Design of an Information System for Palliative Care: User Analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Tobón, Veronica A; Luna-Gómez, Ivan F; Torres-Silva, Ever A; Florez-Arango, Jose F; Rivera-Mejia, Paula T; Higuita Usuga, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    To explore the demographic factors and the level of knowledge related to information and communication technologies of potential users of a palliative care information system. The Task, User, Representation, Functionality (TURF) framework was applied to characterize potential users (patients and caregivers) of an information system for palliative care in a private clinic in Medellin, Colombia, through a survey. We analyzed 35 patients and 39 caregivers. The majority were women, that lived in urban area and belonged to middle-income socioeconomic stratum. Caregivers, in contrast to patients, are common users of information and communication technologies. An information system should focus on the needs of caregivers, and it would be targeted to subjects facing challenges related to technology adoption; information and communication technologies are interesting and important tools for the improvement of health team.

  14. [Continuous subcutaneous infusion in palliative care, an undervalued method].

    PubMed

    van Marum, R J; de Vogel, E M; Zylicz, Z

    2002-11-23

    Three patients, 2 men aged 55 and 54 years and a woman aged 86 years, were admitted to hospital for treatment of symptoms resulting from terminal disease (pain, agitation, nausea etc.). In all three patients, continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSI) of medication was successfully used to control the symptoms. Compared with intravenous infusion, the technique of CSI is easy to learn and is associated with fewer complications. Its reliability and ease-of-use make it a technique that can be used not only in a hospital setting, but also in general practice and nursing homes. Medication used in palliative care (e.g. morphine, haloperidol, metoclopramide, levomepromazine, midazolam) can often be administered safely by CSI. In palliative care, where goals should be accomplished with minimal burden to the patient, CSI must be considered the technique of choice in patients who are unable to swallow their medication.

  15. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  16. Differential Family Experience of Palliative Sedation Therapy in Specialized Palliative or Critical Care Units.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shan; Chen, Szu-Yin; Cheung, Denise Shuk Ting; Wang, Shu-Yi; Lee, Jung Jae; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2018-02-21

    No study has examined the varying family experience of palliative sedation therapy (PST) for terminally ill patients in different settings. To examine and compare family concerns about PST use and its effect on the grief suffered by terminally ill patients' families in palliative care units (PCUs) or intensive care units (ICUs). A total of 154 family members of such patients were recruited in Taiwan, of whom 143 completed the study, with 81 from the PCU and 62 from the ICU. Data were collected on their concerns regarding PST during recruitment. Grief levels were assessed at three days and one month after the patient's death with the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Families' major concern about sedated patients in the PCU was that "there might be other ways to relieve symptoms" (90.2%), whereas families of ICU sedated patients gave the highest ratings to "feeling they still had something more to do" (93.55%), and "the patient's sleeping condition was not dignified" (93.55%). Family members recruited from the ICU tended to experience more grief than those from the PCU (P = 0.005 at Day 3 and < 0.001 at Month 1). PST use predicted higher levels of grief in family members recruited from the PCU (P < 0.001 at Day 3 and Month 1). Family experiences with the use of PST in terminally ill patients varied in different settings. Supportive care should address family concerns about PST use, and regular attention should be paid to the grief of individuals at higher risk. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-Care in Palliative Care Nursing and Medical Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason; Wand, Timothy; Fraser, Jennifer A

    2017-06-01

    Self-care is an important consideration for palliative care professionals. To date, few details have been recorded about the nature or uptake of self-care practices in the palliative care workforce. As part of a broader mixed methods study, this article reports findings from a national survey of nurses and doctors. The objective of this study was to examine perceptions, education, and practices relating to self-care among palliative care nursing and medical professionals. A cross-sectional survey using REDCap software was conducted between April and May 2015. Perceived importance of self-care, self-care education and planning, and self-care strategies most utilized were explored. Descriptive statistics were calculated and content analysis used to identify domains of self-care. Three hundred seventy-two palliative care nursing and medical professionals practicing in Australia. Most respondents regarded self-care as very important (86%). Some rarely practised self-care and less than half (39%) had received training in self-care. Physical self-care strategies were most commonly reported, followed closely by social self-care and inner self-care. Self-care plans had been used by a small proportion of respondents (6%) and over two-thirds (70%) would consider using self-care plans if training could be provided. Self-care is practised across multiple health related domains, with physical self-care strategies used most frequently. Australian palliative care nurses and doctors recognize the importance of self-care practice, but further education and training are needed to increase their understanding of, and consistency in, using effective self-care strategies. These findings carry implications for professional practice and future research.

