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Sample records for aborted sudden death

  1. Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death and a Mother with Suspected Metabolic Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Keller, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) has not been reported as initial manifestation of cardiac involvement in metabolic myopathy (MM). A 20-year-old female with a previous history of three syncopes, hyperhidrosis, and recurrent tick bites experienced aborted SCD. Her mother presented with MM, and a history of pituitary adenoma, nephroptosis, arterial hypertension, depression, migraine, goiter, pancreatitis, osteoporosis, hyperhidrosis, multiple muscle ruptures, and hyperlipidemia. After a few days of disorientation and amnesia, the young female recovered completely. Clinical neurological examination was noticeable for partial ophthalmoparesis and mild hyperprolactinemia. She received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, which did not discharge so far. Recurrent syncopes and aborted SCD may be the initial manifestation of MM with multiple organ involvement. The family history is important in cases with aborted SCD to guide the diagnostic work-up. Phenotypic heterogeneity between the family members may be an indicator of MM. PMID:25187745

  2. Anomalous Left Circumflex Coronary Artery Arising from the Right Pulmonary Artery: A Rare Cause of Aborted Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Fursevich, Dzmitry; O'Dell, Matthew C; Flores, Miguel; Feranec, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery arising from the right pulmonary artery resulting in stress-induced cardiac arrest. The patient collapsed after running a 5K race and was resuscitated. Subsequent workup revealed the culprit anatomy, which was successfully treated with surgical ligation. To the authors' knowledge, this is only the second case of this variant coronary anomaly resulting in aborted sudden cardiac death, subsequent surgical ligation, and recovery in a healthy young adult and is the first case treated by ligation alone without coronary bypass. PMID:27014533

  3. Recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death with seizures and rhabdomyolysis due to bulimia-induced hypokalemia: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent vomiting due to bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives causing severe hypokalemia may result in recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) and seizures. We report a 25-year-old female with a history of bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives since the age of 15 years, migraine since puberty, renal abscesses at age 20 y, and rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause at age 24 y. She experienced aborted SCD due to severe hypokalemia with symptomatic seizures at 21 and 25 years of age. Bulimia patients additionally taking laxatives or furosemide are at particular risk of SCD and rhabdomyolysis and require periodic determination of electrolytes, potassium substitution, and adequate psychiatric therapy and surveillance.

  4. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained death of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...

  5. Unusual sudden death.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to usual sudden death seen in the course of coronary artery disease, individuals dying suddenly from other causes form a complex array of situations. In some the causes are readily identifiable. No simple pattern is available to identify the potential candidate, but on review of the many causes some moves by the physician may be helpful. For example, a more complete physical evaluation of young individuals participating in competitive athletics is in order. This is particularly true if the athlete reports an episode of unexplained syncope. This may well be the warning of a propensity towards sudden death under physical and emotional stress. Knowledge of the specific problems in underwater swimming and diving, in high altitude exposure and in various circumstances such as certain weight reduction diets and industrial exposures may lead to control of some types of unusual sudden death. Clearly, more studies are needed to give answers in so called crib death. As the incidence of usual sudden death falls, these unusual forms of sudden death will represent a more important fraction of sudden death in general. PMID:6537674

  6. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  7. [Sudden infant death syndrome].

    PubMed

    Espinosa Morett, A; Shkurovich, M; Carlos Ugartechea, J; Mallet Arelano, A; Salmón Rodríguez, L E

    1976-01-01

    This report is based on a review of the present situation of the sudden infant death syndrome through the presentation of four cases studied at the Unidad de Pediatría, Hospital General de México, S.S.A. All cases were in apparent good health before death. All babies were less than ten months of age. In three cases, necropsy was not performed, and the other one did not show significant abnormalities at the post-mortem examination. A complete review of the literature was made including: historical, epidemiological, genetic, clinical and pathological aspects. Special emphasis is made on the pathophysiology of the syndrome during MOR phase of sleep and muscular hypertrophy of the lungs arteriolae suggesting chronic hypoxia which are the most relevant theories in the sudden infant death syndrome. Psychological aspects and the family management by the physician and detection of possible future victims of the syndrome are finally discussed. PMID:973858

  8. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... Share this: Page Content SIDS is the sudden death of an infant younger than 1 year of ...

  9. Unnatural sudden infant death

    PubMed Central

    Meadow, R.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To identify features to help paediatricians differentiate between natural and unnatural infant deaths.
METHOD—Clinical features of 81 children judged by criminal and family courts to have been killed by their parents were studied. Health and social service records, court documents, and records from meetings with parents, relatives, and social workers were studied.
RESULTS—Initially, 42 children had been certified as dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and 29 were given another cause of natural death. In 24 families, more than one child died; 58died before the age of 6 months and most died in the afternoon or evening. Seventy per cent had experienced unexplained illnesses; over half were admitted to hospital within the previous month, and 15 had been discharged within 24 hours of death. The mother, father, or both were responsible for death in 43, five, and two families, respectively. Most homes were disadvantaged—no regular income, receiving income support—and mothers smoked. Half the perpetrators had a history of somatising or factitious disorder. Death was usually by smothering and 43% of children had bruises, petechiae, or blood on the face.
CONCLUSIONS—Although certain features are indicative of unnatural infant death, some are also associated with SIDS. Despite the recent reduction in numbers of infants dying suddenly, inadequacies in the assessment of their deaths exist. Until a thorough postmortem examination is combined with evaluation of the history and circumstances of death by an experienced paediatrician, most cases of covert fatal abuse will go undetected. The term SIDS requires revision or abandonment.

 PMID:10325752

  10. Sudden death of entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Eberly, J H

    2009-01-30

    A new development in the dynamical behavior of elementary quantum systems is the surprising discovery that correlation between two quantum units of information called qubits can be degraded by environmental noise in a way not seen previously in studies of dissipation. This new route for dissipation attacks quantum entanglement, the essential resource for quantum information as well as the central feature in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen so-called paradox and in discussions of the fate of Schrödinger's cat. The effect has been labeled ESD, which stands for early-stage disentanglement or, more frequently, entanglement sudden death. We review recent progress in studies focused on this phenomenon.

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen M; Ward, Chad E; Garcia, Karla L

    2015-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden unexpected death of a child younger than one year during sleep that cannot be explained after a postmortem evaluation including autopsy, a thorough history, and scene evaluation. The incidence of SIDS has decreased more than 50% in the past 20 years, largely as a result of the Back to Sleep campaign. The most important risk factors relate to the sleep environment. Prone and side sleeping positions are significantly more dangerous than the supine position. Bed sharing with a parent is strongly correlated with an increased risk of SIDS, especially in infants younger than 12 weeks. Apparent life-threatening events are not a risk factor for SIDS. Parents should place infants on their backs to sleep, should not share a bed, and should avoid exposing the infant to tobacco smoke. Other risk-reducing measures include using a firm crib mattress, breastfeeding, keeping vaccinations up to date, avoiding overheating due to overbundling, avoiding soft bedding, and considering the use of a pacifier during sleep once breastfeeding is established. One consequence of the Back to Sleep campaign is a significant increase in the incidence of occipital flattening. Infants who develop a flat spot should be placed with the head facing alternating directions each time he or she is put to bed. Supervised prone positioning while the infant is awake, avoiding excessive use of carriers, and upright positioning while awake are also recommended. PMID:26034855

  12. [Genetics of sudden unexplained death].

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-03-20

    Sudden unexplained death is defined by death without a conclusive diagnosis after autopsy and it is responsible for a large percentage of sudden deaths. The progressive interaction between genetics and forensics in post-mortem studies has identified inheritable alterations responsible for pathologies associated with arrhythmic sudden death. The genetic diagnosis of the deceased enables the undertaking of preventive measures in family members, many of them asymptomatic but at risk. The implications of this multidisciplinary translational medical approach are complex, requiring the dedication of a specialized team.

  13. [Genetics of sudden unexplained death].

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Brugada, Ramon

    2014-03-20

    Sudden unexplained death is defined by death without a conclusive diagnosis after autopsy and it is responsible for a large percentage of sudden deaths. The progressive interaction between genetics and forensics in post-mortem studies has identified inheritable alterations responsible for pathologies associated with arrhythmic sudden death. The genetic diagnosis of the deceased enables the undertaking of preventive measures in family members, many of them asymptomatic but at risk. The implications of this multidisciplinary translational medical approach are complex, requiring the dedication of a specialized team. PMID:24018251

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Crib death; SIDS ... However, SIDS is still a major cause of death in infants under 1 year old. Thousands of ... affects boys more often than girls. Most SIDS deaths occur in the winter. The following may increase ...

  15. [Current concepts on sudden death].

    PubMed

    Asensio, Enrique; Narváez, René; Dorantes, Joel; Oseguera, Jorge; Orea, Arturo; Hernández, PabloR; Rebollar, Verónica; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep

    2005-01-01

    Sudden death is defined as the death occurring less than one hour before the onset of the patient's symptoms. It is a severe condition considered a public health issue in several countries and in ours, it accounts for 33 000 to 53 000 annual deaths mainly related to ischemic heart disease. The main cause of sudden death are severe ventricular arrhythmias, but determining what patients are at risk for such an episode is complex, that is why risk stratification is usually a low cost-effective intervention. In the present study, we describe different sudden death risk-stratification strategies. Different sudden death treatment strategies regarding general population have different success rates in different countries, nevertheless, among select high risk populations; the best therapy currently available is the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. We also discuss other treatment options. In Mexico it is deemed necessary to do an important effort for the early detection, prevention and treatment of sudden death in order to limit the consequences of this problem. PMID:15892455

  16. Sudden death of effective entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, K.; Horodecki, P.; Horodecki, R.

    2010-04-15

    Sudden death of entanglement is a well-known effect resulting from the finite volume of separable states. We study the case when the observer has a limited measurement capability and analyze the effective entanglement (i.e., entanglement minimized over the output data). We show that in the well-defined system of two quantum dots monitored by single-electron transistors, one may observe a sudden death of effective entanglement when real, physical entanglement is still alive. For certain measurement setups, this occurs even for initial states for which sudden death of physical entanglement is not possible at all. The principles of the analysis may be applied to other analogous scenarios, such as estimation of the parameters arising from quantum process tomography.

  17. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  18. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Hutter, Adolph M.; Weiner, Rory B.

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  19. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Facts for Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents risk factors and prevention measures related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Offers infant sleep recommendations and five discussion questions to test knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. (DLH)

  20. Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funds Request Information Get Involved Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby Home Grieving Families Surviving the ... Candle on For Families Who Have Experienced the Death of a Baby The numbers are staggering. Every ...

  1. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  2. Sudden Death Following Exercise; a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Najari, Fares; Alimohammadi, Alimohammad; Ghodrati, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Natural and unexpected death that happens within less than one hour of first symptom occurrence is called sudden death. Cardiovascular diseases are the main known reason of sudden death and more than 75% of sudden deaths in athletes are assigned to it. Here we reported the autopsy results of all cases with sudden death following exercise that were referred to forensic center of Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2014. Methods: In this cross sectional study all subjects who were registered to forensic medicine center of Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2014, as a case of sudden death following exercise were evaluated. Demographic data and medical history as well as autopsy and toxicology findings were retrospectively gathered using profiles of the deceased. Results were reported using descriptive analysis. Results: 14 cases were registered as sudden death following exercise in forensic medicine profiles during the study period. Exploring the files of the mentioned deceased, revealed five non-compatible cases in this regard. Finally, 9 eligible cases were enrolled (88.9% male). The mean age of the deceased was 28.66 ± 10.86 years (range: 7 – 40). Toxicological tests were available for 7 cases, one of which was positive for tramadol. Sudden death following football was reported most frequently (44.4%). Only 3 (33.3%) cases had herald signs such as chest pain, syncope, or loss of consciousness. 1 case (11.11%) had a positive history of sudden death in relatives. Conclusion: Although most sudden death victims are asymptomatic until the event, all those who suffer from symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue and irregular heart rate during physical activities, should be screened regarding common probable causes of sudden death. PMID:27274521

  3. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  4. Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Deyell, Marc W.; Krahn, Andrew D.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (SCD-VT/VF) or pulseless electrical activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our health care and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD due to pulseless electrical activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-VT/VF. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-VT/VF. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction and/or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-VT/VF occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  5. Sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

    2014-02-01

    A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (≥ 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of

  6. Athletes at risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-02-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to have the highest incidence of sudden cardiac death. Screening of athletes prior to participation in competitive sports usually falls short of recommended guidelines. Poorly defined legislation and the absence of a national standard for sports physicals have contributed to inadequate health screenings of athletes. This article will describe the incidence and causes of sudden cardiovascular death in young athletes as well as guidelines intended to prevent this unfortunate problem.

  7. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  8. Psychosocial Aspects of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome ("Cot Death").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluglass, Kerry

    1981-01-01

    Reviews literature on reactions of parents and siblings to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The prospects for prolonged, adverse reactions are considered, and professional concerns regarding abnormal adaptation are noted. (Author/DB)

  9. Brain weight and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Falck, G; Rajs, J

    1995-03-01

    Increased brain weights have been reported in the literature to occur among infants who have died from sudden infant death syndrome, suggesting that cerebral edema might play a role in the cause of death among these children. We have compared brain weights from children between the ages of 1 week and 1 year, autopsied between 1980 and 1992. One group consisted of 125 victims of sudden infant death syndrome and the other of 38 children who had died with a diagnosis other than the sudden infant death syndrome. Brain weights from both groups exceeded the 50th percentile in previously published reference material. We were unable to show any significant differences between the groups in either the ratio between observed and expected brain weights or the ratio between brain weight and body weight. We conclude that there is no evidence for the notion that victims of sudden infant death syndrome have an increased brain weight. Other authors (in previous studies) may have overlooked the low overall weight at gestational age of prematurely born children while collecting data for reference levels. A revision of the figures seems to be necessary.

  10. Dying, sudden cardiac death and resuscitation technology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy M

    2008-04-01

    Many nurses will be familiar with the demanding role of caring for a patient who requires cardiopulmonary resuscitation following a sudden, life-threatening illness or event. This paper examines the phenomenon of sudden cardiac death and in particular, focuses on the medical-technical discourse of dying and death in the context of resuscitation for the victims of sudden cardiac arrest. The process of dying is distinguished from the end point of death by drawing upon biomedical determinants and definitions of death. Comparison is made between the use of resuscitation techniques in an attempt to reverse 'clinical death' and the notion of a 'natural death' that is proffered as a means to a 'good' or 'ideal' death. The humanistic versus technological imperative is further deliberated by examining the role of the emergency team in end of life care and includes consideration of the effects that medical dominance may have on the dying process. The practice of family witnessed resuscitation is recognised as one way in which a holistic approach to emergency resuscitative care may be achieved.

  11. Sudden death in racquet sports.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1988-04-01

    The regular playing of racquet sports tends to confer general health and to protect the heart--to produce the athletic heart syndrome. Strenuous play, however, can provoke ventricular arrhythmias and can kill individuals with heart disease. The overall risk for an exercise death from racquet sport play seems to be as low as from distance running. Middle-aged men, however, especially those with known coronary disease or coronary risk factors, should approach racquet sports with caution, and might benefit from timely medical advice.

  12. Manual Snow Removal and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Skavić, Petar; Stemberga, Valter; Duraković, Din

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to analyze the causes of sudden death in middle-aged and elderly men during manual snow removal. During snowy winter months in Zagreb, from January 2013 to January 2014, four males aged 52, 65, 72 and 81, died suddenly while manually removing snow. They were all autopsied. All of them have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, and one suffered from metabolic syndrome. The cause of death in two was probable malignant ventricular arrhythmia. In the third who fell down on the icy surface, consequences were cerebral contusion and neck vertebral luxation. In the fourth who fell down from the top of a 15 m tall building during snow removal, the cause of death were multiple injuries: fractures of both clavicles, ribs and vertebrae's Th5, Th6, hematothorax, cardiac contusion, hematopericardium, thoracic aorta rupture, contusions and ruptures of both lungs, rupture of the diaphragm, liver rupture, hematoperitoneum and cerebral edema. The estimated death rate in the City of Zagreb for males aged 30-64 years is 5.44/1,000,000 inhabitants, which is less than in those aged 65-85 years (40.03/1,000,000; p = 0.2269). Sudden strenuous physical effort due to manual snow removal in two non-trained persons, who have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, was the cause of sudden death. Manual snow removal is an important cause of sudden death, as it is a very arduous effort in non-adapted middle-aged and elderly persons. PMID:26753462

  13. Manual Snow Removal and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Skavić, Petar; Stemberga, Valter; Duraković, Din

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to analyze the causes of sudden death in middle-aged and elderly men during manual snow removal. During snowy winter months in Zagreb, from January 2013 to January 2014, four males aged 52, 65, 72 and 81, died suddenly while manually removing snow. They were all autopsied. All of them have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, and one suffered from metabolic syndrome. The cause of death in two was probable malignant ventricular arrhythmia. In the third who fell down on the icy surface, consequences were cerebral contusion and neck vertebral luxation. In the fourth who fell down from the top of a 15 m tall building during snow removal, the cause of death were multiple injuries: fractures of both clavicles, ribs and vertebrae's Th5, Th6, hematothorax, cardiac contusion, hematopericardium, thoracic aorta rupture, contusions and ruptures of both lungs, rupture of the diaphragm, liver rupture, hematoperitoneum and cerebral edema. The estimated death rate in the City of Zagreb for males aged 30-64 years is 5.44/1,000,000 inhabitants, which is less than in those aged 65-85 years (40.03/1,000,000; p = 0.2269). Sudden strenuous physical effort due to manual snow removal in two non-trained persons, who have suffered from arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease, was the cause of sudden death. Manual snow removal is an important cause of sudden death, as it is a very arduous effort in non-adapted middle-aged and elderly persons.

  14. Pathological view of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J

    1981-01-01

    The common cause of sudden cardiac death is ischaemic heart disease. Such patients may have an occlusive recent thrombosis in a major coronary artery but the largest group has no recent occlusion. Comparison of such patients without occlusion with non-cardiac death control hearts suggests that an area of stenosis of 85 per cent is the best discriminating level. Most subjects who die of ischaemic heart disease suddenly have this degree of stenosis in two or three major arteries. Non-ischaemic sudden cardiac death occurs in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and in severe left ventricular hypertrophy particularly from aortic valve stenosis. When the heart is macroscopically normal, review of previous electrocardiograms is the most helpful guide and may disclose conditions such as a long QT interval or pre-excitation. When no such data are available examination of the conduction system histologically may be helpful but is often non-specific. Use of the term "cardiomyopathy" by pathologists to cover all non-ischaemic sudden cardiac death is clinically misleading. PMID:6450599

  15. Alcohol Use and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Karen B.; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    2004-01-01

    Despite general evidence of fetal toxicities associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), there has been limited research focusing on the effects of parental alcohol use on SIDS occurrence, either directly or in interaction with other risk conditions. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on parental, especially maternal,…

  16. Behavior of chickens prior to death from sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Newberry, R C; Gardiner, E E; Hunt, J R

    1987-09-01

    A study was made to determine if chickens dying from sudden death syndrome (SDS) showed any unusual behavioral characteristics during the final 12 h preceding death. Continuous video recordings were made of floor pens of 50 to 120 individually marked male broiler chickens between 3 and 10 wk of age. Behavioral data were obtained from video tapes played back following death of chickens from SDS. Analysis of the video tapes revealed no significant differences between 10 SDS chickens and their matched controls in the frequencies or proportions of time spent in each of 19 different behavioral activities. All SDS chickens exhibited a sudden attack prior to death lasting an average of 53 s and characterized by loss of balance, violent flapping, and strong muscular contractions. There was no evidence that death was preceded by a particular environmental or behavioral event. It was concluded that there were no consistent behavioral symptoms which could be used to identify SDS chickens prior to death. PMID:3684869

  17. Racial differences in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fender, Erin A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), in African Americans, the basis of which is likely multifactorial. African Americans have higher rates of traditional cardiac risk factors including hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and heart failure. There are also significant disparities in health care delivery. While these factors undoubtedly affect health outcomes, there is also growing evidence that genetics may have a significant impact as well. In this paper, we discuss data and hypotheses in support of both sides of the controversy around racial differences in SCD/SCA.

  18. Sudden Unexpected Infant Death and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Reducing the Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations offer support: CJ Foundation for SIDS First Candle Sudden Unexplained Death In Childhood Foundation (SUDC) The ... and Caregivers Healthy Children Safe to Sleep First Candle CJ Foundation for SIDS Cribs for Kids Safe ...

  19. [EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH: DATA FROM THE PARIS SUDDEN DEATH EXPERTISE CENTER REGISTRY].

    PubMed

    Jouven, Xavier; Bougouin, Wulfran; Karam, Nicole; Marijon, Eloi

    2015-09-01

    Sudden cardiac death is an unexpected cardiac arrest without obvious extra-cardiac cause. Epidemiology of sudden cardiac death has been poorly documented in France, mainly because of challenging requirement in order to capture all cases in a specific area. The Parisian registry (Sudden Death Expertise Center, European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Paris) was initiated in May 2011 and analyzed data of all sudden death in Paris and suburbs (6.6 millions inhabitants). Over 3 years, the annual incidence estimated to 50-70 per 100,000. Those occurred mainly in men (69%), with a mean age of 65 year, and at home (75%). The event was witnessed in 80% of cases, but bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated in only half of cases. Initial cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation in 25%. Survival to hospital discharge remains low (8%).

  20. Sudden Unexplained Death – Treating the Family

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in the context of a normal heart at post-mortem and negative toxicological analysis is termed sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). SADS is often due to cardiac genetic disease, particularly channelopathies. Assessment of family members of SADS victims will reveal at least one affected individual in up to half of families. Specialist evaluation begins with an expert cardiac autopsy that improves diagnostic accuracy and minimises erroneous interpretation of minor pathological findings. Retention of appropriate material for post-mortem genetic testing, ‘the molecular autopsy’, is recommended as this may provide a genetic diagnosis in up to a third of cases. Clinical assessment of families initially comprises 12-lead ECG with high right ventricular leads, echocardiogram and exercise testing. Additional investigations include sodium channel blocker and epinephrine provocation tests. Families with a diagnosis should be managed as per guidelines. Those with negative investigations can generally be discharged unless they are young and/or symptomatic. PMID:26835084

  1. Sudden Heart Death More Common in Male Minority Athletes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159606.html Sudden Heart Death More Common in Male Minority Athletes Inherited condition ... found that about one-third of sudden cardiac deaths were caused by the heart condition hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. ...

  2. The Debate in Cuba's Scientific Community on Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Ernesto; Ochoa, Luis A; Ramos, Lianne

    2015-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death poses a challenge to modern medicine because of its high incidence, the unexpected and dramatic nature of the event, and years of potential life lost. What's more, despite modest decreases in global mortality attributed to cardiovascular diseases, incidence of sudden cardiac death has not declined. Cuba, like most of the Americas, suffers from knowledge gaps that hamper adequate strategies to address sudden cardiac death as a population health problem. We suggest that a generally accepted operational definition of sudden cardiac death be agreed upon, and a national registry developed that recognizes this cause of death on death certificates. These two actions will enable Cuba's public health authorities to assess the extent of the problem and to design intervention strategies for the population with intermediate and lower cardiovascular risk, the group in which most cases occur. KEYWORDS Sudden cardiac death, cardiovascular disease, sudden death, sudden cardiac arrest, risk reduction, prevention and control, Cuba.

  3. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base. PMID:25634430

  4. Cardiac ganglionitis associated with sudden unexpected death.

    PubMed

    James, T N; Zipes, D P; Finegan, R E; Eisele, J W; Carter, J E

    1979-11-01

    In a postmortem study of the hearts of two young women who died suddenly and unexpectedly, we found a remarkably similar and distinctive ganglionitis, predominantly in the region of the sinus node. Both women had ventricular fibrillation at the time of collapse. Vesicular neuritis and older neural degeneration were present in other regions of the heart. Except for focal fibromuscular dysplasia of the sinus node artery and atrioventricular node artery of one heart, there was no other significant anatomic abnormality in either heart. The functional significance of this cardiac ganglionitis is unclear, but its location in and around the conduction system makes it a possible cause of the fatal electrical instability. Recognition that ganglionitis of the heart may be associated with sudden death should stimulate a number of additionally useful studies.

  5. Sudden natural death masquerading as accidental death - a case report.

    PubMed

    Praveen, S; Kamath, Sulatha; Usha, M; Akshith

    2015-03-01

    Things are not always what they seem at first sight. One should always be on the watch for more than presents itself as the main issue in the investigation of crime. Whenever a person dies at the scene of accident, it is inferred that the accident caused the death. But that does not mean that the inference is correct. A person who was suspected to have met with a road traffic accident after autopsy turned out to be a case of sudden natural death due to acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis. The case is reported as it is of medico-legal interest because a natural death appeared to be due to a traffic accident.

  6. Secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Curnis, Antonio; Mascioli, Giosuè; Bontempi, Luca; Bordonali, Tania; Dei Cas, Livio

    2005-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death is still the largest cause of natural death in western countries, especially in patients with coronary artery disease and in those who have already experienced an episode of resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or ventricular tachycardia. Prevention of arrhythmia recurrences (i.e. secondary prevention) in these patients remains a challenge for the cardiologist. To date no studies have demonstrated that drug therapy can be of some value in preventing arrhythmia recurrences or sudden death in these patients, and only cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantation resulted effective in reducing mortality rate. It remains, however, to be defined which patients who survived an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or who already experienced a sustained ventricular tachycardia could benefit the most from an ICD, but to date no invasive or non-invasive tests have proven to be effective for this stratification. Vaughan-Williams class II and III drugs could be of some value in reducing tachycardia cycle length thus increasing antitachycardia pacing efficacy and reducing ICD shocks.

  7. Sudden cardiac death athletes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Previous events evidence that sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes is still a reality and it keeps challenging cardiologists. Considering the importance of SCD in athletes and the requisite for an update of this matter, we endeavored to describe SCD in athletes. The Medline (via PubMed) and SciELO databases were searched using the subject keywords "sudden death, athletes and mortality". The incidence of SCD is expected at one case for each 200,000 young athletes per year. Overall it is resulted of complex dealings of factors such as arrhythmogenic substrate, regulator and triggers factors. In great part of deaths caused by heart disease in athletes younger than 35 years old investigations evidence cardiac congenital abnormalities. Athletes above 35 years old possibly die due to impairments of coronary heart disease, frequently caused by atherosclerosis. Myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction are responsible for the most cases of SCD above this age (80%). Pre-participatory athletes' evaluation helps to recognize situations that may put the athlete's life in risk including cardiovascular diseases. In summary, cardiologic examinations of athletes' pre-competition routine is an important way to minimize the risk of SCD. PMID:20682064

  8. Sudden cardiac death: epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Adabag, A. Selcuk; Luepker, Russell V.; Roger, Véronique L.; Gersh, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an important public-health problem with multiple etiologies, risk factors, and changing temporal trends. Substantial progress has been made over the past few decades in identifying markers that confer increased SCD risk at the population level. However, the quest for predicting the high-risk individual who could be a candidate for an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or other therapy, continues. In this article, we review the incidence, temporal trends, and triggers of SCD, and its demographic, clinical, and genetic risk factors. We also discuss the available evidence supporting the use of public-access defibrillators. PMID:20142817

  9. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The proportion of cardiovascular deaths attributable to sudden cardiac death (SCD) is on the rise. Herein lies the rationale for developing risk stratification strategies to predict who will benefit from prophylactic ICD implantation. Current guidelines recommend prophylactic ICD therapy in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). However, there are clear limitations in using LVEF alone to decide who should receive an ICD. There is mounting evidence that microvolt-level T wave alternans (TWA) is an important marker of arrhythmic risk. TWA is appealing because it non-invasively probes underlying electrophysiological substrate and has been linked to cellular mechanisms for arrhythmias. This review considers the clinical role of TWA for risk stratification of SCD. PMID:19631909

  10. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy genetics: Molecular diagnostics and prevention.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Alica M; Behr, Elijah R; Semsarian, Christopher; Bagnall, Richard D; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Cooper, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies clearly document the public health burden of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Clinical and experimental studies have uncovered dynamic cardiorespiratory dysfunction, both interictally and at the time of sudden death due to epilepsy. Genetic analyses in humans and in model systems have facilitated our current molecular understanding of SUDEP. Many discoveries have been informed by progress in the field of sudden cardiac death and sudden infant death syndrome. It is becoming apparent that SUDEP genomic complexity parallels that of sudden cardiac death, and that there is a pauci1ty of analytically useful postmortem material. Because many challenges remain, future progress in SUDEP research, molecular diagnostics, and prevention rests in international, collaborative, and transdisciplinary dialogue in human and experimental translational research of sudden death.

  11. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Ian N; Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Grace, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pharmacological and device-based therapies have provided a range of management options for patients at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Since all such interventions come with their attendant risks, however, stratification procedures aimed at identifying those who stand to benefit overall have gained a new degree of importance. This review assesses the value of risk stratification measures currently available in clinical practice, as well as of others that may soon enter the market. Parameters that may be obtained only by performing invasive cardiac catheterisation procedures are considered separately from those that may be derived using more readily available non-invasive techniques. It is concluded that effective stratification is likely to require the use of composite parameters and that invasive procedures might only be justified in specific sub-groups of patients.

  12. Ibogaine related sudden death: a case report.

    PubMed

    Papadodima, Stavroula A; Dona, Artemis; Evaggelakos, Christos I; Goutas, Nikolaos; Athanaselis, Sotirios A

    2013-10-01

    Ibogaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid derived from the roots of the rain forest shrub Tabernanthe iboga. Deaths have occurred temporarily related to the use of ibogaine. However, although not licensed as therapeutic drug, and despite evidence that ibogaine may disturb the rhythm of the heart, this alkaloid is currently used as an anti-addiction drug in alternative medicine for detoxification purposes. We report the case of a man who died suddenly 12-24 h after ibogaine use for alcohol detoxification treatment. In the autopsy liver cirrhosis and heavy fatty infiltration was found. The concentration of ibogaine was 2 mg/l. The potential risks of ibogaine use, especially for persons with pathological medical background, are discussed.

  13. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Ian N; Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Huang, Christopher L-H; Grace, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pharmacological and device-based therapies have provided a range of management options for patients at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Since all such interventions come with their attendant risks, however, stratification procedures aimed at identifying those who stand to benefit overall have gained a new degree of importance. This review assesses the value of risk stratification measures currently available in clinical practice, as well as of others that may soon enter the market. Parameters that may be obtained only by performing invasive cardiac catheterisation procedures are considered separately from those that may be derived using more readily available non-invasive techniques. It is concluded that effective stratification is likely to require the use of composite parameters and that invasive procedures might only be justified in specific sub-groups of patients. PMID:19351522

  14. Ibogaine related sudden death: a case report.

    PubMed

    Papadodima, Stavroula A; Dona, Artemis; Evaggelakos, Christos I; Goutas, Nikolaos; Athanaselis, Sotirios A

    2013-10-01

    Ibogaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid derived from the roots of the rain forest shrub Tabernanthe iboga. Deaths have occurred temporarily related to the use of ibogaine. However, although not licensed as therapeutic drug, and despite evidence that ibogaine may disturb the rhythm of the heart, this alkaloid is currently used as an anti-addiction drug in alternative medicine for detoxification purposes. We report the case of a man who died suddenly 12-24 h after ibogaine use for alcohol detoxification treatment. In the autopsy liver cirrhosis and heavy fatty infiltration was found. The concentration of ibogaine was 2 mg/l. The potential risks of ibogaine use, especially for persons with pathological medical background, are discussed. PMID:24112325

  15. Serotonin in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waters, Karen

    2010-11-01

    It seems likely that some infants who die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have a brainstem abnormality of the serotonergic system. Evidence suggests that infants who died from SIDS had defective respiratory and/or autonomic responses that led to death instead of recovery after an acute insult. The serotonergic neuromodulator system has roles in the control of cardiac autonomic and respiratory function, as well as now being identified as abnormal in infants with SIDS. This manuscript reviews the multiple roles of serotonin with reference to the functional aspects of the relevant brain regions. Correlations with pre- or postnatal exposure to stressors, or an underlying genetic process are also reviewed. Together, these studies indicate that perturbed function of the serotonin system will have significant physiological impact during early development. Understanding the functional importance of these systems assists understanding of the pathogenesis of SIDS. In conclusion, whether an infant inherits serotonergic defects and is therefore "inherently vulnerable", or whether postnatal stressors can induce the abnormalities, any functional abnormalities of the serotonergic system that result are likely to be subclinical in the majority of cases and not easily detected with current medical tools. PMID:21152449

  16. Structural imaging biomarkers of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias; Scott, Catherine; Micallef, Caroline; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thom, Maria; Harper, Ronald M; Sander, Josemir W; Vos, Sjoerd B; Duncan, John S; Lhatoo, Samden; Diehl, Beate

    2015-10-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a major cause of premature death in people with epilepsy. We aimed to assess whether structural changes potentially attributable to sudden death pathogenesis were present on magnetic resonance imaging in people who subsequently died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. In a retrospective, voxel-based analysis of T1 volume scans, we compared grey matter volumes in 12 cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (two definite, 10 probable; eight males), acquired 2 years [median, interquartile range (IQR) 2.8] before death [median (IQR) age at scanning 33.5 (22) years], with 34 people at high risk [age 30.5 (12); 19 males], 19 at low risk [age 30 (7.5); 12 males] of sudden death, and 15 healthy controls [age 37 (16); seven males]. At-risk subjects were defined based on risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy identified in a recent combined risk factor analysis. We identified increased grey matter volume in the right anterior hippocampus/amygdala and parahippocampus in sudden death cases and people at high risk, when compared to those at low risk and controls. Compared to controls, posterior thalamic grey matter volume, an area mediating oxygen regulation, was reduced in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and subjects at high risk. The extent of reduction correlated with disease duration in all subjects with epilepsy. Increased amygdalo-hippocampal grey matter volume with right-sided changes is consistent with histo-pathological findings reported in sudden infant death syndrome. We speculate that the right-sided predominance reflects asymmetric central influences on autonomic outflow, contributing to cardiac arrhythmia. Pulvinar damage may impair hypoxia regulation. The imaging findings in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and people at high risk may be useful as a biomarker for risk-stratification in future studies.

  17. Structural imaging biomarkers of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias; Scott, Catherine; Micallef, Caroline; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Thom, Maria; Harper, Ronald M.; Sander, Josemir W.; Vos, Sjoerd B.; Duncan, John S.; Lhatoo, Samden

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is a major cause of premature death in people with epilepsy. We aimed to assess whether structural changes potentially attributable to sudden death pathogenesis were present on magnetic resonance imaging in people who subsequently died of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. In a retrospective, voxel-based analysis of T1 volume scans, we compared grey matter volumes in 12 cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (two definite, 10 probable; eight males), acquired 2 years [median, interquartile range (IQR) 2.8] before death [median (IQR) age at scanning 33.5 (22) years], with 34 people at high risk [age 30.5 (12); 19 males], 19 at low risk [age 30 (7.5); 12 males] of sudden death, and 15 healthy controls [age 37 (16); seven males]. At-risk subjects were defined based on risk factors of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy identified in a recent combined risk factor analysis. We identified increased grey matter volume in the right anterior hippocampus/amygdala and parahippocampus in sudden death cases and people at high risk, when compared to those at low risk and controls. Compared to controls, posterior thalamic grey matter volume, an area mediating oxygen regulation, was reduced in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and subjects at high risk. The extent of reduction correlated with disease duration in all subjects with epilepsy. Increased amygdalo-hippocampal grey matter volume with right-sided changes is consistent with histo-pathological findings reported in sudden infant death syndrome. We speculate that the right-sided predominance reflects asymmetric central influences on autonomic outflow, contributing to cardiac arrhythmia. Pulvinar damage may impair hypoxia regulation. The imaging findings in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy and people at high risk may be useful as a biomarker for risk-stratification in future studies. PMID:26264515

  18. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: an important concern

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo; de Albuquerque, Marly; Scattolini, Marcello; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic problems worldwide. Unfortunately, individuals with epilepsy are at higher risk of death than the general population, and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy is the most important direct epilepsy-related cause of death. In this review article, our research group focused on the risk factors, mechanisms and preventative measures obtained from clinical and experimental studies on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. PMID:21779724

  19. Sudden cardiac death in adults: causes, incidence and interventions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    Many nurses will be familiar with the unexpected death of an adult patient following a sudden, life-threatening cardiac event. It is a situation that demands sensitive nursing care and skilled interventions to provide a foundation for recovery and promote healthy bereavement. This article examines the causes and incidence of sudden cardiac death in adults. Possible reactions of those who are suddenly bereaved are described and immediate care interventions aimed at dealing with the grief process are discussed. The article concludes by identifying ways in which the incidence of sudden cardiac death may be reduced.

  20. Non-locality Sudden Death in Tripartite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Gregg; Ann, Kevin

    2009-03-10

    Bell non-locality sudden death is the disappearance of non-local properties in finite times under local phase noise, which decoheres states only in the infinite-time limit. We consider the relationship between decoherence, disentanglement, and Bell non-locality sudden death in bipartite and tripartite systems in specific large classes of state preparation.

  1. New Areas for Preventive Programing: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Joseph

    Crisis intervention programs for persons experiencing the sudden death of family members or surviving natural disasters have been advocated as methods of primary prevention, although few have actually been implemented. A program utilizing nurses to deliver grief intervention to parents losing a baby to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) was…

  2. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  3. Sudden cardiac death after modified electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Jiyu

    2015-10-01

    Sudden deaths associated with the use of electroconvulsive therapy are rare. In this case report a 58-year-old male with a 20-year history of bipolar disorder and no history or signs of cardiac illness died from cardiac arrest within one hour of receiving an initial session of modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) to treat a recurrent episode of non-psychotic mania. The patient regained consciousness and was medically stable immediately after the MECT session (which did not produce a convulsion) but deteriorated rapidly after transfer to the recovery room. It was not possible to conduct an autopsy, but the authors surmise that the most probable cause was that the use of haloperidol 17 hours prior to MECT exacerbated the cardiac effects of nonconvulsive MECT. The case highlights the need for a thorough cardiac work-up on patients being considered for MECT (possibly including assessment of cardiac enzymes in older individuals) and careful consideration of the concurrent use of antipsychotic medications and MECT.

  4. Sudden unexpected death, epilepsy and familial cardiac pathology.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, A J; Thompson, T; Vohra, J K; O'Brien, T J; Winship, I

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of epilepsy in a cohort of patients who suffered a sudden unexpected death (SUDEP), and determined the proportion of the deaths that were related to an identifiable underlying familial cardiac pathology. Epilepsy is common in people who experience a sudden unexpected death, with approximately a quarter having identifiable familial electrophysiological abnormalities. Familial cardiac pathology may be an important cause of SUDEP. A retrospective evaluation was performed of 74 families that were referred to the Royal Melbourne Hospital Cardiac Genetic Clinic over a 5 year period for investigation following a family member's sudden, presumed cardiac, death. This state-wide referral clinic includes all patients who have died from a sudden unexpected death in whom the cause of death is unascertained. An epilepsy diagnosis was categorised as either definite, probable, possible or unlikely. The family members underwent comprehensive clinical evaluations and investigations in an attempt to identify a familial cardiac cause for the sudden unexpected death. Our findings suggest that systematic referral to a cardiac genetics service is warranted for the first degree relatives of people with epilepsy who experience a sudden unexplained death, for further evaluation and to identify those who are at higher risk for sudden death. Interventions may then be instituted to potentially reduce this risk.

  5. Effects of Sudden vs. Chronic Illness Death on Bereavement Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Catherine M.

    1982-01-01

    Interviewed bereaved persons shortly after the death of a close family member and 18 months later. Respondents were grouped according to mode of death. The short-term chronic illness group made the most favorable adjustment. Sudden death and long-term chronic illness death groups sustained higher intensities of bereavement. (Author/RC)

  6. Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: place and time of death

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, JFT; Thompson, AJ; Ingram, PJ

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many babies who die of Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI) in Northern Ireland are found dead in bed – i.e. co-sleeping – with an adult. In order to assess its frequency autopsy reports between April 1996 and August 2001 were reviewed and linked to temporal factors. The day and month of death, and the place where the baby was found were compared to a reference population of infant deaths between one week of age and the second birthday. Although the rate of SUDI was lower than the UK average, 43 cases of SUDI were identified, and two additional deaths with virtually identical autopsy findings that were attributed to asphyxia caused by suffocation due to overlaying. Thirty-two of the 45 (71%) were less than four months of age. In 30 of the 45 cases (67%) the history stated that the baby was bed sharing with others; 19 died sleeping in an adult bed, and 11 on a sofa or armchair. In 16 of the 30 (53%) there were at least two other people sharing the sleeping surface, and in one case, three. SUDI was twice as frequent at weekends (found dead Saturday – Monday mornings) compared to weekdays (p<0.02), and significantly more common compared to reference deaths (p<0.002). Co-sleeping deaths were also more frequent at weekends. Almost half of all SUDI (49%) occurred in the summer months – more than twice the frequency of reference deaths. While sharing a place of sleep per se may not increase the risk of death, our findings may be linked to factors such as habitual smoking, consumption of alcohol or illicit drugs as reported in case-control studies. In advising parents on safer childcare practices, health professionals must be knowledgeable of current research and when, for example, giving advice on co-sleeping this needs to be person-specific cognisant of the risks within a household. New and better means of targeting such information needs to be researched if those with higher risk life-styles are to be positively influenced. PMID:16457407

  7. Histological findings in unclassified sudden infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liebrechts-Akkerman, Germaine; Bovée, Judith V M G; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Maes, Ann; Nikkels, Peter G J; de Krijger, Ronald R

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to study histological variations and abnormalities in unclassified sudden infant death (USID), including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in The Netherlands. Two hundred Dutch USID cases between 1984 and 2005 were identified. The histology slides and autopsy reports of 187 cases were available for systematic review, including brain autopsy in 135 cases. An explanation for the cause of death in 19 patients (10.2%) was found. Twelve patients had bronchopneumonia, 3 showed extensive aspiration, 2 had signs of a metabolic disorder, 1 had sepsis, and 1 had meningitis. Frequent nonspecific findings were congestion (66%), edema (47%), small hemorrhages (18%), and lymphoid aggregates (51%) in the lungs; congestion of the liver (23%); and asphyctic bleeding in the kidney (44%), adrenal gland (23%), and thymus (17%). Statistical associations were found for infection with starry sky macrophages in the thymus (P  =  0.004), with calcification (P  =  0.023), or with debris in the Hassal's corpuscles (P  =  0.034). In this study, in 10.2% of cases the histological findings were incompatible with SIDS or USID. Furthermore, several frequent nonspecific histological findings in the thymus that point toward an infection were found. PMID:23331080

  8. Sudden death associated with danon disease in women.

    PubMed

    Miani, Daniela; Taylor, Matthew; Mestroni, Luisa; D'Aurizio, Federica; Finato, Nicoletta; Fanin, Marina; Brigido, Silvana; Proclemer, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Danon disease is an X-linked systemic disorder characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy, mental retardation, and skeletal myopathy affecting young men. Electrocardiogram usually displays a Wolff-Parkinson-White preexcitation pattern. Less has been reported about the phenotype in women, although later-onset cardiac symptoms have been described. The aim of this study was to expand the knowledge of the phenotype of Danon disease in women. We clinically followed and evaluated with echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and genetic testing a family affected by Danon disease in which 2 men and 6 women showed a severe arrhythmogenic phenotype. Affected family members carried a nucleotide substitution at position 294 in exon 3 (c.294 G → A) that changed a tryptophan residue to a stop codon at position W98X in the lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) gene. Four women died suddenly (1 aborted) at 37 to 54 years of age. Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern with atrioventricular block was detected in 2 of 6 women. Four had successful pregnancies without symptoms of heart failure. cMRI showed late gadolinium enhancement areas in a clinically healthy woman who was a mutation carrier. Two patients underwent heart transplantation; histology of explanted hearts demonstrated severe interstitial fibrosis, hypertrophic cardiomyocytes with cytoplasmic vacuoles, and myofibrillar disarray. In conclusion, LAMP2 mutation can cause a severe arrhythmogenic phenotype in women that includes a high risk of sudden death. cMRI may be useful in women harboring LAMP2 mutations to permit early detection of cardiac involvement and guide timely considerations of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy. Heart transplantation should be considered at onset of heart failure symptoms owing to rapid progression of the disease.

  9. Sudden infant death syndrome: oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M; Tervit, H

    1999-06-01

    In studies of oxidative stress in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) there were two major findings: (1) During normal post-natal development, there was a gradual decline in the number of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and parahippocampus gyrus in the brain; (2) The total number of immunoreactive neurons was elevated in SIDS victims compared to age-matched controls in infants 6 months of age and under (1). SOD and neuronal aging and degeneration in the hippocampus and neocortex were features of SIDS, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. In the SIDS study of infants from 3-6 months of age, the elevation of SOD in SIDS victims was significant, whereas no significant elevation of GSHPx was detected. An imbalance between SOD and GSHPx was said to be crucial in the prevention of toxicity of free radicals (1). Zinc-deficient cells cannot up-regulate gene expression of the scavenger enzymes SOD and GSHPx in cells exposed to high levels of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (2). GSHPx coupled to reduced nicotine adenine diphosphate (NADPH) regenerating systems via glutathione reductase is virtually able to guarantee an effective protection of biological structures against oxidative attack (22). When the capacity of the cell to regenerate GSH is exceeded - primarily due to an insufficient supply of NADPH-oxidised glutathione (GSSG) is released from the cell and protein synthesis turns off (20). We hypothesize that the increased incidence of aging and neuronal death and increased incidence of SOD and GSHPx reactive neurons in early post-natal development indicates an increased up-regulation of gene expression of scavenger enzymes during high exposure to oxidative stress after birth. GSH-dependent peroxide metabolism is linked to the pentose phosphate shunt via NADPH-dependent glutathione reductase (GR). GSHPx is a selenium containing enzyme which together with catalase (CAT) SOD and vitamin E

  10. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... SADS Foundation and John Hopkins Hospital Division of Cardiology are hosting a family support and educational meeting ... Baltimore/DC area families with cardiac arrhythmias. Sports Cardiology & Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the Young Conference 01/ ...

  11. Advanced Electrocardiographic Predictors of Sudden Death in Familial Dysautonomia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solaimanzadeh, I.; Schlegel, T. T.; Greco, E. C.; DePalma, J. L.; Starc, V.; Marthol, H.; Tutaj, M.; Buechner, S.; Axelrod, F. B.; Hilz, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify accurate predictors for the risk of sudden death in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD). Ten-minute resting high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs were obtained from 14 FD patients and 14 age/gender-matched healthy subjects. Multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters were studied for their ability to predict sudden death in FD over a subsequent 4.5-year period, including multiple indices of linear and non-linear heart rate variability (HRV); QT variability; waveform complexity; high frequency QRS; and derived Frank-lead parameters. Four of the 14 FD patients died suddenly during the follow-up period, usually with concomitant pulmonary disorder. The presence of low vagally-mediated HRV was the ECG finding most predictive of sudden death. Concomitant left ventricular hypertrophy and other ECG abnormalities such as increased QTc and JTc intervals, spatial QRS-T angles, T-wave complexity, and QT variability were also present in FD patients, suggesting that structural heart disease is fairly common in FD. Although excessive or unopposed cardiac vagal (relative to sympathetic) activity has been postulated as a contributor to sudden death in FD, the presence of low vagally-mediated HRV was paradoxically the best predictor of sudden death. However, we suggest that low vagally-mediated HRV be construed not as a direct cause of sudden death in FD, but rather as an effect of concurrent pathological processes, especially hypoxia due to pulmonary disorders and sleep apnea, that themselves increase the risk of sudden death in FD and simultaneously diminish HRV. We speculate that adenosine may play a role in sudden death in FD, possibly independently of vagal activity, and that adenosine inhibitors such as theophylline might therefore be useful as prophylaxis in this disorder.

  12. Sudden cardiac death in epilepsy disappoints, but epileptologists keep faith.

    PubMed

    Scorza, Fulvio A; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Costa, Jaderson Costa da

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of death in people with intractable epilepsy. Probably, optimization of seizure control will prevent some of these deaths. Briefly, we integrated in this paper some data about the epidemiology, risk factors, etiology, and preventative measures in the management of SUDEP. PMID:27487377

  13. Sudden cardiac death from the perspective of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Eleid, Mackram F; Gulati, Rajiv; Holmes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 50% of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease in the United States. It is most commonly associated with coronary artery disease and can be its initial manifestation or may occur in the period after an acute myocardial infarction. Decreasing the rate of sudden cardiac death requires the identification and treatment of at-risk patients through evidence-based pharmacotherapy and interventional strategies aimed at primary and secondary prevention. For this review, we searched PubMed for potentially relevant articles published from January 1, 1970, through March 1, 2014, using the following key search terms: sudden cardiac death, ischemic heart disease, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest. Searches were enhanced by scanning bibliographies of identified articles, and those deemed relevant were selected for full-text review. This review outlines various mechanisms for sudden cardiac death in the setting of coronary artery disease, describes risk factors for sudden cardiac death, explores the management of cardiac arrest, and outlines optimal practice for the monitoring and treatment of patients after an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to decrease the risk of sudden death. PMID:25440727

  14. Bilateral sudden hearing loss following habitual abortion: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tuanfang; Huang, Fengying; Ren, Jihao; Liu, Wei; Chen, Xing; Li, Lihua; Xie, Dinghua; Lu, Yongde

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The most common causes of this disease are known to be the vascular and viral agents, but immune disorders are involved in the development of sudden deafness. The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune system disorder, which is defined as the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) in the patient's blood, then cause venous and/or arterial thrombosis in various organs of the body, for example, thrombosis can occur in the placenta and/or the inner ear. As a result, it can cause abortion and/or sudden deafness. Bilateral SSNHL following habitual abortion is a rare clinical event. Here, we report a case of 32-year-old woman who presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss following recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Combine the literature, the diagnosis, clinical implication and treatment are discussed.

  15. [Sudden cardiac death in non-professional athletes].

    PubMed

    Nappo, A; Varesi, C; Rossi, L; Matturri, L

    1997-10-01

    Sudden death during sports activities in non-professional athletes is a rare occurrence, however it is of great interest in clinical pathology and forensic medicine. We performed chemico-toxicologic and histopathologic investigations in three cases of sudden cardiac death in non-professional athletes, focusing in particular on the cardiac conduction system. Examination of conduction tissue was performed on sections seriated every 150 microns, stained alternately with hematoxylin-eosin and Heidenhain's trichrome (azan). In all three cases diagnostic evidence showed hyperacute myocardial infarction, due to spasm of coronaries with mild atherosclerosis, and myocardial lesions due to reperfusive necrosis. The pathogenesis of sudden death in young athletes is not related only to ischemic-coronary damage that is not exclusively mechanical, but also a dynamic event (spasm and reperfusion), but also to fatal arrhythmias related to abnormal findings in the conduction system. Such findings can therefore be considered the morphologic substrate of sudden cardiac death.

  16. Sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Padubidri, Jagadish Rao; Raghavendra Babu, Y P; Naik, Ramadas; Kanchan, Tanuj; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Chawla, Khushboo

    2016-06-01

    Sudden unwitnessed, unexpected deaths when the bodies are found in public places require a complete and meticulous medicolegal autopsy to ascertain the cause and manner of death to avoid further unnecessary investigations by the legal authorities. Such deaths attributed to gastrointestinal causes at autopsy are relatively uncommon. We report a case of sudden unexpected death due to strangulated inguinal hernia in a 60-year-old man. The body was discovered in a public area near a place of worship. The present case illustrates a potentially preventable sudden unexpected death due to a surgically correctable gastrointestinal condition. In the present case, the individual feared being hospitalised for treatment of his scrotal swelling with potential surgery and the eventual loss of daily income. In our opinion, such apprehensions may have delayed the potentially life-saving hospital surgical intervention in the individual. PMID:26837567

  17. Inheritance of febrile seizures in sudden unexplained death in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ingrid A; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R; Kinney, Hannah C; Krous, Henry F

    2012-04-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians.

  18. [Sudden death following a single oral administration of haloperidol].

    PubMed

    Remijnse, P L; Eeckhout, A M; van Guldener, C

    2002-04-20

    A 39-year-old man was admitted with myasthenia, alcoholic hepatitis and electrolyte abnormalities due to an inadequate nutritional state. On admission the ECG showed a prolonged QTc interval (0.46 s). The patient was treated with intravenous fluid and supplementary vitamins and minerals. On the third day of admission the patient developed a delirium, partly due to alcohol withdrawal, and was therefore treated with oxazepam 50 mg 3 times daily and a single dose of haloperidol 5 mg. One hour after ingesting haloperidol, the patient suddenly succumbed and resuscitation was not successful. The autopsy revealed a cardiomyopathy but no explanation for the sudden death. Due to the temporal relationship between the ingestion of haloperidol and this sudden death, we assume that haloperidol induced a fatal arrhythmia in the presence of a preexisting prolonged repolarisation time. To the best of our knowledge, sudden death after a single oral therapeutic dose of haloperidol has not previously been described. PMID:11998355

  19. A large family characterised by nocturnal sudden death

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, M.P.; Viersma, J.W.; Beaufort-Krol, G.C.M.; Bink-Boelkens, M.Th.E.; Bezzina, C.R.; Veldkamp, M.W.; Brouwer, J.; Haaksma, J.; van Tintelen, J.P.; van Langen, I.M.; Wouda, A.A.; Wilde, A.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Background We recently identified a novel mutation in large family characterised by premature nocturnal sudden death. In the present paper we provide an overview of the findings in this family. Methods From 1958 onwards, when the first patient presented, we collected clinical data on as many family members as possible. After identification in 1998 of the underlying genetic disorder (SCN5A, 1795insD), genotyping was performed diagnostically. Results Since 1905 unexplained sudden death occurred in 26 family members, 17 of whom died during the night. Besides sudden death, symptomatology was rather limited; only six patients reported syncopal attacks. In one of them, a 13-year-old boy, asystolic episodes up to nine seconds were documented. Until now, the mutation has been found in 114 family members (57 males, 57 females). Carriers of the mutant gene exhibited bradycardia-dependent QT-prolongation, intrinsic sinus node dysfunction, generalised conduction abnormalities, a paucity of ventricular ectopy, and the Brugada sign. Cardiomyopathy or other structural abnormalities were not found in any of the carriers. Electrophysiological studies showed that mutant channels were characterised by markedly reduced INa amplitude, a positive shift of voltage-dependence of activation and a substantial negative shift of voltage-dependence of inactivation of INa. From 1978 onwards, a pacemaker for anti-brady pacing was implanted for prevention of sudden death. In patients in whom a prophylactic pacemaker was implanted no unexplained sudden death occurred, whereas 5 sudden deaths occurred in the group of patients who did not receive a pacemaker. Conclusion We have described a large family with a SCN5A-linked disorder (1795insD) with features of LQT3, Brugada syndrome and familial conduction system disease. Anti-brady pacing was successful in preventing sudden death. The mode of death is possibly bradycardic. ImagesFigure 5 PMID:25696119

  20. Genetics of channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Oscar; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Brugada, Ramon; Brugada, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances in cardiology have resulted in new guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. Despite these improvements, sudden death remains one of the main challenges to clinicians because the majority of diseases associated with sudden cardiac death are characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Hence, patients may be unaware of their illness, and physical activity can be the trigger for syncope as first symptom of the disease. Most common causes of sudden cardiac death are congenital alterations and structural heart diseases, although a significant number remain unexplained after comprehensive autopsy. In these unresolved cases, channelopathies are considered the first potential cause of death. Since all these diseases are of genetic origin, family members could be at risk, despite being asymptomatic. Genetics has also benefited from technological advances, and genetic testing has been incorporated into the sudden death field, identifying the cause in clinically affected patients, asymptomatic family members and post-mortem cases without conclusive diagnosis. This review focuses on recent advances in the genetics of channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death. PMID:26566530

  1. [Sudden death in new-born babies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guilhaume, A

    This sudden death of a new-born baby, which had been thriving up to then, is a dramatic but not exceptional event. A systematic search for the etiology must be made, and this should include an autopsy in order that the diagnosis of "sudden and unexplained death" is confirmed only after eliminating all other possible causes. Knowledge of this syndrome has benefited from epidemiological surveys which have defined the previous clinical condition, but none of the many etiollotical hypotheses envisaged can take into account the total number of cases reported. One of the most recent cases developed apnoea during sleep, which could explain some unexpected deaths in new-born babies. This was discovered by polygraphic sleep recordings and confirmed by pathological examinations. These demonstrated indirect signs of chronic hypoxia which could have been related to the sudden death of the baby. Though there does not appear to be any relationship between the apnoea syndrome during sleep and these sudden and unexpected deaths, this hypothesis has opened up a new promising line of research which could help to identify new-born babies at risk from "sudden death", and to propose preventative measures. PMID:224505

  2. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Jerry R.; Bodfish, James W.

    2000-01-01

    Medical records of residents of a facility for persons with mental retardation from January 1, 1978, through December 31, 1997, were analyzed to identify incidence of sudden unexpected death for 180 individuals with and 125 without comorbid epilepsy. Eighty deaths were identified, with 55 occurring in those with epilepsy. (Contains 15 references.)…

  3. Grief Counseling for Survivors of Sudden Death (SOSD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Robert

    This paper describes a program of free, short-term, individual bereavement counseling for survivors of sudden death in Marin County, California. Co-sponsors are Marin Suicide Prevention Center and Marin County Coroner's Office. Most survivors are initially referred to the program by the coroner at the time of certifying cause of death, others are…

  4. [Mechanoelectric feedback and sudden death in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Guadalajara Boo, J F

    2001-01-01

    Better knowledge of mechanisms which perpetuate heart failure and promote progression and death in patients with these sicknesses, has led to find a better medical treatment to improve the functional status, decrease mortality and improve life span, avoiding the progression of ventricular dysfunction. Mortality reduction due to the disease progression has led to evident arrhythmic mortality show by sudden death. Aspects involved in the genesis and pathophysiology of sudden death in patients with chronic-heart failure; are reviewed in this paper. Special reference to mechano-electrical feedback is considered. PMID:11565349

  5. Supporting families after sudden infant death.

    PubMed

    McClain, M E; Shaefer, S J

    1996-04-01

    Parents consistently report that supportive contacts with their health care providers make a difference in their overall adjustment to their baby's death. Parents require continuing validation that the baby's death is no one's fault, that it was not caused by anything they did or did not do. In supporting bereaved families, our goal is to assist parents to incorporate the baby's death into their lives in a way that allows them to continue to function and to recognize life as worth living and happiness as possible.

