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Sample records for abortus brucella melitensis

  1. Epidemiology of brucellosis in domestic animals caused by Brucella melitensis, Brucella suis and Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Díaz Aparicio, E

    2013-04-01

    Brucellosis is a disease that causes severe economic losses for livestock farms worldwide. Brucella melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis, which are transmitted between animals both vertically and horizontally, cause abortion and infertility in their primary natural hosts - goats and sheep (B. melitensis), cows (B. abortus) and sows (B. suis). Brucella spp. infect not only their preferred hosts but also other domestic and wild animal species, which in turn can act as reservoirs of the disease for other animal species and humans. Brucellosis is therefore considered to be a major zoonosis transmitted by direct contact with animals and/or their secretions, or by consuming milk and dairy products.

  2. Comparative proteome analysis of laboratory grown Brucella abortus 2308 and Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Wagner, Mary Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Miller-Scandle, Tabbi L; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2006-07-01

    Brucella species are pathogenic agents that cause brucellosis, a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects a large variety of domesticated animals and humans. Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus are considered major health threats because of their highly infectious nature and worldwide occurrence. The availability of the annotated genomes for these two species has allowed a comparative proteomics study of laboratory grown B. melitensis 16M and B. abortus 2308 by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Computer-assisted analysis of the different 2-D gel images of strains 16M and 2308 revealed significant quantitative and qualitative differences in their protein expression patterns. Proteins involved in membrane transport, particularly the high affinity amino acids binding proteins, and those involved in Sec-dependent secretion systems related to type IV and type V secretion systems, were differentially expressed. Differential expression of these proteins may be responsible for conferring specific host preference in the two strains 2308 and 16M.

  3. Vaccination with Brucella abortus rough mutant RB51 protects BALB/c mice against virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Jones, S M; Blasco, J M; Enright, F M; Schurig, G G; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with live Brucella abortus RB51, a stable rough mutant, produced protection against challenge with virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis. Passive-transfer experiments indicated that vaccinated mice were protected against B. abortus 2308 through cell-mediated immunity, against B. ovis PA through humoral immunity, and against B. melitensis 16M through both forms of immunity. Live bacteria were required for the induction of protective cell-mediated immunity; vaccination with whole killed cells of strain RB51 failed to protect mice against B. abortus 2308 despite development of good delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Protective antibodies against the heterologous species were generated in vaccinated mice primarily through anamnestic responses following challenge infections. Growth of the antigenically unrelated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in the spleens of vaccinated mice indicated that nonspecific killing by residual activated macrophages contributed minimally to protection. These results encourage the continued investigation of strain RB51 as an alternative vaccine against heterologous Brucella species. However, its usefulness against B. ovis would be limited if, as suggested here, epitopes critical for protective cell-mediated immunity are not shared between B. abortus and B. ovis. Images PMID:7927779

  4. Comparison of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis infections of mice and their effect on acquired cellular resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Young, E J; Gomez, C I; Yawn, D H; Musher, D M

    1979-01-01

    By using mice infected with strains of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis we examined the histological responses to infection, the relationship of histology to persistence of organisms, and the relation of persistence of organisms to the acquisition of acquired cellular resistance (ACR). Infection with B. abortus resulted in well-formed granulomas in the livers, which persisted for more than 30 days. In contrast, infection with B. melitensis produced microabscesses in the livers which resolved before 30 days. The clearance of organisms from the tissues was also different. A total of 30 days after infection, large numbers of viable bacteria were recovered from the tissues of B. abortus-infected mice whereas bacteria were no longer recoverable from B. melitensis-infected animals. ACR to Listeria monocytogenes, another intracellular pathogen, persisted for more than 30 days in B. abortus-infected mice but waned rapidly in B. melitensis-infected animals. This disappearance of ACR due to B. melitensis paralleled the clearance of bacteria from the tissues. Images PMID:121113

  5. Molecular investigation of virulence factors of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains isolated from clinical and non-clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mirnejad, Reza; Jazi, Faramarz Masjedian; Mostafaei, Shayan; Sedighi, Mansour

    2017-08-01

    Brucella is zoonotic pathogen that induces abortion and sterility in domestic mammals and chronic infections in humans called Malta fever. It is a facultative intracellular potential pathogen with high infectivity. The virulence of Brucella is dependent upon its potential virulence factors such as enzymes and cell envelope associated virulence genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the Brucella virulence factors among strains isolated from humans and animals in different parts of Iran. Seventy eight strains of Brucella species isolated from suspected human and animal cases from several provinces of Iran during 2015-2016 and identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) assay was performed in order to detect the ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA genes by using gene specific primers. Out of 78 isolates of Brucella spp., 57 (73%) and 21 (27%) isolates were detected as B. melitensis and B. abortus, respectively, by molecular method. The relative frequency of virulence genes ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA were 74.4%, 89.7%, 93.6%, 94.9%, 100% and 92.3%, respectively. Our results indicate that the most of Brucella strains isolated from this region possess high percent of virulence factor genes (ure, wbkA, omp19, mviN, manA and perA) in their genome. So, each step of infection can be mediated by a number of virulence factors and each strain may have a unique combination of these factors that affected the rate of bacterial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Seroprevalence for Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Austrian adults: a cross-sectional survey among military personnel and civilians.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, Selma; Nedomansky, Klara; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Müller, Maria; Faas, Angelus; Mooseder, Gerhard; Allerberger, Franz; Stanek, Gerold; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine induces robust B and T-cell responses and protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Mailybayeva, Aigerim; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Sansyzbay, Abylai; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Tabynov, Kaissar

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a potent candidate vaccine against bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus using the influenza viral vector expressing Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins (Flu-BA). Our success in the Flu-BA vaccine trial in cattle and results of a pilot study in non-pregnant small ruminants prompted us in the current study to test its efficacy against B. melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats. In this study, we improved the Flu-BA vaccine formulation and immunization method to achieve maximum efficacy and safety. The Flu-BA vaccine formulation had two additional proteins Omp19 and SOD, and administered thrice with 20% Montanide Gel01 adjuvant, simultaneously by both subcutaneous and conjunctival routes at 21 days intervals in pregnant sheep and goats. At 42 days post-vaccination (DPV) we detected antigen-specific IgG antibodies predominantly of IgG2a isotype but also IgG1, and also detected a strong lymphocyte recall response with IFN-γ production. Importantly, our candidate vaccine prevented abortion in 66.7% and 77.8% of pregnant sheep and goats, respectively. Furthermore, complete protection (absence of live B. melitensis 16M) was observed in 55.6% and 66.7% of challenged sheep and goats, and 72.7% and 90.0% of their fetuses (lambs/yeanlings), respectively. The severity of B. melitensis 16M infection in vaccinated sheep and goats and their fetuses (index of infection and rates of Brucella colonization in tissues) was significantly lower than in control groups. None of the protection parameters after vaccination with Flu-BA vaccine were statistically inferior to protection seen with the commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine (protection against abortion and vaccination efficacy, alpha = 0.18-0.34, infection index, P = 0.37-0.77, Brucella colonization, P = 0.16 to P > 0.99). In conclusion, our improved Flu-BA vaccine formulation and delivery method were found safe and effective in protecting pregnant sheep and goats against adverse

  8. Improved influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine induces robust B and T-cell responses and protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats

    PubMed Central

    Mailybayeva, Aigerim; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Sansyzbay, Abylai; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a potent candidate vaccine against bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus using the influenza viral vector expressing Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins (Flu-BA). Our success in the Flu-BA vaccine trial in cattle and results of a pilot study in non-pregnant small ruminants prompted us in the current study to test its efficacy against B. melitensis infection in pregnant sheep and goats. In this study, we improved the Flu-BA vaccine formulation and immunization method to achieve maximum efficacy and safety. The Flu-BA vaccine formulation had two additional proteins Omp19 and SOD, and administered thrice with 20% Montanide Gel01 adjuvant, simultaneously by both subcutaneous and conjunctival routes at 21 days intervals in pregnant sheep and goats. At 42 days post-vaccination (DPV) we detected antigen-specific IgG antibodies predominantly of IgG2a isotype but also IgG1, and also detected a strong lymphocyte recall response with IFN-γ production. Importantly, our candidate vaccine prevented abortion in 66.7% and 77.8% of pregnant sheep and goats, respectively. Furthermore, complete protection (absence of live B. melitensis 16M) was observed in 55.6% and 66.7% of challenged sheep and goats, and 72.7% and 90.0% of their fetuses (lambs/yeanlings), respectively. The severity of B. melitensis 16M infection in vaccinated sheep and goats and their fetuses (index of infection and rates of Brucella colonization in tissues) was significantly lower than in control groups. None of the protection parameters after vaccination with Flu-BA vaccine were statistically inferior to protection seen with the commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine (protection against abortion and vaccination efficacy, alpha = 0.18–0.34, infection index, P = 0.37–0.77, Brucella colonization, P = 0.16 to P > 0.99). In conclusion, our improved Flu-BA vaccine formulation and delivery method were found safe and effective in protecting pregnant sheep and goats against adverse

  9. Observations on brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis*

    PubMed Central

    Spink, Wesley W.

    1953-01-01

    A special study was made of the problem of brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis in visits to Mexico City in 1948, to the FAO/WHO Brucellosis Centres at Montpellier (France), Florence (Italy), and Rijeka (Yugoslavia) in 1951, and to Spain in 1952. Br. melitensis infection in human beings causes more severe illness than Br. abortus infection. It develops primarily in rural communities living in close contact with goats and sheep; cattle and swine may also harbour the infection. In diagnosis, the agglutination test has proved the most satisfactory procedure; testing would be more uniformly reliable if a single antigen were used. Lack of funds and technical assistance have in many instances limited the bacteriological studies upon which a more definitive diagnosis of brucellosis depends. Antibiotics, Brucella vaccines, and colloidal preparations of gold and silver—used separately and in combination—have proved of varying therapeutic value, although response to antibiotics is less favourable than in cases of Br. abortus infection. While the drastic measures—involving the slaughter of about 10,000 sheep—taken in Slovenia, Yugoslavia, in the late 1940's, against an outbreak of brucellosis, is an inspiring example of how the disease can be eradicated, the removal of all diseased animals is rarely feasible economically. It is hoped that future research will reveal a practicable alternative in the immunization of sheep and goats against the disease. PMID:13106703

  10. The genome of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Kapatral, Vinayak; Elzer, Philip; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar V

    2002-12-20

    The genome of Brucella melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and contained 3,294,931 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes. Chromosome I was composed of 2,117,144 bp and chromosome II has 1,177,787 bp. A total of 3,198 ORFs were predicted. The origins of replication of the chromosomes are similar to each other and to those of other alpha-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes such as those that encode for DNA replication, protein synthesis, core metabolism, and cell-wall biosynthesis were found on both chromosomes. Genes encoding adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were also identified.

  11. Molecular characterization of Brucella abortus chromosome II recombination.

    PubMed

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Merz, Christian A; Manning, Simon P; Giovagnoli-Kurtz, Renée; Williams, Leanne E; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2003-10-01

    Large-scale genomic rearrangements including inversions, deletions, and duplications are significant in bacterial evolution. The recently completed Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330 genomes have facilitated the investigation of such events in the Brucella spp. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed in identifying genomic differences between B. melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308. Analysis of 45 SSH clones revealed several deletions on chromosomes of B. abortus and B. melitensis that encoded proteins of various metabolic pathways. A 640-kb inversion on chromosome II of B. abortus has been reported previously (S. Michaux Charachon, G. Bourg, E. Jumas Bilak, P. Guigue Talet, A. Allardet Servent, D. O'Callaghan, and M. Ramuz, J. Bacteriol. 179:3244-3249, 1997) and is further described in this study. One end of the inverted region is located on a deleted TATGC site between open reading frames BMEII0292 and BMEII0293. The other end inserted at a GTGTC site of the cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase A (PDEA) gene (BMEII1009), dividing PDEA into two unequal DNA segments of 160 and 977 bp. As a consequence of inversion, the 160-bp segment that encodes the N-terminal region of PDEA was relocated at the opposite end of the inverted chromosomal region. The splitting of the PDEA gene most likely inactivated the function of this enzyme. A recombination mechanism responsible for this inversion is proposed.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Brucella abortus Chromosome II Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Merz, Christian A.; Manning, Simon P.; Giovagnoli-Kurtz, Renée; Williams, Leanne E.; Mujer, Cesar V.; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Redkar, Rajendra J.; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale genomic rearrangements including inversions, deletions, and duplications are significant in bacterial evolution. The recently completed Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330 genomes have facilitated the investigation of such events in the Brucella spp. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed in identifying genomic differences between B. melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308. Analysis of 45 SSH clones revealed several deletions on chromosomes of B. abortus and B. melitensis that encoded proteins of various metabolic pathways. A 640-kb inversion on chromosome II of B. abortus has been reported previously (S. Michaux Charachon, G. Bourg, E. Jumas Bilak, P. Guigue Talet, A. Allardet Servent, D. O'Callaghan, and M. Ramuz, J. Bacteriol. 179:3244-3249, 1997) and is further described in this study. One end of the inverted region is located on a deleted TATGC site between open reading frames BMEII0292 and BMEII0293. The other end inserted at a GTGTC site of the cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase A (PDEA) gene (BMEII1009), dividing PDEA into two unequal DNA segments of 160 and 977 bp. As a consequence of inversion, the 160-bp segment that encodes the N-terminal region of PDEA was relocated at the opposite end of the inverted chromosomal region. The splitting of the PDEA gene most likely inactivated the function of this enzyme. A recombination mechanism responsible for this inversion is proposed. PMID:14526025

  13. Antibody Reactivity to Omp31 from Brucella melitensis in Human and Animal Infections by Smooth and Rough Brucellae

    PubMed Central

    Cassataro, Juliana; Pasquevich, Karina; Bruno, Laura; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2004-01-01

    Group 3 of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Brucella includes Omp25 and Omp31, which share 34% identity. Omp25 is highly conserved in Brucella species, and Omp31 is present in all Brucella species, except Brucella abortus. Antibodies to Brucella melitensis Omp31 have been sought only in infected sheep, and Western blotting of sera from infected sheep did not reveal anti-Omp31 reactivity. We obtained recombinant purified Omp31 (B. melitensis) and tested its recognition by sera from humans and animals suffering from brucellosis by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum samples from 74 patients, 57 sheep, and 47 dogs were analyzed; brucellosis was confirmed by bacteriological isolation in all ovine and canine cases and 31 human cases of brucellosis. Thirty-five patients (47%) were positive for antibodies to Omp31, including seven cases of Brucella suis infection, two cases of B. abortus infection, and three cases of B. melitensis infection. Of 39 sheep naturally infected with B. melitensis (biovars 1 and 3), 23 (59%) were positive for antibodies to Omp31. Anti-Omp31 antibodies were also detected in 12 of 18 rams (67%) in which Brucella ovis was isolated from semen. Antibodies to Omp31 were also found in 41 (87%) of the 47 dogs, including 13 with recent infection. These results suggest that an indirect ELISA using recombinant purified Omp31 from B. melitensis would be of limited value for the diagnosis of human and animal brucellosis. Nevertheless, the potential usefulness of this antigen in combination with other recombinant proteins from Brucella should not be dismissed.   PMID:14715555

  14. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  15. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  16. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  17. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  18. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  19. Global analysis of Brucella melitensis proteomes.

    PubMed

    Mujer, Cesar V; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Redkar, Rajendra; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Delvecchio, Vito G

    2002-10-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative, intracellular, gram-negative cocco-bacillus that causes Malta fever in humans and brucellosis in animals. There are at least six species in the genus, and the disease is classified as zoonotic because several species infect humans. Using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we have initiated (i) a comprehensive mapping and identification of all the expressed proteins of B. melitensis virulent strain 16M, and (ii) a comparative study of its proteome with the attentuated vaccinal strain Rev 1. Comprehensive proteome maps of all six Brucella species will be generated in order to obtain vital information for vaccine development, identification of pathogenicity islands, and establishment of host specificity and evolutionary relatedness.

  20. Brucella melitensis infection in sheep: present and future.

    PubMed

    Garin-Bastuji, B; Blasco, J M; Grayon, M; Verger, J M

    1998-01-01

    Sheep brucellosis, a zoonosis mainly due to B. melitensis (biovar 1, 2 or 3), remains widespread world-wide. Pathologically and epidemiologically, the disease is very similar to B. abortus infection in cattle. The live B. melitensis Rev 1 strain is currently considered as the best vaccine available for the control of sheep brucellosis, especially when used at the standard dose by the conjunctival route. Used exhaustively in whole-flock vaccination programmes, it induces a great decrease in the prevalence in both sheep and human populations. The expensive test-and-slaughter strategy should be restricted to the lowest infected areas. Whenever possible, Brucella spp. should be isolated by culture using adequate selective media from uterine discharges, aborted fetuses, udder secretions or selected tissues, such as lymph nodes, testes or epididymides. Species and biovar identification is routinely based on cultural criteria, on lysis by phages and on simple biochemical and serological tests. The recently developed polymerase chain reaction methods provide additional means of detection and identification. Despite the high degree of DNA homology within the genus Brucella, several methods, including PCR-RFLP and Southern blot, have been developed which allow, to a certain extent, the differentiation between Brucella species and some of their biovars. While several ELISA tests have been developed recently, the rose bengal plate agglutination and complement fixation tests, based on the detection of anti-S-LPS antibody, are still recommended for screening flocks and individuals. However, these tests sometimes lack specificity or sensitivity. For pooled samples, there are no useful tests such as the milk ring test in cattle. The brucellin allergic skin test can be used as a screening or complementary test in unvaccinated flocks, provided that a purified, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-free and standardized antigen preparation is used.

  1. Brucella abortus is Prevalent in Both Humans and Animals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A K M A; Saegerman, C; Berkvens, D; Melzer, F; Neubauer, H; Fretin, D; Abatih, E; Dhand, N; Ward, M P

    2017-08-01

    To determine the role of different Brucella (B.) spp. in Bangladesh, 62 animal samples and 500 human sera were tested. Animal samples from cattle, goats and sheep (including milk, bull semen, vaginal swabs and placentas) were cultured for Brucella spp. Three test-positive human sera and all animal samples were screened by Brucella genus-specific real-time PCR (RT-PCR), and positive samples were then tested by IS711 RT-PCR to detect B. abortus and B. melitensis DNA. Only B. abortus DNA was amplified from 13 human and six animal samples. This is the first report describing B. abortus as the aetiological agent of brucellosis in occupationally exposed humans in Bangladesh. Of note is failure to detect B. melitensis DNA, the species most often associated with human brucellosis worldwide. Further studies are required to explore the occurrence of Brucella melitensis in Bangladesh. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Evaluation of serological tests for diagnosis of Brucella melitensis infection of goats.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Aparicio, E; Marín, C; Alonso-Urmeneta, B; Aragón, V; Pérez-Ortiz, S; Pardo, M; Blasco, J M; Díaz, R; Moriyón, I

    1994-01-01

    Five serological assays were evaluated for the diagnosis of brucellosis in goats: the rose bengal test (RBT), complement fixation test (CFT), radial immunodiffusion (RID) with Brucella and Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 polysaccharides, counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) with cytosol, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with polyclonal and protein G conjugates and smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS), native hapten polysaccharide (NH), or cytosol antigens. For optimal sensitivity, RBT had to be used with sera-antigen at a 3:1 dilution. In the RID test, Brucella melitensis biotype 1 NH could not be replaced by Brucella abortus biotype 1 or Y. enterocolitica 0:9 polysaccharides. In the ELISA, S-LPS and NH gave similar results and the protein G conjugate increased the specificity. With the sera from 55 B. melitensis culture-positive goats, the sensitivity was 100% for RBT, CFT (titer > or = 4), and ELISA with S-LPS or NH; 94% for RID; and 93% for CIEP. All tests were negative (100% specific) when testing the sera from 127 brucella-free goats. Larger discrepancies among the results of the serological tests were obtained with sera from goats of areas where brucellosis is endemic. When the sera of 20 young goats vaccinated subcutaneously (10(9) CFU of B. melitensis Rev 1) and bled 6 months later were examined, the specificities were as follows: NH ELISA, 60%; CFT and S-LPS ELISA, 75%; RBT, 80%; CIEP, 90%; and RID, 94%. With the sera from 10 young goats vaccinated conjunctivally (10(9) CFU of B. melitensis Rev 1) all tests were 100% specific 4 months after vaccination. The proportion of goats giving a positive reaction after vaccination decreased faster in RID than in other tests. PMID:8051240

  3. African Lineage Brucella melitensis Isolates from Omani Livestock.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeffrey T; Walker, Faith M; Rannals, Brandy D; Hussain, M Hammad; Drees, Kevin P; Tiller, Rebekah V; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Al-Rawahi, Abdulmajeed; Keim, Paul; Saqib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a common livestock disease in the Middle East and North Africa, but remains poorly described in the region both genetically and epidemiologically. Traditionally found in goats and sheep, Brucella melitensis is increasingly recognized as infecting camels. Most studies of brucellosis in camels to date have focused on serological surveys, providing only limited understanding of the molecular epidemiology of circulating strains. We genotyped B. melitensis isolates from Omani camels using whole genome SNP assays and VNTRs to provide context for regional brucellosis cases. We identified a lineage of B. melitensis circulating in camels as well as in goats, sheep, and cattle in Oman. This lineage is genetically distinct from most genotypes from the Arabian Peninsula and from isolates from much of the rest of the Middle East. We then developed diagnostic assays that rapidly identify strains from this lineage. In analyses of genotypes from throughout the region, Omani isolates were genetically most closely related to strains from brucellosis cases in humans and livestock in North Africa. Our findings suggest an African origin for B. melitensis in Oman that has likely occurred through the trade of infected livestock. Moreover, African lineages of B. melitensis appear to be undersampled and consequently are underrepresented in genetic databases for Brucella . As we begin to more fully understand global genomic diversity of B. melitensis , finding and characterizing these unique but widespread lineages is essential. We predict that increased sampling of humans and livestock in Africa will reveal little known diversity in this important zoonotic pathogen.

  4. Brucella melitensis infection within warthin tumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Horasan, Elif Sahin; Vaysoğlu, Yusuf; Unal, Murat; Uğuz, Mustafa; Kaya, Ali

    2011-09-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic systemic infectious disease, and multiorgan involvement is commonly seen, but involvement of the neck is a rare presentation of brucellosis. Granulomatous infections of the parotid gland are extremely rare. Warthin tumor is a well-known benign neoplasm of the salivary glands. In this report, we describe a Warthin tumor associated with Brucella melitensis in the same parotid gland.

  5. Physical map of the Brucella melitensis 16 M chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Allardet-Servent, A; Carles-Nurit, M J; Bourg, G; Michaux, S; Ramuz, M

    1991-01-01

    We present the first restriction map of the Brucella melitensis 16 M chromosome obtained by Southern blot hybridization of SpeI, XhoI, and XbaI fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. All restriction fragments (a total of 113) were mapped into an open circle. The main difficulty in mapping involved the exceedingly high number of restriction fragments, as was expected considering the 59% G + C content of the Brucella genome. Several cloned genes were placed on this map, especially rRNA operons which are repeated three times. The size of the B. melitensis chromosome, estimated as 2,600 kb long in a previous study, appeared longer (3,130 kb) by restriction mapping. This restriction map is an initial approach to achieve a genetic map of the Brucella chromosome. Images PMID:2007548

  6. Brucella melitensis infection following military duty in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Bechtol, D; Carpenter, L R; Mosites, E; Smalley, D; Dunn, J R

    2011-11-01

    Brucellosis is a common zoonotic disease worldwide; however, few cases are reported in the US. Brucella melitensis infections are primarily acquired via consumption of high-risk foods or travel to endemic areas. We describe a case of B. melitensis infection in a Tennessee soldier following deployment in Iraq. Initial symptoms included knee and back pain. Culture of an aspirate of the left sacroiliac joint yielded B. melitensis. Genetic analysis indicated that this isolate came from the Middle East. Investigation of laboratory workers identified risky exposures and positive serology prompting post-exposure prophylaxis. Military personnel and other travellers should be advised to reduce risk regarding food consumption and animal contact in endemic areas. Additionally, medical providers should remain vigilant for non-endemic zoonoses among recent travellers. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Brucella melitensis in France: Persistence in Wildlife and Probable Spillover from Alpine Ibex to Domestic Animals

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Virginie; Le Carrou, Gilles; Corde, Yannick; Game, Yvette; Jay, Maryne; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a major zoonosis, mainly caused by Brucella abortus, more rarely by Brucella melitensis. France has been bovine brucellosis officially-free since 2005 with no cases reported in domestic/wild ruminants since 2003. In 2012, bovine and autochthonous human cases due to B. melitensis biovar 3 (Bmel3) occurred in the French Alps. Epidemiological investigations implemented in wild and domestic ruminants evidenced a high seroprevalence (>45%) in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex); no cases were disclosed in other domestic or wild ruminants, except for one isolated case in a chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). These results raised the question of a possible persistence/emergence of Brucella in wildlife. The purpose of this study was to assess genetic relationships among the Bmel3 strains historically isolated in humans, domestic and wild ruminants in Southeastern France, over two decades, by the MLVA-panel2B assay, and to propose a possible explanation for the origin of the recent bovine and human infections. Indeed, this genotyping strategy proved to be efficient for this microepidemiological investigation using an interpretation cut-off established for a fine-scale setting. The isolates, from the 2012 domestic/human outbreak harbored an identical genotype, confirming a recent and direct contamination from cattle to human. Interestingly, they clustered not only with isolates from wildlife in 2012, but also with local historical domestic isolates, in particular with the 1999 last bovine case in the same massif. Altogether, our results suggest that the recent bovine outbreak could have originated from the Alpine ibex population. This is the first report of a B. melitensis spillover from wildlife to domestic ruminants and the sustainability of the infection in Alpine ibex. However, this wild population, reintroduced in the 1970s in an almost closed massif, might be considered as a semi-domestic free-ranging herd. Anthropogenic factors could therefore account with the

  8. Pheno- and genotyping of Brucella abortus biovar 5 isolated from a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus: First case reported in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Diana; Thompson, Carolina; Draghi, Graciela; Canavesio, Vilma; Jacobo, Roberto; Zimmer, Patricia; Elena, Sebastián; Nicola, Ana M; de Echaide, Susana Torioni

    2014-09-17

    An isolate of Brucella spp. from an aborted water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus was characterized based on its pheno- and genotype. The phenotype was defined by carbon dioxide requirement, hydrogen sulfide production, sensitivity to thionin and basic fuchsin and agglutination with Brucella A and M monospecific antisera. The genotype was based on the amplification of the following genes: bcsp31, omp2ab, and eri and the species-specific localization of the insertion sequence IS711 in the Brucella chromosome via B. abortus-B. melitensis-B. ovis-B. suis (AMOS)-PCR. Unexpectedly, the isolate showed a phenotype different from B. abortus bv 1, the most prevalent strain in cattle in Argentina, and from vaccine strain 19, currently used in bovines and water buffaloes. Genotyping supported the phenotypic results, as the analysis of the omp2ab gene sequence showed an identical pattern to either B. abortus bv 5 or B. melitensis. Finally, the AMOS PCR generated a 1700-bp fragment from the isolate, different than those amplified from B. abortus bv 1 (498bp) and B. melitensis (731bp), confirming the presence of B. abortus bv 5. The OIE/FAO Reference Laboratory for Brucellosis confirmed this typing. This is the first report of B. abortus bv 5 from a water buffalo in the Americas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lymphocyte proliferative responses of goats vaccinated with Brucella melitensis 16M or a delta purE201 strain.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, S C; Cheville, N F; Stevens, M G; Houng, H H; Drazek, E S; Hadfield, T L; Warren, R L; Hoover, D L

    1997-01-01

    The response to a Brucella melitensis purEK deletion mutant, delta purE201 (referred to as strain 201), was compared with the response to its parental strain, 16M, in juvenile goats. Proliferative responses to gamma-irradiated bacteria were detected earlier in strain 201-infected goats. Lymphocytes from strain 16M- or 201-infected goats proliferated in response to one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of similar mass isolated from strain 16M or Brucella abortus RB51. Data from this study suggest that some antigens stimulating cell-mediated responses are conserved among Brucella species, as 201- and 16M-infected goats recognized similar proteins expressed by RB51 and 16M. PMID:9199478

  10. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  11. Recovery of a Medieval Brucella melitensis Genome Using Shotgun Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Gemma L.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Giuffra, Valentina; Bandiera, Pasquale; Milanese, Marco; Bramanti, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shotgun metagenomics provides a powerful assumption-free approach to the recovery of pathogen genomes from contemporary and historical material. We sequenced the metagenome of a calcified nodule from the skeleton of a 14th-century middle-aged male excavated from the medieval Sardinian settlement of Geridu. We obtained 6.5-fold coverage of a Brucella melitensis genome. Sequence reads from this genome showed signatures typical of ancient or aged DNA. Despite the relatively low coverage, we were able to use information from single-nucleotide polymorphisms to place the medieval pathogen genome within a clade of B. melitensis strains that included the well-studied Ether strain and two other recent Italian isolates. We confirmed this placement using information from deletions and IS711 insertions. We conclude that metagenomics stands ready to document past and present infections, shedding light on the emergence, evolution, and spread of microbial pathogens. PMID:25028426

  12. The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-08

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other alpha-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti.