  18. Intrathecal Analgesia and Palliative Care: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen S; Crawford, Gregory B

    2010-01-01

    Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented. PMID:20859471

  19. A Multiorganization Approach to Improving Palliative Care in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Kennedy Sheldon, Lisa; Dahlin, Constance; Maingi, Shail; Sanchez, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Since 2011, oncology nurses and physicians in the United States have been volunteering in Honduras with the International Cancer Corps (ICC), organized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), in partnership with Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO). In this article, the authors will summarize the work of the ASCO/HVO ICC teams that developed educational programs with local partners to improve cancer and palliative care in Honduras.

  20. Development of research priorities in paediatric pain and palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Liossi, Christina; Anderson, Anna-Karenia; Howard, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Priority setting for healthcare research is as important as conducting the research itself because rigorous and systematic processes of priority setting can make an important contribution to the quality of research. This project aimed to prioritise clinical therapeutic uncertainties in paediatric pain and palliative care in order to encourage and inform the future research agenda and raise the profile of paediatric pain and palliative care in the United Kingdom. Clinical therapeutic uncertainties were identified and transformed into patient, intervention, comparison and outcome (PICO) format and prioritised using a modified Nominal Group Technique. Members of the Clinical Studies Group in Pain and Palliative Care within National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN)-Children took part in the prioritisation exercise. There were 11 clinically active professionals spanning across a wide range of paediatric disciplines and one parent representative. The top three research priorities related to establishing the safety and efficacy of (1) gabapentin in the management of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics, (2) intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the management of post-operative pain in pre-schoolers and (3) different opioid formulations in the management of acute pain in children while at home. Questions about the long-term effect of psychological interventions in the management of chronic pain and various pharmacological interventions to improve pain and symptom management in palliative care were among the ‘top 10’ priorities. The results of prioritisation were included in the UK Database of Uncertainties about the Effects of Treatments (DUETS) database. Increased awareness of priorities and priority-setting processes should encourage clinicians and other stakeholders to engage in such exercises in the future. PMID:28386399

  1. Nursing workload for cancer patients under palliative care.

    PubMed

    Fuly, Patrícia Dos Santos Claro; Pires, Livia Márcia Vidal; Souza, Claudia Quinto Santos de; Oliveira, Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista de; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2016-01-01

    To verify the nursing workload required by cancer patients undergoing palliative care and possible associations between the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients and the nursing workload. This is a quantitative, cross-sectional, prospective study developed in the Connective Bone Tissue (TOC) clinics of Unit II of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute José Alencar Gomes da Silva with patients undergoing palliative care. Analysis of 197 measures of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) revealed a mean score of 43.09% and an association between the performance status of patients undergoing palliative care and the mean NAS scores. The results of the study point to the need to resize the team of the unit. The NAS has proven to be a useful tool in oncologic clinical units for patients undergoing palliative care. Verificar a carga de trabalho de enfermagem requerida por pacientes com câncer sob cuidados paliativos e possíveis associações entre as características demográficas e clínicas dos pacientes e a carga de trabalho de enfermagem. Trata-se de um estudo de abordagem quantitativa, transversal, prospectivo, desenvolvido na clínica de Tecido Ósseo Conectivo (TOC) da Unidade II do Instituto Nacional de Câncer José Alencar Gomes da Silva, com pacientes em cuidados paliativos. A análise de 197 medidas do Nursing Activities Score (NAS) revelou um escore médio de 43,09% e uma associação entre a performance status de pacientes em cuidados paliativos com os valores médios do NAS. Os resultados do estudo apontam para a necessidade de redimensionamento da equipe da Unidade. O NAS mostrou-se um instrumento passível de utilização em unidades clínicas oncológicas, com pacientes em cuidados paliativos.