  6. Sudden death due to congenital pericardial defect: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Uzün, Ibrahim; Büyük, Yalçin; Pakiş, Işil; Doğru, Adnan; Calk, Ali Ulvi

    2008-09-01

    Pericardial defects are rare in childhood and outcome is usually benign. Patients may be asymptomatic, but chest pain, emboli, arrhythmia, and sudden death have been described in the literature. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy who suddenly died after mild exercise. A left-sided pericardial defect with a diameter of 8 cm was detected on medico-legal autopsy.

  7. [Sudden death caused by freon 22?].

    PubMed

    Dal Grande, M; Zanderigo, C; Coato, F; Menegolli, S; Cipriani, E; Pancheri, V; Malesani, F; Perbellini, L

    1992-01-01

    Case report of a plumber's fatal work accident. Investigations on the causes of death made at post mortem showed that the worker had absorbed a large quantity of freon 22 (chlorodifluoromethane) which is known to be a narcotic agent and capable of inducing cardiac arrhythmia. It is believed freon inhalation was the cause of loss of consciousness with consequent death from drowning in the water issuing from the pipes. It is concluded that preventive measures need to be reinforced by adequate information to the workforce on the risks connected to this type of gas.

  8. Sudden Death: An Uncommon Occurrence in Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P; Wilbers, Joyce; Aerts, Marjolein B; Leijten, Quinten H; van Dijk, Jan G; Esselink, Rianne A; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-01-01

    We present a 75-year-old woman with dementia and parkinsonism who developed severe orthostatic hypotension and eventually died. Autopsy revealed extensive Lewy body formation in the midbrain, limbic system, intermediate spinal cord, and medulla oblongata. Furthermore, a vast amount of Lewy bodies was seen in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia which likely explained the severe autonomic failure. We speculate that this autonomic failure caused sudden death through dysregulation of respiration or heart rhythm, reminiscent of sudden death in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Clinicians should be aware of this complication in patients presenting with parkinsonism and autonomic dysfunction, and that sudden death may occur in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) as it does in MSA. PMID:26891177

  9. Sudden cardiac death markers in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mauricio; Rohde, Luis Eduardo; Zimerman, André; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 30-40% of patients, the etiology is non-ischemic. In this group of patients, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) prevents sudden death and decreases total mortality. However, due to burden of cost, the fact that many ICD patients will never need any therapy, and possible complications involved in implant and follow-up, the device should not be implanted in every patient with non-ischemic heart failure. There is an urgent need to adequately identify patients with highest sudden death risk, in whom the implant is most cost-effective. In the present paper, the authors discuss current available tests for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:27016256

  10. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  11. Sudden Death in a Patient with Carney's Complex.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, James Adam; Kreso, Melissa; Slodzinski, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Carney's complex is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome that involves spotty skin pigmentations, recurrent cardiac myxomas, endocrine hyperactivity, pituitary adenomas, peripheral nerve tumors, testicular tumors, and ovarian lesions. We present a case of sudden cardiac death in a 40 year old female with a history of Carney's complex with recurrent cardiac myxomas presenting for exploratory laparotomy and enblock adnexal resection of a slowly enlarging right sided ovarian mass. This case highlights the risk for sudden death in these patients as well as the preoperative assessment that should be undertaken by the anesthesiologist as it relates to Carney's complex. PMID:24223358

  12. Sudden death of distillability in qutrit-qutrit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Song Wei; Zhu Shiliang; Chen Lin

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the concept of distillability sudden death, i.e., free entangled states can evolve into nondistillable (bound entangled or separable) states in finite time under local noise. We describe the phenomenon through a specific model of local dephasing noise and compare the behavior of states in terms of the Bures fidelity. Then we propose a few methods to avoid distillability sudden death of states under (general) local dephasing noise so that free entangled states can be robust against decoherence. Moreover, we find that bound entangled states are unstable in the limit of infinite time.

  13. Sudden Death in a Patient with Carney's Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, James Adam; Kreso, Melissa; Slodzinski, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Carney’s complex is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome that involves spotty skin pigmentations, recurrent cardiac myxomas, endocrine hyperactivity, pituitary adenomas, peripheral nerve tumors, testicular tumors, and ovarian lesions. We present a case of sudden cardiac death in a 40 year old female with a history of Carney’s complex with recurrent cardiac myxomas presenting for exploratory laparotomy and enblock adnexal resection of a slowly enlarging right sided ovarian mass. This case highlights the risk for sudden death in these patients as well as the preoperative assessment that should be undertaken by the anesthesiologist as it relates to Carney’s complex. PMID:24223358

  14. The Retarding Effect of Noise on Entanglement Sudden Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Hünkar

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we consider a system of two atoms in which one atom is in a JC cavity under the influence of a random phase telegraph noise and the other is an isolated atom. We obtain an exact solution to the time evolution of this system to investigate the effects of noise on the entanglement dynamics of the atoms. We show that the noise causes entanglement sudden death without recovery in a finite time interval. The time for this is independent of the initial state of the pure entangled atomic state. Moreover, an intensive noise delays the entanglement sudden death.

  15. Sudden cardiac death in 13 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Lammey, Michael L; Lee, D Rick; Ely, John J; Sleeper, Meg M

    2008-02-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), presumed secondary to fatal arrhythmias, is a common cause of mortality in captive chimpanzees at the Alamogordo Primate Facility. Over the 6-year period at the Alamogordo Primate Facility between 2001 and 2006, 13 animals were defined as sudden cardiac death (11 male and 2 female) on the basis of clinical presentation which was 38% of all deaths. All animals had annual physical exams, including electrocardiograms and serial blood pressures. Six of the 13 animals underwent a complete cardiac evaluation by a veterinary cardiologist and all six of these animals were diagnosed with various degrees of cardiomyopathy. Systemic hypertension was noted in two of the 13 cases and antemortem cardiac arrhythmias were seen in all 13 animals. Histological examination of the hearts revealed myocardial fibrosis in 12 chimpanzees. Most of the animals (10/13) that died of sudden cardiac death had cardiomegaly (increased heart weight/body weight ratio) and some degree of myocardial fibrosis noted. Additional data as well as serial diagnostic evaluations will be needed to identify the possible causes of sudden cardiac death in captive chimpanzees. PMID:18269527

  16. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event.

  17. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths linked with trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Da Broi, Ugo; Colatutto, Antonio; Sala, Pierguido; Desinan, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Sudden deaths attributed to sniffing trichloroethylene are caused by the abuse of this solvent which produces pleasant inebriating effects with rapid dissipation. In the event of repeated cycles of inhalation, a dangerous and uncontrolled systemic accumulation of trichloroethylene may occur, followed by central nervous system depression, coma and lethal cardiorespiratory arrest. Sometimes death occurs outside the hospital environment, without medical intervention or witnesses and without specific necroscopic signs. Medico legal investigations into sudden sniffing deaths associated with trichloroethylene demand careful analysis of the death scene and related circumstances, a detailed understanding of the deceased's medical history and background of substance abuse and an accurate evaluation of all autopsy and laboratory data, with close cooperation between the judiciary, coroners and toxicologists.

  18. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event. PMID:25128006

  19. Sudden death in right ventricular dysplasia with minimal gross abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Burke, A P; Robinson, S; Radentz, S; Smialek, J; Virmani, R

    1999-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is emerging as a relatively common cause of exercise-induced sudden death in the young. The diagnostic criteria at autopsy are, however, not fully established, leading to both over- and underdiagnosis. We report a young man and a young woman dying suddenly of right ventricular dysplasia during exercise, in whom the gross autopsy findings in the right ventricle were minimal or even absent. However, the histologic features in both right and left ventricles were typical of the disease, and consisted of fibrofatty infiltrates with typical myocyte degeneration of the right ventricle and subepicardial regions of the left ventricle. These cases illustrate that microscopic findings are diagnostic and may be present in the absence of gross findings. Marked fat replacement is not essential for the diagnosis of right ventricular dysplasia, and the right ventricle should be extensively sampled histologically in all cases of sudden unexpected death, especially those that are exercise related.

  20. Spontaneous abortion and unexpected death: a critical discussion of Marquis on abortion.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Mary Clayton

    2013-02-01

    In his classic paper, 'Why abortion is immoral', Don Marquis argues that what makes killing an adult seriously immoral is that it deprives the victim of the valuable future he/she would have otherwise had. Moreover, Marquis contends, because abortion deprives a fetus of the very same thing, aborting a fetus is just as seriously wrong as killing an adult. Marquis' argument has received a great deal of critical attention in the two decades since its publication. Nonetheless, there is a potential challenge to it that seems to have gone unnoticed. A significant percentage of fetuses are lost to spontaneous abortion. Once we bring this fact to our attention, it becomes less clear whether Marquis can use his account of the wrongness of killing to show that abortion is the moral equivalent of murder. In this paper, I explore the relevance of the rate of spontaneous abortion to Marquis' classic anti-abortion argument. I introduce a case I call Unexpected Death in which someone is about to commit murder, but, just as the would-be murderer is about to strike, his would-be victim dies unexpectedly. I then ask: what does Marquis' account of killing imply about the moral status of what the would-be murderer was about to do? I consider four responses Marquis could give to this question, and I examine what implications these responses have for Marquis' strategy of using his account of the wrongness of killing an adult to show that abortion is in the same moral category. PMID:23038800

  1. Medical examiners' seminar looked at mysteries surrounding sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D

    1997-01-01

    Medical examiners in Nova Scotia recently attended their first-ever seminar concerning the skills, challenges and techniques their jobs require. It was welcomed by the physicians, most of whom are family physicians with little training in the investigation of sudden death. PMID:9307567

  2. Research advances and management of soybean sudden death syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium virguliforme causes soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) in the United States. The disease was first observed in Arkansas in 1971, and since has been reported in most soybean-producing states, with a general movement from the southern to the northern states. In addition to F. virguliforme, ...

  3. Entanglement-breaking channels and entanglement sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Laura T.; Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Farías, Osvaldo Jiménez; Walborn, Stephen P.; Larotonda, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence of entanglement sudden death in the evolution of a bipartite system depends on both the initial state and the channel responsible for the evolution. An extreme case is that of entanglement-breaking channels, which are channels that, acting on only one of the subsystems, drives them to full disentanglement, regardless of the initial state. In general, one can find certain combinations of initial states and channels acting on one or both subsystems that can result in entanglement sudden death or not. Neither the channel nor the initial state are responsible for this effect but their combination. In this paper we show that, for two entangled qubits, when entanglement sudden death occurs, the evolution can be mapped to that of an effective entanglement-breaking channel on a modified initial state. Our results allow to anticipate which states will suffer entanglement sudden death or not for a given evolution. An experiment with polarization-entangled photons demonstrates the utility of this result in a variety of cases.

  4. Survivor-Victim Status, Attachment, and Sudden Death Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mark D.; Greenwald, Jason Y.

    1991-01-01

    Examined significance of survivor-victim relationship in understanding grief following sudden death bereavement by suicide or accident. Results showed that survivor-victim attachment was more important than survivor status (parent versus sibling/child) in explaining grief reactions. Compared to accident survivors, suicide survivors experienced…

  5. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, FY 1983. Special Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This report describes research programs focusing on the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and indicates some presently available results. Specific attention is given to research on sleep apnea, respiratory control, and hypoxia, as well as to infectious disease processes and immunology. Findings of a large-scale multidisciplinary SIDS project are…

  6. Preventing Sudden Death: Cardiovascular Screening of Young Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ades, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Efficiently and inexpensively identifying athletes at risk for exercise-related sudden death is difficult. The article discusses types of cardiac disorders and outlines a practical screening method that features a cardiac history questionnaire designed to identify symptomatic athletes and those with a family history of congenital heart disease.…

  7. Neuropathologic findings in postmortem studies of sudden death in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thorn, M

    1997-11-01

    Death in patients with epilepsy may occur suddenly and unexpectedly. When no anatomic or chemically demonstrable cause for such a death is found at postmortem examination, the death may remain unexplained. Previous studies of general autopsy features in cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) have reported increased lung and liver weights, pulmonary edema, hepatic fatty change, and small increases in heart weights. Neuropathologic findings include cerebral edema, lighter brain weights compared with age-matched controls, and various other structural brain lesions in 34% to almost 50% of cases. In an ongoing United Kingdom study, brains from 25 cases of SUDEP have been examined. Macroscopic abnormalities were identified in 70% of cases and included contusions, old infarcts, hippocampal sclerosis, cortical dysgenesis, vascular malformation, oligodendroglioma, neurodegenerative brain disease, and microcephaly. Histopathologic findings include evidence of acute neocortical and brainstem hypoxic neuronal changes. Similar changes in hippocampal and basal ganglia neurones have also been observed. These changes indicate a cerebral event occurring at least 4-6 h before death and are at odds with a "sudden" death which, by definition, occurs within 1 h. Because many SUDEP cases are unwitnessed, the exact time sequence of events is often unknown. This study confirms the high incidence of structural brain lesions in SUDEP cases. PMID:19909322

  8. Defining Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes with Regard to Anatomo-Pathological Examination

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700–2,000. Yet, despite advances in maternal–infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) has a sixfold to eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS–SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS–SIUDS complex is “The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa”. Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists is necessary. PMID:27709109

  9. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    Summary Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community. PMID:26494436

  10. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Identifying risk and preventing mortality.

    PubMed

    Lhatoo, Samden; Noebels, Jeffrey; Whittemore, Vicky

    2015-11-01

    Premature death among individuals with epilepsy is higher than in the general population, and sudden unexpected death is the most common cause of this mortality. A new multisite collaborative research consortium, the Center for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) Research (CSR), has received major funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to examine the possible biologic mechanisms underlying this potentially preventable comorbidity and develop predictive biomarkers for interventions that could lower SUDEP incidence. This inaugural report describes the structure of the CSR, its priorities for human and experimental research, and the strategic collaborations and advanced tools under development to reduce this catastrophic outcome of epilepsy. The CSR Partners Program will work closely with committed volunteer agencies, industry, and academic institutions to accelerate and communicate these advances to the professional and lay community.

  11. [Sudden cardiac death during sports due to coronariitis].

    PubMed

    Bilkenroth, B; Wegmann, W

    2000-07-01

    A case of sudden and unexpected death of a 29-year-old man during a basketball game is reported. Six years before death a transient ischemic attack and a membranous glomerulonephritis were diagnosed. The autopsy revealed as cause of death to be a severe lymphoplasmocytic coronariitis and, in addition, a small single focus of a lymphoplasmocytic aortitis, indicating a systemic disease. A suspected syphilitic vasculitis could not be confirmed. In the literature there are few cases of similar coronary arteriitis are described, such as Takayasu's type of arteriitis in men of young and middle age.

  12. Sudden death due to swimming in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Škavić, Petar; Duraković, Din

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to analyze the rate of sudden death in elderly Croatian women in comparison to elderly Croatian men, who died suddenly due to swimming. In the period from 2002 to 2011 one elderly Croatian woman and five elderly men died suddenly during swimming. In the same time, the same number of elderly foreigners died due to swimming at the Croatian Adriatic coast. One Croatian woman aged 66, who suffered of arterial hypertension with left ventricular hyper- trophy of 15 mm, diabetes mellitus and alcoholic liver cirrhosis, drowned in the sea during swimming. She was intoxi- cated with alcohol and had alcohol level in urine of 3.03 per thousand. One foreign woman, aged 82, who suffered coronary heart disease with left ventricular scar after myocardial infarction, arterial hypertension with excessive left ventricular hypertrophy of 22 mm and nephroangiosclerosis, suddenly lost conscionsness during swimming. The death rate in elderly Croatian women due to swimming reached 0.25, and the death rate in men is eight times higher: 1.97 (p = 0.0701), but the difference is not significant probably because of a small observational number. PMID:26040091

  13. [Sudden cardiac death in acromegaly. Anatomopathological observation of a case].

    PubMed

    Matturri, L; Varesi, C; Nappo, A; Cuttin, M S; Rossi, L

    1998-01-01

    Involvement of the cardiovascular system in patients affected by acromegaly is an important factor in morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis in these subjects is acromegalic cardiomyopathy with cardiac decompensation, arrhythmias and sudden death. The pathologic substrate has rarely been described. The present study reports the findings in a case of sudden death in a 54-year-old man, affected by acromegaly. Subsequent diagnostic investigation revealed the characteristic aspects of acromegalic cardiomyopathy in the common myocardium and the presence of hyperacute myocardial infarct of the antero-septal wall of the left ventricle. Examination of conduction tissue revealed slight fibrolipomatosis and dispersion of the atrio-ventricular node (AVN), which extended to the His bundle and bifurcation. The right branch was prematurely intramural with sclerosis and lipomatosis. This location in atrio-ventricular conduction system has seldom been reported in the literature and if so, with different lesions from those found in the case we investigated. The results of microscopic examination convalidate the hypothesis of electrical instability in the heart, as confirmed by the subject's history of ventricular extrasystoles, left branch block and attacks of angina after effort. Death was correlated to hyperacute myocardial infarction of the anteroseptal wall of the left ventricle, in a subject with history of angina, affected by acromegalic cardiomegaly and electric instability. In this case, sudden death could also be considered arrhythmogenic in relation to the additional workload by persistent hormonal stimulation.

  14. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Evaluation of forensic autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Luo; Zhang, Yang; Zielke, H Ronald; Levine, Barry; Zhang, Xiang; Chang, Lin; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2012-11-30

    Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by seizures. Mortality is significantly increased in patients with epilepsy. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common seizure-related category of death. A retrospective study of forensic autopsy cases from 2007 to 2009 at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) yielded a total of 104 sudden unexpected deaths directly or indirectly caused by an epilepsy/seizure disorder in the State of Maryland. Of these deaths, 74 cases met a general accepted definition of SUDEP. The age of SUDEP individuals ranged from 14 to 63 with the majority of subjects in the ages between 21 and 50 years (58 cases, 78.4%). Males were slightly more likely than females to die of SUDEP (male:female=1.5:1 based on the rate). The onset age of epilepsy was documented in 47.3% of cases (35/74) based on investigation and medical records. Of the 35 cases, 12 subjects had early onset epilepsy (onset ages 1-15 years) and 20 subjects had duration of epilepsy for more than 10 years. The majority of deaths (61 of the 74 cases, 82.4%) were unwitnessed. Death scene investigation showed that 71 deaths (95.9%) occurred inside their residence with 50 subjects (70.4%) found either in bed or on the bedroom floor near the bed. Forty-three out of 74 cases (58.1%) showed neuropathological lesions. Per history, 50 subjects were reported as being on anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, postmortem toxicological analysis revealed that only 26 subjects (35.1%) had detectable AEDs. Of the 74 cases, seizure disorder or epilepsy was listed as primary cause of death in 66 cases and the term of SUDEP as official cause of death in only 8 cases. This report focuses on the characteristics of death scene investigation and postmortem examination findings of SUDEP cases.

  15. Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in Central China (Hubei)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenglian; Mu, Jiao; Chen, Xinshan; Dong, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study was conducted at Tongji Forensic Medical Center in Hubei (TFMCH) from 1999 to 2014. Forty-nine cases of sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) were collected. The SUNDS rate was 1.0% in the total number of cases, in which an incidence was fluctuating over the years. Interestingly, April and January, and 3:00 to 6:00 am were the peak months and times of death. Among the decedents, farmers and migrant workers accounted for 67.3%. The syndrome predominantly attacked males in their 30s. One victim had sinus tachycardia. Thirteen victims (26.5%) were witnessed and had abnormal symptoms near death. Macroscopically, compared to sudden noncardiac deaths, the weights of brain, heart, and lungs had no statistical difference in SUNDS. Microscopically, the incidence of lung edema (45 cases, 91.8%) was significantly higher in SUNDS group than in the control group (27 cases, 55.1%). 82.9% of 35 SUNDS cases examined displayed minor histological anomalies of the cardiac conduction system (CCS), including mild or moderate fatty, fibrous or fibrofatty tissue replacement, insignificant stenosis of node artery, and punctate hemorrhage in the node area. These findings suggested that minor CCS abnormalities might be the substrates for some SUNDS deaths. Therefore, SUNDS victims might suffer ventricular fibrillation and acute cardiopulmonary failure before death. Further in-depth studies are needed to unveil the underlying mechanisms of SUNDS. PMID:26945374

  16. Sudden cardiac death secondary to antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sicouri, Serge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A number of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are known to increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Based largely on a concern over QT prolongation and the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, a number of antipsychotic drugs have been temporarily or permanently withdrawn from the market or their use restricted. Some antidepressants and antipsychotics have been linked to QT prolongation and the development of Torsade de pointes arrhythmias, whereas others have been associated with a Brugada syndrome phenotype and the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. This review examines the mechanisms and predisposing factors underlying the development of cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, associated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in clinical use. PMID:18324881

  17. Mechanisms underlying Phalaris aquatica "sudden death" syndrome in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bourke, C A; Carrigan, M J

    1992-07-01

    Twenty outbreaks of Phalaris aquatica "sudden death" syndrome in sheep were investigated between 1981 and 1991. Four were confirmed and one was suspected, to be a cardiac disorder; 5 were confirmed and 3 were suspected, to be a polioencephalomalacic disorder; the aetiology of the remaining 7 outbreaks could not be determined. Potentially toxic levels of hydrocyanic acid (20 to 36 mg/100 g) were measured in the 3 toxic phalaris pastures tested. The measurement of potentially toxic levels of nitrate nitrogen (2920 micrograms/g) in toxic phalaris pastures by others, was noted. It is suggested that phalaris "sudden death" syndrome could have as many as 4 different underlying mechanisms, and that these might reflect the presence in the plant of a cardio-respiratory toxin, a thiaminase and amine co-substate, cyanogenic compounds, and nitrate compounds. PMID:1445081

  18. Melatonin concentrations in the sudden infant death syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, W. Q.; Lynch, H. J.; Deng, M. H.; Gleason, R. E.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The melatonin levels in various body fluids of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are compared with those of infants of comparable age who died of other causes to examine a possible relationship between pineal function and SIDS. After adjusting for age differences, cerebrospinal fluid melatonin levels are found to be significantly lower in the SIDS infants. It is suggested that diminished melatonin production may be characteristic of SIDS and could represent an impairment in the maturation of physiologic circadian organization.

  19. Sudden death due to recreational exercise in physicians.

    PubMed

    Duraković, Z; Misigoj-Duraković, M; Skavić, J

    2002-12-01

    In a period from 1982-2002 we noticed five dead among Croatian male physicians aged 34 to 67, during or after recreational physical exercise: swimming, soccer, tennis and jogging. Three of them who were autopsied, have been non-smokers and without previous symptoms. In all coronary heart disease was found. The left descending anterior artery was stenotic in one and occluded in two, with myocardial scars in one. An acute myocardial infarction was found in none of them, and in two-left ventricular hypertrophy 15 and 18 mm. We could not find a recent medical record in those physicians including a clinical finding and other findings. Two physicians who were not been autopsied, had possible an alcohol cardiomyopathy. Both of them were smokers. In Croatia about 7% of the whole population are engaged in recreational physical exercise. In a period of twenty years (1982-2002) we noticed 43 sudden and unexpected deaths during or immediately after physical exercise: it reached 43/6,300,000 sudden death in Croatia in twenty years or 2.15/315,000 yearly among persons engaged in physical exercise. In Croatia there are 4,957 male physicians-specialists, and a rate of sudden cardiac death during or immediately after physical exercise in this group reached 5/99,140 in 20 years or 1/19,828 every four years. A medical check up before recreational physical exercise is essential including a clinical examination, a serum concentration of risk factors and other risk factors, an electrocardiogram at rest, a stress test and echocardiography in clinical indication, as are medical controls over persons taking exercise. This study shows that medical evaluation is important because of the underlying problems such as sudden death during exercise. In non-trained persons and in the elderly a physical exercise should be recommended of a gradually intensity, which could not exceed 6 METs. PMID:12528274

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of Sudden Death Bearing Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations combined with sudden death testing were used to compare resultant bearing lives to the calculated hearing life and the cumulative test time and calendar time relative to sequential and censored sequential testing. A total of 30 960 virtual 50-mm bore deep-groove ball bearings were evaluated in 33 different sudden death test configurations comprising 36, 72, and 144 bearings each. Variations in both life and Weibull slope were a function of the number of bearings failed independent of the test method used and not the total number of bearings tested. Variation in L10 life as a function of number of bearings failed were similar to variations in lift obtained from sequentially failed real bearings and from Monte Carlo (virtual) testing of entire populations. Reductions up to 40 percent in bearing test time and calendar time can be achieved by testing to failure or the L(sub 50) life and terminating all testing when the last of the predetermined bearing failures has occurred. Sudden death testing is not a more efficient method to reduce bearing test time or calendar time when compared to censored sequential testing.

  1. Commotio cordis: an underappreciated cause of sudden death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Lateef, F

    2000-10-01

    Over the last few years, the recognised cardiovascular risks of sporting activities have been extended to include cardiac arrest resulting from low-energy precordial chest impact produced by projectiles (e.g. baseball) or bodily contact, in the young, healthy and active athlete [also known as commotio cordis (CC)]. However, case reports of CC in European medical literature can be traced back for at least 130 years. CC accounts for a small, but important, subset of sudden death during sporting activities. It is a devastating electrophysiological event in the young athlete, and one which has generated considerable concern, both in the medical profession as well as in the public. The mechanism of sudden death appears to be caused by ventricular fibrillation, which occurs when the chest impact is delivered within a narrow, electrically vulnerable portion of the cardiac cycle, that is, during repolarisation, just before the peak of the T wave. Resuscitation of these victims is possible with prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. Preventive measures, such as the use of age-appropriate safety baseballs and suitably designed chest wall protection, may reduce the risk of sudden death and, thus, make the athletic field a safer place for young athletes.

  2. [Newborn sleep positioners and sudden infant death syndrome risk].

    PubMed

    Rossato, Norma Elena

    2013-01-01

    The rate of sudden infant death decreased after the publication of the first guidelines regarding infant sleep position and safe environment in 1992. From 2005 onwards, infant deaths by suffocation, choking or entrapment have increased. Some of them were associated with wedges, positioning devices, and bumper pads. Media and manufacturers should follow safe sleep guidelines in their messaging and advertising, but there is a lack of control over this. We emphasize the important role of health professionals in disseminating the recommendation for a safe infant sleep environment. PMID:23381706

  3. Deaths from injuries and induced abortion among rural Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Fauveau, V; Blanchet, T

    1989-01-01

    Information about injuries and violence as causes of death of women is scarce and often incomplete, and particularly so regarding women in the rural areas of South Asia. This report provides detailed specific information collected in Matlab, a sub-district of rural Bangladesh. Of 1139 women (aged 15-44 yr) who died there during the 11-yr period from 1976 to 1986, 207 (18%) were victims of unintentional injuries or violence. In this study, unintentional injuries include domestic and traffic accidents, drowning and snake-bites, while violent deaths are defined as due to intentional injury and include homicide, suicide and lethal complications of induced abortion. Injuries and violence accounted for 31% of all deaths among women aged 15-19 yr. This proportion dropped significantly with age to 10% among women aged 35-44 yr. Unmarried women suffered a higher proportion of such deaths (36%) than married women (15%). Violent deaths during pregnancy and complications of induced abortion among young unmarried women deserve special attention. In the male-dominated society under study, suicide and homicide are observed to be two frequent consequences of illegitimate pregnancy. Although this study suffers from the absence of data on non-fatal injuries and attempted violence, it may serve as a basis for recommending preventive measures.

  4. [Periodic Repolarization Dynamics--innovative strategies for preventing sudden death].

    PubMed

    Rizas, Konstantinos; Bauer, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most common single cause of death in the industrialized world. Survivors of acute myocardial infarction (MI) are at increased risk of death. The vast majority of deaths occur in post-MI patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) for whom no prophylactic strategies exist. Periodic repolarization dynamics (PRD) is a novel electrocardiographic phenomenon that refers to low frequency (< 0.1 Hz) modulations of cardiac repolarization, most likely linked to sympathetic activity. Increased PRD is a strong and independent predictor of mortality after acute MI. PRD assessment allows to identify a new high risk group of post-MI patients with preserved LVEF (35-50 %) who have the same mortality risk as patients with LVEF ≤ 35 %. Future studies are needed to test the efficacy of preventive strategies in this new high risk group. PMID:27031208

  5. Sudden Death in Sleep of Laotian-Hmong Refugees in Thailand: A Case-Control Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Ronald G.

    1987-01-01

    Surveillance for sudden deaths conducted among Laotian-Hmong refugees in Thailand revealed associations between sudden death in sleep and membership in the Green-Hmong subgroup, a family history of sudden death, and previous non-fatal sleep disturbances. Most victims are young men. (PS)

  6. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: epidemiology, mechanisms, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Devinsky, Orrin; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Thurman, David J; Lhatoo, Samden; Richerson, George

    2016-09-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) can affect individuals of any age, but is most common in younger adults (aged 20-45 years). Generalised tonic-clonic seizures are the greatest risk factor for SUDEP; most often, SUDEP occurs after this type of seizure in bed during sleep hours and the person is found in a prone position. SUDEP excludes other forms of seizure-related sudden death that might be mechanistically related (eg, death after single febrile, unprovoked seizures, or status epilepticus). Typically, postictal apnoea and bradycardia progress to asystole and death. A crucial element of SUDEP is brainstem dysfunction, for which postictal generalised EEG suppression might be a biomarker. Dysfunction in serotonin and adenosine signalling systems, as well as genetic disorders affecting cardiac conduction and neuronal excitability, might also contribute. Because generalised tonic-clonic seizures precede most cases of SUDEP, patients must be better educated about prevention. The value of nocturnal monitoring to detect seizures and postictal stimulation is unproven but warrants further study. PMID:27571159

  7. The Spectrum of Epidemiology Underlying Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Meiso; Shimizu, Wataru; Albert, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest is a major international public health problem accounting for an estimated 15–20% of all deaths. Although resuscitation rates are generally improving throughout the world, the majority of individuals who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest will not survive. SCD most often develops in older adults with acquired structural heart disease, but it also rarely occurs in the young, where it is more commonly due to inherited disorders. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is known to be the most common pathology underlying SCD, followed by cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and valvular heart disease. Over the past three decades, declines in SCD rates have not been as steep as for other causes of CHD deaths, and there is a growing fraction of SCDs not due to CHD and/or ventricular arrhythmias, particularly among certain subsets of the population. The growing heterogeneity of the pathologies and mechanisms underlying SCD present major challenges for SCD prevention, which are magnified further by a frequent lack of recognition of the underlying cardiac condition prior to death. Multifaceted preventative approaches, which address risk factors in seemingly low risk and known high-risk populations will be required to decrease the burden of SCD. In this Compendium, we review the wide-ranging spectrum of epidemiology underlying SCD within both the general population and in high-risk subsets with established cardiac disease placing an emphasis on recent global trends, remaining uncertainties, and potential targeted preventive strategies. PMID:26044246

  8. Sudden infant death due to Lactococcal infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, K; Nakayama, M; Nakahira, K; Nakura, Y; Kanagawa, N; Yanagihara, I; Miyaishi, S

    2016-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) of infants is rare, most of which occur associated with congenital heart disease or its cardiac surgery. We experienced a case of sudden death of a four-month-old male infant without congenital heart disease. It was elucidated by postmortem examination that the dead had suffered severe IE, which led him to death. In the microbiological genetic analysis using histological section, the pathogen causing inflammation in the present case was identified as Lactococcus lactis subspecies, although Staphylococci have been reported to be common and important one. Previously reported infectious diseases by Lactococcus lactis subspecies were all adult cases and this is the first report of an infantile death due to Lactococcal IE according to our knowledge. Any fatal disease may be included in sudden death cases targeted for forensic autopsy, even if it is rare. It is expected for forensic pathologists that they note such case and share each experience among themselves and other medical fields to develop a strategy for prevention. PMID:26277368

  9. The spectrum of epidemiology underlying sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Meiso; Shimizu, Wataru; Albert, Christine M

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest is a major international public health problem accounting for an estimated 15%-20% of all deaths. Although resuscitation rates are generally improving throughout the world, the majority of individuals who experience a sudden cardiac arrest will not survive. SCD most often develops in older adults with acquired structural heart disease, but it also rarely occurs in the young, where it is more commonly because of inherited disorders. Coronary heart disease is known to be the most common pathology underlying SCD, followed by cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and valvular heart disease. During the past 3 decades, declines in SCD rates have not been as steep as for other causes of coronary heart disease deaths, and there is a growing fraction of SCDs not due to coronary heart disease and ventricular arrhythmias, particularly among certain subsets of the population. The growing heterogeneity of the pathologies and mechanisms underlying SCD present major challenges for SCD prevention, which are magnified further by a frequent lack of recognition of the underlying cardiac condition before death. Multifaceted preventative approaches, which address risk factors in seemingly low-risk and known high-risk populations, will be required to decrease the burden of SCD. In this Compendium, we review the wide-ranging spectrum of epidemiology underlying SCD within both the general population and in high-risk subsets with established cardiac disease placing an emphasis on recent global trends, remaining uncertainties, and potential targeted preventive strategies.

  10. Causes and prevention of sudden cardiac death in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Tung, Patricia; Albert, Christine M

    2013-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of mortality in elderly individuals owing to a high prevalence of coronary heart disease, systolic dysfunction, and congestive heart failure (CHF). Although the incidence of SCD increases with age, the proportion of cardiac deaths that are sudden decreases owing to high numbers of other cardiac causes of death in elderly individuals. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy has been demonstrated to improve survival and prevent SCD in selected patients with systolic dysfunction and CHF. However, ICD therapy in elderly patients might not be effective because of a greater rate of pulseless electrical activity underlying SCD and other competing nonarrhythmic causes of death in this population. Although under-represented in randomized trials of ICD use, elderly patients comprise a substantial proportion of the population that qualifies for and receives an ICD for primary prevention under current guidelines. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), which has been demonstrated to reduce mortality in selected populations with heart failure, is also more commonly used in this group of patients than in younger individuals. In this Review, we examine the causes of SCD in elderly individuals, and discuss the existing evidence for effectiveness of ICD therapy and CRT in this growing population.

  11. Sudden natural deaths in Edirne, Turkey, from 1984 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Azmak, Ali Derya

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of sudden natural deaths (SND) in forensic autopsy cases which were performed in Trakya University Department of Forensic Medicine, Edirne, Turkey. For each case, a complete autopsy, toxicological screening and histological examination were performed. Deaths due to unnatural causes, alcohol, drug overdose and undetermined causes (negative autopsy) were excluded from the study. Autopsy reports of 959 consecutive forensic cases performed in a 22-year period were reviewed. Two hundred and seventy-eight (278) SNDs were identified, involving 232 males (83.4%) and 46 females (16.6%). The age group of 50-59 years accounted for 21.58% of the cases. In the majority (55%) the cause of death was related to the cardiovascular system--principally ischemic heart disease. The second most common cause of SND was related to the respiratory system (19.1%), especially pneumonia. Most of the SNDs occurred in the winter months. Ethyl alcohol was detected in 5.3% of cases. In conclusion, sudden natural deaths related to the cardiovascular system are shown to be a significant problem in the Trakya region of Turkey.

  12. Sudden birth versus sudden death of entanglement for the extended Werner-like state in a dissipative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chuan-Jia; Chen, Tao; Liu, Ji-Bing; Cheng, Wei-Wen; Liu, Tang-Kun; Huang, Yan-Xia; Li, Hong

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamical behaviour of entanglement in terms of concurrence in a bipartite system subjected to an external magnetic field under the action of dissipative environments in the extended Werner-like initial state. The interesting phenomenon of entanglement sudden death as well as sudden birth appears during the evolution process. We analyse in detail the effect of the purity of the initial entangled state of two qubits via Heisenberg XY interaction on the apparition time of entanglement sudden death and entanglement sudden birth. Furthermore, the conditions on the conversion of entanglement sudden death and entanglement sudden birth can be generalized when the initial entangled state is not pure. In particular, a critical purity of the initial mixed entangled state exists, above which entanglement sudden birth vanishes while entanglement sudden death appears. It is also noticed that stable entanglement, which is independent of different initial states of the qubits (pure or mixed state), occurs even in the presence of decoherence. These results arising from the combination of the extended Werner-like initial state and dissipative environments suggest an approach to control and enhance the entanglement even after purity induced sudden birth, death and revival.

  13. [Sudden unexpected natural death from a viewpoint of forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Takatsu, A

    1995-12-01

    Sudden unexpected natural death (SUND) has several characteristics, such as unknown clinical history, very short course to death, evidence of trauma, interference of postmortem changes and social implications of diagnosis. From these points, SUND involves important challenges in forensic pathology. Presented here are the highlights of our SUND studies which allow scientific speculation into the antemortem pathophysiological course to death and a subsequent accurate diagnosis of the cause of death in SUND cases. 1. Forensic problems of SUND of unknown etiology 1) Do sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) studies continue endlessly? In Japan there are many cases of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) which were regarded as SIDS, often without postmortem examination. Pure SIDS should be a diagnosis of exclusion under thorough postmortem examination. Additionally, many SIDS studies have focused on pathogenesis of pure SIDS based on the analysis of so-called SIDS cases described above. In this sense, SIDS studies may continue forever. To clarify whether SIDS is an onion type, that is a heterogeneous disease entity, or bamboo shoot type, a single disease entity with a single cause, it is more vital to accurately search autopsy findings to exclude the cause of death, rather than to study pathogenesis of SIDS. Thereafter, pure SIDS will be carved in relief and we could study the pathogenesis, if it remains in the future. Present in 40% of our SUID cases examined was the existence of viral infection as a cause of death. 2) Pokkuri disease It has long been believed that the main branches of coronary arteries in Pokkuri-disease cases are macroscopically hypoplastic and cause sudden cardiac death. However, our two-dimensional morphometric analysis of the main branches, such as wall thickness, degree of stenosis, lumen area, area within internal elastic lamina, showed no significant differences between Pokkuri-disease cases and age and sex-matched control cases. 2. Information

  14. Critical diaphragm failure in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siren, Pontus Max Axel; Siren, Matti Juhani

    2011-05-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in infants between the ages of 1 and 12 months in developed countries. SIDS is by definition a diagnosis of exclusion, and its mechanism of action is unknown. The SIDS-Critical Diaphragm Failure (CDF) hypothesis postulates that the cause of death in SIDS is respiratory failure caused by CDF. Four principal risk factors contribute to CDF in young infants: undeveloped respiratory muscles, non-lethal infections, prone resting position, and REM sleep. Even relatively minor infections can cause an acute and significant reduction in diaphragm force generation capacity that in conjunction with other risk factors can precipitate CDF. CDF-induced acute muscle weakness leaves few, if any pathological marks on the affected tissue.Understanding the underlying mechanism of SIDS may help in formulating new approaches to child care that can help to further reduce the incidence of SIDS. PMID:21222555

  15. [Sudden cardiac death during a city marathon run].

    PubMed

    Beutler, J; Schmid, E; Fischer, S; Hürlimann, S; Konrad, C

    2015-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young athletes during physical stress is a rare event with an incidence of 1-3 deaths per 100,000 athletes per year. A coronary anomaly is the second most common cause of death following hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Symptomatic prodromes occur in 20% of cases prior to the SCD event. This case report describes a 35-year-old male who collapsed near the finishing line of a half marathon run. Despite immediate resuscitation attempts and initial return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), a pulseless electrical activity (PEA) followed and the patient died 1 h after arrival in the resuscitation unit. The autopsy revealed an anomalous left coronary artery (ALCA), which can lead to ischemia of the respective heart muscles under severe stress.

  16. Sudden death in infancy due to bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Karayel, Ferah; Ozaslan, Abdi; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Pakis, Isil; Ketenci, Cetin; Eroglu, Ayse Guler

    2006-09-01

    Symptoms of bicuspid aortic valve usually occur in the age group of 50-70 years, but rarely, it can also lead to sudden unexpected death in infancy and early childhood. The autopsy of a 2-month-old baby boy, found dead in his cot, revealed the heart weight as 25 g, and the macroscopic examination showed the circumference of the aortic valve consisting of two leaflets as 8 mm. The thickness of the left ventricle, right ventricle, and septum was measured as 8, 7, and 10 mm, respectively. Microscopically, the heart revealed hypertrophic changes of myocytes. Subendocardial areas displayed necrosis of myocytes, and severe and diffuse ischemic changes characterized by loss of myofibers and vacuolization. Interstitial pneumonia was identified in the lungs. Death occurred as a result of a congenital bicuspid aortic valve obstructing the left ventricular outflow tract complicated by lung infection. As there are only a few reported cases in infancy, and congenital bicuspid aortic valve can lead to sudden unexpected death, this case is presented to the forensic community.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics, fractals, cardiac physiology and sudden death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose a diametrically opposite viewpoint to the generally accepted tendency of equating healthy function with order and disease with chaos. With regard to the question of sudden cardiac death and chaos, it is suggested that certain features of dynamical chaos related to fractal structure and fractal dynamics may be important organizing principles in normal physiology and that certain pathologies, including ventricular fibrillation, represent a class of 'pathological periodicities'. Some laboratory work bearing on the relation of nonlinear analysis to physiological and pathophysiological data is briefly reviewed, with tentative theories and models described in reference to the mechanism of ventricular fibrillation.

  18. Coherent state quantum key distribution based on entanglement sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Gregg; Simon, David; Sergienko, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    A method for quantum key distribution (QKD) using entangled coherent states is discussed which is designed to provide key distribution rates and transmission distances surpassing those of traditional entangled photon pair QKD by exploiting entanglement sudden death. The method uses entangled electromagnetic signal states of `macroscopic' average photon numbers rather than single photon or entangled photon pairs, which have inherently limited rate and distance performance as bearers of quantum key data. Accordingly, rather than relying specifically on Bell inequalities as do entangled photon pair-based methods, the security of this method is based on entanglement witnesses and related functions.

  19. Mechanisms of Sudden Cardiac Death: Oxidants and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmia is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Deranged cardiac metabolism and abnormal redox state during cardiac diseases foment arrhythmogenic substrates through direct or indirect modulation of cardiac ion channel/transporter function. This review presents current evidence on the mechanisms linking metabolic derangement and excessive oxidative stress to ion channel/transporter dysfunction that predisposes to ventricular arrhythmias and SCD. As conventional anti-arrhythmic agents aiming at ion channels have proven challenging to use, targeting arrhythmogenic metabolic changes and redox imbalance may provide novel therapeutics to treat or prevent life-threatening arrhythmias and SCD. PMID:26044249

  20. Ebstein's Anomaly, Left Ventricular Noncompaction, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Michael; Warner, Luke; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital disorder characterized by apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Ebstein's anomaly may be seen in association with other cardiac conditions, including patent foramen ovale, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). LVNC is characterized by increased trabeculation within the left ventricular apex. Echocardiography is often used to diagnose LVNC; however, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior characterization of the myocardium. We report a case of sudden cardiac death in a patient with Ebstein's anomaly with unrecognized LVNC noted on post mortem examination with screening documenting the presence of LVNC in one of the patient's twin sons. PMID:26240764

  1. Living after sudden death: A case report of Naxos disease.

    PubMed

    Noain, Jose Alberto Garcia; Golet, Amparo Cantin; Calzada, Jorge Navarro; Mellado, Ascension Muñoz; Duarte, Julian Mozota

    2012-10-01

    Naxos disease is a recessive inherited condition with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) and a peculiar cutaneous phenotype (woolly hair and a palmoplantar keratoderma). Woolly hair appears from birth, palmoplantar keratoderma develops during childhood and cardiomyopathy is clinically manifested by adolescence. Patients present with syncope, sustained ventricular tachycardia or sudden death. We report a case of a 14 year old boy from Spain, who was admitted into our emergency room after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest, secondary to malignant ventricular tachycardia that developed while he was playing basketball.

  2. Exercise-Related Sudden Death: Risks and Causes (Part 1 of 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    The causes of exercise-related sudden death are discussed. Multiple structural cardiovascular diseases are the primary cause of death in athletes under 30; severe coronary artery disease is the culprit in deaths of those over 30. These diseases and the mechanisms of sudden death, as well as preventive measures, are detailed. (JL)

  3. A possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Christos, G A; Christos, J A

    1993-09-01

    Research into (lucid) dreaming has shown that the images of a dream are supported by the corresponding body actions, utilizing those muscles which remain active during dreaming. We suggest that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or Cot Death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe in the usual sense, the infant may cease to breathe and die. Our hypothesis is consistent with the known facts about SIDS, including social factors such as sleeping position and climatic variation. We suggest that the risk of SIDS can be reduced by making the environment of the infant, as much as possible, unlike that of the womb. PMID:8259083

  4. A possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Christos, G A; Christos, J A

    1993-09-01

    Research into (lucid) dreaming has shown that the images of a dream are supported by the corresponding body actions, utilizing those muscles which remain active during dreaming. We suggest that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or Cot Death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe in the usual sense, the infant may cease to breathe and die. Our hypothesis is consistent with the known facts about SIDS, including social factors such as sleeping position and climatic variation. We suggest that the risk of SIDS can be reduced by making the environment of the infant, as much as possible, unlike that of the womb.

  5. Seasonal relationship of sudden infant death syndrome and environmental pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppenbrouwers, T.; Calub, M.; Arakawa, K.; Hodgman, J.E.

    1981-06-01

    Evidence that chronic hypoxia precedes death from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is mounting. Prolonged exposure to moderate levels of pollutants could be a contributing factor to hypoxia. Levels of carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and hydrocarbons (HC) are highest in the winter when incidence of SIDS is increased. SIDS cases in Los Angeles County were correlated with daily mean levels of these pollutants, temperature, barometric pressure and monthly lead levels with the aid of time series analyses. Peaks in CO, SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, HC and lead preceded the seasonal increase in SIDS by seven weeks. Theoretical considerations, such as the hypoxia-inducing effects of CO, support the hypothesis that this temporal relation has functional significance. The role of pollution levels as a predisposing factor in risk for SIDS cannot be summarily dismissed.

  6. Acute myocardial infarction and sudden death in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Hrabovsky, S L; Welty, T K; Coulehan, J L

    1989-01-01

    While some Indian tribes have low rates of acute myocardial infarction, Northern Plains Indians, including the Sioux, have rates of morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction higher than those reported for the United States population in general. In a review of diagnosed cases of acute myocardial infarction over a 3-year period in 2 hospitals serving predominantly Sioux Indians, 8% of cases were found misclassified, and 22% failed to meet rigorous diagnostic criteria, although the patients did indeed have ischemic heart disease. Patients had high frequencies of complications and risk factors and a fatality rate of 16% within a month of admission. Sudden deaths likely due to ischemic heart disease but in persons not diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction by chart review occurred 3 times more frequently than deaths occurring within a month of clinical diagnosis. PMID:2735047

  7. SUMOylation and Potassium Channels: Links to Epilepsy and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongmei; Chen, Xu; Cheng, Jinke; Qi, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal potassium ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the action potential and excitability of neurons. The dysfunction of ion channel subunits can cause channelopathies, which are associated in some cases with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy SUDEP. The physiological roles of neuronal ion channels have been largely determined, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying neurological channelopathies, especially the determinants of the channels' regulation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) proteins covalently conjugate lysine residues in a large number of target proteins and modify their functions. SUMO modification (SUMOylation) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for protein stability, function, subcellular localization, and protein-protein interactions. Since SUMO was discovered almost 20 years ago, the biological contribution of SUMOylation has not fully understood. It is until recently that the physiological impacts of SUMOylation on the regulation of neuronal potassium ion channels have been investigated. It is well established that SUMOylation controls many aspects of nuclear function, but it is now clear that it is also a key determinant in the function of potassium channels, and SUMOylation has also been implicated in a wide range of channelopathies, including epilepsy and sudden death. PMID:26920693

  8. Does breastfeeding protect against sudden infant death syndrome?

    PubMed

    Bernshaw, N J

    1991-06-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of infant death from one to six months in the developed world, strikes approximately two infants per 1000 live births in the U.S. The characteristics of the infants who die suddenly and unexpectedly are non-specific; none are universal except for the age distribution. Therefore, an infant is recognized to have died from SIDS only after thorough examination fails to demonstrate any other cause for the death. It is the purpose of this paper to review the most populat hypotheses of the causes of SIDS and try to explain through published scientific findings how breastfed infants appear to be protected from this condition. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain SIDS. Some deficiencies/problems are related to the infant, such as a defect in sleep and/or breathing control, severe infant botulism, infections, reactions to immunizations, hypersensitivity to cow's milk, "maternal deprivation syndrome." Other causes are attributed to maternal circumstances, such as lower socioeconomic status, prenatal health, smoking, and the winter season. Additional suggestions of potential causes of SIDS include baby's thiamine deficiency, and hormonal and/or biochemical imbalance. The occurrence of most of these circumstances can be associated with a lack of breastfeeding. Because SIDS occurs much less frequently in breastfed infants, it is speculated that breastfeeding protects infants against SIDS. However, scientific literature lacks uniformity in the definitions of breastfeeding (whether partial and exclusive). This specification is necessary to select control infants to elucidate the well documented substantial lower rate of incidence of SIDS in breastfed babies.

  9. Bed sharing and the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff-Cohen, H.; Edelstein, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether infants who died of the sudden infant death syndrome routinely shared their parents' bed more commonly than control infants. DESIGN--Case-control study. SETTING--Southern California. SUBJECTS--200 white, African-American, Latin American, and Asian infants who died and 200 living controls, matched by birth hospital, date of birth, sex, and race. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Routine bedding (for example, crib, cradle), day and night time sleeping arrangement (for example, alone or sharing a bed); for cases only, sleeping arrangement at death. Differences in bed sharing practices among races. RESULTS--Of the infants who died of the syndrome, 45 (22.4%) were sharing a bed. Daytime bed sharing was more common in African-American (P < 0.001) and Latin American families (P < 0.001) than in white families. The overall adjusted odds ratio for the syndrome and routine bed sharing in the daytime was 1.38 (95% confidence interval 0.59 to 3.22) and for night was 1.21 (0.59 to 2.48). These odds ratios were adjusted for routine sleep position, passive smoking, breast feeding, intercom use, infant birth weight, medical conditions at birth, and maternal age and education. There was no interaction between bed sharing and passive smoking or alcohol use by either parent. CONCLUSIONS--Although there was a significant difference between bed sharing among African-American and Latin American parents compared with white parents, there was no significant relation between routine bed sharing and the sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:7496236

  10. Mechanically induced sudden death in chest wall impact (commotio cordis).

    PubMed

    Link, Mark S

    2003-01-01

    Sudden death due to nonpenetrating chest wall impact in the absence of injury to the ribs, sternum and heart is known as commotio cordis. Although once thought rare, an increasing number of these events have been reported. Indeed, a significant percentage of deaths on the athletic field are due to chest wall impact. Commotio cordis is most frequently observed in young individuals (age 4-18 years), but may also occur in adults. Sudden death is instantaneous or preceded by several seconds of lightheadedness after the chest wall blow. Victims are most often found in ventricular fibrillation, and successful resuscitation is more difficult than expected given the young age, excellent health of the victims, and the absence of structural heart disease. Autopsy examination is notable for the lack of any significant cardiac or thoracic abnormalities. In an experimental model of commotio cordis utilizing anesthetized juvenile swine, ventricular fibrillation can be produced by a 30 mph baseball strike if the strike occurred during the vulnerable period of repolarization, on the upslope of the T-wave. Energy of the impact object was also found to be a critical variable with 40 mph baseballs more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation than velocities less or greater than 40 mph. In addition, more rigid impact objects and blows directly over the center of the chest were more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation. Peak left ventricular pressure generated by the chest wall blow correlated with the risk of ventricular fibrillation. Activation of the K(+)(ATP) channel is a likely cause of the ventricular fibrillation produced by chest wall blows. Successful resuscitation is attainable with early defibrillation.

  11. Overexpression of KCNN3 results in sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Mills, Robert W.; Tucker, Nathan R.; Simonson, Bridget; Macri, Vincenzo; Lemoine, Marc D.; Das, Saumya; Milan, David J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus for atrial fibrillation at the KCNN3 gene. Since the KCNN3 gene encodes for a small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, we hypothesized that overexpression of the SK3 channel increases susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Methods and results We characterized the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of a mouse line with overexpression of the SK3 channel. We generated homozygote (SK3T/T) and heterozygote (SK3+/T) mice with overexpression of the channel and compared them with wild-type (WT) controls. We observed a high incidence of sudden death among SK3T/T mice (7 of 19 SK3T/T mice). Ambulatory monitoring demonstrated that sudden death was due to heart block and bradyarrhythmias. SK3T/T mice displayed normal body weight, temperature, and cardiac function on echocardiography; however, histological analysis demonstrated that these mice have abnormal atrioventricular node morphology. Optical mapping demonstrated that SK3T/T mice have slower ventricular conduction compared with WT controls (SK3T/T vs. WT; 0.45 ± 0.04 vs. 0.60 ± 0.09 mm/ms, P = 0.001). Programmed stimulation in 1-month-old SK3T/T mice demonstrated inducible atrial arrhythmias (50% of SK3T/T vs. 0% of WT mice) and also a shorter atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 43 ± 6 vs. 52 ± 9 ms, P = 0.02). Three-month-old SK3T/T mice on the other hand displayed a trend towards a more prolonged atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 61 ± 1 vs. 52 ± 6 ms, P = 0.06). Conclusion Overexpression of the SK3 channel causes an increased risk of sudden death associated with bradyarrhythmias and heart block, possibly due to atrioventricular nodal dysfunction. PMID:24296650

  12. Sudden infant death syndrome and abnormal metabolism of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Derrick

    2015-12-01

    Although it has been generally accepted that moving the infant from the prone to the supine position has solved the problem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), it has been hypothesized that this is an insufficient explanation and that a mixture of genetic risk, some form of stressful incident and marginal brain metabolism is proportionately required. It is suggested that each of these three variables, with dominance in one or more of them, act together in the common etiology. Much has been written about the association of thiamin and magnesium but the finding of extremely high concentrations of serum thiamin in SIDs victims has largely caused rejection of thiamin as being involved in the etiology. The publication of abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials strongly suggests that there are electrochemical changes in the brainstem affecting the mechanisms of automatic breathing and the control of cardiac rhythm. The brainstem, cerebellum and limbic system of the brain are known to be highly sensitive to thiamin deficiency (pseudo-hypoxia) and the pathophysiology is similar to a mild continued deprivation of oxygen. Little attention has been paid to the complex metabolism of thiamin. Dietary thiamin requires the cooperation of the SLC19 family of thiamin transporters for its absorption into cells and recent information has shown that transporter SNPs may be relatively common and can be expected to increase genetic risk. Thiamin must be phosphorylated to synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), well established in its vital action in glucose metabolism. TPP is also a cofactor for the enzyme 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) in the peroxisome, emphasizing its importance in alpha oxidation and plasmalogen synthesis in cell membrane physiology. The importance of thiamine triphosphate (TTP) in energy metabolism is still largely unknown. Thiamin metabolism has been implicated in hyperemesis gravidarum and iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy has been reported when the

  13. Sudden infant death syndrome: a possible primary cause.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that poisoning by phosphines, arsines and stibines might be the primary cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was investigated. Most mattress materials contain phosphorus or antimony compounds as fire retardant additives. Mattress materials in areas affected by the warmth and perspiration of the sleeping infant were found to be naturally infected by the fungus Scopulariopsis brevicaulis which is thought to be capable of generating phosphines, arsines and stibines from materials containing phosphorus, arsenic or antimony compounds. These gases may cause anticholinesterase poisoning and cardiac failure in infants, but contributory factors include the prone sleeping position and overwrapping. In England and Wales, the progressive increase in SIDS between 1951 and 1988 seems to be related to increasing use of phosphorus and antimony compounds as fire retardents in cot mattresses.

  14. [Morphological prerequisites of heart ventricles fibrillation in sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Reznik, A G

    2009-01-01

    We studied morphological changes in the myocardium and content of glucose, magnesium, calcium, sodium in pericardial fluid of victims of out of hospital sudden death due to acute coronary insufficiency and prenecrotic stage of myocardial infarction. We established that both in regions of ischemic injury appearing as III degree contracture lesions of cardiomyocytes, zones of intracellular myocytolysis and primary breakdown of myofibrils, as will as in zones of relaxation myocardium loses its contractile properties. This in turn leads to asynchronous contraction of left and right ventricles. As fibrillation develops in both ventricles simultaneously there are all grounds to believe that morphological prerequisite (source of origin) of fibrillation is the presence of areas of ischemic injury and relaxation in the myocardium.

  15. Cardiac and other abnormalities in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Naeye, R. L.; Whalen, P.; Ryser, M.; Fisher, R.

    1976-01-01

    Many victims of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have abnormally heavy cardiac right ventricles. The degree of this abnormality is directly proportional to: a) the mass of muscle about small pulmonary arteries, b) the amount of brown fat retention about adrenal glands, and c) the presence of hepatic erythropoiesis. The pulmonary arterial abnormality is probably the result of chronic alveolar hypoventilation, while brown fat retention and hepatic erythropoiesis are likely consequences of chronic hypoxemia. These abnormalities are found in both SIDS victims who die with and those who die without mild respiratory tract infections. However, there are some differences between the two SIDS groups. Infected victims die at an older age and have smaller thymus glands and larger spleens; there is a greater proportion of males in the infected victims than in the noninfected victims. PMID:1247080

  16. Endogenous alcohol production by intestinal fermentation in sudden infant death.

    PubMed

    Geertinger, P; Bodenhoff, J; Helweg-Larsen, K; Lund, A

    1982-01-01

    In some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) the intestinal flora was found to be dominated by Candida albicans. Microbiologic investigations of the various organs showed the occasional presence of different Candida species, but not in the form of massive growth as in sepsis. There is no basis to assume that the activity of yeasts, first of all of Candida albicans, is a contributory factor in the occurrence of SIDS. Candida albicans was shown to produce alcohol from glucose at a rate of maximally 1 mg of alcohol per gram of intestinal content per hour. It is concluded that the intestinal production of alcohol in vivo from cases showing a Candida albicans dominated intestinal flora will not be able to surpass the normal alcohol metabolizing capacity of the liver. Thus, measurable concentrations of alcohol in the blood from such cases cannot be expected.