  13. The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J.; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H.; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other α-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti. PMID:11756688

  14. Intracellular trafficking of Brucella abortus in J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arenas, G N; Staskevich, A S; Aballay, A; Mayorga, L S

    2000-07-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterium capable of surviving inside professional and nonprofessional phagocytes. The microorganism remains in membrane-bound compartments that in several cell types resemble modified endoplasmic reticulum structures. To monitor the intracellular transport of B. abortus in macrophages, the kinetics of fusion of phagosomes with preformed lysosomes labeled with colloidal gold particles was observed by electron microscopy. The results indicated that phagosomes containing live B. abortus were reluctant to fuse with lysosomes. Furthermore, newly endocytosed material was not incorporated into these phagosomes. These observations indicate that the bacteria strongly affect the normal maturation process of macrophage phagosomes. However, after overnight incubation, a significant percentage of the microorganisms were found in large phagosomes containing gold particles, resembling phagolysosomes. Most of the Brucella bacteria present in phagolysosomes were not morphologically altered, suggesting that they can also resist the harsh conditions prevalent in this compartment. About 50% colocalization of B. abortus with LysoSensor, a weak base that accumulates in acidic compartments, was observed, indicating that the B. abortus bacteria do not prevent phagosome acidification. In contrast to what has been described for HeLa cells, only a minor percentage of the microorganisms were found in compartments labeled with monodansylcadaverine, a marker for autophagosomes, and with DiOC6 (3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide), a marker for the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that B. abortus bacteria alter phagosome maturation in macrophages. However, acidification does occur in these phagosomes, and some of them can eventually mature to phagolysosomes.

  15. Diverse Genetic Regulon of the Virulence-Associated Transcriptional Regulator MucR in Brucella abortus 2308

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Clayton C.; Elhassanny, Ahmed E. M.; Planchin, Emilie E.; Roux, Christelle M.; Weeks-Gorospe, Jenni N.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The Ros-type regulator MucR is one of the few transcriptional regulators that have been linked to virulence in Brucella. Here, we show that a Brucella abortus in-frame mucR deletion strain exhibits a pronounced growth defect during in vitro cultivation and, more importantly, that the mucR mutant is attenuated in cultured macrophages and in mice. The genetic basis for the attenuation of Brucella mucR mutants has not been defined previously, but in the present study the genes regulated by MucR in B. abortus have been elucidated using microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). In B. abortus 2308, MucR regulates a wide variety of genes whose products may function in establishing and maintaining cell envelope integrity, polysaccharide biosynthesis, iron homeostasis, genome plasticity, and transcriptional regulation. Particularly notable among the MucR-regulated genes identified is arsR6 (nolR), which encodes a transcriptional regulator previously linked to virulence in Brucella melitensis 16 M. Importantly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) determined that a recombinant MucR protein binds directly to the promoter regions of several genes repressed by MucR (including arsR6 [nolR]), and in Brucella, as in other alphaproteobacteria, MucR binds to its own promoter to repress expression of the gene that encodes it. Overall, these studies have uncovered the diverse genetic regulon of MucR in Brucella, and in doing so this work has begun to define the MucR-controlled genetic circuitry whose misregulation contributes to the virulence defect of Brucella mucR mutants. PMID:23319565

  16. Gene Discovery through Genomic Sequencing of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Daniel O.; Zandomeni, Ruben O.; Cravero, Silvio; Verdún, Ramiro E.; Pierrou, Ester; Faccio, Paula; Diaz, Gabriela; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Agüero, Fernán; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Andersson, Siv G. E.; Rossetti, Osvaldo L.; Grau, Oscar; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2001-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of brucellosis, a disease that affects bovines and human. We generated DNA random sequences from the genome of B. abortus strain 2308 in order to characterize molecular targets that might be useful for developing immunological or chemotherapeutic strategies against this pathogen. The partial sequencing of 1,899 clones allowed the identification of 1,199 genomic sequence surveys (GSSs) with high homology (BLAST expect value < 10−5) to sequences deposited in the GenBank databases. Among them, 925 represent putative novel genes for the Brucella genus. Out of 925 nonredundant GSSs, 470 were classified in 15 categories based on cellular function. Seven hundred GSSs showed no significant database matches and remain available for further studies in order to identify their function. A high number of GSSs with homology to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti proteins were observed, thus confirming their close phylogenetic relationship. Among them, several GSSs showed high similarity with genes related to nodule nitrogen fixation, synthesis of nod factors, nodulation protein symbiotic plasmid, and nodule bacteroid differentiation. We have also identified several B. abortus homologs of virulence and pathogenesis genes from other pathogens, including a homolog to both the Shda gene from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and the AidA-1 gene from Escherichia coli. Other GSSs displayed significant homologies to genes encoding components of the type III and type IV secretion machineries, suggesting that Brucella might also have an active type III secretion machinery. PMID:11159979

  17. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  18. Rapid identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis by chip-based continuous flow PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Michael; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2012-06-01

    To combat the threat of biological agents like Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis in bioterroristic scenarios requires fast, easy-to-use and safe identification systems. In this study we describe a system for rapid amplification of specific genetic markers for the identification of Yersinia pestis and Brucella melitensis. Using chip based PCR and continuous flow technology we were able to amplify the targets simultaneously with a 2-step reaction profile within 20 minutes. The subsequent analysis of amplified fragments by standard gel electrophoresis requires another 45 minutes. We were able to detect both pathogens within 75 minutes being much faster than most other nucleic acid amplification technologies.

  19. Limited genetic diversity of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Gándara, B; Merino, A L; Rogel, M A; Martínez-Romero, E

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici. The Brucella strains tested that were representatives of the six electrophoretic types had the same rRNA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns and identical ribotypes. All 99 isolates had similar chromosome profiles as revealed by the Eckhardt procedure.

  20. Virulence Effects and Signaling Partners Modulated by Brucella melitensis Light-sensing Histidine Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Christopher R.

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis utilizes diverse virulence factors. A Brucella light sensing histidine kinase can influence in vitro virulence of the bacteria during intracellular infection. First, we demonstrated that the B. melitensis light sensing kinase (BM-LOV-HK) affects virulence in an IRF-1-/- mouse model of infection. Infection with a Δ BM-LOV-HK strain resulted in less bacterial colonization of IRF-1-/- spleens and extended survivorship compared to mice infected with wild type B. melitensis 16M. Second, using PCR arrays, we observed less expression of innate and adaptive immune system activation markers in ΔBM-LOV-HK infected mouse spleens than wild type B. melitensis 16M infected mouse spleens 6 days after infection. Third, we demonstrated by microarray analysis of B. melitensis that deletion of BM-LOV-HK alters bacterial gene expression. Downregulation of genes involved in control of the general stress response system included the alternative sigma factor RpoE1 and its anti-anti sigma factor PhyR. Conversely, genes involved in flagella production, quorum sensing, and the type IV secretion system (VirB operon) were upregulated in the Δ BM-LOV-HK strain compared to the wild type B. melitensis 16M. Analysis of genes differentially regulated in Δ BM-LOV-HK versus the wild type strain indicated an overlap of 110 genes with data from previous quorum sensing regulator studies of Δ vjbR and/ΔblxR(babR) strains. Also, several predicted RpoE1 binding sites located upstream of genes were differentially regulated in the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain. Our results suggest BM-LOV-HK is important for in vivo Brucella virulence, and reveals that BM-LOV-HK directly or indirect regulates members of the Brucella quorum sensing, type IV secretion, and general stress systems.

  1. In vitro assay for the anti-brucella activity of medicinal plants against tetracycline-resistant Brucella melitensis *

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Hossein; Darabpour, Esmaeil; Gholipour, Mahnaz; Seyyed Nejad, Seyyed Mansour

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis caused by four species of brucella, has a high morbidity. Brucella melitensis is the main causative agent of brucellosis in both human and small ruminants. As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, medicinal plants are valuable resources for new agents against antibiotic-resistant strains. The aim of this study was to investigate the usage of native plants for brucellosis treatment. For this purpose, the anti-brucella activities of ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, Plantago ovata, Cordia myxa, and Crocus sativus were assessed. The activity against a resistant Br. melitensis strain was determined by disc diffusion method at various concentrations from 50–400 mg/ml. Antibiotic discs were also used as a control. Among the evaluated herbs, six plant (Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, and Crocus sativus) showed anti-brucella activity. Oliveria decumbens was chosen as the most effective plant for further studies. A tested isolate exhibited resistance to tetracycline, nafcillin, oxacillin, methicillin, and colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for Oliveria decumbens against resistant Br. melitensis were the same (5 mg/ml), and for gentamicin they were both 2 mg/ml. Time-kill kinetics for a methanolic extract of Oliveria decumbens was 7 h whereas for an ethanolic extract it was 28 h. Also, Oliveria decumbens extracts showed a synergistic effect in combination with doxycycline and tetracycline. In general, the similar values of MIC and MBC for Oliveria decumbens suggest that these extracts could act as bactericidal agents against Br. melitensis. In addition to Oliveria decumbens, Crocus sativus and Salvia sclarea also had good anti-brucella activity and these should be considered for further study. PMID:20593515

  2. In vitro assay for the anti-Brucella activity of medicinal plants against tetracycline-resistant Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Hossein; Darabpour, Esmaeil; Gholipour, Mahnaz; Seyyed Nejad, Seyyed Mansour

    2010-07-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis caused by four species of brucella, has a high morbidity. Brucella melitensis is the main causative agent of brucellosis in both human and small ruminants. As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, medicinal plants are valuable resources for new agents against antibiotic-resistant strains. The aim of this study was to investigate the usage of native plants for brucellosis treatment. For this purpose, the anti-brucella activities of ethanolic and methanolic extracts of Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, Plantago ovata, Cordia myxa, and Crocus sativus were assessed. The activity against a resistant Br. melitensis strain was determined by disc diffusion method at various concentrations from 50-400 mg/ml. Antibiotic discs were also used as a control. Among the evaluated herbs, six plant (Salvia sclarea, Oliveria decumbens, Ferulago angulata, Vitex pseudo-negundo, Teucrium polium, and Crocus sativus) showed anti-brucella activity. Oliveria decumbens was chosen as the most effective plant for further studies. A tested isolate exhibited resistance to tetracycline, nafcillin, oxacillin, methicillin, and colistin. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for Oliveria decumbens against resistant Br. melitensis were the same (5 mg/ml), and for gentamicin they were both 2 mg/ml. Time-kill kinetics for a methanolic extract of Oliveria decumbens was 7 h whereas for an ethanolic extract it was 28 h. Also, Oliveria decumbens extracts showed a synergistic effect in combination with doxycycline and tetracycline. In general, the similar values of MIC and MBC for Oliveria decumbens suggest that these extracts could act as bactericidal agents against Br. melitensis. In addition to Oliveria decumbens, Crocus sativus and Salvia sclarea also had good anti-brucella activity and these should be considered for further study.

  3. Genotyping of Brucella melitensis strains from dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) from the United Arab Emirates with multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Wernery, Ulli; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Juhász, Judit; Felde, Orsolya; Nagy, Péter

    2016-04-15

    Camel brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease in camel-rearing countries caused by Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus. The aim of this study was the first genetic analysis of B. melitensis strains isolated from dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). MLVA 16 and its MLVA 8 and MLVA11 subsets were used to determine the genotypes of 15 B. melitensis isolates from dromedary camels (11 strains) and other host species (4 strains) from the United Arab Emirates and the results were then compared to B. melitensis MLVA genotypes from other parts of the world. Five, including two novel genotypes were identified with MLVA 8. MLVA 16 further discriminated these five genotypes to ten variants. The eleven camel isolates clustered into four main genetic groups within the East-Mediterranean and African clades and this clustering correlated with the geographic origin of the hosts (United Arab Emirates, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Sudan) and the date of their isolation. The camel strains were also genetically related to strains isolated from wild and domestic ruminants from their close habitat or from other parts of the world. Although limited number of strains were analysed, based on our data imported animals from foreign countries, local small ruminants and wildlife species are hypothesized to be the main sources of camel brucellosis in the United Arab Emirates. MLVA was successfully applied to determine the epidemiological links between the different camel B. melitensis infections in the United Arab Emirates and it can be a beneficial tool in future disease control programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Isolation & characterization of Brucella melitensis isolated from patients suspected for human brucellosis in India

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Anita; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Prakash, Archana; Tiwari, Sapana; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Brucellosis is endemic in the southern part of India. A combination of biochemical, serological and molecular methods is required for identification and biotyping of Brucella. The present study describes the isolation and biochemical, molecular characterization of Brucella melitensis from patients suspected for human brucellosis. Methods: The blood samples were collected from febrile patients suspected to have brucellosis. A total of 18 isolates were obtained from 102 blood samples subjected to culture. The characterization of these 18 isolates was done by growth on Brucella specific medium, biochemical reactions, CO2 requirement, H2S production, agglutination with A and M mono-specific antiserum, dye sensitivity to basic fuchsin and thionin. Further, molecular characterization of the isolates was done by amplification of B. melitensis species specific IS711 repetitive DNA fragment and 16S (rRNA) sequence analysis. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of omp2 locus and IS711 gene was also done for molecular characterization. Results: All 102 suspected samples were subjected to bacteria isolation and of these, 18 isolates could be recovered on blood culture. The biochemical, PCR and PCR-RFLP and 16s rRNA sequencing revealed that all isolates were of B. melitensis and matched exactly with reference strain B. melitensis 16M. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study showed an overall isolation rate of 17.64 per cent for B. melitensis. There is a need to establish facilities for isolation and characterization of Brucella species for effective clinical management of the disease among patients as well as surveillance and control of infection in domestic animals. Further studies are needed from different geographical areas of the country with different level of endemicity to plan and execute control strategies against human brucellosis. PMID:27488010

  5. The Antibacterial Activity of Selected Labiatae (Lamiaceae) Essential Oils against Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Safi, Mazen

    2013-03-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis caused by four species of brucella, has a high morbidity. The major cause of brucellosis worldwide is brucella melitensis. Medicinal plants are considered as new antibacterial sources that could replace conventional antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of some native plants, alone and in combination with some antibiotics, in the treatment of brucellosis. The present experimental in vitro study was carried out to evaluate the anti-brucella activities of essential oils of Rosmarinus officinalis L., Origanum syriacum, Thymus syriacus, Salvia palaestina Benth, Mentha piperia, and Lavandula stoechas L., alone and in combination with some antibiotics. The activity against 16 tetracycline-resistant B. melitensis isolates was determined by disc diffusion method incorporating a concentration of 5%. Antibiotic discs were also used as a control. Microdilution brucella broth susceptibility assay was used in order to determine the MICs of essential oils and five antibiotics. Among all the herbs evaluated, only the essential oils of O. syriacum and T. syriacus plants demonstrated most effective anti-brucella activity, and were then chosen for MIC study. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC50) of essential oils of O. syriacum and T. syriacus against tetracycline-resistant B. melitensis were 3.125 µl/ml and 6.25 µl/ml, respectively. Among the essential oils studied, those of O. syriacum and T. syriacus were most effective. Since a combination of levofloxacin and Thymus syriacus essential oil increased the efficacy of this antibiotic, O. syriacum and T. syriacus are recommended to be used as bactericidal agents against B. melitensis.

  6. Molecular epidemiological investigation of Brucella melitensis circulating in Mongolia by MLVA16.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Erdenebaataar, Janchivdorj; Vanaabaatar, Batbaatar; Cho, Hyorim; Sung, So-Ra; Lee, Jin Ju; Jung, Suk Chan; Park, Yong Ho; Kim, Ji-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    Mongolia has a high incidence of brucellosis in human and animals due to livestock husbandry. To investigate the genetic characteristics of Mongolian B. melitensis, an MLVA (multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis)-16 assay was performed with 94 B. melitensis isolates. They were identified as B. melitensis biovar (bv.) 1 (67), 3 (10) and Rev. 1 vaccine strains (17) using a classical biotyping and multiplex PCR. In genotyping, three human isolates were grouped at 2 genotypes with sheep isolates, and it implies that B. melitensis are cross-infected between human and livestock. In the parsimony analysis, Mongolian B. melitensis isolates had high genetic similarity with Chinese strains, likely due to the geographical proximity, clustered distinctively as compared with other foreign isolates. B. melitensis Rev. 1 vaccine strains were divided into 4 genotypes with 92% similarity. In the analysis of Rev.1 strains, the risk of mutation of vaccine strain might not be overlooked. Animal quarantines should be strengthened to prevent the spread of Brucella species among adjacent countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A case report of spontaneous abortion caused by Brucella melitensis biovar 3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Xia; Feng, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Hao, Rui-E; Yao, Su-Xia; Zhao, Rong; Piao, Dong-Ri; Cui, Bu-Yun; Jiang, Hai

    2018-05-02

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. Brucella invades the body through the skin mucosa, digestive tract, and respiratory tract. However, only a few studies on human spontaneous abortion attributable to Brucella have been reported. In this work, the patient living in Shanxi Province in China who had suffered a spontaneous abortion was underwent pathogen detection and Brucella melitensis biovar 3 was identified. The patient in this study was 22 years old. On July 16, 2015, she was admitted to Shanxi Grand Hospital, Shanxi Province, China because of one day of vaginal bleeding and three days of abdominal distension accompanied by fever after five months of amenorrhea. A serum tube agglutination test for brucellosis and blood culture were positive. At the time of discharge, she was prescribed oral doxycycline (100 mg/dose, twice a day) and rifampicin (600 mg/dose, once daily) for 6 weeks as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). No recurrence was observed during the six months of follow-up after the cessation of antibiotic treatment. This is the first reported case of miscarriage resulting from Brucella melitensis biovar 3 isolated from a pregnant woman who was infected through unpasteurized milk in China. Brucellosis infection was overlooked in the Maternity Hospital because of physician unawareness. Early recognition and prompt treatment of brucellosis infection are crucial for a successful outcome in pregnancy.

  8. A multicopper oxidase contributes to the copper tolerance of Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tonglei; Wang, Shaohua; Wang, Zhen; Peng, Xiaowei; Lu, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2015-06-01

    Copper is a potent antimicrobial agent. Multiple mechanisms of copper tolerance are utilized by some pathogenic bacteria. BMEII0580, which is significantly similar to the multicopper oxidase from Escherichia coli, was predicted to be the probable blue copper protein YacK precursor in Brucella melitensis 16M, and was designated as Brucella multicopper oxidase (BmcO). A bioinformatics analysis indicated that the typical motifs of multicopper oxidases are present in BmcO. BmcO, the expression of which was up-regulated by copper, could catalyze the oxidation of 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), dimethoxyphenol (DMP) and para-phenylenediamine (pPD), which are widely used as substrates for multicopper oxidase. Additionally, BmcO exhibited ferroxidase activity, which indicated that it might play an important role in the Fe(2+) uptake of B. melitensis. Importantly, the mutant strain 16MΔbmcO was more sensitive to copper than the wild-type strain B. melitensis 16M as well as its complementation strain 16MΔbmcO(bmcO). The infection assays of cells showed that similar bacterial numbers of B. melitensis 16M, 16MΔbmcO and 16MΔbmcO(bmcO) strains were recovered from the infected macrophages. This result indicated that BmcO was not essential for B. melitensis intracellular growth. In conclusion, our results confirm that BmcO is a multicopper oxidase and contributes to the copper tolerance of B. melitensis 16M. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Shedding Rates and SeroPrevalence of Brucella melitensis in Lactating Goats of Shahrekord, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Milan, Jalal Sheykh Kanluye; Mahzoonieh, Mohamad Reza; Khaksar, Khadijeh

    2014-03-01

    Brucellosis remains a major worldwide zoonosis. Caprine brucellosis is a significant problem for both public health and animal production. Brucella melitensis causes disease in goats, sheep, humans, and occasionally cattle. Transmission is by ingestion or contact with infected materials, vaginal discharge, or milk. The current study aimed to determine the rate of B. melitensis seropositives and its probable shedding in lactating goats from flocks in Shahrekord district, Iran. In the current study, 1080 samples of milk, blood and vaginal swabs of 360 lactating goats (three samples from each animal) were randomly collected from 12 flocks in Shahrekord district. Serums from blood samples were examined by Rose Bengal plate (RBT) test and the titre of positives determined by tube agglutination test (TAT). Vaginal swab and milk (cream and sediment) samples were cultured on Brucella agar. Brucella spp. suspected pure cultures were incubated in the same conditions and then examined by Modified Zeil-Nelson (MZN) staining, oxidase and catalase tests. Positive isolates were examined by PCR. Out of 360 serum samples, 50 (13.9%) were positive by RBT, and six (1/66%) were positive by TAT. Culturing of milk and vaginal samples lead to isolation of 12 (3.33%) and 10 (2.77%) Brucella spp. suspected colonies, respectively. The PCR examinations of these isolates showed that ten (2.77%) milk and 6 vaginal swab samples (1.66%) belonged to B. melitensis species. Eight goats (2.22%) had positive results in RBT, culture and PCR examinations, simultaneously. The regional distribution of caprine brucellosis and shedding of B. melitensis through vaginal secretions and milk secretions of lactating goats indicated that 50% and 83.33% of the goat flocks contained vaginal and milk shedders, respectively.

  10. Design and implementation of a database for Brucella melitensis genome annotation.

    PubMed

    De Hertogh, Benoît; Lahlimi, Leïla; Lambert, Christophe; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Depiereux, Eric

    2008-03-18

    The genome sequences of three Brucella biovars and of some species close to Brucella sp. have become available, leading to new relationship analysis. Moreover, the automatic genome annotation of the pathogenic bacteria Brucella melitensis has been manually corrected by a consortium of experts, leading to 899 modifications of start sites predictions among the 3198 open reading frames (ORFs) examined. This new annotation, coupled with the results of automatic annotation tools of the complete genome sequences of the B. melitensis genome (including BLASTs to 9 genomes close to Brucella), provides numerous data sets related to predicted functions, biochemical properties and phylogenic comparisons. To made these results available, alphaPAGe, a functional auto-updatable database of the corrected sequence genome of B. melitensis, has been built, using the entity-relationship (ER) approach and a multi-purpose database structure. A friendly graphical user interface has been designed, and users can carry out different kinds of information by three levels of queries: (1) the basic search use the classical keywords or sequence identifiers; (2) the original advanced search engine allows to combine (by using logical operators) numerous criteria: (a) keywords (textual comparison) related to the pCDS's function, family domains and cellular localization; (b) physico-chemical characteristics (numerical comparison) such as isoelectric point or molecular weight and structural criteria such as the nucleic length or the number of transmembrane helix (TMH); (c) similarity scores with Escherichia coli and 10 species phylogenetically close to B. melitensis; (3) complex queries can be performed by using a SQL field, which allows all queries respecting the database's structure. The database is publicly available through a Web server at the following url: http://www.fundp.ac.be/urbm/bioinfo/aPAGe.

  11. Sacroiliitis as a sole manifestation of Brucella melitensis infection in a child

    SciTech Connect

    Miron, D.; Garty, I.; Tal, I.

    A case of a 12-year-old boy with sacroiliitis documented by positive Tc-99m MDP and Ga-67 scans is described. Isolation of brucella melitensis from the blood and bone marrow established the diagnosis. He responded promptly to docycycline therapy. Throughout the course of his disease this boy had neither fever nor other signs of brucellosis, and x-ray was normal.

  12. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts' defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host's killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host's genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible.

  13. Typing and comparative genome analysis of Brucella melitensis isolated from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Abou Zaki, Natalia; Salloum, Tamara; Osman, Marwan; Rafei, Rayane; Hamze, Monzer; Tokajian, Sima

    2017-10-16

    Brucella melitensis is the main causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis. This study aimed at typing and characterizing genetic variation in 33 Brucella isolates recovered from patients in Lebanon. Bruce-ladder multiplex PCR and PCR-RFLP of omp31, omp2a and omp2b were performed. Sixteen representative isolates were chosen for draft-genome sequencing and analyzed to determine variations in virulence, resistance, genomic islands, prophages and insertion sequences. Comparative whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism analysis was also performed. The isolates were confirmed to be B. melitensis. Genome analysis revealed multiple virulence determinants and efflux pumps. Genome comparisons and single nucleotide polymorphisms divided the isolates based on geographical distribution but revealed high levels of similarity between the strains. Sequence divergence in B. melitensis was mainly due to lateral gene transfer of mobile elements. This is the first report of an in-depth genomic characterization of B. melitensis in Lebanon. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Bactericidal Action of Fresh Rabbit Blood Against Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Richard W.; Hall, Wendell H.

    1968-01-01

    A photometric method was used to measure the bactericidal kinetics for Brucella abortus of freshly drawn rabbit blood during the time before clotting. This antibrucellar activity varied between rabbits in different immunologic states. Nonimmunized rabbits had moderate bactericidal activity after a lag of about 2 min. The blood of some immunized rabbits gave an immediate and strong kill, but in certain other immunized rabbits, especially when hyperimmunized, the bactericidal activity was inhibited. It appeared that serum bactericidins and complement are sometimes as active in unclotted blood as they are in serum. However, this bactericidal activity can be either increased or neutralized by immunization. The prozone bactericidal inhibition phenomenon (Neisser-Wechsberg) found in immune serum may, in fact, reflect inhibition taking place in vivo. Inhibition of the bactericidal activity in blood can contribute to the persistence of chronic infections and individual variations in resistance. PMID:4971893

  15. Comparative Proteome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Vaccine Strain Rev 1 and a Virulent Strain, 16M

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A.; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V.; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G.

    2002-01-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1. PMID:12193611

  16. Comparative proteome analysis of Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev 1 and a virulent strain, 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Wagner, Mary Ann; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-09-01

    The genus Brucella consists of bacterial pathogens that cause brucellosis, a major zoonotic disease characterized by undulant fever and neurological disorders in humans. Among the different Brucella species, Brucella melitensis is considered the most virulent. Despite successful use in animals, the vaccine strains remain infectious for humans. To understand the mechanism of virulence in B. melitensis, the proteome of vaccine strain Rev 1 was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared to that of virulent strain 16M. The two strains were grown under identical laboratory conditions. Computer-assisted analysis of the two B. melitensis proteomes revealed proteins expressed in either 16M or Rev 1, as well as up- or down-regulation of proteins specific for each of these strains. These proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. It was found that certain metabolic pathways may be deregulated in Rev 1. Expression of an immunogenic 31-kDa outer membrane protein, proteins utilized for iron acquisition, and those that play a role in sugar binding, lipid degradation, and amino acid binding was altered in Rev 1.

  17. An outbreak of Brucella abortus biovar 2 in Canadian cattle

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lorry B.; Steele, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An outbreak of brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus biovar 2 was identified in cattle in Alberta in December 1986. This was the only clinical infection discovered since the national cattle herd was declared brucellosisfree in 1985. It was the first report of B. abortus biovar 2 in Canadian cattle. The outbreak, involving three herds containing purebred Hereford cattle, was spread by the private treaty sale of untested cattle, and was identified following investigation of an abortion. The source of infection for the outbreak was not established, but several possibilities were identified including infected herds present in the area during the mid-1970's, latent infection originating in a Saskatchewan herd during the early 1960's, American cattle imported during the early 1970's, and brucellosis-infected bison in Wood Buffalo National Park. The containment and elimination of this nidus of infection appears to have been successful, and the national cattle herd at the time of writing is free of the disease. PMID:17423457

  18. The International Standard for Anti-Brucella abortus Serum

    PubMed Central

    Stableforth, A. W.

    1954-01-01

    In field trials on the eradication of brucellosis from dairy herds in Great Britain, which began in 1933, a serum standard of reference was used for the examination of agglutinating suspensions prepared in different laboratories. In 1937, the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) adopted this standard and made recommendations for its use internationally. These recommendations were revised by OIE in 1948, by the Third Inter-American Congress on Brucellosis and by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Panel on Brucellosis in 1950, and again by the latter body in 1952. A new batch equivalent in potency to the original standard was established by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 1952 as the International Standard for Anti-Brucella abortus Serum. The International Standard, or a national standard of equivalent potency, ensures comparability of the titres obtained in different countries by different methods, and the results of such comparisons can be expressed in a simple manner by describing the titres in terms of International Units of Brucella antibody. PMID:13199656

  19. Nasal Vaccination Stimulates CD8+ T Cells for Potent Protection Against Mucosal Brucella melitensis Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Beata; Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis remains a significant zoonotic threat worldwide. Humans and animals acquire infection via their oropharynx and upper respiratory tract following oral or aerosol exposure. After mucosal infection, brucellosis develops into a systemic disease. Mucosal vaccination could offer a viable alternative to conventional injection practices to deter disease. Using a nasal vaccination approach, the ΔznuA B. melitensis was found to confer potent protection against pulmonary Brucella challenge, and reduce colonization of spleens and lungs by more than 2500-fold, with more than 50% of vaccinated mice showing no detectable brucellae. Furthermore, tenfold more brucellae-specific, IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells than CD4+ T cells were induced in the spleen and respiratory lymph nodes. Evaluation of pulmonary and splenic CD8+ T cells from mice vaccinated with ΔznuA B. melitensis revealed that these expressed an activated effector memory (CD44hiCD62LloCCR7lo) T cells producing elevated levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin, and granzyme B. To assess the relative importance of these increased numbers of CD8+ T cells, CD8−/− mice were challenged with virulent B. melitensis, and they showed markedly increased bacterial loads in organs in contrast to similarly challenged CD4−/− mice. Only ΔznuA B. melitensis- and Rev-1-vaccinated CD4−/− and wild-type mice, not CD8−/− mice, were completely protected against Brucella challenge. Determination of cytokines responsible for conferring protection showed the relative importance of IFN-γ, but not IL-17. Unlike wild-type mice, IL-17 was greatly induced in IFN-γ−/− mice, but IL-17 could not substitute for IFN-γ’s protection, although an increase in brucellae dissemination was observed upon in vivo IL-17 neutralization. These results show that nasal ΔznuA B. melitensis vaccination represents an attractive means to stimulate systemic and mucosal immune protection via CD8+ T cell engagement. PMID:26752510

  20. Vaccination of elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus strain RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase genes does not induce adequate protection against experimental brucella abortus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA). In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the d...