  2. The competencies required by professional hospice palliative care spiritual care providers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dan; Aherne, Michael; Pereira, José

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association (2002) identifies spiritual care of the dying and their families as a core service for Hospice Palliative Care programs. Yet, until the Spiritual Care Development Initiative of the Canadian Pallium Project, there was no published literature indicating systematic profiling of occupationally relevant core competencies or competency-based training programs specific to this specialized field of practice. This article describes a Canadian Community of Practice process to develop an occupational analysis-based competency profile for the Professional Hospice Palliative Care Spiritual Care Provider utilizing a modified Developing a Curriculum (DACUM) methodology. Competency profiles are important contributions to the development of curricula to train care providers who are recognized by other professions and by institutions as possessing the requisite theoretical and clinical expertise, particularly in academic tertiary care settings.

  3. The contribution of undergraduate palliative care education: does it influence the clinical patient's care?

    PubMed

    Centeno, Carlos; Rodríguez-Núñez, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this 2-year systematic review is to understand how learner assessment and curriculum evaluation of education in palliative care is being undertaken and to examine whether current undergraduate education influences the clinical patient's care. Almost half of the 30 studies reviewed used a qualitative approach to evaluate learning experiences. Only three of them were controlled studies and a further one was a cohort study.When students openly express themselves, they agree that there is 'something' deep as regards the core or the essence of medical practice or nursing. They feel that they become better professionals and better prepared for the patients, not only in terms of end of life care, but also as regards care, irrespective of the phase of the disease.The inclusion of palliative care in undergraduate education is a way of providing knowledge, skill, and competences about palliative care (especially communication) and also improving attitudes toward caring in advanced disease and at the end of life. Different methods of experiential learning, even brief experiences, which bring students into close contact with palliative care clinical cases or patients, are providing better results. From research studies, there is only indirect evidence that palliative care training at university leads to better clinical care of patients. In the future, long-term cohort or controlled studies might answer that question.

  4. Negotiating the equivocality of palliative care: a grounded theory of team communicative processes in inpatient medicine.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Kalish, Virginia B

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of U.S. hospitals, inpatient medicine teams make palliative care decisions in the absence of a formalized palliative system. Using a grounded theory approach, interviews with inpatient team members were systematically analyzed to uncover how participants conceptualize palliative care and how they regard the communicative structures that underlie its delivery. During analysis, Weick's model of organizing emerged as a framework that fit the data. The 39 participant inpatient team members discussed palliative care as primarily a communicative process. Themes describing the meaning of palliative care emerged around the concepts of receiver of care, timeline of care, and location of care. The emerging model included four stages in the communicative processes of inpatient palliative care: (a) interpret the need, (b) initiate the conversation, (c) integrate the processes, and (d) identify what works. In contrast to stable, focused palliative care teams or hospice care teams, which have prescribed patient populations and processes, the inpatient medicine team faces the equivocality of providing palliative care within a broader practice. This research offers a four-phase model to show how these inpatient teams communicate within this context. Implications for the provision of palliative care are discussed.

  5. Development of Palliative Care in China: A Tale of Three Cities.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhenyu; Li, Jinxiang; Ma, Ke; Ning, Xiaohong; Chen, Huiping; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Chun; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2017-11-01

    China is the most populous country in the world, but access to palliative care is extremely limited. A better understanding of the development of palliative care programs in China and how they overcome the barriers to provide services would inform how we can further integrate palliative care into oncology practices in China. Here, we describe the program development and infrastructure of the palliative care programs at three Chinese institutions, using these as examples to discuss strategies to accelerate palliative care access for cancer patients in China. Case study of three palliative care programs in Chengdu, Kunming, and Beijing. The three examples of palliative care delivery in China ranged from a comprehensive program that includes all major branches of palliative care in Chengdu, a program that is predominantly inpatient-based in Kunming, and a smaller program at an earlier stage of development in Beijing. Despite the numerous challenges related to the limited training opportunities, stigma on death and dying, and lack of resources and policies to support clinical practice, these programs were able to overcome many barriers to offer palliative care services to patients with advanced diseases and to advance this discipline in China through visionary leadership, collaboration with other countries to acquire palliative care expertise, committed staff members, and persistence. Palliative care is limited in China, although a few comprehensive programs exist. Our findings may inform palliative care program development in other Chinese hospitals. With a population of 1.3 billion, China is the most populous country in the world, and cancer is the leading cause of death. However, only 0.7% of hospitals offer palliative care services, which significantly limits palliative care access for Chinese cancer patients. Here, we describe the program development and infrastructure of three palliative care programs in China, using these as examples to discuss how they were