  17. Pathogenesis of sudden death following water immersion (immersion syndrome)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhring, M.; Spies, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    Sympathetic activity under cold stress is investigated. Predominantly vagal cardio-depressive reflexes are discussed besides currently known mechanisms of sudden death after water immersion. Pronounced circulatory centralization in diving animals as well as following exposure in cold water indicates additional sympathetic activity. In cold water baths of 15 C, measurements indicate an increase in plasma catecholamine levels by more than 300 percent. This may lead to cardiac arrhythmias by the following mechanisms: cold water essentially induces sinus bradycardia; brady-and tachycardiarrhythmias may supervene as secondary complications; sinusbradycardia may be enhanced by sympathetic hypertonus. Furthermore, ectopic dysrhythmias are liable to be induced by the strictly sympathetic innervation of the ventricle. Myocardial ischemia following a rise in peripheral blood pressure constitutes another arrhythmogenic factor. Some of these reactions are enhanced by alcohol intoxication.

  18. Genetic etiology and evaluation of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena; Mahida, Saagar; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A

    2013-08-01

    A wide range of inherited syndromes can result in ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). The natural histories of inherited arrhythmia syndromes are highly variable and current risk stratification techniques are limited. Thus, the management of these conditions can be difficult and often involves a combination of risk assessment, lifestyle modification, cardiac interventions, counselling, and family screening. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing have enabled routine testing in patients with a high clinical index of suspicion for an inherited arrhythmia condition, and cascade screening in relatives of mutation carriers. Given the complexity in screening and data interpretation that has been introduced by recent genomic advances, individuals with inherited arrhythmia syndromes are encouraged to seek care at specialized centers with cardiovascular genetics expertise. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of SCD syndromes and discuss strategies for the evaluation of patients at risk for SCD with a focus on the role of genetic testing and family screening. PMID:23812838

  19. Melatonin concentrations in the sudden infant death syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, W. Q.; Lynch, H. J.; Deng, M. H.; Gleason, R. E.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    To examine a possible relationship between pineal function and the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), samples of whole blood, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or vitreous humor (VH) were obtained at autopsy from 68 infants (45 male, 23 female) whose deaths were attributed to either SIDS (n = 32, 0.5-5.0 months of age; mean plus or minus S.E.M., 2.6 plus or minus 0.2 months) or other causes (non-SIDS, n = 36, 0.3-8.0 months of age 4.3 plus or minus 0.3 months). The melatonin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. A significant correlation was observed for melatonin levels in different body fluids from the same individual. After adjusting for age differences, CSF melatonin levels were significantly lower among the SIDS infants (91 plus or minus 29 pmol/l; n = 32) than among those dying from other causes (180 plus or minus 27; n = 35, P less than 0.05). A similar, but non-significant trend was also noted in blood (97 plus or minus 23, n = 30 vs. 144 plus or minus 22 pmol/l, n = 33) and vitreous humor (68 plus or minus 21, n = 10 vs. 81 plus or minus 17 pmol/l, n = 15). These differences do not appear to be explainable in terms of the interval between death and autopsy, gender, premortem infection, or therapeutic measures instituted prior to death. Diminished melatonin production may be characteristic of SIDS and could represent an impairment in the maturation of physiologic circadian organization.

  20. Sudden unexplained death syndrome--a new manifestation in melioidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, E. H.; Chan, Y. C.; Goh, K. T.; Chao, T. C.; Heng, B. H.; Thong, T. W.; Tan, H. C.; Thong, K. T.; Jacob, E.; Singh, M.

    1991-01-01

    The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test using sensitized turkey erythrocytes and the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IgM-IFA) was confirmed to be sensitive in the detection of a recent or current Pseudomonas pseudomallei infection in 19 culture-confirmed Singapore melioidosis patients. All were found to have antibody titres from 4 to 32768 in the IHA test and 10 to 320 in the IgM-IFA test. When these tests were employed on sera from 16 immigrant Thai construction workers who died of sudden unexplained death syndrome (SUDS) and 73 healthy Thai fellow workers, 93.8% and 68.8% of SUDS cases had IHA titre of greater than or equal to 4 and IgM-IFA titre of greater than or equal to 10 respectively, in contrast to 39.7% and 12.3% found among healthy Thai workers. These data indicate that at the time of death, most of the SUDS patients had an active infection with P. pseudomallei, possibly resulting from reactivation of a latent infection. The aetiological role of P. pseudomallei as the major cause of SUDS is discussed. PMID:1721589

  1. Molecular autopsy of sudden unexplained death in the young.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J; Tester, D J; Driscoll, D J

    2001-06-01

    Sudden unexplained death (SUD) claims over 4,000 persons between the age of 1 and 22 each year in the United States. Nearly half of all pediatric SUD cases have a normal structural autopsy evaluation and are dismissed without a diagnosis. With the discovery of the genetic basis for potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS), postmortem molecular diagnosis of this disorder is possible. The authors describe the results of a molecular autopsy performed on a 17-year-old boy found dead in bed. A novel clinical test involving an epinephrine challenge in the decedent's mother implicated a potential defect in the phase 3 potassium current encoded by the gene KVLQT1. Exon-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing of KVLQT1 revealed a 5-base pair deletion in the genetic material recovered from the decedent's paraffin-embedded heart tissue. The ability to perform molecular autopsies on archived necropsy material undoubtedly will transform the forensic evaluation of SUD. The combination of catecholamine provocation testing in survivors and a postmortem LQTS gene analysis may unmask families with "concealed" LQTS and establish the cause and manner of death in SUDS.

  2. Sudden cardiac death in haemodialysis patients: preventative options.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Diana Yuan Yng; Sinha, Smeeta; Kalra, Philip A; Green, Darren

    2014-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the most common cause of death in haemodialysis patients, accounting for 25% of all-cause mortality. There are many potential pathological precipitants as most patients with end-stage renal disease have structurally or functionally abnormal hearts. For example, at initiation of dialysis, 74% of patients have left ventricular hypertrophy. The pathophysiological and metabolic milieu of patients with end-stage renal disease, allied to the regular stresses of dialysis, may provide the trigger to a fatal cardiac event. Prevention of SCD can be seen as a legitimate target to improve survival in this patient group. In the general population, this is most effective by reducing the burden of ischaemic heart disease. However, the aetiology of SCD in haemodialysis patients appears to be different, with myocardial fibrosis, vascular calcification and autonomic dysfunction implicated as possible causes. Thus, the range of therapies is different to the general population. There are potential preventative measures emerging as our understanding of the underlying mechanisms progresses. This article aims to review the evidence for therapies to prevent SCD effective in the general population when applied to dialysis patients, as well as promising new treatments specific to this population group.

  3. Tissue and Animal Models of Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Karim; Li, Yingxin; Sager, Philip T.; Houser, Steven R.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is a common cause of death in patients with structural heart disease, genetic mutations or acquired disorders affecting cardiac ion channels. A wide range of platforms exist to model and study disorders associated with SCD. Human clinical studies are cumbersome and are thwarted by the extent of investigation that can be performed on human subjects. Animal models are limited by their degree of homology to human cardiac electrophysiology including ion channel expression. Most commonly used cellular models are cellular transfection models, which are able to mimic the expression of a single ion channel offering incomplete insight into changes of the action potential profile. Induced pluripotent stem cell derived Cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) resemble, but are not identical, to adult human cardiomyocytes, and provide a new platform for studying arrhythmic disorders leading to SCD. A variety of platforms exist to phenotype cellular models including conventional and automated patch clamp, multi-electrode array, and computational modeling. iPSC-CMs have been used to study Long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and other hereditary cardiac disorders. Although iPSC-CMs are distinct from adult cardiomyocytes, they provide a robust platform to advance the science and clinical care of SCD. PMID:26044252

  4. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Michelle M; O'Regan, John A; Lavin, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    One quarter of all hemodialysis patients will succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD), a rate far exceeding that observed in the general population. A high prevalence of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease amongst patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) partly explains this exaggerated risk. However, uremia and dialysis related factors are also of critical importance. Interventions aimed at preventing SCD have been inadequately studied in patients with ESKD. Data extrapolated from non-renal populations cannot necessarily be applied to hemodialysis patients, who possess relatively unique risk factors for SCD including "uremic cardiomyopathy", electrolyte shifts, fluctuations in intravascular volume and derangements of mineral and bone metabolism. Pending data derived from proposed randomized controlled clinical trials, critical appraisal of existing evidence and the selective application of guidelines developed for the general population to dialysis patients are required if therapeutic nihilism, or excessive intervention, are to be avoided. We discuss the evidence supporting a role for medical therapies, dialysis prescription refinements, revascularization procedures and electrical therapies as potential interventions to prevent SCD amongst hemodialysis patients. Based on current best available evidence, we present suggested strategies for the prevention of arrhythmia-mediated death in this highly vulnerable patient population. PMID:24720456

  5. Sudden infant deaths: arousal as a survival mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Andre; Groswasser, Jose; Franco, Patricia; Scaillet, Sonia; Sawaguchi, Toshiko; Kelmanson, Igor; Bernanrd, Dan

    2002-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) are still largely unknown. To explain what factors contribute to the deaths, we suggest a model: the '3 S model for SIDS' that includes 'sicknesses', 'stages of development' and 'surroundings': (1) 'sicknesses' refers to infectious diseases or other medical condition. (2) 'Stages of development' relates to the maturation of vital systems including respiratory, neurovegetative or sleep-wake behavioral controls. (3) 'Surroundings' refers to environmental conditions that enhance the deficiency of cardiorespiratory, vegetative and/or arousal controls. Such conditions were identified by epidemiological studies and include the following main risk factors: the prone body position during sleep, high environmental temperature, maternal smoking or sleep deprivation. An infant could be at higher risk for SIDS because of a deficiency in breathing and cardiac autonomic controls during sleep, inducing repeated episodes of hypoxia and hypoxemia. The risk is increased when the infant has a lower propensity to arouse from sleep and so, to autoresuscitate. The accident has a greater probability to occur when an infection, or an unfavorable environmental factor aggravates the immature cardiorespiratory and sleep/wake behaviors of the infant. The clinical findings could be related to the changes reported in the brainstems of SIDS victims. PMID:14592372

  6. [Sudden death during performance of sport: forensic medicine elucidation].

    PubMed

    La Harpe, R; Rostan, A; Fryc, O

    1992-06-01

    Our study deals with cases of sudden death (non-traumatic death) while playing sport which were examined at the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Geneva, and covers the last ten years: 1980-1989. We discovered 19 cases, all men between the ages of 17 to 67. In the case of the younger sportsmen (under the age of 45-50) or when the causes of mortality were unclear, the police requested an autopsy, which totalled 8 cases. In the other 11 cases, we were asked to make an external examination of the bodies, in order to exclude any signs of violence. Seven sportsmen, aged 36-49, who used to play high-risk sports such as football, tennis, basketball and running were autopsied and presented a myocardial infarct. Its interesting that 2 of these cases had also an old scar of a myocardial infarct. The eighth case was a 17 year old boy who had an already known obstructive cardiomyopathy.

  7. [The clinical condition and treatment of diseases associated with sudden death].

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Atsushi; Katabami, Ken-ichi; Ishimori, Naoki; Singu, Yasuei; Nakayama, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    The Hokkaido Medical Society is a group of doctors and medical researchers in Hokkaido. Its purpose is to contribute to medicine and to the improvement of medical treatment. This symposium was carried out in order to inform citizens about the condition known as sudden death. We hypothesize that the incidence of sudden death tends to increase in line with the incidence of metabolic syndrome. Approximately four hundred patients were transported to our hospital by ambulance in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) last year. The number of CPA patients who are treated in our hospital has increased in comparison to the previous decade. The theme of this year is "The clinical condition and treatment of diseases associated with sudden death" in view of the above mentioned situation. In 2015, it was reported that sudden death occurred in an American pilot and that the co-pilot was forced to make an emergency landing. Interestingly, sudden death can ever sometimes occur in pilots who undergo regular physical examinations. Numerous diseases and conditions are associated with sudden death, including: acute myocardial infarction, irregular pulse, cardiac insufficiency, cerebrovascular disease, aortic dissection and choking. We are of the opinion that the frequency of sudden death is very high in the fields of emergency medicine, cardiovascular medicine, cardiovascular surgery and neurosurgery. In this symposium, we presented and explained the condition that is known as sudden death and the current state of treatment of sudden death in emergency medicine, cardiovascular medicine, cardiovascular surgery and neurosurgery departments of the Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine in October, 2015. We hope that the symposium will help the citizen audience to understand the condition and treatment of sudden death, and also to help prevent sudden death.

  8. Ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death during myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this PhD thesis, we report that VF is still a common complication of STEMI, with an incidence of 11.6% in the population of Danish STEMI patients who survive to reach the hospital. In this STEMI population, we identified several risk factors associated with VF independent of MI. We identified and confirmed findings from several previous studies and found several risk factors, such as younger age, a family history of sudden death, a TIMI flow grade of 0, the absence of angina, anterior infarction (i.e., VF before PPCI), and inferior infarction (i.e., VF during PPCI) that were associated with VF in a Danish cohort. Furthermore, a history of atrial fibrillation and alcohol intake were identified as novel risk factors for VF. To the best of our knowledge, this study contains data on the largest VF cohort with the longest reported follow-up published; we found that VF mortality is significantly higher within the first 30 days for patients who experience VF before and during PPCI compared with STEMI patients without VF. However, the long-term mortality rates of the three groups are the same. Importantly, our results contradict the previous understanding that VF during PPCI is "benign"; the mortality rate within the first 30 days was as high for patients with VF during PPCI as the mortality rate of patients with VF before PPCI. Finally, although it is difficult to draw clinical implications from a descriptive study, due to the comprehensiveness of Danish death certificates, we reported a high incidence of cardiac symptoms and contact with healthcare professionals based on cardiac symptoms in young SCD patients who died due to CAD, although death was not avoided. PMID:27127021

  9. Abortion.

    PubMed

    Hume, K

    1979-04-21

    The review by Aileen F. Connon of Abortion by Potts, Diggory and Peel (Journal, February 10) made interesting reading, especially her quotation of the "facinating statistical information" that Australia has 11.5 million people and 45,000 to 90,000 criminal abortions a year. These are rather wide upper and lower confidence limits. One wonders what other information the authors have included that is of the same standard of accuracy. On the other hand, Malcolm Potts told me some years ago that the experience of his parent organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, with the IUD in India was a disaster. That I could well believe. Seeing some of the victims, the sight would indeed be enough to stir the stony heart of the most inhuman consultant gynaecologist. There is in Australia, and indeed in the world, an increasing number of doctors who are revolted by the activities of the International Planned Parenthood Federation and its affiliates which aggressively promote abortion as "an acceptable method of fertility control," and even as the primary method. These are a cross-section of the profession and include some of its most distinguished and erudite members who would be both competent and happy to review a book such as Abortion by Potts et alii from a pro-life point of view. Could I suggest that in future your book reviews and editorials include some well informed commentaries from doctors representing that heretofore silent group? I am holding a long and growing list of Australian doctors who have signed the "Declaration of Doctors," thus explicitly spelling out their respect for human life from the first moment of biological existence to that of natural death. Their services are available on request.

  10. The triple risk hypotheses in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guntheroth, Warren G; Spiers, Philip S

    2002-11-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) victims were regarded as normal as a matter of definition (Beckwith 1970) until 1952 when Kinney and colleagues argued for elimination of the clause, "unexpected by history." They argued that "not all SIDS victims were normal," and referred to their hypothesis that SIDS results from brain abnormalities, which they postulated "to originate in utero and lead to sudden death during a vulnerable postnatal period." Bergman (1970) argued that SIDS did not depend on any "single characteristic that ordains a infant for death," but on an interaction of risk factors with variable probabilities. Wedgwood (1972) agreed and grouped risk factors into the first "triple risk hypothesis" consisting of general vulnerability, age-specific risks, and precipitating factors. Raring (1975), based on a bell-shaped curve of age of death (log-transformed), concluded that SIDS was a random process with multifactorial causation. Rognum and Saugstad (1993) developed a "fatal triangle" in 1993, with groupings similar to those of Wedgwood, but included mucosal immunity under a vulnerable developmental stage of the infant. Filiano and Kinney (1994) presented the best known triple risk hypothesis and emphasized prenatal injury of the brainstem. They added a qualifier, "in at least a subset of SIDS," but, the National Institute of Child Health and Development SIDS Strategic Plan 2000, quoting Kinney's work, states unequivocally that "SIDS is a developmental disorder. Its origins are during fetal development." Except for the emphasis on prenatal origin, all 3 triple risk hypotheses are similar. Interest in the brainstem of SIDS victims began with Naeye's 1976 report of astrogliosis in 50% of all victims. He concluded that these changes were caused by hypoxia and were not the cause of SIDS. He noted an absence of astrogliosis in some older SIDS victims, compatible with a single, terminal episode of hypoxia without previous hypoxic episodes, prenatal or postnatal

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome: neonatal hypodynamia (reduced exercise level).

    PubMed

    Reid, G M

    2001-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been described as a silent unexpected death during sleep. Infants with near-miss SIDS have shown a higher heart rate and diminished heart rate variability during sleep. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep rate variability was related to respiration. A decreased heart rate variability was also observed in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or prenatal hypoxia. It was hypothesized that decreased heart rate variability and decreased body measurement during sleep were related to a decreased arousal response. Cardiac output is greater in the supine position. Acetylcholine slows the heart beat. Postural changes modify the acute baroreflex control of the heart rate. The cerebellum also contributes to the reflex anti-orthostatic (supine) cardiovascular response to postural change. Delayed myelination of various areas of the brain occurred in SIDS victims and it was suggested that the defect in central respiratory control could be a motor rather than a sensory problem, and that the search for abnormalities should be extended to regions in the cerebellum and pre-frontal-temporal-limbic systems. The cerebellum exercises control over motor neuron impulses from the cerebral cortex to lower structures. An extended period of neonatal decreased body movement has its counterpart in the astronaut exposed to the deconditioning effect of zero gravity. Hypodynamia induces hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, renal inositoluria and impaired nerve conduction. Myoinositol is 20 times higher in fetal-like tissue than in adults. The insecticide lindane (gammexane) is an inositol antagonist. Lindane administration to neonatal rats induced low levels of specific components of myelin proteins in oligodendrocytes in the brain. The activity of these specific enzymes was reduced in oligodendrocytes in the brain of SIDS victims. It is hypothesized that lindane administration to laboratory neonatal animals is a laboratory model for studying

  12. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and the Genetics of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Linda; Opdal, Siri Hauge

    2015-01-01

    Several studies report signs of slight infection prior to death in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Based on this, a hypothesis of an altered immunological homeostasis has been postulated. The cytokines are important cellular mediators that are crucial for infant health by regulating cell activity during the inflammatory process. The pro-inflammatory cytokines favor inflammation; the most important of these are IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. These cytokines are controlled by the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This is accomplished by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and thus counteracts their biological effect. The major anti-inflammatory cytokines are interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, and IL-13. The last decade there has been focused on genetic studies within genes that are important for the immune system, for SIDS with a special interest of the genes encoding the cytokines. This is because the cytokine genes are considered to be the genes most likely to explain the vulnerability to infection, and several studies have investigated these genes in an attempt to uncover associations between SIDS and different genetic variants. So far, the genes encoding IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α are the most investigated within SIDS research, and several studies indicate associations between specific variants of these genes and SIDS. Taken together, this may indicate that in at least a subset of SIDS predisposing genetic variants of the immune genes are involved. However, the immune system and the cytokine network are complex, and more studies are needed in order to better understand the interplay between different genetic variations and how this may contribute to an unfavorable immunological response. PMID:25750641

  13. Sudden cardiac death in China: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Similar to the number of SCDs in western countries including the USA, the number of SCDs in China is ∼544,000 annually. However, there are significant differences in patient characteristics between Chinese primary prevention population and U.S. primary prevention population. In contrast to western countries where implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) devices have been well adopted as a major effective method for both primary and secondary prevention of SCD, China has a low prevalence of ICD utilization (∼1.5 device per 1 million people). Socioeconomic and political factors, awareness and knowledge of SCD, and the difference in disease patterns have led to the underutilization of ICD in China. China, as the most populated and the second largest economic country in the world, has now taken variable approaches to address this pressing health problem and enhances the delivery of lifesaving therapies, including arrhythmia ablation and medical treatment besides ICD, to patients who are at risk of SCD.

  14. Risk of sudden cardiac death in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Banerjee, Debasish; Malik, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The review discusses the epidemiology and the possible underlying mechanisms of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and highlights the unmet clinical need for noninvasive risk stratification strategies in these patients. Although renal dysfunction shares common risk factors and often coexists with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, the presence of renal impairment increases the risk of arrhythmic complications to an extent that cannot be explained by the severity of the atherosclerotic process. Renal impairment is an independent risk factor for SCD from the early stages of CKD; the risk increases as renal function declines and reaches very high levels in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. Autonomic imbalance, uremic cardiomyopathy, and electrolyte disturbances likely play a role in increasing the arrhythmic risk and can be potential targets for treatment. Cardioverter defibrillator treatment could be offered as lifesaving treatment in selected patients, although selection strategies for this treatment mode are presently problematic in dialyzed patients. The review also examines the current experience with risk stratification tools in renal patients and suggests that noninvasive electrophysiological testing during dialysis may be of clinical value as it provides the necessary standardized environment for reproducible measurements for risk stratification purposes. PMID:24256575

  15. Cardiac imaging in evaluating patients prone to sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Tamene, Ashenafi; Tholakanahalli, Venkatakrishna N.; Chandrashekhar, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying subjects who are at risk for SCD and stratifying them correctly into low or high-risk groups is the holy grail of Cardiology. While imaging shows a lot of promise, it is plagued by the fact that most SCD occurs in relatively healthy subjects, a massive group who would not ordinarily be subjected to imaging. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) currently is our primary parameter for risk stratification for sudden cardiac death but is a poor marker with low sensitivity and specificity. Current data shows that sophisticated imaging with techniques, mainly Cardiac magnetic resonance Imaging (CMR), have the potential to identify novel high-risk markers underlying SCD, beyond ejection fraction. Imaging seems to further refine risk in patients with low LVEF as well as in those with normal EF; this is a major strength of advanced imaging. Clinical application has been slow and not fully prime time. It is important to remember that while promising, imaging techniques including CMR, have not been tested in rigorous prospective studies and thus have not as yet replaced EF as the gatekeeper to ICD implantation. PMID:24568832

  16. Adaptive management of Sudden Oak Death in California woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbelotto, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sudden Oak Death is an emergent disease caused by the exotic pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. This newly described Phytophthora is also responsible for a disease of ornamental plants, and multiple lines of evidence indicate its introduction in North America is linked to the trade of infected ornamental plants. P. ramorum is predominantly aerially transmitted, but a soil and water phases, not unlike other forest Phytophthoras are also present. One striking feature of the epidemiology of the disease is that the largest amounts of infectious aerial sporangia are produced on bay laurel leaves, while oaks appear to be non-infectious. Our strategy to deal with the disease has been multiple and involves the following aspects: 1)- Understand the mode of introduction of the pathogen, and monitor potential new escapes in the wild; 2)- Understand factors linked to the reproductive and spread potential, e.g. seasonalpatterns in the life cycle of the pathogen and distance of spread; 3)- Define the relationship between ecological stand characteristics and severity of the disease, inclusive of predictive modeling; 4)- Qualify precise pathways for infection; 5)- Reduce infection rates by modifying known infection pathways; 6)- Change stands characteristics to make them less favorable to the spread of the disease, e.g. by selective thinnings; 7)- Protect individual trees and some populations of the highly susceptible tanoak using phosphonate chemical treatments. Because our knowledge of the epidemiology and biology of the disease is still rather limited, recommendations are expected to change in time, as our understanding of the disease improves.

  17. Early repolarization syndrome: A cause of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdi; Butt, Nida; Sheikh, Azeem S

    2015-01-01

    Early repolarization syndrome (ERS), demonstrated as J-point elevation on an electrocardiograph, was formerly thought to be a benign entity, but the recent studies have demonstrated that it can be linked to a considerable risk of life - threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Early repolarization characteristics associated with SCD include high - amplitude J-point elevation, horizontal and/or downslopping ST segments, and inferior and/or lateral leads location. The prevalence of ERS varies between 3% and 24%, depending on age, sex and J-point elevation (0.05 mV vs 0.1 mV) being the main determinants. ERS patients are sporadic and they are at a higher risk of having recurrent cardiac events. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and isoproterenol are the suggested therapies in this set of patients. On the other hand, asymptomatic patients with ERS are common and have a better prognosis. The risk stratification in asymptomatic patients with ERS still remains a grey area. This review provides an outline of the up-to-date evidence associated with ERS and the risk of life - threatening arrhythmias. Further prospective studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmogenesis in patients with ERS. PMID:26322186

  18. Systems-level perspective of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salomonis, Nathan

    2014-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains one of the primary causes of infant mortality in developed countries. Although the causes of SIDS remain largely inconclusive, some of the most informative associations implicate molecular, genetic, anatomical, physiological, and environmental (i.e., infant sleep) factors. Thus, a comprehensive and evolving systems-level model is required to understand SIDS susceptibility. Such models, by being powerful enough to uncover indirect associations, could be used to expand our list of candidate targets for in-depth analysis. We present an integrated WikiPathways model for SIDS susceptibility that includes associated cell systems, signaling pathways, genetics, and animal phenotypes. Experimental and literature-based gene-regulatory data have been integrated into this model to identify intersecting upstream control elements and associated interactions. To expand this pathway model, we performed a comprehensive analysis of existing proteomics data from brainstem samples of infants with SIDS. From this analysis, we discovered changes in the expression of several proteins linked to known SIDS pathologies, including factors involved in glial cell production, hypoxia regulation, and synaptic vesicle release, in addition to interactions with annotated SIDS markers. Our results highlight new targets for further consideration that further enrich this pathway model, which, over time, can improve as a wiki-based, community curation project. PMID:24964230

  19. A Systems-Level Perspective of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salomonis, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) remains one of the primary causes of infant mortality in developed countries. While the causes of SIDS remain largely inconclusive, some of the most informative associations implicate molecular, genetic, anatomical, physiological and environmental (i.e., infant sleep) factors. Thus, a comprehensive and evolving systems-level model is required to understand SIDS susceptibility. Such models, by being powerful enough to uncover indirect associations, could be used to expand our list of candidate targets for in-depth analysis. We present an integrated WikiPathways model for SIDS susceptibility that includes associated cell systems, signaling pathways, genetics and animal phenotypes. Experimental and literature-based gene-regulatory data has been integrated into this model, to identify intersecting upstream control elements and associated interactions. To expand this pathway model, we performed a comprehensive analysis of existing proteomics data from brainstem samples of SIDS infants. From this analysis, we discovered changes in the expression of several proteins linked to known SIDS pathologies, including factors involved in glial cell production, hypoxia regulation, and synaptic vesicle release, in addition to interactions with annotated SIDS markers. Our results highlight new targets for further consideration that further enrich this pathway model, which, over time, can improve as a wiki-based, community curation project. PMID:24964230

  20. Prevention of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: a realistic goal?

    PubMed

    Ryvlin, Philippe; Nashef, Lina; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2013-05-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) represents one of the most severe consequences of drug-resistant epilepsy, for which no evidence-based prevention is available. Development of effective prevention will depend on the following: (1) better understanding of the pathophysiology of SUDEP to define the most appropriate targets of intervention, and (2) identification of risk factors for SUDEP that would allow for the design of feasible clinical trials to test targeted interventions in high-risk populations. The most important known risk factor is the occurrence and frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS), a seizure type that triggers the majority of witnessed SUDEP. Therefore, one likely way to prevent SUDEP is to minimize the risk of GTCS with optimal medical management and patient education. However, whether one might prevent SUDEP in patients with refractory epilepsy by using more frequent review of antiepileptic treatment and earlier referral for presurgical evaluation, remains to be seen. Another hypothetical strategy to prevent SUDEP is to reduce the risk of GTCS-induced postictal respiratory distress. This might be achieved by using lattice pillow, providing nocturnal supervision, reinforcing interictal serotoninergic tone, and lowering opiate- or adenosine-induced postictal brainstem depression. Promising interventions can be tested first on surrogate markers, such as postictal hypoxia in epilepsy monitoring units (EMUs), before SUDEP trials can be implemented. EMU safety should also be improved to avoid SUDEP occurrence in that setting. Finally, the development of ambulatory SUDEP prevention devices should be encouraged but raises a number of unsolved issues.

  1. Temporal Epidemiology of Sudden Oak Death in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ebba K; Hansen, Everett M; Kanaskie, Alan

    2015-07-01

    An effort to eradicate Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death, has been underway since its discovery in Oregon forests. Using an information-theoretical approach, we sought to model yearly variation in the size of newly infested areas and dispersal distance. Maximum dispersal distances were best modeled by spring and winter precipitation 2 years before detection, and infestation size the year prior. Infestation size was best modeled by infestation size and spring precipitation the year prior. In our interpretation, there is a 2-year delay between the introduction of inoculum and onset of mortality for a majority of sites. The year-long gap in between allows ample time for the production of inoculum contributing to the spread of P. ramorum. This is supported by epidemic development following changes in eradication protocols precipitated by an outbreak in 2011, attributable to a 2009 treatment delay and an uncharacteristically wet spring in 2010. Posteradication, we have observed an increase in the total area of new outbreaks and increased frequency in dispersal distances greater than 4 km. Although the eradication program has not eliminated P. ramorum from Oregon forests, it has likely moderated this epidemic, emphasizing the need for prompt treatment of future invasive forest pathogens.

  2. Sudden cardiac death: ethical considerations in the return to play.

    PubMed

    Piantanida, Nicholas A; Oriscello, Ralph G; Pettrone, Frank A; O'Connor, Francis G

    2004-04-01

    The team physician-athlete relationship prompts many basic questions in medical ethics. Return-to-play decisions form many of the core responsibilities facing team physicians, and occasionally these decisions can have overriding ethical dilemmas. Therefore, a structured ethical decision-making process is a valuable skill for every successful sports medicine physician. An ethical question is confronted here in a case presentation that weighs the risk of repeat sudden cardiac death and the potential for failed cardiac resuscitation against the athlete's interest to play competitive basketball. The article applies a four-step framework for ethical decision making in sports medicine. The important first step includes gathering medical information and understanding the preferences of the athlete. Step 2 brings together the decision-making stakeholders, the team physician as a member, to define ethical issues and apply ethical principles: beneficence, non-maleficence, and patient autonomy. Step 3 selects a course of action with unbiased analysis and arrives at a good choice that merits an action plan in step 4. This decision need not be perfect, but should reinforce the team physician's responsibilities to the athlete and center on the athlete's welfare.

  3. A survey of the causes of sudden death in sport in the Republic of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, F.

    2000-01-01

    Background—Sudden death in sport is rare, but when it occurs the effects are devastating. There have not been any reports to date describing the frequency and causes of sudden death in sport in the Republic of Ireland. Aim—To describe the incidence, possible causes, associated factors, and pathological findings in people who died while exercising in the Republic of Ireland in the 10 year period from January 1987 to December 1996. Methods—All 49 regional coroners in the Republic of Ireland were approached and details on all cases of sudden death in sport from 1 January 1987 to 31 December 1996 were requested. A questionnaire was used to document age, sex, participating sport, previous symptoms, previous medical investigations, circumstances of death, and main pathological finding in all reported cases. Results—Of the 49 coroners surveyed, 45 replied. A total of 51 cases of sudden death in sport were identified. The median age was 48 (range 15–78). Fifty of the deaths were of men. Golf was the most popular participating sport. In 42 cases, the pathological cause of death was atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Conclusions—This is the first time the incidence of sudden death in sport in the Republic of Ireland has been described. The main cause of death in all age groups was atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Key Words: sudden death; heart; atherosclerotic artery disease PMID:10953896

  4. Sudden cardiac death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew Mn; Cubbon, Richard M

    2015-07-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, around 50% of deaths due to cardiovascular causes are sudden cardiac deaths. The prevalence of diabetes in cohorts with chronic heart failure is increasing, and while sudden cardiac death is an increasingly rare mode of death in chronic heart failure patients as a whole, the risk of this outcome remains high in those with diabetes. This review summarises the current knowledge on the incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with diabetes and chronic heart failure, before discussing the causes of the excess risk seen in those with these coexistent conditions. We then describe current strategies for risk stratification and prevention of sudden cardiac death in these patients before discussing the priorities for further study in this area.

  5. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): microgravity and inadequate sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M

    2006-01-01

    In early gestation, the human foetus develops in a buoyant environment, which is similar to the near-weightlessness of space flight. After the 26th week of gestation, the foetus gradually becomes exposed to gravitational forces. The influence of fluid immersion declines as the weight of the foetus increases. In this way, the foetus adapts and trains for the gravity environment after birth. Failure of gravitational loading in the last trimester of pregnancy delays development and maintains the pathophysiological environment of microgravity as experienced by the astronaut in space flight. The deconditioning effects of microgravity during space flight are the reverse processes of intrauterine development after the 26th week when the foetus begins training body processes for adaptation to an earthly environment. Growth requires space and movement, which suggests that a growth-retarded foetus may have been deprived of the mechanical dimension of uterine wall pressure, and, in twins, the smaller sibling may have been deprived of space. The behaviour of a study group of sudden infant death syndrome infants suggested a continuation of the effects of the foetal akinesia syndrome during the third trimester period of gestation. NASA research into the pathophysiology of microgravity was based on a simple insight: that the physiological effects of human space travel were virtually identical to the adjustments the body makes when lying down. This is the same environment as that of the human foetus in the first 22 weeks of gestation after which the uterine environment becomes a prelude to adaptations to the force of gravity.

  6. A New Insight Into Sudden Cardiac Death in Young People

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueyue; Xia, Lei; Shen, Xiaodong; Han, Guoxin; Feng, Dan; Xiao, Hongju; Zhai, Yongzhi; Chen, Xin; Miao, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Chunhong; Wang, Yingchan; Guo, Mingguang; Li, Tanshi; Zhu, Hai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) causes sudden cardiac death and has garnered increased attention worldwide in recent years. However, few studies have clearly classified the risk factors for this disease, including gender, race and morbidity, as well as the physical and mental stressors that can exacerbate the disease, particularly in young patients. To better analyze the characteristics of young TTC patients, we performed a systematic review of reported cases involving young patients. A computer-assisted search was performed using prominent electronic medical information sources to identify literature published between January 1965 and December 2013. Relevant studies containing clinical data of young TTC patients were included. Ninety-six records that included information about 104 cases were ultimately selected for our review. Several of the following results were noted: First, physical stress was more likely to exacerbate TTC than was mental stress in young patients. Second, more female than male TTC patients were noted among both young patients and the general population. Third, ethnicity appears to play no role in the disease, as no significant differences were noted among individuals of different races with respect to clinical characteristics, morbidity or stressors. Fourth, the clinical manifestations of TTC were similar to those of other cardiac diseases, including coronary heart disease. However, TTC may be detected using the combination of echocardiography and ventriculography. Clinicians should consider TTC if young patients present with symptoms similar to those of coronary heart disease so that harmful treatments such as coronary artery stent placement may be avoided. Moreover, the answers to questions regarding the clinical diagnostic criteria, etiology, pathophysiology, and the management of this syndrome in youth remain unclear; therefore, further research is needed. PMID:26266349

  7. Roadway Proximity and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jaime E; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Laden, Francine; Albert, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major source of mortality and is the first manifestation of heart disease for the majority of cases. Thus, there is a definite need to identify risk factors for SCD that can be modified on the population level. Exposure to traffic, measured by residential roadway proximity, has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to determine if roadway proximity was associated with an increased risk of SCD and to compare to the risk of other coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. Methods and Results A total of 523 cases of SCD were identified over 26 years of follow-up among 107,130 members of the prospective Nurses’ Health Study. We calculated residential distance to roadways at all residential addresses from 1986–2012. In age- and race-adjusted models, women living within 50 meters of a major roadway had an elevated risk of SCD (HR=1.56; 95%CI: 1.18–2.05). The association was attenuated but still statistically significant after controlling for potential confounders and mediators (HR=1.38; 95%CI:1.04–1.82). The equivalent adjusted HRs for nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD were 1.08 (95%CI: 0.96–1.23) and 1.24 (95%CI: 1.03–1.50), respectively. Conclusions Among this sample of middle-aged and older women, roadway proximity was associated with an elevated and statistically significant risks of SCD and fatal CHD, even after controlling for other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25332277

  8. The role of pharmacotherapy in the prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Phillip A; Sieg, Adam; Gass, Jennifer Ann; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2016-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a significant threat to the survival of patients with heart failure. Long-term cardiac remodeling predisposes these patients to develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Permanent implantable and temporary external defibrillators remain a mainstay for the prevention of sudden cardiac death in this population. For decades, researchers have attempted to identify reliable drug therapies to avoid such arrhythmias; however, to date, success has been inconsistent. This review aims to explore the evidence defining the role of drug therapies for direct and indirect suppression of arrhythmias that may cause sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. PMID:27003591

  9. Distillability sudden death and sudden birth in a two-qutrit system under decoherence at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Wang, Guo-you; Zeng, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Distillability sudden death and sudden birth in a two-qutrit system locally subject to amplitude damping channel at a finite temperature have been studied in detail. By using the negativity and the realignment criterion, the results show that certain initially prepared free entangled states under amplitude damping channel at a finite temperature may become bound entangled or separable states in a finite time. Moreover, we have also demonstrated initially prepared bound entangled or separable states may also become distillable entangled states in a finite time.

  10. Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    An abortion is a procedure to end a pregnancy. It uses medicine or surgery to remove the embryo or ... personal. If you are thinking of having an abortion, most healthcare providers advise counseling.

  11. Statewide Systematic Evaluation of Sudden, Unexpected Infant Death Classification: Results from a National Pilot Project

    PubMed Central

    Kryscio, Richard; Holsinger, James W.; Krous, Henry F.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded seven states, including Kentucky, to clarify statewide death certification practices in sudden, unexpected infant death and compare state performances with national expectations. Accurate assignment of the cause and manner of death in cases of sudden, unexpected infant death is critical for accurate vital statistics data to direct limited resources to appropriate targets, and to implement optimal and safe risk reduction strategies. The primary objectives are to (1) Compare SUID death certifications recommended by the KY medical examiners with the stated cause of death text field on the hard copy death electronic death certificates and (2) Compare KY and national SUID rates. Causes of death for SUID cases recommended by the medical examiners and those appearing on the hard copy and electronic death certificates in KY were collected retrospectively for 2004 and 2005. Medical examiner recommendations were based upon a classification scheme devised by them in 2003. Coroners hard copy death certificates and the cause of death rates in KY were compared to those occurring nationally. Eleven percent of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly did not undergo autopsy during the study interval. The KY 2003 classification scheme for SIDS is at variance with the NICHD and San Diego SIDS definitions. Significant differences in causes of death recommended by medical examiners and those appearing on the hard copy and electronic death certificates were identified. SIDS rates increased in KY in contrast to decreasing rates nationally. Nationwide adoption of a widely used SIDS definition, such as that proposed in San Diego in 2004 as well as legislation by states to ensure autopsy in all cases of sudden unexpected infant death are recommended. Medical examiners’ recommendations for cause of death should appear on death certificates. Multidisciplinary pediatric death review teams prospectively evaluating cases before death

  12. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  13. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: review of implicated genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Ackerman, Michael J; Marazita, Mary L; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M

    2007-04-15

    Genetic studies in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) have been motivated by clinical, epidemiological, and/or neuropathological observations in SIDS victims, with subsequent pursuit of candidate genes in five categories: (1) genes for ion channel proteins based on electrocardiographic evidence of prolonged QT intervals in SIDS victims, (2) gene for serotonin transporter based on decreased serotonergic receptor binding in brainstems of SIDS victims, (3) genes pertinent to the early embryology of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) (and with a link to the 5-HT system) based on reports of ANS dysregulation in SIDS victims, (4) genes for nicotine metabolizing enzymes based on evidence of cigarette smoking as a modifiable risk factor for SIDS, and (5) genes regulating inflammation, energy production, hypoglycemia, and thermal regulation based on reports of postnatal infection, low birth weight, and/or overheating in SIDS victims. Evidence for each of these classes of candidate genes is reviewed in detail. As this review indicates, a number of genetically controlled pathways appear to be involved in at least some cases of SIDS. Given the diversity of results to date, genetic studies support the clinical impression that SIDS is heterogeneous with more than one entity and with more than one possible genetic etiology. Future studies should consider expanded phenotypic features that might help clarify the heterogeneity and improve the predictive value of the identified genetic factors. Such features should be evaluated to the extent possible in both SIDS victims and their family members. With 2,162 infants dying from SIDS in 2003 in the U.S. alone, and improved but still imperfect parent and caretaker compliance with known modifiable risk factors for SIDS, it behooves clinicians, researchers, and parents to combine efforts to reach a common goal. The message of the "Back to Sleep" campaign needs to be re-introduced/re-engineered to reach families and caretakers of all

  14. Determinants of maternal deaths in induced abortion complications in Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Thonneau, Patrick; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Goyaux, Nathalie; Djanhan, Yao; Yace-Soumah, Frederique; Welffens, Christiane

    2004-10-01

    Persistently high levels of maternal mortality have been reported in Abidjan, the capital of Ivory Coast, with a high prevalence of deaths related to complications of induced abortion. In order to assess the determinants of maternal deaths in induced-abortion complications, this study investigated women admitted to the gynecological departments of four reference hospitals throughout Ivory Coast. Information concerning abortion events was collected by means of a questionnaire during a confidential, face-to-face interview. Medical records were used to collect clinical data and final vital status. In our series, 60% of women declared that they induced abortion themselves at their home; a large majority mentioned "insertion of objects into the vagina" or "ingestion of traditional plants" for this purpose. On the other hand, 40% declared that abortion had been performed by a health worker, mostly at a health facility and by using surgical methods (dilatation and curettage). Less-educated women were more likely to have chosen to induce abortion themselves at home, and more-educated women had undergone abortion through a health professional. Our findings highlight the role of both women and health professionals in responsibility for induced abortion complications.

  15. Virus-like particles associated with intracardiac ganglionitis in 2 cases of sudden unexpected death.

    PubMed

    James, T N; Imamura, K

    1981-05-01

    Two previously healthy young individuals died suddenly and unexpectedly, and in both of them there was ganglionitis in the heart, especially near the sinus node. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated virus-like particles in the vicinity of the ganglionitis of both hearts. Viral cardioneuropathy may play a role in the pathogenesis of sudden unexpected deaths and deserves further investigation.

  16. Avoiding entanglement sudden death using single-qubit quantum measurement reversal.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Lee, Jong-Chan; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2014-08-11

    When two entangled qubits, each owned by Alice and Bob, undergo separate decoherence, the amount of entanglement is reduced, and often, weak decoherence causes complete loss of entanglement, known as entanglement sudden death. Here we show that it is possible to apply quantum measurement reversal on a single-qubit to avoid entanglement sudden death, rather than on both qubits. Our scheme has important applications in quantum information processing protocols based on distributed or stored entangled qubits as they are subject to decoherence.

  17. Dentate gyrus abnormalities in sudden unexplained death in infants: morphological marker of underlying brain vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Hannah C; Cryan, Jane B; Haynes, Robin L; Paterson, David S; Haas, Elisabeth A; Mena, Othon J; Minter, Megan; Journey, Kelley W; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Goldstein, Richard D; Armstrong, Dawna D

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in infants, including the sudden infant death syndrome, is likely due to heterogeneous causes that involve different intrinsic vulnerabilities and/or environmental factors. Neuropathologic research focuses upon the role of brain regions, particularly the brainstem, that regulate or modulate autonomic and respiratory control during sleep or transitions to waking. The hippocampus is a key component of the forebrain-limbic network that modulates autonomic/respiratory control via brainstem connections, but its role in sudden infant death has received little attention. We tested the hypothesis that a well-established marker of hippocampal pathology in temporal lobe epilepsy-focal granule cell bilamination in the dentate, a variant of granule cell dispersion-is associated with sudden unexplained death in infants. In a blinded study of hippocampal morphology in 153 infants with sudden and unexpected death autopsied in the San Diego County medical examiner's office, deaths were classified as unexplained or explained based upon autopsy and scene investigation. Focal granule cell bilamination was present in 41.2% (47/114) of the unexplained group compared to 7.7% (3/39) of the explained (control) group (p < 0.001). It was associated with a cluster of other dentate developmental abnormalities that reflect defective neuronal proliferation, migration, and/or survival. Dentate lesions in a large subset of infants with sudden unexplained death may represent a developmental vulnerability that leads to autonomic/respiratory instability or autonomic seizures, and sleep-related death when the infants are challenged with homeostatic stressors. Importantly, these lesions can be recognized in microscopic sections prepared in current forensic practice. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between hippocampal and previously reported brainstem pathology in sudden infant death. PMID:25421424

  18. Beyond abortion: the looming battle over death in the 'culture wars'.

    PubMed

    Evans, James

    2008-08-01

    By concentrating on abortion, the culture wars have avoided facing a crisis about the end of life. This paper explores four themes: (1) the technological transformation of birth and death into matters of decision, not matters of fact; (2) abortion as the nexus of Eros (sex) with Thanatos (death); (3) the real crisis, conveniently masked by our obsession with sex, looming at the end of life, not at its beginning; (4) the surplus-repression that protects us from assuming responsibility for choosing between life and death. PMID:18410462

  19. Beyond abortion: the looming battle over death in the 'culture wars'.

    PubMed

    Evans, James

    2008-08-01

    By concentrating on abortion, the culture wars have avoided facing a crisis about the end of life. This paper explores four themes: (1) the technological transformation of birth and death into matters of decision, not matters of fact; (2) abortion as the nexus of Eros (sex) with Thanatos (death); (3) the real crisis, conveniently masked by our obsession with sex, looming at the end of life, not at its beginning; (4) the surplus-repression that protects us from assuming responsibility for choosing between life and death.

  20. Is sudden death random or is it in the weather?

    PubMed

    Bierton, Christopher; Cashman, Kara; Langlois, Neil E I

    2013-03-01

    It has been suggested that the weather may promote some types of death; this study sought to determine if types of death in the region around Adelaide, South Australia, occur in non-random clusters and in relationship to the weather. A Poisson model was used to determine if the occurrence of types of death were random. An exploratory analysis was performed for each death type to see if there was a relationship to weather variables using data supplied by the Bureau of Meteorology. Cases examined at Forensic Science South Australia from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 were reviewed. It was ascertained that cardiovascular deaths were distributed non-randomly; there was statistical evidence to suggest that deaths from ischemic heart disease, pulmonary embolus and drug toxicity had non-random occurrence. Maximum temperatures and increases in temperatures correlated with deaths from natural causes, cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease and pulmonary thromboembolus; lower hours of sunlight were statistically significant for deaths due to pulmonary thromboembolus. The distribution pattern of deaths resulting from motor vehicle collision did not fit the Poisson (random) model with variation through the week also being present. Non-random clusters of deaths do occur and weather events, such as increase in temperature, are associated with some types of death. However, analysis indicates that the weather is not responsible for all clustering. With regards to motor vehicle collision deaths temporal variation may be related to social factors, such as holiday periods. Further investigation may assist with health resource planning.

  1. The Costs of Suicide and Sudden Death within an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinder, Andrew; Cooper, Cary L.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of any death spreads out to many people. Deaths that occur in the workplace need to be handled with particular care given that the bereaved family as well as work colleagues will have been affected. Death by suicide or situations when an employee becomes suicidal can challenge even the most experienced manager. This article aims to…

  2. Ignored Disease or Diagnostic Dustbin? Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in the British Context

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Angus H.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) was defined in 1969 and incorporated into the International Classification of Diseases a decade later. To advocates of SIDS as a diagnosis, medical interest in sudden infant death was long overdue. However, the definition of SIDS lacked positive diagnostic criteria, provoking some to view it as a ‘diagnostic dustbin’ for the disposal of problematic cases where cause of death was unclear. This paper examines the development of medical interest in sudden infant death in Britain during the middle decades of the twentieth century. It highlights the importance of recognising the historicity of SIDS as a diagnosis facilitated by changes in law and medicine over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It suggests that SIDS provides a definitive case study of the medicalisation of life and death, and a unique example of an officially recognised disease that had no symptoms, signs, pathology or patients. PMID:26217070

  3. Sudden Death Caused by Anomalous Origin of the Coronary Artery During Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Akira; Kuroyanagi, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Shinobu; Omura, Kazunobu; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Anomalous origin of the coronary artery (AOCA) is a rare, but important cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes. Nine autopsy cases (8 male, 1 female; mean age, 17.9 years; age range, 11-31 years) of sudden death during or just after exercise caused by AOCA were reviewed. The exercises performed at the time of death were running (4 cases), soccer (2 cases), and baseball, swimming and kendo (Japanese swordsmanship) (1 case each). In 6 cases, the left coronary artery arose from the right sinus of Valsalva, and in 3, the right coronary artery from the left sinus. The coronary arteries passed between the pulmonary artery and the aorta with an acute angle takeoff from the orifice. Three cases had cardiovascular manifestations prior to death. In cases with cardiovascular manifestations, novel imaging methods should be considered to prevent sudden death.

  4. Witnessed sleep-related seizure and sudden unexpected death in infancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Anna G.; Minter, Megan E.; Berry, Gerard T.; Poduri, Annapurna; Goldstein, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Witnessed reports of sudden death are rare, but critical to deciphering its mechanism(s). We report such a death in a seemingly healthy 8-month-old boy in whom seizures and respiratory distress in the prone position were witnessed upon discovery during a sleep period. Following cardiopulmonary resuscitation, anoxic encephalopathy resulted in “brain death” and withdrawal of life support after 2 days. The autopsy did not reveal a primary anatomic cause of death. Metabolic evaluation failed to uncover an inborn error of ammonia, amino, organic, or fatty acid metabolism. Seizures in this case may have been secondary to cerebral hypoxia–ischemia complicating cardiorespiratory arrest of unknown etiology. Yet, they may represent the first manifestation of idiopathic epilepsy, triggering cardiopulmonary arrest, analogous to the terminal events postulated in sudden and unexplained death in epilepsy. This report alerts the forensic community to the possibility that sudden and unexplained death in infants may be due to seizures. PMID:23852931

  5. Sudden Death Caused by Anomalous Origin of the Coronary Artery During Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Akira; Kuroyanagi, Kazumi; Yamauchi, Shinobu; Omura, Kazunobu; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Anomalous origin of the coronary artery (AOCA) is a rare, but important cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes. Nine autopsy cases (8 male, 1 female; mean age, 17.9 years; age range, 11-31 years) of sudden death during or just after exercise caused by AOCA were reviewed. The exercises performed at the time of death were running (4 cases), soccer (2 cases), and baseball, swimming and kendo (Japanese swordsmanship) (1 case each). In 6 cases, the left coronary artery arose from the right sinus of Valsalva, and in 3, the right coronary artery from the left sinus. The coronary arteries passed between the pulmonary artery and the aorta with an acute angle takeoff from the orifice. Three cases had cardiovascular manifestations prior to death. In cases with cardiovascular manifestations, novel imaging methods should be considered to prevent sudden death. PMID:27404630

  6. A Case of Sudden Infant Death Due to Incomplete Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Daisuke; Shimizu, Keiko; Oka, Kumiko; Asari, Masaru; Maseda, Chikatoshi; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Shiono, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Seiji; Ogawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self-limiting disease, it may cause sudden cardiac death. Diagnosis of KD is principally based on clinical signs; however, some infant cases do not meet the criteria. Such cases are identified as incomplete KD. The sudden death risk in incomplete KD cases is similar to conventional KD. In our 5-month-old case, he had been admitted to a hospital for a fever and suppuration at the site of Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG) vaccination. However, after discharge from the hospital, his C-reactive protein (CRP) levels declined, he got indisposed and died suddenly. A medico-legal autopsy revealed myocarditis, coronaritis, platelet-aggregated emboli in coronary arteries, and myocardial degeneration, suggesting that the fatal myocardial infarction was due to thrombus emboli in the coronary arteries. Forensic pathologists therefore should pay attention to the cardiac pathology originated from incomplete KD as a potential cause in cases of sudden infant death. PMID:26347043

  7. Adult sudden death caused by aspiration of chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Njau, S N

    2004-01-28

    A case of a fatal foreign material aspiration is presented in the following text. A 24-year-old white male died suddenly. A piece of chewing gum lodged in a pool of frothy fluid was revealed at autopsy. Microscopic examinations revealed atelectasia emphysema, eosinophilic exudate and empty spaces. Blood and urine samples were analyzed, for alcohol and drug use by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on an Abbott AXSYM system. No alcohol or other drugs were detected in blood or urine. PMID:15040903

  8. Subvalvular aortic stenosis as a cause of sudden death: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Guven, Taner; Karayel, Ferah; Pakis, Isil; Gurpinar, Kagan; Ozaslan, Abdi

    2006-03-01

    Sudden death is defined as a death that occurs suddenly, develops during an unpredictable course, and is due to natural or unnatural causes. Although there is no universally standardized definition on how "sudden" a sudden death is, WHO defines sudden death as a death that occurs within 24 hours after the onset of symptoms. The aim of this study is to present 2 rarely reported autopsy cases and to emphasize the importance of systemic autopsy at sudden death. On macroscopic examination, crescent-shaped, thick, fibrous membranes, located 5 mm and 3 mm away from the aortic valves, were detected. Fibrous membranes extended from the ventricular septum to the left ventricular outflow tract, thus apparently narrowing this region. Left ventricular wall and septum were slightly thickened, and there were scattered grayish-white areas of a small diameter. These became more intense in the septum and myocardium of the left ventricle on the anterior plane of the myocardial sections. In both cases, the aortic valves of were thickened and also markedly narrowed on one of them. In this case, the fibrous membrane adhered to the aortic valve and extended to the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve at one side. Both aortic valves comprised 3 leaflets. Other valves and coronary arteries showed no macroscopic pathologic findings. Microscopic examination of both cases demonstrated that the fibrous membrane comprising abundant collagen fibers was situated on the ventricular septum. Hypertrophy, moderate to severe interstitial fibrosis, and focal areas of scarring were observed in the specimens taken from the septal and ventricular myocardium. No abnormality was found on the conduction system examinations. Toxicologic analysis results in blood were negative. Based on the findings, membranous-type (discrete type) subvalvular aortic stenosis, diagnosed during the autopsy, was considered as the cause of sudden death in both cases.

  9. Sudden death due to hydatid cyst: thirty-four medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Jedidi, Maher; Mlayeh, Souheil; Masmoudi, Tasnim; Souguir, Mohamed Kamel; Zemni, Majed

    2014-03-01

    The natural history of the echinococcosis can be studded with multiple complications; the most formidable is sudden death. We studied the epidemiological, pathological, and thanatological features of 34 sudden deaths due to hydatid cyst. The mean age was 33.2 years. A male predominance was observed with a sex ratio of 1.8. Most of our victims were from rural areas (79.4%). Sudden death was preceded by prodromal symptoms in 61.7% of cases. The most common was dyspnea (23.5%), followed by hemoptysis (11.8%). In 85.3% of cases, the cyst location was liver. It was cracked in 25 cases and broken in 6 cases. The rupture was spontaneous in 25 cases (73%). It was preceded by trauma in 7 cases. Death was related to an anaphylactic shock in 82.3% of cases, infection in 14.7%, and respiratory distress in 3% of cases. Sudden death is a serious and not exceptional complication of hydatid cyst. Several mechanisms may explain the sudden death. PMID:24317095

  10. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Practical Steps for Preventing Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    2002-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare cause of death among athletes, with deaths occurring in young, apparently healthy people. Differentiating HCM from conditioning hypertrophy is challenging. Routine detection involves family history, physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. Keys to differential diagnosis include…

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    PubMed

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  12. Sports and Marfan Syndrome: Awareness and Early Diagnosis Can Prevent Sudden Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salim, Mubadda A.; Alpert, Bruce S.

    2001-01-01

    Physicians who work with athletes play an important role in preventing sudden death related to physical activity in people who have Marfan syndrome. Flagging those who have the physical stigmata and listening for certain cardiac auscultation sounds are early diagnostic keys that can help prevent deaths. People with Marfan syndrome should be…

  13. Cigarette Smoking as a Risk Factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Population-Based Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Bengt; Cnattingius, Sven

    1990-01-01

    Examines risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome based on Swedish births between 1983 and 1985. Results indicate that maternal smoking doubles the risk of infant death, and infants of smokers also died sooner. The more the mother smoked the more likely her infant was to die. (JS)

  14. Coping with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Intervention Strategies and a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aadalen, Sharon

    1980-01-01

    Family-centered intervention after the death of a baby due to sudden infant death syndrome facilitates reorganization, growth, and development of the family system. A potentially defeating crisis becomes an opportunity to develop coping skills and strengthen family members. Public health nursing is an essential component of the program.…

  15. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Cedars, Ari M.