  1. Vector Development for the Expression of Foreign Proteins in the Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Vigliocco, Ana M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    A vector for the expression of foreign antigens in the vaccine strain Brucella abortus S19 was developed by using a DNA fragment containing the regulatory sequences and the signal peptide of the Brucella bcsp31 gene. This fragment was cloned in broad-host-range plasmid pBBR4MCS, resulting in plasmid pBEV. As a reporter protein, a repetitive antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. The recombinant fusion protein is stably expressed and secreted into the Brucella periplasmic space, inducing a good antibody response against the T. cruzi antigen. The expression of the repetitive antigen in Brucella neither altered its growth pattern nor generated a toxic or lethal effect during experimental infection. The application of this strategy for the generation of live recombinant vaccines and the tagging of B. abortus S19 vaccine is discussed. This is the first time that a recombinant protein has been expressed in the periplasm of brucellae. PMID:9673273

  2. Draft genome sequence of field isolate Brucella melitensis strain 2007BM/1 from India.

    PubMed

    Singh, D K; Kumar, Bablu; Shrinet, Garima; Singh, R P; Das, Aparajita; Mantur, B G; Abhishek; Pandey, Aruna; Mondal, Piyali; Sajjanar, B K; Doimari, Soni; Singh, Vijayata; Kumari, Reena; Tiwari, A K; Gandham, Ravi Kumar

    2018-04-21

    Brucellosis is among one of the most widespread important global zoonotic diseases that is endemic in many parts of India. Brucella melitensis is supposed to be the most pathogenic species for humans. Here we report the draft genome sequence of B. melitensis strain 2007BM/1 isolated from a human in India. Genomic DNA was extracted from Brucella culture and was sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq platform. The generated reads were assembled using three de novo assemblers and the draft genome was annotated. This monoisolate, with a genome length of 3268756bp, was found to be resistant to azithromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole but susceptible to tetracycline, ofloxacin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and doxycycline. The presence of virulence genes in the strain was identified. The results obtained will help in understanding drug resistance mechanisms and virulence factors in highly zoonotic B. melitensis and suggest the need for judicious use of antibiotics in livestock health and management practices. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly Sensitive Bacteriophage-Based Detection of Brucella abortus in Mixed Culture and Spiked Blood

    PubMed Central

    Sergueev, Kirill V.; Filippov, Andrey A.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, bacteriophages (phages) have been used for Brucella species identification in the diagnosis and epidemiology of brucellosis. Traditional Brucella phage typing is a multi-day procedure including the isolation of a pure culture, a step that can take up to three weeks. In this study, we focused on the use of brucellaphages for sensitive detection of the pathogen in clinical and other complex samples, and developed an indirect method of Brucella detection using real-time quantitative PCR monitoring of brucellaphage DNA amplification via replication on live Brucella cells. This assay allowed the detection of single bacteria (down to 1 colony-forming unit per milliliter) within 72 h without DNA extraction and purification steps. The technique was equally efficient with Brucella abortus pure culture and with mixed cultures of B. abortus and α-proteobacterial near neighbors that can be misidentified as Brucella spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi and Afipia felis. The addition of a simple short sample preparation step enabled the indirect phage-based detection of B. abortus in spiked blood, with the same high sensitivity. This indirect phage-based detection assay enables the rapid and sensitive detection of live B. abortus in mixed cultures and in blood samples, and can potentially be applied for detection in other clinical samples and other complex sample types. PMID:28604602

  4. Human infection by Brucella melitensis: an outbreak attributed to contact with infected goats.

    PubMed

    Wallach, J C; Samartino, L E; Efron, A; Baldi, P C

    1997-12-01

    Although several outbreaks of Brucella melitensis infection have been reported among laboratory workers or goat cheese consumers, outbreaks related to rural labour have been rarely studied. An outbreak of human brucellosis among farm workers of Argentina was studied and revealed a close relationship with an epidemic of caprine abortions which occurred shortly before on the same farm. High rates of B. melitensis infection were found among goats. Active brucellosis was diagnosed in 33 subjects (14 with positive blood culture for B. melitensis), while other 27 did not show evidence of illness. While 25 of the brucellosis active patients were rural workers, only 5 of the healthy subjects were engaged in rural labour. Active brucellosis was diagnosed in 91.3% of the subjects in continuous contact with goats and in 32% of those having an occasional contact with the animals. All the 60 subjects denied consumption of goat cheese or milk. As shown here, epidemic human infections by B. melitensis may develop among people frequently in contact with infected goat herds or goat manure.

  5. Isolation and expression of recombinant antibody fragments to the biological warfare pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Hayhurst, Andrew; Happe, Scott; Mabry, Robert; Koch, Zephyr; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2003-05-01

    Brucella melitensis is a highly infectious animal pathogen able to cause a recurring debilitating disease in humans and is therefore high on the list of biological warfare agents. Immunoglobulin genes from mice immunized with gamma-irradiated B. melitensis strain 16M were used to construct a library that was screened by phage display against similarly prepared bacteria. The selected phage particles afforded a strong enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) signal against gamma-irradiated B. melitensis cells. However, extensive efforts to express the respective single chain antibody variable region fragment (scFv) in soluble form failed due to: (i) poor solubility and (ii) in vivo degradation of the c-myc tag used for the detection of the recombinant antibodies. Both problems could be addressed by: (i) fusing a human kappa light chain constant domain (Ck) chain to the scFv to generate single chain antibody fragment (scAb) antibody fragments and (ii) by co-expression of the periplasmic chaperone Skp. While soluble, functional antibodies could be produced in this manner, phage-displaying scFvs or scAbs were still found to be superior ELISA reagents for immunoassays, due to the large signal amplification afforded by anti-phage antibodies. The isolated phage antibodies were shown to be highly specific to B. melitensis and did not recognize Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in contrast to the existing diagnostic monoclonal YST 9.2.1.

  6. Isolation, purification, and partial characterization of Brucella abortus matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Moriyon, I; Berman, D T

    1983-01-01

    Peptidoglycan sacculi with peptidoglycan-associated proteins were prepared from cell envelopes of Brucella abortus by extraction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 50 degrees C. On extraction of these preparations with SDS at 100 degrees C, a protein was obtained whose removal from peptidoglycan was confirmed by electron microscopy. Incubation of the 50 degrees C SDS-extracted cell envelopes with 50 mM MgCl2 in SDS-2-beta-mercaptoethanol at 37 degrees C also extracted the protein, along with lipopolysaccharide. At temperatures below 60 degrees C, the protein did not bind SDS strongly and had an apparent molecular weight greater than 92,000 in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At higher temperatures, SDS bound strongly, and the apparent molecular weight was 38,000. Urea at 5 M did not alter the electrophoretic mobility of this 38,000-molecular-weight form. Immunoelectrophoresis in detergents with antisera to cell envelopes, carbohydrate staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gels, and production of anti-lipopolysaccharide antibodies by mice immunized with the purified protein indicated that lipopolysaccharide was present in free and protein-bound forms. Sequential gel filtration in SDS-EDTA and SDS-NaCl removed most lipopolysaccharide. After further purification by preparative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a gas-liquid chromatographic analysis showed residual lipid tightly associated with the protein. The results suggested that the interactions between matrix proteins and other outer membrane components are stronger in B. abortus than in Escherichia coli, which was used as a control throughout. Images PMID:6401696

  7. An outbreak of Brucella melitensis infection by airborne transmission among laboratory workers.

    PubMed Central

    Ollé-Goig, J E; Canela-Soler, J

    1987-01-01

    An outbreak of acute brucellosis infection was detected among the employees of a biologicals manufacturing laboratory located in Girona, Spain. The first cases appeared six weeks after a vaccine with attenuated Brucella melitensis, Rev-1 had been produced for one week. A clinical and epidemiologic investigation conducted among the 164 employees found 22 patients with clinical symptoms and positive serology, and six patients detected by serology only (attack rate: 17.1 per cent). Blood cultures were obtained from two patients and Brucella melitensis was isolated. Employees working in areas with open windows above the laboratory air extracting system had an attack rate of 39.5 per cent, substantially higher than those working in other locations. When vaccine was manufactured again, an electric oven reaching 300 degrees C had been installed in the air extracting system just before its exit to the exterior. Appropriate culture medium plates were exposed to the laboratory air before and after passing through the oven. Brucellae were isolated from the plates exposed to the air before passing through the oven but not after doing so. PMID:3812841

  8. Anti-Brucella activity of Caryopteris mongolica Bunge root extract against Brucella melitensis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    N, Tsevelmaa; B, Narangerel; O, Odgerel; D, Dariimaa; J, Batkhuu

    2018-05-03

    The current treatment for human brucellosis requires a combination of antibiotics for long periods of time, and the reported incidence and prevalence of the disease vary widely in nomadic livestock of Mongolia. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo antibacterial activity of the C. mongolica root extract against B. melitensis. In this study, we used of 6 groups of mice (n = 5). Five groups of BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with the M16 strain of B. melintensis, as follows: (i) one group was used for pretreatment monitoring; (ii) the control group was administered 2% Tween 80 and was used as the non-treatment group; and the other three groups were treated with one oral gavage per day for 21 days with (iii) doxycycline (2 mg/day), (iv) doxycycline (1 mg/day) with root extract (20 mg/day), and (v) C. mongolica root extract (20 mg/day). The one group that was kept non-infected was used as a healthy control group. This study demonstrated that daily treatment with doxycycline alone and in combination with C. mongolica root extract significantly reduced splenic infection at the end of treatment. However, the spleen index of both the doxycycline-treated and the combination-treated groups of mice decreased by approximately 50% compared to that of the healthy control mouse group. Treatment with the C. mongolica root extract resulted in a 1.47log reduction in splenic infection compared to the non-treatment group, and the spleen index of the C. mongolica-treated group of mice was the same as that of the normal mouse group. In all treatment groups, neutrophil phagocytic activity significantly decreased, and all treatment groups demonstrated splenic regeneration. The present study showed that the C. mongolica root extract may be useful in the treatment of brucellosis patients, in combination with doxycycline or other antibiotics, to reduce the toxicity of high-dosage antibiotics, to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance

  9. Survival of a bacterioferritin deletion mutant of Brucella melitensis 16M in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Denoel, P A; Crawford, R M; Zygmunt, M S; Tibor, A; Weynants, V E; Godfroid, F; Hoover, D L; Letesson, J J

    1997-01-01

    A bacterioferritin (BFR) deletion mutant of Brucella melitensis 16M was generated by gene replacement. The deletion was complemented with a broad-host-range vector carrying the wild-type bfr gene, pBBR-bfr. The survival and growth of the mutant, B. melitensis PAD 2-78, were similar to those of its parental strain in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). These results suggest that BFR is not essential for the intracellular survival of B. melitensis in human MDM. PMID:9317046

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Brucella melitensis Isolates in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    cipruftoxacin, and tl’imethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were determined by the Etest method. All isulates were sensitive to tested drugs during the periuds...rifampin (RIF), strepto- mycin, gentamicin (GE), and trimethoprim -sulfarnethoxazole (SXT); generally, two or three drugs arc used in combination for... trimethoprim -sulfamethoxazole in Kuwait (5) and Mcxicu (9) has similarly been reported. In this study, we sought to evaluate the susceptibility of Brucella

  11. [Preparation and characterization of follwing the national standard anti-Brucella abortus serum, bovine].

    PubMed

    Li, Cui; Guan, Fushi; Dai, Zhihong; Jiang, Hui; Wen, Fang; Lu, Lianshou; Wang, Zaishi

    2011-05-01

    To prepare anti-Brucella abortus serum used for calibrate the agglutination test follwing the national standard, 4 anti-Brucella abortus sera were obtained from 4 cows infected with Brucella abortus naturally. By potency testing, the third serum was selected. Sterility, vaccum degree, residual moisture, uniformity and stability of this standard material were tested and proved to meet the national standard. Referring to the international standard, RBT (Rose-Bengal plate agglutination test), SAT (standard tube agglutination) and CFT (complement fixation test) titers of this standard material were measured to be 1:160 "+" 1:2 400 "++" and 1:800 "++", which are identical with the collaborative assay results. International unit of the standard material is 4 000 IU/mL.

  12. Intracellularly Induced Cyclophilins Play an Important Role in Stress Adaptation and Virulence of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells. PMID:23230297

  13. Efficacies of gentamicin-loaded magnetite block ionomer complexes against chronic Brucella melitensis infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Pothayee, Nipon; Pothayee, Nikorn; Tyler, Ronald; Caudell, David L.; Balasubramaniam, Sharavanan; Hu, Nan; Davis, Richey M.; Riffle, Judy S.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2013-11-01

    Anionic copolymers can enable intracellular delivery of cationic drugs which otherwise cannot cross cell membrane barriers. We tested the efficacy of gentamicin-loaded magnetite block ionomer complexes (MBICs) against intracellular Brucella melitensis. Anionic block copolymers were used to coat nanomagnetite through adsorption of a portion of anions on the particle surfaces, then the remaining anions were complexed with 30-32 weight percentage of gentamicin. The zeta potential changed from -39 to -13 mV after encapsulation of the drug with complementary charge. The gentamicin-loaded MBICs had intensity average hydrodynamic diameters of 62 nm, while the polymer-coated nanomagnetite particles without drug were 34 nm in size. No toxicity as measured by a MTS assay was observed upon incubation of the MBICs with J774A.1 murine macrophage-like cells. Confocal microscopic images showed that the MBICs were taken up by the macrophages and distributed in the cell cytoplasm and endosomal/lysosomal compartments. Upon treatment with gentamicin-loaded MBICs (3.5 Log10), B. melitensis-infected macrophages showed significantly higher clearance of Brucella compared to the treatment with free g (0.9 Log10). Compared to doxycycline alone, a combination of doxycycline and gentamicin (either free or encapsulated in MBICs) showed significantly higher clearance of B. melitensis from chronically infected mice. Histopathological examination of kidneys from the MBICs-treated mice revealed multifocal infiltration of macrophages containing intracytoplasmic iron (MBICs) in peri-renal adipose. Although MBICs showed similar efficacy as free gentamicin against Brucella in mice, our strategy presents an effective way to deliver higher loads of drugs intracellularly and ability to study the bio-distribution of drug carriers.

  14. Seroepidemiology of Brucella abortus infection in bovids in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Silva, I; Dangolla, A; Kulachelvy, K

    2000-07-03

    From 1992 to 1995, 0.15% (n=3916) of the bovids (cattle and buffalo) in Sri Lanka were sampled, using a multi-stage sampling procedure. Serum antibodies for Brucella abortus were detected using the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The age, the agroecological zone and the management system practiced in the farms of the sampled bovids were studied as risk factors for seropositivity. The overall seroprevalence of brucellosis in cattle was 4.7% (n=3076) and 4.2% in buffaloes (n=840). Bovids that were over 3 years of age, from the dry zone (annual rainfall 20-35 in.), and reared under an extensive management system had higher odds of being seropositive. Bovids from the dry zone were at approximately six times higher odds of being seropositive even after controlling for the possible effects of age and management system. Approximately 75% of the seropositive males were from the dry zone. Most bovids (84%) from the dry zone in this study were reared under an extensive management system (free grazing) which allows unrestricted contact between animals. These factors may have contributed to the spread of brucellosis in bovids in the dry zone. This infection might be an important cause of abortion in bovids in Sri Lanka. However, there is also evidence of other causes for abortion, repeat breeding and retained placenta.

  15. Brucella melitensis survival during manufacture of ripened goat cheese at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Méndez-González, Karla Y; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Monroy, Jorge F; López-Merino, Ahide; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the current work was to assess the influence of two temperatures, 4°C and 24°C, on pH and water activity and their association with Brucella melitensis survival during the traditional manufacture of ripened goat cheese. Raw milk from a brucellosis-free goat herd was used for the manufacture of ripened cheese. The cheese was inoculated with 5×10(9) of the B. melitensis 16M strain during the tempering stage. The cheeses were matured for 5, 20, and 50 days at both temperatures. To assess Brucella survival, the pH and a(w) were recorded at each stage of the process (curd cutting, draining whey, immersion in brine, ripening I, ripening II, and ripening III). B. melitensis was detected at ripening stage III (1×10(3) colony-forming unit [CFU]/mL) from cheeses matured at 4°C with a pH of 5.0 and a(w) of 0.90, and at a ripening stage II (1×10(4) CFU/mL) from cheeses ripened at 24°C with a pH of 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. The remaining stages were free from the inoculated pathogen. In addition, viable B. melitensis was recovered in significant amounts (1-2×10(6) CFU/mL) from the whey fractions of both types of cheese ripened at 24°C and 4°C. These results revealed the effects of high temperature (24°C vs. 4°C) on the low pH (4) and a(w) (0.89) that appeared to be associated with the suppression of B. melitensis at the early stages of cheese ripening. In the ripened goat cheeses, B. melitensis survived under a precise combination of temperature during maturation, ripening time, and a(w) in the manufacturing process.

  16. Brucella melitensis T Cell Epitope Recognition in Humans with Brucellosis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, Anthony P.; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Sidney, John; Patra, Kailash P.; Torres, Katherine; Tsolis, Renee M.; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L.; Saito, Mayuko; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Brucella melitensis, one of the causative agents of human brucellosis, causes acute, chronic, and relapsing infection. While T cell immunity in brucellosis has been extensively studied in mice, no recognized human T cell epitopes that might provide new approaches to classifying and prognosticating B. melitensis infection have ever been delineated. Twenty-seven pools of 500 major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) restricted peptides were created by computational prediction of promiscuous MHC-II CD4+ T cell derived from the top 50 proteins recognized by IgG in human sera on a genome level B. melitensis protein microarray. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) analyses were used to quantify and compare Th1 and Th2 responses of leukapheresis-obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Peruvian subjects cured after acute infection (n = 9) and from patients who relapsed (n = 5). Four peptide epitopes derived from 3 B. melitensis proteins (BMEI 1330, a DegP/HtrA protease; BMEII 0029, type IV secretion system component VirB5; and BMEII 0691, a predicted periplasmic binding protein of a peptide transport system) were found repeatedly to produce significant IFN-γ ELISPOT responses in both acute-infection and relapsing patients; none of the peptides distinguished the patient groups. IL-5 responses against the panel of peptides were insignificant. These experiments are the first to systematically identify B. melitensis MHC-II-restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by the human immune response, with the potential for new approaches to brucellosis diagnostics and understanding the immunopathogenesis related to this intracellular pathogen. PMID:24126518

  17. Multiple Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Brucella Typing Reveals Multiple Lineages in Brucella melitensis Currently Endemic in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingjun; Jing, Zhigang; Di, Dongdong; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Zhicheng; Xu, Quangang; Zhang, Xiyue; Wang, Xun; Ni, Bo; Sun, Xiangxiang; Yan, Chengxu; Yang, Zhen; Tian, Lili; Li, Jinping; Fan, Weixing

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. In China, brucellosis is recognized as a reemerging disease mainly caused by Brucella melitensis specie. To better understand the currently endemic B. melitensis strains in China, three Brucella genotyping methods were applied to 110 B. melitensis strains obtained in past several years. By MLVA genotyping, five MLVA-8 genotypes were identified, among which genotypes 42 (1-5-3-13-2-2-3-2) was recognized as the predominant genotype, while genotype 63 (1-5-3-13-2-3-3-2) and a novel genotype of 1-5-3-13-2-4-3-2 were second frequently observed. MLVA-16 discerned a total of 57 MLVA-16 genotypes among these Brucella strains, with 41 genotypes being firstly detected and the other 16 genotypes being previously reported. By BruMLSA21 typing, six sequence types (STs) were identified, among them ST8 is the most frequently seen in China while the other five STs were firstly detected and designated as ST137, ST138, ST139, ST140, and ST141 by international multilocus sequence typing database. Whole-genome sequence (WGS)-single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based typing and phylogenetic analysis resolved Chinese B. melitensis strains into five clusters, reflecting the existence of multiple lineages among these Chinese B. melitensis strains. In phylogeny, Chinese lineages are more closely related to strains collected from East Mediterranean and Middle East countries, such as Turkey, Kuwait, and Iraq. In the next few years, MLVA typing will certainly remain an important epidemiological tool for Brucella infection analysis, as it displays a high discriminatory ability and achieves result largely in agreement with WGS-SNP-based typing. However, WGS-SNP-based typing is found to be the most powerful and reliable method in discerning Brucella strains and will be popular used in the future.

  18. Advancement of knowledge of Brucella over the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Palmer, M V

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, bacteria in the genus Brucella were known to cause infertility and reproductive losses. At that time, the genus was considered to contain only 3 species: Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella suis. Since the early 1960s, at least 7 new species have been identified as belonging to the Brucella genus (Brucella canis, Brucella ceti, Brucella inopinata, Brucella microti, Brucella neotomae, Brucella ovis, and Brucella pinnipedialis) with several additional new species under consideration for inclusion. Although molecular studies have found such high homology that some authors have proposed that all Brucella are actually 1 species, the epidemiologic and diagnostic benefits for separating the genus based on phenotypic characteristics are more compelling. Although pathogenic Brucella spp have preferred reservoir hosts, their ability to infect numerous mammalian hosts has been increasingly documented. The maintenance of infection in new reservoir hosts, such as wildlife, has become an issue for both public health and animal health regulatory personnel. Since the 1960s, new information on how Brucella enters host cells and modifies their intracellular environment has been gained. Although the pathogenesis and histologic lesions of B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis in their preferred hosts have not changed, additional knowledge on the pathology of these brucellae in new hosts, or of new species of Brucella in their preferred hosts, has been obtained. To this day, brucellosis remains a significant human zoonosis that is emerging or reemerging in many parts of the world. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Innocuity and immune response to Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels (Camelus dromedarius)

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, A.; Idrissi, A.H. El; Doumbia, A.; de Balogh, K.

    2014-01-01

    A field trial was conducted in a camel brucellosis-free herd to evaluate antibody response to the Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine in camels and assess shedding of the vaccine strain in milk. Twenty eight camels were divided into four groups according to their age and vaccination route. Groups A (n=3) and B (n=3) consisted of non-pregnant lactating female camels, vaccinated through subcutaneous and conjunctival routes, respectively. Groups C (n=10) consisted of 8-11 months old calves vaccinated through conjunctival route. The rest of the herd (n=12) composed of female and young camels were not vaccinated and were considered as the control group. Each animal from groups A, B and C was given the recommended dose of 2 × 109 colony forming units of Rev.1 vaccine irrespective of age or route of vaccination. Blood samples were collected from all the animals at the time of vaccination and at weekly, bi-weekly and monthly interval until 32 weeks post vaccination and from controls at weeks 8 and 24. The serological tests used were modified Rose Bengal Test, sero-agglutination test, and an indirect Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Milk samples were collected from all vaccinated female camels and tested for the presence of Rev.1 vaccine strain. Most vaccinated animals started to show an antibody response at week 2 and remained positive until week 16. By week 20 post-vaccination all animals in the three groups were tested negative for Brucella antibodies. Bacteriological analysis of milk samples did not allow any isolation of Brucella melitensis. All samples were found Brucella negative in PCR analysis. The results of this study indicate that the Rev.1 vaccine induces seroconversion in camels. Rev.1 vaccine strain is not excreted in the milk of camels. These findings are promising as to the safe use of the Rev.1 vaccine in camels. PMID:26623347

  20. Global analysis of the Brucella melitensis proteome: Identification of proteins expressed in laboratory-grown culture.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2002-08-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes brucellosis, a zoonotic disease primarily infecting sheep and goats, characterized by undulant fever, arthritic pain and other neurological disorders in humans. A comprehensive proteomic study of strain 16M was conducted to identify and characterize the proteins expressed in laboratory-grown culture. Using overlapping narrow range immobilized pH gradient strips for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 883 protein spots were detected between pH 3.5 and 11. The average isoelectric point and molecular weight values of the detected spots were 5.22 and 46.5 kDa, respectively. Of the 883 observed protein spots, 440 have been identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry. These proteins represent 187 discrete open reading frames (ORFs) or 6% of the predicted 3197 ORFs contained in the genome. The corresponding ORFs of the identified proteins are distributed evenly between each of the two circular B. melitensis chromosomes, indicating that both replicons are functionally active. The presented proteome map lists those protein spots identified to date in this study. This map may serve as a baseline reference for future proteomic studies aimed at the definition of biochemical pathways associated with stress responses, host specificity, pathogenicity and virulence. It will also assist in characterization of global proteomic effects in gene-knockout mutants. Ultimately, it may aid in our overall understanding of the cell biology of B. melitensis, an important bacterial pathogen.

  1. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Expression and identification of eukaryotic expression vectors of Brucella melitensis lipoprotein OMP19].

    PubMed

    He, Zuoping; Luo, Peifang; Hu, Feihuan; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Chengyao

    2016-04-01

    To construct eukaryotic expression vectors carrying Brucella melitensis outer membrane protein 19 (OMP19), express them in transfected Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells, and analyze their role in cell apoptosis. Brucella melitensis lipidated OMP19 (L-OMP19) gene and unlipidated OMP19 (U-OMP19) gene were amplified by PCR and inserted into the vector pZeroBack/blunt. The correct L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 genes verified by XbaI and BamHI double digestion and sequencing were cloned into the lentivirus expression vector pHAGE-CMV-MCS-IZsGreen to construct vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19, which were separately transfected into 293FT cells, Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 in the cells were detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. Flow cytometry combined with annexin V-PE/7-AAD staining was used to detect the cell apoptosis. The lentiviral vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19 were constructed correctly and the recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in the above cells were well recognized by the specific antibodies against L-OMP19 in Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 induced JEG-3 cell death, but did not induce the apoptosis of Huh7.5.1 cells. The eukaryotic expression vectors of L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 have been constructed successfully. Recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in cells have a good antigenicity, which could be used as experimental materials for the research on the relationship between host cells and lipoproteins in Brucella infection.

  3. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and he...

  4. Rapid Quantitative Detection of Brucella melitensis by a Label-Free Impedance Immunosensor Based on a Gold Nanoparticle-Modified Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyun; Zuo, Yueming; Cui, Chuanjin; Yang, Wei; Ma, Haili; Wang, Xiaowen

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for quantitative monitoring of Brucella melitensis using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is reported for the first time. The label-free immunosensors were fabricated by immobilizing Brucella melitensis antibody on the surface of gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (GNP-SPCEs). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and EIS were used to characterize the Brucella melitensis antigen interaction on the surface of GNP-SPCEs with antibody. A general electronic equivalent model of an electrochemical cell was introduced for interpretation of the impedance components of the system. The results showed that the change in electron-transfer resistance (Rct) was significantly different due to the binding of Brucella melitensis cells. A linear relationship between the Rct variation and logarithmic value of the cell concentration was found from 4 × 104 to 4 × 106 CFU/mL in pure culture. The label-free impedance biosensor was able to detect as low as 1 × 104 and 4 × 105 CFU/mL of Brucella melitensis in pure culture and milk samples, respectively, in less than 1.5 h. Moreover, a good selectivity versus Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus cells was obtained for our developed immunosensor demonstrating its specificity towards only Brucella melitensis. PMID:23881126

  5. Rapid quantitative detection of Brucella melitensis by a label-free impedance immunosensor based on a gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyun; Zuo, Yueming; Cui, Chuanjin; Yang, Wei; Ma, Haili; Wang, Xiaowen

    2013-07-04

    A rapid and simple method for quantitative monitoring of Brucella melitensis using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is reported for the first time. The label-free immunosensors were fabricated by immobilizing Brucella melitensis antibody on the surface of gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (GNP-SPCEs). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and EIS were used to characterize the Brucella melitensis antigen interaction on the surface of GNP-SPCEs with antibody. A general electronic equivalent model of an electrochemical cell was introduced for interpretation of the impedance components of the system. The results showed that the change in electron-transfer resistance (Rct) was significantly different due to the binding of Brucella melitensis cells. A linear relationship between the Rct variation and logarithmic value of the cell concentration was found from 4 × 10(4) to 4 × 10(6) CFU/mL in pure culture. The label-free impedance biosensor was able to detect as low as 1 × 10(4) and 4 × 10(5) CFU/mL of Brucella melitensis in pure culture and milk samples, respectively, in less than 1.5 h. Moreover, a good selectivity versus Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus cells was obtained for our developed immunosensor demonstrating its specificity towards only Brucella melitensis.