  6. Development of Palliative Care in China: A Tale of Three Cities

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhenyu; Li, Jinxiang; Ma, Ke; Ning, Xiaohong; Chen, Huiping; Fu, Haiyan; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Chun; Bruera, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. China is the most populous country in the world, but access to palliative care is extremely limited. A better understanding of the development of palliative care programs in China and how they overcome the barriers to provide services would inform how we can further integrate palliative care into oncology practices in China. Here, we describe the program development and infrastructure of the palliative care programs at three Chinese institutions, using these as examples to discuss strategies to accelerate palliative care access for cancer patients in China. Methods. Case study of three palliative care programs in Chengdu, Kunming, and Beijing. Results. The three examples of palliative care delivery in China ranged from a comprehensive program that includes all major branches of palliative care in Chengdu, a program that is predominantly inpatient‐based in Kunming, and a smaller program at an earlier stage of development in Beijing. Despite the numerous challenges related to the limited training opportunities, stigma on death and dying, and lack of resources and policies to support clinical practice, these programs were able to overcome many barriers to offer palliative care services to patients with advanced diseases and to advance this discipline in China through visionary leadership, collaboration with other countries to acquire palliative care expertise, committed staff members, and persistence. Conclusion. Palliative care is limited in China, although a few comprehensive programs exist. Our findings may inform palliative care program development in other Chinese hospitals. Implications for Practice. With a population of 1.3 billion, China is the most populous country in the world, and cancer is the leading cause of death. However, only 0.7% of hospitals offer palliative care services, which significantly limits palliative care access for Chinese cancer patients. Here, we describe the program development and infrastructure of three

  7. Physician Perspectives on Palliative Care for Children With Neuroblastoma: An International Context.

    PubMed

    Balkin, Emily M; Thompson, Daria; Colson, K Ellicott; Lam, Catherine G; Matthay, Katherine K

    2016-05-01

    Studies have shown that children with cancer globally lack access to palliative care. Little is known regarding physicians' perceptions of palliative care, treatment access, and self-reported competence in providing palliative care. Members of the Global Neuroblastoma Network (online tumor board) were surveyed. Eighty-three respondents met inclusion criteria; 53 (64%) completed the survey. Most respondents trained in high-income countries (HIC) but practice in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), and care for more than five patients with neuroblastoma annually. WHO Essential Medicines in palliative care varied in availability, with incomplete access across LMIC centers. Nonpharmacologic therapies were inconsistently available. Contrary to international definitions, 17% of respondents inappropriately considered palliative care as that initiated only after curative therapy is stopped. Mean physician competence composite score (Likert scale 1-5, 5 = very competent) in providing symptomatic relief and palliative care across phases of care was 2.93 (95% CI 2.71-3.22). Physicians reported significantly greater competence in symptom management during cure-directed therapy than during end-of-life (P = 0.02) or when patients are actively dying (P = 0.007). Practicing in HIC, prior palliative care training, having access to radiotherapy, and not having to turn patients away due to bed shortages were significantly predictive of perceived competence in providing palliative care at end of life. An international sample identified gaps in treatment and palliative care service availability, in understanding the definition of palliative care, and in self-reported competence in providing palliative care. Increased perceived competence was associated with training, which supports the need for increased palliative care education and advocacy, especially in LMIC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. How much does care in palliative care wards cost in Poland?