    2015-01-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  16. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death in Adults with Transposition of the Great Arteries: A Review of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Sandeep S; Cedars, Ari M

    2015-08-01

    Transposition of the great arteries encompasses a set of structural congenital cardiac lesions that has in common ventriculoarterial discordance. Primarily because of advances in medical and surgical care, an increasing number of children born with this anomaly are surviving into adulthood. Depending upon the subtype of lesion or the particular corrective surgery that the patient might have undergone, this group of adult congenital heart disease patients constitutes a relatively new population with unique medical sequelae. Among the more common and difficult to manage are cardiac arrhythmias and other sequelae that can lead to sudden cardiac death. To date, the question of whether implantable cardioverter-defibrillators should be placed in this cohort as a preventive measure to abort sudden death has largely gone unanswered. Therefore, we review the available literature surrounding this issue. PMID:26413012

  17. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: basic mechanisms and clinical implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Gehlbach, Brian K; Richerson, George B

    2016-04-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of death in patients with intractable epilepsy. The substantial lifetime risk of SUDEP and the lack of a clear pathophysiological connection between epilepsy itself and sudden death have fuelled increased attention to this phenomenon. Understanding the mechanisms underlying SUDEP is paramount to developing preventative strategies. In this review, we discuss SUDEP population studies, case-control studies, witnessed and monitored cases, as well as human seizure cardiorespiratory findings related to SUDEP, and SUDEP animal models. We integrate these data to suggest the most probable mechanisms underlying SUDEP. Understanding the modifiable risk factors and pathophysiology allows us to discuss potential preventative strategies.

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing Sudden Death in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Anderson, Scott A.; Courson, Ronald W.; Heck, Jonathan F.; Jimenez, Carolyn C.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Miller, Michael G.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Swartz, Erik E.; Walsh, Katie M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention and screening, recognition, and treatment of the most common conditions resulting in sudden death in organized sports. Background: Cardiac conditions, head injuries, neck injuries, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, asthma, and other factors (eg, lightning, diabetes) are the most common causes of death in athletes. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on preventing sudden death in sports and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:22488236

  19. Sudden unexpected infant deaths associated with car seats.

    PubMed

    Bamber, Andrew R; Pryce, Jeremy; Ashworth, Michael T; Sebire, Neil J

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency, circumstances, demographics, and causes of death of infants dying while seated in car safety seats. A retrospective review of a pediatric autopsy database at a specialist center over a 16-year period was undertaken to identify any infant deaths (aged <1 year), in whom death occurred while seated in a car safety seat. Fourteen car seat-associated deaths were identified from a total of 1,465 coronial infant autopsies (0.96 %). Four involved infants were being appropriately transported in the car seat, all of whom had a medical underlying cause of death (one infection and three congenital heart disease). The majority (10 cases; 70 %) occurred while car seats were being inappropriately used, outside of the car, including as an alternative to a cot or high-chair. Five of these infants died of explained causes, but four deaths remained unexplained after autopsy, and in one no cause of death was available. There were no cases of previously healthy infants dying unexpectedly in a car seat when it was being used appropriately, and in this series there were no cases of traumatic death associated with car seats, either during road traffic accidents, or from falling or being suspended from a car seat. Infant deaths in car seats are rare. These data support the recommendation that car seats be used only for transport and not as alternatives for cots or high-chairs. More research is required to investigate the effect of travel in car seats on infants with underlying conditions. There appears to be no increased risk of unexpected deaths of healthy infants transported appropriately in car seats. PMID:24435952

  20. [Abortion].

    PubMed

    Dourlen-rollier, A M

    1971-01-01

    The historical and current (1969) abortion laws in France as well as those in other Western countries are analyzed. France has had a series of punitive abortion codes since the Napoleonic Code of 1810 prescribing solitary confinement for the woman. The reforms of 1920 and 1923 made provocation of abortion or contraceptional propaganda a "crime" (felony), later a "delit" (misdemeanor), called for trial before magistr ate instead of jury, but resulted in only about 200 convictions a year. The decree of 1939 extended the misdemeanor to women who aborted even if they were not pregnant, and provided for professional licenses such as that of surgeon or pharmacist to be suspended. The law of 1942 made abortion a social crime and increased the maximum penalty to capital punishment, which was exercised in 2 cases. About 4000 per year were convicted from 1942-1944. Now the law still applies to all who intend to abort, whether or not pregnant or successful, but punishemnt is limited to 1-5 years imprisonment, and 72,000 francs fine, or suspension of medical practice for 5 years. About 500 have been convicted per year. Since 1955 legal abortion has been available (to about 130 women over 4 years) if it is the only means to save the woman's life. Although pregnancy tests are controlled, the population desregards the law by resorting to clandestine abortion. The wealthy travel to Switzerland (where 68% of legal abortions are done on French women) or to England. Numbers are estimated by the French government at 250,000-300,000 per year, or 1 for every 2 live births, but by hospital statistics at 400,000-1,000,000 per year. The rest of the review covers abortion laws in Scandinavian, Central European, and individual US states as of 1969.

  1. The factors contributing to the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Athanasakis, E; Karavasiliadou, S; Styliadis, I

    2011-04-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant under one year of age which remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene and review of the clinical history. SIDS is one of the leading causes of infant mortality and occurs from the first month, until the first year of life for newborns and infants.The aim of this review was to identify and examine risk factors responsible for causing the sudden infant death and to propose certain measures in order to protect newborns and infants from sudden death. The potential factors that contribute to the occurrence of SIDS include inadequate prenatal care, low birth weight (<2499gr), premature infants, intrauterine growth delay, short interval between pregnancies and maternal substance use (tobacco, alcohol, opiates). Moreover, factors related to infant's sleep environment such as the prone or side sleeping position and thick coverlet increase the risk of sudden death in infants. Also, the combination of risk factors such as that of prone sleeping position and soft bed mattress are linked to a 20-fold increased risk of death. Finally, polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT), viral respiratory infections, long Q-T (responsible for the presence of fatal arrhythmia) are related to the SIDS.Literature review indicates that each individual risk factor contributes to the appearance of SIDS and the establishment of certain protective measures for parents and health professionals has reduced its prevalence. But the precise identification of the SIDS causes and how these contribute to the occurrence of sudden death in neonates and infants, remains a challenge for health professionals. PMID:22110293

  2. Sudden unexpected non-violent death between 1 and 19 years in north Spain

    PubMed Central

    Morentin, B.; Aguilera, B.; Garamendi, P. M.; Suarez-Mier, M

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To study the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological characteristics of sudden unexpected non-violent deaths between 1and 19years.
METHODS—Population based observational study of all sudden unexpected non-violent deaths between 1 and 19 years, from 1990 to 1997,in a north Spain county (Bizkaia). In each case, clinical information and circumstances of death were obtained and a complete forensic autopsy was performed.
RESULTS—There were 34 sudden unexpected non-violent deaths. The mortality rate was 1.7 per 100 000 persons per year (representing 9% of the mortality rate of all non-violent deaths). In 10 cases the cause of death was cardiac, in 13 cases extracardiac, and 11 cases were unexplained. In 17 cases there were no pathological antecedents and in nine cases death occurred in patients with known disorders. Syncopes prior to death were present in five cases. Exercise related deaths occurred in seven cases (mainly associated with cardiac causes). Eight cases were "death in bed".

 PMID:10833176

  3. Physical exertion as a trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Mittleman, M A; Siscovick, D S

    1996-05-01

    The data reviewed in this article indicate that physical exertion can trigger the onset of nonfatal myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In addition, it is clear that although the relative risk associated with heavy exertion may be high, the absolute risk is actually quite small. It also is clear that regular exercise reduces the risk of triggering of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death by isolated bouts of exertion. Thus, these data provide further support for encouragement of regular exercise, as recommended by the American Heart Association. Such a program is likely to lower the overall risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death because it may lower the baseline risk and also decrease the relative risk that an episode of exertion will trigger a myocardial infarction or sudden cardiac death. Specific recommendations for patients with a history of myocardial infarction or angina are complex. Patients with coronary artery disease have the same relative risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death as those with no such history. Because of their elevated and variable baseline risk, however, specific recommendations regarding the risks and benefits of heavy physical exertion must be provided by their individual physicians, acting on recommended guidelines for exercise in such patients.

  4. QT prolongation and sudden cardiac death in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.P.; James, O.F.W. . Dept. of Medicine); Butler, T.J. . Dept. of Medical Statistics); Campbell, R.W.F. . Dept. of Academic Cardiology)

    1993-06-05

    Cardiovascular death is the most important cause of mortality in alcoholics, yet alcohol may protect against ischemic heart disease. This could be explained if deaths were a consequence of alcohol-related arrhythmias rather than of coronary atheroma. In many conditions, abnormalities of the QT interval are markers of arrhythmia and for risk of sudden death. The authors examined the relation between QT intervals and mortality in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

  5. Second trimester abortion as a cause of maternal death: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Avcioglu, Sümeyra Nergiz; Altinkaya, Sündüz Özlem; Küçük, Mert; Zafer, Emre; Sezer, Selda Demircan; Yüksel, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Each year, an estimated 529 000 maternal deaths occur worldwide. In literature, it is known that maternal mortality can occur during pregnancy, peripartum and also in postpartum period. Although very rare, maternal deaths may occur after spontaneous abortion. In present case, 37 year old G5P4 (Caesarean Section) women was admitted to Adnan Menderes University, Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic with diagnosis of missed abortion at 18 weeks’ gestation. She had been hospitalized in the public maternity hospital for five days due to abortus incipience and prolapse of amnion membranes but had no contractions. Fetal heart beats ceased at the second day of hospitalization. Medically induced abortion was recommended but not accepted by the patient. At the fifth day of hospitalization, she was referred to our clinic due to deterioration of general health condition, low blood pressure and tachycardia. In emergency department, it was determined that she was not oriented, had confusion, had blood pressure of 49/25 mmHg and tachycardia. In ultrasonographic examination, 18 week in utero ex fetus was determined and there was free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. The free fluid was suspected to be amniotic fluid due to rupture of uterus. Laparotomy was performed, no uterine rupture, hematoma or atony was observed. However during laparotomy, a very bad smelling odor, might be due to septicemia, was felt in the operation room. Cardiac arrest occurred during that operation. In autopsy report, it was concluded that maternal death was because of remaining of inutero ex fetus for a long time. In conclusion, although very rare, maternal deaths after spontaneous abortion may occur. Because spontaneous abortion is a common outcome of pregnancy, continued careful, strict monitoring and immediate treatment of especially second trimester spontaneous abortion is recommended to prevent related, disappointing, unexpected maternal deaths. PMID:26958124

  6. Sudden death at the end of the Mesozoic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emiliani, C.; Kraus, E.B.; Shoemaker, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    A paleoecological analysis of the fossil record before and after the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary indicates that the widespread extinctions and biological stresses around the boundary are best explained in terms of a sudden, significant, but short temperature rise. L. Alvarez and co-authors, having found an enrichment in iridium at the same boundary, postulated that it was associated with the impact of an extraterrestrial body. If this body struck the ocean, the water injected into the atmosphere may have led to a transient increase in the global surface temperature. This temperature pulse may have been primarily responsible for the effects observed in the biosphere. The pattern of extinction of higher plant species suggests that splash down occurred in the northern Pacific-Bering Sea area. ?? 1981.

  7. Rare Titin (TTN) Variants in Diseases Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Sanchez-Molero, Olallo; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Riuró, Helena; Allegue, Catarina; Coll, Monica; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Mates, Jesus; Picó, Ferran; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    A leading cause of death in western countries is sudden cardiac death, and can be associated with genetic disease. Next-generation sequencing has allowed thorough analysis of genes associated with this entity, including, most recently, titin. We aimed to identify potentially pathogenic genetic variants in titin. A total of 1126 samples were analyzed using a custom sequencing panel including major genes related to sudden cardiac death. Our cohort was divided into three groups: 432 cases from patients with cardiomyopathies, 130 cases from patients with channelopathies, and 564 post-mortem samples from individuals showing anatomical healthy hearts and non-conclusive causes of death after comprehensive autopsy. None of the patients included had definite pathogenic variants in the genes analyzed by our custom cardio-panel. Retrospective analysis comparing the in-house database and available public databases also was performed. We identified 554 rare variants in titin, 282 of which were novel. Seven were previously reported as pathogenic. Of these 554 variants, 493 were missense variants, 233 of which were novel. Of all variants identified, 399 were unique and 155 were identified at least twice. No definite pathogenic variants were identified in any of genes analyzed. We identified rare, mostly novel, titin variants that seem to play a potentially pathogenic role in sudden cardiac death. Additional studies should be performed to clarify the role of these variants in sudden cardiac death.

  8. [Treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias and prevention of sudden cardiac death: commentary on the 2016 ESC guideline].

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Lars; Köbe, Julia; Wasmer, Kristina

    2016-08-01

    The 2016 ESC guideline on prevention and therapy of ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death present an excellent recommendation and summary for all forms of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with and without structural or electrical heart disease. This includes cardiomyopathies as well as conditions such as proarrhythmia, neurologic/psychaitric disorders, or pregnancy. Some aspects are novel; (1) the guideline emphasizes for the first time genetic work-up in sudden cardiac death victims; (2) for prevention of sudden cardiac death systematic re-evaluation 6-12 weeks after myocardial infarction is recommended; (3) subcutaneous ICD as well as the wearable cardioverter/defibrillator are for the first time included in the guidelines; (4) automatic external defibrillators are recommended for public places; (5) for patients with recurrent ventricular tachyarrhythmias the role of catheter ablation has been upgraded. PMID:27509343

  9. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  10. Sudden unexpected death due to Chiari type I malformation in a road accident case.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Shao, Yu; Qin, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ningguo; Zou, Donghua; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2013-03-01

    This case concerns a sudden death of a patient with Chiari I malformation. A 17-year-old female was seen unconscious then fell off a motorbike during the vehicle acceleration. The girl was confirmed dead on the way to hospital, being previously asymptomatic and with a clean medical record. Autopsy findings showed an extremely extra-long cerebellar tonsillar herniation in the left side and unexplained multiple small cavities in cerebral hemispheres. Microscopic findings revealed loss and abnormal migration of the Purkinje cells, as well as capillary congestion in the herniated tonsil. The cause and mechanisms of this sudden death are considered as the cardiopulmonary dysfunction and arrest resulted from compression of the medulla and cervical cord, which was induced by both the positional insult and minor head trauma. In addition, this study stresses the importance of cervical cord examination in the case of unexpected sudden death following road accidents.

  11. Alternative research funding to improve clinical outcomes: model of prediction and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Robert J; Ullmann, Steven G

    2015-04-01

    Although identification and management of cardiovascular risk markers have provided important population risk insights and public health benefits, individual risk prediction remains challenging. Using sudden cardiac death risk as a base case, the complex epidemiology of sudden cardiac death risk and the substantial new funding required to study individual risk are explored. Complex epidemiology derives from the multiple subgroups having different denominators and risk profiles, while funding limitations emerge from saturation of conventional sources of research funding without foreseeable opportunities for increases. A resolution to this problem would have to emerge from new sources of funding targeted to individual risk prediction. In this analysis, we explore the possibility of a research funding strategy that would offer business incentives to the insurance industries, while providing support for unresolved research goals. The model is developed for the case of sudden cardiac death risk, but the concept is applicable to other areas of the medical enterprise.

  12. Stratification of the Risk of Sudden Death in Nonischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Maurício; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe; Rohde, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant therapeutic advancements, heart failure remains a highly prevalent clinical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In 30%-40% patients, the etiology of heart failure is nonischemic. The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is capable of preventing sudden death and decreasing total mortality in patients with nonischemic heart failure. However, a significant number of patients receiving ICD do not receive any kind of therapy during follow-up. Moreover, considering the situation in Brazil and several other countries, ICD cannot be implanted in all patients with nonischemic heart failure. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of sudden death because these would benefit more than patients at a lower risk, despite the presence of heart failure in both risk groups. In this study, the authors review the primary available methods for the stratification of the risk of sudden death in patients with nonischemic heart failure. PMID:25352509

  13. Alternative research funding to improve clinical outcomes: model of prediction and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Robert J; Ullmann, Steven G

    2015-04-01

    Although identification and management of cardiovascular risk markers have provided important population risk insights and public health benefits, individual risk prediction remains challenging. Using sudden cardiac death risk as a base case, the complex epidemiology of sudden cardiac death risk and the substantial new funding required to study individual risk are explored. Complex epidemiology derives from the multiple subgroups having different denominators and risk profiles, while funding limitations emerge from saturation of conventional sources of research funding without foreseeable opportunities for increases. A resolution to this problem would have to emerge from new sources of funding targeted to individual risk prediction. In this analysis, we explore the possibility of a research funding strategy that would offer business incentives to the insurance industries, while providing support for unresolved research goals. The model is developed for the case of sudden cardiac death risk, but the concept is applicable to other areas of the medical enterprise. PMID:25669654

  14. Classification system for the Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Case Registry and its application.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Camperlengo, Lena; Ludvigsen, Rebecca; Cottengim, Carri; Anderson, Robert N; Andrew, Thomas; Covington, Theresa; Hauck, Fern R; Kemp, James; MacDorman, Marian

    2014-07-01

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUID) accounted for 1 in 3 postneonatal deaths in 2010. Sudden infant death syndrome and accidental sleep-related suffocation are among the most frequently reported types of SUID. The causes of these SUID usually are not obvious before a medico-legal investigation and may remain unexplained even after investigation. Lack of consistent investigation practices and an autopsy marker make it difficult to distinguish sudden infant death syndrome from other SUID. Standardized categories might assist in differentiating SUID subtypes and allow for more accurate monitoring of the magnitude of SUID, as well as an enhanced ability to characterize the highest risk groups. To capture information about the extent to which cases are thoroughly investigated and how factors like unsafe sleep may contribute to deaths, CDC created a multistate SUID Case Registry in 2009. As part of the registry, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a classification system that recognizes the uncertainty about how suffocation or asphyxiation may contribute to death and that accounts for unknown and incomplete information about the death scene and autopsy. This report describes the classification system, including its definitions and decision-making algorithm, and applies the system to 436 US SUID cases that occurred in 2011 and were reported to the registry. These categories, although not replacing official cause-of-death determinations, allow local and state programs to track SUID subtypes, creating a valuable tool to identify gaps in investigation and inform SUID reduction strategies. PMID:24913798

  15. [Sudden death of a 16-year-old girl with WPW syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, Kirsten; Doberentz, Elke; Madea, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    The Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a usually benign heart disease with accessory pathways. Circling excitations arise between atria and ventricles which can lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Cases of sudden cardiac death are rare (0.2 %). Risk factors for sudden cardiac death in patients with WPW syndrome are old age, several accessory pathways, male sex and previous syncopes. A 16-year-old girl was found lying dead in her bed. The evening before, she didn't feel well and complained about abdominal pain. The girl had known epilepsy and Wolff- Parkinson-White syndrome. The macroscopic and histological findings are presented and discussed with reference to the pertinent literature.

  16. Dirty diving. Sudden death of a SCUBA diver in a water treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Nichols, G R; Davis, G J; Parola, A C

    1992-03-01

    We report a case of a sudden death in a SCUBA diver working at a water treatment facility. The victim, an employee of the facility with a specialty in electronics, was a sport diver not qualified in commercial diving. While attempting to clean sludge from a blocked drain 25 ft under water, the diver was suddenly pinned against the drain valve when the sludge plug was broken up. We review the mechanics of the incident and the actual cause of death, asphyxia, as opposed to drowning. We believe this to be the first reported case of traumatic (pressure) asphyxia in a SCUBA diver.

  17. Sudden death due to an unrecognized cardiac hydatid cyst: three medicolegal autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Pakis, Isil; Akyildiz, Elif Ulker; Karayel, Ferah; Turan, Arzu Akcay; Senel, Berna; Ozbay, Mehmet; Cetin, Gursel

    2006-03-01

    Echinococcosis is a human infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcocus granulosus. The most common sites of infection are the liver and the lungs. Cardiac hydatid cysts are very rare, even in regions where hydatic cysts are endemic (the Mediterranean, South America, Africa, and Australia). It has been reported that cardiac involvement is seen in about 0.5-3% of human echinococcosis cases. Three cases of cardiac hydatid disease that caused sudden death and which were histopathologically diagnosed are reported. Cardiac echinococcosis is rare, but due to its insidious presentation and affinity to cause sudden death, it is important that it be identified in the histopathological examination.

  18. Physical and chemical injury as causes of sudden cardiac death: the forensic forum.

    PubMed

    Riddick, L

    1994-01-01

    Physical and chemical injuries account for the largest number of sudden, unexpected cardiac deaths in persons between the ages of 1 and 44 years. Blunt-force injuries, lacerations, avulsions, and contusions of the heart and great vessels sustained during motor vehicle crashes constitute the most prevalent type of lethal physical trauma to the cardiovascular system. The second most prevalent type of trauma is from penetrating and perforating wounds inflicted by firearms. The mechanisms of these injuries are discussed, with emphasis placed on those factors contributing to lethality. The three most prevalent chemicals associated with sudden cardiac death-ethyl alcohol, cocaine, and tricylic antidepressants-are briefly mentioned.

  19. Sudden or unnatural deaths involving anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Torok, Michelle; Duflou, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are frequently misused. To determine causes of death, characteristics, toxicology, and pathology of AAS positive cases, all cases (n = 24) presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine (1995-2012) were retrieved. All were male, and the mean age was 31.7 years. Deaths were mainly due to accidental drug toxicity (62.5%), then suicide (16.7%) and homicide (12.5%). Abnormal testosterone/epitestosterone ratios were reported in 62.5%, followed by metabolites of nandrolone (58.3%), stanozolol (33.3%), and methandienone (20.8%). In 23 of 24 cases, substances other than steroids were detected, most commonly psychostimulants (66.7%). In nearly half, testicular atrophy was noted, as was testicular fibrosis and arrested spermatogenesis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was noted in 30.4%, and moderate to severe narrowing of the coronary arteries in 26.1%. To summarize, the typical case was a male polydrug user aged in their thirties, with death due to drug toxicity. Extensive cardiovascular disease was particularly notable. PMID:24611438

  20. Sudden or unnatural deaths involving anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Torok, Michelle; Duflou, Johan

    2014-07-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) are frequently misused. To determine causes of death, characteristics, toxicology, and pathology of AAS positive cases, all cases (n = 24) presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine (1995-2012) were retrieved. All were male, and the mean age was 31.7 years. Deaths were mainly due to accidental drug toxicity (62.5%), then suicide (16.7%) and homicide (12.5%). Abnormal testosterone/epitestosterone ratios were reported in 62.5%, followed by metabolites of nandrolone (58.3%), stanozolol (33.3%), and methandienone (20.8%). In 23 of 24 cases, substances other than steroids were detected, most commonly psychostimulants (66.7%). In nearly half, testicular atrophy was noted, as was testicular fibrosis and arrested spermatogenesis. Left ventricular hypertrophy was noted in 30.4%, and moderate to severe narrowing of the coronary arteries in 26.1%. To summarize, the typical case was a male polydrug user aged in their thirties, with death due to drug toxicity. Extensive cardiovascular disease was particularly notable.

  1. Infant dreaming and fetal memory: a possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christos, G A

    1995-04-01

    During rapid-eye-movement sleep, when we dream, the brain is thought to be processing stored memory. The memory of a newborn infant is dominated by its fetal experience, and the infant is likely to dream about its life in the womb. Research with lucid (or conscious) dreaming has shown that dream images are supported by the corresponding body actions, using those muscles which remain active during rapid-eye-movement sleep. We suggest that sudden infant death syndrome or cot death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life (or memory) as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe (in the usual sense) the infant may cease to breathe and may die. This simple hypothesis is consistent with all of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome (pathological and epidemiological), such as the age at death curve (the observed exponential decay and possibly the peak at 2-3 months), the higher risk with the prone sleeping position (but not excluding the supine position), and the observed climatic variation (seasonal and regional) in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome. Many of these well-established facts have no other known explanation and other theories can generally only account for a few of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome. Our hypothesis is also supported by recent findings that, as a group, sudden infant death syndrome infants have a higher proportion of rapid-eye-movement sleep, and also that they have an average higher heart rate (corresponding to possible fetal dreams) but only during rapid-eye-movement sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7666822

  2. Infant dreaming and fetal memory: a possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christos, G A

    1995-04-01

    During rapid-eye-movement sleep, when we dream, the brain is thought to be processing stored memory. The memory of a newborn infant is dominated by its fetal experience, and the infant is likely to dream about its life in the womb. Research with lucid (or conscious) dreaming has shown that dream images are supported by the corresponding body actions, using those muscles which remain active during rapid-eye-movement sleep. We suggest that sudden infant death syndrome or cot death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life (or memory) as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe (in the usual sense) the infant may cease to breathe and may die. This simple hypothesis is consistent with all of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome (pathological and epidemiological), such as the age at death curve (the observed exponential decay and possibly the peak at 2-3 months), the higher risk with the prone sleeping position (but not excluding the supine position), and the observed climatic variation (seasonal and regional) in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome. Many of these well-established facts have no other known explanation and other theories can generally only account for a few of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome. Our hypothesis is also supported by recent findings that, as a group, sudden infant death syndrome infants have a higher proportion of rapid-eye-movement sleep, and also that they have an average higher heart rate (corresponding to possible fetal dreams) but only during rapid-eye-movement sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  4. Sudden unexpected death under acute influence of cannabis.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Benno; Kauferstein, Silke; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Daldrup, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The acute toxicity of cannabinoids is said to be low and there is little public awareness of the potentially hazardous cardiovascular effects of cannabis, e.g. marked increase in heart rate or supine blood pressure. We describe the cases of two young, putative healthy men who died unexpectedly under the acute influence of cannabinoids. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of suspected fatal cannabis intoxications where full postmortem investigations, including autopsy, toxicological, histological, immunohistochemical and genetical examinations, were carried out. The results of these examinations are presented. After exclusion of other causes of death we assume that the young men experienced fatal cardiovascular complications evoked by smoking cannabis. PMID:24598271

  5. Abortions, fetal death, and stillbirths in pregnant pygmy goats inoculated with tachyzoites of Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Rippey, N S; Powe, T A; Sartin, E A; Dubey, J P; Blagburn, B L

    1995-09-01

    Neospora caninum-induced abortion is a major production problem in the dairy cattle industry in the United States and worldwide. Abortions attributable to naturally acquired N caninum infection also have been observed in pygmy goats. We studied experimentally induced infections with N caninum in pregnant pygmy does to determine whether abortions attributable to N caninum infection would occur after inoculation. Seven pregnant pygmy does (1 control doe and 6 inoculated with N caninum) were studied. The control doe remained clinically normal throughout the study and delivered 2 healthy kids. Abortion, fetal death, and stillbirths were observed in some pregnant does inoculated with N caninum. Two pregnant pygmy does inoculated with N caninum early in gestation (day 51) had fetuses that died and were aborted, or died and were reabsorbed. Neospora caninum tachyzoites and lesions were observed in the brain, spinal cord, and heart of aborted fetuses; parasites also were isolated from the placenta. Four additional pregnant pygmy does (2 inoculated at mid-gestation [day 85], and 2 at late gestation [day 127]) did not abort after inoculation. However, 1 doe inoculated during mid-gestation delivered a stillborn fetus that had died about 1 week prior to parturition. This kid was congenitally infected with N caninum. Neospora caninum was isolated from the placentas of all inoculated does examined. Neonatal neosporosis was not observed in live-born kids, nor were stages of N caninum isolated from any live-born kid. Does did not undergo abortion or have congenitally infected kids when they were rebred and evaluated for neosporosis.

  6. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report in Medicolegal Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tangsermkijsakul, Aphinan

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of birth defects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most serious form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Infants with FAS are prone to death because of various physical abnormalities. Consequently, infants with FAS may be presented in the medicolegal investigation as a form of sudden unexpected death in infancy. The author reported a 6-month-old male infant who was found dead at home. The history of maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy was obtained. The infant was diagnosed with FAS at the autopsy because he was presented with postnatal growth retardation, multiple facial abnormalities, and abnormal brain structures, which met the criteria of FAS. The cause of death was severe aspiration pneumonia. The purposes of this case report are to show an uncommon manifestation of sudden unexpected death in infancy case for the forensic pathologists and to emphasize on the national healthcare problem.

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy: A Case Report in Medicolegal Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Tangsermkijsakul, Aphinan

    2016-03-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of birth defects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is the most serious form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Infants with FAS are prone to death because of various physical abnormalities. Consequently, infants with FAS may be presented in the medicolegal investigation as a form of sudden unexpected death in infancy. The author reported a 6-month-old male infant who was found dead at home. The history of maternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy was obtained. The infant was diagnosed with FAS at the autopsy because he was presented with postnatal growth retardation, multiple facial abnormalities, and abnormal brain structures, which met the criteria of FAS. The cause of death was severe aspiration pneumonia. The purposes of this case report are to show an uncommon manifestation of sudden unexpected death in infancy case for the forensic pathologists and to emphasize on the national healthcare problem. PMID:26730801

  8. PHOX2B polyalanine repeat length is associated with sudden infant death syndrome and unclassified sudden infant death in the Dutch population.

    PubMed

    Liebrechts-Akkerman, Germaine; Liu, Fan; Lao, Oscar; Ooms, Ariadne H A G; van Duijn, Kate; Vermeulen, Mark; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Hofman, Albert; Engelberts, Adèle C; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-07-01

    Unclassified sudden infant death (USID) is the sudden and unexpected death of an infant that remains unexplained after thorough case investigation including performance of a complete autopsy and review of the circumstances of death and the clinical history. When the infant is below 1 year of age and with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, this is referred to as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). USID and SIDS remain poorly understood despite the identification of several environmental and some genetic risk factors. In this study, we investigated genetic risk factors involved in the autonomous nervous system in 195 Dutch USID/SIDS cases and 846 Dutch, age-matched healthy controls. Twenty-five DNA variants from 11 genes previously implicated in the serotonin household or in the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, of which some have been associated with SIDS before, were tested. Of all DNA variants considered, only the length variation of the polyalanine repeat in exon 3 of the PHOX2B gene was found to be statistically significantly associated with USID/SIDS in the Dutch population after multiple test correction. Interestingly, our data suggest that contraction of the PHOX2B exon 3 polyalanine repeat that we found in six of 160 SIDS and USID cases and in six of 814 controls serves as a probable genetic risk factor for USID/SIDS at least in the Dutch population. Future studies are needed to confirm this finding and to understand the functional effect of the polyalanine repeat length variation, in particular contraction, in exon 3 of the PHOX2B gene. PMID:24442913

  9. Case-control study of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania, 1997–2000

    PubMed Central

    Bubnaitienė, Vilija; Kalėdienė, Ramunė; Kėvalas, Rimantas

    2005-01-01

    Background To identify risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome relevant in Lithuania. Methods A nationwide case-control study surveying parents of 35 infants who died from sudden infant death syndrome during the period of 1997–2000 and parents of 145 control infants matched with SIDS infants for date of birth and for region of birth was carried out. Results Deaths incidence was greater in the warm period (60%) vs. cold period (40%). Prone and side sleeping positions both carried no increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome compared with supine because of a rare prone sleeping (4.1% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants) and more prevalent side than supine sleeping (84.8% of controls vs. 94.3% of dead infants) in the controls as well as the cases. Bed sharing for the whole night as a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome has not been confirmed, either, as bed sharing was common only for the controls (13.8% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants). Routine sleeping environment factors such as heavy wrapping (≥4 togs) of an infant (odds ratio 8.49; 95% confidence interval 2.38 to 30.32), sleeping in a bassinet (4.22; 1.16 to 15.38) and maternal factors such as maternal education ≤12 years (4.48; 1.34 to 14.94), unplanned pregnancy (5.22; 1.49 to 18.18) and ≥2 previous live births (3.90; 1.00 to 15.10) were significantly associated with sudden infant death syndrome on multivariate analysis. Conclusion The results of this first population-based case-control study have shed some light on the epidemiology of the syndrome in Lithuania. Although the mortality of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania is not high, it might be lowered moreover by public informing about sudden infant death syndrome and related risk factors. Special attention must be paid to mothers with low education on potentially modifiable risk factors such as routine heavy wrapping of an infant during sleep, routine sleeping in a bassinet and unplanned pregnancy. PMID:16283946

  10. Athletic Training Educators' Pedagogical Strategies for Preparing Students to Address Sudden Death in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Salvatore, Anthony C.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Educational training programs both impart knowledge and allow students to practice skills to gain clinical competence. Objective: Understand the educational training provided to athletic training students regarding sudden death in sport beyond exertional heat stroke. Design: An exploratory, qualitative study using telephone interviews and…

  11. Infant Temperament Characteristics Related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Its Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Three major components have been repeatedly implicated for the origin(s) of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): system, minor sickness and surroundings. All these factors also frame infant temperament, and therefore it seems logical to suppose that the babies who either succumb to or are at risk of SIDS may present with certain behavioral…

  12. Exercise-Related Sudden Death: Cardiovascular Evaluation of Exercisers (Part 2 of 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    A primary goal of the cardiovascular evaluation of exercisers is to identify conditions that carry the risk of exercise-related sudden death. These conditions, which are found in a careful evaluation of the patient, are identifed and described in detail. (Author/JL)

  13. Genome-wide association mapping of quantitative resistance to sudden death syndrome in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is a serious threat to soybean production that can be controlled by host plant resistance. To dissect the genetic architecture of quantitative resistance to the disease in soybean, two independent association panels of soybean elite cultivar, consisting of 392 and 300 uni...

  14. Emergency Room Sudden Death: What Can be Done for the Survivors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, William H.

    1978-01-01

    Persons called to a hospital emergency room as the result of a sudden death of a relative or friend are usually in need of emotional support while still at the emergency room. This article identifies characteristics of an effective emotional support model for use in such situations. (Author)

  15. Issues in Student Suicide and Sudden Death Postvention: Best Practices in School Crisis Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Walter S.

    Recent statistics indicate that a high school of 2000 students will experience an average of one student suicide every four years. This paper reviews and synthesizes relevant information on issues in school response to student suicide and sudden death. Highlighted are risk factors that school personnel can identify in suicide-prone students,…

  16. Preparticipation Screening for Sudden Cardiac Death in High School and College Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, David S.; Strong, William B.

    1988-01-01

    A properly performed screening history and cardiovascular examination can identify most young athletes at risk for sudden death from heart abnormalities. Warning signs and examiner response are discussed as well as appropriate use of echocardiography. Included is a sample preparticipation examination form recommended by the American Academy of…

  17. The Psychological Effects of Sudden Infant Death on Grandmothers and Grandfathers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrain, John D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined psychological and social impact of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) on 80 grandmothers and grandfathers. Results of quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that SIDS for most grandparents is a devastating experience. Common feelings expressed included disbelief, anger, guilt, anxiety, depression, concern for their bereaved adult…

  18. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death under amplitude damping and phase damping

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiehui; Zhu Shiyao

    2007-12-15

    By using principal minor method, which is developed from the Peres-Horodecki criterion for the separability of a quantum state, we derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death of a two-qubit state under amplitude damping and phase damping.

  19. Statistical and Modeling Techniques for Studying the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Helen L.

    1976-01-01

    The intention of this research is to contribute additional data, hopefully bearing on the solution to some of the problems and indirectly, the cause(s) of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, and to present ideas for consideration for future SIDS research. (Author/RK)

  20. SIDS Family Adjustment Scale: A Method of Assessing Family Adjustment to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Harold J.; Breme, Frederick J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and the family's resultant grief process. Explores SIDS as a family crisis, and by identifying the psychological factors or tasks pertinent to family adjustment, proposes a SIDS Family Adjustment Scale which assists in recognizing adaptive and maladaptive grief responses. (Author)

  1. Psychological and Religious Coping Strategies of Mothers Bereaved by the Sudden Death of a Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Miriam J.; Marwit, Samuel J.; Vandenberg, Brian; Chibnall, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the associations of 3 types of psychological coping (task-based, emotion-based, avoidance), 2 types of religious coping (positive, negative), and their interactions with grief of 57 mothers bereaved by the sudden death of a child. Results indicated that mothers who use emotion-based coping report significantly higher levels of…

  2. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K; Chung, Daniel C; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-11-30

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2(-)/cap2(-) males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2(-)/cap2(-) females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease.

  3. Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy in risk stratification of sudden death in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martins da Silva, Marta Inês; Vidigal Ferreira, Maria João; Morão Moreira, Ana Paula

    2013-06-01

    Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a false neurotransmitter noradrenaline analogue that is taken up by the 'uptake 1' transporter mechanism in the cell membrane of presynaptic adrenergic neurons and accumulates in catecholamine storage vesicles. Since it is practically unmetabolized, it can be labeled with a radioisotope (iodine-123) in scintigraphic exams to noninvasively assess the functional status of the sympathetic innervation of organs with a significant adrenergic component, including the heart. Studies of its application in nuclear cardiology appear to confirm its value in the assessment of conditions such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden death. Heart failure is a global problem, with an estimated prevalence of 2% in developed countries. Sudden cardiac death is the main cause of its high mortality. The autonomic nervous system dysfunction, including sympathetic hyperactivity, that accompanies chronic heart failure is associated with progressive myocardial remodeling, declining left ventricular function and worsening symptoms, and contributes to the development of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Since 123I-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy can detect changes in the cardiac adrenergic system, there is considerable interest in its role in obtaining diagnostic and prognostic information in patients with heart failure. In this article we present a literature review on the use of 123I-MIBG scintigraphy for risk stratification of sudden death in patients with heart failure.

  4. A method for determining the severity of Sudden Death Syndrome in soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by the fungus Fusarium virguliforme, is a widespread mid- to late- season soybean disease with distinctive foliar symptoms that in some extreme cases may cause nearly 100% yield loss. This article reports on the development of an image analysis method to quantify ...

  5. Risk Factors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Risk Factors for Sleep Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between major risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep disorders in the infants is the subject of review and discussion. Improper micro-environmental characteristics (especially poor environmental organisation and lack of developmental stimulation), pre-term delivery and/or infant low birth weight, prone sleep…

  6. "What to Say" and "What Not to Say" to the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Parent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzenried, John

    The responses of friends and acquaintances of parents whose child has died as the result of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome can be helpful and supportive or they can be guilt-producing, painful, and destructive. Some destructive responses experienced by parents in those circumstances include questioning such as, "Did you...?" which implies that…

  7. Spatial and temporal analysis of populations of the Sudden Oak Death pathogen in Oregon forests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden oak death caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum was first discovered in California towards the end of the 20th century and subsequently emerged on tanoak forests in Oregon before its first detection in 2001 by aerial surveys. The Oregon Department of Forestry has since monitored the epi...

  8. Sudden Cardiac Death in Children and Adolescents: Can We Prevent It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) can occur at any age in apparently healthy people. Early identification and intervention are essential. This article examines SCD in children and adolescents, explaining: who is at risk; the importance of training school personnel for SCD emergencies and having automated external defibrillators (AED) within the schools;…

  9. Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome Species Diversity within North and South America Revealed by Multilocus Genotyping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden-death syndrome (SDS) of soybean and has become a serious constraint to the production of this crop in North and South America. Recently published phenotypic and multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses, and pathogenicity experiments have demonstrated that four morphologically and phylogene...

  10. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z.; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J.; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K.; Chung, Daniel C.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2−/cap2− males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2−/cap2− females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  11. A Retrospective Study of the Effect of an Athlete's Sudden Death on Teammates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henschen, Keith R.; Heil, John

    1992-01-01

    Investigated psychological effects of teammate's exercise-related sudden death on 10 remaining team members at end of collegiate careers (4 years later). Findings indicated initially similar responses from teammates (shock and disbelief); mixed reactions concerning influence of event on individual lives; deep emotions during interviews; and…

  12. Mechanisms of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: the pathway to prevention.

    PubMed

    Massey, Cory A; Sowers, Levi P; Dlouhy, Brian J; Richerson, George B

    2014-05-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy, with an estimated 35% lifetime risk in this patient population. There is a surprising lack of awareness among patients and physicians of this increased risk of sudden death: in a recent survey, only 33% of Canadian paediatricians who treated patients with epilepsy knew the term SUDEP. Controversy prevails over whether cardiac arrhythmia or respiratory arrest is more important as the primary cause of death. Effective preventive strategies in high-risk patients will rely on definition of the mechanisms that lead from seizures to death. Here, we summarize evidence for the mechanisms that cause cardiac, respiratory and arousal abnormalities during the ictal and postictal period. We highlight potential cellular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities, such as a defect in the serotonergic system, ictal adenosine release, and changes in autonomic output. We discuss genetic mutations that cause Dravet and long QT syndromes, both of which are linked with increased risk of sudden death. We then highlight possible preventive interventions that are likely to decrease SUDEP incidence, including respiratory monitoring in epilepsy monitoring units and overnight supervision. Finally, we discuss treatments, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, that might be personalized to a specific genetic or pathological defect.

  13. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M

    1992-10-01

    Vitamin E pretreatment significantly prevented E. coli-induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) in rats (1). DIC, a reduction in fibrinogen and a falling platelet count and diffuse haemorrhage are part of the clinical features of Haemorrhagic Shock Encephalopathy Syndrome (HSES), recognised as a disease entity in the 1980s (2). At the SIDS Conference 1974 Reisinger described the effect of Escherichia coli (E. coli) endotoxin on the rabbit (3). An early effect was a reduction in fibrinogen and a falling platelet count, resulting in the release of relatively large amounts of the neuro-transmitter serotonin, stored in platelets (3, 4). Fibrinogen inhibited the release of serotonin from platelets (24). Serotonin is released from platelets during platelet aggregation (14). Platelet aggregation is inhibited by vitamin E (1). Serotonin is a neuro-transmitter associated with deep sleep, respiratory movements and cardiovascular collapse (3). Death at a later stage involved vascular permeability, edema and haemorrhage. After fibrin-platelet clots had formed DIC was present in lungs, kidneys and other organs (3). Medical researchers in Australia linked almost half of SIDS victims with a poisonous strain of intestinal E. coli bacteria (5). Dietary selenium in the intestinal villous tip is considered a daily modulator of cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of drugs and toxins absorbed by intestinal mucosa (6). Villous atrophy occurs in HSES (2). PMID:1461172

  15. Sudden cardiac death in marathons: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waite, Oliver; Smith, Andy; Madge, Luke; Spring, Hannah; Noret, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the results of cohort studies that examined the incidence of SCD in marathons and to assess the quality of the methods used. A search of the PROSPERO international database revealed no prospective or published systematic reviews investigating SCD in marathons. The review was conducted using studies that reported and characterised the incidence of SCD in people participating in marathons. Studies were identified via electronic database searches (Medline, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Google Scholar) from January 1, 1966 to October 1, 2014 and through manual literature searches. 7 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. 6 of the studies were conducted in the USA and 1 in the UK. These studies covered a 34-year period involving between 215,413 and 3,949,000 runners. The SCD of between 4 and 28 people are recorded in the papers and the reported estimates of the incidence of SCD in marathons ranged widely from 0.6 to 1.9 per 100,000 runners. The proportion of those suffering SCD who were male ranged from 57.1% to 100% and the mean age reported in the papers, ranged from 37 to 48. This review raises 4 methodological concerns over i) collating reports of SCD in marathons; ii) time of death in relation to the marathon; iii) the use of registrants rather than runners in the estimates of sample size and iv) limited detail on runners exercise history. These four concerns all threaten the reliability and interpretation of any estimate of SCD incidence rates in marathons.  This review recommends that the methods used to collect data on SCD in marathons be improved and that a central reporting system be established. PMID:26765272

  16. Application of a classification system focusing on potential asphyxia for cases of sudden unexpected infant death.

    PubMed

    Randall, Brad; Donelan, Kent; Koponen, Mark; Sens, Mary Ann; Krous, Henry F

    2012-03-01

    Current classification schemes for sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) may not be optimal for capturing scene events that potentially predispose to asphyxia. (1) To compare causes of death in a group of SUID cases assigned by multiple reviewers using our recently published classification scheme for SUID that is based on asphyxial risk at the death scene, and (2) To compare these newly assigned causes of death to that originally assigned by the medical examiners of record who performed the autopsies. Five reviewers independently assigned causes of death for 117 cases of SUID, including 83 originally diagnosed as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), accessioned into the San Diego SIDS/SUDC Research Project from the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office. The diagnostic categories are: A: SIDS; B: Unexplained-Potentially Asphyxia; C: Unexplained-Other Potential Causes of Death; D: Unclassified-Other; E: Unclassified; and F: Known Cause of Death. The reviewers collectively opined that conditions at the death scene contributed to or caused death in 32-50% of all of the 117 cases as well as in 40-59% of the 83 originally diagnosed SIDS cases. Another cause of death was considered plausible in 2-12% of the SIDS cases. Application of this new classification system resulted in 55-69% decrease in SIDS diagnoses. Asphyxia as a potential contributor to, or as the specific cause of death, appears to exist in a large percentage of cases designated as SIDS using other classification schemes. When certifiers use a classification system that focuses upon potential asphyxia in determining the cause of death the incidence of SIDS dramatically declines. PMID:22076787

  17. Congenital anomalies of coronary arteries: role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Cheitlin, Melvin D; MacGregor, John

    2009-06-01

    After hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery anomalies of origin from the wrong sinus of Valsalva are the second most common cause of sudden death on the athletic field in the USA. Although the right coronary artery arising from the left coronary sinus (ARCA) is four times as common as the left coronary artery arising from the anterior sinus (ALCA), it is the latter that is by far the more common cause of sudden death with or shortly after vigorous physical activity. Of the four types of ALCA, the interarterial type, where the left coronary artery passes anteriorly between the aorta and the right ventricular outflow tract, is the only type that places the patient at risk of sudden death. Another feature of this syndrome is the fact that sudden death occurs associated with or shortly after vigorous exercise and is very unusual after the patient is > 35 years of age. The mechanism by which there is sudden occlusion of the interarterial coronary artery is at present unknown, although there are a number of hypotheses involving the oblique passage of the vessel as it leaves the aorta. Sudden death is probably rare considering the number of people who have these anomalies. Symptoms premonitory to a fatal event such as exertional syncope, chest pain, or palpitations are probably common in patients at risk, and surgical correction is indicated in symptomatic patients at any age. In older asymptomatic patients, surgery is not recommended, since the incidence of sudden death in this age group is extremely small. In asymptomatic young patients, a stress test, preferably with radioisotope myocardial perfusion imaging or stress echocardiogram, should be done and surgical correction performed in those with ischemia provoked in the appropriate myocardial region. Since there is evidence that in patients who have survived a potentially fatal event, it is rare to be able to provoke ischemia with equal or greater exercise than had precipitated the malignant arrhythmia, the

  18. [Sudden death of twins: botulism because of contamination by pap vegetables].

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; Freislederer, A; Jorch, G

    2004-01-01

    Botulism is caused by the blockage of the neural transmission in the cholinergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) which is produced by Clostridium botulinum or other Clostridia. The classic form of botulism occurs after the ingestion of food contaminated by BoNT. The course of the infection can be asymptomatic, mild with subtle paralysis ("failure to thrive") oder severe with generalized paralysis ("floppy infant"). Infected infants can also die sudden and unexpectedly. These deaths often are attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), unless a thorough postmortem examination reveals Botulism. The rate of fatal Botulism falsely attributed to SIDS is not known, because it is difficult in most cases to show the causal relationship between contamination, disease and death. We report the sudden and unexpected simultaneous death of twins of 22 months which could be attributed to Botulism. Contamination of food, colonization of the gut by Clostridia and infection with specific pathomorphological changes could be proven. The initial suspicion of infanticide could be excluded. lt could be shown, that Botulism is a potential cause of simultaneous unexpected deaths in twins.

  19. Sudden Death in Sickle Cell Anaemia: Report of Three Cases with Brief Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Niraimathi, Manickam; Kar, Rakhee; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Basu, Debdatta

    2016-06-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell anaemia is one of the commonest presentations and a leading cause of death. Death can be sudden and unexpected. Herein we present three cases of sickle cell anaemia with sudden death within 3 days of hospitalisation. All the three cases presented with fever and jaundice. Two cases presented consecutively in the same year within a span of 5 months while the other case had presented 2 years prior to these two cases. Infection was the precipitating event in two cases and pregnancy with infection in one. One case in addition had 'right upper quadrant syndrome' and one case had 'acute chest syndrome' (ACS) due to bone marrow fat embolism. Postmortem liver biopsy of all the three cases showed dilated and congested sinusoids with sickled RBCs, kupfer cell prominence with erythrophagocytosis. Lung biopsy of case with ACS showed vessels occluded with bone marrow elements indicating bone marrow fat embolism. PMID:27408408

  20. Sudden Death in Sauna Due to Fatal Burns: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lindroos, Katarina; Keltanen, Terhi

    2016-03-01

    Sudden death during or after sauna bathing is a rare event. When occurring accidentally, it is often caused or contributed by consumption of ethanol. To accidentally burn to death because of hot air is highly uncommon without some contributing factor that lowers the person's consciousness. Hot air burns have been reported to develop in 20 to 60 minutes. We present a case of sudden death of a healthy man with rare and extensive hot air burns that developed in less than 10 minutes in the sauna. Ethanol was not a contributing factor. Substantial injuries were found at the autopsy, both external and internal, for instance, small hemorrhages in the stomach mucosa, indicating a heavy antemortem stress reaction. The most probable reason for the extensive scalds was concluded to be, apart from the high temperature, the high degree of relative humidity in the sauna.

  1. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Fatal post-ictal respiratory and arousal mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Levi P.; Massey, Cory A.; Gehlbach, Brian K.; Granner, Mark A.; Richerson, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the cause of premature death of up to 17% of all patients with epilepsy and as many as 50% with chronic refractory epilepsy. However, SUDEP is not widely recognized to exist. The etiology of SUDEP remains unclear, but growing evidence points to peri-ictal respiratory, cardiac, or autonomic nervous system dysfunction. How seizures affect these systems remains uncertain. Here we focus on respiratory mechanisms believed to underlie SUDEP. We highlight clinical evidence that indicates peri-ictal hypoxemia occurs in a large percentage of patients due to central apnea, and identify the proposed anatomical regions of the brain governing these responses. In addition, we discuss animal models used to study peri-ictal respiratory depression. We highlight the role 5-HT neurons play in respiratory control, chemoreception, and arousal. Finally, we discuss the evidence that 5-HT deficits contribute to SUDEP and sudden infant death syndrome and the striking similarities between the two. PMID:23707877

  2. Next-Generation Sequencing in Post-mortem Genetic Testing of Young Sudden Cardiac Death Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lahrouchi, Najim; Behr, Elijah R.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young (<40 years) occurs in the setting of a variety of rare inherited cardiac disorders and is a disastrous event for family members. Establishing the cause of SCD is important as it permits the pre-symptomatic identification of relatives at risk of SCD. Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) is defined as SCD in the setting of negative autopsy findings and toxicological analysis. In such cases, reaching a diagnosis is even more challenging and post-mortem genetic testing can crucially contribute to the identification of the underlying cause of death. In this review, we will discuss the current achievements of “the molecular autopsy” in young SADS cases and provide an overview of key challenges in assessing pathogenicity (i.e., causality) of genetic variants identified through next-generation sequencing. PMID:27303672

  3. Sudden fetal death due to dualism of the sino-atrial node.

    PubMed

    Pusiol, Teresa; Roncati, Luca; Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Taddei, Fabrizio; Piscioli, Francesco; Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    First, we report a sudden fetal death at 33(+3)weeks due to sino-atrial node dualism. The female stillborn was delivered by induced labor. The postmortem examination of the cardiac conduction system revealed a dualism of the sino-atrial node, associated with fragmentation of the atrio-ventricular node and His bundle. These abnormalities of the cardiac conduction system represent the morphological substrate for the development of malignant arrhythmias. In particular, the dualism of the sino-atrial node can cause the dissociation of the longitudinal nodal impulse into two distinct ways of different pulse generation, resulting in supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. This observation suggests new avenues of research on the pathogenesis of the sudden unexpected fetal death. Moreover, our findings confirm the need for an accurate postmortem examination, including serial sectioning of the cardiac conduction system, in every case of unexplained fetal death, following standardized autoptic protocols. PMID:27191041

  4. [Sudden Cardiac Death of Young Persons: Risk Factors, Causes, Morphological Equivalents].

    PubMed

    Shilova, M A; Mamedov, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article contains literature review on the problem of causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among young people as well as results of author's own retrospective study of deaths of persons before 39 years based on forensic autopsies performed during 10 year period. The study of structure and dynamics of causes of death, its risk factors and the role of connective tissue dysplasia in development of terminal symptomocomlexes allowed to establish that main mechanism of SCD in young people was arrhythmogenic developing as a response to provoking factors--physical effort, psychoemotional stress, consumption of light alcoholic beverages. PMID:26688929

  5. Prevalence of HCM and long QT syndrome mutations in young sudden cardiac death-related cases.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Catarina; Gil, Rocio; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Santori, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Calvo, Marisol; Concheiro, Luis; Carracedo, Angel; Brion, María

    2011-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies and channelopathies are major causes of sudden cardiac death. The genetic study of these diseases is difficult because of their heterogenic nature not only in their genetic traits but also in their phenotypic expression. The purpose of the present study is the analysis of a wide spectrum of previously known genetic mutations in key genes related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), long QT syndrome (LQTS), and Brugada syndrome (BrS) development. The samples studied include cases of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young adults and their relatives in order to identify the real impact of genetic screening of SCD in forensic cases. Genetic screening of described variation in 16 genes implicated in the development of HCM and three more genes implicated in LQTS and BrS was performed by using MassARRAY technology. In addition, direct sequencing of the two most prevalent genes implicated in the development of SQTL type 1 and 2 was also carried out. Genetic screening allowed us to unmask four possibly pathogenic mutation carriers in the 49 SCD cases considered; carriers of mutation represent 9% (2/23) of the probands with structural anomalies found after autopsy and 7% (1/14) of the probands with structurally normal hearts after in depth autopsy protocol. One mutation was found among 12 of the recovered SCD cases considered. In people with direct family history of sudden cardiac death, but not themselves, 11 additional mutation carriers were found. Three different mutations were found in six of the 19 LQTS patients, representing three families and two different mutations were found among six patients with previous syncope. Genetic analysis in sudden cardiac death cases could help to elucidate the cause of death, but it also can help in the prevention of future deaths in families at risk. The study presented here shows the importance and relevance of genetic screening in patients with signs of cardiac hypertrophy and in family cases with more than one

  6. Sudden death in a child following jellyfish envenomation by Chiropsalmus quadrumanus. Case report and autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, K; Nichols, M M; Schnadig, V; Ellis, M D; Bengston, K

    1991-09-11

    Sudden death following coelenterate envenomation is not uncommon in Australia where the Pacific box jellyfish is indigenous. However, few cases of sudden fatal reactions have been reported in the Northern Hemisphere, and those that have occurred have all been attributed to the Portuguese man-of-war, Physalia physalis. We report the case of a child who died within 40 minutes of accidental envenomation with tentacles of a jellyfish, Chiropsalmus quadrumanus, and describe the findings at autopsy. This coelenterate may be of special danger to small children. PMID:1679136

  7. Infant botulism acquired from household dust presenting as sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevas, Mari; Lindström, Miia; Virtanen, Antti; Hielm, Sebastian; Kuusi, Markku; Arnon, Stephen S; Vuori, Erkki; Korkeala, Hannu

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type B was detected by multiplex PCR in the intestinal contents of a suddenly deceased 11-week-old infant and in vacuum cleaner dust from the patient's household. C. botulinum was also isolated from the deceased infant's intestinal contents and from the household dust. The genetic similarity of the two isolates was demonstrated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, thereby confirming that dust may act as a vehicle for infant botulism that results in sudden death.

  8. Abortion.

    PubMed

    Churchill, M

    1979-09-15

    I would like to take issue with Dr Colin Brewer's statements concerning intrauterine contraceptive devices and abortion (11 August, p 389). I agree that logically there is no distinction between IUCDs, and other abortifacients used early in pregnancy, and abortion methods used later in pregnancy. However, I disagree with his statement that to make illegal IUCDs and similar methods out of an "obsessive concern for microscopic forms of life" would be "absurd." Firstly, size has never been a criterion for the presence or absence of life, or of its importance. Surely Dr Brewer, MPs, and the public would be outraged by anything less than obsessively careful handling of, say, rabies or smallpox viruses in laboratories. Do not the products of conception, with the full potential of a human being unless actively interfered with by other men (neglecting normal fetal wastage), deserve any less concern? Secondly, mortality should not be determined by practicalities; rather morality should determine one's actions. The question of whether IUCDs and other such procedures should remain legal or be made illegal should not be determined by their efficacy, popularity, or economy. I agree fully with Dr Brewer--abortion is a moral issue and it is a pity that the BMF has not raised the moral issues at stake. Particularly so, as Lord Denning put it "...without morality there can be no law." I personally subscribe to the Hippocratic Oath. PMID:497769

  9. Sudden cardiac death due to coronary artery dissection as a complication of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kanaroglou, Savas; Nair, Vidhya; Fernandes, John R

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), cardiac tamponade and sudden cardiac death that typically affects young women in the postpartum period. Rarely, it can be caused by systemic inflammatory conditions such as sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease most often affecting the lung and lymph nodes that can sometimes affect the heart. The authors report a case of sudden cardiac death caused by SCAD in the context of undiagnosed and subclinical cardiac sarcoidosis. The decedent was a 47-year-old male with a relatively innocuous past medical history. He was found dead in bed. At autopsy, there was a lethal hemopericardium resulting in cardiac tamponade. Gross examination of the heart revealed dissection of the posterior descending coronary branch of the right coronary artery. Histologically, the coronary artery showed acute and organizing dissection with evidence of vasculitis. A chronic inflammatory infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, histiocytes, eosinophils and giant cells was seen. Sections of the myocardium showed myocarditis with a nonnecrotizing granuloma. The death was attributed to cardiac tamponade secondary to SCAD in the context of systemic sarcoidosis. The presented case demonstrates two concurrent rare pathologies and highlights the importance of considering SCAD in cases of sudden cardiac death at autopsy.