  6. The effect of tigecycline and ertapenem against clinical isolates of Brucella melitensis detected by E-test on different media.

    PubMed

    Tanyel, E; Coban, A Y; Fisgin, N Tasdelen; Tulek, N

    2010-01-01

    In this study, in vitro activity of tigecycline (TIG) and ertapenem (ERT) against clinical isolates of Brucella melitensis and the effect of different media on in vitro test results were investigated. The in vitro effects of TIG and ERT to 38 B. melitensis isolates were comparatively investigated in brucella agar and 5% sheep blood agar. MIC value of ERT was 0.032 μg/mL in 23 of 38 and 20 of 38 isolates on blood and brucella agar, respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of TIG were substantially different ranging between 0.064-0.25 μg/mL on blood agar. However, MIC values of TIG were similar on brucella agar with 0.25 μg/mL in 15 of 38 isolates and 0.5 μg/mL in 10 of 38 isolates. In conclusion, although ERT and TIG were effective against B. melitensis isolates in vitro, further studies are needed in order to determine the use of these novel drugs in treatment of brucellosis.

  7. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus. II. Elimination of some sporadic serological reactions by chelation of divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, K; Samagh, B S; Speckmann, G; Stemshorn, B

    1979-01-01

    The standard agglutination tests for detecting antibody to Brucella abortus were modified by addition of chelating agents (EDTA and EGTA) to the antigens. Approximately 80% of "singleton" agglutination test reactions, negative on the diagnostic complement fixation test, obtained with cattle sera were eliminated while no decrease in titer was apparent when sera from B. abortus infected or vaccinated cattle were tested. PMID:121242

  8. New Features in the Lipid A Structure of Brucella suis and Brucella abortus Lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casabuono, Adriana C.; Czibener, Cecilia; Del Giudice, Mariela G.; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Ugalde, Juan E.; Couto, Alicia S.

    2017-12-01

    Brucellaceae are Gram-negative bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the most distributed worldwide zoonosis, transmitted to humans by contact with either infected animals or their products. The lipopolysaccharide exposed on the cell surface has been intensively studied and is considered a major virulence factor of Brucella. In the last years, structural studies allowed the determination of new structures in the core oligosaccharide and the O-antigen of this lipopolysaccharide. In this work, we have reinvestigated the lipid A structure isolated from B. suis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharides. A detailed study by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in the positive and negative ion modes of the lipid A moieties purified from both species was performed. Interestingly, a new feature was detected: the presence of a pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue substituting the backbone. LID-MS/MS analysis of some of the detected ions allowed assurance that the Lipid A structure composed by the diGlcN3N disaccharide, mainly hexa-acylated and penta-acylated, bearing one phosphate and one pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. New Features in the Lipid A Structure of Brucella suis and Brucella abortus Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana C; Czibener, Cecilia; Del Giudice, Mariela G; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Ugalde, Juan E; Couto, Alicia S

    2017-12-01

    Brucellaceae are Gram-negative bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the most distributed worldwide zoonosis, transmitted to humans by contact with either infected animals or their products. The lipopolysaccharide exposed on the cell surface has been intensively studied and is considered a major virulence factor of Brucella. In the last years, structural studies allowed the determination of new structures in the core oligosaccharide and the O-antigen of this lipopolysaccharide. In this work, we have reinvestigated the lipid A structure isolated from B. suis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharides. A detailed study by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in the positive and negative ion modes of the lipid A moieties purified from both species was performed. Interestingly, a new feature was detected: the presence of a pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue substituting the backbone. LID-MS/MS analysis of some of the detected ions allowed assurance that the Lipid A structure composed by the diGlcN3N disaccharide, mainly hexa-acylated and penta-acylated, bearing one phosphate and one pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  10. The prevalence and distribution of Brucella melitensis in goats in Malaysia from 2000 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Bamaiyi, P H; Hassan, L; Khairani-Bejo, S; ZainalAbidin, M; Ramlan, M; Adzhar, A; Abdullah, N; Hamidah, N H M; Norsuhanna, M M; Hashim, S N

    2015-05-01

    A study was conducted to describe the prevalence and distribution of zoonotic Brucella melitensis in goats in Peninsular Malaysia. Using serosurveillance data of the last decade (2000-2009) involving 119,799 goats and 3555 farms, the seroprevalence of brucellosis among goats was 0.91% (95% CI=0.86-0.96) and among farms was 7.09% (95% CI=6.27-7.98). The odds of brucellosis was significantly (P<0.05) higher in the later part of the decade, in larger herd size and among the states located in the peninsula as compared to eastern Malaysia. The infection was detected throughout Malaysia but at generally low seroprevalences with states like Perlis that border neighbouring countries having higher seroprevalence of brucellosis than other non-border states. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A B lymphocyte mitogen is a Brucella abortus virulence factor required for persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Juan Manuel; Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Mucci, Juan; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2006-01-01

    Microbial pathogens with the ability to establish chronic infections have evolved strategies to actively modulate the host immune response. Brucellosis is a disease caused by a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that if not treated during the initial phase of the infection becomes chronic as the bacteria persist for the lifespan of the host. How this pathogen and others achieve this action is a largely unanswered question. We report here the identification of a Brucella abortus gene (prpA) directly involved in the immune modulation of the host. PrpA belongs to the proline-racemase family and elicits a B lymphocyte polyclonal activation that depends on the integrity of its proline-racemase catalytic site. Stimulation of splenocytes with PrpA also results in IL-10 secretion. Construction of a B. abortus-prpA mutant allowed us to assess the contribution of PrpA to the infection process. Mice infected with B. abortus induced an early and transient nonresponsive status of splenocytes to both Escherichia coli LPS and ConA. This phenomenon was not observed when mice were infected with a B. abortus-prpA mutant. Moreover, the B. abortus-prpA mutant had a reduced capacity to establish a chronic infection in mice. We propose that an early and transient nonresponsive immune condition of the host mediated by this B cell polyclonal activator is required for establishing a successful chronic infection by Brucella. PMID:17053080

  12. Evaluation of a new immunocapture test for the diagnosis of ovine brucellosis caused by Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Durán-Ferrer, M; Mendoza, J; Osuna, A; Caporale, V; Lucas, A; León, L; Garrido, F

    2002-11-23

    A new immunocapture technique has been applied to the diagnosis of ovine brucellosis under experimental conditions. The tests were made on a serum bank derived from both young and adult ewes vaccinated conjunctivally with the Rev 1 strain at a dose of 10(8) to 10(9) colony-forming units. Adult ewes were infected experimentally two-and-a-half years after they had been vaccinated and the results were compared with an unvaccinated control group. The condition of each animal in terms of infection with Brucella melitensis was determined by clinical and bacteriological investigations. The development of the immune response was compared by the rose bengal test, the complement fixation test, the Coombs' test and the immunocapture technique for 180 days after the vaccination and for 410 days after the experimental infection, that is, the two following gestations. The results suggest that the new technique is more specific in animals vaccinated conjunctivally, regardless of their age when they were vaccinated. After the experimental infection, significantly (P < 0.05) fewer of the vaccinated sheep which were free of clinical signs and were not excreting B melitensis reacted positively to the test.

  13. Isolation of brucella abortus from two dogs in contact with bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, M G

    1976-01-01

    On a farm where several cattle were serologically positive for bovine brucellosis, three dogs were found to have titres greater than 400 i.u. to Brucella abortus. The titres persisted until the dogs were killed over two months later. Two male dogs were necropsied. B. abortus was isolated from the spleen of both dogs. While farm dogs are not thought to be a major reservoir of bovine brucellosis they may be considered as possible carriers in imfected herds and should be considered during the investigation and eradication of bovine brucellosis. PMID:826308

  14. Immunogenic proteins of Brucella abortus to minimize cross reactions in brucellosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung Yuk; Kim, Jong-Wan; Her, Moon; Kang, Sung-Il; Jung, Suk Chan; Cho, Dong Hee; Kim, Ji-Yeon

    2012-05-04

    To overcome the limitations of serological diagnosis, including false positive reactions caused by other pathogens, specific antigens for diagnosis of brucellosis other than LPS have been required. The present study was conducted to separate and identify immuno-dominant insoluble proteins of Brucella abortus against the antisera of cattle infected with B. abortus, or/and Yersinia enterocolitica, or the sera of non-infected cattle. After separating insoluble proteins of B. abortus by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), their immuno-reactivity was determined by western blotting. A portion of the immunogenic spots against the positive antisera of B. abortus that have the potential for use as specific antigens were identified by MS/MS analysis. Overall, 18 immunogenic insoluble proteins of B. abortus 1119-3 showed immuno-reactivity against only the positive antisera of B. abortus, but failed to have immunogenicity toward both the positive sera of Y. enterocolitica and the negative sera of B. abortus. Identification of these proteins revealed the following: F0F1 ATP synthase subunit β, solute-binding family 5 protein, 28 kDa OMP, Leu/Ile/Val-binding family protein, Histidinol dehyddrogenase, Hypothetical protein, Twin-arginine translocation pathway signal sequence domain-containing protein, Dihydroorotase, Serine protease family protein, β-hydroxyacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) dehydratase FabA, Short-chain dehydrogenase-/reductase carbonic anhydrase, Orinithine carbamoyltransferase, Leucyl aminopeptidase, Cold shock DNA-binding domain-containing protein, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and Methionine aminopeptidase. The 18 immunogenic proteins separated in the present study can be considered candidate antigens to minimize cross reaction in the diagnosis of brucellosis and useful sources for Brucella vaccine development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Limited Genetic Diversity of Brucella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gándara, Benjamín; Merino, Ahidé López; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici. The Brucella strains tested that were representatives of the six electrophoretic types had the same rRNA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns and identical ribotypes. All 99 isolates had similar chromosome profiles as revealed by the Eckhardt procedure. PMID:11136777

  16. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus I. A water soluble antigen precipitated by sera of some naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1977-01-01

    Selected sera from cattle naturally infected with Brucella abortus precipitate water soluble antigens extracted by sonication from B. abortus. One of these antigens resembles antigen E (Baughn and Freeman) as it is excluded from Sephadex G-200 gels, migrates anodally when electrophoresed at pH 8.6, resists heating at 100 degrees C for ten minutes and appears to be susceptible to papain digestion. Precipitins specific for this antigen remained in sera from which all detectable Brucella agglutinating antibody had been removed by adsorption with live or heat killed B. abortus. The antigen has been extracted from smooth and rough strains of B abortus. Precipitins specific for this antigen have been detected in antisera produced against Brucella canis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:405088

  17. Improved immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid by Brucella abortus S19 LPS adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Gharegozlou, Behnaz

    2014-09-01

    Adjuvants are used to increase the immunogenicity of new generation vaccines, especially those based on recombinant proteins. Despite immunostimulatory properties, the use of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an adjuvant has been hampered due to its toxicity and pyrogenicity. Brucella abortus LPS is less toxic and has no pyrogenic properties compared to LPS from other gram negative bacteria. To evaluate the adjuvant effect of B. abortus (vaccine strain, S19) LPS for tetanus toxoid antigen (TT) and to investigate the protective effect of different tetanus vaccine preparations. LPS was extracted and purified from B. abortus S19 and KDO, glycan, phosphate content, and protein contamination were measured. Adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) was used as a linker for conjugation of TT to LPS. Different amounts of B. abortus LPS, TT, TT conjugated with LPS, and TT mixed with LPS or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) were injected into mice and antibody production against TT was measured. The protective effect of induced antibodies was determined by LD50. Immunization of mice with TT+LPS produced the highest anti-TT antibody titer in comparison to the group immunized with TT without any adjuvant or the groups immunized with TT-LPS or TT+CFA. Tetanus toxid-S19 LPS also produced a 100% protective effect against TT in immunized mice. These data indicate that B. abortus LPS enhances the immune responses to TT and suggest the possible use of B. abortus LPS as an adjuvant in vaccine preparations.

  18. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L.; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN. PMID:25946018

  19. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 {times} 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peakmore » differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished.« less

  20. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Pires, Simone F.; Chapeaurouge, Alexander D.; Perales, Jonas; Santos, Renato L.; Andrade, Hélida M.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h) was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF). Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation. PMID:27104343

  1. Differentiation of the serological response to Yersinia enterocolitica and Brucella abortus in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Corbel, M. J.; Cullen, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    The serological responses of cattle to inoculation with Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica type IX were compared. Complete cross-reactions were found in serum agglutination, antiglobulin, complement fixation and Rose Bengal plate tests. The cross-reaction between Br. abortus and Y. enterocolitica IX was confirmed by immunodiffusion tests. Although antibodies specific for each organism could also be detected by immunodiffusion tests with high titre rabbit or bovine sera, these tests were insufficiently sensitive for routine diagnostic use. A quantitative Rose Bengal plate test, using Rose Bengal stained Br. abortus and Y. enterocolitica IX, was developed which enabled the antibody responses to the two organisms to be differentiated. The specificity of this test was confirmed by cross-absorption experiments and its sensitivity was sufficient to permit evaluation of all bovine sera giving positive reactions to the serum agglutination test. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4992575

  2. PPARγ-mediated increase in glucose availability sustains chronic Brucella abortus infection in alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Maria G.; Spees, Alanna M.; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; Nguyen, Kim; Roux, Christelle M.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Atluri, Vidya L.; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Keestra, A. Marijke; Monack, Denise M.; Luciw, Paul A.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Santos, Renato L.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Eradication of persistent intracellular bacterial pathogens with antibiotic therapy is often slow or incomplete. However, strategies to augment antibiotics are hampered by our poor understanding of the nutritional environment that sustains chronic infection. Here we show that the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus survives and replicates preferentially in alternatively activated macrophages (AAM), which are more abundant during chronic infection. A metabolic shift induced by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which increases intracellular glucose availability, is identified as a causal mechanism promoting enhanced bacterial survival in AAM. Glucose uptake was crucial for increased replication of B. abortus in AAM, and chronic infection, as inactivation of the bacterial glucose transporter gluP reduced both intracellular survival in AAM and persistence in mice. Thus, a shift in intracellular nutrient availability induced by PPARγ promotes chronic persistence of B. abortus within AAM and targeting this pathway may aid in eradicating chronic infection. PMID:23954155

  3. [Detection of a clonal complex with Brucella abortus biovar 2 genotype as founder in B. abortus isolates from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Daiana; Conde, Sandra B; Salustio, Eduardo; Samartino, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. Up to date, eight biovars of B. abortus have been described. In Argentina, biovar 1 is the most frequently isolated. However, biovar 2, which is more pathogenic than biovar 1, is also found. Molecular methods for subtyping isolates are necessary for allowing epidemiological surveillance and control of eradication programs. Due to the genetic homogeneity of the genus Brucella, the development of molecular typing tools has been difficult. The publication of microorganism genomes facilitates the design of this approach. The aim of this work was to employ a Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) scheme for strains from Argentina isolated in our laboratory. From the 56 isolates analyzed, 47 different genotypic profiles were obtained. All the strains typed as biovar 2 showed the same profile. This scheme allowed assigning each isolate to the biovar it belongs to. All the genotypes were related using the goeBURST analysis and biovar 2 was proposed as founder. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic analysis of Brucella abortus cell envelope and identification of immunogenic candidate proteins for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Joseph P; Comerci, Diego; Alefantis, Timothy G; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian; Chafin, Ryan; Grewal, Paul; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2006-07-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiologic agent of bovine brucellosis and causes a chronic disease in humans known as undulant fever. In livestock the disease is characterized by abortion and sterility. Live, attenuated vaccines such as S19 and RB51 have been used to control the spread of the disease in animals; however, they are considered unsafe for human use and they induce abortion in pregnant cattle. For the development of a safer and equally efficacious vaccine, immunoproteomics was utilized to identify novel candidate proteins from B. abortus cell envelope (CE). A total of 163 proteins were identified using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS. Some of the major protein components include outer-membrane protein (OMP) 25, OMP31, Omp2b porin, and 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL. 2-DE Western blot analyses probed with antiserum from bovine and a human patient infected with Brucella identified several new immunogenic proteins such as fumarate reductase flavoprotein subunit, F0F1-type ATP synthase alpha subunit, and cysteine synthase A. The elucidation of the immunome of B. abortus CE identified a number of candidate proteins for developing vaccines against Brucella infection in bovine and humans.

  5. Purification and properties of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase extracted from Brucella abortus strain 19

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, L.B.

    Recent work showed that a recombinant 20 kDa protein from Brucella abortus expressed in E. coli is a Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Western blot and ELISA results indicated that cattle with brucellosis have antibody to SOD. Here the authors report the purification and properties of the native B. abortus Cu-Zn SOD. SOD was extracted from methanol-killed Brucella abortus strain 19 with 0.1 M sodium citrate-1.0 M sodium chloride solution. The extract was dialyzed and protein precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 70-100% saturation was collected. The SOD was purified by HPLC anion exchange chromatography. SOD activity was assayed with a coupledmore » enzyme assay using xanthine oxidase-cytochrome C reduction assay. The authors determined that the Brucella SOD is present in two molecular forms both inhibitable with KCN with Ki's of 0.32 mM and 4.98 mM, respectively. No other form of SOD was identified in the extract. Polyclonal antibody to SOD and polyclonal antibody to SOD synthetic peptide residues 134-143 inhibited SOD activity by 50% and 13%, respectively. Both SOD and the synthetic peptide inhibited binding of anti-SOD antibody to SOD by 60% and 20%, respectively. Based on these results the SOD and its amphipathic peptide will be considered as candidates for the design of synthetic multiple peptide vaccines and diagnostic reagents for bovine brucellosis.« less

  6. Molecular typing of isolates obtained from aborted foetuses in Brucella-free Holstein dairy cattle herd after immunisation with Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Böttcher, Denny; El-Diasty, Mohamed; El-Beskawy, Mohamed; Rasheed, Nesma; Schmoock, Gernot; Roesler, Uwe; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis is endemic in Egypt in spite of application of surveillance and control measures. An increase of abortions was reported in a Holstein dairy cattle herd with 600 animals in Damietta governorate in Egypt after immunisation with Brucella (B.) abortus RB51 vaccine. Twenty one (10.6%) of 197 vaccinated cows aborted after 3 months. All aborted cows had been tested seronegative for brucellosis in the past 3 years. B. abortus was isolated from four foetuses. Conventional biochemical and bacteriological identification and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed two B. abortus biovar (bv.) 1 smooth and two B. abortus rough strains. None of the B. abortus isolates were identified as RB51. Genotyping analysis by multiple locus of variable number tandem repeats analysis based on 16 markers (MLVA-16) revealed two different profiles with low genetic diversity. B. abortus bv1 was introduced in the herd and caused abortions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole genome sequencing of Brucella melitensis isolated from 57 patients in Germany reveals high diversity in strains from Middle East.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Enrico; Walter, Mathias C; Pfalzgraf, Marie-Theres; Northoff, Bernd H; Holdt, Lesca M; Scholz, Holger C; Zoeller, Lothar; Zange, Sabine; Antwerpen, Markus H

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis, a worldwide common bacterial zoonotic disease, has become quite rare in Northern and Western Europe. However, since 2014 a significant increase of imported infections caused by Brucella (B.) melitensis has been noticed in Germany. Patients predominantly originated from Middle East including Turkey and Syria. These circumstances afforded an opportunity to gain insights into the population structure of Brucella strains. Brucella-isolates from 57 patients were recovered between January 2014 and June 2016 with culture confirmed brucellosis by the National Consultant Laboratory for Brucella. Their whole genome sequences were generated using the Illumina MiSeq platform. A whole genome-based SNP typing assay was developed in order to resolve geographically attributed genetic clusters. Results were compared to MLVA typing results, the current gold-standard of Brucella typing. In addition, sequences were examined for possible genetic variation within target regions of molecular diagnostic assays. Phylogenetic analyses revealed spatial clustering and distinguished strains from different patients in either case, whereas multiple isolates from a single patient or technical replicates showed identical SNP and MLVA profiles. By including WGS data from the NCBI database, five major genotypes were identified. Notably, strains originating from Turkey showed a high diversity and grouped into seven subclusters of genotype II. MLVA analysis congruently clustered all isolates and predominantly matched the East Mediterranean genetic clade. This study confirms whole-genome based SNP-analysis as a powerful tool for accurate typing of B. melitensis. Furthermore it allows special allocation and therefore provides useful information on the geographic origin for trace-back analysis. However, the lack of reliable metadata in public databases often prevents a resolution below geographic regions or country levels and corresponding precise trace-back analysis. Once this obstacle is

  8. Whole genome sequencing of Brucella melitensis isolated from 57 patients in Germany reveals high diversity in strains from Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Enrico; Walter, Mathias C.; Pfalzgraf, Marie-Theres; Northoff, Bernd H.; Holdt, Lesca M.; Scholz, Holger C.; Zoeller, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis, a worldwide common bacterial zoonotic disease, has become quite rare in Northern and Western Europe. However, since 2014 a significant increase of imported infections caused by Brucella (B.) melitensis has been noticed in Germany. Patients predominantly originated from Middle East including Turkey and Syria. These circumstances afforded an opportunity to gain insights into the population structure of Brucella strains. Brucella-isolates from 57 patients were recovered between January 2014 and June 2016 with culture confirmed brucellosis by the National Consultant Laboratory for Brucella. Their whole genome sequences were generated using the Illumina MiSeq platform. A whole genome-based SNP typing assay was developed in order to resolve geographically attributed genetic clusters. Results were compared to MLVA typing results, the current gold-standard of Brucella typing. In addition, sequences were examined for possible genetic variation within target regions of molecular diagnostic assays. Phylogenetic analyses revealed spatial clustering and distinguished strains from different patients in either case, whereas multiple isolates from a single patient or technical replicates showed identical SNP and MLVA profiles. By including WGS data from the NCBI database, five major genotypes were identified. Notably, strains originating from Turkey showed a high diversity and grouped into seven subclusters of genotype II. MLVA analysis congruently clustered all isolates and predominantly matched the East Mediterranean genetic clade. This study confirms whole-genome based SNP-analysis as a powerful tool for accurate typing of B. melitensis. Furthermore it allows special allocation and therefore provides useful information on the geographic origin for trace-back analysis. However, the lack of reliable metadata in public databases often prevents a resolution below geographic regions or country levels and corresponding precise trace-back analysis. Once this obstacle is

  9. The Bactec FX Blood Culture System Detects Brucella melitensis Bacteremia in Adult Patients within the Routine 1-Week Incubation Period.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Moshe; Nesher, Lior; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2017-03-01

    The performance of the Bactec FX blood culture system for detecting Brucella bacteremia within the routine 1-week incubation period was assessed in a prospective study conducted in an area in southern Israel in which Brucella melitensis is endemic. Aerobic vials (BD Bactec Plus Aerobic/F medium) inoculated with blood specimens obtained from adult patients with positive Rose-Bengal screening test results were monitored for 4 consecutive weeks, and blind subcultures of negative vials were performed on solid media on days 7 and 28. During a 16-month period, a total of 31 (35.2%) of 88 cultures, obtained from 19 (38.0%) of 50 patients, were positive for Brucella melitensis The blood culture instrument identified 30 (96.8%) of 31 positive vials within 7 days of incubation; the single positive vial that was missed by the automated readings was detected only by the blind subculture performed on day 28. It is concluded that the Bactec FX system is able to detect the vast majority of episodes of Brucella bacteremia within the 1-week incubation protocol instituted in most clinical microbiology laboratories and without the need to perform blind subcultures of negative vials, enabling early diagnosis and saving labor and incubation time and space. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion, Suppressed Gamma Interferon Production, and Delayed Memory Response Induced by Chronic Brucella melitensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8+ T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8+ T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8+ cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8+ LFA1HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) and long-lived memory (CD8+ CD27HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8+ T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8+ T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8+ T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection. PMID:26416901

  11. Brucellosis vaccines based on the open reading frames from genomic island 3 of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Leonardo; Alvarez, Francisco; Betancur, Daniel; Oñate, Angel

    2018-05-17

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of brucellosis, a zoonotic disease affecting cattle and humans. This disease has been partially controlled in cattle by immunization with live attenuated B. abortus S19 and RB51 strains. However, use of these vaccine strains has been associated with safety issues in animals and humans. New vaccines have since emerged in the prevention of brucellosis, particularly DNA vaccines, which have shown effectiveness and a good safety profile. Their protection efficacy in mice is associated with the induction of Th1 type and cytotoxic T cell mediated immune response against structural antigens and virulence factors expressed during B. abortus infection. Some antigenic candidate for vaccine design against brucellosis (mainly DNA vaccines) have been obtained from genomic island 3 (GI-3) of B. abortus, which encodes several open reading frames (ORFs) involved in the intracellular survival and virulence of this pathogen. The immunogenicity and protection conferred by these DNA vaccines in a murine model is reviewed in this article, suggesting that some of them could be safe and effective vaccine candidates against to prevent B. abortus infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In Vitro Antibacterial Effects of Five Volatile Oil Extracts Against Intramacrophage Brucella Abortus 544

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Saour, George; Hamou, Razan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause a highly contagious disease in sheep, goats, cattle and one-humped camels. It is responsible for one of the most important zoonosis in human. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Mentha piperita, Origanum majorana, Citrus lemon, Cinnamomum verum and Myristica fragrans essential volatile oil extracts on human macrophages infected by B. abortus 544. Methods: Essential volatile oil extracts from M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon, C. verum and M. fragrans were extracted. Human macrophages were cultured at a density of 2×105 cells per well in sterile 96-well microtiter plates, and infected with B. abortus 544 at a ratio of 1:100 bacteria/cell. Then essential volatile oil extracts were added at a concentration of 1%. At specified times; cells were washed, lysed with 0.1% Triton, and plated on 2YT agar to determine the number of intracellular bacteria. Results: Cinnamomum verum volatile oil at a concentration of 1% had the highest antibacterial activity against B. abortus 544 inside human macrophages. Its inhibitory effect observed from 24 h and continued till 144 h after the infection. Moreover, C. verum (0.1%) in combination with 1% concentration of M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon or M. fragrans volatile oil extracts produced a synergistic inhibitory effect against B. abortus 544. Conclusion: The results indicate that, among the five selected oil extracts, C. verum volatile oil applied either separately or in combination with other oil extracts had the most effective antimicrobial activity against Brucella. PMID:23115441

  13. Structural elucidation of the Brucella melitensis M antigen by high-resolution NMR at 500 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bundle, D.R.; Cherwonogrodzky, J.W.; Perry, M.B.

    The Brucella M antigen from the species type strain Brucella melitensis 16M has been identified as a component of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS). O polysaccharide liberated from this LPS by mild acid hydrolysis exhibited M activity in serological tests and was shown to be a homopolymer of 4-formamido-4,6-dideoxy-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues arranged in an oligosaccharide repeating unit as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native lipopolysaccharide. Structural analysis of the O polysaccharide by NMR methods was difficult due to apparent microheterogeneity of the repeating unit, which was in fact caused by the presence of rotational isomers ofmore » the N-formyl moiety. This problem was resolved by chemical modification of the polysaccharide to its amino and N-acetyl derivatives, the 500-MHz /sup 1/H and 125-MHz /sup 13/C NMR spectra of which could be analyzed in terms of a unique structure through application of pH-dependent ..beta..-shifts and two-dimensional techniques that included COSY, relayed COSY, and NOESY experiments together with heteronuclear C/H shift correlation spectroscopy. On the basis of these experiments and supported by methylation and periodate oxidation data, the structure of the M polysaccharide was determined as a linear polymer of unbranched pentasaccharide repeating units consisting of four 1,2-linked and one 1,3-lined 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues. The marked structural similarity of the M antigen and the A antigen, which is known to be a 1,2-linked homopolysaccharide of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl units, accounts for cross-serological reactions of the two and the long-standing confusion surrounding the nature of their antigenic determinants.« less

  14. Advancement of knowledge of Brucella over the past 50 years

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fifty years ago, bacteria in the genus Brucella were known to cause infertility and reproductive losses. The genus was considered to contain only three species, B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis. Since the early 1960’s, at least seven new species have been identified as belonging to the Brucell...

  15. Modeling, molecular docking, probing catalytic binding mode of acetyl-CoA malate synthase G in Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Adi, Pradeepkiran Jangampalli; Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2016-12-01

    There are enormous evidences and previous reports standpoint that the enzyme of glyoxylate pathway malate synthase G (MSG) is a potential virulence factor in several pathogenic organisms, including Brucella melitensis 16M. Where the lack of crystal structures for best candidate proteins like MSG of B. melitensis 16M creates big lacuna to understand the molecular pathogenesis of brucellosis. In the present study, we have constructed a 3-D structure of MSG of Brucella melitensis 16M in MODELLER with the help of crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis malate synthase (PDB ID: 2GQ3) as template. The stereo chemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by SAVES server; remarkably we identified the catalytic functional core domain located at 4 th cleft with conserved catalytic amino acids, start at ILE 59 to VAL 586 manifest the function of the protein. Furthermore, virtual screening and docking results reveals that best leadmolecules binds at the core domain pocket of MSG catalytic residues and these ligand leads could be the best prospective inhibitors to treat brucellosis.