    PubMed Central

    Pokropska, Wieslawa; Łuczak, Jacek; Kaptacz, Anna; Stachowiak, Andrzej; Hurich, Krystyna; Koszela, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The main task of palliative care units is to provide a dignified life for people with advanced progressive chronic disease through appropriate symptom management, communication between medical specialists and the patient and his family, as well as the coordination of care. Many palliative care units struggle with low incomes from the National Health Fund (NHF), which causes serious economic problems. The aim of the study was to estimate of direct and administrative costs of care and the actual cost per patient per day in selected palliative care units and comparison of the results to the valuation of the NHF. Material and methods The study of the costs of hospitalization of 175 patients was conducted prospectively in five palliative care units (PCUs). The costs directly associated with care were recorded on the specially prepared forms in each unit and also personnel and administrative costs provided by the accounting departments. Results The total costs of analyzed units amounted to 209 002 EUR (898 712 PLN), while the payment for palliative care services from the NHF amounted to 126 010 EUR (541 844 PLN), which accounted for only 60% of the costs incurred by the units. The average cost per person per day of hospitalization, calculated according to the actual duration of hospitalization in the unit, was 83 EUR (357 PLN), and the average payment from the NHF was 52.8 EUR (227 PLN). Underpayment per person per day was approximately 29.2 EUR (125 PLN). Conclusions The study showed a significant difference between the actual cost of palliative care units and the level of refund from the NHF. Based on the analysis of costs, the application has been submitted to the NHF to change the reimbursement amount of palliative care services in 2013. PMID:27186194

  9. Palliative Care Physicians' Religious / World View and Attitude Towards Euthanasia: A Quantitative Study Among Flemish Palliative Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Broeckaert, B; Gielen, J; Van Iersel, T; Van den Branden, S

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To Study the religious and ideological views and practice of Palliative Care physician towards Euthanasia. Materials and Methods: An anonymous self administered questionnaire approved by Flemish Palliative Care Federation and its ethics steering group was sent to all physicians(n-147) working in Flemish Palliative Care. Questionnaire consisted of three parts. In first part responded were requested to provide demographic information. In second part the respondents were asked to provide information concerning their religion or world view through several questions enquiring after religious or ideological affiliation, religious or ideological self-definition, view on life after death, image of God, spirituality, importance of rituals in their life, religious practice, and importance of religion in life. The third part consisted of a list of attitudinal statements regarding different treatment decisions in advanced disease on which the respondents had to give their opinion using a five-point Likert scale.99 physician responded. Results: We were able to distinguish four clusters: Church-going physicians, infrequently church-going physicians, atheists and doubters. We found that like the Belgian general public, many Flemish palliative care physicians concoct their own religious or ideological identity and feel free to drift away from traditional religious and ideological authorities. Conclusions: In our research we noted that physicians who have a strong belief in God and express their faith through participation in prayer and rituals, tend to be more critical toward euthanasia. Physicians who deny the existence of a transcendent power and hardly attend religious services are more likely to approve of euthanasia even in the case of minors or demented patients. In this way this study confirms the influence of religion and world view on attitudes toward euthanasia. PMID:20606855

  10. Supportive and palliative care for patients with chronic mental illness including dementia.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Abba, Katharine; Crowther, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    People with preexisting mental illness are known to have difficulty accessing healthcare services including palliative care and people with dementia have similar issues accessing palliative care. The review addressed the time period from January 2013 to March 2014. There were few articles addressing issues for palliative and supportive care for patients with preexisting mental health issues. The main factor that would improve care is interdisciplinary working between mental healthcare teams and palliative care teams. In contrast, there were many published articles on the palliative and supportive care needs for people with dementia. These articles included consensus statements, models of care; studies of why models of care, for example Advanced Care Planning were not being implemented; and carer reports of care in the last year of life. Urgent research is required as to how support for people with preexisting mental illness who require palliative care can be improved--excellent liaison between mental health and palliative care teams is essential. There is much research on palliative care needs for people with dementia but an apparent lack of innovative approaches to care including care of people within their family home.

  11. The view of pulmonologists on palliative care for patients with COPD: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Duenk, RG; Verhagen, C; Dekhuijzen, PNR; Vissers, KCP; Engels, Y; Heijdra, Y

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Early palliative care is not a common practice for patients with COPD. Important barriers are the identification of patients for palliative care and the organization of such care in this patient group. Objective Pulmonologists have a central role in providing good quality