  10. Ethnic differences in incidence of sudden infant death syndrome in Birmingham.

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, D; Sunderland, R; Stonehouse, M; Cummins, C; Ross, O

    1990-01-01

    Among the 45,204 live births in Birmingham in the three calendar years 1981-3, there were 218 postneonatal deaths, giving a postneonatal mortality rate of 4.82 per 1000 live births. Postneonatal mortality rates were 4.22 for whites, 5.91 for Asians (relative risk 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.53) and 8.20 for Afro-Caribbeans (relative risk 1.78, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.55). Among Asians malformations were common (3.36) and sudden infant death syndrome rare (1.18), in contrast to Afro-Caribbeans among whom the rates were 0.66 and 5.25, respectively. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significantly lower risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Asians and significantly raised risks of SIDS in very low birthweight babies and those with unemployed parent(s). Ethnic differences persisted after controlling for maternal age, social class, and birth weight. Studies of sociocultural differences in child rearing practices are needed and may uncover important aetiological factors of sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:2400217

  11. Cytoarchitectural and Functional Abnormalities of the Inferior Colliculus in Sudden Unexplained Perinatal Death

    PubMed Central

    Lavezzi, Anna M.; Pusiol, Teresa; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The inferior colliculus is a mesencephalic structure endowed with serotonergic fibers that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information. The implication of the neuromodulator serotonin also in the aetiology of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death syndromes and the demonstration in these pathologies of developmental alterations of the superior olivary complex (SOC), a group of pontine nuclei likewise involved in hearing, prompted us to investigate whether the inferior colliculus may somehow contribute to the pathogenetic mechanism of unexplained perinatal death. Therefore, we performed in a wide set of fetuses and infants, aged from 33 gestational weeks to 7 postnatal months and died of both known and unknown cause, an in-depth anatomopathological analysis of the brainstem, particularly of the midbrain. Peculiar neuroanatomical and functional abnormalities of the inferior colliculus, such as hypoplasia/structural disarrangement and immunonegativity or poor positivity of serotonin, were exclusively found in sudden death victims, and not in controls. In addition, these alterations were frequently related to dysgenesis of connected structures, precisely the raphé nuclei and the superior olivary complex, and to nicotine absorption in pregnancy. We propose, on the basis of these results, the involvement of the inferior colliculus in more important functions than those related to hearing, as breathing and, more extensively, all the vital activities, and then in pathological conditions underlying a sudden death in vulnerable periods of the autonomic nervous system development, particularly associated to harmful risk factors as cigarette smoking. PMID:25674737

  12. Chronic kidney disease and risk factors responsible for sudden cardiac death: a whiff of hope?

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Márcio G.; Mion, Decio

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown a strong independent association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events, including death, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Recent clinical trials extend this range of adverse cardiovascular events, also including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Furthermore, other studies suggest structural remodeling of the heart and electrophysiological alterations in this population. These processes may explain the increased risk of arrhythmia in kidney disease and help to identify patients who are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. Sympathetic hyperactivity is well known to increase cardiovascular risk in CKD patients and is a hallmark of essential hypertensive state that occurs early in the clinical course of the disease. In CKD, the sympathetic hyperactivity seems to be expressed at the earliest clinical stage of the disease, showing a direct relationship with the severity of the condition of renal failure, being more pronounced in the terminal stage of CKD. The sympathetic efferent and afferent neural activity in kidney failure is a key mediator for the maintenance and progression of the disease. The aim of this review was to show that the feedback loop of this cycle, due to adrenergic hyperactivity, also aggravates many of the risk factors responsible for causing sudden cardiac death and may be a potential target modifiable by percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. If it is feasible and effective in end-stage renal disease, little is known. PMID:27069851

  13. Historical Perspectives on Sudden Deaths in Young Athletes With Evolution over 35 Years.

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J

    2015-11-01

    Sudden death in young competitive athletes has become a highly visible and substantial issue within cardiovascular medicine of interest both to the general public and to the practicing community. At this time, it is instructive to revisit the evolution of this clinical problem over the past 35 years starting with introduction into the public and medical consciousness by the unexpected sudden deaths of 2 college basketball players within 8 weeks of each other in 1976, 1 with Marfan syndrome and the other with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Subsequently, over the next years, a number of elite athletes died suddenly, raising public visibility and awareness of these tragic events: Len Bias, "Pistol" Pete Maravich, Hank Gathers, Reggie Lewis, Kori Stringer, Jason Collier, and Thomas Herrion. Intense interest in these and many other athlete deaths has led to a considerable understanding regarding the demographics, incidence, and causes of these deaths, which include a variety of genetic and/or congenital cardiovascular diseases (most commonly hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), blunt trauma, commotio cordis, and sickle cell trait. Ultimately, initiatives emerged creating consensus guidelines for disqualification versus eligibility decisions, and preparticipation screening to detect unsuspected cardiac abnormalities. This journey of now >3 decades has generated voluminous data and even controversy, but continues to hold great interest in clinical scientists, medical practitioners, and the general public.

  14. Unexpected and sudden death due to undiagnosed medulloblastoma in twin pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Francesco; Barranco, Rosario; Gentile, Raffaella; Vergani, Patrizia

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of sudden and unexpected death caused by a medulloblastoma in a woman aged 28, native of South America, at the 33rd week of twin pregnancy, with neurological signs appeared a month before death. The initial symptoms were attributed to epiphenomena of pregnancy. Two weeks after hospitalization, the woman showed an acute frontal headache that prevented movement and caused a rapid lowering of arterial oxygen saturation. The patient died around 3h later, despite resuscitation. Immediately after, a caesarean section was performed but it was not enough to prevent the death of the two foetuses. The autopsy revealed the presence of a tumour between the left lobe of the cerebellum and the vermis. Histological examination enabled to identify a medulloblastoma. Death was attributed to acute cardio-respiratory insufficiency caused by compression of the brain stem. Foetuses showed no malformation and their death was due to an acute hypoxia resulting from the mother cardiovascular arrest. PMID:27595435

  15. Unexpected and sudden death due to undiagnosed medulloblastoma in twin pregnancy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Francesco; Barranco, Rosario; Gentile, Raffaella; Vergani, Patrizia

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of sudden and unexpected death caused by a medulloblastoma in a woman aged 28, native of South America, at the 33rd week of twin pregnancy, with neurological signs appeared a month before death. The initial symptoms were attributed to epiphenomena of pregnancy. Two weeks after hospitalization, the woman showed an acute frontal headache that prevented movement and caused a rapid lowering of arterial oxygen saturation. The patient died around 3h later, despite resuscitation. Immediately after, a caesarean section was performed but it was not enough to prevent the death of the two foetuses. The autopsy revealed the presence of a tumour between the left lobe of the cerebellum and the vermis. Histological examination enabled to identify a medulloblastoma. Death was attributed to acute cardio-respiratory insufficiency caused by compression of the brain stem. Foetuses showed no malformation and their death was due to an acute hypoxia resulting from the mother cardiovascular arrest.

  16. [A proposal of essentials for forensic pathological diagnosis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)].

    PubMed

    Takatsu, A; Misawa, S; Yoshioka, N; Nakasono, I; Sato, Y; Kurihara, K; Nishi, K; Maeda, H; Kurata, T

    2000-08-01

    There are many sudden unexpected infant death cases which are easily diagnosed as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) both with or without autopsy in Japan. A SIDS diagnosis may provide a cover for accidental or criminal death. SIDS should not be a convenient diagnostic box that shelters the cases of unexpected infant death which lack the necessary antemortem information to make the correct diagnosis. The authors consider that SIDS should be diagnosed according to the direction of the international definition of SIDS, and propose the following essentials for a forensic pathological diagnosis. 1) A thorough autopsy should be performed based on precise autopsy protocol, including not only histological observation, but also, if necessary, toxicological, bacteriological, viral and/or biochemical examinations. 2) The forensic pathologist should be provided with pertinent information regarding antemortem health status, past clinical history, social circumstances, death scene investigation, etc. In order to collect more precise information, the authors recommend using a questionnaire such as the example in this report to record information from the deceased's guardians. 3) Suspicion of accidental death or infanticide should be completely ruled out. SIDS should be diagnosed only after these three essentials have been satisfied. When there is even a slight suspicion of accidental death or infanticide, or when the forensic pathologist can not obtain pertinent information about the deceased, the causes and classification of the death should be diagnosed as unspecified or undetermined. That is, the causes and classification of the death are undetermined as to whether it is a natural or unnatural death. Furthermore, several warning flags indicating a possible SIDS diagnosis were proposed: a case found dead in a supine position, the existence of a foreign body in the respiratory tract or mild infectious findings. The authors also emphasize the physician's responsibility to

  17. Forensic Pathological Study of 1656 Cases of Sudden Cardiac Death in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiuping; Zhang, Liyong; Zheng, Jinxiang; Zhao, Qianhao; Wu, Yeda; Yin, Kun; Huang, Lei; Tang, Shuangbo; Cheng, Jianding

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is progressively threatening the lives of young people throughout the world. We conducted a retrospective study of SCD cases identified among sudden death cases based on comprehensive autopsies and pathological examinations in the Center for Medicolegal Expertise of Sun Yat-Sen University to investigate the exact etiological distribution and epidemiological features of SCD. One thousand six hundred fifty-six cases were identified, and SCD accounted for 43.0% of these sudden death cases. The mean age of the SCD cases—where the data of definite ages were accessible—was 38.2 years, and the highest incidence occurred among the 31- to 40-year-old cases (25.6%). The male-to-female ratio among SCD cases was 4.3:1, and this ratio peaked in the 41- to 50-year-old group (7.7:1). The places of death were confirmed in 1411 cases, and predominantly in hospitals (46.3%) and at home (33.8%). SCD occurred throughout the year with a marginally increase in April and May. The major causes of SCD were coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD, 41.6%), unexplained sudden death (15.1%), and myocarditis (11.8%). Our data indicated that in the age group of younger affected persons (below 35 years old), sudden unexplained death and myocarditis were much more prevalent than CAD. According to anatomical examinations of the CAD-related SCD cases, the proportion of cases with coronary artery stenosis exceeding 75% (grade IV) was 67.2%. Moreover, the percentages of higher grades of coronary atherosclerosis increased with age. Among all branches of the coronary arteries, the left anterior descending branch was the most prone to atherosclerosis; atherosclerosis was present in this branch in 95.4% of the cases with atherosclerosis. Additionally, lesions of multiple branches of the coronary artery were associated with ageing. This is the first study to report the causes of death and basic epidemiological data related to SCD in Southern China. PMID:26844513

  18. Forensic Pathological Study of 1656 Cases of Sudden Cardiac Death in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuping; Zhang, Liyong; Zheng, Jinxiang; Zhao, Qianhao; Wu, Yeda; Yin, Kun; Huang, Lei; Tang, Shuangbo; Cheng, Jianding

    2016-02-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is progressively threatening the lives of young people throughout the world. We conducted a retrospective study of SCD cases identified among sudden death cases based on comprehensive autopsies and pathological examinations in the Center for Medicolegal Expertise of Sun Yat-Sen University to investigate the exact etiological distribution and epidemiological features of SCD. One thousand six hundred fifty-six cases were identified, and SCD accounted for 43.0% of these sudden death cases. The mean age of the SCD cases-where the data of definite ages were accessible-was 38.2 years, and the highest incidence occurred among the 31- to 40-year-old cases (25.6%). The male-to-female ratio among SCD cases was 4.3:1, and this ratio peaked in the 41- to 50-year-old group (7.7:1). The places of death were confirmed in 1411 cases, and predominantly in hospitals (46.3%) and at home (33.8%). SCD occurred throughout the year with a marginally increase in April and May. The major causes of SCD were coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD, 41.6%), unexplained sudden death (15.1%), and myocarditis (11.8%). Our data indicated that in the age group of younger affected persons (below 35 years old), sudden unexplained death and myocarditis were much more prevalent than CAD. According to anatomical examinations of the CAD-related SCD cases, the proportion of cases with coronary artery stenosis exceeding 75% (grade IV) was 67.2%. Moreover, the percentages of higher grades of coronary atherosclerosis increased with age. Among all branches of the coronary arteries, the left anterior descending branch was the most prone to atherosclerosis; atherosclerosis was present in this branch in 95.4% of the cases with atherosclerosis. Additionally, lesions of multiple branches of the coronary artery were associated with ageing. This is the first study to report the causes of death and basic epidemiological data related to SCD in Southern China.

  19. Asbestos bodies in children's lungs. An association with sudden infant death syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, A.K.; Kanz, M.F.

    1988-05-01

    Lungs from 46 autopsied children (age range, 1 to 27 months) were examined for asbestos bodies using a bleach-digestion extraction technique. Ten (21.7%) of 46 children had asbestos bodies in their lungs. Of these ten children, seven were diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome, and three were diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Thus, 46.6% of children with sudden infant death syndrome and 42.8% of children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia had asbestos bodies. Impaired lung-clearing mechanisms due to either abnormal lung physiology or reorganization of pulmonary architecture may be significant in the formation of asbestos bodies. Additionally, children with asbestos bodies may have been exposed to higher ambient levels of asbestos and other pollutants.

  20. Sudden death of distillability in a two-qutrit anisotropic Heisenberg spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Zou, Hong-mei; Zhang, Shi-yang; Liu, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    Sudden death of distillability for a two-qutrit anisotropic Heisenberg XX chain with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied in detail. By using the negativity and realignment criterion, we show that certain initial prepared free entangled states may become bound entangled or separable states in a finite time. Moreover, the influences of the isotropic bilinear interaction parameter, the external magnetic field strength, the DM interaction parameter, as well as the intrinsic decoherence parameter on the possibility of distillability sudden death (DSD) have been studied. The results show, controlling the isotropic bilinear interaction parameter, the external magnetic field strength, the DM interaction parameter, as well as the intrinsic decoherence parameter, can accelerate the possibility of DSD in the present model.

  1. Distillability sudden death in qutrit-qutrit systems under global and multilocal dephasing

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Mazhar

    2010-04-15

    Recently Song et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012331 (2009)] discovered that certain two-qutrit entangled states interacting with multilocal dephasing undergo distillability sudden death (DSD). We generalized their studies for quantum states under global, collective, and multilocal dephasing. We found that for a specific family of quantum states DSD and entanglement sudden death may happen under global dephasing as well as under multilocal dephasing. Moreover, for these states simple local unitary transformations may not avoid DSD under the current dynamics. As there is no definitive criterion for separability or entanglement of density matrices with dimensions greater than six, therefore we believe that the results obtained in this article are restricted to the specific family of states considered here.

  2. Predicting sudden cardiac death from T wave alternans of the surface electrocardiogram: promise and pitfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, D. S.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a preeminent public health problem. Despite advances in preventative treatment for patients known to be at risk, to date we have been able to identify, and thus treat, only a small minority of these patients. Therefore, there is a major need to develop noninvasive diagnostic technologies to identify patients at risk. Recent studies have demonstrated that measurement of microvolt-level T wave alternans is a promising technique for the accurate identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In this article, we review the clinical data establishing the relationship between microvolt T wave alternans and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also review the methods and technology that have been developed to measure microvolt levels of T wave alternans noninvasively in broad populations of ambulatory patients. In particular, we examine techniques that permit the accurate measurement of T wave alternans during exercise stress testing.

  3. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and sudden infant death syndrome: disorders of autonomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Rand, Casey M; Patwari, Pallavi P; Carroll, Michael S; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2013-03-01

    Long considered a rare and unique disorder of respiratory control, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome has recently been further distinguished as a disorder of autonomic regulation. Similarly, more recent evidence suggests that sudden infant death syndrome is also a disorder of autonomic regulation. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome typically presents in the newborn period with alveolar hypoventilation, symptoms of autonomic dysregulation and, in a subset of cases, Hirschsprung disease or tumors of neural crest origin or both. Genetic investigation identified PHOX2B, a crucial gene during early autonomic development, as disease defining for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Although sudden infant death syndrome is most likely defined by complex multifactorial genetic and environmental interactions, it is also thought to result from central deficits in the control of breathing and autonomic regulation. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of these autonomic disorders and discuss the influence of this information on clinical practice and future research directions. PMID:23465774

  4. Local-dephasing-induced entanglement sudden death in two-component finite-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ann, Kevin; Jaeger, Gregg

    2007-10-15

    Entanglement sudden death (ESD), the complete loss of entanglement in finite time, is demonstrated to occur in a class of bipartite states of qudit pairs of any finite dimension d>2, when prepared in so-called 'isotropic states' and subject to multilocal dephasing noise alone. This extends previous results for qubit pairs [T. Yu and J. H. Eberly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006)] to all qudit pairs with d>2.

  5. Abbreviated report of the NIH/NINDS workshop on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Donner, E.J.; So, E.L.; Jacobs, M.; Nashef, L.; Noebels, J.L.; Buchhalter, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a devastating complication of epilepsy and is not rare. The NIH and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke sponsored a 3-day multidisciplinary workshop to advance research into SUDEP and its prevention. Parallel sessions were held: one with a focus on the science of SUDEP, and the other with a focus on issues related to the education of health care practitioners and people with epilepsy. This report summarizes the discussions and recommendations of the workshop, including lessons learned from investigations of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), sudden cardiac death, autonomic and respiratory physiology, medical devices, genetics, and animal models. Recommendations include educating all people with epilepsy about SUDEP as part of their general education on the potential harm of seizures, except in extenuating circumstances. Increasing awareness of SUDEP may facilitate improved seizure control, possibly decreasing SUDEP incidence. There have been significant advances in our understanding of the clinical and physiologic features of SIDS, sudden cardiac death, and SUDEP in both people and animals. Research should continue to focus on the cardiac, autonomic, respiratory, and genetic factors that likely contribute to the risk of SUDEP. Multicenter collaborative research should be encouraged, especially investigations with direct implications for the prevention of SUDEP. An ongoing SUDEP Coalition has been established to facilitate this effort. With the expansion of clinical, genetic, and basic science research, there is reasonable hope of advancing our understanding of SUDEP and ultimately our ability to prevent it. Neurology® 2011;76:1932–1938 PMID:21543734

  6. Dysrhythmias and sudden death in acromegalic heart disease. A clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Thiene, G; Caragaro, L; Giordano, R; Lauro, S

    1977-10-01

    A clinicopathologic investigation was carried out in a patient with acromegaly from acidophylic adenoma of the hypophysis. Pronounced cardiomegaly and disturbances in impulse formation and conduction led to sudden death. The problem of acromegalic cardiomyopathy has been reviewed. Particular attention has been focused on the histopathologic findings in the working and specific myocardium, and in the intrinsic nervous supply to the sinoatrial node, which were correlated with the electrocardiographic features of atrioventricular conduction delay and sick sinus syndrome.

  7. Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia/Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Cardiac Death in the Normal Heart.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Meleze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Sacher, Frederic; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Primary electrical diseases manifest with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) and along with idiopathic VF contribute to about 10% of sudden cardiac deaths (SCDs) overall. These disorders include long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, short QT syndrome, and early repolarization syndrome. This article reviews the clinical electrophysiological management of PMVT/VF in a structurally normal heart affected with these disorders. PMID:27521091

  8. Excited Delirium and Sudden Death: A Syndromal Disorder at the Extreme End of the Neuropsychiatric Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) has raised continued controversy regarding the cause and manner of death of some highly agitated persons held in police custody, restrained or incapacitated by electrical devices. At autopsy, medical examiners have difficulty in identifying an anatomic cause of death, but frequently cite psychostimulant intoxication as a contributing factor. The characteristic symptoms of ExDS include bizarre and aggressive behavior, shouting, paranoia, panic, violence toward others, unexpected physical strength, and hyperthermia. Throughout the United States and Canada, these cases are most frequently associated with cocaine, methamphetamine, and designer cathinone abuse. Acute exhaustive mania and sudden death presents with behavioral symptoms that are identical to what is described for ExDS in psychostimulant abusers. Bell's mania or acute exhaustive mania was first described in the 1850's by American psychiatrist Luther Bell in institutionalized psychiatric patients. This rare disorder of violent mania, elevated body temperature and autonomic collapse continued to be described by others in the psychiatric literature, but with different names until the first cases of ExDS were seen at the beginning of the cocaine epidemic by medical examiners. The neurochemical pathology examination of brain tissues after death revealed a loss of dopamine transporter regulation together with increases in heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) expression as a biomarker of hyperthermia. The similarity in the behavioral symptoms between extremely agitated psychostimulant abusers and unmedicated psychiatric patients suggests that a genetic disorder that leads to dysregulated central dopamine transporter function could be a precipitating cause of the acute delirium and sudden death. While the precise cause and mechanism of lethality remains controversial, the likely whys and wherefores of sudden death of ExDS victims are seen to be

  9. Case-control study of sudden infant death syndrome in Scotland, 1992-5.

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, H.; Gibson, A.; Tappin, D.; Brown, H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between routine infant care practices and the sudden infant death syndrome in Scotland. METHODS: National study of 201 infants dying of the sudden infant death syndrome (cases) and 276 controls by means of home interviews comparing methods of infant care and socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: Sleeping prone (odds ratio 6.96 (95% confidence interval 1.51 to 31.97) and drug treatment in the previous week (odds ratio 2.33 (1.10 to 4.94)) were more common in the cases than controls on multivariate analysis. Smoking was confirmed as a significant risk factor (odds ratio for mother and father both smoking 5.19 (2.26 to 11.91)). The risk increased with the number of parents smoking (P < 0.0001), with the number of cigarettes smoked by mother or father (P = 0.0001), and with bed sharing (P < 0.005). A new finding was an increased risk of dying of the syndrome for infants who slept at night on a mattress previously used by another infant or adult (odds ratio 2.51 (1.39 to 4.52)). However, this increased risk was not established for mattresses totally covered by polyvinyl chloride. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeping prone and parental smoking are confirmed as modifiable risk factors for the sudden infant death syndrome. Sleeping on an old mattress may be important but needs confirmation before recommendations can be made. PMID:9169398

  10. Evaluation of chest barriers for protection against sudden death due to commotio cordis.

    PubMed

    Doerer, Joseph J; Haas, Tammy S; Estes, N A Mark; Link, Mark S; Maron, Barry J

    2007-03-15

    Blunt precordial blows triggering ventricular fibrillation (commotio cordis) represent a leading cause of sudden death in young athletes. Attention has focused on the primary prevention of these tragedies with chest barriers. The U.S. Commotio Cordis Registry was accessed to determine the likelihood of sudden death in athletes exposed to precordial blows while wearing chest protectors. Of 182 cases of commotio cordis, 85 (47%) occurred during practice or competition in organized sports. In 32 of these 85 competitive athletes (38%), fatal chest blows occurred despite the presence of potentially protective equipment. Athletes wore standard, commercially available chest barriers made of polymer foam covered by fabric or hard shells, generally perceived as protective from arrhythmic consequences of the blows. These events occurred in 4 sports: hockey (n = 13; 1 goalie), football (n = 10), lacrosse (n = 6; 3 goalies), and baseball (n = 3; all catchers). Scenarios included the failure of the padding to cover the precordium so that blows circumvented the protective barrier (n = 25) or projectiles that struck the chest barrier directly (n = 7). In conclusion, a significant proportion (about 40%) of sudden deaths reported in young competitive athletes due to blunt chest blows (commotio cordis) occur despite the presence of commercially available sports equipment generally perceived as protective.

  11. Identifying sudden cardiac death risk and specifying its occurrence time by analyzing electrocardiograms in natural time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2007-08-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a frequent cause of death and may occur even if the electrocardiogram seems to be similar to that of a healthy individual. A method which not only identifies the risk but also provides an estimate of the time of an impending cardiac arrest is proposed. Analyzing 159 electrocardiograms in natural time, the authors find that the key quantity is the entropy change under time reversal. After it becomes maximum at the scale of 13 heartbeats, ventricular fibrillation starts within ˜3h in 16 out of 18 SCDs. The method also distinguishes congestive heart failure patients from SCD.

  12. Active surveillance of sudden cardiac death in young athletes by periodic Internet searches.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristal; Pan, Yann Ping; Pock, Michelle; Chang, Ruey-Kang R

    2013-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that prospective, systematic Internet searches could identify occurrences of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes and would be useful for establishing a system of active surveillance. Weekly advanced Google searches of the Internet were conducted for cases of SCD in young athletes during a 12-month period (2007-2008). Athletes ages 11-30 years who collapsed during a game, practice, or within an hour of exercise were included in the study. Individuals with known histories of cardiac issues and events occurring outside the United States were excluded. Verification of SCD was by autopsy reports and death certificates from county coroner offices and vital record agencies. Initially, 71 events were identified. Verification for the cause of death by coroner reports was possible in 45 cases, 43 (96 %) of which were confirmed to be SCDs. A total of 69 individuals 11-30 years of age (mean 17 ± 5 years) died suddenly of cardiovascular causes while participating in 15 different organized sports and a variety of nonorganized physical activities. The most common cause of death was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (30 %), followed by coronary artery anomalies (9 %), and myocarditis (9 %). The incidence of athlete SCD, the types of sports involved, and the cardiac causes of death in our study were comparable with those of previous reports. Readily available Internet searches have the potential to be a powerful tool for identifying occurrences of athlete SCD. An active surveillance system using Google searches followed by coroner report verification can provide important epidemiologic and clinical information.

  13. Active Surveillance of Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes by Periodic Internet Searches

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kristal; Pan, Yann Ping; Pock, Michelle; Chang, Ruey-Kang R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that prospective, systematic Internet searches could identify occurrences of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes, and would be useful to establish a system of active surveillance. Methods Weekly advanced Google searches of the Internet were conducted for cases of SCD in young athletes over a 12-month period (2007–8). Athletes aged 11 to 30 years who collapsed during a game, practice, or within an hour of exercise were included. Individuals with known histories of cardiac issues and events occurring outside the United States were excluded. Verification of SCD was by autopsy reports and death certificates from county coroner offices and vital record agencies. Results A total of 71 events were initially identified. Verification of the cause of death by coroner reports was possible in 45 cases, of which 43 (96%) were confirmed to be SCDs. Sixty-nine individuals, 11 to 30 years of age (mean 17 ± 5), died suddenly from cardiovascular causes while participating in 15 different organized sports and a variety of non-organized physical activities. The most common cause of death was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (30%), followed by coronary artery anomalies (9%), and myocarditis (9%). The incidence of athlete SCD, types of sports involved, and cardiac causes of death in our study were comparable to previous reports. Conclusions Readily available Internet searches have the potential to be a powerful tool for identifying occurrences of athlete SCD. An active surveillance system using Google searches followed by coroner report verification can provide important epidemiologic and clinical information. PMID:23681420

  14. Update: Causes and symptoms of sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Asif, Irfan M; Yim, Eugene S; Hoffman, Jacob M; Froelicher, Vic

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death during exercise. While initial reports suggested that the most common cause of SCD in young athletes was due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a critical review of investigations in several populations (athletes, non-athletes, military, national, and international) supports that the most common finding at autopsy of young individuals with SCD is actually a structurally normal heart (SNH). This information is vital for sports medicine clinicians, especially with regard to the pre-participation evaluation (PPE) since cardiac death associated with a SNH is likely attributed to disorders such as arrhythmia or ion channel diseases. This comprehensive review explores the causes of SCD, along with the symptoms preceding death, which ultimately may help refine the PPE and maximize the ability to detect potentially lethal disease prior to competition.

  15. The relationship between state abortion-restrictions and homicide deaths among children under 5 years of age: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Sen, Bisakha; Wingate, Martha Slay; Kirby, Russell

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether, in the U.S., there are associations between state-level variations in mortality among young children and state abortion restriction policies - such as parental-consent requirements, parental-notification requirements, mandatory delay laws, and restrictions on Medicaid funding for abortion. To investigate this, we used NCHS Multiple Cause of Deaths public-use data files for the period 1983-2002, and compiled data on children ages 0-4 identified as having died as a result of assault/homicide in each state and year. Medicaid funding of abortion, mandatory delay laws, and parental involvement laws for minors seeking abortions were included as the main predictor variables of interest. Multivariate count data models using pooled state-year-age cohort data, with state and time fixed effects and other state-level controls, were estimated. Results indicated that, between 1983 and 2002, the average increase in the number of homicide deaths for children under 5 years of age was 5.70 per state among states that implemented stricter abortion policies over that time, and 2.00 per state for states that did not. In the count data models, parental-consent laws were associated with a 13 percent increase in child homicide deaths; parental-notification laws were associated with an 8 percent increase in child homicide deaths though the results were less robust to alternate model specifications; mandatory delay requirements were associated with a 13 percent increase in child homicide deaths. While these data do not allow us to discern precise pathways via which state abortion-restrictions can lead to more child homicide deaths, we speculate that state restrictions on abortion may result in a disproportionate increase in children born into relatively high-risk environments. Additional research is called for to explore the association of state abortion-restrictions with other measures of infant/child health and well-being.

  16. Comprehensive review of sleep-related sudden unexpected infant deaths and their investigations: Florida 2008.

    PubMed

    Sauber-Schatz, Erin K; Sappenfield, William M; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K

    2015-02-01

    To describe 2008 Florida sleep-related sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs) by describing (a) percentage distribution of medical examiner (ME) cause-of-death determinations; (b) mortality rates by maternal and infant characteristics; (c) prevalence of selected suffocation or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk and protective factors; (d) frequency of selected scene investigation and autopsy components (including extent of missing data); and (e) percentage with public health program contact. In this population-based study, we identified sleep-related SUIDs occurring among Florida residents from the 2008-linked Florida infant death and birth certificates. Information about the circumstances of death was abstracted from ME, law enforcement, and hospital records. We used frequencies and percentages to describe characteristics of sleep-related SUID cases. Of 215 sleep-related SUID cases, MEs identified 47.9% as accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed, 35.4% as unknown or undetermined cause, and 16.7% as SIDS. Sleep-related SUID most frequently occurred in an adult bed (n = 108; 50.2%). At death, 82.4% of sleep-related SUIDs had ≥1 suffocation or SIDS risk factor with 54.4% infants sharing a sleep surface, 38.1% placed nonsupine, 24.2% placed on a pillow, and 10.2% having head covering. Missing data frequently resulted from incomplete scene investigation and autopsy components. SUID contributed to ≥1 in seven Florida infant deaths in 2008. Approximately 80% of sleep-related SUIDs were reported among infants placed in unsafe sleeping environments. Effective interventions are needed to promote safe sleep among caregivers of Florida infants. These interventions must reach infant caregivers at highest risk and change unsafe sleep practices. The substantial percentage of missing investigation data reinforces the need for standardized reporting. PMID:24898690

  17. Three sudden cardiac deaths associated with Lyme carditis - United States, November 2012-July 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochete transmitted by certain species of Ixodes ticks. Approximately 30,000 confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease were reported in the United States in 2012, primarily from high-incidence states in the Northeast (Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont) and upper Midwest (Minnesota and Wisconsin). Common manifestations include cutaneous, neurologic, and rheumatologic signs and symptoms. Symptomatic infection of the heart is rare in recognized Lyme disease cases and usually resolves promptly with appropriate antibiotic therapy. Nonetheless, cardiac involvement occasionally can cause life-threatening cardiac conduction abnormalities. During November 2012-July 2013, one woman and two men (ranging in age from 26 to 38 years) from high-incidence Lyme disease states experienced sudden cardiac death and, on postmortem examination, were found to have evidence of Lyme carditis. The three deaths were investigated by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, New Hampshire Department of Public Health, New York State Department of Health, and CDC. Donated corneas from two decedents had been transplanted to three recipients before the diagnosis of Lyme disease was established, but no evidence of disease transmission was found. Although death from Lyme carditis is rare, it should be considered in cases of sudden cardiac death in patients from high-incidence Lyme disease regions. Reducing exposure to ticks is the best method for preventing Lyme disease and other tickborne infections.

  18. Obstruction of the lung capillaries by blood platelet aggregates and leucocytes in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Tor-Arne; Jørgensen, Leif

    2010-12-01

    Altogether 34 cases of sudden infant death were studied postmortem with particular emphasis on the pathological changes in the lungs. Light microscopy, including application of immunohistochemical methods, and transmission electron microscopy were used for the identification of blood platelets and white blood cell types in alveolar capillaries. The main findings were platelet aggregates and a varying number of neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes in the lung capillaries, mixed with a smaller number of lymphocytes. The findings may be interpreted as an early sign of inflammation with capillary thrombosis, resulting in ischaemia, i.e. arrest of flow. In 21% of the cases, inflammatory cells had also expanded focally into alveolar spaces, creating the picture of localized areas of bronchopneumonia. An infant dying suddenly of a traumatic head injury served as a control. Neither platelets nor leucocytes were observed in the alveolar capillaries of this infant. In conclusion, in lungs from cases of sudden infant death syndrome, the alveolar capillaries are obstructed by platelet aggregates and leucocytes, interpreted as signs of an initial stage of lung inflammation with ischaemia. PMID:21091777

  19. An autopsy case of sudden unexpected death due to a glial cyst of the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Park, Jong-Tae

    2014-09-01

    Pineal cysts are usually asymptomatic; however, they may rarely cause symptoms such as chronic headache, paroxysmal headache with gaze paresis, postural syncope, loss of consciousness, and sudden death. A 30-year-old woman with no specific medical history except chronic headache was found collapsed in a public toilet per se. Postmortem examination revealed no external injuries or internal diseases except a cystic lesion of the pineal gland. Histologic examination showed an internal cyst surrounded by glial tissues and pineal parenchyma that was diagnosed as a glial cyst of the pineal gland. Although the pineal cyst cannot be confirmed as the cause of death, it was considered, as no other cause was evident. Herein, we report a pineal cyst considered as an assumed cause of death.

  20. Acute poisonings and sudden deaths in Crete: a five-year review (1991-1996).

    PubMed

    Christakis-Hampsas, M; Tutudakis, M; Tsatsakis, A M; Assithianakis, P; Alegakis, A; Katonis, P G; Michalodimitrakis, E N

    1998-08-01

    Fatal and non-fatal acute poisonings and other sudden deaths examined in the Toxicology Laboratory of University Hospital of Iraklion, Crete, from 1991 to 1996 mainly involved the abuse of drugs (heroin, flunitrazepam and other psychoactive substances), accidental poisonings or suicide attempts with pesticides (carbamates, organophosphates, paraquat), other chemicals (cyanide salts, paint thinner, chlorine), traffic accidents, drownings and violent deaths (gunshots). Many of the cases were related to poisonous gases or volatiles (carbon monoxide, methylbromide). Fatalities due to alcohol and methylene-dioxy-ethyl amphetamine were also examined. Amphetamine and alcohol-related deaths due to drowning were more recent. A significant number of cases were related to the accidental ingestion of alcohol, drugs or suicide attempts by children. Some of the cases were treated successfully in various Cretan hospitals, while others had fatal outcomes due to late hospital admission. PMID:9682411

  1. Commodio cordis: an underappreciated cause of sudden cardiac death in young patients: assessment and management in the ED.

    PubMed

    Perron, A D; Brady, W J; Erling, B F

    2001-09-01

    Commotio cordis is the condition of sudden cardiac death or near sudden cardiac death after blunt, low-impact chest wall trauma in the absence of structural cardiac abnormality. Ventricular fibrillation is the most commonly reported induced arrhythmia in commotio cordis. Blunt impact injury to the chest with a baseball is the most common mechanism. Survival rates for commotio cordis are low, even with prompt CPR and defibrillation.

  2. Is There a Role for Genetics in the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death?

    PubMed

    Faragli, Alessandro; Underwood, Katherine; Priori, Silvia G; Mazzanti, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    The identification of patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) is fundamental for both acquired cardiovascular diseases (such as coronary artery diseases, CAD) and inherited arrhythmia syndromes (such as the long-QT syndrome, LQTS). Genetics may play a role in both situations, although the potential to exploit this information to reduce the burden of SCD varies among these two groups. Concerning acquired cardiovascular diseases, which affect most of the general population, preliminary data suggest an association between genetics and the risk of dying suddenly. The maximal utility, instead, is reached in inherited arrhythmia syndromes, where the discovery of monogenic diseases such as LQTS tracked the way for the first genotype-phenotype correlations. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview focusing on the current genetic knowledge and on the present and future applicability for prevention in these two populations at risk for SCD. PMID:27279603

  3. Vascular anomaly of the bundle of His associated with sudden death in a young man.

    PubMed

    Bell, M D; Tate, L G

    1994-06-01

    A 24-year-old black man suddenly collapsed while playing basketball. He died despite prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The only abnormality found at autopsy was a vascular anomaly confined to the atrioventricular bundle of His within the cardiac conduction system. This arborizing collection of abnormal and increased number of blood vessels lacked both elastic fibers and smooth muscle, both of which were replaced by collagen. The number of vessels in the decedent's bundle of His was quantitatively compared with 117 normal controls by using a point-counting method. The percentage of points landing on vessels per total points counted (% VP/TP) in this man was 31% compared with 5.6 +/- 2.7% SD in the controls. No vascular malformations were seen elsewhere. This lesion has not been previously reported in the medical literature. This case confirmed the occasional usefulness of sampling the cardiac conduction system in sudden death with no obvious autopsy findings.

  4. The Mikamo lecture. Role of higher nervous activity in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lown, B

    1990-06-01

    The brain receives and catalogues myriads of information from within and without the organism. These inputs promote neural integration of bodily function through a multiplicity of cybernetic feedback loops. Higher nervous activity shapes the contours of perceived well-being and determines the course and progress of disease. Behavioral and neural factors play an important role in cardiovascular function and are especially relevant to the problem of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Clinical data attesting to the role of biobehavioral factors in SCD derive from a diversity of sources. It has long been known that bereavement increases the prevalence of cardiac fatality. Business failure rates are strongly related to increased mortality among persons aged 55 and over. Recession in economic activity, with increasing unemployment, is associated with augmented death rates from ischemic heart disease. In extensive surveys conducted among London civil servants, Rose and Marmot found not only the level but the type of employment to be a factor determining coronary heart disease mortality. Blue collar workers had a 3.6 times greater chance of dying from heart disease than an age-matched population in the higher ranks of civil service. A man's employment status was a stronger predictor of risk for dying from coronary heart disease than any of the usual risk factors, such as smoking, blood pressure, height-weight ratio, leisure time activities, glucose tolerance, or plasma cholesterol. Operation of behavioral factors is also suggested by the time of occurrence of sudden death. Among 3,983 men followed for more than 30 years, Rabkin and co-workers observed an excess proportion of fatalities on Mondays. No such pattern was noted for cancer mortality. Not only the day of the week but the time of day appears to be a factor. Muller and co-workers found a significant preponderance in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and sudden death from 6:00 AM to noon. They could not implicate

  5. Abortion.

    PubMed

    Rice-Oxley, C P

    1979-09-15

    Professor Peter Hungerford (25 August, p 496) says that he is fed up with semantic arguments about abortion which ignore reality. He then invokes two major fantasies of the last decade, those of sexual equality and the woman's right to choose. The second of these has become an article of faith to many pro-abortionists and its credentials should be examined. Whence does this right derive? A woman takes part in a more or less pleasurable activity with a man and then, without her volition, with no conscious effort on her part at all, the miraculous occurs and a new life comes into being. How does she have the right to destroy this new life? The argument is usually to the effect that it belongs to her and could not survive without her: "It's mine and I can do what I like with it." Of course, it is true that a fetus cannot survive without the support of its mother; no more could Professor Hungerford or I survive without the support of our fellow men who provide us with food, drink, and clothing, but that does not give them the right to kill us. The claim to possession, the assumption that the fetus is owned by its mother involves, I believe, a semantic error. In a sense, the fetus is "hers" in that it is growing inside her, even though she did not create it. Likewise, her husband is hers because joined to her by marriage and her country is hers because she lives there, although she does not own either of them and certainly has no right to destroy them. The life growing inside the mother is not hers in the same way that a cardigan she has bought or knitted for herself is hers. It is the consideration of semantics that protects us from the "realities" of such as Professor Hungerford.

  6. Medullary Serotonin Defects and Respiratory Dysfunction in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, David S; Hilaire, Gerard; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2009-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden and unexpected death of an infant less than 12 months of age that occurs during sleep and remains unexplained after a complete autopsy, death scene investigation, and review of the clinical history. It is the leading cause of postneonatal mortality in the developed world. The cause of SIDS is unknown, but is postulated to involve impairment of brainstem-mediated homeostatic control. Extensive evidence from animal studies indicates that serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the medulla oblongata play a role in the regulation of multiple aspects of respiratory and autonomic function. A subset of SIDS infants have several abnormalities in medullary markers of 5-HT function and genetic polymorphisms impacting the 5-HT system, informing the hypothesis that SIDS results from a defect in 5-HT brainstem-mediated control of respiratory (and autonomic) regulation. Here we review the evidence from postmortem human studies and animal studies to support this hypothesis and discuss how the pathogenesis of SIDS is likely to originate in utero during fetal development. PMID:19481178

  7. [Apparent life-threatening events and sudden unexpected death in infancy: Two different entities].

    PubMed

    Naud, J

    2015-09-01

    Most infant apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) are minor with spontaneously favorable prognosis. Frequent etiologies are gastroesophageal reflux, obstructive apneas, respiratory infections, and breath-holding spells. Some rare but potentially serious causes must be discussed. Diagnosis is usually guided by careful questioning of the parents and repeated clinical examinations. A few complementary examinations are systematically needed and their performance is increased if they are oriented by clinical aspects. Hospitalization is usual for monitoring, further etiological investigation, and management of parental anxiety. ALTE and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) etiologies are often different. SUDI is called sudden unexplained death in infancy if it remains unexplained after investigation including autopsy. The annual incidence in France fell sharply after prevention campaigns in the 1990s, and now is about 400 SUDI, including 250 unexplained SUDI. The main guidelines of prevention are back sleeping, cessation of smoking during and after pregnancy, securing the bed and bedding, prevention of hyperthermia, and avoidance of dangerous factors of bed sharing. In the future, infants with particular vulnerabilities may be identified. The Haute Autorité de santé (French National Authority for Health) has published guidelines to support SUDI, standardize procedures, and improve our understanding of the causes of death. PMID:26228810

  8. [Apparent life-threatening events and sudden unexpected death in infancy: Two different entities].

    PubMed

    Naud, J

    2015-09-01

    Most infant apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) are minor with spontaneously favorable prognosis. Frequent etiologies are gastroesophageal reflux, obstructive apneas, respiratory infections, and breath-holding spells. Some rare but potentially serious causes must be discussed. Diagnosis is usually guided by careful questioning of the parents and repeated clinical examinations. A few complementary examinations are systematically needed and their performance is increased if they are oriented by clinical aspects. Hospitalization is usual for monitoring, further etiological investigation, and management of parental anxiety. ALTE and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) etiologies are often different. SUDI is called sudden unexplained death in infancy if it remains unexplained after investigation including autopsy. The annual incidence in France fell sharply after prevention campaigns in the 1990s, and now is about 400 SUDI, including 250 unexplained SUDI. The main guidelines of prevention are back sleeping, cessation of smoking during and after pregnancy, securing the bed and bedding, prevention of hyperthermia, and avoidance of dangerous factors of bed sharing. In the future, infants with particular vulnerabilities may be identified. The Haute Autorité de santé (French National Authority for Health) has published guidelines to support SUDI, standardize procedures, and improve our understanding of the causes of death.

  9. Atypical antipsychotics: from potassium channels to torsade de pointes and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Titier, Karine; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Verdoux, Hélène; Molimard, Mathieu; Bégaud, Bernard; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Lader, Malcolm; Moore, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Syncope and sudden death are features of schizophrenia that can be attributed to ischaemic heart disease, the use of antipsychotics (because of proarrhythmia or other reasons such as pharyngeal dyskinesia) or the psychiatric disease itself. Cases have been described with most antipsychotics and have led to the withdrawal, temporary suspension from the market or restricted use of antipsychotics, such as sultopride, droperidol, sertindole or thioridazine. Reviewing the available data shows that all antipsychotics tested affect the cardiac potassium channel, with the concentration that produces 50% inhibition (IC50) ranging from 1 nmol/L (haloperidol) to 6 micromol/L (olanzapine). Experimental in vitro or in vivo electrophysiological studies have shown a dose-dependent increase in the duration of the action potential with various degrees of indicators of serious arrhythmogenicity. However, this does not always translate clinically into an increased duration of the QT interval or increased risk of torsade de pointes or sudden death in clinical trials or pharmacoepidemiological studies. In turn, QT prolongation in clinical trials does not always translate to an increased risk of torsade de pointes or sudden death. The reasons for these apparent discrepancies are unclear and could be related to insufficiently powered field studies, low plasma and tissue drug concentrations with reference to in vitro data or drug effects on other receptors or ion channels that have a protective effect. Alternatively, risks that were not apparent from preclinical or clinical data could be related to the use of the drug in high-risk patients, metabolic interactions or other factors that would only be encountered in large postmarketing populations. The assessment of cardiovascular safety, both preclinical and during premarketing clinical trials, needs to be supported by appropriately powered pharmacoepidemiology studies.

  10. Intra-alveolar haemorrhage in sudden infant death syndrome: a cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, N; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Green, M A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The "Back to Sleep" campaign in 1991 resulted in a dramatic decrease in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The proportion of presumed SIDS deaths being actually suspicious deaths from airway obstruction is likely to have become relatively greater. There is usually little pathological evidence to suggest smothering, but intra-alveolar haemorrhage appears to be more prominent in cases where interference with the airway is suspected. AIM: To attempt to quantify intra-alveolar haemorrhage to see whether it could be used as a marker to distinguish between smothering/overlaying and SIDS. METHODS: Intra-alveolar haemorrhage was quantified using digital image analysis on haematoxylin/eosin stained sections taken from the lungs of 62 consecutive infants who had died suddenly and unexpectedly. Cases were initially classified according to the original cause of death. After quantitation, the case histories were critically reviewed. Three pathologists independently made microscopic assessments of the degree of intra-alveolar haemorrhage in the first 24 cases to see whether these accurately reflected the quantitative results. RESULTS: 73% of those infants with a history suggesting possible involuntary overlaying and 45% of those with a history suspicious of smothering had significant intra-alveolar haemorrhage (> 5% of total lung surface area assessed). From the history, the cause of death in 11 cases initially classified as SIDS would better have been given as "Unascertained." Simple microscopic assessments underestimated the true extent of the haemorrhage in 33% (8/24). CONCLUSIONS: If a moderate degree (at least 5%) of pulmonary parenchymal haemorrhage is observed, this may be an indicator of airway obstruction for a significant period, either from overlaying or possibly smothering. The diagnosis of SIDS may be being used inappropriately in such cases. Images PMID:10645227

  11. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes. PMID:27156002

  12. Entanglement degree measure and a criterion for sudden death as a phase transition in bipartite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M.A. de; Mizrahi, S.S.; Moussa, M.H.Y.

    2009-11-15

    We propose a method to compute the entanglement degree E of bipartite systems having dimension 2 x 2 and demonstrate that the partial transposition of density matrix, the Peres criterion, arise as a consequence of our method. Differently from other existing measures of entanglement, the one presented here makes possible the derivation of a criterion to verify if an arbitrary bipartite entanglement will suffers sudden death (SD) based only on the initial-state parameters. Our method also makes possible to characterize the SD as a dynamical quantum phase transition, with order parameter E, having a universal critical exponent -1/2.

  13. A Case of Sudden Death in Decameron IV.6: Aortic Dissection or Atrial Myxoma?

    PubMed

    Toscano, Fabrizio; Spani, Giovanni; Papio, Michael; Rühli, Frank J; Galassi, Francesco M

    2016-07-01

    Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron contains a novella that details the sudden death of a young man called Gabriotto, including a portrayal of the discomfort that the protagonist experienced and a rudimentary autopsy performed by local physicians. The intriguing description of symptoms and pathologies has made it possible to read a 7-century-old case through the modern clinical lens. Thanks to the medical and philological analysis of the text-despite the vast difference between modern and medieval medicine-2 hypothetical diagnoses have emerged: either an aortic dissection or an atrial myxoma.

  14. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes.

  15. GENERAL: Entanglement sudden death induced by the Dzialoshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Fang; Shao, Bin; Yang, Lin-Guang; Li, Jian; Zou, Jian

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we study the entanglement dynamics of two-spin Heisenberg XYZ model with the Dzialoshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. The system is initially prepared in the Werner state. The effects of purity of the initial state and DM coupling parameter on the evolution of entanglement are investigated. The necessary and sufficient condition for the appearance of the entanglement sudden death (ESD) phenomenon has been deduced. The result shows that the ESD always occurs if the initial state is sufficiently impure for the given coupling parameter or the DM interaction is sufficiently strong for the given initial state. Moreover, the critical values of them are calculated.

  16. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City.

  17. Influence of Interaction Between Qubits on Entanglement Sudden Death and Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y. H.; Wang, Z. S.; Hu, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic evolution of entanglement is studied for coupling two-qubit system in non-Markov environment in terms of concurrence. We find that the degree of entanglement depends on the initial quantum state of the system and the interaction between the two-qubit system and the environment. When the interaction between the qubits and the environment is completely symmetric, especially, the environment has no effect on the entanglement, where the decoherence is entirely resulted from the interaction between qubits. By controlling the coupling way of the interaction, thus, one may avoid the entanglement sudden death (ESD).

  18. Influence of the Stark Shift on Entanglement Sudden Death and Birth in Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Song; Chen, Ai-Xi; Wu, Kun-Hua

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with two vacuum fields of two spatially separated cavities with the Stark effects by employing the concurrence. It is shown that the entanglement sudden death (ESD) and birth (ESB) could be controlled by adjusting the Stark-shift parameters. If the Stark-shift parameters are chosen appropriately, then ESD and ESB phenomena will appear. In addition, the appearance of ESD before or after ESB depends on the Stark-shift values.

  19. Best practice recommendations for prevention of sudden death in secondary school athletes: an update.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Rianna R; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the recent Inter-Association Task Force held in Washington, D.C. at the 2013 Youth Safety Summit determined best practice recommendations for preventing sudden death in secondary school athletics. This document highlights the major health and safety practices and policies in high school athletics that are paramount to keep student athletes safe. The purpose of this commentary is to review the findings of the document developed by the task force and to provide possible areas where research is needed to continue to educate medical practitioners, players, coaches, and parents on ways to prevent tragedies from occurring during sport.

  20. Cardiac asystole following cannabis (marijuana) usage--additional mechanism for sudden death?

    PubMed

    Menahem, Samuel

    2013-12-10

    A 21 year old university student previously operated during infancy for an unobstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage with an excellent result, was noted on a routine follow up 24 h Holter monitor to have multiple pauses related to cardiac asystole, the longest lasting 5.8 s and temporally related to marijuana inhalation. A repeat Holter was normal following a two week cessation of marijuana usage and again when carried out 3 months later. The documented periods of asystole may be a precursor of sudden death seen in addicts even without evidence of ischaemic heart disease. PMID:24200372

  1. A Case of Sudden Death in Decameron IV.6: Aortic Dissection or Atrial Myxoma?

    PubMed

    Toscano, Fabrizio; Spani, Giovanni; Papio, Michael; Rühli, Frank J; Galassi, Francesco M

    2016-07-01

    Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron contains a novella that details the sudden death of a young man called Gabriotto, including a portrayal of the discomfort that the protagonist experienced and a rudimentary autopsy performed by local physicians. The intriguing description of symptoms and pathologies has made it possible to read a 7-century-old case through the modern clinical lens. Thanks to the medical and philological analysis of the text-despite the vast difference between modern and medieval medicine-2 hypothetical diagnoses have emerged: either an aortic dissection or an atrial myxoma. PMID:27390329

  2. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids: hypertrophy, ischemia and electrical remodelling as potential triggers of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, J H M; Medei, E

    2011-05-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic testosterone derivatives developed to maximise anabolic activity and minimise androgenic activity. AAS abuse is widespread among both athletes and non-athletes at fitness centres and is becoming a public health issue. In addition to their atherogenic, thrombogenic and spastic effects, AAS have direct cardiotoxic effects by causing hypertrophy, electrical and structural remodelling, and contractile dysfunction and by increasing the susceptibility to ischemic injuries. All of these factors contribute to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

  3. Lessons Learned from a Decade of Sudden Oak Death in California: Evaluating Local Management

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Sudden Oak Death has been impacting California’s coastal forests for more than a decade. In that time, and in the absence of a centrally organized and coordinated set of mandatory management actions for this disease in California’s wildlands and open spaces, many local communities have initiated their own management programs. We present five case studies to explore how local-level management has attempted to control this disease. From these case studies, we glean three lessons: connections count, scale matters, and building capacity is crucial. These lessons may help management, research, and education planning for future pest and disease outbreaks. PMID:20559634

  4. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City. PMID:25661095

  5. A study of sudden natural deaths in medico legal autopsies in University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; San, Kang Pei; Idwan, Anuar; Shah, Norazlan; Hajar, Siti; Norkahfi, Mohamad

    2007-04-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine the causes and the epidemiological aspects of sudden natural deaths. Data were collected from 545 sudden natural autopsies in UMMC, Kuala Lumpur over a five-year period, from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2004. There were 475 males and 70 females. The largest number of sudden natural deaths was in the age group of 41-50 years. 35.8%, 30.5% and 11.7% of the patients were Chinese, Indian and Malay, respectively. A majority of the patients were married (59.8%) and came from the semiskilled-unskilled group (30.6%). The monthly distribution was almost constant. Cardiovascular diseases were the most important cause contributing 64.9% in sudden natural deaths. PMID:16914354

  6. Sudden cardiac death in forensic medicine – Swiss recommendations for a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Matthias; Bolliger, Stephan A; Bartsch, Christine; Fokstuen, Siv; Gräni, Christoph; Martos, Viktor; Medeiros Domingo, Argelia; Osculati, Antonio; Rieubland, Claudine; Sabatasso, Sara; Saguner, Ardan M; Schyma, Christian; Tschui, Joelle; Wyler, Daniel; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A; Fellmann, Florence; Michaud, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is by definition unexpected and cardiac in nature. The investigation is almost invariably performed by a forensic pathologist. Under these circumstances the role of the forensic pathologist is twofold: (1.) to determine rapidly and efficiently the cause and manner of death and (2.) to initiate a multidisciplinary process in order to prevent further deaths in existing family members. If the death is determined to be due to "natural" causes the district attorney in charge often refuses further examinations. However, additional examinations, i.e. extensive histopathological investigations and/or molecular genetic analyses, are necessary in many cases to clarify the cause of death. The Swiss Society of Legal Medicine created a multidisciplinary working group together with clinical and molecular geneticists and cardiologists in the hope of harmonising the approach to investigate SCD. The aim of this paper is to close the gap between the Swiss recommendations for routine forensic post-mortem cardiac examination and clinical recommendations for genetic testing of inherited cardiac diseases; this is in order to optimise the diagnostic procedures and preventive measures for living family members. The key points of the recommendations are (1.) the forensic autopsy procedure for all SCD victims under 40 years of age, (2.) the collection and storage of adequate samples for genetic testing, (3.) communication with the families, and (4.) a multidisciplinary approach including cardiogenetic counselling.

  7. Audit of practice in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) post mortems and neuropathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Zuzanna; Wright, Gabriella; Dawson, Timothy; Hilton, David; Joshi, Abhijit; Diehl, Beate; Koepp, Matthias; Lhatoo, Samden; Sander, Josemir W.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is one of the leading causes of death in people with epilepsy. For classification of definite SUDEP, a post mortem (PM), including anatomical and toxicological examination, is mandatory to exclude other causes of death. We audited PM practice as well as the value of brain examination in SUDEP. Methods We reviewed 145 PM reports in SUDEP cases from four UK neuropathology centres. Data were extracted for clinical epilepsy details, circumstances of death and neuropathological findings. Results Macroscopic brain abnormalities were identified in 52% of cases. Mild brain swelling was present in 28%, and microscopic pathologies relevant to cause or effect of seizures were seen in 89%. Examination based on whole fixed brains (76.6% of all PMs), and systematic regional sampling was associated with higher detection rates of underlying pathology (P < 0.01). Information was more frequently recorded regarding circumstances of death and body position/location than clinical epilepsy history and investigations. Conclusion Our findings support the contribution of examination of the whole fixed brain in SUDEP, with high rates of detection of relevant pathology. Availability of full clinical epilepsy‐related information at the time of PM could potentially further improve detection through targeted tissue sampling. Apart from confirmation of SUDEP, complete neuropathological examination contributes to evaluation of risk factors as well as helping to direct future research into underlying causes. PMID:26300477

  8. After sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Lessons learned and the road forward.

    PubMed

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Waddell, Briony; Osland, Karen; Leach, John P; Duncan, Susan; Nashef, Lina; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    The devastating effects of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) can be difficult to navigate, even for experienced clinicians. Mounting evidence supports full disclosure of the risks of epilepsy to those affected and their caregivers, and recommendations from regulatory and professional groups encourage the same. Following a death, families are faced with tragedy, guilt, and sometimes anger. Clinicians are often called upon to provide information and support. The development of a comprehensive approach to SUDEP education requires careful consideration of the people living with epilepsy, facts about SUDEP and known risk factors, as well as experiences of families and care providers. In this article, we share the experiences of those working in SUDEP education and epilepsy care, including the voluntary sector. We explore the experience of bereaved families and clinicians, derive lessons from published research, highlight areas where more research is needed, and report on preliminary data from a nationwide study from France. PMID:26749016

  9. Sudden cardiac death while playing Australian Rules football: a retrospective 14 year review.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sarah; Lynch, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Australian Rules football is a sport which evolved from Gaelic football and which is played by a large number of predominantly male participants in a number of countries. The highest participation rates are in the southern states of Australia. A retrospective review over a period of 14 years identified 14 cases of sudden cardiac death that occurred in individuals while playing the sport. All were male and ranged in age from 13 to 36 years with a mean and median age of 23 years. A spectrum of cardiac causes was identified including coronary artery atherosclerosis, myocarditis, anomalous coronary artery anatomy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and healed Kawasaki disease. In 5 cases the heart was morphologically normal raising the possibility of a channelopathy. No traumatic deaths were identified. Some of the individuals had experienced symptoms prior to the fatal episode and the role of pre participation screening in reducing mortality is discussed.

  10. After sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Lessons learned and the road forward.

    PubMed

    Donner, Elizabeth J; Waddell, Briony; Osland, Karen; Leach, John P; Duncan, Susan; Nashef, Lina; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    The devastating effects of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) can be difficult to navigate, even for experienced clinicians. Mounting evidence supports full disclosure of the risks of epilepsy to those affected and their caregivers, and recommendations from regulatory and professional groups encourage the same. Following a death, families are faced with tragedy, guilt, and sometimes anger. Clinicians are often called upon to provide information and support. The development of a comprehensive approach to SUDEP education requires careful consideration of the people living with epilepsy, facts about SUDEP and known risk factors, as well as experiences of families and care providers. In this article, we share the experiences of those working in SUDEP education and epilepsy care, including the voluntary sector. We explore the experience of bereaved families and clinicians, derive lessons from published research, highlight areas where more research is needed, and report on preliminary data from a nationwide study from France.