  16. Whole-genome analyses of speciation events in pathogenic Brucellae

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick S. G.; Comerci, Diego J.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    Despite their high DNA identity and a proposal to group classical Brucella species as biovars of Brucella melitensis, the commonly recognized Brucella species can be distinguished by distinct biochemical and fatty acid characters, as well as by a marked host range (e.g., Brucella suis for swine, B. melitensis for sheep and goats, and Brucella abortus for cattle). Here we present the genome of B. abortus 2308, the virulent prototype biovar 1 strain, and its comparison to the two other human pathogenic Brucella species and to B. abortus field isolate 9-941. The global distribution of pseudogenes, deletions, and insertions supports previousmore » indications that B. abortus and B. melitensis share a common ancestor that diverged from B. suis. With the exception of a dozen genes, the genetic complements of both B. abortus strains are identical, whereas the three species differ in gene content and pseudogenes. The pattern of species-specific gene inactivations affecting transcriptional regulators and outer membrane proteins suggests that these inactivations may play an important role in the establishment of host specificity and may have been a primary driver of speciation in the genus Brucella. Despite being nonmotile, the brucellae contain flagellum gene clusters and display species-specific flagellar gene inactivations, which lead to the putative generation of different versions of flagellum-derived structures and may contribute to differences in host specificity and virulence. Metabolic changes such as the lack of complete metabolic pathways for the synthesis of numerous compounds (e.g., glycogen, biotin, NAD, and choline) are consistent with adaptation of brucellae to an intracellular life-style.« less

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Detergent Resistant Membrane Domains during Early Interaction of Macrophages with Rough and Smooth Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Sabine A.; Iyer, Srinivas; Sanchez, Timothy; Forst, Christian V.; Bowden, Brent; Carlson, Kay; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains discrete nanometer-sized domains that are resistant to non-ionic detergents, and which are called detergent resistant membrane domains (DRMDs) or lipid rafts. Exposure of host cells to pathogenic bacteria has been shown to induce the re-distribution of specific host proteins between DRMDs and detergent soluble membranes, which leads to the initiation of cell signaling that enable pathogens to access host cells. DRMDs have been shown to play a role in the invasion of Brucella into host macrophages and the formation of replicative phagosomes called Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs). In this study we sought to characterize changes to the protein expression profiles in DRMDs and to respective cellular pathways and networks of Mono Mac 6 cells in response to the adherence of rough VTRM1 and smooth 16 M B. melitensis strains. DRMDs were extracted from Mono Mac 6 cells exposed for 2 minutes at 4°C to Brucella (no infection occurs) and from unexposed control cells. Protein expression was determined using the non-gel based quantitative iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation) mass spectrometry technique. Using the identified iTRAQ proteins we performed enrichment analyses and probed constructed human biochemical networks for interactions and metabolic reactions. We identified 149 proteins, which either became enriched, depleted or whose amounts did not change in DRMDs upon Brucella exposure. Several of these proteins were distinctly enriched or depleted in DRMDs upon exposure to rough and smooth B. melitensis strains which results in the differential engagement of cellular pathways and networks immediately upon Brucella encounter. For some of the proteins such as myosin 9, small G protein signaling modulator 3, lysine-specific demethylase 5D, erlin-2, and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2, we observed extreme differential depletion or enrichment in DRMDs. The identified proteins and pathways could provide

  18. Effectiveness of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant for tuberculin PPD.

    PubMed

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Zeinali, Majid; Mosaveri, Nader; Mohammad Taheri, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has T-helper 1 (Th1) immunostimulatory activities but because of toxicity and pyrogenicity cannot be used as an adjuvant. Brucella abortus LPS has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. In the current study, the immunostimulatory properties of B. abortus LPS were evaluated for its adjuvant activity. Tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was extracted and after anion-exchange chromatography on Q-sepharose column, two fractions (17 and 23), which dominantly contained 30- and 70-kDa antigens, were collected for immunological studies. BALB/c mice were immunized with four different antigen preparations (BCG, PPD, 17th and 23rd PPD fractions) along with complete Freund's adjuvant or B. abortus LPS. The T-cell immune response of mice was assessed by measurement of Th1-type cytokine (IFN-γ) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-5 and IL-10) levels. Also, the humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific IgG levels. Our results showed that immunization of mice with 17th PPD fraction along with B. abortus LPS can induce a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high IFN-γ/IL-5 ratio, while immunization with PPD or 23rd PPD fraction along with the same adjuvant resulted to a mixed Th1/Th2-type cytokine response. Copyright © 2010 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of Brucella melitensis Rev.1 vaccine-strain genetic markers: Towards understanding the molecular mechanism behind virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammad Nouh; Ashhab, Yaqoub

    2016-09-22

    Brucella melitensis Rev.1 is an avirulent strain that is widely used as a live vaccine to control brucellosis in small ruminants. Although an assembled draft version of Rev.1 genome has been available since 2009, this genome has not been investigated to characterize this important vaccine. In the present work, we used the draft genome of Rev.1 to perform a thorough genomic comparison and sequence analysis to identify and characterize the panel of its unique genetic markers. The draft genome of Rev.1 was compared with genome sequences of 36 different Brucella melitensis strains from the Brucella project of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The comparative analyses revealed 32 genetic alterations (30 SNPs, 1 single-bp insertion and 1 single-bp deletion) that are exclusively present in the Rev.1 genome. In silico analyses showed that 9 out of the 17 non-synonymous mutations are deleterious. Three ABC transporters are among the disrupted genes that can be linked to virulence attenuation. Out of the 32 mutations, 11 Rev.1 specific markers were selected to test their potential to discriminate Rev.1 using a bi-directional allele-specific PCR assay. Six markers were able to distinguish between Rev.1 and a set of control strains. We succeeded in identifying a panel of 32 genome-specific markers of the B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine strain. Extensive in silico analysis showed that a considerable number of these mutations could severely affect the function of the associated genes. In addition, some of the discovered markers were able to discriminate Rev.1 strain from a group of control strains using practical PCR tests that can be applied in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification and Characterization of a High-Affinity Choline Uptake System of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Claudia K.; Bukata, Lucas; Melli, Luciano; Marchesini, M. Ines; Caramelo, Julio J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid of the eukaryotic cell membrane, is present in the cell envelope of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis. In this pathogen, the biosynthesis of PC proceeds mainly through the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway; hence, it relies on the presence of choline in the milieu. These observations imply that B. abortus encodes an as-yet-unknown choline uptake system. Taking advantage of the requirement of choline uptake for PC synthesis, we devised a method that allowed us to identify a homologue of ChoX, the high-affinity periplasmic binding protein of the ABC transporter ChoXWV. Disruption of the choX gene completely abrogated PC synthesis at low choline concentrations in the medium, thus indicating that it is a high-affinity transporter needed for PC synthesis via the PC synthase (PCS) pathway. However, the synthesis of PC was restored when the mutant was incubated in media with higher choline concentrations, suggesting the presence of an alternative low-affinity choline uptake activity. By means of a fluorescence-based equilibrium-binding assay and using the kinetics of radiolabeled choline uptake, we show that ChoX binds choline with an extremely high affinity, and we also demonstrate that its activity is inhibited by increasing choline concentrations. Cell infection assays indicate that ChoX activity is required during the first phase of B. abortus intracellular traffic, suggesting that choline concentrations in the early and intermediate Brucella-containing vacuoles are limited. Altogether, these results suggest that choline transport and PC synthesis are strictly regulated in B. abortus. PMID:23161032

  1. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus. III. Preparation of antisera against a Brucella component precipitated by sera of some infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K; Samagh, B

    1981-01-01

    Two methods are described for the partial purification of a high molecular weight, heat-resistant component (CO1) of sonicates of smooth and rough Brucella abortus which is precipitated by sera of some infected cattle. Method 1, a combination of gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was used to prepare CO1 from sonicates of a smooth field strain of B. abortus. Method 2, a combination of gel filtration chromatography and heat treatment, was used to obtain CO1, from sonicates of rough B. abortus strain 45/20. Rabbit antisera produced against CO1 prepared by either method contained only CO1 precipitins but were negative in standard agglutination and complement fixation tests conducted with whole cell antigens. Evidence is presented that CO1 is identical to Brucella antigen A2, and it is proposed that in future the designation A2 be employed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6791797

  2. Evaluation of Brucella abortus strain RB51 and strain 19 in pronghorn antelope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elzer, P.H.; Smith, J.; Roffe, T.; Kreeger, T.; Edwards, J.; Davis, D.

    2002-01-01

    Free-roaming elk and bison in the Greater Yellowstone Area remain the only wildlife reservoirs for Brucella abortus in the United States, and the large number of animals and a lack of holding facilities make it unreasonable to individually vaccinate each animal. Therefore, oral delivery is being proposed as a possible option to vaccinate these wild ungulates. One of the main problems associated with oral vaccination is the potential exposure of nontarget species to the vaccines. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two Brucella vaccines, strain 19 (S19) and the rough strain RB51 (SRB51), in pregnant pronghorn antelope. We conclude that S19 and SRB51 rarely colonize maternal and fetal tissues of pregnant pronghorn and were not associated with fetal death. Oral delivery of either vaccine at this dose appears to be nonhazardous to pregnant pronghorn.

  3. Brucella abortus Strain 2308 Wisconsin Genome: Importance of the Definition of Reference Strains

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Castillo-Zeledón, Amanda; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Roop II, R. Martin; Comerci, Diego J.; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Caswell, Clayton C.; Baker, Kate S.; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Moreno, Edgardo; Letesson, Jean J.; De Bolle, Xavier; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial infectious disease affecting a wide range of mammals and a neglected zoonosis caused by species of the genetically homogenous genus Brucella. As in most studies on bacterial diseases, research in brucellosis is carried out by using reference strains as canonical models to understand the mechanisms underlying host pathogen interactions. We performed whole genome sequencing analysis of the reference strain B. abortus 2308 routinely used in our laboratory, including manual curated annotation accessible as an editable version through a link at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucella#Genomics. Comparison of this genome with two publically available 2308 genomes showed significant differences, particularly indels related to insertional elements, suggesting variability related to the transposition of these elements within the same strain. Considering the outcome of high resolution genomic techniques in the bacteriology field, the conventional concept of strain definition needs to be revised. PMID:27746773

  4. Comparison of abortion and infection after experimental challenge of pregnant bison and cattle with Brucella abortus strain 2308

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comparative study was conducted using data from naive bison (n=45) and cattle (n=46) from 8 and 6 studies, respectively, in which a standardized Brucella abortus strain 2308 experimental challenge was administered. The incidence of abortion, fetal infection, uterine or mammary infection, or infec...

  5. A Live Vaccine from Brucella abortus Strain 82 for Control of Cattle Brucellosis in the Russian Federation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the first half of the 20th century, widespread regulatory efforts to control cattle brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics were essentially nonexistent, and control was limited to selective test and slaughter of serologic agglutination reactors. By the 1950...

  6. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  7. GLUTAMATE METABOLISM IN BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAINS OF LOW AND HIGH VIRULENCE

    PubMed Central

    Dasinger, B. L.; Wilson, J. B.

    1962-01-01

    Dasinger, B. L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and J. B. Wilson. Glutamate metabolism in Brucella abortus strains of low and high virulence. J. Bacteriol. 84:911–915. 1962.—Brucella abortus strains of low virulence oxidize glutamate at a high rate, whereas strains of high virulence oxidize glutamate at a relatively low rate. Results indicated that this observation was not related to differences in pathway of glutamate oxidation or to differences in total enzyme activity. Permeability studies showed that the maximal rates of glutamate accumulation were 2.8 μmoles per 2 min per g (wet wt) for a strain of high virulence and 6.2 μmoles per 2 min per g for a strain of low virulence, but equal intracellular steady-state concentrations were attained by both types of strains. Evidence is presented which suggests that the site of glutamate oxidation is separate from the pool of glutamate being measured. Unequal rates of permeability at these sites could be the reason for the differences in rate of glutamate oxidation. PMID:14028057

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of the Brucella abortus BvrR/BvrS Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Viadas, Cristina; Rodríguez, María C.; Sangari, Felix J.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; García-Lobo, Juan M.; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Background The two-component BvrR/BvrS system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction alters the expression of some major outer membrane proteins and the pattern of lipid A acylation. To determine the genes regulated by BvrR/BvrS, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis using B. abortus RNA obtained from wild type and bvrR mutant cells grown in the same conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 127 differentially expressed genes were found: 83 were over expressed and 44 were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Two operons, the phosphotransferase system and the maltose transport system, were down-regulated. Several genes involved in cell envelope or outer membrane biogenesis were differentially expressed: genes for outer membrane proteins (omp25a, omp25d), lipoproteins, LPS and fatty acid biosynthesis, stress response proteins, chaperones, flagellar genes, and twelve genes encoding ABC transport systems. Ten genes related with carbon metabolism (pckA and fumB among others) were up-regulated in the bvrR mutant, and denitrification genes (nirK, norC and nosZ) were also regulated. Notably, seven transcriptional regulators were affected, including VjbR, ExoR and OmpR that were less expressed in the bvrR mutant. Finally, the expression of eleven genes which have been previously related with Brucella virulence was also altered. Conclusions/Significance All these data corroborate the impact of BvrR/BvrS on cell envelope modulation, confirm that this system controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and suggest a cross-talk among some regulators to adjust the Brucella physiology to the shift expected to occur during the transit from the extracellular to the intracellular niche. PMID:20422049

  9. Novel vector vaccine against Brucella abortus based on influenza A viruses expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins: evaluation of protection in pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-10-14

    The present study provides the first information about the protection of a novel influenza viral vector vaccine expressing the Brucella proteins ribosomal L7/L12 or Omp16 containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in pregnant heifers. Immunization of pregnant heifers was conducted via the conjunctival (n=10) or subcutaneous (n=10) route using cross prime and booster vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. The vector vaccine was evaluated in comparison with positive control groups vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 (n=10) or B. abortus RB51 (n=10) and a negative (PBS+Montanide Gel01; n=10) control group. Via both the conjunctival or subcutaneous route, evaluation of protectiveness against abortion, effectiveness of vaccination and index of infection (in heifers and their fetuses or calves) demonstrated the vector vaccine provided good protection against B. abortus 544 infection compared to the negative control group (PBS+Montanide Gel01) and comparable protection to commercial vaccines B. abortus S19 or B. abortus RB51. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Typing Discrepancy Between Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization Revealing an Emerging Biovar 9 Variant of Smooth Phage-Resistant B. abortus Strain 8416 in China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yao-Xia; Li, Xu-Ming; Piao, Dong-Ri; Tian, Guo-Zhong; Jiang, Hai; Jia, En-Hou; Lin, Liang; Cui, Bu-Yun; Chang, Yung-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhu, Yong-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    A newly isolated smooth colony morphology phage-resistant strain 8416 isolated from a 45-year-old cattle farm cleaner with clinical features of brucellosis in China was reported. The most unusual phenotype was its resistance to two Brucella phages Tbilisi and Weybridge, but sensitive to Berkeley 2, a pattern similar to that of Brucella melitensis biovar 1. VITEK 2 biochemical identification system found that both strain 8416 and B. melitensis strains shared positive ILATk, but negative in other B. abortus strains. However, routine biochemical and phenotypic characteristics of strain 8416 were most similar to that of B. abortus biovar 9 except CO2 requirement. In addition, multiple PCR molecular typing assays including AMOS-PCR, B. abortus special PCR (B-ab PCR) and a novel sub-biovar typing PCR, indicated that strain 8416 may belong to either biovar 3b or 9 of B. abortus. Surprisingly, further MLVA typing results showed that strain 8416 was most closely related to B. abortus biovar 3 in the Brucella MLVA database, primarily differing in 4 out of 16 screened loci. Therefore, due to the unusual discrepancy between phenotypic (biochemical reactions and particular phage lysis profile) and molecular typing characteristics, strain 8416 could not be exactly classified to any of the existing B. abortus biovars and might be a new variant of B. abortus biovar 9. The present study also indicates that the present phage typing scheme for Brucella sp. is subject to variation and the routine Brucella biovar typing needs further studies.

  11. In vitro antibacterial effects of five volatile oil extracts against intramacrophage Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Saour, George; Hamou, Razan

    2012-06-01

    Brucellaabortus is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause a highly contagious disease in sheep, goats, cattle and one-humped camels. It is responsible for one of the most important zoonosis in human. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Mentha piperita, Origanum majorana, Citrus lemon, Cinnamomum verum and Myristica fragrans essential volatile oil extracts on human macrophages infected by B. abortus 544. Essential volatile oil extracts from M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon, C. verum and M. fragrans were extracted. Human macrophages were cultured at a density of 2×10(5) cells per well in sterile 96-well microtiter plates, and infected with B. abortus 544 at a ratio of 1:100 bacteria/cell. Then essential volatile oil extracts were added at a concentration of 1%. At specified times; cells were washed, lysed with 0.1% Triton, and plated on 2YT agar to determine the number of intracellular bacteria. Cinnamomum verum volatile oil at a concentration of 1% had the highest antibacterial activity against B. abortus 544 inside human macrophages. Its inhibitory effect observed from 24 h and continued till 144 h after the infection. Moreover, C. verum (0.1%) in combination with 1% concentration of M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon or M. fragrans volatile oil extracts produced a synergistic inhibitory effect against B. abortus 544. The results indicate that, among the five selected oil extracts, C. verum volatile oil applied either separately or in combination with other oil extracts had the most effective antimicrobial activity against Brucella.

  12. Epidemiology of Brucellosis and Genetic Diversity of Brucella abortus in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsova, Elena; Shevtsov, Alexandr; Mukanov, Kasim; Filipenko, Maxim; Kamalova, Dinara; Sytnik, Igor; Syzdykov, Marat; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Akhmetova, Assel; Zharova, Mira; Karibaev, Talgat; Tarlykov, Pavel; Ramanculov, Erlan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a major zoonotic infection in Kazakhstan. However, there is limited data on its incidence in humans and animals, and the genetic diversity of prevalent strains is virtually unstudied. Additionally, there is no detailed overview of Kazakhstan brucellosis control and eradication programs. Here, we analyzed brucellosis epidemiological data, and assessed the effectiveness of eradication strategies employed over the past 70 years to counteract this infection. We also conducted multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Brucella abortus strains found in Kazakhstan. We analyzed official data on the incidence of animal brucellosis in Kazakhstan. The records span more than 70 years of anti-brucellosis campaigns, and contain a brief description of the applied control strategies, their effectiveness, and their impact on the incidence in humans. The MLVA-16 method was used to type 94 strains of B. abortus and serial passages of B. abortus 82, a strain used in vaccines. MLVA-8 and MLVA-11 analyses clustered strains into a total of four and seven genotypes, respectively; it is the first time that four of these genotypes have been described. MLVA-16 analysis divided strains into 28 distinct genotypes having genetic similarity coefficient that varies from 60 to100% and a Hunter & Gaston diversity index of 0.871. MST analysis reconstruction revealed clustering into "Kazakhstani-Chinese (Central Asian)", "European" and "American" lines. Detection of multiple genotypes in a single outbreak confirms that poorly controlled trade of livestock plays a crucial role in the spread of infection. Notably, the MLVA-16 profile of the B. abortus 82 strain was unique and did not change during 33 serial passages. MLVA genotyping may thus be useful for epidemiological monitoring of brucellosis, and for tracking the source(s) of infection. We suggest that countrywide application of MLVA genotyping would improve the control of brucellosis in Kazakhstan. PMID

  13. Epidemiology of Brucellosis and Genetic Diversity of Brucella abortus in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Shevtsova, Elena; Shevtsov, Alexandr; Mukanov, Kasim; Filipenko, Maxim; Kamalova, Dinara; Sytnik, Igor; Syzdykov, Marat; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Akhmetova, Assel; Zharova, Mira; Karibaev, Talgat; Tarlykov, Pavel; Ramanculov, Erlan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a major zoonotic infection in Kazakhstan. However, there is limited data on its incidence in humans and animals, and the genetic diversity of prevalent strains is virtually unstudied. Additionally, there is no detailed overview of Kazakhstan brucellosis control and eradication programs. Here, we analyzed brucellosis epidemiological data, and assessed the effectiveness of eradication strategies employed over the past 70 years to counteract this infection. We also conducted multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Brucella abortus strains found in Kazakhstan. We analyzed official data on the incidence of animal brucellosis in Kazakhstan. The records span more than 70 years of anti-brucellosis campaigns, and contain a brief description of the applied control strategies, their effectiveness, and their impact on the incidence in humans. The MLVA-16 method was used to type 94 strains of B. abortus and serial passages of B. abortus 82, a strain used in vaccines. MLVA-8 and MLVA-11 analyses clustered strains into a total of four and seven genotypes, respectively; it is the first time that four of these genotypes have been described. MLVA-16 analysis divided strains into 28 distinct genotypes having genetic similarity coefficient that varies from 60 to100% and a Hunter & Gaston diversity index of 0.871. MST analysis reconstruction revealed clustering into "Kazakhstani-Chinese (Central Asian)", "European" and "American" lines. Detection of multiple genotypes in a single outbreak confirms that poorly controlled trade of livestock plays a crucial role in the spread of infection. Notably, the MLVA-16 profile of the B. abortus 82 strain was unique and did not change during 33 serial passages. MLVA genotyping may thus be useful for epidemiological monitoring of brucellosis, and for tracking the source(s) of infection. We suggest that countrywide application of MLVA genotyping would improve the control of brucellosis in Kazakhstan.

  14. Brucella abortus choloylglycine hydrolase affects cell envelope composition and host cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Comerci, Diego J

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization.

  15. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  16. Occurrence of oxidative stress in dairy cows seropositives for Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Perin, Géssica; Fávero, Juscivete F; Severo, Diego R T; Silva, Anielen D; Machado, Gustavo; Araújo, Hugo L; Lilenbaum, Walter; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Jordão, Ricardo S; Stefani, Lenita M; Bottari, Nathieli B; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2017-09-01

    Bovine brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus that leads to economic losses due to animal discard and commercial restrictions. Since positive animals for brucellosis are culled, little is known about the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, the aims of this study were to evaluate possible changes in the activity of deaminase adenosine (ADA) and the oxidative stress in cows seropositives for brucellosis (Experiment I), and to evaluate the seroprevalence of B. abortus in dairy cows from the Western state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil (Experiment II). The Experiment I evaluated 20 pregnant cows: ten seropositives for B. abortus and ten seronegatives that were used as controls. The ADA activity and markers of oxidative stress (TBARS, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated in these animals. A reduction in the activity of ADA and catalase enzymes in seropositive animals was observed (p < 0.001). Conversely, there was an increase in TBARS levels and superoxide dismutase activity in cows infected by B. abortus (p < 0.001). The presence of oxidative stress and a reduction of ADA might be related to the modulation of the inflammatory response. The experiment II was performed due to a high number of herds with restrictions imposed by cases of brucellosis in the state of Santa Catarina in the last two years, and thus, the seroprevalence for B. abortus was evaluated in 1242 serum samples of cows of 69 herds. The serodiagnosis was performed using two tests: buffered acidified antigen and 2-mercaptoethanol. However, none of the serum samples were positive for B. abortus. Although we did not find seropositive animals for brucellosis in our study, the disease still requires continued surveillance, due to its economic impact, and to the oxidative stress caused by it, which may have contributed to cases of abortion in three seropositive cows (Experiment I) in the final third of the gestation

  17. Acute Brucella melitensis M16 infection model in mice treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Murat; Ergin, Çağrı; Şen-Türk, Nilay; Sayin-Kutlu, Selda; Zorbozan, Orçun; Akalın, Şerife; Şahin, Barboros; Çobankara, Veli; Demirkan, Neşe

    2015-02-19

    There is limited data in the literature about brucellosis related to an intracellular pathogen and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) medication. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute Brucella infections in mice receiving anti-TNFα drug treatment. Anti-TNFα drugs were injected in mice on the first and fifth days of the study, after which the mice were infected with B. melitensis M16 strain. Mice were sacrificed on the fourteenth day after infection. Bacterial loads in the liver and spleen were defined, and histopathological changes were evaluated. Neither the liver nor the spleen showed an increased bacterial load in all anti-TNFα drug groups when compared to a non-treated, infected group. The most significant histopathological findings were neutrophil infiltrations in the red pulp of the spleen and apoptotic cells with hepatocellular pleomorphism in the liver. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of previously reported histopathological findings, such as extramedullary hematopoiesis and granuloma formation. There were no differences in hepatic and splenic bacterial load and granuloma formation, which indicate worsening of the acute Brucella infection in mice; in other words, anti-TNFα treatment did not exacerbate the acute Brucella spp. infection in mice.

  18. Attenuated Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis Mutants of Brucella melitensis Identified during the Acute Phase of Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lestrate, P.; Dricot, A.; Delrue, R.-M.; Lambert, C.; Martinelli, V.; De Bolle, X.; Letesson, J.-J.; Tibor, A.

    2003-01-01

    For this study, we screened 1,152 signature-tagged mutagenesis mutants of Brucella melitensis 16M in a mouse model of infection and found 36 of them to be attenuated in vivo. Molecular characterization of transposon insertion sites showed that for four mutants, the affected genes were only present in Rhizobiaceae. Another mutant contained a disruption in a gene homologous to mosA, which is involved in rhizopine biosynthesis in some strains of Rhizobium, suggesting that this sugar may be involved in Brucella pathogenicity. A mutant was disrupted in a gene homologous to fliF, a gene potentially coding for the MS ring, a basal component of the flagellar system. Surprisingly, a mutant was affected in the rpoA gene, coding for the essential α-subunit of the RNA polymerase. This disruption leaves a partially functional protein, impaired for the activation of virB transcription, as demonstrated by the absence of induction of the virB promoter in the Tn5::rpoA background. The results presented here highlight the fact that the ability of Brucella to induce pathogenesis shares similarities with the molecular mechanisms used by both Rhizobium and Agrobacterium to colonize their hosts. PMID:14638795

  19. Immunogencity of HSA-L7/L12 (Brucella abortus ribosomal protein) in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Iraj; Rezaee, Abbas; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Tabbaraee, Bahman; Delpisheh, Ali

    2009-03-01

    The immunogenic Brucella abortus ribosomal protein L7/L12 is a promising candidate antigen for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis. This study was aimed to evaluate the protection of recombinant Human Serum Albumin (HAS)-L7/L12 fusion protein in Balb/c mice. The amplified L7/L12 gene was cloned in pYHSA5 vector, pYHSA5-L7/L12 construct was transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the expressed protein from supernatant was purified by affinity chromatography. Balb/c mice were immunized in five groups by tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein (group 1), Brucella abortus S19 (group 2), HSA (group 3), recombinant L7/L12 (group 4), PBS (group 5). ELISA to detect antibody production, LTT test to assess antigen specific lymphocyte response were conducted prior to virulent B. abortus strain 544 challenge two weeks after the last injection. Bacterial counts from spleens of immunized mice were done four weeks after challenge. In ELISA tests, the specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin IgG1 over IgG2a. In addition, the tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein and L7/L12 elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant tHSA-L7/L12 and L7/L12, suggesting the induction of a cellular immunity response in vivo. However, there was no significant difference in proliferative response of L7/L12 and tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein (p>0.05). The L7/L12 and tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein vaccines could also induce significant protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in Balb/c mice (p< or =0.05). The tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein, similar to L7/L12 has the ability to induce antigen specific lymphocyte proliferation, stimulate humoral immunity and engender protection.