  11. Risk Factor Changes for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome After Initiation of Back-to-Sleep Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Haas, Elisabeth A.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Stanley, Christina

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that the profile of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) changed after the Back-to-Sleep (BTS) campaign initiation, document prevalence and patterns of multiple risks, and determine the age profile of risk factors. METHODS: The San Diego SIDS/Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project recorded risk factors for 568 SIDS deaths from 1991 to 2008 based upon standardized death scene investigations and autopsies. Risks were divided into intrinsic (eg, male gender) and extrinsic (eg, prone sleep). RESULTS: Between 1991–1993 and 1996–2008, the percentage of SIDS infants found prone decreased from 84.0% to 48.5% (P < .001), bed-sharing increased from 19.2% to 37.9% (P < .001), especially among infants <2 months (29.0% vs 63.8%), prematurity rate increased from 20.0% to 29.0% (P = .05), whereas symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection decreased from 46.6% to 24.8% (P < .001). Ninety-nine percent of SIDS infants had at least 1 risk factor, 57% had at least 2 extrinsic and 1 intrinsic risk factor, and only 5% had no extrinsic risk. The average number of risks per SIDS infant did not change after initiation of the BTS campaign. CONCLUSIONS: SIDS infants in the BTS era show more variation in risk factors. There was a consistently high prevalence of both intrinsic and especially extrinsic risks both before and during the Back-to-Sleep era. Risk reduction campaigns emphasizing the importance of avoiding multiple and simultaneous SIDS risks are essential to prevent SIDS, including among infants who may already be vulnerable. PMID:22451703

  12. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death. PMID:26839662

  13. Explaining the clinical manifestations of T wave alternans in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Michael J; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying sudden cardiac death (SCD) are complex and diverse. Therefore, correct application of any marker to risk stratify patients for appropriate therapy requires knowledge regarding how the marker is reflective of a particular electro-anatomical substrate for arrhythmias. Non-invasive measurement of beat-to-beat alternation of the electrocardiographic T-wave, referred to as T-wave alternans (TWA), is an important marker of risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Is this relationship a mere association or is TWA mechanistically linked to SCD? Recent experimental evidence strongly supports a mechanistic relationship between TWA and SCD. This review will consider the underlying mechanisms of TWA derived from experimental studies, as they relate to clinical observations of TWA in humans, addressing the following questions derived from common clinical observations: 1) Where does TWA on the surface ECG come from? 2) Why is controlled heart rate elevation required to elicit TWA? 3) Why is TWA associated with risk for SCD? 4) Why is TWA associated with a broad range of ventricular arrhythmias? and 5) How do commonly used medications affect TWA? PMID:19168395

  14. Basis for Sudden Cardiac Death Prediction by T-Wave Alternans from an Integrative Physiology Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Richard L.; Kumar, Kapil; Nearing, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of microvolt levels of T-wave alternans (TWA) has been shown to be useful in identifying individuals at heightened risk for sudden cardiac death. The mechanistic bases for TWA are complex, at the cellular level involving multiple mechanisms, particularly instabilities in membrane voltage (i.e., steep action potential duration restitution slope) and disruptions in intracellular calcium cycling dynamics. The integrative factors influencing TWA at the systemic level are also multifold. We focus on three main variables, namely, heart rate, autonomic nervous system activities, and myocardial ischemia. Clinically, there is growing interest in extending TWA testing to include ambulatory ECG monitoring as well as exercise. The former modality permits assessment of the influence of diverse provocative stimuli of daily life, including circadian factors, mental stress, and sleep-state related disturbances in respiratory and cardiovascular function. Two major emerging concepts in clinical TWA testing are discussed, namely, quantitative analysis of TWA level, to complement the current binary classification scheme, and risk stratification of patients with preserved left ventricular function, the population with the largest absolute number of sudden cardiac deaths. PMID:19251221

  15. Sudden death of a young woman shortly after fleeing from violence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shirushi; Funayama, Masato

    2009-04-01

    A woman in her late-teens ran downstairs and out into the street to escape from violence by her boyfriend. She ran approximately 150 m and was suddenly collapsed immediately after stopping to call for help. She underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which was unsuccessful. Autopsy revealed some minor injuries on the face, trunk and extremities. Meanwhile, the left coronary artery was originated from the right sinus of Valsalva, and the orifice had a slit-like appearance. Additionally, the main trunk of the left coronary artery coursed between the aortic sinus and the pulmonary trunk. Microscopically, the heart (240 g) showed small foci of contraction band necrosis and wavy changes. This type of coronary artery anomaly makes up only 0.0375% among all varieties of the anomaly according to a report of the US. However, it has a greater risk of sudden cardiac death during physical exercise. Taking the eyewitness testimony into account, we determined that the 150 m run at full speed, rather than the assault itself, had caused acute coronary insufficiency, leading the death of the decedent. PMID:19269230

  16. Ion Channel Macromolecular Complexes in Cardiomyocytes: Roles in Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Abriel, Hugues; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jalife, José

    2015-01-01

    The movement of ions across specific channels embedded on the membrane of individual cardiomyocytes is crucial for the generation and propagation of the cardiac electrical impulse. Emerging evidence over the last 20 years strongly suggests that the normal electrical function of the heart is the result of dynamic interactions of membrane ion channels working in an orchestrated fashion as part of complex molecular networks. Such networks work together with exquisite temporal precision to generate each action potential and contraction. Macromolecular complexes play crucial roles in transcription, translation, oligomerization, trafficking, membrane retention, glycosylation, posttranslational modification, turnover, function and degradation of all cardiac ion channels known to date. In addition, the accurate timing of each cardiac beat and contraction demands, a comparable precision on the assembly and organizations of sodium, calcium and potassium channel complexes within specific subcellular microdomains, where physical proximity allows for prompt and efficient interaction. This review article, part of the Compendium on Sudden Cardiac Death, discusses the major issues related to the role of ion channel macromolecular assemblies in normal cardiac electrical function and the mechanisms of arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. It provides an idea of how these issues are being addressed in the laboratory and in the clinic, which important questions remain unanswered, and what future research will be needed to improve knowledge and advance therapy. PMID:26044251

  17. Sudden infant death syndrome: near-weightlessness and delayed neural transformation.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M; Tervit, H M

    1996-04-01

    Dilation of the pulmonary arteries and increased pulmonary blood volume are recorded in sudden infant death syndrome and in infants living at low barometric pressures (high altitude). Low barometric pressure leads to chronic alveolar hypoxia (1,2). There is diversion and loss of body-fluid under conditions of microgravity (near-weightlessness) encountered in human space-travel and prolonged bedrest (3). The condition mimics shock and oligemia (4,5). The human neonate has underdeveloped postural mechanisms and low muscle-power. A transformation begins at about two months of age, which enables the human infant to adapt to the extrauterine environment (6). The neonate resembles the space traveller who, in a near-weightlessness antigravity environment, develops baroreceptor incompetence, visceral and venous congestion and oliguria. The low birthweight infant displays many of the disorders of the space traveller, viz. poor circulation, high blood-glucose, insulin resistance, weak muscles, slow gut absorption and bone demineralization (7-10). These conditions are virtually identical with the internal adjustments the body makes on lying down (negative gravity or near-weightlessness). We discuss the similarities of sudden infant death syndrome to low barometric pressure environment, orthostatic intolerance, the Pickwickian syndrome and X disease.

  18. Electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death beyond the left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gatzoulis, Konstantinos A; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Arsenos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-26

    Sudden cardiac death threats ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. Anti- arrhythmic protection may be provided to these patients with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICD), after an efficient risk stratification approach. The proposed risk stratifier of an impaired left ventricular ejection fraction has limited sensitivity meaning that a significant number of victims will remain undetectable by this risk stratification approach because they have a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Current risk stratification strategies focus on combinations of non invasive methods like T wave alternans, late potentials, heart rate turbulence, deceleration capacity and others, with invasive methods like the electrophysiologic study. In the presence of an electrically impaired substrate with formed post myocardial infarction fibrotic zones, programmed ventricular stimulation provides important prognostic information for the selection of the patients expected to benefit from an ICD implantation, while due to its high negative predictive value, patients at low risk level may also be detected. Clustering evidence from different research groups and electrophysiologic labs support an electrophysiologic testing guided risk stratification approach for sudden cardiac death.

  19. Idiopathic systemic granulomatous pathology causing sudden death due to myocarditis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Kundal, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous myocarditis is extremely rare, particularly since the introduction of drugs effective against tuberculosis (TB), viruses, fungi and the effective treatment of sarcoidosis. Here is a case of a 65-year-old female prisoner having history of sudden collapse and ultimately death. Autopsy findings of various viscera on histopathological examination show granulomatous pathology, that is, in spleen, liver and in the left ventricular wall of heart. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the sections show the absence of acid fast bacilli, negative for fungal staining as most of the granulomas are noncaseating type with presence of giant cells having no asteroid body and Schuamann body, real-time polymerase chain reaction for TB is negative. Idiopathic giant cell myocarditis is a disease of relatively young adults, that is, between 3 rd and 4 th decade of life. So, this case is strongly considered to be a case of sudden death due to myocarditis as a result of idiopathic systemic granulomatous pathology, a rare case in in literature. PMID:25673606

  20. Neuroanatomical dysmorphology of the medial superior olivary nucleus in sudden fetal and infant death.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Matturri, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    This study expands our understanding of the organization of the human caudal pons, providing a morphologic characterization of the medial superior olivary nucleus (MSO), component of the superior olivary complex (SOC) that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information. We examined victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death and controls (n = 75), from 25 gestational weeks to 8 months of postnatal age, by complete autopsy and in-depth autonomic nervous system histological examination, particularly of the MSO nucleus, the focus of this study. Peculiar cytoarchitectural features of the MSO nucleus were found in sudden death cases, such as hypoplasia/agenesis and immature hypercellularity, frequently related to dysgenesis of contiguous structures involved in respiratory rhythm-generating circuit, in particular to hypoplasia of the retrotrapezoid and the facial nuclei. We propose the involvement of this nucleus in more important functions than those related to hearing, as breathing and, more extensively, all the vital activities. Besides, we highlight the fundamental role of the maternal smoking in pregnancy as etiological factor in the dysmorphic neuroanatomical development of the MSO nucleus.

  1. Fulminant Peripartum myocarditis associated with sudden cardiac death: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella; Vestito, Domenico; Marzullo, Andrea; Tunzi, Francesco; Solarino, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of myocardium, associated with nonischemic necrosis and degeneration of myocytes. Although the clinical course is rapid, myocarditis can lead to dilated cardiomyopathy with chambers dilatation and ventricular dysfunction. The pathophysiology of myocarditis in humans is not completely understood. There are several etiological agents implicated, mainly viral agents. The clinical presentation is extremely various, with nonspecific systemic symptoms until sudden death. The great variability of symptoms makes the diagnosis, therefore, extremely difficult. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed, after childbirth, hyperthermia associated with neck and left arm pain; initially treated with acetaminophen, without any benefit, the young woman, after few days, died suddenly. The autopsy documented the presence of edematous lungs and enlarged and congested liver. The microbiological tests performed 4 days after death were negative. The heart was normal in shape and volume; a section of the left ventricle wall showed subendocardial discromic areas histologically characterized by multifocal perivascular and interstitial inflammatory infiltrates. These infiltrates consisted mainly of neutrophils with eosinophil component associated with myocyte necrosis and hemorrhagic interstitial infiltration.

  2. Sudden Death Due To Acute Cocaine Toxicity-Excited Delirium in a Body Packer.

    PubMed

    Shields, Lisa B E; Rolf, Cristin M; Hunsaker, John C

    2015-11-01

    Excited delirium denotes a life-threatening medical condition characterized by the acute onset of agitated and violent behavior that often results in a sudden and unexplained death. Cocaine-induced excited delirium refers to fatal cocaine intoxication with the following symptoms occurring sequentially: hyperthermia, delirium with agitation, respiratory arrest, and death. We present a case of cocaine-induced excited delirium in a cocaine "body packer" or a "mule", specifically an individual who attempts to smuggle cocaine within the body. Investigators at the scene initially suspected homicide due to the victim's sharp and blunt force injuries. Three rubber packets containing cocaine were removed from the victim's rectum. Blood toxicological analysis revealed an alcohol concentration of 0.016 g/100 and cocaine >1 mg/L. The forensic pathologist should consider cocaine-induced excited delirium when an individual exhibits aggressive behavior, unexpected strength, and resistance to pain who dies suddenly. Further analysis should be performed during the scene investigation and autopsy for evidence of body packing.

  3. Evidence against barium in the mushroom Trogia venenata as a cause of sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanchun; Wu, Gang; Feng, Bang; Yoell, Shanze; Yu, Zefen; Zhang, Keqin; Xu, Jianping

    2012-12-01

    This study examined barium concentrations in the mushroom Trogia venenata, the leading culprit for sudden unexpected deaths in Yunnan, southwest China. We found that barium concentrations in T. venenata from Yunnan were low and comparable to other foods, inconsistent with barium concentrations in this mushroom as a significant contributor to these deaths.

  4. Sudden unexpected death in infancy associated with maltreatment: evidence from long term follow up of siblings

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, A

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To identify any association between sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) and maltreatment within local families. Methods: Retrospective enquiry and subsequent follow up of all siblings and later births within the families. Full investigation of the circumstances of all unexpected deaths. Setting: Scarborough and Bridlington Health Districts and Trusts, North and East Yorkshire. Subjects: All local families losing a baby from SUDI, 1982–96. Follow up to end of 2000. Main outcome measures: Court judgements and the objective decisions of legally constituted Social Services Case Conferences to place siblings on the Child Protection Register (CPR), or provide equivalent safeguards. Results: Sixty nine families had 72 unexpected deaths; three families had two deaths, with two families raising maltreatment issues. Three families had other children subsequently put on the CPR, all identifiable as likely problems of maltreatment at the time of the single SUDI. In 64/69 families, no child protection issues were formally raised at the time of the SUDI; 41/64 of these families already had 63 children. Four families were lost to follow up after the SUDI; 52/60 of the remaining families have had 93 more children without objective evidence of maltreatment. Conclusions: The association of SUDI and maltreatment within families was at the lower end of previous estimates, 3–10%. Child protection intervention is rarely needed, but investigation and follow up for maltreatment is mandatory where apparent life threatening episodes are reported with a second baby, and after a recurrence of apparent SUDI. PMID:12876167

  5. Early repolarization with horizontal ST segment may be associated with aborted sudden cardiac arrest: a retrospective case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of the early repolarization pattern (ERP) is needed to identify malignant early repolarization. J-point elevation with a horizontal ST segment was recently suggested as a malignant feature of the ERP. In this study, the prevalence of the ERP with a horizontal ST segment was examined among survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) without structural heart disease to evaluate the value of ST-segment morphology in risk stratification of the ERP. Methods We reviewed the data of 83 survivors of SCA who were admitted from August 2005 to August 2010. Among them, 25 subjects without structural heart disease were included. The control group comprised 60 healthy subjects who visited our health promotion center; all control subjects were matched for age, sex, and underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension). Early repolarization was defined as an elevation of the J point of at least 0.1 mV above the baseline in at least two continuous inferior or lateral leads that manifested as QRS slurring or notching. An ST-segment pattern of <0.1 mV within 100 ms after the J point was defined as a horizontal ST segment. Results The SCA group included 17 men (64%) with a mean age of 49.7 ± 14.5 years. The corrected QTc was not significantly different between the SCA and control groups (432.7 ± 37.96 vs. 420.4 ± 26.3, respectively; p = 0.089). The prevalence of ERP was not statistically different between the SCA and control groups (5/25, 20% vs. 4/60, 6.7%, respectively; p = 0.116). The prevalence of early repolarization with a horizontal ST segment was more frequent in the SCA than in the control group (20% vs. 3.3%, respectively; p = 0.021). Four SCA subjects (16%) and one control subject (1.7%) had a J-point elevation of >2 mm (p = 0.025). Four SCA subjects (16%) and one (1.7%) control subject had an ERP in the inferior lead (p = 0.025). Conclusion The prevalence of ERP with a horizontal ST segment was higher in patients with aborted SCA than in

  6. Metabolic autopsy with postmortem cultured fibroblasts in sudden unexpected death in infancy: diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuma; Emoto, Yuko; Murayama, Kei; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kuriu, Yukiko; Ohtake, Akira; Matoba, Ryoji

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are the most common disorders among inherited metabolic disorders. However, there are few published reports regarding the relationship between mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders and sudden unexpected death in infancy. In the present study, we performed metabolic autopsy in 13 Japanese cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. We performed fat staining of liver and postmortem acylcarnitine analysis. In addition, we analyzed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activity in frozen organs as well as in postmortem cultured fibroblasts. In heart, 11 cases of complex I activity met the major criteria and one case of complex I activity met the minor criteria. In liver, three cases of complex I activity met the major criteria and four cases of complex I activity met the minor criteria. However, these specimens are susceptible to postmortem changes and, therefore, correct enzyme analysis is hard to be performed. In cultured fibroblasts, only one case of complex I activity met the major criteria and one case of complex I activity met the minor criteria. Cultured fibroblasts are not affected by postmortem changes and, therefore, reflect premortem information more accurately. These cases might not have been identified without postmortem cultured fibroblasts. In conclusion, we detected one probable case and one possible case of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders among 13 Japanese cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are one of the important inherited metabolic disorders causing sudden unexpected death in infancy. We advocate metabolic autopsy with postmortem cultured fibroblasts in sudden unexpected death in infancy cases.

  7. [Updated ESC guideline: innovations for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and recommendations for prevention of sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Eckardt, L; Deneke, T

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death is an update of the former 2006 European/American guidelines. This new consensus document gives a detailed overview on prevention and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This includes detailed discussion of channelopathies and various cardiomyopathies. Gaps in evidence are identified and also discussed. DNA analysis and postmortem assessment in sudden cardiac death victims is for the first time part of these new recommendations. In addition, for the first time recommendations on subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and the wearable defibrillator are given. The guidelines strengthen the role of ICD therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death although data used as the basis for these recommendations are 10-15 years old and patients' characteristics including therapeutic options have changed during that time. Systematic reassessment of left ventricular function 6-12 weeks after infarction is also included as a new recommendation. The role of catheter ablation in electrical storm and for those presenting with a first episode of sustained ventricular tachycardia has also been upgraded in the new guidelines. Hopefully, the new guidelines will reach not only cardiologists and help to improve patient care, but also contribute to reducing the high number sudden cardiac deaths in Europe. PMID:27581243

  8. [Arrhythomgenic right ventricular dysplasia and sudden death: An autopsy and histological study].

    PubMed

    Haj Salem, N; Mesrati, M A; Hadhri, R; Besbes, S; Belhadj, M; Aissaoui, A; Zakhama, A; Chadly, A

    2015-09-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is cardiomyopathy where normal myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrofatty tissue. Histological examination performed on myocardial biopsy or on autopsy samples are used to confirm the diagnosis. However, in many cases, the diagnosis cannot be made on a simple macroscopic and histological study and requires genetic analysis and molecular biology. In this work, we propose to describe the main macroscopic and histological findings of ARVD through the study of an autopsy series. We report 12 autopsy cases of sudden death in ARVD collected in the Department of Forensic Medicine of the University Hospital Fattouma Bourguiba Monastir (Tunisia) during a period of 20years. Microscopic examination was performed on 5microns thick histological sections. All slides were reviewed by two operators in a double blind (physician pathologist, pathologist) and in each, the percentage of adipose tissue, fibrosis and infarction in the right ventricle, left ventricle and interventricular septum, the presence or absence of inflammatory infiltrate, the presence or absence of signs of degeneration of myocytes were noticed. ARVD was found in 12 cases (1.8% of sudden cardiac death). The age ranged between 13 and 67years (mean age: 45.3years). The death occurred in half of the cases during exercise. Macroscopic examination of the RV showed the presence of a wall thinning (thickness<3mm) in 9 cases. Histological study highlight RV adipose infiltration in all cases with a percentage between 15% and 60%, fibrotic lesions were observed in only 9 cases with an average percentage of 10.25% and signs of degeneration of myocytes were noted in 10 cases. In concordance with what has been reported in the literature, there is still no consensus regarding the criteria to be adopted to pose with certainty the diagnosis of ARVD and the presence of adipose tissue remains the criterion more suggestive.

  9. Sudden infant deaths from undiagnosed ventricular septal defect - Report of two autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Rie; Kato, Naho; Suto, Miwako; Rinnou, Mami; Mizusawa, Ikubumi; Kuroda, Naohito

    2016-09-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) has a relatively non-aggressive clinical course; either spontaneous closure or causing congestive heart failure treatable with surgical intervention. We present two autopsy cases of sudden infant deaths from clinically undiagnosed VSDs. Case 1 was an 18-day-old boy. As the deceased coughed and became limp after feeding, he was carried to a hospital. Heart murmur was not auscultated there, so he was brought back to home. He presented severe dyspnea and then he was pronounced dead the next day. Case 2 was a 3-week-old boy. Any abnormality was pointed out at physical examination, although his mother felt his wheeze. He developed respiratory arrest at home in the morning and then he was confirmed dead at the hospital. Heart weights of these babies were heavier than mean weights of each normal development. There were perimembranous VSDs in both cases. Histology revealed that the pulmonary arterial walls were thickened. We diagnosed the cause of death in these cases was cardiac collapse with pulmonary hypertension due to VSD. Congenital heart diseases can be diagnosed as early as before birth, because echocardiograph and fetal echography are prevalent in these days. Most VSDs can be noticed by systolic murmur even today. We consider that the failure of initial clinical diagnosis of VSD in primary physical assessment could lead unexpected sudden death. These two cases reminded us to the importance of auscultation which is conventional but as one of the indispensable measure to find a clue for the congenital abnormality. PMID:27591530

  10. Occupation and risk of sudden death in a United States community: a case–control analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Narayanan, Kumar; Suryadevara, Vallabh; Teodorescu, Carmen; Reinier, Kyndaron; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Chugh, Harpriya; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S

    2015-01-01

    Objective Work environment is said to influence cardiovascular risk. We assessed whether nature of occupation affects risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the general population. Methods In the ongoing, prospective Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (catchment population 1 million), working-age SCD cases (18–65 years) were compared with controls who died from any cause. Usual occupation obtained from death certificates was classified using the US Census Bureau standard occupational classification descriptions and categorised as white collar, blue collar or homemaker. Odds ratio (OR) for SCD by occupation category was obtained and clinical profile of SCD cases was compared by occupation type. Results Among SCD cases (n=646; 74% male) compared to controls (n=622; 73.6% male), the proportion of white collar workers was higher among male SCD cases (52.7% vs 43.7%; p=0.01); the difference in females was smaller (59.5% vs 55%; p=0.62). Adjusting for race and smoking status, male white collar workers had a higher risk of SCD compared to blue collar workers (OR=1.67, (1.26 to 2.23), p<0.001). A similar, non-significant trend was observed among females (OR 1.49 (0.81 to 2.75); p=0.20). White collar SCD cases were less likely to be current smokers (34.7% vs 45.3%, p=0.008), drug misusers (13.1% vs 18.5%) or have diabetes (21.4% vs 28.2%, both p=0.07) compared to blue collar workers. Other cardiac risk factors were similar. Conclusions A white collar occupation was associated with increased risk of SCD, when compared to blue collar occupations. Since differences in conventional risk factors did not explain this elevated risk, work-related behavioural and psychosocial stressors warrant a closer evaluation. PMID:26685031

  11. Sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in male competitive athletes. A report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Durakovic, Z; Misigoj-Durakovic, M; Vuori, I; Skavic, J; Belicza, M

    2005-12-01

    In the period of 30 years, i.e. from 1973 to 2002, we noticed in Croatia 6 sudden and unexpected cardiac deaths in male athletes during or after training. Two were soccer players, 2 athletic runners, one was a rugby player and one was a basketball player. All of them were without cardiovascular symptoms. At the forensic autopsy, the first athlete, aged 29, had chronic myocarditis and thickened left ventricular wall of 15 mm. The second, aged 21, had an acute myocardial infarction of the posterior wall with normal coronaries and thickened left ventricular wall of 15 mm. The third aged 17, had hypoplastic right coronary artery and narrowed ascending aorta, suppurant tonsillitis and subacute myocarditis. Two athletes, aged 29 and 15, had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal coronaries, and one dilated aorta. The sixth, aged 24, had arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy of the right ventricle. All the 6 athletes died suddenly, obviously because of malignant ventricular arrhythmias. In Croatia the death rate among athletes reached 0.15/100 000, in others who practice exercise reached 0.74/100,000 and the difference is highly significant (c2=14.487, Poisson rates=3.81, P=0.00014) and in physicians-specialists reached 33.6/100,000. Preventive medical examinations are essential, especially in athletes before physical exercise, as are other investigations in every case suspicious of heart disease, including electrocardiogram (ECG), stress ECG, echocardiography and stress-echocardiography and other findings if indicated. Physical exercise is contraindicated in acute respiratory infection: in 2 of those cases had been a cause of death as a trigger.

  12. Physical activity and sudden cardiac death in elders--a Croatian study.

    PubMed

    Duraković, Zijad; Duraković, Marjeta Misigoj; Skavić, Josip; Gojanović, Marija Definis

    2011-03-01

    The paper deals with the sudden cardiac death in elders due to physical activity in Croatia and to compare it to other population groups who practice physical activity. The data are a part of a retrospective study dealing with 59 sudden death due to physical activity in men in Croatia: from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 2008. Fifteen aged 65 to 82 years were recreationally engaged in physical activity: six in swimming, four in tennis, one in driving a bicycle, one in jogging, two in bowling and one died during sexual act. Only one had symptoms of pectoral angina, two suffered from arterial hypertension, and two had congestive heart failure. Eleven were without symptoms before exercise. At forensic autopsy, fourteen had coronary heart disease, seven had critical coronary artery stenosis, three had occluded left descendens anterior coronary artery and four critical coronary stenosis, four had a recent myocardial infarctions, and eleven had myocardial scars due to previous myocardial infarctions. Twelve of them had left ventricular hypertrophy: 15-25 mm. In Croatia, about 7per cent of the entire male population undertake recreational physical activity, while 13 per cent of them are elders. A sudden cardiac death due to recreational physical activity in elders reached 1.71/100 000 yearly, in the entire male population engaged in recreational physical exercise: 0.75/100 000 (p = 0.05730), in the total male population aged 15-40 engaged in sports and recreational physical exercise: 0.57/100.0000 (p = 0.00387), in young athletes: 0.15/100 000 (p = 0.00000). Medical examination of all elderly persons has to be done before starting of recreational physical activity: by clinical examination, searching for risk factors for atherosclerosis, performing ECG at rest, stress ECG, and echocardiography and to repeat the medical examination at least once a year Physical activity should start with a warm-up period and with a gradually increasing load, and usually not to exceed 6

  13. [Preventive antifibrillatory treatment of sudden cardiac death in acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Thale, J; Gülker, H; Hindricks, G; Haverkamp, W; Pollock, B; Buchwalsky, R

    1988-01-01

    The pathophysiological basis of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias in acute myocardial infarction has been extensively investigated in experimental as well as in some clinical studies. Numerous clinical studies have been performed with the aim to establish the feasibility of antifibrillatory prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death by pretreatment with antiarrhythmic drugs. Using class I-antiarrhythmic drugs the reported findings were contradictory. While the antiarrhythmic efficacy of Lidocaine and other, newer class I-antiarrhythmic drugs is well established, the antifibrillatory effects of these drugs in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction remain uncertain. In clinical studies with the endpoint of mortality in patients at risk, longterm administration of orally effective class I-antiarrhythmic drugs did not prove to be superior to placebo. However, beta-sympatholytic agents have been shown to reduce mortality in patients at risk in several large clinical studies. The basic mechanism seems to be primarily a reduction in sudden cardiac death which is caused predominantly by ventricular fibrillation. The antifibrillatory properties of beta-blockers was demonstrated as well by a reduction in the number of episodes of ventricular fibrillation. The recognition of patients at risk who profit most from chronic beta-blocker therapy remains the main problem when treatment of numerous low-risk patients is avoided. In the ISIS I-study with Atenolol intravenous administration of a beta-blocker in the early phase of acute myocardial infarction has been shown to be beneficial if hemodynamic monitoring, for example using flow-directed heart catherization is performed. In general this does not apply to the treatment with calciumantagonists, especially with Verapamil and Nifedipine. These drugs do not improve prognosis of acute myocardial ischemia, obviously because of hemodynamic side effects. The antifibrillatory efficacy of Verapamil

  14. Matters of life and death: social, political, and religious correlates of attitudes on abortion.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ross K; Epstein, Laurily K; Forth, Rodney D

    1981-01-01

    This article investigates the structure of attitudes toward abortion using several demographic, political, and religious variables. The analysis is based on a 1978 survey of New Jersey's voting age population. Responses to questions on 3 aspects of the abortion issue--a constitutional ban on abortion, abortion on demand, and government funding of abortions--are combined to form a scale of support and opposition to abortion. We find that support for abortion is related to youth, high socioeconomic status, a liberal ideology, opposition to right-to-die legislation, and support for the Equal Rights Amendment. Additionally, we find that approval for abortion is not a function of religious preference. Rather, attitudes on abortion are a function of intensity of religious adherence, regardless of specific religion.

  15. Sudden cardiac death after acute ST elevation myocardial infarction: insight from a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Hygriv B; Sastry, B K S; Korabathina, Radhika; Raju, Krishnam P

    2012-01-01

    Background There is no data concerning sudden cardiac death (SCD) following acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in India. We assessed the incidence and factors influencing SCD following STEMI. Methods Patients with STEMI admitted in our hospital from 2006 to 2009 were prospectively entered into a database. In the period 2010–2011, patients or their kin were periodically contacted and administered a questionnaire to ascertain their survival, and mode of death if applicable. Results Study population comprised of 929 patients with STEMI (mean age 55±17 years) having a mean follow-up of 41±16 months. The total number of deaths was 159, of which 78 were SCD (mean age 62.2±10 years). The cumulative incidence of total deaths and SCD at 1 month, 1, 2, 3 years and at conclusion of the study was 10.1%, 13.2%, 14.6%, 15.8%, 17.3% and 4.9%, 6.5%, 8.0%, 8.9% and 9.7%, respectively. The temporal distribution of SCD was 53.9% at first month, 19.2% at 1 month to 1 year, 15.4% in 1–2 years, 7.6% in 2–3 years and 3.8% beyond 3 years. Comparison between SCD and survivor cohorts by multivariate analysis showed five variables were found to be associated with SCD (age p=0.0163, female gender p=0.0042, severe LV dysfunction p=0.0292, absence of both reperfusion and revascularisation p=0.0373 and lack of compliance with medications p <0.0001). Conclusions SCD following STEMI accounts for about half of the total deaths. It involves younger population and most of these occur within the first month. This data has relevance in prioritising healthcare strategies in India. PMID:27326036

  16. Sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients: an in-depth review.

    PubMed

    Green, Darren; Roberts, Paul R; New, David I; Kalra, Philip A

    2011-06-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients, accounting for death in up to one-quarter of this population. Unlike in the general population, coronary artery disease and heart failure often are not the underlying pathologic processes for SCD; accordingly, current risk stratification tools are inadequate when assessing these patients. Factors assuming greater importance in hemodialysis patients may include left ventricular hypertrophy, electrolyte shift, and vascular calcification. Knowledge regarding SCD in hemodialysis patients is insufficient, in part reflecting the lack of an agreed-on definition of SCD in this population, although epidemiologic studies suggest the most common times for SCD to occur are toward the end of the long 72-hour weekend interval between dialysis sessions and in the 12 hours immediately after hemodialysis. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that the dialysis procedure itself may have important implications for SCD. Supporting this is recognition that hemodialysis is associated with both ventricular arrhythmias and dynamic electrocardiographic changes. Importantly, echocardiography and electrocardiography may show changes that are modifiable by alterations to dialysis prescription. The most effective preventative strategy in the general population, implanted cardioverter-defibrillator devices, are less effective in the presence of chronic kidney disease and have not been studied adequately in dialysis patients. Last, many dialysis patients experience SCD despite not fulfilling current criteria for implantation, making appropriate allocation of defibrillators uncertain.

  17. Sudden infant death syndrome in Korea: a retrospective analysis of autopsy-diagnosed cases.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Kim, Angela Julie; Kang, Shin-Mong; Lee, Han Young; Seo, Joong-Seok; Kwon, Tae Jung; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the demographic and sleeping environmental factors associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Korea. The autopsy reports of all SIDS cases reported to the National Forensic Service and Seoul National University College of Medicine between 1996 and 2008 were reviewed for data collection and analysis to identify the risk factors for SIDS. Analysis of the 355 SIDS cases reported within the study period revealed that of the 168 (47.3%) cases for which sleeping position before death had been reported, 75 (44.7%) cases had occurred after placement in prone or side position. Of the 204 (57.5%) cases for which bed-sharing situation had been reported, 121 (59.3%) deaths had occurred during bed-sharing, of which 54 (44.6%) infants were under 3 months of age, a significantly younger age than that of the non-bed-sharing cases (P = 0.0279). Analysis of the results indicated no tendency toward an increase or decrease in the use of a prone or side position. Rather, there was a statistically significant increasing trend for bed-sharing over the study period (OR, 1.087; 95% CI, 1.004-1.177; P = 0.04). These findings indicate the need for nationwide educational programs promoting a safe sleeping environment to enhance SIDS prevention. PMID:23487503

  18. [Sudden death associated with myocardial damage caused by microthrombi in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Yukinori; Shimada, Koki; Araki, Yoko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Tsushita, Keitaro

    2015-11-01

    We describe a 35-year-old woman with Down's syndrome who was admitted to a clinic with anorexia and vomiting. Since laboratory findings showed anemia (Hb 7.4 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (0.5 × 10⁴/μl), she was transferred to our hospital for treatment. Further laboratory examinations revealed schistocytes, LDH elevation, and a negative Coombs' test. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange (PEX) and prednisolone administration were thus immediately initiated. Prior to these treatments, ADAMTS13 activity was less than 5% and inhibitors were detected at a level of 0.8 Bethesda U/ml. Although her platelet count had risen to 13.0 × 10⁴/μl by day 6 (post 4 sessions of PEX), it had decreased to 1.8 × 10⁴/μl on day 7. Despite ongoing PEX, thrombocytopenia persisted. On day 21, she suddenly died. Autopsy findings revealed no evidence of myocardial necrosis or coronary artery thrombosis. Extensive microthrombi were, however, detected in precapillary arterioles, capillaries, and post-capillary venules of the heart. Therefore, this patient's sudden death was clinically suspected to have been caused by cardiomyopathy, which had produced cardiogenic shock. PMID:26666721

  19. A Study on Entanglement Sudden Death in the Open Bipartite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jia Hua; Fang, Mao Fa; Huang, Guo Hui; Yang, Xiong

    2014-06-01

    Examining the relation between concurrence and energy in the open bipartite systems, we give an enlightening discussion about reason which causes the entanglement sudden death. We consider two two-level atoms A and B initially entangled to some extent and coupled individually to two cavities which are initially in their vacuum states. We analyze the dynamics of entanglement and energy for two atoms after tracing over the cavity degrees of freedom. By comparing with concurrence and energy, we obtain a conclusion, i.e., there is a critical value U C =0, when the energy U< U C =0, or, U'≤0, the concurrence must be zero and the ESD will occur for a period of time. Then, we discuss how non-Markovian effects and detunings influence the critical value. Finally, we point out the impact of initial degree of entanglement on the critical value of the energy.

  20. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death: Current Approaches and Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Gustavo; Curtis, Anne B.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a serious public health problem; the annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in North America is approximately 166,200. Identifying patients at risk is a difficult proposition. At the present time, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) remains the single most important marker for risk stratification. According to current guidelines, most patients with LVEF <35% could benefit from prophylactic ICD implantation, particularly in the setting of symptomatic heart failure. Current risk stratification strategies fail to identify patients at risk of SCD in larger population groups encompassing a greater number of potential SCD victims. However, the best approach to identifying patients and the value of various risk stratification tools is not entirely clear. The goal of this review is to discuss the problem of SCD and the value of the different risk stratification markers and their potential clinical use either alone or in combination with other risk stratification markers. PMID:20066150

  1. Michel Mirowski and the beginning of a new era of fighting sudden arrhythmic death.

    PubMed

    Klein, Helmut U; Nisam, Seah

    2015-06-01

    Prior to the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias were treated using anti-arrhythmic drugs. The concept of an implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden arrhythmic death was first published by Michel Mirowski in 1970. Despite critical opinions by leading physicians, Michel Mirowski continued development of his vision. Hallmarks in the development of the ICD include the following: internal-external defibrillator used during surgery on humans in 1971/1972; fully implantable defibrillator tested in canines in 1975; defibrillator successfully implanted in a 57-year-old woman in 1980; second generation devices introduced in 1982; US Food and Drug Administration device approved in 1985. Today it is hard to imagine modern medicine without ICD therapy. This article provides the reader a history of the development of the ICD. PMID:26058996

  2. Meaning-making in the aftermath of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Guenther

    2006-09-01

    The reconstruction of meaning in the aftermath of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is part of the grieving process but has to date been poorly understood. Earlier theorists including Freud, Bowlby and Kübler-Ross provided a foundation for what occurs during this time using stage theories. More recent researchers, often using qualitative techniques, have provided a more complex and expanded view that enhances our knowledge of meaning reconstruction following infant loss. This overview of representative contemporary authors compares and contrasts them with the longstanding models that are being supplanted within the emerging field of thanatology. Understanding parental reactions within this new framework can help healthcare professionals in dealing with those affected by SIDS and provide a more empathic and sensitive approach to individual differences. Parents' own accounts of their post-SIDS experience are consistent with these newer theories. Comprehending how parents cope and reconstruct their lives is an important element in providing appropriate psychological support services. PMID:16918783

  3. Intra-beat Scaling Properties of Cardiac Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Eduardo; Lerma, Claudia; Echeverría, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2008-02-01

    We applied detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to characterize the intra-beat scaling dynamics of electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings from the PhysioNet Sudden Cardiac Death Holter Database. The main finding of this contribution is that, in such recordings involving different types of arrhythmias; the ECG waveform, besides showing a less-random intra-beat dynamics, becomes more regular during bigeminy, ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even atrial fibrillation (AFIB) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) despite the appearance of erratic traces. Thus, notwithstanding that these cardiac rhythm abnormalities are generally considered as irregular and some of them generated by random impulses or wavefronts, the intra-beat scaling properties suggest that regularity dominates the underlying mechanisms of arrhythmias. Among other explanations, this may result from shorted or restricted -less complex- pathways of conduction of the electrical activity within the ventricles.

  4. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27590646

  5. Entanglement sudden death as an indicator of fidelity in a four-qubit cluster state

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Yaakov S.

    2009-05-15

    I explore the entanglement evolution of a four-qubit cluster state in a dephasing environment concentrating on the phenomenon of entanglement sudden death (ESD). Specifically, I ask whether the onset of ESD has an effect on the utilization of this cluster state as a means of implementing a single-qubit rotation in the measurement-based cluster state model of quantum computation. To do this, I compare the evolution of the entanglement to the fidelity, a measure of how accurately the desired state (after the measurement-based operations) is achieved. I find that ESD does not cause a change in behavior or discontinuity in the fidelity but may indicate for certain states when the fidelity goes to 0.5.

  6. [New strategies for assessing the risk of sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Krzysztof; Możeńska, Olga; Kosior, Dariusz A

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by a primarily increased ventricular wall thickness, usually caused by the mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Thanks to the growing awareness in the medical community as well as advances in diagnostic techniques HCM can be diagnosed at earlier stages than ever before. However, in some cases the first symptom of this disease is a sudden cardiac death (SCD) and diagnosis remains unknown until post-mortem examination. Implantation of a cardioverterdefibrillator (ICD) provides the most effective method of SCD prevention. Nevertheless, due to a number of risks associated with surgery as well as the possession of such devices, predictive factors of serious ventricular arrhythmia in individual patients have been sought for many years. The aim of this review is to present the current strategies of risk assessment and prevention of SCD in patients with HCM. PMID:27591441

  7. Sudden cardiac death and chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, L; Rivera, R; Barbera, V; Bellasi, A; Cozzolino, M; Russo, D; De Pascalis, A; Banerjee, D; Floccari, F; Ronco, C

    2016-08-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients demonstrate higher rates of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; and increased incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) with declining kidney failure. Coronary artery disease (CAD) associated risk factors are the major determinants of SCD in the general population. However, current evidence suggests that in CKD patients, traditional cardiovascular risk factors may play a lesser role. Complex relationships between CKD-specific risk factors, structural heart disease, and ventricular arrhythmias (VA) contribute to the high risk of SCD. In dialysis patients, the occurrence of VA and SCD could be exacerbated by electrolyte shifts, divalent ion abnormalities, sympathetic overactivity, inflammation and iron toxicity. As outcomes in CKD patients after cardiac arrest are poor, primary and secondary prevention of SCD and cardiac arrest could reduce cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:27174593

  8. Interleukin-2 as a neuromodulator possibly implicated in the physiopathology of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Hazim; Deltenre, Paul; De Prez, Carine; Sébire, Guillaume

    2010-08-16

    Dysfunction in vital brainstem centers, including those controlling cardiorespiratory- and sleep/arousal pathophysiology, is reported in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Biological mechanisms underlying SIDS, however, remain unclear. Cytokines are inter-cellular signaling chemicals. They can interact with neurotransmitters and might thus modify neural and neuroimmune functions. Cytokines could therefore act as neuromodulators. Interleukin (IL)-2 is a major immune-related cytokine. It has not been previously depicted in vital brainstem centers. We detected intense neuronal IL-2 immune-reactivity in the SIDS brainstem, namely in vital neural centers. This IL-2 overexpression might interfere with neurotransmitters in those critical brainstem centers, causing disturbed homeostatic control of cardiorespiratory and arousal responses, possibly leading to SIDS. PMID:20542085

  9. Prevalence of modifiable risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome in British Forces Germany.

    PubMed

    Miller, S A; Morrison, M M

    1996-06-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted amongst parents in the military community in British Forces Germany to investigate the prevalence of known and suspected risk factors for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Over a thousand questionnaires were returned (response rate 58%) and these showed that the prevalence of babies being placed in the prone position to sleep is now extremely low and the use of room thermometers to help control ambient temperature is widespread. However 29% of the mothers had smoked in pregnancy and 44% of households with a new-born baby had at least one parent who smoked. Additional health promotion activity aimed at reducing the prevalence of smoking in pregnancy and amongst the parents of new-born babies is recommended. PMID:8819036

  10. Nurses' Knowledge and Adherence To Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Prevention Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Kendra L; Cartwright, Sara B; Shefferly, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) defines standard guidelines for infant positioning and sleep environment to reduce the rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), but recent data on nurses' knowledge and adherence to these guidelines in hospital settings are limited. An observational, quantitative, and descriptive study was conducted on well-baby postpartum nurseries at two urban Washington, DC, hospitals. Sixty-six direct observations of infant position and crib environment were conducted, and a 17-question survey was administered to determine nurses' knowledge and practice regarding AAP SIDS prevention guidelines. Of observed sleeping conditions, 69.7% failed the guidelines for infant positioning, crib environment, or both, despite nurses' reporting knowledge of the AAP guidelines. Further research is needed to determine if the study's findings are consistent with hospitals elsewhere, and to better understand the disconnect between nurses' knowledge and behavior regarding SIDS prevention guidelines. PMID:27019936

  11. Infantile disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis presenting as sudden infant death.

    PubMed

    Kagata, Y; Matsubara, O; Ogata, S; Lie, J T; Mark, E J

    1999-03-01

    The rare clinicopathological entity 'disseminated visceral giant cell arteritis' (DVGCA) was first described in 1978. It is characterized by widespread small-vessel giant cell angitis and extravascular granulomas. A normal and healthy 7-month-old boy who presented unexpectedly with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is reported. Histological examination at autopsy revealed giant cell angitis of the aorta, common carotid, coronary, pulmonary, celiac, mesenteric and common iliac arteries. There were also granulomas in the tracheal wall and liver. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of DVGCA occurring in an infant younger than 12 months of age. A review of the literature on DVGCA is presented in this report, and the differential diagnosis is discussed.

  12. Meaning-making in the aftermath of sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Guenther

    2006-09-01

    The reconstruction of meaning in the aftermath of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is part of the grieving process but has to date been poorly understood. Earlier theorists including Freud, Bowlby and Kübler-Ross provided a foundation for what occurs during this time using stage theories. More recent researchers, often using qualitative techniques, have provided a more complex and expanded view that enhances our knowledge of meaning reconstruction following infant loss. This overview of representative contemporary authors compares and contrasts them with the longstanding models that are being supplanted within the emerging field of thanatology. Understanding parental reactions within this new framework can help healthcare professionals in dealing with those affected by SIDS and provide a more empathic and sensitive approach to individual differences. Parents' own accounts of their post-SIDS experience are consistent with these newer theories. Comprehending how parents cope and reconstruct their lives is an important element in providing appropriate psychological support services.

  13. [Sudden death caused by a less lethal weapon chest-wall injury (Commotio cordis)].

    PubMed

    Contargyris, C; Peytel, E

    2012-05-01

    Less lethal weapons, like Flashball, are more and more used since 1995 in law enforcement, even by the local police to neutralize combative individuals and to disperse riot crowds. This gun fires large rubber bullets and has been incriminated many times in cases of face injuries with functional consequences. In this case report, we mention a case of sudden death from cardiac arrest due to low energy chest wall impact of a rubber bullet shot with the Flashball. Commotio cordis is potentialized by a lethal set of three including, a certain impact velocity, an exact location of the hit over the cardiac silhouette, and a precise timing 15 m/s prior to the peak of the T-wave. This case report highlights the fact that such impacts can cause significant injury to internal organs, in particular circonstances, implying the necessity of a raising awareness of the medical staff, in ordre to not underestimate the severity of such injuries.

  14. Sudden Death After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)—Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Zelić, Marko; Stimac, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There are only a few cases found in literature regarding air embolism in endoscopic procedures, especially in connection to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We are presenting a case of a 56-year-old female patient who suffered from non-Hodgkin lymphoma located in her right groin. She was also diagnosed with choledocholithiasis and underwent ERCP to remove the gallstones. Immediately after the procedure she went into sudden cardiac arrest and subsequently died, despite all of our efforts. We reviewed literature in order to identify possible causes of death because fatal outcome following an uneventful and successful procedure was not expected. It is important to bear in mind all possible complications of ERCP. Our focus during the literature search was on air embolism. PMID:25501087

  15. Hypothesis: holiday sudden cardiac death: food and alcohol inhibition of SULT1A enzymes as a precipitant.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death is a significant health issue, causing millions of deaths worldwide annually. Studies have found that the likelihood of such death is higher in winter. Further studies identified that the highest likelihood occurs on Christmas Day and New Years Day, but not the interim period. Thanksgiving, Independence Day and the Islamic holiday Eid Al-Fitr also show significant increases in the rate of cardiac events or death. A number of mechanisms have been proposed, but none have satisfactorily explained the evidence. This article reviews the data supporting the existence of a holiday cardiac death phenomenon, the involvement of catecholamines and the normal modes of human catecholamine deactivation. Further evidence is reviewed that supports a hypothesized mechanism whereby critical SULT1A catecholamine deactivation enzymes can in some patients be inhibited by naturally-occurring phenols and polyphenols in foods and alcohols. If deactivation is inhibited by holiday consumption excesses, holiday stress or excitement could lead to a buildup of catecholamines that can cause fatal arrhythmias. Awareness of this mechanism could reduce deaths, both through doctor/patient education leading to a moderation in consumption and through the potential identification of patients with a predisposition to SULT1A inhibition. This hypothesis also raises parallels between sudden cardiac death in adults and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The possible involvement of SULT1A inhibition in SIDS is discussed.

  16. Impact of Denervated Myocardium on Improving Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Between 184,000 and 462,000 Americans die suddenly each year. Fifty percent to 70% of these deaths are due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested whether hibernating myocardium or myocardial sympathetic denervation identifies patients at high-risk for developing VT/VF independently of ejection fraction (EF). Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify myocardial sympathetic denervation (11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine [11C-HED]), perfusion (13N-ammonia), and viability (insulin-stimulated 18F-2-deoxyglucose [18FDG]) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (EF < 35%) eligible for a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The primary end-point was sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) defined as arrhythmic death or ICD discharge for VT/VF > 240 bpm. Volumes of total denervated (P = .001) and viable denervated myocardium (11C-HED-18FDG mismatch, P = .03) predicted SCA, whereas hibernating and infarcted myocardium did not. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of SCA: denervated myocardium > 37.6% of left ventricule (LV), LV end-diastolic volume > 98 mL/m2, creatinine level > 1.49 mg/dL, and no angiotensin- inhibition therapy. Denervated myocardium had a hazard ratio of 3.5 for SCA (10.3%/year vs. 3.0%/year, p=0.001). Absence of all four factors predicted low risk (44% of cohort; SCA <1%/y) whereas two or more factors identified subjects at high-risk (20% of cohort; SCA 12%/y). Denervated myocardium quantified using PET strongly predicts risk of SCA, and is independent of EF, infarct volume, and other clinical variables. PMID:25125727

  17. Impact of denervated myocardium on improving risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Cain, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Between 184,000 and 462,000 Americans die suddenly each year. Fifty percent to 70% of these deaths are due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested whether hibernating myocardium or myocardial sympathetic denervation identifies patients at high-risk for developing VT/VF independently of ejection fraction (EF). Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify myocardial sympathetic denervation ((11)C-meta-hydroxyephedrine [(11)C-HED]), perfusion ((13)N-ammonia), and viability (insulin-stimulated (18)F-2-deoxyglucose [(18)FDG]) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (EF < 35%) eligible for a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The primary end-point was sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) defined as arrhythmic death or ICD discharge for VT/VF > 240 bpm. Volumes of total denervated (P = .001) and viable denervated myocardium ((11)C-HED-(18)FDG mismatch, P = .03) predicted SCA, whereas hibernating and infarcted myocardium did not. Multivariate analysis identified four independent predictors of SCA: denervated myocardium > 37.6% of left ventricule (LV), LV end-diastolic volume > 98 mL/m(2), creatinine level > 1.49 mg/dL, and no angiotensin- inhibition therapy. Denervated myocardium had a hazard ratio of 3.5 for SCA (10.3%/year vs. 3.0%/year, p=0.001). Absence of all four factors predicted low risk (44% of cohort; SCA <1%/y) whereas two or more factors identified subjects at high-risk (20% of cohort; SCA 12%/y). Denervated myocardium quantified using PET strongly predicts risk of SCA, and is independent of EF, infarct volume, and other clinical variables.

  18. Using a pacifier to decrease sudden infant death syndrome: an emergency department educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Paul; Vieth, Teri; Rodriguez, Carolina; Lona, Nicole; Molina, Rogelio; Habebo, Emnet; Caldera, Enrique; Garcia, Cynthia; Veazey, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pacifier use decreases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An emergency department (ED) visit may provide an opportunistic 'teachable moment' for parents. Objectives. To test the hypotheses (1) that caregivers were less familiar with the role of pacifiers in sudden infant death (SIDS) prevention than other recommendations, and (2) that an ED educational intervention would increase pacifier use in infants younger than six months, and (3) that otitis media would not occur more frequently in pacifier users. Methods. We did an intervention-group-only longitudinal study in a county hospital ED. We measured pacifier use infants and baseline knowledge of SIDs prevention recommendations in caregivers. We followed up three months later to determine pacifier use, and 12 months later to determine episodes of otitis media. Results. We analyzed data for 780 infants. Parents knew of advice against co-sleeping in 469/780 (60%), smoking in 660/776 (85%), and prone sleeping in 613/780 (79%). Only 268/777 (35%) knew the recommendation to offer a pacifier at bedtime. At enrollment 449/780 (58%) did not use a pacifier. Of 210/338 infants aged less than 6 months followed up 41/112 (37%) non-users had started using a pacifier at bedtime (NNT 3). Over the same period, 37/98 (38%) users had discontinued their pacifier. Otitis media did not differ between users and non-users at 12 months. Conclusion. Caregiver knowledge of the role of pacifiers in SIDS prevention was less than for other recommendations. Our educational intervention appeared to increase pacifier use. Pacifier use was not associated with increased otitis media.

  19. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in the young and in athletes: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Thiene, Gaetano; Carturan, Elisa; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases account for 40% of all deaths in the Western countries, and nearly two thirds of them occur suddenly. Young people (<35 years) are not spared from sudden death (SD) with a rate of 1/100,000 per year. Effort is a trigger with a threefold risk in athletes vs. nonathletes, and sports disqualification is by itself life-saving in people with underlying concealed cardiovascular diseases. Several culprits of cardiac SD may be identified at postmortem and atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is the leading cause (25% of SD cases in the young), mostly consisting of a single obstructive plaque with fibrocellular intimal proliferation. However, the spectrum of cardiovascular substrates is wide and include also congenital diseases of the coronary arteries (mainly anomalous origin), myocardium (arrhythmogenic and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, myocarditis), valves (aortic stenosis and mitral valve prolapse), and conduction system (ventricular preexcitation, accelerated atrioventricular conduction and block). In up to 20% of cases, the heart is grossly and histologically normal at autopsy (unexplained SD or "mors sine materia"), and inherited ion channel diseases have been implicated (long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia). Targets to treat and prevent SD in the young consist of the following: (a) avoid triggers like effort or emotion, (b) inhibit the onset of arrhythmias with drugs or ablation, (c) switch off arrhythmias with defibrillator, and (d) hinder the recurrence of the disease with genetic counseling and/or therapy. In vivo detection of cardiomyopathies is nowadays feasible by electrocardiogram and/or echocardiography, which resulted in a sharp decline of SD in the athletes in Italy, thanks to obligatory preparticipation screening for sport activity. Genetic screening could play a pivotal role in early detection of asymptomatic mutation carriers of cardiovascular diseases at risk

  20. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined. PMID:22686063

  1. [Pathology of the heart conducting system in the thanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Larev, Z V; Fedulova, M V; Denisova, O P; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The present literature review is focused on the contribution of various pathological changes in the heart conducting system to the tanatogenesis of sudden death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease viewed from the perspective of a forensic medical expert. The currently available data on the disorders in the heart conducting system in the subjects with these diseases are presented. Various aspects of pathology of the heart conducting system are considered in the modern and historical contexts. The prospects for the further investigations into the tanatogenic mechanisms of sudden death by reason of alcoholic cardiomyopathy and coronary heart disease are outlined.

  2. Risk of sudden infant death syndrome after immunization with the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M R; Ray, W A; Livengood, J R; Schaffner, W

    1988-09-01

    To evaluate recent immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP) as a possible risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), we studied the rates of SIDS after the administration of DTP vaccine in a cohort of 129,834 children who were born in four urban Tennessee counties during the period from 1974 through 1984. All the children received at least one DTP immunization in the first year of life at county health-department clinics or from Medicaid providers. Computerized immunization records from these sources were linked with Tennessee birth and death certificates to establish the cohort, ascertain the timing of immunization, and identify cases of SIDS. These children represented 42 percent of the births in the four counties. Among these children, 204 deaths occurred at the ages of 29 to 365 days; 109 deaths were classified as due to SIDS. We estimated the risk of SIDS according to the length of time, up to 30 days, since DTP immunization and compared it with the risk 31 days or more after immunization to calculate the relative risk. With control for age, the relative risk from 0 to 3 days after DTP immunization was 0.18 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.8); from 4 to 7 days, 0.17 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.7); from 8 to 14 days, 0.75 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.4 to 1.5); and from 15 to 30 days, 1.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.6 to 1.6). A multivariate analysis in which we controlled for age, sex, race, year, birth weight, and Medicaid enrollment, produced similar results. We conclude that in this large population of children there was no increase in the risk of SIDS after immunization with the DTP vaccine.

  3. Sudden infant death syndrome "gray zone" disclosed only by a study of the brain stem on serial sections.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi; Bruni, Barbara; Lavezzi, Anna M

    2005-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) "gray zone" or borderline cases are defined as those cases in which it is difficult to establish whether the pathological findings are sufficiently severe to have caused the death. Examination of the brainstem in 103 cases of SIDS disclosed five SIDS "gray zone" cases in which only further investigations of serial sections successfully identified anatomico-pathological findings that likely represent the morphological substrates for a sudden reflexogenic death. A complete autopsy was performed, including close examination of the brainstem and cardiac conduction system, according to our guidelines. Our five cases are consistent with the triple-risk model of SIDS, a hypothesis postulating an underlying biological vulnerability to exogenous stressors or triggering factors in a critical developmental period. Inflammatory infiltrates (cases 1 and 2), necrotic focus of the solitary tract (case 3), hemangioendothelioma (case 4) and mild pneumonia (case 5) alone might or might not have accounted for the sudden deaths, if it had not been for the location and/or concomitant presence of brainstem abnormalities that could have had a triggering role in causing the sudden death of these babies.

  4. Role of Sodium and Calcium Dysregulation in Tachyarrhythmias in Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefan; Maier, Lars S.; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in the therapy of underlying heart disease sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of death worldwide. Disturbed Na and Ca handling is known to be a major predisposing factor for life-threatening tachyarrhythmias. In cardiomyocytes many ion channels and transporters, including voltage-gated Na and Ca channels, cardiac ryanodine receptors, Na/Ca-exchanger and SR Ca-ATPase are involved in this regulation. We have learned a lot about the pathophysiological relevance of disturbed ion channel function from monogenetic disorders. Changes in the gating of a single ion channel and/or the activity of an ion pump suffice to dramatically increase the propensity for arrhythmias even in structurally normal hearts. Nevertheless, patients with heart failure (HF) with acquired dysfunction in many ion channels and transporters exhibit profound dysregulation of Na and Ca handling and Ca/calmodulin dependent protein kinase, and are especially prone to arrhythmias. A deeper understanding of the underlying arrhythmic principles is mandatory if we are to improve their outcome. This review addresses basic tachy-arrhythmic mechanisms, the underlying ionic mechanisms and the consequences for ion homeostasis, and the situation in complex diseases like HF. PMID:26044250

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sudden cardiac death: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marten E; Stricker, Bruno H; Brusselle, Guy G; Lahousse, Lies

    2016-10-01

    Both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are major health burdens. A number of studies have addressed their interrelationship, but currently no systematic review has been published. Our objective is to give an overview of the literature of the association between COPD and SCD. A search on PubMed with both MeSH headings and free-text keywords was performed. We selected all original articles of studies in humans that assessed COPD on the one hand and SCD, electrocardiographic markers for SCD, ventricular arrhythmias, or asystole on the other. The electronic search yielded 251 articles, from which 27 full publications were selected after careful evaluation of the full-text articles. In these studies, COPD was associated with a prolonged and shortened QT interval. In patients with a myocardial infarction (MI), COPD was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and decreased survival. COPD was a risk factor for SCD both in cardiovascular patient groups and in community-based studies, independent from cardiovascular risk profile. Studies of the potential impact of respiratory treatment on the occurrence of SCD showed conflicting results. In conclusion, cumulating evidence associates COPD with an increased risk of SCD. Asystole and pulseless electric activity could be more common than VT/VF in deaths associated with COPD. Underlying mechanisms explaining this association require further investigation. PMID:27234353

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sudden cardiac death: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marten E; Stricker, Bruno H; Brusselle, Guy G; Lahousse, Lies

    2016-10-01

    Both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are major health burdens. A number of studies have addressed their interrelationship, but currently no systematic review has been published. Our objective is to give an overview of the literature of the association between COPD and SCD. A search on PubMed with both MeSH headings and free-text keywords was performed. We selected all original articles of studies in humans that assessed COPD on the one hand and SCD, electrocardiographic markers for SCD, ventricular arrhythmias, or asystole on the other. The electronic search yielded 251 articles, from which 27 full publications were selected after careful evaluation of the full-text articles. In these studies, COPD was associated with a prolonged and shortened QT interval. In patients with a myocardial infarction (MI), COPD was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and decreased survival. COPD was a risk factor for SCD both in cardiovascular patient groups and in community-based studies, independent from cardiovascular risk profile. Studies of the potential impact of respiratory treatment on the occurrence of SCD showed conflicting results. In conclusion, cumulating evidence associates COPD with an increased risk of SCD. Asystole and pulseless electric activity could be more common than VT/VF in deaths associated with COPD. Underlying mechanisms explaining this association require further investigation.

  7. Experience With the Wearable Cardioverter-Defibrillator in Patients at High Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Michael; Quick, Silvio; Pfluecke, Christian; Rottstädt, Fabian; Szymkiewicz, Steven J.; Ringquist, Steven; Strasser, Ruth H.; Speiser, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the wearable cardioverter-defibrillator (WCD) for use and effectiveness in preventing sudden death caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmia or fibrillation. Methods: From April 2010 through October 2013, 6043 German WCD patients (median age, 57 years; male, 78.5%) were recruited from 404 German centers. Deidentified German patient data were used for a retrospective, nonrandomized analysis. Results: Ninety-four patients (1.6%) were treated by the WCD in response to ventricular tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation. The incidence rate was 8.4 (95% confidence interval, 6.8–10.2) per 100 patient-years. Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation had an incidence rate of 19.3 (95% confidence interval, 12.2–29.0) per 100 patient-years. In contrast, an incidence rate of 8.2 (95% confidence interval, 6.4–10.3) was observed in the remaining cardiac diagnosis groups, including dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, and ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Among 120 shocked patients, 112 (93%) survived 24 hours after treatment, whereas asystole was observed in 2 patients (0.03%) with 1 resulting death. ConclusionS: This large cohort represents the first nationwide evaluation of WCD use in patients outside the US healthcare system and confirms the overall value of the WCD in German treatment pathways. PMID:27458236

  8. Developmental alterations of the auditory brainstem centers--pathogenetic implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), despite the success of campaigns to reduce its risks, is the leading cause of infant death in the Western world. Even though the pathogenesis remains unexplained, brainstem abnormalities of the neuronal network that mediates breathing and protective responses to asphyxia, particularly in the arousal phase from sleep, are believed to play a fundamental role. This is the first study to identify, in SIDS, developmental defects of specific brainstem centers involved in hearing pathways, particularly in the cochlear and vestibular nuclei, in the superior olivary complex and in the inferior colliculus, suggesting a possible influence of the acoustic system on respiratory activity. In 49 SIDS cases and 20 controls an in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system was performed, with the main aim of detecting developmental alterations of brainstem structures controlling both the respiratory and auditory activities. Overall, a significantly higher incidence of cytoarchitectural alterations of both the auditory and respiratory network components were observed in SIDS victims compared with matched controls. Even if there is not sufficient evidence to presume that developmental defects of brainstem auditory structures can affect breathing, our findings, showing that developmental deficit in the control respiratory areas are frequently accompanied by alterations of auditory structures, highlight an additional important element for the understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of SIDS. PMID:26254624

  9. From unwitnessed fatality to witnessed rescue: Nonpharmacologic interventions in sudden unexpected death in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rugg-Gunn, Fergus; Duncan, John; Hjalgrim, Helle; Seyal, Masud; Bateman, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) risk reduction remains a critical aim in epilepsy care. To date, only aggressive medical and surgical efforts to control seizures have been demonstrated to be of benefit. Incomplete understanding of SUDEP mechanisms limits the development of more specific interventions. Periictal cardiorespiratory dysfunction is implicated in SUDEP; postictal electroencephalography (EEG) suppression, coma, and immobility may also play a role. Nocturnal supervision is protective against SUDEP, presumably by permitting intervention in the case of a life-threatening event. Resuscitative efforts were implemented promptly in near-SUDEP cases but delayed in SUDEP deaths in the Mortality in Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Study (MORTEMUS) study. Nursing interventions--including repositioning, oral suctioning, and oxygen administration--reduce seizure duration, respiratory dysfunction, and EEG suppression in the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU), but have not been studied in outpatients. Cardiac pacemakers or cardioverter-defibrillator devices may be of benefit in a few select individuals. A role for implantable neurostimulators has not yet been established. Seizure detection devices, including those that monitor generalized tonic-clonic seizure-associated movements or cardiorespiratory parameters, may provide a means to permit timely periictal intervention. However, these and other devices, such as antisuffocation pillows, have not been adequately investigated with respect to SUDEP prevention.

  10. Is shock a key element in the pathology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)?

    PubMed

    Blood-Siegfried, Jane; Bowers, Margaret T; Lorimer, Marcia

    2009-10-01

    In developed countries, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most common cause of death for infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. The etiology of SIDS is likely to be multifactorial, and current paradigms often describe three overlapping elements of risk. Those elements are a critical developmental period, a vulnerable infant, and one or more exogenous stressors. In the triple-risk model, SIDS infants are described as having an underlying vulnerability in cardiorespiratory control in the central nervous system during a critical period when autonomic control is developing. This vulnerability might affect the response to exogenous stressors, including prone sleeping position, hypoxia, and increased carbon dioxide. In the common bacterial hypothesis and fatal triangle, the focus is on the stressors. In the first, a combination of common respiratory infections can cause SIDS in an infant during a developmentally vulnerable period. This theory also includes 3 factors of vulnerability: a genetic predisposition, a vulnerable developmental age, and infectious stressors. In the fatal triangle theory, infection, inflammation, and genetics each play a role in triggering a SIDS fatality. From our work in an animal model, we have found that rat pups die from a combination of infectious insults during a critical time of development. This is exacerbated by perinatal nicotine exposure, a condition shown to alter the autonomic response in exposed offspring. We are proposing that shock and cardiovascular collapse is a key element that links these theories.

  11. Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP): Are All Your Patients Informed?

    PubMed

    Marin Collazo, I Vanessa; Tatum, William O

    2016-07-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is a devastating direct epilepsy-related cause of death. Although its occurrence has some risk factors, it is unanticipated and very traumatic to the families of affected patients. Effective preventive measures for SUDEP are lacking; therefore, efforts are directed at modifiable risk factors. The majority of caregivers of patients with epilepsy and SUDEP wish they would have known more about the topic before the terminal event. SUDEP is a difficult topic for physicians and clearly even more challenging to discuss with patients and caregivers. The pathophysiology of SUDEP is controversial, but awareness should be raised despite individual opinions. During the last decade SUDEP has received substantial attention, and efforts are being made to increase worldwide awareness. The American Epilepsy Society and Epilepsy Foundation Joint Task force, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network recommend educating patients about SUDEP. Education will potentially help meet treatment goals, promote better patient-physician rapport, decrease anxiety and fear, serve as a filter for inaccurate information, and lessen grief and blame in the families of patients affected by SUDEP. This article will cover a literature review on SUDEP, epidemiology, risk factors, proposed mechanism, potential interventions, physician practices and suggested measurements, and public websites designed to increase SUDEP awareness. PMID:27348142

  12. Sudden Cardiac Death Due to Deficiency of the Mitochondrial Inorganic Pyrophosphatase PPA2.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Hannah; Haack, Tobias B; Hartill, Verity; Mataković, Lavinija; Baumgartner, E Regula; Potter, Howard; Mackay, Richard; Alston, Charlotte L; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; McFarland, Robert; Connolly, Grainne; Gannon, Caroline; King, Richard; Mead, Scott; Crozier, Ian; Chan, Wandy; Florkowski, Chris M; Sage, Martin; Höfken, Thomas; Alhaddad, Bader; Kremer, Laura S; Kopajtich, Robert; Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Rodenburg, Richard J; Minet, Jean Claude; Dobbie, Angus; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; George, Peter M; Johnson, Colin A; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Doudney, Kit; Mayr, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    We have used whole-exome sequencing in ten individuals from four unrelated pedigrees to identify biallelic missense mutations in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPA2) that are associated with mitochondrial disease. These individuals show a range of severity, indicating that PPA2 mutations may cause a spectrum of mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Severe symptoms include seizures, lactic acidosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and death within days of birth. In the index family, presentation was milder and manifested as cardiac fibrosis and an exquisite sensitivity to alcohol, leading to sudden arrhythmic cardiac death in the second decade of life. Comparison of normal and mutant PPA2-containing mitochondria from fibroblasts showed that the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase was significantly reduced in affected individuals. Recombinant PPA2 enzymes modeling hypomorphic missense mutations had decreased activity that correlated with disease severity. These findings confirm the pathogenicity of PPA2 mutations and suggest that PPA2 is a cardiomyopathy-associated protein, which has a greater physiological importance in mitochondrial function than previously recognized. PMID:27523597

  13. Developmental neurotransmitter pathology in the brainstem of sudden infant death syndrome: a review and sleep position.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Y; Takashima, S

    2002-09-14

    Developmental studies on neurotransmitters and their receptors in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants and controls are reviewed, including comparison between the prone and supine positions at death. In SIDS infants, there are an increase of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes in the brainstem, an increase of substance P (SP) in the medulla and pons, a decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive catecholaminergic neurons in the ventrolateral medulla (VLM), and vagal nuclei in the medulla oblongata and basal ganglia, a decrease of tryptophan hydroxylase (TrH)-positive serotonergic neurons in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and decreases of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivities in the VLM and vagal nuclei in the medulla oblongata. These findings may be the result of chronic or repeated hypoxia and at the same time suggest hypofunction or immaturity of cardiorespiratory regulation. In contrast, 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivities are increased in the PAG of SIDS infants. These increased immunoreactivities may reflect delayed neuronal maturation or a developmental abnormality of the nocicetive reaction of cardiorespiratory and arousal control in SIDS. Also, there are no differences of brainstem gliosis and catecholaminergic neuron changes between the prone and supine positions. Therefore, these changes may be predisposing factors for SIDS. PMID:12350301

  14. Interaction between sphingomyelin and oxysterols contributes to atherosclerosis and sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Kummerow, Fred A

    2013-01-01

    Despite major public health efforts, coronary heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the United States. Oxidized lipids contribute to heart disease both by increasing deposition of calcium on the arterial wall, a major hallmark of atherosclerosis, and by interrupting blood flow, a major contributor to heart attack and sudden death. Oxidized cholesterol (oxysterols) enhances the production of sphingomyelin, a phospholipid found in the cellular membranes of the coronary artery. This increases the sphingomyelin content in the cell membrane, which in turn enhances the interaction between the membrane and ionic calcium (Ca2+), thereby increasing the risk of arterial calcification. Patients undergoing bypass surgery had greater concentrations of oxysterols in their plasma than cardiac catheterized controls with no stenosis, and had five times more sphingomyelin in their arteries than in the artery of the placenta of a newborn. The oxysterols found in the plasma of these patients were also found in the plasma of rabbits that had been fed oxidized cholesterol and in frying fats and powdered egg yolk intended for human consumption. Together these findings suggest that oxysterols found in the diet are absorbed and contribute to arterial calcification. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) further contributes to heart disease by increasing the synthesis of thromboxane in platelets, which increases blood clotting. Cigarette smoke and trans fatty acids, found in partially hydrogenated soybean oil, both inhibit the synthesis of prostacyclin, which inhibits blood clotting. By increasing the ratio of thromboxane to prostacyclin, these factors interact to interrupt blood flow, thereby contributing to heart attack and sudden death. Levels of oxysterols and OxLDL increase primarily as a result of three diet or lifestyle factors: the consumption of oxysterols from commercially fried foods such as fried chicken, fish, and french fries; oxidation of cholesterol

  15. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in Croatia in a 27-year period.

    PubMed

    Duraković, Zijad; Duraković, Marjeta Misigoj; Skavić, Josip

    2011-12-01

    The paper deals with the sudden cardiac death during physical exercise in males in Croatia. The data are a part of a retrospective study dealing with 69 sudden death due to physical activity in men in Croatia during 27 years: from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 2010. Three of them suddenly died during training and two of them died during recreational physical exercise, probably because of malignant ventricular arrhythmia due to hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy. One had an obstructive form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with i.v. septum of 40 mm and four had a non-obstructive forms of hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular wall of 18-20-22-25 mm. First athlete was a short trails runner, aged 24, with no any previous physical discomforts, who suddenly collapsed and died during training. The second athlete was a soccer player aged 18, with no any previous physical discomfort, who suddenly collapsed and died during training. The third aged 15, was a school boy, basketball player, with no any previous physical discomfort, who collapsed and died during training. Two aged 25 and 34, were with no physical discomfort during exercise and died suddenly during recreational soccer games. A sudden cardiac death due to physical exercise in young athletes in Croatia suffered of hyperthropic cardiomyopathy reached 0.06/100 000 yearly (p = 0.00000) in 27 years, in teenagers 0.26/100 000 (p = 0.00226), in teenagers suffered of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy reached 0.10/100 000 (p = 0.00000), in all young athletes suffered of other heart diseases reached 0.19/100 000 (p = 0.00005), and in the total male population aged 15 or more, engaged in sports and recreational physical exercise: 0.71/100.0000 (p = 0.00001).

  16. Sudden death due to hydatid disease: a six-year study in the northern part of Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Khelil, Mehdi; Allouche, Mohamed; Banasr, Ahmed; Gloulou, Fatma; Benzarti, Anis; Zhioua, Mongi; Haouet, Slim; Hamdoun, Moncef

    2013-09-01

    Human ecchinococcosis also known as hydatid disease is a zoonotic infection caused by the tapeworm Ecchinococcus with 2-3 Million cases worldwide. We hereby report a 6 years period study of Sudden death due to hydatidosis aiming to analyze the epidemiological criteria, death circumstances, and autopsy observations attributed to hydatid disease. During the past 6 years, 26 death cases were due to hydatid disease. Our analysis shows that the sex ratio (M/F) was 1.6, the mean age was 31-year old, and 65% of the subjects lived in rural places. In 17 cases, death occurred in the victim's place, five victims died after a heavy exercise, and in two cases, death occurred immediately after trauma. At autopsy, 91% of the cysts were found in the liver. In three cases, death followed a septic state, and in two cases, it followed an acute respiratory failure. Death was attributed to anaphylaxis in 17 cases.

  17. Association between Clinical and Doppler Echocardiographic Parameters with Sudden Death in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barberato, Silvio Henrique; Bucharles, Sérgio Gardano Elias; Barberato, Marcia Ferreira Alves; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death in maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients, but there is little information about underlying risk factors. Objectives: Evaluate the association between clinical and echocardiographic variables with SCD on HD patients. Methods: Retrospective nested case-control study on chronic HD patients who were prospectively followed. The primary endpoint was SCD. Variables were compared by Student t test, Mann-Whitney or Chi-Square, and independent predictors of SCD were evidenced by multivariate logistic regression. Results: We followed 153 patients (50 ± 15 years, 58% men) for 23 ± 14 months and observed 35 deaths, 17 of which were SCD events. When compared to the control group (matched for gender, age, and body mass index) there were no differences regarding time on dialysis, traditional biochemical parameters, blood pressure, smoking, use of cardiovascular protective drugs, ejection fraction, left ventricular dimensions, and diastolic function indices. On the other hand, in the SCD group, we found a higher prevalence of previous heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and diabetes, greater left ventricular mass index, greater left atrial size and lower global myocardial performance. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, diabetes (OR = 2.6; CI = 1.3-7.5; p = 0.023) and left ventricular mass index ≥ 101 g/m2.7 (OR = 1.04; CI = 1.01-1.08; p = 0.028) showed independent association with SCD events. Conclusions: HD patients with diabetes mellitus and left ventricular hypertrophy appear to have the highest risk of SCD. Preventive and therapeutic strategies should be encouraged in addressing these risk factors to minimize the occurrence of SCD in HD patients. PMID:27411094

  18. Pathophysiology of sudden cardiac death as demonstrated by molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-11-30

    Various heart diseases present with sudden death; however, it is difficult to interpret the severity of or difference in respective preexisting and terminal cardiac dysfunction based on conventional morphology. The present study investigated the cardiac pathophysiology employing quantitative mRNA measurement of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium as markers of cardiac strain, using autopsy materials consisting of acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD, n=40) with/without the pathology of apparent myocardial necrosis (n=19/21), recurrent myocardial infarction (RMI, n=19), chronic congestive heart disease (CHD, n=11) and right ventricular cardiomyopathy (RVC, n=5), as well as hemopericardium (HP, n=11) due to myocardial infarction (n=5) and aortic rupture (n=6), and acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE, n=5). Cardiac death groups showed higher ANP and/or BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricle than acute fatal bleeding (sharp instrumental injury; n=15) and/or mechanical asphyxiation (strangulation; n=10). AIHD and RMI cases had similar ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in bilateral ventricular walls, but their bilateral atrial levels were lower in RMI. RVC showed higher mRNA expressions of posterior left ventricular BNP, and right ventricular and bilateral atrial ANP and BNP. HP cases had lower BNP mRNA expression in the right ventricular wall, but PTE showed lower ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricular wall; however, these mRNA expressions at other sites were similar to those of AIHD. CHD presented findings similar to those of AIHD, but the pericardial BNP level was significantly increased. These observations indicate characteristic molecular biological responses of myocardial natriuretic peptides in individual heart diseases and suggest the possible application of molecular pathology to demonstrate cardiac dysfunction even after death.

  19. [Sudden infant death and sickle cell anemia in the Sahel region of Africa].

    PubMed

    Vix, J; Buguet, A; Straboni, S; Beidari, H

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (S.I.D.S.) in families of government employees who benefited of free health care. Out of approximately 400 families with around 2000 children, 29 reported at least one infant death meeting the chosen criteria for S.I.D.S. A total of 41 children, mostly males, died between 1 day and 30 months of age, amongst the 149 children born in these families; most of them died during the first 3 months of life. The mothers were generally house wives, aged 26.2 +/- 1.0 years. Sickle cell trait was found in at least one parent of 21 families. In the other 8 families, 11 out of 38 children died, giving a prevalence rate of 6.9/1000 live births for S.I.D.S. in the healthy population. In the sickle cell trait population, the prevalence rate for S.I.D.S. reached 75.0/1000 live births, the prevalence of sickle cell anemia being about 20% in Niger. When very strict criteria were used for diagnosing S.I.D.S., the prevalence rate was 2.5/1000 and 40/1000 live births in the healthy and the sickle trait populations respectively. This study is the first attempt to determine the place of S.I.D.S. in the infant mortality rate in Sahelian Africa. In families with sickle cell disease, the risk of S.I.D.S. was 11.5 times greater than in healthy families. The role of sleep apnea as a cause of S.I.D.S. is discussed. It may represent a common cause of death in both healthy families at risk and sickle cell trait families.

  20. Sudden death due to rupture of the right internal carotid artery in neurofibromatosis type 1: A case report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yue; Tong, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Wenhe; Zhou, Yiwu

    2016-07-01

    Vascular involvement is a well-recognized manifestation of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) which has the potential to be fatal when disrupted. We here present a case of sudden death due to the fatal arterial rupture resulted from infiltration of the neurofibromas. A 42-year-old man who suffered from NF1 presented a 1-h history of sudden onset of pain in his right cervical region. His condition worsened and became unconscious on his way to the emergency room. Despite resuscitation efforts, he died 30min later without regaining consciousness. Autopsy examination showed that a neurofibroma located around the right internal carotid artery, confirmed immunohistochemically with S-100, vimentin and CD34. Furthermore, proliferation of spindle cells positive for S-100 was seen in the wall of right internal carotid artery, which was disrupted and resulted in a hemorrhage. These findings suggest that the artery was disrupted by neurofibromas in the vascular wall, which led to fragility of the vessel. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that the cause of death was asphyxia resulting from airway obstruction compressed by the hematoma due to the arterial rupture. As the locality of the neurofibroma and hemorrhage were closed to the carotid baroreflex, we considered another possible mechanism of his sudden death, which could be cardiac inhibition induced by vagal stimulation. We hope this case will increase recognition of NF-1 vasculopathy when encountering any sudden death in NF1 patients. PMID:27497331

  1. Effect of fungicide seed treatments on Fusarium virguliforme infection of soybean and development of sudden death syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by Fusarium virguliforme (Fv), is a major yield-limiting disease of soybean in North America. Infection of soybean seedling roots by Fv results in severe root damage; therefore, fungicide seed treatments could potentially reduce these early-season infections and r...

  2. Sudden Unexpected Death in Infants. (Supplement to Literature Search No. 71-14, April 1971 through June 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Kamp, Jacqueline, Comp.

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has prepared a selected computer-generated bibliography from recent international journals on sudden death in infants. Each of 108 citations is accompanied by descriptors selected from the NLM's list of medical subject headings to facilitate the use of the retrieval system for those who are interested in…

  3. Neuropathology of the area postrema in sudden intrauterine and infant death syndromes related to tobacco smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Mecchia, Donatella; Matturri, Luigi

    2012-01-26

    The area postrema is a densely vascularized small protuberance at the inferoposterior limit of the fourth ventricle, outside of the blood-brain barrier. This structure, besides to induce emetic reflex in the presence of noxious chemical stimulation, has a multifunctional integrative capacity to send major and minor efferents to a variety of brain centers particularly involved in autonomic control of the cardiovascular and respiratory activities. In this study we aimed to focus on the area postrema, which is so far little studied in humans, in a large sample of subjects aged from 25 gestational weeks to 10 postnatal months, who died of unknown (sudden unexplained perinatal and infant deaths) and known causes (controls). Besides we investigated a possible link between alterations of this structure, sudden unexplained fetal and infant deaths and maternal smoking. By the application of morphological and immunohistochemical methods, we observed a significantly high incidence of alterations of the area postrema in fetal and infant victims of sudden death as compared with age-matched controls. These pathological findings, including hypoplasia, lack of vascularization, cystic formations and reactive gliosis, were related to maternal smoking. We hypothesize that components from maternal cigarette smoke, particularly in pregnancy, could affect neurons of the area postrema connected with specific nervous centers involved in the control of vital functions. In conclusion, we suggest that the area postrema should be in depth examined particularly in victims of sudden fetal or infant death with smoker mothers.

  4. Predictive Value of Beat-to-Beat QT Variability Index across the Continuum of Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Competing Risks of Non-cardiac or Cardiovascular Death, and Sudden or Non-Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; McNitt, Scott; Vazquez, Rafael; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Han, Lichy; Sur, Sanjoli; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Berger, Ronald D.; de Luna, Antoni Bayes; Zareba, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to determine the predictive value of beat-to-beat QT variability in heart failure (HF) patients across the continuum of left ventricular dysfunction. Methods and Results Beat-to-beat QT variability index (QTVI), heart rate variance (LogHRV), normalized QT variance (QTVN), and coherence between heart rate variability and QT variability have been measured at rest during sinus rhythm in 533 participants of the Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca (MUSIC) HF study (mean age 63.1±11.7; males 70.6%; LVEF >35% in 254 [48%]) and in 181 healthy participants from the Intercity Digital Electrocardiogram Alliance (IDEAL) database. During a median of 3.7 years of follow-up, 116 patients died, 52 from sudden cardiac death (SCD). In multivariate competing risk analyses, the highest QTVI quartile was associated with cardiovascular death [hazard ratio (HR) 1.67(95%CI 1.14-2.47), P=0.009] and in particular with non-sudden cardiac death [HR 2.91(1.69-5.01), P<0.001]. Elevated QTVI separated 97.5% of healthy individuals from subjects at risk for cardiovascular [HR 1.57(1.04-2.35), P=0.031], and non-sudden cardiac death in multivariate competing risk model [HR 2.58(1.13-3.78), P=0.001]. No interaction between QTVI and LVEF was found. QTVI predicted neither non-cardiac death (P=0.546) nor SCD (P=0.945). Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) rather than increased QT variability was the reason for increased QTVI in this study. Conclusions Increased QTVI due to depressed HRV predicts cardiovascular mortality and non-sudden cardiac death, but neither SCD nor excracardiac mortality in HF across the continuum of left ventricular dysfunction. Abnormally augmented QTVI separates 97.5% of healthy individuals from HF patients at risk. PMID:22730411

  5. Sudden, unexpected death of a 15-year-old boy due to pancarditis

    PubMed Central

    Osculati, Antonio; Visonà, Silvia Damiana; Ventura, Francesco; Castelli, Francesca; Andrello, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Generally, rheumatic heart disease is, today, sporadic in developed countries, even though it continues to be a major health hazard in the developing ones. It is also a very rare cause of sudden unexpected death. We report a case of a 15-year-old boy who suddenly died at home. Since 3 days he had presented fever and chest pain. The family physician had diagnosed bronchitis and treated the boy with amoxicillin. Methods: Seven hours after death, a forensic autopsy were performed . Before the autopsy, anamnesis and some circumstantial data were collected from the boy's parents. During the autopsy, samples for histological, toxicological and molecular examinations were collected. The samples for the histology (brain, hypophysis, heart and pericardium, lungs, spleen, liver, kidney, adrenal glands) were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. Each section was stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin. Immunostaining was also performed, with anti-CD 68, anti-CD3, anti-CD 20, anti-myeloperoxidase. Microbiological cultures were performed on cardiac blood, myocardium, pericardial effusion and cerebrospinal fluid samples collected during autopsy. Blood specimens were also processed through PCR, in order to reveal the presence of Enteroviruses, Chickenpox virus, Epstein Barr virus. Also chemical-toxicological examinations for the detection of the main medications and drugs were performed on blood samples. Results: The anamnesis, collected before the autopsy, revealed an acute pharyngitis few weeks before. The autopsy, and the following histological and immunochemical examinations suggested an immunological etiology. The immunohistochemistry, showing a strong positivity of antiCD68 antibodies, integrated with clinical-anamnestic information, leads to hypothesize a rheumatic carditis. Conclusion: In light of this case, at least 3 main messages of great importance for the clinician can be deduced. First, an accurate anamnesis collected by the family physician could have

  6. Sudden cardiac death in adults with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries

    PubMed Central

    McCombe, A; Touma, F; Jackson, D; Canniffe, C; Choudhary, P; Pressley, L; Tanous, D; Robinson, Peter J; Celermajer, D

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) is a rare congenital heart disease. There have been only few reports of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with ccTGA and reasonable ventricular function. Methods A retrospective review of the medical records of all patients attending our adult congenital heart centre, with known ccTGA. Results From a database of over 3500 adult patients with congenital heart disease, we identified 39 (∼1%) with ccTGA and ‘two-ventricle’ circulations. 65% were male. The mean age at diagnosis was 12.4±11.4 years and the mean age at last time of review was 34.3±11.3 years. 24 patients (56%) had a history of surgical intervention. 8 (19%) had had pacemaker implantation and 2 had had a defibrillator implanted for non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). In 544 years of patient follow-up, there had been five cases of SCD in our population; 1 death per 109 patient-years. Two of these patients had had previously documented supraventricular or NSVT. However, they were all classified as New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I or II, and systemic (right) ventricular function had been recorded as normal, mildly or mildly–moderately impaired, at most recent follow-up. Conclusions Our experience suggests the need for improved risk stratification and/or surveillance for malignant arrhythmia in adults with ccTGA, even in those with reasonable functional class on ventricular function. PMID:27493760

  7. Chronic intermittent mental stress promotes atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability, myocardial infarction and sudden death in mice.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lynn; Rombouts, Miche; Schrijvers, Dorien M; Lemmens, Katrien; De Keulenaer, Gilles W; Martinet, Wim; De Meyer, Guido R Y

    2015-09-01

    Vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are prone to plaque rupture leading to acute cardiovascular syndromes and death. Elucidating the risk of plaque rupture is important to define better therapeutic or preventive strategies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of chronic intermittent mental stress on atherosclerotic plaque stability and cardiovascular mortality in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice with a heterozygous mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene (Fbn1(C1039G+/)(-)). This mouse model displays exacerbated atherosclerosis with spontaneous plaque ruptures, myocardial infarction and sudden death, when fed a Western-type diet (WD). Female ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice were fed a WD for up to 25 weeks. After 10 weeks WD, mice were divided in a control (n = 27) and mental stress (n = 29) group. The chronic intermittent mental stress protocol consisted of 3 triggers: water avoidance, damp bedding and restraint stress, in a randomly assigned order lasting 6 h every weekday for 15 weeks. Chronic intermittent mental stress resulted in a significant increase in the amount of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of the proximal ascending aorta, whereas type I collagen and fibrous cap thickness were decreased. The coronary arteries of mental stress-treated mice showed larger plaques, more stenosis, and an increased degree of perivascular fibrosis. Moreover, myocardial infarctions occurred more frequently in the mental stress group. As compared to the control group, the survival of stressed ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice decreased from 67% to 52% at 25 weeks WD, presumably due to myocardial infarctions. In conclusion, chronic intermittent mental stress promotes plaque instability, myocardial infarctions, and mortality of ApoE(-/-)Fbn1(C1039G+/-) mice. PMID:26233915

  8. Transcriptional analysis of soybean root response to Fusarium virguliforme, the causal agent of sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Osman; Liu, Yu; Clough, Steven J

    2011-08-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean can be caused by any of four distinct Fusarium species, with F. virguliforme and F. tucumaniae being the main casual agents in North and South America, respectively. Although the fungal tissue is largely confined to the roots, the fungus releases a toxin that is translocated to leaf tissues, in which it causes interveinal chlorosis and necrosis leading to scorching symptoms and possible defoliation. In this study, we report on an Affymetrix analysis measuring transcript abundances in resistant (PI 567.374) and susceptible (Essex) roots upon infection by F. virguliforme, 5 and 7 days postinoculation. Many of the genes with increased expression were common between resistant and susceptible plants (including genes related to programmed cell death, the phenylpropanoid pathway, defense, signal transduction, and transcription factors), but some genotype-specific expression was noted. Changes in small (sm)RNA levels between inoculated and mock-treated samples were also studied and implicate a role for these molecules in this interaction. In total, 2,467 genes were significantly changing in the experiment, with 1,694 changing in response to the pathogen; 93 smRNA and 42 microRNA that have putative soybean gene targets were identified from infected tissue. Comparing genotypes, 247 genes were uniquely modulating in the resistant host, whereas 378 genes were uniquely modulating in the susceptible host. Comparing locations of differentially expressed genes to known resistant quantitative trait loci as well as identifying smRNA that increased while their putative targets decreased (or vice versa) allowed for the narrowing of candidate SDS defense-associated genes. PMID:21751852

  9. Arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in elite athletes. American College of Cardiology, 16th Bethesda Conference.

    PubMed

    Garson, A

    1998-01-01

    With the recent high visibility deaths of Hank Gathers and Reggie Lewis, two nationally recognized elite basketball players due to cardiovascular disease and arrhythmias, our awareness of the most optimal ways to manage athletes with known arrhythmias has become heightened. In making medical decisions we physicians come to rely in large measure on data, in addition to clinical acumen and experience. Unfortunately, we are at a disadvantage with respect to athletes since previously published data on the natural history and outcome of such individuals with known arrhythmias are sparse. Furthermore, the tragedies of Lewis, Gathers, Pete Maravich and others are also poignant reminders that the denominator of this equation is not defined and that we do not really know precisely how many athletes experience important arrhythmias, nor their relation to sports activity. In the decade since the 16th Bethesda Conference, an American College of Cardiology sponsored consensus panel that developed standards and recommendations for the disqualification from competition of athletes with known cardiovascular disease, little new data have been developed to make objective decisions in these areas (including arrhythmias) much easier. Nevertheless, while such decision-making in athletes involves situations that are relatively rare, the consequences of misjudgement are substantial. Unfortunately, to complicate matters, even if the precise likelihood of sudden death for a given athlete with arrhythmias were known, many (if not most) professional and elite college athletes might still regard any risk as acceptable and withdrawal from formal competition as highly unacceptable from a financial and psychological standpoint. In this review, consideration will be given to the state of our medical knowledge in these areas. Many controversies persist with regard to arrhythmias, most notably for the athlete who has Wolff-Parkinson-White, mitral valve prolapse, myocarditis, or complex ventricular

  10. Incidence of sudden cardiac death in athletes: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Kimberly G; Drezner, Jonathan A; Wilson, Mathew G; Sharma, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading medical cause of death in athletes; however, the precise incidence is unknown. The objectives of this review were to examine studies on the rate of SCD in athletes, assess the methodological strengths and weaknesses used to arrive at estimates, compare studies in athletes with estimates in similar populations and arrive at an approximation of the incidence of SCD based on the best available evidence. A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed using key terms related to SCD in athletes. Articles were reviewed for relevance and included if they contained information on the incidence of SCD in athletes or young persons up to the age of 40. The reference list from each manuscript was reviewed for additional relevant articles. The methods for case identification were examined, as well as the inclusion and exclusion criteria and the precision of the population denominator studied. Thirteen studies were found investigating the rate of SCD in athletes who ranged in age from 9 to 40. An additional 15 incidence studies were located examining the rate of SCD in other populations under the age of 40. Rates of SCD varied from 1:917,000 to 1:3000. Studies with higher methodological quality consistently yielded incidence rates in the range of 1:40,000 to 1:80,000. Some athlete subgroups, specifically men, African-American/black athletes and basketball players, appear to be at higher risk. The incidence of SCD in athletes is likely higher than traditional estimates which may impact the development of more effective prevention strategies.

  11. Comparison of the Frequency of Sudden Cardiovascular Deaths in Young Competitive Athletes Versus Nonathletes: Should We Really Screen Only Athletes?

    PubMed

    Maron, Barry J; Haas, Tammy S; Duncanson, Emily R; Garberich, Ross F; Baker, Andrew M; Mackey-Bojack, Shannon

    2016-04-15

    The issue of sudden death in young athletes and consideration for the most practical and optimal strategy to identify those genetic and/or congenital heart diseases responsible for these tragic events continues to be debated. However, proponents of broad-based and mandatory national preparticipation screening, including with 12-lead electrocardiograms have confined the focus to a relatively small segment of the youthful population who choose to engage in competitive athletic programs at the high school, college, and elite-professional level. Therefore, lost in this discussion of preparticipation screening of athletes is that the larger population of young people not involved in competitive sports (and, therefore, a priori are excluded from systematic screening) who nevertheless may die suddenly of the same cardiovascular diseases as athletes. To substantiate this hypothesis, we accessed the forensic Hennepin County, Minnesota registry in which cardiovascular sudden deaths were 8-fold more common in nonathletes (n = 24) than athletes (n = 3) and threefold more frequent in terms of incidence. The most common diseases responsible for sudden death were hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 6) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4). These data raise ethical considerations inherent in limiting systematic screening for unsuspected genetic and/or congenital heart disease to competitive athletes.

  12. Genetic investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy using next-generation sequencing of 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Christin Loeth; Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl; Dahl, Morten; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Weeke, Peter Ejvin; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Grarup, Niels; Ottesen, Gyda Lolk; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Banner, Jytte; Morling, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most frequent manner of post-perinatal death among infants. One of the suggested causes of the syndrome is inherited cardiac diseases, mainly channelopathies, that can trigger arrhythmias and sudden death. The purpose of this study was to investigate cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) for potential causative variants in 100 cardiac-associated genes. We investigated 47 SUDI cases of which 38 had previously been screened for variants in RYR2, KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Using the Haloplex Target Enrichment System (Agilent) and next-generation sequencing (NGS), the coding regions of 100 genes associated with inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies were captured and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Sixteen (34%) of the SUDI cases had variants with likely functional effects, based on conservation, computational prediction and allele frequency, in one or more of the genes screened. The possible effects of the variants were not verified with family or functional studies. Eight (17%) of the SUDI cases had variants in genes affecting ion channel functions. The remaining eight cases had variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathies. In total, one third of the SUDI victims in a forensic setting had variants with likely functional effect that presumably contributed to the cause of death. The results support the assumption that channelopathies are important causes of SUDI. Thus, analysis of genes associated with cardiac diseases in SUDI victims is important in the forensic setting and a valuable supplement to the clinical investigation in all cases of sudden death.

  13. Genetic investigations of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy using next-generation sequencing of 100 genes associated with cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Christin Loeth; Christiansen, Sofie Lindgren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl; Dahl, Morten; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Weeke, Peter Ejvin; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Grarup, Niels; Ottesen, Gyda Lolk; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Banner, Jytte; Morling, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most frequent manner of post-perinatal death among infants. One of the suggested causes of the syndrome is inherited cardiac diseases, mainly channelopathies, that can trigger arrhythmias and sudden death. The purpose of this study was to investigate cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) for potential causative variants in 100 cardiac-associated genes. We investigated 47 SUDI cases of which 38 had previously been screened for variants in RYR2, KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Using the Haloplex Target Enrichment System (Agilent) and next-generation sequencing (NGS), the coding regions of 100 genes associated with inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies were captured and sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Sixteen (34%) of the SUDI cases had variants with likely functional effects, based on conservation, computational prediction and allele frequency, in one or more of the genes screened. The possible effects of the variants were not verified with family or functional studies. Eight (17%) of the SUDI cases had variants in genes affecting ion channel functions. The remaining eight cases had variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathies. In total, one third of the SUDI victims in a forensic setting had variants with likely functional effect that presumably contributed to the cause of death. The results support the assumption that channelopathies are important causes of SUDI. Thus, analysis of genes associated with cardiac diseases in SUDI victims is important in the forensic setting and a valuable supplement to the clinical investigation in all cases of sudden death. PMID:26350513

  14. Discussing sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Are we empowering our patients? A questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Keddie, S; Angus-Leppan, H; Parker, T; Toescu, S; Nash, A; Adewunmi, O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine patient knowledge about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) compared to other risks in epilepsy. To explore patients’ experiences surrounding SUDEP disclosure and opinions on how information should be delivered. Design A cross-sectional questionnaire. Setting Royal Free Hospital, London outpatient epilepsy clinics. Participants New and follow-up patients attending epilepsy clinics at a London teaching hospital over six months. Patients identified as being at risk of suffering negative emotional or psychological consequences of SUDEP discussions were excluded. Main outcome measures Patient knowledge about epilepsy risks; patient opinion regarding source, timing and delivery of SUDEP information; impact on health seeking behaviour. Results Ninety-eight per cent of patients were aware of medication adherence, 84% of factors influencing seizure frequency, 78% of driving regulations, 50% of SUDEP and 38% of status epilepticus; 72% of patients felt that SUDEP information should be given to all patients. Preferences for timing of SUDEP discussions varied between those wanting information at diagnosis (40%) and those preferring to receive it after three clinic appointments (18%) to avoid information overload at the first consultation. Emotional responses (48% positive, 38% negative) predominated over measurable behavioural change following SUDEP discussions. Conclusions Less than half the patients knew about SUDEP and status epilepticus. Although the majority of patients with epilepsy wish to be informed about SUDEP early on in their diagnosis, information must be delivered in a way that promotes patient knowledge and empowerment.

  15. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death: current status and challenges for the future†

    PubMed Central

    Wellens, Hein J.J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; Lindemans, Fred W.; Buxton, Alfred E.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.; Hohnloser, Stefan H.; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Kääb, Stefan; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Malik, Marek; Myerburg, Robert J.; Simoons, Maarten L.; Swedberg, Karl; Tijssen, Jan; Voors, Adriaan A.; Wilde, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) remains a daunting problem. It is a major public health issue for several reasons: from its prevalence (20% of total mortality in the industrialized world) to the devastating psycho-social impact on society and on the families of victims often still in their prime, and it represents a challenge for medicine, and especially for cardiology. This text summarizes the discussions and opinions of a group of investigators with a long-standing interest in this field. We addressed the occurrence of SCD in individuals apparently healthy, in patients with heart disease and mild or severe cardiac dysfunction, and in those with genetically based arrhythmic diseases. Recognizing the need for more accurate registries of the global and regional distribution of SCD in these different categories, we focused on the assessment of risk for SCD in these four groups, looking at the significance of alterations in cardiac function, of signs of electrical instability identified by ECG abnormalities or by autonomic tests, and of the progressive impact of genetic screening. Special attention was given to the identification of areas of research more or less likely to provide useful information, and thereby more or less suitable for the investment of time and of research funds. PMID:24801071

  16. Plasma Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 and Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Maziarz, Marlena; Biggs, Mary L.; Ix, Joachim H.; Zieman, Susan J.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Tracy, Russell P.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David S.; Sotoodehnia, Nona

    2013-01-01

    Although fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) may increase risk of diabetes and exert negative cardiac inotropy, it is unknown whether plasma concentrations of FABP4 are associated with incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD). We prospectively analyzed data on 4,560 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study. FABP4 was measured at baseline using ELISA, and SCD events were adjudicated through review of medical records. We used Cox proportional hazards to estimate effect measures. During a median followup of 11.8 years, 146 SCD cases occurred. In a multivariable model adjusting for demographic, lifestyle, and metabolic factors, relative risk of SCD associated with each higher standard deviation (SD) of plasma FABP4 was 1.15 (95% CI: 0.95–1.38), P = 0.15. In a secondary analysis stratified by prevalent diabetes status, FABP4 was associated with higher risk of SCD in nondiabetic participants, (RR per SD higher FABP4: 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07–1.65), P = 0.009) but not in diabetic participants (RR per SD higher FABP4: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.62–1.27), P = 0.50), P for diabetes-FABP4 interaction 0.049. In summary, a single measure of plasma FABP4 obtained later in life was not associated with the risk of SCD in older adults overall. Confirmation of our post-hoc results in nondiabetic people in other studies is warranted. PMID:24455402

  17. [The morphological changes in the myocardial tissue after sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This paper was designed to report the results of the retrospective analysis of the protocols of 180 forensic medical autopsy sections stored in the archives of Sankt-Petersburg Bureau of Forensic Medical Expertise and the data of the histological studies of myocardial tissues obtained after sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy. The study revealed the following most pathognomonic histological criteria for alcoholic heart lesions: the alternation of hypertrophic and atrophic cardiomyocytes in the state of severe parenchymatous degeneration, pronounced mesenchymal fatty dystrophy in combination with pathological changes of the vascular walls (vascular wall plasmatization), sub-endothelial accumulation of the PAS-positive tissue compounds, microcirculatory disorders in the form of erythrocyte stasis with the manifestations of the blood "sludge" phenomenon, and precapillary fibrosis. The signs of severe parenchymatous and stromal vascular dystrophy of the myocardial histohematic barrier (HHB) are supposed to reflect the toxic effects of ethanol and its metabolites that are directly involved in the mechanisms underlying the disturbances of intracellular metabolism and dyscirculatory events leading to the development of heart muscle hypoxia.

  18. Discussing sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: Are we empowering our patients? A questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Keddie, S; Angus-Leppan, H; Parker, T; Toescu, S; Nash, A; Adewunmi, O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine patient knowledge about sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) compared to other risks in epilepsy. To explore patients’ experiences surrounding SUDEP disclosure and opinions on how information should be delivered. Design A cross-sectional questionnaire. Setting Royal Free Hospital, London outpatient epilepsy clinics. Participants New and follow-up patients attending epilepsy clinics at a London teaching hospital over six months. Patients identified as being at risk of suffering negative emotional or psychological consequences of SUDEP discussions were excluded. Main outcome measures Patient knowledge about epilepsy risks; patient opinion regarding source, timing and delivery of SUDEP information; impact on health seeking behaviour. Results Ninety-eight per cent of patients were aware of medication adherence, 84% of factors influencing seizure frequency, 78% of driving regulations, 50% of SUDEP and 38% of status epilepticus; 72% of patients felt that SUDEP information should be given to all patients. Preferences for timing of SUDEP discussions varied between those wanting information at diagnosis (40%) and those preferring to receive it after three clinic appointments (18%) to avoid information overload at the first consultation. Emotional responses (48% positive, 38% negative) predominated over measurable behavioural change following SUDEP discussions. Conclusions Less than half the patients knew about SUDEP and status epilepticus. Although the majority of patients with epilepsy wish to be informed about SUDEP early on in their diagnosis, information must be delivered in a way that promotes patient knowledge and empowerment. PMID:27688898

  19. Integrated Omic Analysis of a Guinea Pig Model of Heart Failure and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Foster, D Brian; Liu, Ting; Kammers, Kai; O'Meally, Robert; Yang, Ni; Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N; Talbot, C Conover; Cole, Robert N; O'Rourke, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Here, we examine key regulatory pathways underlying the transition from compensated hypertrophy (HYP) to decompensated heart failure (HF) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in a guinea pig pressure-overload model by integrated multiome analysis. Relative protein abundances from sham-operated HYP and HF hearts were assessed by iTRAQ LC-MS/MS. Metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS or GC-MS. Transcriptome profiles were obtained using mRNA microarrays. The guinea pig HF proteome exhibited classic biosignatures of cardiac HYP, left ventricular dysfunction, fibrosis, inflammation, and extravasation. Fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial transcription/translation factors, antioxidant enzymes, and other mitochondrial procsses, were downregulated in HF but not HYP. Proteins upregulated in HF implicate extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal remodeling, and acute phase inflammation markers. Among metabolites, acylcarnitines were downregulated in HYP and fatty acids accumulated in HF. The correlation of transcript and protein changes in HF was weak (R(2) = 0.23), suggesting post-transcriptional gene regulation in HF. Proteome/metabolome integration indicated metabolic bottlenecks in fatty acyl-CoA processing by carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT1B) as well as TCA cycle inhibition. On the basis of these findings, we present a model of cardiac decompensation involving impaired nuclear integration of Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signals that are coupled to mitochondrial metabolic and antioxidant defects through the CREB/PGC1α transcriptional axis.

  20. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden cardiac death may be prevented by influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Meyers, David G

    2003-03-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and atherothrombotic stroke share a common pathogenesis involving disrupted atherosclerotic plaque and intravascular thrombosis. Both AMI and stroke have their peak incidence in winter months. Similarly, the incidence of upper respiratory infections (URIs), 38% of which are due to influenza, also peaks in winter (November and December). URIs result in many biochemical, cellular, and hemostatic changes that could predispose to plaque disruption and thrombosis. Infections, particularly URIs, frequently precede AMI and stroke. Up to 16% of persons older than 60 years of age experience a URI each year. Nineteen percent of those suffering an AMI recall a URI in the 2 weeks prior to their event. Three epidemiologic and one small clinical trial suggest that influenza vaccination is associated with a 50% reduction in incidence of sudden cardiac death, AMI, and ischemic stroke. Influenza vaccine is extremely safe and has a 50% efficacy. Theoretically, up to 104,500 AMIs and 192,000 nonembolic ischemic strokes could be prevented each year by influenza vaccination.

  1. Apnoea and bradycardia during epileptic seizures: relation to sudden death in epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Nashef, L; Walker, F; Allen, P; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D; Fish, D R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To record non-invasively ictal cardiorespiratory variables. METHODS--Techniques employed in polysomnography were used in patients with epilepsy undergoing EEG-video recording at a telemetry unit. RESULTS--Apnoea (> 10, range > 10-63, mean 24 s) was seen in 20 of 47 clinical seizures (three secondary generalised, 16 complex partial, and one tonic) and 10 of 17 patients. Apnoea was central in 10 patients, but obstructive apnoea was also recorded in three of 10. Oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SpO2) dropped to less than 85% in 10 seizures (six patients). An increase in heart rate was common (91% of seizures). Bradycardia/sinus arrest was documented in four patients (mean maximum RR interval 5.36, range 2.8-8.6 s) but always in the context of a change in respiratory pattern. CONCLUSION--Ictal apnoea was often seen. The occurrence of bradycardia in association with apnoea suggests the involvement of cardiorespiratory reflexes. Similar mechanisms may operate in cases of sudden death in epilepsy. PMID:8609507

  2. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Populations of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen in Oregon Forests.

    PubMed

    Kamvar, Z N; Larsen, M M; Kanaskie, A M; Hansen, E M; Grünwald, N J

    2015-07-01

    Sudden oak death caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum was first discovered in California toward the end of the 20th century and subsequently emerged on tanoak forests in Oregon before its first detection in 2001 by aerial surveys. The Oregon Department of Forestry has since monitored the epidemic and sampled symptomatic tanoak trees from 2001 to the present. Populations sampled over this period were genotyped using microsatellites and studied to infer the population genetic history. To date, only the NA1 clonal lineage is established in this region, although three lineages exist on the North American west coast. The original introduction into the Joe Hall area eventually spread to several regions: mostly north but also east and southwest. A new introduction into Hunter Creek appears to correspond to a second introduction not clustering with the early introduction. Our data are best explained by both introductions originating from nursery populations in California or Oregon and resulting from two distinct introduction events. Continued vigilance and eradication of nursery populations of P. ramorum are important to avoid further emergence and potential introduction of other clonal lineages.

  3. Integrated Omic Analysis of a Guinea Pig Model of Heart Failure and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Foster, D Brian; Liu, Ting; Kammers, Kai; O'Meally, Robert; Yang, Ni; Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N; Talbot, C Conover; Cole, Robert N; O'Rourke, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Here, we examine key regulatory pathways underlying the transition from compensated hypertrophy (HYP) to decompensated heart failure (HF) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in a guinea pig pressure-overload model by integrated multiome analysis. Relative protein abundances from sham-operated HYP and HF hearts were assessed by iTRAQ LC-MS/MS. Metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS or GC-MS. Transcriptome profiles were obtained using mRNA microarrays. The guinea pig HF proteome exhibited classic biosignatures of cardiac HYP, left ventricular dysfunction, fibrosis, inflammation, and extravasation. Fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial transcription/translation factors, antioxidant enzymes, and other mitochondrial procsses, were downregulated in HF but not HYP. Proteins upregulated in HF implicate extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal remodeling, and acute phase inflammation markers. Among metabolites, acylcarnitines were downregulated in HYP and fatty acids accumulated in HF. The correlation of transcript and protein changes in HF was weak (R(2) = 0.23), suggesting post-transcriptional gene regulation in HF. Proteome/metabolome integration indicated metabolic bottlenecks in fatty acyl-CoA processing by carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT1B) as well as TCA cycle inhibition. On the basis of these findings, we present a model of cardiac decompensation involving impaired nuclear integration of Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signals that are coupled to mitochondrial metabolic and antioxidant defects through the CREB/PGC1α transcriptional axis. PMID:27399916

  4. Mortality and community changes drive sudden oak death impacts on litterfall and soil nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Richard C; Eviner, Valerie T; Rizzo, David M

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have quantified pathogen impacts to ecosystem processes, despite the fact that pathogens cause or contribute to regional-scale tree mortality. We measured litterfall mass, litterfall chemistry, and soil nitrogen (N) cycling associated with multiple hosts along a gradient of mortality caused by Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death. In redwood forests, the epidemiological and ecological characteristics of the major overstory species determine disease patterns and the magnitude and nature of ecosystem change. Bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) has high litterfall N (0.992%), greater soil extractable NO3 -N, and transmits infection without suffering mortality. Tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) has moderate litterfall N (0.723%) and transmits infection while suffering extensive mortality that leads to higher extractable soil NO3 -N. Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) has relatively low litterfall N (0.519%), does not suffer mortality or transmit the pathogen, but dominates forest biomass. The strongest impact of pathogen-caused mortality was the potential shift in species composition, which will alter litterfall chemistry, patterns and dynamics of litterfall mass, and increase soil NO3 -N availability. Patterns of P. ramorum spread and consequent mortality are closely associated with bay laurel abundances, suggesting this species will drive both disease emergence and subsequent ecosystem function. PMID:23790136

  5. Hypothesis on supine sleep, sudden infant death syndrome reduction and association with increasing autism incidence

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Nils J

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a hypothesis on: Supine sleep, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) reduction and association with increasing autism incidence. METHODS Literature was searched for autism spectrum disorder incidence time trends, with correlation of change-points matching supine sleep campaigns. A mechanistic model expanding the hypothesis was constructed based on further review of epidemiological and other literature on autism. RESULTS In five countries (Denmark, United Kingdom, Australia, Israel, United States) with published time trends of autism, change-points coinciding with supine sleep campaigns were identified. The model proposes that supine sleep does not directly cause autism, but increases the likelihood of expression of a subset of autistic criteria in individuals with genetic susceptibility, thereby specifically increasing the incidence of autism without intellectual disability. CONCLUSION Supine sleep is likely a physiological stressor, that does reduce SIDS, but at the cost of impact on emotional and social development in the population, a portion of which will be susceptible to, and consequently express autism. A re-evaluation of all benefits and harms of supine sleep is warranted. If the SIDS mechanism proposed and autism model presented can be verified, the research agenda may be better directed, in order to further decrease SIDS, and reduce autism incidence. PMID:27610351

  6. Prediction and prevention of sudden death in young populations: the role of ECG screening.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kevin R; Friedman, Richard A; Link, Mark S; Estes, N A Mark

    2013-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), particularly when it affects a child or a young athlete who is presumed to be healthy, is an emotionally charged event that has a widespread impact. An effective ECG screening strategy for this population is intuitively appealing. The primary objective of ECG screening is to detect occult cardiovascular conditions likely to manifest with SCD. Such an endeavor is only effective if it is highly sensitive with an acceptably low false-positive rate. It also must be accompanied by an intervention that reduces the risk of SCD and improves outcomes. Despite significant advancements, considerable knowledge gaps remain about the etiology of SCD and the frequency with which SCD occurs. Reports of screening programs that have reduced the incidence of SCD have limited generalizability based on program design and the populations studied. Within the USA, considerable gaps in knowledge exist related to the frequency of SCD in youth and to the incremental predictive value of an ECG when added to a standardized history and physical examination. The strategy of ECG screening of young populations needs careful consideration based on principles of effective screening and evidence-based medicine. From a health policy perspective, additional data are needed from robust registries and carefully designed trials before advancing ECG screening in youth. PMID:23179925

  7. Standardizing the nomenclature for clonal lineages of the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M; Ivors, Kelly; Garbelotto, Matteo; Martin, Frank N; Prospero, Simone; Hansen, Everett; Bonants, Peter J M; Hamelin, Richard C; Chastagner, Gary; Werres, Sabine; Rizzo, David M; Abad, Gloria; Beales, Paul; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Blomquist, Cheryl L; Brasier, Clive; Brière, Stephan C; Chandelier, Anne; Davidson, Jennifer M; Denman, Sandra; Elliott, Marianne; Frankel, Susan J; Goheen, Ellen M; de Gruyter, Hans; Heungens, Kurt; James, Delano; Kanaskie, Alan; McWilliams, Michael G; Man in 't Veld, Willem; Moralejo, Eduardo; Osterbauer, Nancy K; Palm, Mary E; Parke, Jennifer L; Sierra, Ana Maria Perez; Shamoun, Simon F; Shishkoff, Nina; Tooley, Paul W; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Webber, Joan; Widmer, Timothy L

    2009-07-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages which can only be distinguished by performing molecular marker-based analyses. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of these lineages. Here we propose a system for naming clonal lineages of P. ramorum based on a consensus established by the P. ramorum research community. Clonal lineages are named with a two letter identifier for the continent on which they were first found (e.g., NA = North America; EU = Europe) followed by a number indicating order of appearance. Clonal lineages known to date are designated NA1 (mating type: A2; distribution: North America; environment: forest and nurseries), NA2 (A2; North America; nurseries), and EU1 (predominantly A1, rarely A2; Europe and North America; nurseries and gardens). It is expected that novel lineages or new variants within the existing three clonal lineages could in time emerge.

  8. Power blackouts, sudden death, and flash crashes: The physics of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Recent disasters ranging from abrupt financial ``flash crashes'' and large-scale power outages to sudden death among the elderly dramatically exemplify the fact that the most dangerous vulnerability is hiding in the many interdependencies among different networks. This talk reports recent work quantifying failure mechanisms in interconnected networks, and demonstrates the need to consider mutually dependent network properties in designing resilient systems. Specifically, we have uncovered new laws governing the nature of switching phenomena in coupled networks, and found that phenomena that are continuous ``second order'' phase transitions in isolated networks become discontinuous abrupt ``first order'' transitions in interdependent networks [J. Gao, S. V. Buldyrev, H. E. Stanley, and S. Havlin, ``Novel Behavior of Networks Formed from Interdependent Networks,'' Nature Physics 8, 40 (2012)]. We also report parallel efforts to understand the phenomenon of spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks as occurs, e.g., immediately after a flash crash [A. Majdandzic, B. Podobnik, S. V. Buldyrev, D. Y. Kenett, S. Havlin, and H. E. Stanley, ``Spontaneous Recovery in Dynamic Networks,'' Nature Physics 9, No. 1 (2014)].