  20. Outer membrane proteins from rough strains of four Brucella species.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, J M; Verstreate, D R; Perera, V Y; Winter, A J

    1984-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins from 15 rough strains of Brucella abortus, B. ovis, B. canis, and B. melitensis were extracted with a dipolar detergent, and outer membrane proteins from selected strains were purified by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration (Verstreate et al., Infect. Immun. 35:979-989, 1982). Outer membrane proteins produced two types of profiles on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One type, demonstrated by B. abortus, B. ovis, and B. canis strains, contained the three predominant protein groups present in smooth B. abortus strains (Verstreate et al., Infect. Immun. 35:979-989, 1982): groups 1, 2 (porin [Douglas et al., Infect. Immun. 44:16-21]), and 3. B. melitensis strains demonstrated the second profile type, in which there was an additional band between groups 1 and 2. The relative proportion of porin was considerably lower in B. ovis, B. canis, and B. melitensis than in B. abortus. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles could be used to distinguish B. abortus and B. melitensis from each other and from B. canis and B. ovis. The amino acid compositions of groups 2 and 3 from rough strains of B. abortus, B. canis, and B. melitensis were similar to those of corresponding proteins from smooth B. abortus strains. Zwittergent-soluble fractions from most rough strains contained antigen [b], which cross-reacted with group 2 from smooth B. abortus strains, and antigens [c] and [d], which cross-reacted with group 3 from smooth B. abortus strains. Antigen [a], shared by groups 2 and 3 (D. R. Verstreate and A. J. Winter, Infect. Immun. 46:182-187, 1984), was detected in most rough strains. None of these antigens were related to either rough or smooth lipopolysaccharide. Images PMID:6480106

  1. First Report of Orchitis in Man Caused by Brucella abortus Biovar 1 in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Douce, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present a 44-year-old man from a rural community in northern Ecuador who worked on a cattle farm where he was involved with primary veterinary care, including assistance during births (or calving) and placenta retention and artificial insemination, with minimal precautions. In September of 2009, quite abruptly, he developed asthenia and hypersomnia without any apparent cause or symptoms like fever, chills, or night sweats. On November 14, 2009, he suffered from pain and edema in the right testicle that coincided with pain in the abdomen. Clinical, serological, and bacteriological investigations confirmed the first case of unilateral orchitis in man in Ecuador caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1. Because brucellosis is a neglected disease, special attention should be given to it in the training of medical and veterinary students. PMID:22826490

  2. An ecological perspective on the changing face of Brucella abortus in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Maichak, Eric J.; Brennan, Angela; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Henningsen, John C.; Luikart, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    After a hiatus during the 1990s, outbreaks of Brucella abortus in cattle are occurring more frequently in some of the western states of the United States, namely, Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. This increase is coincident with increasing brucellosis seroprevalence in elk (Cervus elaphus), which is correlated with elk density. Vaccines are a seductive solution, but their use in wildlife systems remains limited by logistical, financial, and scientific constraints. Cattle vaccination is ongoing in the region. Livestock regulations, however, tend to be based on serological tests that test for previous exposure and available vaccines do not protect against seroconversion. The authors review recent ecological studies of brucellosis, with particular emphasis on the Greater Yellowstone Area, and highlight the management options and implications of this work, including the potential utility of habitat modifications and targeted hunts, as well as scavengers and predators. Finally, the authors discuss future research directions that will help us to understand and manage brucellosis in wildlife.

  3. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  4. Evaluation of Brucella abortus Phosphoglucomutase (pgm) Mutant as a New Live Rough-Phenotype Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Comerci, Diego José; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2003-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 is the vaccine most frequently used against bovine brucellosis. Although it induces good protection levels, it cannot be administered to pregnant cattle, revaccination is not advised due to interference in the discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals during immune-screening procedures, and the vaccine is virulent for humans. Due to these reasons, there is a continuous search for new bovine vaccine candidates that may confer protection levels comparable to those conferred by S19 but without its disadvantages. A previous study characterized the phenotype associated with the phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene disruption in Brucella abortus S2308, as well as the possible role for the smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in virulence and intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells (J. E. Ugalde, C. Czibener, M. F. Feldman, and R. A. Ugalde, Infect. Immun. 68:5716-5723, 2000). In this report, we analyze the protection, proliferative response, and cytokine production induced in BALB/c mice by a Δpgm deletion strain. We show that this strain synthesizes O antigen with a size of approximately 45 kDa but is rough. This is due to the fact that the Δpgm strain is unable to assemble the O side chain in the complete LPS. Vaccination with the Δpgm strain induced protection levels comparable to those induced by S19 and generated a proliferative splenocyte response and a cytokine profile typical of a Th1 response. On the other hand, we were unable to detect a specific anti-O-antigen antibody response by using the fluorescence polarization assay. In view of these results, the possibility that the Δpgm mutant could be used as a vaccination strain is discussed. PMID:14573645

  5. Immune Responses of Bison and Efficacy after Booster Vaccination with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J. L.; Sacco, R. E.; Hennager, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 1010 CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against brucellosis in

  6. Multicenter prospective study of treatment of Brucella melitensis brucellosis with doxycycline for 6 weeks plus streptomycin for 2 weeks.

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, J M; Viciana, P; Colmenero, J; Pachón, J; Martinez, C; Alarcón, A

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness of treating human brucellosis caused by Brucella melitensis with a 6-week course of doxcycline plus streptomycin for 2 of those weeks was analyzed by a multicenter prospective study of 139 patients. Subjects with central nervous system involvement, endocarditis, or spondylitis were excluded from the study. All but 5 of the 139 patients completed the full treatment schedule and became afebrile in the first week of therapy. Four patients suffered relapses during the follow-up period. Of the five patients who did not complete the treatment, two left because of adverse secondary effects (1.4%), another two left for noncomplicance with the treatment (1.4%), and the remaining patient was considered a therapeutic failure because his symptoms persisted after the first week of therapy (0.7%). We concluded that the combination of doxycycline and streptomycin is an effective treatment for the types of brucellosis included in our study. PMID:2193624

  7. Detection of Brucella abortus DNA in aborted goats and sheep in Egypt by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Roesler, Uwe; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2015-06-03

    Brucellosis is a major zoonoses affects wide range of domesticated as well as wild animals. Despite the eradication program of brucellosis in Egypt, the disease is still endemic among cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, and camels. In the present study, abortion occurred naturally among 25 animals (10 cows, 5 buffaloes, 9 Egyptian Baladi goats and 1 ewe) shared the same pasture were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). DNA of Brucella (B.) abortus was detected in serum of goats and sheep which has aborted recently by species-specific RT-PCR. The results suggest cross-species infection of B. abortus from cattle to non-preferred hosts raised in close contact. This article will renew our knowledge about the Brucella agent causing abortion in small ruminants in Egypt. Information provided in this study is important for surveillance program, because eradication programs and vaccination strategies may have to be adapted accordingly.

  8. Prepatellar bursitis due to Brucella abortus: case report and analysis of the local immune response.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Jorge C; Delpino, M Victoria; Scian, Romina; Deodato, Bettina; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2010-12-01

    A case of prepatellar bursitis in a man with chronic brucellosis is presented. Brucella abortus biotype 1 was isolated from the abundant yellowish fluid obtained from the bursa. Clinical and epidemiological data did not suggest a direct inoculation of the agent in the bursa. However, the patient mentioned occasional local trauma due to recreational sports, which may have constituted a predisposing factor. As determined by ELISA, there were higher levels of IgG against Brucella LPS and cytosolic proteins detected in the patient's bursal synovial fluid when compared with serum. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, gamma interferon, interleukin 8 and MCP-1) were higher than in synovial fluids obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and a patient with septic arthritis, and a zymographic analysis revealed a gelatinase of about 92 kDa. These findings indicate that it may be possible to diagnose brucellar bursitis by measuring specific antibodies in the bursal synovial fluid. In addition, our findings suggest a role of increased local levels of proinflammatory cytokines and gelatinases in the inflammatory manifestations of brucellar bursitis.

  9. Development of a dual vaccine for prevention of Brucella abortus infection and Escherichia coli O157:H7 intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Iannino, Florencia; Herrmann, Claudia K; Roset, Mara S; Briones, Gabriel

    2015-05-05

    Zoonoses that affect human and animal health have an important economic impact. In the study now presented, a bivalent vaccine has been developed that has the potential for preventing the transmission from cattle to humans of two bacterial pathogens: Brucella abortus and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). A 66kDa chimeric antigen, composed by EspA, Intimin, Tir, and H7 flagellin (EITH7) from STEC, was constructed and expressed in B. abortus Δpgm vaccine strain (BabΔpgm). Mice orally immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) elicited an immune response with the induction of anti-EITH7 antibodies (IgA) that clears an intestinal infection of E. coli O157:H7 three times faster (t=4 days) than mice immunized with BabΔpgm carrier strain (t=12 days). As expected, mice immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) strain also elicited a protective immune response against B. abortus infection. A Brucella-based vaccine platform is described capable of eliciting a combined protective immune response against two bacterial pathogens with diverse lifestyles-the intracellular pathogen B. abortus and the intestinal extracellular pathogen STEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, A; Terwagne, M; Zygmunt, M S; Cloeckaert, A; De Bolle, X; Letesson, J J

    2013-02-01

    Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for cell envelope components and their timely regulation for a successful infectious cycle. Here, we report the characterization of Brucella melitensis mucR, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional regulator that has previously been shown to be involved in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents). We show that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts.

  11. Development of a bead-based Luminex assay using lipopolysaccharide specific monoclonal antibodies to detect biological threats from Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Silbereisen, Angelika; Tamborrini, Marco; Wittwer, Matthias; Schürch, Nadia; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-10-05

    Brucella, a Gram-negative bacterium, is classified as a potential bioterrorism agent mainly due to the low dose needed to cause infection and the ability to transmit the bacteria via aerosols. Goats/sheep, cattle, pigs, dogs, sheep and rodents are infected by B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, B. canis, B. ovis and B. neotomae, respectively, the six classical Brucella species. Most human cases are caused by B. melitensis and B. abortus. Our aim was to specifically detect Brucellae with 'smooth' lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a highly sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) based immunological assay. To complement molecular detection systems for potential bioterror agents, as required by international biodefense regulations, sets of mAbs were generated by B cell hybridoma technology and used to develop immunological assays. The combination of mAbs most suitable for an antigen capture assay format was identified and an immunoassay using the Luminex xMAP technology was developed. MAbs specific for the LPS O-antigen of Brucella spp. were generated by immunising mice with inactivated B. melitensis or B. abortus cells. Most mAbs recognised both B. melitensis and B. abortus and antigen binding was not impeded by inactivation of the bacterial cells by γ irradiation, formalin or heat treatment, a step required to analyse the samples immunologically under biosafety level two conditions. The Luminex assay recognised all tested Brucella species with 'smooth' LPS with detection limits of 2×10(2) to 8×10(4) cells per mL, depending on the species tested. Milk samples spiked with Brucella spp. cells were identified successfully using the Luminex assay. In addition, the bead-based immunoassay was integrated into a multiplex format, allowing for simultaneous, rapid and specific detection of Brucella spp., Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis within a single sample. Overall, the robust Luminex assay should allow detection of Brucella spp. in both natural

  12. First isolation, identification, phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Brucella abortus biovar 3 from dairy cattle in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mathew, C; Stokstad, M; Johansen, T B; Klevar, S; Mdegela, R H; Mwamengele, G; Michel, P; Escobar, L; Fretin, D; Godfroid, J

    2015-07-21

    Brucellosis is a disease of worldwide public health and economic importance. Successful control is based on knowledge of epidemiology and strains present in an area. In developing countries, most investigations are based on serological assays. This study aimed at investigating a dairy herd experiencing abortions in order to establish within-herd seroprevalence to Brucella spp., identify, characterize Brucella strains by Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA-VNTR) and investigate possible spillover to other species. The within-herd seroprevalence in cattle (n = 200) was 48 % (95 % CI 41-55), using an indirect ELISA, while the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) yielded lower prevalence (21.5 %; 95 % CI 16-27). Two sheep (n = 35) and one goat (n = 50) were seropositive using ELISA while none of the dogs (n = 6) was positive with the RBT. Three Brucella were isolated from an aborted fetus and associated membranes. Real time PCR (IS711), Bruce-ladder and classical biotyping classified the isolates as B. abortus biovar 3. MLVA-VNTR revealed two different but closely related genotypes. The isolates showed unique profiles, providing the first genotypic data from Tanzania. These genotypes were not related to B. abortus biovar 3 reference strain Tulya originally isolated from a human patient in Uganda in 1958, unlike the genotypes isolated and characterized recently in Kenya. High within-herd prevalence, isolation of the pathogen and abortion confirm that B. abortus is circulating in this herd with cattle as reservoir hosts. A low seroprevalence in sheep and goats suggests a spillover of B. abortus from cattle to small ruminants in the herd. This is the first isolation and characterization of B. abortus biovar 3 from a dairy cow with abortion in Tanzania. The origin of the Tanzanian genotypes remain elusive, although they seem to be related to genotypes found in Europe, Turkey and China but not related to B. abortus biovar 3 reference strain or genotypes from

  13. TLR9 is required for MAPK/NF-κB activation but does not cooperate with TLR2 or TLR6 to induce host resistance to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Pereira, Guilherme de Sousa; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Splitter, Gary; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2016-05-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence, leading to undulant fever in humans and abortion in domestic animals. B. abortus is recognized by several pattern-recognition receptors triggering pathways during the host innate immune response. Therefore, here, we determined the cooperative role of TLR9 with TLR2 or TLR6 receptors in sensing Brucella Furthermore, we deciphered the host innate immune response against B. abortus or its DNA, emphasizing the role of TLR9-MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. TLR9 is required for the initial host control of B. abortus, but this TLR was dispensable after 6 wk of infection. The susceptibility of TLR9(-/-)-infected animals to Brucella paralleled with lower levels of IFN-γ produced by mouse splenocytes stimulated with this pathogen compared with wild-type cells. However, no apparent cooperative interplay was observed between TLR2-TLR9 or TLR6-TLR9 receptors to control infection. Moreover, B. abortus or its DNA induced activation of MAPK/NF-κB pathways and production of IL-12 and TNF-α by macrophages partially dependent on TLR9 but completely dependent on MyD88. In addition, B. abortus-derived CpG oligonucleotides required TLR9 to promote IL-12 and TNF-α production by macrophages. By confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that TLR9 redistributed and colocalized with lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 upon Brucella infection. Thus, B. abortus induced TLR9 traffic, leading to cell signaling activation and IL-12 and TNF-α production. Although TLR9 recognized Brucella CpG motifs, our results suggest a new pathway of B. abortus DNA-activating macrophages independent of TLR9. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Bin; Lee, Won Jung; Shin, Min Kyoung; Jung, Myung Hwan; Shin, Seung Won; Yoo, An Na; Kim, Jong Wan; Yoo, Han Sang

    2013-06-27

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further.

  15. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further. PMID:23802650

  16. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against

  17. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus isolates from an outbreak by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus is one of the most important zoonoses in the world. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16) has been shown be a useful tool to epidemiological traceback studies in B. abortus infection. Thus, the present study aimed (i) to evaluate the genetic diversity of B. abortus isolates from a brucellosis outbreak, and (ii) to investigate the in vivo stability of the MLVA16 markers. Results Three-hundred and seventy-five clinical samples, including 275 vaginal swabs and 100 milk samples, were cultured from a brucellosis outbreak in a cattle herd, which adopted RB51 vaccination and test-and-slaughter policies. Thirty-seven B. abortus isolates were obtained, eight from milk and twenty-nine from post-partum/abortion vaginal swabs, which were submitted to biotyping and genotyping by MLVA16. Twelve B. abortus isolates obtained from vaginal swabs were identified as RB51. Twenty four isolates, seven obtained from milk samples and seventeen from vaginal swabs, were identified as B. abortus biovar 3, while one isolate from vaginal swabs was identified as B. abortus biovar 1. Three distinct genotypes were observed during the brucellosis outbreak: RB observed in all isolates identified as RB51; W observed in all B. abortus biovar 3 isolates; and Z observed in the single B. abortus biovar 1 isolate. Epidemiological and molecular data show that the B. abortus biovar 1 genotype Z strain is not related to the B. abortus biovar 3 genotype W isolates, and represents a new introduction B. abortus during the outbreak. Conclusions The results of the present study on typing of multiple clinical B. abortus isolates from the same outbreak over a sixteen month period indicate the in vivo stability of MLVA16 markers, a low genetic diversity among B. abortus isolates and the usefulness of MLVA16 for epidemiological studies of bovine brucellosis. PMID:25015840

  18. MULTILOCUS SEQUENCE TYPING OF BRUCELLA ISOLATES FROM THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Chawjiraphan, Wireeya; Sonthayanon, Piengchan; Chanket, Phanita; Benjathummarak, Surachet; Kerdsin, Anusak; Kalambhaheti, Thareerat

    2016-11-01

    Although brucellosis outbreaks in Thailand are rare, they cause abortions and infertility in animals, resulting in significant economic loss. Because Brucella spp display > 90% DNA homology, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was employed to categorize local Brucella isolates into sequence types (STs) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Brucella samples were isolated from vaginal secretion of cows and goats, and from blood cultures of infected individuals. Brucella species were determined by multiplex PCR of eight loci, in addition to MLST based on partial DNA sequences of nine house-keeping genes. MLST analysis of 36 isolates revealed 78 distinct novel allele types and 34 novel STs, while two isolates possessed the known ST8. Sequence alignments identified polymorphic sites in each allele, ranging from 2-6%, while overall genetic diversity was 3.6%. MLST analysis of the 36 Brucella isolates classified them into three species, namely, B. melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis, in agreement with multiplex PCR results. Genetic relatedness among ST members of B. melitensis and B. abortus determined by eBURST program revealed ST2 as founder of B. abortus isolates and ST8 the founder of B. melitensis isolates. ST 36, 41 and 50 of Thai Brucella isolates were identified as single locus variants of clonal cluster (CC) 8, while the majority of STs were diverse. The genetic diversity and relatedness identified using MLST revealed hitherto unexpected diversity among Thai Brucella isolates. Genetic classification of isolates could reveal the route of brucellosis transmission among humans and farm animals and also reveal their relationship with other isolates in the region and other parts of the world.

  19. Comparison of Abortion and Infection after Experimental Challenge of Pregnant Bison and Cattle with Brucella abortus Strain 2308▿

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, S. C.; Johnson, C.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted using data from naive bison (n = 45) and cattle (n = 46) from 8 and 6 studies, respectively, in which a standardized Brucella abortus strain 2308 experimental challenge was administered during midgestation. The incidence of abortion, fetal infection, uterine or mammary infection, or infection in maternal tissues after experimental challenge was greater (P < 0.05) in bison than in cattle. In animals that did abort, the time between experimental challenge and abortion was shorter (P < 0.05) for bison than for cattle. Brucella colonization of four target tissues and serologic responses on the standard tube agglutination test at the time of abortion did not differ (P > 0.05) between cattle and bison. The results of our study suggest that naive bison and cattle have similarities and differences after experimental exposure to a virulent B. abortus strain. Although our data suggest that bison may be more susceptible to infection with Brucella, some pathogenic characteristics of brucellosis were similar between bison and cattle. PMID:21976222

  20. Latex agglutination using the periplasmic proteins antigen of Brucella melitensis is a successful, rapid, and specific serodiagnostic test for ovine brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, Alaa Bassuny; Swelum, Ayman Abdel-Aziz; Mostafa, Salama A-H; Alhumiany, Abdel-Rahman A

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, especially caused by Brucella melitensis, is considered the most-widespread zoonosis in the world, particularly in developing countries. This study was planned to develop an accurate test for diagnosis of ovine brucellosis using a specific hot saline extracted soluble Brucella melitensis periplasmic proteins (SBPPs). The efficacy of the latex agglutination test (LAT) using SBPPs compared to the Rose Bengal test (RBT), buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT), serum agglutination test (SAT), and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA) was evaluated in the field diagnosis of ovine brucellosis. The test performance was evaluated by estimating sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), disease prevalence (DP), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) using test agreement and bacteriological culture in 1777 samples. The false-positive result was significantly (P ⩽0.05) lower in LAT than RBT, BPAT, SAT, and i-ELISA. With reference to test agreement, the Se, Sp, PPV, and PLR were highest (P ⩽0.05) in LAT 99.33%, 99.88%, 98.68%, and 827.25%, respectively. With reference to bacteriological culture, the LAT and i-ELISA tests showed a significant difference in Se with SAT. However, no significant difference in specificity was detected. The DP was 8.44% in the five tests. In conclusion, LAT using SBPPs of B. melitensis could be a suitable serodiagnostic field test for ovine brucellosis, with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27207442

  1. Latex agglutination using the periplasmic proteins antigen of Brucella melitensis is a successful, rapid, and specific serodiagnostic test for ovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Alaa Bassuny; Swelum, Ayman Abdel-Aziz; Mostafa, Salama A-H; Alhumiany, Abdel-Rahman A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis, especially caused by Brucella melitensis, is considered the most-widespread zoonosis in the world, particularly in developing countries. This study was planned to develop an accurate test for diagnosis of ovine brucellosis using a specific hot saline extracted soluble Brucella melitensis periplasmic proteins (SBPPs). The efficacy of the latex agglutination test (LAT) using SBPPs compared to the Rose Bengal test (RBT), buffered plate agglutination test (BPAT), serum agglutination test (SAT), and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA) was evaluated in the field diagnosis of ovine brucellosis. The test performance was evaluated by estimating sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), disease prevalence (DP), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) using test agreement and bacteriological culture in 1777 samples. The false-positive result was significantly (P ⩽0.05) lower in LAT than RBT, BPAT, SAT, and i-ELISA. With reference to test agreement, the Se, Sp, PPV, and PLR were highest (P ⩽0.05) in LAT 99.33%, 99.88%, 98.68%, and 827.25%, respectively. With reference to bacteriological culture, the LAT and i-ELISA tests showed a significant difference in Se with SAT. However, no significant difference in specificity was detected. The DP was 8.44% in the five tests. In conclusion, LAT using SBPPs of B. melitensis could be a suitable serodiagnostic field test for ovine brucellosis, with high sensitivity and specificity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Whole-genome analyses of the speciation events in the pathogenic Brucellae

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Comerci, D; Tolmasky, M

    Despite their high DNA identity and a proposal to group classical Brucella species as biovars of B. melitensis, the commonly recognized Brucella species can be distinguished by distinct biochemical and fatty acid characters as well as by a marked host range (e.g. B. suis for swine, B. melitensis for sheep and goats, B. abortus for cattle). Here we present the genome of B. abortus 2308, the virulent prototype biovar 1 strain, and its comparison to the two other human pathogenic Brucellae species and to the B. abortus field isolate 9-941. The global distribution of pseudogenes, deletions and insertions support previousmore » indications that B. abortus and B. melitensis share a common ancestor that diverged from B. suis. With the exception of a dozen genes, the genetic complement of both B. abortus strains is identical, whereas the three species differ in gene content and pseudogenes. The pattern of species-specific gene inactivations affecting transcriptional regulators and outer membrane proteins suggest that these inactivations may play an important role in the establishment of host-specificity and may have been a primary driver of speciation in the Brucellae. Despite being non-motile, the Brucellae contain flagellum gene clusters and display species-specific flagellar gene inactivations, which lead to the putative generation of different versions of flagellum-derived structures, and may contribute to differences in host-specificity and virulence. Metabolic changes such as the lack of complete metabolic pathways for the synthesis of numerous compounds (e.g. glycogen, biotin, NAD, and choline) are consistent with adaptation of Brucellae to an intracellular lifestyle.« less

  3. Molecular typing of Brucella melitensis endemic strains and differentiation from the vaccine strain Rev-1.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Papi, Rigini M; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Minas, Anastasios; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A

    2012-03-01

    In the present study forty-four Greek endemic strains of Br. melitensis and three reference strains were genotyped by Multi locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat (ML-VNTR) analysis based on an eight-base pair tandem repeat sequence that was revealed in eight loci of Br. melitensis genome. The forty-four strains were discriminated from the vaccine strain Rev-1 by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The ML-VNTR analysis revealed that endemic, reference and vaccine strains are genetically closely related, while most of the loci tested (1, 2, 4, 5 and 7) are highly polymorphic with Hunter-Gaston Genetic Diversity Index (HGDI) values in the range of 0.939 to 0.775. Analysis of ML-VNTRs loci stability through in vitro passages proved that loci 1 and 5 are non stable. Therefore, vaccine strain can be discriminated from endemic strains by allele's clusters of loci 2, 4, 6 and 7. RFLP and DGGE were also employed to analyse omp2 gene and reveled different patterns among Rev-1 and endemic strains. In RFLP, Rev-1 revealed three fragments (282, 238 and 44 bp), while endemic strains two fragments (238 and 44 bp). As for DGGE, the electrophoretic mobility of Rev-1 is different from the endemic strains due to heterologous binding of DNA chains of omp2a and omp2b gene. Overall, our data show clearly that it is feasible to genotype endemic strains of Br. melitensis and differentiate them from vaccine strain Rev-1 with ML-VNTR, RFLP and DGGE techniques. These tools can be used for conventional investigations in brucellosis outbreaks.

  4. [Multiplication of Brucella abortus and production of nitric oxide in two macrophage cell lines of different origin].

    PubMed

    Serafino, J; Conde, S; Zabal, O; Samartino, L

    2007-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a bacterium which causes abortions and infertility in cattle and undulant fever in humans. It multiplies intracellularly, evading the mechanisms of cellular death. Nitric oxide (NO) is important in the regulation of the immune response. In the present work, we studied the ability of three B. abortus strains to survive intracellularly in two macrophage cell lines. The bacterial multiplication in both cell lines was determined at two different times in UFC/ ml units. Moreover the inoculated cells were also observed under light-field and fluorescence microscopy stained with Giemsa and acridine orange, respectively. The stain of both cellular lines showed similar results with respect to the UFC/ml determination. The presence of B. abortus was confirmed by electronic microscopy. In both macrophage cell lines inoculated with the rough strain RB51, the multiplication diminished and the level of NO was higher, compared with cells inoculated with smooth strains (S19 and 2308). These results suggest that the absence of O-chain of LPS probably affects the intracellular growth of B. abortus.

  5. Infection of cattle with Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, L B; Tessaro, S V

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if cattle could be infected with a strain of Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park. Three pregnant cows inoculated conjunctivally with 5.7 x 10(8) cfu of the bacterium, and their subsequent calves, showed seroconversion on standard serological tests for bovine brucellosis, and large numbers of the bacterium were isolated from numerous tissues at necropsy. A 4th cow that was moved into the pen that previously contained the inoculated cows subsequently showed seroconversion, and the same strain of B. abortus biovar 1 was isolated from numerous tissues. Although this strain from bison in Wood Buffalo National Park has existed in isolation from cattle for over 60 years, it remains infectious and contagious for cattle. PMID:8809394

  6. The Bactericidal Effect of High Temperature Is an Essential Resistance Mechanism of Chicken Macrophage against Brucella abortus Infection.

    PubMed

    Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Xuan, Huy Tran; Baek, Eun Jin; Min, Wongi; Kim, Suk

    2017-10-28

    Knowledge of avian host responses to brucellosis is critical to understanding how birds resist this infection; however, this mechanism is not well established. On the other hand, temperature has a major involvement in the physiology of living organisms, and cell death induced by heat is attributed to protein denaturation. This study demonstrates the direct bactericidal effect of a high temperature (41ºC) on Brucella abortus that resulted in the gradual reduction of intracellular bacteria and inhibited bacterial growth within avian macrophage HD11 in an increasing period of time. On the other hand, this study also revealed that high temperature does not affect the rate of bacterial uptake, as confirmed by the bacterial adherence assay. No significant difference was observed in the expression of target genes between infected and uninfected cells for both temperatures. This study suggests the susceptibility of B. abortus to bacterial death under a high temperature with an increased period of incubation, leading to suppression of bacterial growth.

  7. Conjunctival vaccination of pregnant ewes and goats with Brucella melitensis Rev 1 vaccine: safety and serological responses.

    PubMed

    Zundel, E; Verger, J M; Grayon, M; Michel, R

    1992-01-01

    When Brucella melitensis strain Rev 1 vaccine (Rev 1) is administered by the standard method (1-2 x 10(9) viable bacteria injected subcutaneously), it may induce long-lasting serological responses and/or cause abortion in pregnant animals. The conjunctival route considerably reduces these drawbacks. In the present experiment a 1 x 10(8) CFU dose for both ewes and goats conjunctivally vaccinated at mid-pregnancy was tested for innocuousness (outcome of pregnancy, contamination of unvaccinated contact animals, duration of serological responses) in comparison with 3 x 10(8) CFU (ewes and goats), 1 x 10(9) and 3 x 10(9) CFU (ewes) doses. No reaction was observed at the time of vaccination, and the risk of environmental contamination with Rev 1, due to the conjunctival administration of the vaccine, is negligible. Abortions occurred later at surprisingly severe rates (over 60% of pregnant vaccinated animals), except in the 1 x 10(8) CFU ewes group (20%). Moreover, the serological reactions of the 1 x 10(8) CFU ewes which normally lambed were negative again as early as 12 weeks after vaccination. Although the dose of 1 x 10(8) CFU Rev 1 was safer for pregnancy than the standard dose mainly in ewes as compared to goats, the innocuousness was not yet sufficient to propose the former dose to indiscriminately vaccinate sheep and goats by the conjunctival route, whatever the age or physiological status.