  9. Sudden infant death syndrome: an update and new perspectives of etiology.

    PubMed

    Rubens, Daniel; Sarnat, Harvey B

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a condition in which an infant, usually in the early postnatal period and nearly always before 6 months of age, dies during sleep for unexplained reasons and the standard autopsy fails to disclose an etiology. Various physiological explanations of risk factors include the prone sleeping position, overheating by excessive bundling, viral upper respiratory tract infections, parental smoking at home, and birthing injury resulting in an insult to the inner ear and central chemoreceptor zone, an immaturity that involves CO2 chemoreceptors that regulate respiratory control. Neuropathological studies and theories implicate: (1) hypoplasia or defective transmitter function in the medullary arcuate nucleus, a derivative of the rhombencephalic lip of His; (2) synaptic or receptor immaturity of the nucleus of the fasciculus solitarius, the "pneumotaxic center"; and (3) functional impairment of the serotonergic raphé nuclei of the pontine and medullary ventral median septum and other serotonergic neurons of the brainstem. Additional neurological risk factors for SIDS include perinatal neuromuscular diseases, infantile epilepsies or status epilepticus, and genetic metabolic encephalopathies. PMID:23622296

  10. Neurochemical abnormalities in the brainstem of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Machaalani, Rita; Waters, Karen A

    2014-12-01

    The brainstem has been a focus in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) research for 30 years. Physiological and animal model data show that cardiorespiratory, sleep, and arousal mechanisms are abnormal after exposure to SIDS risk factors or in infants who subsequently die from SIDS. As the brainstem houses the regulatory centres for these functions, it is the most likely site to find abnormalities. True to this hypothesis, data derived over the last 30 years shows that the brainstem of infants who died from SIDS exhibits abnormalities in a number of major neurotransmitter and receptor systems including: catecholamines, neuropeptides, acetylcholinergic, indole amines (predominantly serotonin and its receptors), amino acids (predominantly glutamate), brain derived neurotrophic growth factor (BDNF), and some cytokines. A pattern is emerging of particular brainstem nuclei being consistently affected including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), arcuate nucleus (AN) and raphe. We discuss the implications of these findings and directions that this may lead in future research. PMID:25304427

  11. Assessing Field-Specific Risk of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome Using Satellite Imagery in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Li, X; Chen, C; Kyveryga, P; Yang, X B

    2016-08-01

    Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery from 2004 to 2013 were used to assess the field-specific risks of soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by Fusarium virguliforme in Iowa. Fields with a high frequency of significant decrease (>10%) of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) observed in late July to middle August on historical imagery were hypothetically considered as high SDS risk. These high-risk fields had higher slopes and shorter distances to flowlines, e.g., creeks and drainages, particularly in the Des Moines lobe. Field data in 2014 showed a significantly higher SDS level in the high-risk fields than fields selected without considering NDVI information. On average, low-risk fields had 10 times lower F. virguliforme soil density, determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, compared with other surveyed fields. Ordinal logistic regression identified positive correlations between SDS and slope, June NDVI, and May maximum temperature, but high June maximum temperature hindered SDS. A modeled SDS risk map showed a clear trend of potential disease occurrences across Iowa. Landsat imagery was analyzed similarly, to discuss the ability to utilize higher spatial resolution data. The results demonstrated the great potential of both MODIS and Landsat imagery for SDS field-specific risk assessment. PMID:27070424

  12. Hypothesis on supine sleep, sudden infant death syndrome reduction and association with increasing autism incidence

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Nils J

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a hypothesis on: Supine sleep, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) reduction and association with increasing autism incidence. METHODS Literature was searched for autism spectrum disorder incidence time trends, with correlation of change-points matching supine sleep campaigns. A mechanistic model expanding the hypothesis was constructed based on further review of epidemiological and other literature on autism. RESULTS In five countries (Denmark, United Kingdom, Australia, Israel, United States) with published time trends of autism, change-points coinciding with supine sleep campaigns were identified. The model proposes that supine sleep does not directly cause autism, but increases the likelihood of expression of a subset of autistic criteria in individuals with genetic susceptibility, thereby specifically increasing the incidence of autism without intellectual disability. CONCLUSION Supine sleep is likely a physiological stressor, that does reduce SIDS, but at the cost of impact on emotional and social development in the population, a portion of which will be susceptible to, and consequently express autism. A re-evaluation of all benefits and harms of supine sleep is warranted. If the SIDS mechanism proposed and autism model presented can be verified, the research agenda may be better directed, in order to further decrease SIDS, and reduce autism incidence.

  13. Mortality and community changes drive sudden oak death impacts on litterfall and soil nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Richard C; Eviner, Valerie T; Rizzo, David M

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have quantified pathogen impacts to ecosystem processes, despite the fact that pathogens cause or contribute to regional-scale tree mortality. We measured litterfall mass, litterfall chemistry, and soil nitrogen (N) cycling associated with multiple hosts along a gradient of mortality caused by Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death. In redwood forests, the epidemiological and ecological characteristics of the major overstory species determine disease patterns and the magnitude and nature of ecosystem change. Bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) has high litterfall N (0.992%), greater soil extractable NO3 -N, and transmits infection without suffering mortality. Tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) has moderate litterfall N (0.723%) and transmits infection while suffering extensive mortality that leads to higher extractable soil NO3 -N. Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) has relatively low litterfall N (0.519%), does not suffer mortality or transmit the pathogen, but dominates forest biomass. The strongest impact of pathogen-caused mortality was the potential shift in species composition, which will alter litterfall chemistry, patterns and dynamics of litterfall mass, and increase soil NO3 -N availability. Patterns of P. ramorum spread and consequent mortality are closely associated with bay laurel abundances, suggesting this species will drive both disease emergence and subsequent ecosystem function.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Populations of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen in Oregon Forests.

    PubMed

    Kamvar, Z N; Larsen, M M; Kanaskie, A M; Hansen, E M; Grünwald, N J

    2015-07-01

    Sudden oak death caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum was first discovered in California toward the end of the 20th century and subsequently emerged on tanoak forests in Oregon before its first detection in 2001 by aerial surveys. The Oregon Department of Forestry has since monitored the epidemic and sampled symptomatic tanoak trees from 2001 to the present. Populations sampled over this period were genotyped using microsatellites and studied to infer the population genetic history. To date, only the NA1 clonal lineage is established in this region, although three lineages exist on the North American west coast. The original introduction into the Joe Hall area eventually spread to several regions: mostly north but also east and southwest. A new introduction into Hunter Creek appears to correspond to a second introduction not clustering with the early introduction. Our data are best explained by both introductions originating from nursery populations in California or Oregon and resulting from two distinct introduction events. Continued vigilance and eradication of nursery populations of P. ramorum are important to avoid further emergence and potential introduction of other clonal lineages. PMID:26068281

  15. Pathological Studies of “Sudden Death Syndrome” in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ononiwu, J.C.; Thomson, R.G.; Carlson, H.C.; Julian, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Sudden death syndrome usually occurs in heavy, fast-growing and healthy-looking broilers. Most of the affected birds are males. The characteristic necropsy changes are seen in well-fleshed broilers with edema and generalized pulmonary congestion, recently ingested feed in the crop and gizzard, distended intestine with creamy content and empty gall bladder. The liver and kidneys are slightly enlarged and the latter have patchy areas of subcapsular hemorrhage. The heart contains clotted blood in the atria but the ventricles are often empty and the left ventricle in particular assumes a hypertrophied appearance. Microscopic examination of heart muscle reveals degeneration of fibers, separation of cardiac muscle fibers by edema and infiltration of heterophils. The lungs have severe vascular congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration in the mucosa of the secondary bronchi and edema fluid in the tertiary bronchi and interlobular connective tissue. The liver has moderate bile duct hyperplasia, periportal hepatitis and mononuclear cell infiltration adjacent to bile ducts which possibly leads to bile duct constriction. The kidneys have subcapsular and parenchymatous hemorrhage. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:436100

  16. Sexual reproduction in the soybean sudden death syndrome pathogen Fusarium tucumaniae.

    PubMed

    Covert, S F; Aoki, T; O'Donnell, K; Starkey, D; Holliday, A; Geiser, D M; Cheung, F; Town, C; Strom, A; Juba, J; Scandiani, M; Yang, X B

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the sexual reproductive mode of the two most important etiological agents of soybean sudden death syndrome, Fusarium tucumaniae and Fusarium virguliforme. F. tucumaniae sexual crosses often were highly fertile, making it possible to assign mating type and assess female fertility in 24 South American isolates. These crosses produced red perithecia and oblong-elliptical ascospores, as is typical for sexual members of the F. solani species complex. Genotyping of progeny from three F. tucumaniae crosses confirmed that sexual recombination had occurred. In contrast, pairings among 17 U.S. F. virguliforme isolates never produced perithecia. Inter-species crosses between F. tucumaniae and F. virguliforme, in which infertile perithecia were induced only in one of the two F. tucumaniae mating types, suggest that all U.S. F. virguliforme isolates are of a single mating type. We conclude that the F. tucumaniae life cycle in S. America includes a sexual reproductive mode, and thus this species has greater potential for rapid evolution than the F. virguliforme population in the U.S., which may be exclusively asexual. PMID:17300967

  17. Restraint in police use of force events: examining sudden in custody death for prone and not-prone positions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Christine; Votova, Kristine; Heyd, Christopher; Walker, Matthew; MacDonald, Scott; Eramian, Doug; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-04-01

    Little is understood about the incidence of sudden death, its underlying pathophysiology, or its actual relationship to subject positioning. We report data from 4828 consecutive use of force events (August 2006-March 2013) in 7 Canadian police agencies in Eastern and Western Canada. Consecutive subjects aged >18 years who were involved in a police use of force event were included regardless of outcome. Officers prospectively documented: final resting position of the subject (prone or non-prone), intoxicants and/or emotional distress, presence of features of excited delirium, and the use of all force modalities. Our outcome of interest was sudden in-custody death. Our study has 80% power to detect a difference of 0.5% in sudden death between the positions. In over 3.25 million consecutive police--public interactions; use of force occurred in 4,828 subjects (0.1% of police public interactions; 95% CI = 0.1%, 0.1%). Subjects were usually male (87.5%); median age 32 years; 81.5% exhibited alcohol and/or drug intoxication, and/or emotional distress at the scene. Significantly more subjects remained in a non-prone vs. prone position; but over 2000 subjects remained prone. One individual died suddenly and unexpectedly in the non-prone position with all 10 features of excited delirium. No subject died in the prone position. There was no significant difference in sudden in custody death, in a worst case scenario 99.8% of subjects would be expected to survive being in either the prone or non-prone position following police use of force.

  18. Degree Of Diminution In Vagal-Cardiac Activity Predicts Sudden Death In Familial Dysautonomia When Resting Tachycardia Is Absent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Marthol, H.; Bucchner, S.; Tutaj, M.; Berlin, D.; Axelrod, F. B.; Hilz, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) have an increased risk of sudden death, but sensitive and specific predictors of sudden death in FD are lacking. Methods. We recorded 10-min resting high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs in 14 FD patients and in 14 age/gender-matched healthy subjects and studied 25+ different heart rate variability (HRV) indices for their ability to predict sudden death in the FD patients. Indices studied included those from 4 "nonlinear" HRV techniques (detrended fluctuation analysis, approximate entropy, correlation dimension, and PoincarC analyses). The predictive value of PR, QRS, QTc and JTc intervals, QT dispersion (QTd), beat-to-beat QT and PR interval variability indices (QTVI and PRVI) and 12- lead high frequency QRS ECG (150-250 Hz) were also studied. FD patients and controls (C) differed (Pless than 0.0l) with respect to 20+ of the HRV indices (FD less than C) and with respect to QTVI and PRVI (FDBC) and HF QRS- related root mean squared voltages (FDBC) and reduced amplitude zone counts (FD less than C). They differed less with respect to PR intervals (FD less than C) and JTc intervals (FD greater than C) (P less than 0.05 for both) and did not differ at all with respect to QRS and QTc intervals and to QTd. Within 12 months after study, 2 of the 14 patients succumbed to sudden cardiac arrest. The best predictor of sudden death was the degree of diminution in HRV vagal-cardiac (parasympathetic) parameters such as RMSSD, the SDl of Poincare plots, and HF spectral power. Excluding the two FD patients who had resting tachycardia (HR greater than 100, which confounds traditional HRV analyses), the following criteria were independently 100% sensitive and 100% specific for predicting sudden death in the remaining 12 FD patients during spontaneous breathing: RMSSD less than 13 ms and/or PoincarC SD1 less than 9 ms. In FD patients without supine tachycardia, the degree of diminution in parasympathetic HRV parameters (by high-fidelity ECG) predicts

  19. Usefulness of combined history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and limited echocardiogram in screening adolescent athletes for risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey B; Grenier, Michelle; Edwards, Nicholas M; Madsen, Nicolas L; Czosek, Richard J; Spar, David S; Barnes, Allison; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Knilans, Timothy K

    2014-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death in the young (SCDY) is the leading cause of death in young athletes during sport. Screening young athletes for high-risk cardiac defects is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and feasibility of a comprehensive cardiac screening protocol in an adolescent population. Adolescent athletes were recruited from local schools and/or sports teams. Each subject underwent a history and/or physical examination, an electrocardiography (ECG), and a limited echocardiography (ECHO). The primary outcome measure was identification of cardiac abnormalities associated with an elevated risk for sudden death. We secondarily identified cardiac abnormalities not typically associated with a short-term risk of sudden death. A total of 659 adolescent athletes were evaluated; 64% men. Five subjects had cardiac findings associated with an elevated risk for sudden death: prolonged QTc >500 ms (n = 2) and type I Brugada pattern (n = 1), identified with ECG; dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 1) and significant aortic root dilation; and z-score = +5.5 (n = 1). History and physical examination alone identified 76 (11.5%) subjects with any cardiac findings. ECG identified 76 (11.5%) subjects in which a follow-up ECHO or cardiology visit was recommended. Left ventricular mass was normal by ECHO in all but 1 patient with LVH on ECG. ECHO identified 34 (5.1%) subjects in whom a follow-up ECHO or cardiology visit was recommended. In conclusion, physical examination alone was ineffective in identification of subjects at elevated risk for SCDY. Screening ECHO identified patients with underlying cardiac disease not associated with immediate risk for SCDY. Cost of comprehensive cardiac screening is high.

  20. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature. PMID:26986309

  1. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  2. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional X X Z and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T =0 , negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  3. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePlus

    ... womb (uterus). There are different types of medical abortions: Therapeutic medical abortion is done because the woman has ... Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion

  4. Seasonal Timing of Infant Bronchiolitis, Apnea and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Wu, Pingsheng; Carroll, Kecia N.; Mitchel, Edward; Anderson, Larry J.; Larkin, Emma K.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Rates of Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID), bronchiolitis, and central apnea increase in winter in temperate climates. Though associations between these three conditions are suggested, more work is required to establish if there is a causal pathway linking bronchiolitis to SUID through inducing central apnea. Utilizing a large population-based cohort of infants studied over a 20-year period (n = 834,595, from birth years 1989–2009)), we analyzed ecological associations between timing of SUID cases, bronchiolitis, and apnea healthcare visits. Data were analyzed between 2013 and 2015. We used a Cox Proportional Hazards model to analyze possible interactions between maternal smoking and maternal asthma with infant bronchiolitis on time to SUID. SUID and bronchiolitis both occurred more frequently in winter. An increase in bronchiolitis clinical visits occurred within a few days prior to apnea visits. We found a temporal relationship between infant bronchiolitis and apnea. In contrast, no peak in SUID cases was seen during peaks of bronchiolitis. Among those without any bronchiolitis visits, maternal smoking was associated with an increased risk of SUID: Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.38 (95% CI: 2.11, 2.67, p-value <0.001). Maternal asthma was associated with an increased risk of SUID among infants with at least one bronchiolitis visit: HR of 2.40 (95% CI: 1.04, 5.54, p-value = 0.04). Consistent trends between bronchiolitis, apnea, and SUID were not established due to small numbers of SUID cases. However, interaction analysis revealed potential differential associations of bronchiolitis and SUID by maternal smoking, maternal asthma status. PMID:27404386

  5. Seasonal Timing of Infant Bronchiolitis, Apnea and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Chantel D; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Wu, Pingsheng; Carroll, Kecia N; Mitchel, Edward; Anderson, Larry J; Larkin, Emma K; Hartert, Tina V

    2016-01-01

    Rates of Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID), bronchiolitis, and central apnea increase in winter in temperate climates. Though associations between these three conditions are suggested, more work is required to establish if there is a causal pathway linking bronchiolitis to SUID through inducing central apnea. Utilizing a large population-based cohort of infants studied over a 20-year period (n = 834,595, from birth years 1989-2009)), we analyzed ecological associations between timing of SUID cases, bronchiolitis, and apnea healthcare visits. Data were analyzed between 2013 and 2015. We used a Cox Proportional Hazards model to analyze possible interactions between maternal smoking and maternal asthma with infant bronchiolitis on time to SUID. SUID and bronchiolitis both occurred more frequently in winter. An increase in bronchiolitis clinical visits occurred within a few days prior to apnea visits. We found a temporal relationship between infant bronchiolitis and apnea. In contrast, no peak in SUID cases was seen during peaks of bronchiolitis. Among those without any bronchiolitis visits, maternal smoking was associated with an increased risk of SUID: Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.38 (95% CI: 2.11, 2.67, p-value <0.001). Maternal asthma was associated with an increased risk of SUID among infants with at least one bronchiolitis visit: HR of 2.40 (95% CI: 1.04, 5.54, p-value = 0.04). Consistent trends between bronchiolitis, apnea, and SUID were not established due to small numbers of SUID cases. However, interaction analysis revealed potential differential associations of bronchiolitis and SUID by maternal smoking, maternal asthma status. PMID:27404386

  6. The clinical challenge of preventing sudden cardiac death immediately after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S

    2014-12-01

    Unfortunately, of all patients experiencing acute myocardial infarction (MI), usually in the form of ST-elevation MI, 25-35% will die of sudden cardiac death (SCD) before receiving medical attention, most often from ventricular fibrillation. For patients who reach the hospital, prognosis is considerably better and has improved over the years. Reperfusion therapy, best attained with primary percutaneous coronary intervention compared to thrombolysis, has made a big difference in reducing the risk of SCD early and late after ST-elevation MI. In-hospital SCD due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias is manageable, with either preventive measures or drugs or electrical cardioversion. There is general agreement for secondary prevention of SCD post-MI with implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) when malignant ventricular arrhythmias occur late (>48 h) after an MI, and are not due to reversible or correctable causes. The major challenge remains that of primary prevention, that is, how to prevent SCD during the first 1-3 months after ST-elevation MI for patients who have low left ventricular ejection fraction and are not candidates for an ICD according to current guidelines, due to the results of two studies, which did not show any benefits of early (<40 days after an MI) ICD implantation. Two recent documents may provide direction as to how to bridge the gap for this early post-MI period. Both recommend an electrophysiology study to guide implantation of an ICD, at least for those developing syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, who have an inducible sustained ventricular tachycardia at the electrophysiology study. An ICD is also recommended for patients with indication for a permanent pacemaker due to bradyarrhythmias, who also meet primary prevention criteria for SCD.

  7. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal.

  8. Genome-wide Polygenic Burden of Rare Deleterious Variants in Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Costin; Balestrini, Simona; Maher, Bridget; Hernández-Hernández, Laura; Gormley, Padhraig; Hämäläinen, Eija; Heggeli, Kristin; Schoeler, Natasha; Novy, Jan; Willis, Joseph; Plagnol, Vincent; Ellis, Rachael; Reavey, Eleanor; O'Regan, Mary; Pickrell, William O.; Thomas, Rhys H.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Delanty, Norman; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Malone, Stephen; Sadleir, Lynette G.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Nashef, Lina; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Rees, Mark I.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Sander, Josemir W.; Hughes, Elaine; Helen Cross, J.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Palotie, Aarno; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) represents the most severe degree of the spectrum of epilepsy severity and is the commonest cause of epilepsy-related premature mortality. The precise pathophysiology and the genetic architecture of SUDEP remain elusive. Aiming to elucidate the genetic basis of SUDEP, we analysed rare, protein-changing variants from whole-exome sequences of 18 people who died of SUDEP, 87 living people with epilepsy and 1479 non-epilepsy disease controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly increased genome-wide polygenic burden per individual in the SUDEP cohort when compared to epilepsy (P = 5.7 × 10− 3) and non-epilepsy disease controls (P = 1.2 × 10− 3). The polygenic burden was driven both by the number of variants per individual, and over-representation of variants likely to be deleterious in the SUDEP cohort. As determined by this study, more than a thousand genes contribute to the observed polygenic burden within the framework of this study. Subsequent gene-based association analysis revealed five possible candidate genes significantly associated with SUDEP or epilepsy, but no one single gene emerges as common to the SUDEP cases. Our findings provide further evidence for a genetic susceptibility to SUDEP, and suggest an extensive polygenic contribution to SUDEP causation. Thus, an overall increased burden of deleterious variants in a highly polygenic background might be important in rendering a given individual more susceptible to SUDEP. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing in people with epilepsy might eventually contribute to generating SUDEP risk estimates, promoting stratified medicine in epilepsy, with the eventual aim of reducing an individual patient's risk of SUDEP. PMID:26501104

  9. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal. PMID:25953524

  10. Examining the strength and possible causes of the relationship between fire history and Sudden Oak Death.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Max A; Odion, Dennis C

    2005-06-01

    Fire can be a dominant process in the ecology of forest vegetation and can also affect forest disease dynamics. Little is known about the relationship between fire and an emerging disease epidemic called Sudden Oak Death, which is caused by a new pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum. This disease has spread across a large, fire-prone portion of California, killing great numbers of oaks and tanoaks and infecting most associated woody plants. Suitable hosts cover a much broader geographic range, raising concern over where the disease may spread. To understand the strength and potential sensitivities of a fire-disease relationship, we examined geographic patterns of confirmed P. ramorum infections in relation to past fire history. We found these infections to be extremely rare within the perimeter of any area burned since 1950. This finding is not caused by spatial bias in sampling for the disease, and is robust to variation in host abundance scenarios and to aggregation of closely spaced sampling locations. We therefore investigated known fire-related factors that could result in significantly lower incidence of the disease in relatively recently burned landscapes. Chemical trends in post-fire environments can influence the success of pathogens like P. ramorum, either by increasing plant nutrient stress or by reducing the occurrence of chemicals antagonistic to Phytophthoras. Succession in the absence of fire leads to greater abundance of host species, which will provide increased habitat for P. ramorum; this will also increase intraspecific competition where these trees are abundant, and other density-dependent effects (e.g. shading) can reduce resource allocation to defenses. Despite these findings about a fire-disease relationship, a much deeper understanding is necessary before fire can be actively used as a tool in slowing the epidemic. PMID:15891855

  11. Sudden deaths and colony population decline in Greek honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Bacandritsos, N; Granato, A; Budge, G; Papanastasiou, I; Roinioti, E; Caldon, M; Falcaro, C; Gallina, A; Mutinelli, F

    2010-11-01

    During June and July of 2009, sudden deaths, tremulous movements and population declines of adult honey bees were reported by the beekeepers in the region of Peloponnesus (Mt. Mainalo), Greece. A preliminary study was carried out to investigate these unexplained phenomena in this region. In total, 37 bee samples, two brood frames containing honey bee brood of various ages, eight sugar samples and four sugar patties were collected from the affected colonies. The samples were tested for a range of pests, pathogens and pesticides. Symptomatic adult honey bees tested positive for Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae, Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), Acute paralysis virus (ABPV), Deformed wing virus (DWV), Sacbrood virus (SBV) and Black queen cell virus (BQCV), but negative for Acarapis woodi. American Foulbrood was absent from the brood samples. Chemical analysis revealed that amitraz, thiametoxan, clothianidin and acetamiprid were all absent from symptomatic adult bees, sugar and sugar patty samples. However, some bee samples, were contaminated with imidacloprid in concentrations between 14 ng/g and 39 ng/g tissue. We present: the infection of Greek honey bees by multiple viruses; the presence of N. ceranae in Greek honey bees and the first record of imidacloprid (neonicotonoid) residues in Greek honey bee tissues. The presence of multiple pathogens and pesticides made it difficult to associate a single specific cause to the depopulation phenomena observed in Greece, although we believe that viruses and N. ceranae synergistically played the most important role. A follow-up in-depth survey across all Greek regions is required to provide context to these preliminary findings.

  12. [The heart between the risk of sudden death and chronic life].

    PubMed

    Bronzetti, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, medical and surgical therapy has progressed such that even children with the most complex cardiac disease may reach adulthood with an acceptable quality of life. However, apart from this minority, pediatricians and cardiologists deal with diseases such as cardiomyopathies, arrhythmias, channelopathies and other acquired heart diseases. The majority of patients can be problematic 'cause of a cardiac murmur or in obtaining a certificate of sports eligibility. Following recent regulations, in Italy the electrocardiogram (ECG) must be performed also in 6-year-old children who want to practice sport. Although the ECG is a simple and inexpensive tool with good diagnostic accuracy, there remains the issue of false positives that results in additional costs and alarms. The modern era is facing a pandemic, that is, the spread of digital lifestyle and obesity. The only vaccine against this plague is exercise. Denying sport to children for a false positive test may expose them to obesity, hypertension, diabetes and other bad habits. For some, it may be preferable to accept the infinitesimal risk of sudden death rather than being condemned to a chronic life. Like all therapies, sports can have side effects and overdoses. If this happens in the most dramatic way - cardiac arrest - there is the antidote (i.e., the automated external defibrillator). More than 100 years since its birth, the ECG retains a sustainable and irreplaceable lightness. Nevertheless, the ECG seems to suffer from a sort of collective dyslexia. As cardiologists, we should learn to read pediatric ECG and minimize the false positive rate to prevent a healthy child from having a worse quality of life than cardiac patients saved from modern cardiac surgery.

  13. Sudden deaths and colony population decline in Greek honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Bacandritsos, N; Granato, A; Budge, G; Papanastasiou, I; Roinioti, E; Caldon, M; Falcaro, C; Gallina, A; Mutinelli, F

    2010-11-01

    During June and July of 2009, sudden deaths, tremulous movements and population declines of adult honey bees were reported by the beekeepers in the region of Peloponnesus (Mt. Mainalo), Greece. A preliminary study was carried out to investigate these unexplained phenomena in this region. In total, 37 bee samples, two brood frames containing honey bee brood of various ages, eight sugar samples and four sugar patties were collected from the affected colonies. The samples were tested for a range of pests, pathogens and pesticides. Symptomatic adult honey bees tested positive for Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae, Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), Acute paralysis virus (ABPV), Deformed wing virus (DWV), Sacbrood virus (SBV) and Black queen cell virus (BQCV), but negative for Acarapis woodi. American Foulbrood was absent from the brood samples. Chemical analysis revealed that amitraz, thiametoxan, clothianidin and acetamiprid were all absent from symptomatic adult bees, sugar and sugar patty samples. However, some bee samples, were contaminated with imidacloprid in concentrations between 14 ng/g and 39 ng/g tissue. We present: the infection of Greek honey bees by multiple viruses; the presence of N. ceranae in Greek honey bees and the first record of imidacloprid (neonicotonoid) residues in Greek honey bee tissues. The presence of multiple pathogens and pesticides made it difficult to associate a single specific cause to the depopulation phenomena observed in Greece, although we believe that viruses and N. ceranae synergistically played the most important role. A follow-up in-depth survey across all Greek regions is required to provide context to these preliminary findings. PMID:20804765

  14. Soybean sudden death syndrome species diversity within north and South america revealed by multilocus genotyping.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sink, Stacy; Scandiani, María Mercedes; Luque, Alicia; Colletto, Analía; Biasoli, Marisa; Lenzi, Lisandro; Salas, Graciela; González, Victoria; Ploper, Leonardo Daniel; Formento, Norma; Pioli, Rosanna N; Aoki, Takayuki; Yang, X B; Sarver, Brice A J

    2010-01-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean has become a serious constraint to the production of this crop in North and South America. Phenotypic and multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses, as well as pathogenicity experiments, have demonstrated that four morphologically and phylogenetically distinct fusaria can induce soybean SDS. Published molecular diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of these pathogens have reported these pathogens as F. solani, F. solani f. sp. glycines, or F. solani f. sp. phaseoli, primarily because the species limits of these four pathogens were only recently resolved. In light of the recent discovery that soybean SDS and Phaseolus and mung bean root rot (BRR) are caused by four and two distinct species, respectively, multilocus DNA sequence analyses were conducted to assess whether any of the published molecular diagnostic assays were species-specific. Comparative DNA sequence analyses of the soybean SDS and BRR pathogens revealed that highly conserved regions of three loci were used in the design of these assays, and therefore none were species-specific based on our current understanding of species limits within the SDS-BRR clade. Prompted by this finding, we developed a high-throughput multilocus genotyping (MLGT) assay which accurately differentiated the soybean SDS and two closely related Phaseolus and mung BRR pathogens based on nucleotide polymorphism within the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region rDNA and two anonymous intergenic regions designated locus 51 and 96. The single-well diagnostic assay, employing flow cytometry and a novel fluorescent microsphere array, was validated by independent multilocus molecular phylogenetic analysis of a 65 isolate design panel. The MLGT assay was used to reproducibly type a total of 262 soybean SDS and 9 BRR pathogens. The validated MLGT array provides a unique molecular diagnostic for the accurate identification and molecular surveillance of these economically important

  15. Improved Diagnoses and Quantification of Fusarium virguliforme, Causal Agent of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Jacobs, Janette L; Byrne, Jan M; Chilvers, Martin I

    2015-03-01

    Fusarium virguliforme (syn. F. solani f. sp. glycines) is the primary causal pathogen responsible for soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) in North America. Diagnosis of SDS is difficult because symptoms can be inconsistent or similar to several soybean diseases and disorders. Additionally, quantification and identification of F. virguliforme by traditional dilution plating of soil or ground plant tissue is problematic due to the slow growth rate and plastic morphology of F. virguliforme. Although several real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays have been developed for F. virguliforme, the performance of those assays does not allow for accurate quantification of F. virguliforme due to the reclassification of the F. solani species complex. In this study, we developed a TaqMan qPCR assay based on the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) region of F. virguliforme. Specificity of the assay was demonstrated by challenging it with genomic DNA of closely related Fusarium spp. and commonly encountered soilborne fungal pathogens. The detection limit of this assay was determined to be 100 fg of pure F. virguliforme genomic DNA or 100 macroconidia in 0.5 g of soil. An exogenous control was multiplexed with the assay to evaluate for PCR inhibition. Target locus copy number variation had minimal impact, with a range of rDNA copy number from 138 to 233 copies per haploid genome, resulting in a minor variation of up to 0.76 cycle threshold values between strains. The qPCR assay is transferable across platforms, as validated on the primary real-time PCR platform used in the Northcentral region of the National Plant Diagnostic Network. A conventional PCR assay for F. virguliforme detection was also developed and validated for use in situations where qPCR is not possible. PMID:25302524

  16. Usefulness of 10 genomic regions in soybean associated with sudden death syndrome resistance.

    PubMed

    Luckew, A S; Leandro, L F; Bhattacharyya, M K; Nordman, D J; Lightfoot, D A; Cianzio, S R

    2013-09-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an important soybean [Glycine max (L) Merrill] disease caused by the soilborne fungus Fusarium virguliforme. Currently, 14 quantitative trait loci (QTL) had been confirmed associated with resistance or tolerance to SDS. The objective of the study was to evaluate usefulness of 10 of these QTL in controlling disease expression. Six populations were developed providing a total of 321 F2-derived lines for the study. Recombinant inbred lines (RIL) used as parents were obtained from populations of 'Essex' × 'Forrest' (EF), 'Flyer' × 'Hartwig' (FH), and 'Pyramid' × 'Douglas' (PD). Disease resistance was evaluated in the greenhouse at three different planting times, each with four replications, using sorghum infested with F. virguliforme homogeneously mixed in the soil (Luckew et al., Crop Sci 52:2215-2223, 2012). Four disease assessment criteria-foliar disease incidence (DI), foliar leaf scorch disease severity (DS), area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC), and root rot severity-were used. QTL were identified in more than one of the disease assessment criteria, mainly associated with lines in the most resistant categories. Five QTL (qRfs4, qRfs5, qRfs7, qRfs12, and Rfs16) were associated with at least one of the disease assessments across multiple populations. Of the five, qRfs4 was associated with DI, AUDPC, and root rot severity, and Rfs16 with AUDPC and root rot severity. The findings suggest it may be possible for plant breeders to focus on stacking a subset of the previously identified QTL to improve resistance to SDS in soybean. PMID:23793550

  17. Communicable disease-related sudden death in the 21st century in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Akinwusi, Patience Olayinka; Komolafe, Akinwumi Oluwole; Olayemi, Olanrewaju Olayinka; Adeomi, Adeleye Abiodun

    2013-01-01

    Background Some cases of sudden death (SD) have been attributed to communicable diseases (CD) in middle- and low-income countries of the world even in this 21st century. CDs produce clinical symptoms and signs over several days before culminating in death. They are also amenable to treatment with antimicrobials if affected persons present early. We sought to find out the incidence of CD-related SD at the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital (Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria) – a tertiary health facility in southwest Nigeria – and the prevailing associated factors. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of CD-related SD in adult patients aged 18 years and older that occurred from January 2003 to December 2011. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 was used for analysis of the generated data. Percentages and frequencies were calculated. Results There were 17 (39.6%) CD-related SDs out of the 48 cases of SD studied. CD-related SD also accounted for 2.4% of all adult medical admissions. The mean age of the patients was 37.6 ± 11.6 years, age range of 25–62 years, mode of 25 years, and median 34 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1.8:1. Typhoid sepsis was responsible for SD in 47.1% of patients, pulmonary tuberculosis in 17.7% of patients, and lobar pneumonia in 17.7% of patients. The most affected age group was the 20–29-year-old group (41.2%), while the unskilled occupational group was the most affected occupational group with 35.3% of them having SD. Most of the patients with acute bacterial infection died of multiple organ failure. Conclusion There is an urgent need to step up public health strategies to curtail infections in this environment, encourage better use of the existing health facilities by the people, and the government should strive hard to make health a top priority. PMID:24124382

  18. Motivation to Pursue Genetic Testing in Individuals with a Personal or Family History of Cardiac Events or Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Erskine, Kathleen E.; Hidayatallah, Nadia Z.; Walsh, Christine A.; McDonald, Thomas V.; Cohen, Lilian; Marion, Robert W.; Dolan, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for cardiac channelopathies, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, which can lead to sudden cardiac death. Test results can be used to shape an individual’s medical management and to identify at-risk family members. In our qualitative study, all participants had a personal or family history of a diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia syndrome or sudden cardiac death. Open-ended interviews were conducted individually and in focus groups. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a qualitative grounded-theory approach. Of 50 participants, 37 described their motivations for pursuing genetic testing for long QT syndrome or another cardiac channelopathy. Participants’ motivations included: to find an explanation for a family member’s sudden death, to relieve uncertainty regarding a diagnosis, to guide future medical management, to allay concern about children or other family members, and to comply with recommendations of physicians or family members. Perceived reasons not to pursue genetic testing included denial, fear, and lack of information. The genetic counseling and informed consent process can be enhanced by understanding and addressing an individual’s internal and external motivations either for or against pursuing genetic testing. PMID:24664857

  19. Motivation to pursue genetic testing in individuals with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Kathleen E; Hidayatallah, Nadia Z; Walsh, Christine A; McDonald, Thomas V; Cohen, Lilian; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2014-10-01

    Genetic testing is becoming increasingly available for cardiac channelopathies, such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, which can lead to sudden cardiac death. Test results can be used to shape an individual's medical management and to identify at-risk family members. In our qualitative study, all participants had a personal or family history of a diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia syndrome or sudden cardiac death. Open-ended interviews were conducted individually and in focus groups. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using a qualitative grounded-theory approach. Of 50 participants, 37 described their motivations for pursuing genetic testing for long QT syndrome or another cardiac channelopathy. Participants' motivations included: to find an explanation for a family member's sudden death, to relieve uncertainty regarding a diagnosis, to guide future medical management, to allay concern about children or other family members, and to comply with recommendations of physicians or family members. Perceived reasons not to pursue genetic testing included denial, fear, and lack of information. The genetic counseling and informed consent process can be enhanced by understanding and addressing an individual's internal and external motivations either for or against pursuing genetic testing.

  20. Morphologic features of culprit lesions in sudden coronary death with family history of premature coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming Chang; Shen, Yiwen; Xue, Aimin; He, Meng; Cresswell, Nathaniel; Li, Ling; Zhao, Ziqin; Jiang, Yan; Burke, Allen

    2016-09-01

    The morphologic features of familial coronary artery disease (CAD) resulting in sudden coronary death (SCD) are poorly studied. The presence and type of culprit lesions may have important implications in the genetic basis for familial heart disease. Autopsies of SCD victims over a 5-year period from a statewide medical examiner's office were studied. Premature familial disease was defined as sudden death at ≤50 years in women and ≤45 years in men, with premature SCD or acute coronary syndrome in a first-degree relative. Culprit lesion was defined as acute plaque rupture, plaque erosion, and severe narrowing without thrombus (stable plaque). There were 174 acute plaque ruptures (age 49±10 years, 9% women), 49 plaque erosions (age 45±8 years, 37% women), and 213 stable plaques (age 53±11 years, 22% women). There were 8 plaque rupture with family history. There were 9 plaque erosions with family history. There were 7 stable plaques with family history. The rate of familial history in premature coronary disease was 18.4% in erosions, 4.6% in ruptures (p=.02 vs. erosion), and 3.3% in stable plaque (p=.002 vs. erosion). We concluded that the frequency of family history of premature sudden death due to CAD may be higher in plaque erosion as compared to patients dying with acute plaque rupture or stable plaque.

  1. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose–response relation. Results: We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01–1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02–1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12–1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06–1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17–1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate (< 60 [reference], 60–70, 70–80 and > 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93–1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19–1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98–1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98–1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93–1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94–1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12–1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39–1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Interpretation: Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies

  2. Separate loci underlie resistance to root infection and leaf scorch during soybean sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kazi, S; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Johnson, J; Njiti, V N; Lightfoot, D A

    2008-05-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars show differences in their resistance to both the leaf scorch and root rot of sudden death syndrome (SDS). The syndrome is caused by root colonization by Fusarium virguliforme (ex. F. solani f. sp. glycines). Root susceptibility combined with reduced leaf scorch resistance has been associated with resistance to Heterodera glycines HG Type 1.3.6.7 (race 14) of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). In contrast, the rhg1 locus underlying resistance to Hg Type 0 was found clustered with three loci for resistance to SDS leaf scorch and one for root infection. The aims of this study were to compare the inheritance of resistance to leaf scorch and root infection in a population that segregated for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). "Hartwig", a cultivar partially resistant to SDS leaf scorch, F. virguliforme root infection and SCN HG Type 1.3.6.7 was crossed with the partially susceptible cultivar "Flyer". Ninety-two F5-derived recombinant inbred lines and 144 markers were used for map development. Four QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed. One contributed resistance to leaf scorch on linkage group (LG) C2 (Satt277; P = 0.004, R2 = 15%). Two on LG G underlay root infection at R8 (Satt038; P = 0.0001 R2 = 28.1%; Satt115; P = 0.003, R2 = 12.9%). The marker Satt038 was linked to rhg1 underlying resistance to SCN Hg Type 0. The fourth QTL was on LG D2 underlying resistance to root infection at R6 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R2 = 10%). That QTL was in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch and SCN Hg Type 1.3.6.7. The QTL showed repulsion linkage with resistance to SCN that may explain the relative susceptibility to SDS of some SCN resistant cultivars. One additional QTL was discovered on LG G underlying resistance to SDS leaf scorch measured by disease index (Satt130; P = 0.003, R2 = 13%). The loci and markers will provide tagged alleles with which to improve

  3. Development of geospatial techniques for ecological analysis: A case study of sudden oak death in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qinghua

    With the recent advancement of geospatial techniques (e.g., remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems, and GPS), geodatasets have grown dramatically in size and number and become more widely distributed. This provides ecologists unprecedented opportunities to explore ecological problems at larger spatial scale than before. At the same time, the wealth of data demands improvements in geospatial techniques in order to fully explore the current data capacity. In this dissertation, I sought to refine, combine, and develop new geospatial techniques that when applied to a real-world ecological problem, generated new and more comprehensive understanding of the ecological system examined. First, I refined several commonly used spatial analytical techniques such as paired quadrat variance (PQV) and Ripley's K functions. I clarified some misinterpretations of PQV methods, and proposed a GIS approach in correcting the edge-effect problem associated with the Ripley's K function in irregular-shaped study areas. Second, I combined several methods to better understand spatial patterns: (1) I combined Ripley's K and semivariance to study point patterns, and (2) I combined PQV, two term local quadrat variance, new local variance, and their three-term counterparts to study transect data. Third, I developed a new environmental niche model to model potential niche using presence-only data. Fourth, I developed a hybrid classifier which integrated an object-based and a knowledge-based classification method in mapping dead trees from high spatial resolution images. Finally, these geospatial methods were applied to analyze and model the spread of a new forest disease "sudden oak death" in California at the landscape and regional scales. At the landscape level, I found that topographic factors were the most influential factors in controlling the presence of dead trees, followed by foliar hosts of the disease. At the regional scale, I found that the majority of disease risk would

  4. Separate loci underlie resistance to root infection and leaf scorch during soybean sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kazi, S; Shultz, J; Afzal, J; Johnson, J; Njiti, V N; Lightfoot, D A

    2008-05-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars show differences in their resistance to both the leaf scorch and root rot of sudden death syndrome (SDS). The syndrome is caused by root colonization by Fusarium virguliforme (ex. F. solani f. sp. glycines). Root susceptibility combined with reduced leaf scorch resistance has been associated with resistance to Heterodera glycines HG Type 1.3.6.7 (race 14) of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN). In contrast, the rhg1 locus underlying resistance to Hg Type 0 was found clustered with three loci for resistance to SDS leaf scorch and one for root infection. The aims of this study were to compare the inheritance of resistance to leaf scorch and root infection in a population that segregated for resistance to SCN and to identify the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL). "Hartwig", a cultivar partially resistant to SDS leaf scorch, F. virguliforme root infection and SCN HG Type 1.3.6.7 was crossed with the partially susceptible cultivar "Flyer". Ninety-two F5-derived recombinant inbred lines and 144 markers were used for map development. Four QTL found in earlier studies were confirmed. One contributed resistance to leaf scorch on linkage group (LG) C2 (Satt277; P = 0.004, R2 = 15%). Two on LG G underlay root infection at R8 (Satt038; P = 0.0001 R2 = 28.1%; Satt115; P = 0.003, R2 = 12.9%). The marker Satt038 was linked to rhg1 underlying resistance to SCN Hg Type 0. The fourth QTL was on LG D2 underlying resistance to root infection at R6 (Satt574; P = 0.001, R2 = 10%). That QTL was in an interval previously associated with resistance to both SDS leaf scorch and SCN Hg Type 1.3.6.7. The QTL showed repulsion linkage with resistance to SCN that may explain the relative susceptibility to SDS of some SCN resistant cultivars. One additional QTL was discovered on LG G underlying resistance to SDS leaf scorch measured by disease index (Satt130; P = 0.003, R2 = 13%). The loci and markers will provide tagged alleles with which to improve

  5. An approach to predict Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) using time domain and bispectrum features from HRV signal.

    PubMed

    Houshyarifar, Vahid; Chehel Amirani, Mehdi

    2016-08-12

    In this paper we present a method to predict Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) with higher order spectral (HOS) and linear (Time) features extracted from heart rate variability (HRV) signal. Predicting the occurrence of SCA is important in order to avoid the probability of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). This work is a challenge to predict five minutes before SCA onset. The method consists of four steps: pre-processing, feature extraction, feature reduction, and classification. In the first step, the QRS complexes are detected from the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal and then the HRV signal is extracted. In second step, bispectrum features of HRV signal and time-domain features are obtained. Six features are extracted from bispectrum and two features from time-domain. In the next step, these features are reduced to one feature by the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) technique. Finally, KNN and support vector machine-based classifiers are used to classify the HRV signals. We used two database named, MIT/BIH Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) Database and Physiobank Normal Sinus Rhythm (NSR). In this work we achieved prediction of SCD occurrence for six minutes before the SCA with the accuracy over 91%. PMID:27567781

  6. Variants in TSPYL1 are not associated with sudden infant death syndrome in a cohort of deceased infants from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Stephanie; Haas, Cordula; Bartsch, Christine; Mirshekarnejad, Mandana; Kohrs, Sarah; Roettinger, Irene; Grosshennig, Anika; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Scholz, Caroline; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is currently the major cause of an unexpected and unexplained death of infants in the first year of lifetime in industrialized countries. Besides environmental factors also genetic factors have been identified as risk factors for SIDS. Notably, the mutation c.457dupG (p.Glu153Glyfs*17) in the TSPYL1 gene has been reported to cause autosomal recessive sudden infant death with dysgenesis of the testes syndrome (SIDDT) in an Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether variants of TSPYL1 are associated with the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the area of Europe from which the Amish descended. Mutation analysis of the entire TSPYL1 gene was performed in a cohort of 165 SIDS cases with mostly Swiss ethnic origin, in comparison to 163 German controls. Eight known polymorphisms were detected, none of which was significantly associated with SIDS. One deceased girl was heterozygous for the hitherto unreported TSPYL1 variant c.106C>G (p.Leu36Val), and two affected girls were heterozygous for the rare known TSPYL1 variant rs140756663 (c.1098C>A, p.Phe366Leu). In addition, one deceased boy was heterozygous for the rare common silent nucleotide substitution c.718C>T (p.Leu240Leu, rs150144081), while one control was heterozygous for the rare silent nucleotide substitution rs56190632 (c.760C>T; p.Leu254Leu). In silico analyses predicted a likely non-pathogenic effect for p.Leu36Val and p.Phe366Leu, respectively, although protein features might be affected. The Amish founder mutation was not detected in the analyzed SIDS cases and controls. Mutations and polymorphisms in the TSPYL1 gene were not associated with SIDS in a cohort of 165 deceased Swiss infants.

  7. Three cases of sudden death due to butane or propane gas inhalation: analysis of tissues for gas components.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Hideaki; Sasaki, Chizuko; Hashimoto, Chikako; Takeshita, Hiroshi; Nagai, Tomonori; Nakamura, Shigeki; Furukawa, Masataka; Nishikawa, Takashi; Kurihara, Katsuyoshi

    2004-07-16

    We report three cases of sudden death due to inhalation of portable cooking stove fuel (case 1), cigarette lighter fuel (case 2), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) (case 3). Specimens of blood, urine, stomach contents, brain, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and fat were collected and analyzed for propylene, propane, isobutane, and n-butane by headspace gas chromatography. n-Butane was the major substance among the volatiles found in the tissues of cases 1 and 2, and propane was the major substance in case 3. A combination of the autopsy findings and the gas analysis results revealed that the cause of death was ventricular fibrillation induced by hard muscle exercise after gas inhalation in cases 1 and 2, and that the cause of death in case 3 might be hypoxia. It is possible that the victim in case 3 was under anesthetic toxicity of accumulated isobutane which is a minor component of liquefied petroleum gas.

  8. Sudden death and rebirth of entanglement for different dimensional systems driven by a classical random external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, N.; Eleuch, H.; Obada, A.-S.

    2016-10-01

    The entangled behavior of different dimensional systems driven by classical external random field is investigated. The amount of the survival entanglement between the components of each system is quantified. There are different behaviors of entanglement that come into view decay, sudden death, sudden birth and long-lived entanglement. The maximum entangled states which can be generated from any of theses suggested systems are much fragile than the partially entangled ones. The systems of larger dimensions are more robust than those of smaller dimensions systems, where the entanglement decay smoothly, gradually and may vanish for a very short time. For the class of $2\\times 3$ dimensional system, the one parameter family is found to be more robust than the two parameters family. Although the entanglement of driven $ 2 \\times 3$ dimensional system is very sensitive to the classical external random field, one can use them to generate a long-lived entanglement.

  9. How I was almost aborted: reflections on a prenatal brush with death.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, J M

    1991-01-01

    After recently meeting with his biological parents, the author--a 29-year-old-married male--learned he had been an hour away from being aborted, being 'saved' only by extraordinary circumstances. In the paper the author reflects upon previous strong pro-choice beliefs and reasserts his commitment to a pro-choice philosophy, integrating his new personal experience. The paper pays particular attention to the biological mother's experience and how her fresh insights have reinforced the author's views on abortion. PMID:1941954

  10. Reproductive Justice and the Pace of Change: Socioeconomic Trends in US Infant Death Rates by Legal Status of Abortion, 1960–1980

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Singh, Nakul; Kiang, Mathew V.; Chen, Jarvis T.; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gottlieb, Jillian; Beckfield, Jason; Coull, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    US infant death rates for 1960 to 1980 declined most quickly in (1) 1970 to 1973 in states that legalized abortion in 1970, especially for infants in the lowest 3 income quintiles (annual percentage change = −11.6; 95% confidence interval = −18.7, −3.8), and (2) the mid-to-late 1960s, also in low-income quintiles, for both Black and White infants, albeit unrelated to abortion laws. These results imply that research is warranted on whether currently rising restrictions on abortions may be affecting infant mortality. PMID:25713932

  11. Tools for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death: A review of the literature in different patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathi, Loheetha; Pavri, Behzad B.

    2014-01-01

    While various modalities to determine risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have been reported in clinical studies, currently reduced left ventricular ejection fraction remains the cornerstone of SCD risk stratification. However, the absolute burden of SCD is greatest amongst populations without known cardiac disease. In this review, we summarize the evidence behind current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use for the prevention of SCD in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). We also evaluate the evidence for risk stratification tools beyond clinical guidelines in the general population, patients with IHD, and patients with other known or suspected medical conditions. PMID:24568833

  12. Quantum-to-classical transition and entanglement sudden death in Gaussian states under local-heat-bath dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sandeep K.; Ghosh, Sibasish

    2010-10-15

    Entanglement sudden death (ESD) in spatially separated two-mode Gaussian states coupled to local thermal and squeezed thermal baths is studied by mapping the problem to that of the quantum-to-classical transition. Using Simon's criterion concerning the characterization of classicality in Gaussian states, the time to ESD is calculated by analyzing the covariance matrices of the system. The results for the two-mode system at T=0 and T>0 for the two types of bath states are generalized to n modes, and are shown to be similar in nature to the results for the general discrete n-qubit system.

  13. [Sudden death caused by the spontaneous rupture of the right ventricle in a woman with chronic Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Tostes Júnior, S; Lopes, E R; Chapadeiro, E

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of sudden death from hemopericardium consequent to spontaneous rupture of the right ventricle in a 49-year-old chronic chagasic woman. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of spontaneous cardiac rupture with chagasic cardiomyopathy. In our case we believe that the thinning of the anterior right ventricular wall, its large ray curvature and the increased ventricular pressure were factors favoring the rupture. There was no infarction and the chronic cardiopathy was significant. It caused the thinning of the rupture region through chronic myocarditis.

  14. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy: experience from a tertiary epilepsy centre in Cyprus with review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Papacostas, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) affects 0.09-9.3 per 1,000 person-years depending on the population studied and constitutes the most common cause of death in people with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to analyze epidemiological data of patients with SUDEP, identify possible risk factors in the population of a tertiary referral center and provide a review of the literature aiming to raise awareness of this phenomenon. Methods: Data for this study originate from the records of the Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics in Nicosia Cyprus. We performed a systematic review of patients with epilepsy who had died between 1997 and 2012 and identified those whose death circumstances met the definition of SUDEP. Information was collected regarding sex, age, type of seizures, anti-epileptic therapies, and circumstances of death. Ethical approval was obtained from the institutional medical ethics committee. Results: Four hundred and forty four new patients were diagnosed with epilepsy among referrals to the epilepsy clinic and were followed to the end of the study period. Seven patients, six males, were identified who met criteria for SUDEP. The average age was 30 years. All patients had had either primary or secondary tonic-clonic seizures. Most were on polypharmacy, and two had Vagus Nerve Stimulation implanted. Most deaths were unwitnessed and nocturnal. The overall incidence rate for SUDEP in this population was 2.13 deaths/1000 person-years. Overall Cumulative Incidence (or lifetime risk) was calculated at 15.76 SUDEP deaths/1,000 patients. Conclusions: In our series, SUDEP was primarily a nocturnal and unwitnessed event that affected primarily young males. Among both males and females patients, 36.8% of all deaths were due to SUDEP. The major risk factor identified was the occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures signifying that every effort should be made to control this type of seizures. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 338

  15. [Massive cardiac lipomatosis, an autopsy finding in a patient with sudden death].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón-de Lucas, Ester; García-Fernández, Eugenia; Carpio, Carlos; Alcolea, Sergio; Martínez-Abad, Yolanda; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2016-06-17

    The fat replacement of myocardial cells is a degenerative process that usually affects the right ventricle and is found in 50% of the elderly. The problem arises when this degeneration occurs to a massive degree, a differential diagnosis with other pathologies being necessary. We present the case of a patient who died suddenly and a massive cardiac lipomatosis was found on autopsy, as the only explanation of the outcome.

  16. [Massive cardiac lipomatosis, an autopsy finding in a patient with sudden death].

    PubMed

    Zamarrón-de Lucas, Ester; García-Fernández, Eugenia; Carpio, Carlos; Alcolea, Sergio; Martínez-Abad, Yolanda; Álvarez-Sala, Rodolfo

    2016-06-17

    The fat replacement of myocardial cells is a degenerative process that usually affects the right ventricle and is found in 50% of the elderly. The problem arises when this degeneration occurs to a massive degree, a differential diagnosis with other pathologies being necessary. We present the case of a patient who died suddenly and a massive cardiac lipomatosis was found on autopsy, as the only explanation of the outcome. PMID:27143526

  17. Sudden cardiac death in the soccer field: a retrospective study in young soccer players from 2000 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Davogustto, Giovanni; Higgins, John

    2014-11-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with over 200 million active players. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) represents the most striking as well as the most common cause of death in the soccer field. Underlying cardiovascular pathologies predispose to life threatening ventricular arrhythmias and SCD in soccer players. Up to thousands to hundred thousands players might have an underlying condition that predisposes them for SCD. After several media striking SCD events in soccer players the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) has made screening recommendations that are more thorough than the ones recommended for the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology. We present a retrospective search through Internet databases that resulted in 54 soccer players with SCD events from 2000 until 2013. In this article, we will describe and discuss the conditions of those cases of SCD in order to provide more knowledge of the factors that may precipitate SCD in young soccer players.

  18. Hepatic lipidosis and other test findings in two captive adult porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) dying from a "sudden death syndrome".

    PubMed

    Barigye, Robert; Schamber, Ev; Newell, Teresa K; Dyer, Neil W

    2007-11-01

    Routine postmortem examination and histologic evaluation of tissue sections demonstrated hepatic lipidosis (HL) in 2 adult captive porcupines with a history of sudden death. The male porcupine had a markedly enlarged pale liver that microscopically showed large unilocular vacuoles within hepatocellular cytoplasm. The periparturient female had similar but less marked hepatic lesions and an incidental pulmonary mycosis. These findings suggest HL as an important differential of spontaneous death in captive porcupines. It is hypothesized that in addition to the widely documented causes, HL in captive porcupines may be specifically associated with nutritional imbalances caused by the feeding of unsuitable commercial diets. The possible association of the condition with dietary and other factors in captive porcupines needs to be thoroughly investigated.

  19. Hepatic lipidosis and other test findings in two captive adult porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) dying from a "sudden death syndrome".

    PubMed

    Barigye, Robert; Schamber, Ev; Newell, Teresa K; Dyer, Neil W

    2007-11-01

    Routine postmortem examination and histologic evaluation of tissue sections demonstrated hepatic lipidosis (HL) in 2 adult captive porcupines with a history of sudden death. The male porcupine had a markedly enlarged pale liver that microscopically showed large unilocular vacuoles within hepatocellular cytoplasm. The periparturient female had similar but less marked hepatic lesions and an incidental pulmonary mycosis. These findings suggest HL as an important differential of spontaneous death in captive porcupines. It is hypothesized that in addition to the widely documented causes, HL in captive porcupines may be specifically associated with nutritional imbalances caused by the feeding of unsuitable commercial diets. The possible association of the condition with dietary and other factors in captive porcupines needs to be thoroughly investigated. PMID:17998565

  20. Postmortem genetic screening for the identification, verification, and reporting of genetic variants contributing to the sudden death of the young.

    PubMed

    Methner, D Nicole R; Scherer, Steven E; Welch, Katherine; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Eng, Christine M; Belmont, John W; Powell, Mark C; Korchina, Viktoriya; Doddapaneni, Harsha Vardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Wolf, Dwayne A; Sanchez, Luis A; Kahn, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Each year in the United States, thousands of cases of sudden and unexpected deaths of infants, children, and young adults are assigned an undetermined cause of death after postmortem investigation and autopsy. Heritable genetic variants have been suggested as the cause of up to a third of sudden death (SD) cases. Elucidation of the genetic variants involved in SD cases is important to not only help establish cause and manner of death of these individuals, but to also aid in determining whether familial genetic testing should be considered. Previously, these types of postmortem screenings have not been a feasible option for most county medical examiners' and coroners' offices. We sequenced full exons of 64 genes associated with SD in the largest known cohort (351) of infant and young SD decedents using massively parallel sequencing at <$600 per sample. Genetic variants were assessed through literature review and clinical evaluation by a multidisciplinary consortium of experts. Thirteen individuals (3.7%), eight infants (2.8% of those <1 yr of age) and five children/young adults (7.0% of those >1 yr of age), were found to have a reportable genetic variant contributing to SD. These percentages represent an estimate lower than those previously reported. Overall yields and results likely vary between studies due to differences in evaluation techniques and reporting. Additionally, we recommend ongoing assessment of data, including nonreported novel variants, as technology and literature continually advance. This study demonstrates a strategy to implement molecular autopsies in medicolegal investigations of young SD decedents. PMID:27435932