  8. Identification of Brucella genus and eight Brucella species by Luminex bead-based suspension array.

    PubMed

    Lusk Pfefer, Tina S; Timme, Ruth; Kase, Julie A

    2018-04-01

    Globally, unpasteurized milk products are vehicles for the transmission of brucellosis, a zoonosis responsible for cases of foodborne illness in the United States and elsewhere. Existing PCR assays to detect Brucella species are restricted by the resolution of band sizes on a gel or the number of fluorescent channels in a single real-time system. The Luminex bead-based suspension array is performed in a 96-well plate allowing for high throughput screening of up to 100 targets in one sample with easily discernible results. We have developed an array using the Bio-Plex 200 to differentiate the most common Brucella species: B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. suis bv5, B. canis, B. ovis, B. pinnipedia, and B. neotomae, as well as Brucella genus. All probes showed high specificity, with no cross-reaction with non-Brucella strains. We could detect pure DNA from B. abortus, B. melitensis, and genus-level Brucella at concentrations of ≤5 fg/μL. Pure DNA from all other species tested positive at concentrations well below 500 fg/μL and we positively identified B. neotomae in six artificially contaminated cheese and milk products. An intra-laboratory verification further demonstrated the assay's accuracy and robustness in the rapid screening (3-4 h including PCR) of DNA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Modeling, molecular dynamics, and docking assessment of transcription factor rho: a potential drug target in Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    The zoonotic disease brucellosis, a chronic condition in humans affecting renal and cardiac systems and causing osteoarthritis, is caused by Brucella, a genus of Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens. The mode of transmission and the virulence of the pathogens are still enigmatic. Transcription regulatory elements, such as rho proteins, play an important role in the termination of transcription and/or the selection of genes in Brucella. Adverse effects of the transcription inhibitors play a key role in the non-successive transcription challenges faced by the pathogens. In the investigation presented here, we computationally predicted the transcription termination factor rho (TtFRho) inhibitors against Brucella melitensis 16M via a structure-based method. In view the unknown nature of its crystal structure, we constructed a robust three-dimensional homology model of TtFRho’s structure by comparative modeling with the crystal structure of the Escherichia coli TtFRho (Protein Data Bank ID: 1PVO) as a template in MODELLER (v 9.10). The modeled structure was optimized by applying a molecular dynamics simulation for 2 ns with the CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics) 27 force field in NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program; v 2.9) and then evaluated by calculating the stereochemical quality of the protein. The flexible docking for the interaction phenomenon of the template consists of ligand-related inhibitor molecules from the ZINC (ZINC Is Not Commercial) database using a structure-based virtual screening strategy against minimized TtFRho. Docking simulations revealed two inhibitors compounds – ZINC24934545 and ZINC72319544 – that showed high binding affinity among 2,829 drug analogs that bind with key active-site residues; these residues are considered for protein-ligand binding and unbinding pathways via steered molecular dynamics simulations. Arg215 in the model plays an important role in the stability of the protein

  10. Large Scale Immune Profiling of Infected Humans and Goats Reveals Differential Recognition of Brucella melitensis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Leng, Diana; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kayala, Matthew A.; Atluri, Vidya L.; Pablo, Jozelyn; Unal, Berkay; Ficht, Thomas A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Saito, Mayuko; Morrow, W. John W.; Liang, Xiaowu; Baldi, Pierre; Gilman, Robert H.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease that is also a potential agent of bioterrorism. Current serological assays to diagnose human brucellosis in clinical settings are based on detection of agglutinating anti-LPS antibodies. To better understand the universe of antibody responses that develop after B. melitensis infection, a protein microarray was fabricated containing 1,406 predicted B. melitensis proteins. The array was probed with sera from experimentally infected goats and naturally infected humans from an endemic region in Peru. The assay identified 18 antigens differentially recognized by infected and non-infected goats, and 13 serodiagnostic antigens that differentiate human patients proven to have acute brucellosis from syndromically similar patients. There were 31 cross-reactive antigens in healthy goats and 20 cross-reactive antigens in healthy humans. Only two of the serodiagnostic antigens and eight of the cross-reactive antigens overlap between humans and goats. Based on these results, a nitrocellulose line blot containing the human serodiagnostic antigens was fabricated and applied in a simple assay that validated the accuracy of the protein microarray results in the diagnosis of humans. These data demonstrate that an experimentally infected natural reservoir host produces a fundamentally different immune response than a naturally infected accidental human host. PMID:20454614

  11. Fed batch fermentation and purification strategy for high yield production of Brucella melitensis recombinant Omp 28 kDa protein and its application in disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Karothia, B S; Athmaram, T N; D, Thavaselvam; Ashu, Kumar; Tiwari, Sapna; Singh, Anil K; Sathyaseelan, K; Gopalan, N

    2013-07-01

    Brucellosis is a disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. It affects cattle, goat, sheep, dog and humans. The serodiagnosis of brucellosis involves detection of antibodies generated against the LPS or whole cell bacterial extracts, however these tests lack sensitivity and specificity. The present study was performed to optimize the culture condition for the production of recombinant Brucella melitensis outer membrane protein 28 kDa protein in E.coli via fed batch fermentation. Expression was induced with 1.5mM isopropyl β thiogalactoside and the expressed recombinant protein was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. After fed-batch fermentation the dry cell weight of 17.81 g/L and a purified protein yield of 210.10 mg/L was obtained. The purified Brucella melitensis recombinant Omp 28 kDa protein was analyzed through SDS- poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The obtained recombinant protein was evaluated for its diagnostic application through Indirect ELISA using brucellosis suspected human sera samples. Our results clearly indicate that recombinant Omp28 produced via fed batch fermentation has immense potential as a diagnostic reagent that could be employed in sero monitoring of brucellosis.

  12. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Thermostable Cross-Protective Subunit Vaccine against Brucella Species

    PubMed Central

    Barabé, Nicole D.; Grigat, Michelle L.; Lee, William E.; Poirier, Robert T.; Jager, Scott J.; Berger, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 105 CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25320267

  14. A case of acute septic arthritis hip caused by Brucella melitensis in an adolescent child.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Divesh; Elhence, Abhay; Elhence, Poonam; Jain, Princi

    2015-09-21

    Brucella is among the most common zoonotic diseases affecting humans. Although musculoskeletal involvement is seen in a large proportion of patients, the disease is often diagnosed late or misdiagnosed due to its subtle nature and rarity, and lack of awareness among clinicians. In this report, a 12-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute septic arthritis of the hip based on clinico-radiological features, and managed with standard treatment, including arthrotomy. However, the child did not respond to the treatment. Based on the histopathology and local endemicity, Brucella was suspected, and confirmed after serological testing. The child subsequently responded to treatment and, at latest follow-up at 1 year, had a full painless range of motion, with no relapse. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Genotyping of Indian antigenic, vaccine, and field Brucella spp. using multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Shankaranarayana, Padmashree B; Jegadesan, Sankarasubramanian; Udayakumar S, Vishnu; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Saikia, Girin Kumar; Sharma, Narendra Kumar; Chauhan, Harshad; Chandel, Bharat Singh; Jeyaprakash, Rajendhran; Rahman, Habibur

    2016-03-31

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases that affects multiple livestock species and causes great economic losses. The highly conserved genomes of Brucella, with > 90% homology among species, makes it important to study the genetic diversity circulating in the country. A total of 26 Brucella spp. (4 reference strains and 22 field isolates) and 1 B. melitensis draft genome sequence from India (B. melitensis Bm IND1) were included for sequence typing. The field isolates were identified by biochemical tests and confirmed by both conventional and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) targeting bcsp 31Brucella genus-specific marker. Brucella speciation and biotyping was done by Bruce ladder, probe qPCR, and AMOS PCRs, respectively, and genotyping was done by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The MLST typing of 27 Brucella spp. revealed five distinct sequence types (STs); the B. abortus S99 reference strain and 21 B. abortus field isolates belonged to ST1. On the other hand, the vaccine strain B. abortus S19 was genotyped as ST5. Similarly, B. melitensis 16M reference strain and one B. melitensis field isolate were grouped into ST7. Another B. melitensis field isolate belonged to ST8 (draft genome sequence from India), and only B. suis 1330 reference strain was found to be ST14. The sequences revealed genetic similarity of the Indian strains to the global reference and field strains. The study highlights the usefulness of MLST for typing of field isolates and validation of reference strains used for diagnosis and vaccination against brucellosis.

  16. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pImore » 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.« less

  17. Biosafety of parenteral Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in bison calves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Olsen, S.C.; Gidlewski, T.; Jensen, A.E.; Palmer, M.V.; Huber, R.

    1999-01-01

    Vaccination is considered among the primary management tools for reducing brucellosis prevalence in Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) ungulates. Before their use, however, vaccine safety and efficacy must be demonstrated. Twenty-seven female bison (Bison bison) calves (approx 5 months old) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 (1.5 x 1010 colony forming units [CFU], subcutaneously) as part of routine management. We assessed the persistence, pathology, shedding, and transmission associated with RB51 by serial necropsy, bacteriology, histopathology, and serology of 20 of these 27 vaccinated calves, and RB51 serology of 10 nonvaccinated, commingling adult females. With the exception of 1 calf, RB51 dot-blot titers at necropsy were <1:80. Strain RB51 was cultured from lymph nodes in 4 of 4 calves at 14 weeks postvaccination (PV), 4 of 4 calves at 18 weeks PV, 1 of 4 calves at 22 weeks PV, 3 of 4 at 26 weeks PV, and 0 of 4 calves at 30 weeks PV. No gross lesions were observed. Mild histologic changes occurred only in a few draining lymph nodes early in sampling. Adverse clinical effects were not observed in vaccinates. Swabs from nasopharynx, conjunctiva, rectum, and vagina were uniformly culture negative for RB51. Strain RB51 dot-blot assays of bison cows were negative at a 1:20 dilution at 26 weeks PV. Our results suggest that RB51 persists longer in bison calves than in domestic cattle and is systemically distributed within lymphatic tissues. However, bison apparently clear the RB51 vaccine strain without shedding, transmission, or significant adverse reactions.

  18. Immunotoxic effect of thiamethoxam in immunized mice with Brucella abortus cultural filtrate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Salema, L. H.; Alwan, M. J.; Yousif, Afaf Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned for determination the toxic effect of thiamethoxam (TMX) in immunized mice with Brucella abortus culture filtrate antigen (CFBAgs) (as a vaccine) and its role of TMX on decrease activity of B. abortus antigen on eliciting of humoral and cellular immunity. Materials and Methods: To achieve these goals 60 female mice were used, 7-8 weeks age, they were divided equally into three groups (20 in each group) and treated as follows: 1st group: Mice were immunized with CFBAgs intraperitoneally in two doses, 2 weeks intervals with (protein concentration 2 mg\\ml), 2nd group: Mice immunized as in the 1st group and was administrated orally with 1/10 lethal dose 50% of TMX (83.7 mg/kg B.W.) for 4 weeks daily, 3rd group was administrated orally with 0.3 ml normal saline served as a control group. At day 28 post immunization (PI) delayed type hypersensitivity (skin test) was done, and serum samples were collected at day 30 (PI) for detection of passive hemagglutination test (PHA); interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which was done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test in addition to phagocytes assay. Results: The results of skin test post injection with soluble antigen of B. abortus intradermally showed a high significantly mean values at p≤0.05 of footpad skin thickness in the 1st group of mice which recorded (0.51±0.002 mm) as compared with the 2nd group of mice which showed (0.08±0.002 mm) after 24 h; the mean values of skin thickness were declined in the 1st mice (0.46±0.002) and 2nd mice (0.070±0.001) at 48 h; control group showed a negative results. These results were agreed with results of serum levels of IFN-γ (pg/ml) that showed that a significant increase the vaccinated 1st group (406.36±1.52), than those values in the 2nd group (151.61±0.89) and negative result in 3rd group (46.47±0.60), in addition to results of PHA test which showed a significant increase in antibody titer in the 1st group (139±12.16) with low level of serum antibody

  19. Immune responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strains RB51 or RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and Glycosyltransferase genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus stra...

  20. Differential composition of culture supernatants from wild-type Brucella abortus and its isogenic virB mutants.

    PubMed

    Delpino, M Victoria; Comerci, Diego J; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C; Delvecchio, Vito G

    2009-07-01

    The virB genes coding type IV secretion system are necessary for the intracellular survival and replication of Brucella spp. In this study, extracellular proteins from B. abortus 2308 (wild type, WT) and its isogenic virB10 polar mutant were compared. Culture supernatants harvested in the early stationary phase were concentrated and subjected to 2D electrophoresis. Spots present in the WT strain but absent in the virB10 mutant (differential spots) were considered extracellular proteins released in a virB-related manner, and were identified by MALDI-TOF analysis and matching with Brucella genomes. Among the 11 differential proteins identified, DnaK chaperone (Hsp70), choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH) and a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were chosen for further investigation because of their homology with extracellular and/or virulence factors from other bacteria. The three proteins were obtained in recombinant form and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared. By Western blot with these mAbs, the three proteins were detected in supernatants from the WT but not in those from the virB10 polar mutant or from strains carrying non-polar mutations in virB10 or virB11 genes. These results suggest that the expression of virB genes affects the extracellular release of DnaK, PPIase and CGH, and possibly other proteins from B. abortus.

  1. A Homologue of an Operon Required for DNA Transfer in Agrobacterium Is Required in Brucella abortus for Virulence and Intracellular Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Sieira, Rodrigo; Comerci, Diego J.; Sánchez, Daniel O.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a Brucella abortus 2308 genome project carried out in our laboratory, we identified, cloned, and sequenced a genomic DNA fragment containing a locus (virB) highly homologous to bacterial type IV secretion systems. The B. abortus virB locus is a collinear arrangement of 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Between virB1 and virB2 and downstream of ORF12, two degenerated, palindromic repeat sequences characteristic of Brucella intergenic regions were found. Gene reporter studies demonstrated that the B. abortus virB locus constitutes an operon transcribed from virB1 which is turned on during the stationary phase of growth. A B. abortus polar virB1 mutant failed to replicate in HeLa cells, indicating that the virB operon plays a critical role in intracellular multiplication. Mutants with polar and nonpolar mutations introduced in virB10 showed different behaviors in mice and in the HeLa cell infection assay, suggesting that virB10 per se is necessary for the correct function of this type IV secretion apparatus. Mouse infection assays demonstrated that the virB operon constitutes a major determinant of B. abortus virulence. It is suggested that putative effector molecules secreted by this type IV secretion system determine routing of B. abortus to an endoplasmic reticulum-related replication compartment. PMID:10940027

  2. Field study of vaccination of cattle with Brucella abortus strains RB51 and 19 under high and low disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lord, V R; Schurig, G G; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G E

    1998-08-01

    To assess humoral and protective immunity in cattle vaccinated by 12 months with Brucella abortus vaccine strains RB51 and 19 under field conditions of high and low brucellosis prevalence. 450 seronegative female cattle: 330 three to eight months old (calves), and 120 ten to twelve months old (heifers). Ranch A had high prevalence (39%) of brucellosis, and ranch B had low prevalence (2%), as determined by results of conventional serologic testing: agar gel immunodiffusion and the ring test. Seronegative cattle were vaccinated once or twice with 5 x 10(9) colony-forming units of B abortus strain RB51 or once with strain 19. After vaccinating 285 cattle with strain RB51 and 165 with strain 19, 74 (26%) and 30 (18%), respectively, were bred to seropositive bulls, then were kept within the infected herd of origin. All cattle vaccinated with strain 19 seroconverted 30 days later. All 285 cattle vaccinated with strain RB51 had negative results for all serologic tests, including agar gel immunodiffusion. All RB51-vaccinated cattle that became pregnant had negative results for the ring test and for conventional serologic tests after their first calving. Strain RB51 can be used as a live organism vaccine without inducing antibody titers that interfere with serodiagnosis, and induced 100% protection against field strain B abortus-induced abortion in cattle vaccinated at least 1 year before mating to an infected bull. Vaccination with strain 19 under similar conditions was less effective than vaccination with strain RB51.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle, Elk, and Bison in the United States, 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Tod; Quance, Christine; Edwards, William H.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Linfield, Tom; Rhyan, Jack; Berte, Angela; Harris, Beth

    2012-01-01

    A variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) protocol targeting 10 loci in the Brucella abortus genome was used to assess genetic diversity among 366 field isolates recovered from cattle, bison, and elk in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Texas during 1998 to 2011. Minimum spanning tree (MST) and unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analyses of VNTR data identified 237 different VNTR types, among which 14 prominent clusters of isolates could be identified. Cattle isolates from Texas segregated into three clusters: one comprised of field isolates from 1998 to 2005, one comprised of vaccination-associated infections, and one associated with an outbreak in Starr County in January 2011. An isolate obtained from a feral sow trapped on property adjacent to the Starr County herd in May 2011 clustered with the cattle isolates, suggesting a role for feral swine as B. abortus reservoirs in Starr County. Isolates from a 2005 cattle outbreak in Wyoming displayed VNTR-10 profiles matching those of strains recovered from Wyoming and Idaho elk. Additionally, isolates associated with cattle outbreaks in Idaho in 2002, Montana in 2008 and 2011, and Wyoming in 2010 primarily clustered with isolates recovered from GYA elk. This study indicates that elk play a predominant role in the transmission of B. abortus to cattle located in the GYA. PMID:22427502

  4. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4 + T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Humoral immune response against lipopolysaccharide and cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella abortus in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9.

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, P C; Giambartolomei, G H; Goldbaum, F A; Abdón, L F; Velikovsky, C A; Kittelberger, R; Fossati, C A

    1996-01-01

    The humoral immune responses against three different antigens of Brucella abortus were monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 or experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM responses against (i) B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS), (ii) total cytoplasmic proteins depleted of LPS (LPS-free CYT), and (iii) B. abortus 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein were measured. Vaccinated animals and Yersinia-infected animals developed high anti-LPS IgM and IgG titers, which overlapped with those obtained with sera from B. abortus 544-infected animals used as positive controls. In contrast, only a slight or negative IgG and IgM response against LPS-free CYT and the 18-kDa protein was detected in vaccinated or Yersinia-infected cattle, although its levels were always significantly lower than those of B. abortus 544-infected animals. These data indicate that cytoplasmic proteins of B. abortus could be useful for the differential diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. PMID:8807216

  6. MLVA and MLST typing of Brucella from Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun-Ying; Wang, Hu; Zhang, Xue-Fei; Xu, Li-Qing; Hu, Gui-Ying; Jiang, Hai; Zhao, Fang; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Piao, Dong-Ri; Qin, Yu-Min; Cui, Bu-Yun; Lin, Gong-Hua

    2016-04-13

    The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) of China is an extensive pastoral and semi-pastoral area, and because of poverty and bad hygiene conditions, Brucella is highly prevalent in this region. In order to adequately prevent this disease in the QTP region it is important to determine the identity of Brucella species that caused the infection. A total of 65 Brucella isolates were obtained from human, livestock and wild animals in Qinghai, a Chinese province in east of the QTP. Two molecular typing methods, MLVA (multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis) and MLST (multi locus sequence typing) were used to identify the species and genotypes of these isolates. Both MLVA and MLST typing methods classified the 65 isolates into three species, B. melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis, which included 60, 4 and 1 isolates respectively. The MLVA method uniquely detected 34 (Bm01 ~ Bm34), 3 (Ba01 ~ Ba03), and 1 (Bs01) MLVA-16 genotypes for B. melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis, respectively. However, none of these genotypes exactly matched any of the genotypes in the Brucella2012 MLVA database. The MLST method identified five known ST types: ST7 and ST8 (B. melitensis), ST2 and ST5 (B. abortus), and ST14 (B. suis). We also detected a strain with a mutant type (3-2-3-2-?-5-3-8-2) of ST8 (3-2-3-2-1-5-3-8-2). Extensive genotype-sharing events could be observed among isolates from different host species. There were at least three Brucella (B. melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis) species in Qinghai, of which B. melitensis was the predominant species in the area examined. The Brucella population in Qinghai was very different from other regions of the world, possibly owing to the unique geographical characteristics such as extremely high altitude in QTP. There were extensive genotype-sharing events between isolates obtained from humans and other animals. Yaks, sheep and blue sheep were important zoonotic reservoirs of brucellosis causing species found in humans.

  7. Immunological response to Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccination of cattle in a communal area in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Gregory J G; Marcotty, Tanguy; Rouille, Elodie; Chilundo, Abel; Letteson, Jean-Jacques; Godfroid, Jacques

    2018-03-29

    Brucellosis is of worldwide economic and public health importance. Heifer vaccination with live attenuated Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) is the cornerstone of control in low- and middle-income countries. Antibody persistence induced by S19 is directly correlated with the number of colony-forming units (CFU) per dose. There are two vaccination methods: a 'high' dose (5-8 × 1010 CFU) subcutaneously injected or one or two 'low' doses (5 × 109 CFU) through the conjunctival route. This study aimed to evaluate serological reactions to the 'high' dose and possible implications of the serological findings on disease control. This study included 58 female cases, vaccinated at Day 0, and 29 male controls. Serum was drawn repeatedly and tested for Brucella antibodies using the Rose Bengal Test (RBT) and an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). The cases showed a rapid antibody response with peak RBT positivity (98%) at 2 weeks and iELISA (95%) at 8 weeks, then decreased in an inverse logistic curve to 14% RBT and 32% iELISA positive at 59 weeks and at 4.5 years 57% (4/7 cases) demonstrated a persistent immune response (RBT, iELISA or Brucellin skin test) to Brucella spp. Our study is the first of its kind documenting the persistence of antibodies in an African communal farming setting for over a year to years after 'high' dose S19 vaccination, which can be difficult to differentiate from a response to infection with wild-type B. abortus. A recommendation could be using a 'low' dose or different route of vaccination.

  8. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  9. Evaluation of shedding, tissue burdens, and humoral immune response in goats after experimental challenge with the virulent Brucella melitensis strain 16M and the reduced virulence vaccine strain Rev. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is the causative agent of brucellosis in small ruminants and is of considerable economic and public health importance in many countries worldwide. The control of disease in humans depends on the control of disease in livestock; however, few counties with endemic B. melitensis infection have been able to successfully eradicate this pathogen. This underscores the need for further research on the pathogenesis of both virulent and vaccine strains of B. melitensis in the small ruminant host. The aim of the present study was to characterize clinical effects, tissue colonization, shedding, and humoral immune response following B. melitensis infection in goats. Both virulent (16M) and reduced virulence (Rev. 1) strains of B. melitensis were studied. Pregnant goats were infected at 11–14 weeks of gestation with 8 x 106 or 8 x 107 CFU of B. melitensis. Infection of goats with B. melitensis 16M resulted in an 86% abortion rate. This strain disseminated widely in pregnant does post-infection with none of the 15 sampled tissues spared from colonization. Importantly, we report the first isolation of B. melitensis from muscle tissue in ruminants. Pathogenesis of Rev. 1 infection was variable with two does showing minimal colonization and one doe exhibiting disease similar to that of animals infected with fully virulent 16M. Shedding of B. melitensis in milk occurred in all 16M- and Rev. 1- infected goats. In pregnant animals challenged with virulent B. melitensis, median time to seroconversion was 21 days; however, 2 animals did not seroconvert until after abortion. PMID:29028813

  10. Omics of Brucella: Species-Specific sRNA-Mediated Gene Ontology Regulatory Networks Identified by Computational Biology.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Sridhar, Jayavel; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-06-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes the zoonotic infectious disease, brucellosis. Brucella species are currently intensively studied with a view to developing novel global health diagnostics and therapeutics. In this context, small RNAs (sRNAs) are one of the emerging topical areas; they play significant roles in regulating gene expression and cellular processes in bacteria. In the present study, we forecast sRNAs in three Brucella species that infect humans, namely Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis, using a computational biology analysis. We combined two bioinformatic algorithms, SIPHT and sRNAscanner. In B. melitensis 16M, 21 sRNA candidates were identified, of which 14 were novel. Similarly, 14 sRNAs were identified in B. abortus, of which four were novel. In B. suis, 16 sRNAs were identified, and five of them were novel. TargetRNA2 software predicted the putative target genes that could be regulated by the identified sRNAs. The identified mRNA targets are involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, nucleotide, and coenzyme metabolism and transport, energy production and conversion, replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Additionally, the Gene Ontology (GO) network analysis revealed the species-specific, sRNA-based regulatory networks in B. melitensis, B. abortus, and B. suis. Taken together, although sRNAs are veritable modulators of gene expression in prokaryotes, there are few reports on the significance of sRNAs in Brucella. This report begins to address this literature gap by offering a series of initial observations based on computational biology to pave the way for future experimental analysis of sRNAs and their targets to explain the complex pathogenesis of Brucella.

  11. Protection of BALB/C mice against Brucella abortus 544 challenge by vaccination with combination of recombinant human serum albumin-l7/l12 (Brucella abortus ribosomal protein) and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Iraj; Rezaee, Abbas; Rasaee, Mohammad J; Hossieni, Ahmad Zavaran; Tabbaraee, Bahman; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2010-01-01

    The immunogenic Brucella abortus ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are promising candidate antigens for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis. This study was aimed to evaluate the protection of combination of recombinant HSA-L7/L12 fusion protein with LPS in Balb/c mouse. The recombinant HSA-L7/L12 fusion protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was expressed and purified by affinity chromatography column. LPS was extracted by n-butanol, purified by ultracentrifugation. BALB/c mouses were immunized in 9 groups with PBS, HSA, tHSA-L7/L12, L7/L12, LPS, LPS+ HSA, LPS+ tHSA-L7/L12, LPS+ L7/L12, B. abortus S19. ELISA, LTT tests and challenging two weeks after last injection were carried out. Bacterial count of spleen of immunized BALB/c mouse was done four weeks after challenging with virulent strain B. abortus 544. In ELISA test the specific antibodies of tHSA-L7/L12 exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin IgG1 over IgG2a. LPS-HSA and tHSA-L7/L12 + LPS produced a significantly higher antibody titer than LPS alone and L7/L12+LPS (P < 0.05). The predominant IgG subtype for LPS and L7/L12+LPS were IgG3. However, tHSA-L7/L12+ LPS and LPS+ HAS elicited predominantly IgG1 and IgG3 subtypes. In addition, the tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein and L7/L12 elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant tHSA-L7/L12 and L7/L12, suggesting the induction of a cellular immunity response in vivo. However, there was no significant difference proliferative response in L7/L12 and tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein (P > 0.05). The combination of tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein with LPS and B. abortus S19 induce higher level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice than other groups (P = 0.005). The combination of tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein with LPS had higher protective ability than LPS and fusion protein distinctly.

  12. Brucella melitensis prosthetic joint infection in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joseph M; Folb, Jonathan; Kalra, Sanjay; Squire, S Bertel; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Beeching, Nick J

    Brucella spp. prosthetic joint infections are infrequently reported in the literature, particularly in returning travellers, and optimal treatment is unknown. We describe a prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by Brucella melitensis in a traveller returning to the UK from Thailand, which we believe to be the first detailed report of brucellosis in a traveller returning from this area. The 23 patients with Brucella-related PJI reported in the literature are summarised, together with our case. The diagnosis of Brucella-related PJI is difficult to make; only 30% of blood cultures and 75% of joint aspiration cultures were positive in the reported cases. Culture of intraoperative samples provides the best diagnostic yield. In the absence of radiological evidence of joint loosening, combination antimicrobial therapy alone may be appropriate treatment in the first instance; this was successful in 6/7 [86%] of patients, though small numbers of patients and the likelihood of reporting bias warrant caution in drawing any firm conclusions about optimal treatment. Aerosolisation of synovial fluid during joint aspiration procedures and nosocomial infection has been described. Brucella-related PJI should be considered in the differential of travellers returning from endemic areas with PJI, including Thailand. Personal protective equipment including fit tested filtering face piece-3 (FFP3) mask or equivalent is recommended for personnel carrying out joint aspiration when brucellosis is suspected. Travellers can reduce the risk of brucellosis by avoiding unpasteurised dairy products and animal contact (particularly on farms and abattoirs) in endemic areas and should be counselled regarding these risks as part of their pre-travel assessment. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Brucella abortus Cyclic β-1,2-Glucan Mutants Have Reduced Virulence in Mice and Are Defective in Intracellular Replication in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Gabriel; Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Roset, Mara; Vigliocco, Ana; Paulo, Patricia Silva; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2001-01-01

    Null cyclic β-1,2-glucan synthetase mutants (cgs mutants) were obtained from Brucella abortus virulent strain 2308 and from B. abortus attenuated vaccinal strain S19. Both mutants show greater sensitivity to surfactants like deoxycholic acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and Zwittergent than the parental strains, suggesting cell surface alterations. Although not to the same extent, both mutants display reduced virulence in mice and defective intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells. The B. abortus S19 cgs mutant was completely cleared from the spleens of mice after 4 weeks, while the 2308 mutant showed a 1.5-log reduction of the number of brucellae isolated from the spleens after 12 weeks. These results suggest that cyclic β-1,2-glucan plays an important role in the residual virulence of the attenuated B. abortus S19 strain. Although the cgs mutant was cleared from the spleens earlier than the wild-type parental strain (B. abortus S19) and produced less inflammatory response, its ability to confer protection against the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 was fully retained. Equivalent levels of induction of spleen gamma interferon mRNA and anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) subtype antibodies were observed in mice injected with B. abortus S19 or the cgs mutant. However, the titer of anti-LPS antibodies of the IgG1 subtype induced by the cgs mutant was lower than that observed with the parental S19 strain, thus suggesting that the cgs mutant induces a relatively exclusive Th1 response. PMID:11401996

  14. Isolation and identification of bovine Brucella isolates from Pakistan by biochemical tests and PCR.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahzad; Ali, Qurban; Melzer, Falk; Khan, Iahtasham; Akhter, Shamim; Neubauer, Heinrich; Jamal, Syed M

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in bovines in Pakistan. The Brucella species and biovars involved, however, are unknown. The objectives of the present study were to isolate and characterize brucellae from seropositive milk samples, aborted fetuses, and vaginal swabs of cattle and buffaloes which had recently aborted. The seropositive milk samples, aborted fetuses, and vaginal swabs of cattle and buffaloes were collected from the Potohar Plateau, Pakistan. Isolation of brucellae was done on modified Farrell's serum dextrose agar. Isolates were characterized by conventional biotyping methods, while molecular typing was done by genus (B4/B5) and species-specific (Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, Brucella ovis, and Brucella suis) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 30 isolates were recovered from milk (n = 5), aborted fetuses (n = 13), and vaginal swabs (n = 12). Most isolates were from cattle (56.7 %). All of them were identified as B. abortus biovar 1 based on conventional biotyping methods and genus and species-specific PCR. This preliminary study provides the first report on the prevalence of B. abortus biovar 1 in cattle and buffaloes in Pakistan.

  15. MyD88 and STING Signaling Pathways Are Required for IRF3-Mediated IFN-β Induction in Response to Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Lacerda, Thais L. S.; Vasconcelos, Anilton C.; Nogueira, Lucas; Bafica, Andre; Silva, Aristóbolo M.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that orchestrate diverse immune responses to viral and bacterial infections. Although typically considered to be most important molecules in response to viruses, type I IFNs are also induced by most, if not all, bacterial pathogens. In this study, we addressed the role of type I IFN signaling during Brucella abortus infection, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. Herein, we have shown that B. abortus induced IFN-β in macrophages and splenocytes. Further, IFN-β induction by Brucella was mediated by IRF3 signaling pathway and activates IFN-stimulated genes via STAT1 phosphorylation. In addition, IFN-β expression induced by Brucella is independent of TLRs and TRIF signaling but MyD88-dependent, a pathway not yet described for Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, we have identified Brucella DNA as the major bacterial component to induce IFN-β and our study revealed that this molecule operates through a mechanism dependent on RNA polymerase III to be sensed probably by an unknown receptor via the adaptor molecule STING. Finally, we have demonstrated that IFN-αβR KO mice are more resistant to infection suggesting that type I IFN signaling is detrimental to host control of Brucella. This resistance phenotype is accompanied by increased IFN-γ and NO production by IFN-αβR KO spleen cells and reduced apoptosis. PMID:21829705

  16. Pseudorabies Virus and Brucella abortus from an Expanding Wild Pig ( Sus scrofa ) Population in Southern Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Gaskamp, Joshua A; Gee, Kenneth L; Campbell, Tyler A; Silvy, Nova J; Webb, Stephen L

    2016-04-28

    Wild pigs ( Sus scrofa ) are causing increasing ecologic and economic damage at a global scale. Because wild pigs can carry ≥65 diseases that affect livestock, their widespread expansion threatens native wildlife and livestock. We screened wild pigs from south-central Oklahoma, US for antibodies against Brucella abortus , pseudorabies virus (PRV), and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRS). These pathogens were chosen because they are part of eradication programs in the US and could have large economic impacts on domestic livestock if transmitted from wild animals. We tested 282 serum samples during spring 2010 (n=149) and 2011 (n=133) and found an overall exposure rate to PRV of 24.1% (n=68); PRV was detected at two of three study sites. Two wild pigs had detectable antibody to B. abortus , and one had detectable antibody to PRRS. On average, 27% of wild pigs within a sounder were positive for PRV antibody, with 44% of the sounders (16/36) having at least one positive individual. These data highlight that wild pigs could carry pathogens that affect domestic livestock. Because the US is free of these pathogens in commercial livestock operations, continued surveillance and vaccination of domestic livestock are needed. Commercial livestock producers at the wildlife-livestock interface may benefit from spatial prioritization of risk zones to facilitate strategic control efforts.

  17. Variables Associated with Infections of Cattle by Brucella abortus., Leptospira spp. and Neospora spp. in Amazon Region in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiebao, D P; Valadas, S Y O B; Minervino, A H H; Castro, V; Romaldini, A H C N; Calhau, A S; De Souza, R A B; Gennari, S M; Keid, L B; Soares, R M

    2015-10-01

    The frequency of Neospora spp., Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus infections in adult cattle was determined in herds of the State of Pará, Brazil, which is an important region for cattle production located in the Amazon region. A total of 3466 adult female cattle from 176 herds were tested, leading to a frequency of seropositive animals of 14.7%, 3.7% and 65.5% and a herd positivity of 87.4%, 41.3% and 98.8% for infections caused by Neospora spp., B. abortus and Leptospira spp., respectively. The five most frequently diagnosed serologic responses to Leptospira spp. were those against serovars hardjo, wolfii, grippotyphosa, hebdomadis and shermani. The following associations were found: practice of artificial insemination, large farm size, large herd size, large number of dogs and high number of total abortions per year with the presence of antibodies against serovar hardjo; positive results to serovar grippotyphosa with the presence of dogs; inappropriate disposal of aborted foetuses with positivity to serovar hebdomadis. Serovar grippotyphosa was also associated with number of episodes of abortions. Neospora spp. positive herds were associated with episodes of abortion and B. abortus infection with the disposal of dead animals and aborted foetuses on pastures and with the use of artificial insemination. In conclusion, the high frequency of brucellosis, leptospirosis and neosporosis in the region may be a consequence of social, natural and raising conditions as: (i) climate conditions that favour the survival and spread of pathogens in the environment; (ii) farms located in regions bordering forest areas; (iii) farms in areas of difficult access to the veterinary service; (iv) extensive beef herds raised at pastures with different age and productive groups inter-mingled; and (v) minimal concerns regarding hygiene practices and disease prevention measures. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. [Use of multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis for the Brucella systematization].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, Iu K; Kovalev, D A; Misetova, E N; Golovneva, S I; Liapustina, L V; Zheludkov, M M

    2012-01-01

    The methods of molecular-genetic differentiation to strain level acquire increasing significance in the current system of struggle with brucellosis. MLVA (multiple locus variable number tandem repeats analysis) was selected for molecular-genetic differentiation to strain level and simultaneous establishment of the genetic relationship of investigated Brucella strains. The goal of this work was MLVA typing of three pathogenic Brucella species strains with the analysis of stability of chosen loci, discrimination power and concordance to conventional phenotypic methods of the Brucella differentiation for use in systematization of brucellosis causing agents. Twenty six Brucella strains representing reference (n = 15), vaccine (n = 2) and field strains of three pathogenic Brucella species were tested: B. melitensis (n = 3), B. abortus (n = 2), B. suis (n = 2), and isolates (n = 2) with unidentified taxonomic position using MLVA with 9 pairs primers on known variable loci of Brucella genome. The analysis of the stability of chosen loci, discrimination power on Hunter-Gaston discrimination index (HGDI) and consistency to phenotypic methods of identification was performed. MLVA was confirmed for the results of phenotypic methods of identification, stability of the chosen loci in majority reference, and vaccine strains with a high index of variability HGDI 0.9969 for all loci. A dendrogram was plotted on the basis of MLVA data on distributed Brucella strains in related clusters according to its taxonomic species and biovar positions and construction of 25 genotypes. B. melitensis strains formed cluster related to the reference strain of B. melitensis 63/9 biovar 2. Australian isolates of Brucella 83-4 and Brucella 83-6 isolated from rodents formed a cluster distant from other strains of Brucella. MLVA is a promising method for differentiation of Brucella strains with known and unresolved taxonomic status for their systematization and creation of MLVA genotype catalogue that

  19. The Use of Case History Studies to Differentiate Potentially Infected from Potentially Noninfected Herds with Reactors to Brucella abortus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. W.; Gerrow, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    Data on farm characteristics and the results of the first herd test for brucellosis were collected for 74 reactor and 74 negative herds in Wellington County, Ontario. Each reactor herd was classified as either probably infected or probably not infected using the occurrence of abortions prior to the first herd test or during the testing period, the total number of cattle removed and/or the spread of reactors within the herd as criteria of infection. Statistical techniques were used to select variables which were good “discriminators” between probably infected and noninfected herds. In general, reactor herds were primarily dairy herds and were somewhat larger than negative herds. The presence of only single suspicious reactors on the first test appeared to be a good predictor of lack of infection with Brucella abortus. Among the 37 farms in this category the single reactor was removed from only eight farms and no evidence o fthe spread of infection was observed. The presence of one or more positive reactors on the first herd test appeared to be a good predictor of the presence of infection. Of the 24 farms in this category, evidence of the spread of infection was present in ten farms and seven of these ten farms were eventually depopulated. The brucella milk ring test appeared to be the most effective means of identifying infected herds under the conditions present in Wellington County. PMID:417777

  20. Structural, Functional, and Immunogenic Insights on Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase Pathogenic Virulence Factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Bruns, Cami K.; Belzer, Carol A.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Kroll, J. Simon; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen and general pathogenicity factors and are therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomic details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and of SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly, and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes, and suggest general targets for antibacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors of or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. IMPORTANCE By protecting microbes against

  1. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    DOE PAGES

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen, general pathogenicity factors and therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomicmore » details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes and suggest general targets for anti-bacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. IMPORTANCE By protecting microbes against reactive oxygen

  2. Structural, Functional, and Immunogenic Insights on Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase Pathogenic Virulence Factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Ashley J; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S; Cabelli, Diane E; Bruns, Cami K; Belzer, Carol A; Gorringe, Andrew R; Langford, Paul R; Tabatabai, Louisa B; Kroll, J Simon; Tainer, John A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen and general pathogenicity factors and are therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomic details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and of SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly, and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes, and suggest general targets for antibacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors of or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. By protecting microbes against reactive oxygen

  3. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen, general pathogenicity factors and therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomicmore » details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes and suggest general targets for anti-bacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. IMPORTANCE By protecting microbes against reactive oxygen

  4. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  5. Detection of Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus antibodies in free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) in two protected areas of northern Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Selma Samiko Miyazaki; Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; Crawshaw Júnior, Peter Gransden; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; May-Júnior, Joares Adenilson; Morais, Zenaide Maria de; Ferreira Neto, José Soares; Aguiar, Daniel Moura de

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the exposure of free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) to Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus in two conservation units in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The presence of antibodies in blood samples of eleven jaguars was investigated using autochthonous antigens isolated in Brazil added to reference antigen collection applied to diagnosis of leptospirosis by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The Rose Bengal test was applied for B. abortus antibodies. Two (18.2%) jaguars were seroreactive for the Leptospira spp. antigen and the serovar considered as most infective in both animals was a Brazilian isolate of serovar Canicola (L01). All jaguars were seronegative for B. abortus. These data indicate that the inclusion of autochthonous antigens in serological studies can significantly increase the number of reactive animals, as well as modify the epidemiological profile of Leptospira spp. infection.

  6. DETECTION OF Leptospira spp. AND Brucella abortus ANTIBODIES IN FREE-LIVING JAGUARS (Panthera onca) IN TWO PROTECTED AREAS OF NORTHERN PANTANAL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    ONUMA, Selma Samiko Miyazaki; KANTEK, Daniel Luis Zanella; CRAWSHAW, Peter Gransden; MORATO, Ronaldo Gonçalves; MAY-JÚNIOR, Joares Adenilson; de MORAIS, Zenaide Maria; FERREIRA, José Soares; de AGUIAR, Daniel Moura

    2015-01-01

     This study aimed to assess the exposure of free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) to Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus in two conservation units in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The presence of antibodies in blood samples of eleven jaguars was investigated using autochthonous antigens isolated in Brazil added to reference antigen collection applied to diagnosis of leptospirosis by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The Rose Bengal test was applied for B. abortus antibodies. Two (18.2%) jaguars were seroreactive for the Leptospira spp. antigen and the serovar considered as most infective in both animals was a Brazilian isolate of serovar Canicola (L01). All jaguars were seronegative for B. abortus. These data indicate that the inclusion of autochthonous antigens in serological studies can significantly increase the number of reactive animals, as well as modify the epidemiological profile of Leptospira spp. infection. PMID:25923900

  7. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  8. Brucella suis strain 2 vaccine is safe and protective against heterologous Brucella spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangquan; Feng, Yu; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Nan; Ding, Jiabo; Suo, Xun

    2016-01-12

    Brucellosis is a wide spread zoonotic disease that causes abortion and infertility in mammals and leads to debilitating, febrile illness in humans. Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis are the major pathogenic species to humans. Vaccination with live attenuated B. suis strain 2 (S2) vaccine is an essential and critical component in the control of brucellosis in China. The S2 vaccine is very effective in preventing brucellosis in goats, sheep, cattle and swine. However, there are still debates outside of China whether the S2 vaccine is able to provide protection against heterologous virulent Brucella species. We investigated the residual virulence, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the S2 vaccine in BALB/c mice by determining bacteria persistence in spleen, serum antibody response, cellular immune response and protection against a heterologous virulent challenge. The S2 vaccine was of low virulence as there were no bacteria recovered in spleen four weeks post vaccination. The vaccinated mice developed Brucella-specific IgG in 2-3 weeks, and a burst production of IFN-γ at one week as well as a two-fold increase in TNF-α production. The S2 vaccine protected mice from a virulent challenge by B. melitensis M28, B. abortus 2308 and B. suis S1330, and the S2 vaccinated mice did not develop any clinical signs or tissue damage. Our study demonstrated that the S2 vaccine is of low virulence, stimulates good humoral and cellular immunity and protects animals against infection by heterologous, virulent Brucella species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  10. The genome sequence of Brucella pinnipedialis B2/94 sheds light on the evolutionary history of the genus Brucella

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since the discovery of the Malta fever agent, Brucella melitensis, in the 19th century, six terrestrial mammal-associated Brucella species were recognized over the next century. More recently the number of novel Brucella species has increased and among them, isolation of species B. pinnipedialis and B. ceti from marine mammals raised many questions about their origin as well as on the evolutionary history of the whole genus. Results We report here on the first complete genome sequence of a Brucella strain isolated from marine mammals, Brucella pinnipedialis strain B2/94. A whole gene-based phylogenetic analysis shows that five main groups of host-associated Brucella species rapidly diverged from a likely free-living ancestor close to the recently isolated B. microti. However, this tree lacks the resolution required to resolve the order of divergence of those groups. Comparative analyses focusing on a) genome segments unshared between B. microti and B. pinnipedialis, b) gene deletion/fusion events and c) positions and numbers of Brucella specific IS711 elements in the available Brucella genomes provided enough information to propose a branching order for those five groups. Conclusions In this study, it appears that the closest relatives of marine mammal Brucella sp. are B. ovis and Brucella sp. NVSL 07-0026 isolated from a baboon, followed by B. melitensis and B. abortus strains, and finally the group consisting of B. suis strains, including B. canis and the group consisting of the single B. neotomae species. We were not able, however, to resolve the order of divergence of the two latter groups. PMID:21745361

  11. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX.

  12. Studies on the genetic control of murine humoral response to immunization with a peptidoglycan-containing fraction extracted from Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Cannat, A; Feingold, N; Caffin, J C; Serre, A

    1979-01-01

    A peptidoglycan containing fraction (fraction "5") extracted from Brucella melitensis has been injected in low infra-vaccinating doses into inbred mice. The genetic control of the resulting anti-Brucella humoral response has been studied in the C57BL/6 "good responder" X DBA2 "low responder" model. The results observed in F1, F2 and reciprocal backcrosses show that the "good responder" character, although transmitted as a dominant trait, is under polygenic control and independent of H2 haplotype, Ig allotype, sexual chromosoms or the "d" coat color gene. On the other hand, the phenotypic expression of at least one of the genes involved is sex-limited and influenced by hormonal environmental factors. Moreover the expression in females of one of these sex-dependent genes is associated with the "b" coat color gene. These results are discussed in terms of their possible relevance in spontaneous or vaccinal resistance to experimental brucellosis, of the relative role of the peptidoglycan and lipoprotein moieties in fraction "5" and of the possible importance of sex-dependent and chromosome 4-linked genetic factors for B-cell functions.

  13. Assessment of genetic diversity of zoonotic Brucella spp. recovered from livestock in Egypt using multiple locus VNTR analysis.

    PubMed

    Menshawy, Ahmed M S; Perez-Sancho, Marta; Garcia-Seco, Teresa; Hosein, Hosein I; García, Nerea; Martinez, Irene; Sayour, Ashraf E; Goyache, Joaquín; Azzam, Ragab A A; Dominguez, Lucas; Alvarez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is endemic in most parts of Egypt, where it is caused mainly by Brucella melitensis biovar 3, and affects cattle and small ruminants in spite of ongoing efforts devoted to its control. Knowledge of the predominant Brucella species/strains circulating in a region is a prerequisite of a brucellosis control strategy. For this reason a study aiming at the evaluation of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of a panel of 17 Brucella spp. isolates recovered from domestic ruminants (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) from four governorates during a period of five years (2002-2007) was carried out using microbiological tests and molecular biology techniques (PCR, MLVA-15, and sequencing). Thirteen strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 while all phenotypic and genetic techniques classified the remaining isolates as B. abortus (n = 2) and B. suis biovar 1 (n = 2). MLVA-15 yielded a high discriminatory power (h = 0.801), indicating a high genetic diversity among the B. melitensis strains circulating among domestic ruminants in Egypt. This is the first report of the isolation of B. suis from cattle in Egypt which, coupled with the finding of B. abortus, suggests a potential role of livestock as reservoirs of several zoonotic Brucella species in the region.

  14. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Guimarães, Beatriz G.

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one moleculemore » of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C{sub 3} symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.« less

  15. [Detection of Brucella with an automatic hemoculture system: Bact/Alert].

    PubMed

    Casas, J; Partal, Y; Llosá, J; Leiva, J; Navarro, J M; de la Rosa, M

    1994-12-01

    The ability of in vitro and in vivo detection of Brucella spp. with the Bact/Alert system was studied. Three strains of Brucella melitensis and two of Brucella abortus were used. Different dilutions of the five strains were performed in trypticase soy broth (TSB), achieving concentrations of 1 cfu/ml, 5 cfu/ml, 10 cfu/ml and 100 cfu/ml. Ten ml of each dilution and strain were inoculated into 5 aerobic bottles Bact/Alert and 5 biphasic Hemóline bottles. Furthermore, over a 9 month period, 8,216 bottles of Bact/Alert bottles from hospitalized patients and from the emergency department were processed in the authors' laboratory. The mean detection time for Brucella growth was from 2 to 3 days with the Bact/Alert system, and 14 days in the biphasic bottles. Former bottles processed in the authors' laboratory, 11 aerobic bottles belonged to 5 patients in whom brucelosis was confirmed by bloodculture. The Bact/Alert system detected Brucella melitensis in only on bottle at 2.9 days of incubation. In 7 bottles Bact/Alert detected B. melitensis by a blind pass of these bottles at 10 to 20 days of incubation. These results suggest that the Bact/Alert system does not totally solve the diagnosis of brucellosis. Blind passes of the bloodcultures are required.

  16. Immunization with viable Brucella organisms*

    PubMed Central

    Spink, Wesley W.; Hall, James W.; Finstad, Joanne; Mallet, Edmund

    1962-01-01

    In many parts of the world contact with infected livestock may involve a serious risk of the spread of human brucellosis. Partial control of bovine brucellosis has been achieved by slaughter of infected herds and immunization of cattle with Brucella abortus strain 19 living vaccine. However, in areas where such measures are unpractical there remains a need for protection of humans. This study compares the safety of two living Brucella vaccine preparations in human volunteers. Some 32 healthy male volunteers with no evidence of past exposure to brucellosis were divided into two comparable groups; one group received 19-BA vaccine derived from Br. abortus and the other received Rev 1 vaccine derived from Br. melitensis. Detailed studies over a six-month period of the clinical effects, bacteraemia, Brucella agglutinin response and dermal hypersensitivity revealed striking differences between the two groups. Two of the 16 men in the 19-BA group developed acute brucellosis, and another had a positive blood culture. In the Rev 1 group, 11 of 16 developed acute brucellosis, and brucellae were recovered from 12. All 32 men developed Brucella agglutinins, the Rev 1 group having higher titres. Dermal hypersensitivity occurred in all of the Rev. 1 group but in only nine of the 19-BA group. Tetracycline treatment in all the Rev 1 group and in the two brucellosis cases in the 19-BA group resulted in complete recovery. The authors conclude from this study that neither the Rev 1 vaccine nor the 19-BA vaccine inoculated subcutaneously is sufficiently safe in the dosage used to warrant being used for vaccination of humans for prophylactic purposes. PMID:13915813

  17. Vaccination with recombinant L7/L12-truncated Omp31 protein induces protection against Brucella infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Golshani, Maryam; Rafati, Sima; Dashti, Amir; Gholami, Elham; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Oloomi, Mana; Jafari, Anis; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-06-01

    Brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonotic disease worldwide and no vaccine is available for the prevention of human brucellosis. In humans, brucellosis is mostly caused by Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus. The Outer membrane protein 31 (Omp31) and L7/L12 are immunodominant and protective antigens conserved in human Brucella pathogens. In the present study, we evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by a fusion protein designed based on the Truncated form of Omp31 (TOmp31) and L7-L12 antigens. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the recombinant fusion protein (rL7/L12-TOmp31) provided the significant protection level against B. melitensis and B. abortus challenge. Moreover, rL7/L12-TOmp31 elicited a strong specific IgG response (higher IgG2a titers) and significant IFN-γ/IL2 production and T-cell proliferation was also observed. The T helper1 (Th1) oriented response persisted for 12 weeks after the first immunization. The rL7/L12-TOmp31 could be a new potential antigen candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against B. melitensis and B. abortus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Brucella Infection in Asian Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris lutris) on Bering Island, Russia.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Tristan L; Johnson, Christine Kreuder; Burdin, Alexander; Gill, Verena A; Doroff, Angela M; Tuomi, Pamela; Smith, Woutrina A; Goldstein, Tracey

    2017-10-01

    Infection with Brucella spp., long known as a cause of abortion, infertility, and reproductive loss in domestic livestock, has increasingly been documented in marine mammals over the past two decades. We report molecular evidence of Brucella infection in Asian sea otters (Enhydra lutris lutris). Brucella DNA was detected in 3 of 78 (4%) rectal swab samples collected between 2004 and 2006 on Bering Island, Russia. These 78 animals had previously been documented to have a Brucella seroprevalence of 28%, markedly higher than the prevalence documented in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in North America. All of the DNA sequences amplified were identical to one or more previously isolated Brucella spp. including strains from both terrestrial and marine hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence suggested that one animal was shedding Brucella spp. DNA with a sequence matching a Brucella abortus strain, whereas two animals yielded a sequence matching a group of strains including isolates classified as Brucella pinnipedialis and Brucella melitensis. Our results highlight the diversity of Brucella spp. within a single sea otter population.

  19. The unexpected discovery of Brucella abortus Buck 19 vaccine in goats from Ecuador underlines the importance of biosecurity measures.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Berkvens, Dirk; Barzallo-Rivadeneira, Daniela; Angulo-Cruz, Alexandra; González-Andrade, Pablo; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Saegerman, Claude

    2017-03-01

    Very few, mostly old, and only preliminary serological studies of brucellosis in goats exist in Ecuador. In order to assess the current epidemiological situation, we performed a cross-sectional serological study in the goat populations of Carchi (n = 160 animals), Pichincha (n = 224 animals), and Loja provinces (n = 2024 animals). Only two positive serological results (RB negative and SAT-EDTA ≥400 IU/ml) were obtained in lactating goats from the same farm in Quito (Pichincha province). Additionally, milk was sampled from 220 animals in Pichincha province. The present study indicates a low apparent prevalence in Pichincha province and absence in Carchi and Loja provinces. A total of 25 positive milk ring tests (MRT) were obtained in Pichincha province yielding a prevalence of MRT of 11.16%. Subsequent culture was performed on the positive MRT samples. All results were negative, apart from a single sample, obtained from a serologically positive goat in Quito, that was positive for Brucella abortus strain 19 (B19). Several hypotheses are forwarded concerning this unexpected result. The most likely hypothesis is the possible accidental use of a needle, previously used for vaccination of cattle with the said vaccine, for the administration of drug treatment to the goat. This hypothesis underlines the necessity of biosecurity measures to prevent this type of accidents.

  20. Comparison of Buffered, Acidified Plate Antigen to Standard Serologic Tests for the Detection of Serum Antibodies to Brucella abortus in Elk (Cervus canadensis).

    PubMed

    Clarke, P Ryan; Edwards, William H; Hennager, Steven G; Block, Jean F; Yates, Angela M; Ebel, Eric; Knopp, Douglas J; Fuentes-Sanchez, Antonio; Jennings-Gaines, Jessica; Kientz, Rebecca L; Simunich, Marilyn

    2015-07-01

    Brucellosis (caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus) is a zoonotic disease endemic in wild elk (Cervus canadensis) of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, US. Because livestock and humans working with elk or livestock are at risk, validated tests to detect the B. abortus antibody in elk are needed. Using the κ-statistic, we evaluated the buffered, acidified plate antigen (BAPA) assay for agreement with the results of the four serologic tests (card test [card], complement fixation test [CF], rivanol precipitation plate agglutination test [RIV], standard plate agglutination test [SPT]) that are approved by the US Department of Agriculture for the detection of the B. abortus antibody in elk. From 2006 to 2010, serum samples collected from elk within B. abortus-endemic areas (n = 604) and nonendemic areas (n = 707) and from elk culture-positive for B. abortus (n = 36) were split and blind tested by four elk serum diagnostic laboratories. κ-Values showed a high degree of agreement for the card (0.876), RIV (0.84), and CF (0.774) test pairings and moderate agreement for the SPT (0.578). Sensitivities for the BAPA, card, RIV, CF, and SPT were 0.859, 0.839, 0.899, 1.00, and 0.813, whereas specificities were 0.986, 0.993, 0.986, 0.98, and 0.968, respectively. The positive predictive values and the negative predictive values were calculated for 2.6%, 8.8%, and 16.2% prevalence levels. These findings suggest the BAPA test is a suitable screening test for the B. abortus antibodies in elk.

  1. Comparative analysis of the early transcriptome of Brucella abortus - infected monocyte-derived macrophages from cattle naturally resistant or susceptible to brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, C.A.; Galindo, C.L.; Everts, R.E.; Lewin, H.A.; Garner, H.R.; Adams, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease that has a significant economic impact on animal production and human public health. We characterized the gene expression profile of B. abortus-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from naïve cattle naturally resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to brucellosis using a cDNA microarray technology. Our data indicate that 1) B. abortus induced a slightly increased genome activation in R MDMs and a down-regulated transcriptome in S MDMs, during the onset of infection, 2) R MDMs had the ability to mount a type 1 immune response against B. abortus infection which was impaired in S cells, and 3) the host cell activity was not altered after 12h post-B. abortus infection in R MDMs while the cell cycle was largely arrested in infected S MDMs at 12h p.i. These results contribute to understand of how host responses may be manipulated to prevent infection by brucellae. PMID:20932540

  2. Real-time PCR Detection of Brucella Abortus: A Comparative Study of SYBR Green I, 5'-exonuclease, and Hybridization Probe Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah Trishelle; Hadfield, Ted; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    Real-time PCR provides a means of detecting and quantifying DNA targets by monitoring PCR product accumulation during cycling as indicated by increased fluorescence. A number of different approaches can be used to generate the fluorescence signal. Three approaches—SYBR Green I (a double-stranded DNA intercalating dye), 5'-exonuclease (enzymatically released fluors), and hybridization probes (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)—were evaluated for use in a real-time PCR assay to detect Brucella abortus. The three assays utilized the same amplification primers to produce an identical amplicon. This amplicon spans a region of the B. abortus genome that includes portions of the alkB gene and themore » IS711 insertion element. All three assays were of comparable sensitivity, providing a linear assay over 7 orders of magnitude (from 7.5 ng down to 7.5 fg). However, the greatest specificity was achieved with the hybridization probe assay.« less

  3. Oral immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated Brucella neotomae induces protection against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Dabral, Neha; Martha-Moreno-Lafont; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular coccobacilli that cause one of the most frequently encountered zoonosis worldwide. Humans naturally acquire infection through consumption of contaminated dairy and meat products and through direct exposure to aborted animal tissues and fluids. No vaccine against brucellosis is available for use in humans. In this study, we tested the ability of orally inoculated gamma-irradiated B. neotomae and B. abortus RB51 in a prime-boost immunization approach to induce antigen-specific humoral and cell mediated immunity and protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with B. abortus RB51 and B. neotomae and homologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with B. neotomae led to the production of serum and mucosal antibodies specific to the smooth LPS. The elicited serum antibodies included the isotypes of IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. All oral vaccination regimens induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α. Upon intra-peritoneal challenge, mice vaccinated with B. neotomae showed the highest level of resistance against virulent B. abortus 2308 colonization in spleen and liver. Experiments with different doses of B. neotomae showed that all tested doses of 10(9), 10(10) and 10(11) CFU-equivalent conferred significant protection against the intra-peritoneal challenge. However, a dose of 10(11) CFU-equivalent of B. neotomae was required for affording protection against intranasal challenge as shown by the reduced bacterial colonization in spleens and lungs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using gamma-irradiated B. neotomae as an effective and safe oral vaccine to induce protection against respiratory and systemic infections with virulent Brucella.

  4. Express immunochromatographic detection of antibodies against Brucella abortus in cattle sera based on quantitative photometric registration and modulated cut-off level.

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, Dmitriy V; Byzova, Nadezhda A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Eskendirova, Saule Z; Baltin, Kairat K; Mukanov, Kasim K; Ramankulov, Erlan M; Sadykhov, Elchin G; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    An immunochromatographic test system was developed for rapid detection of the levels of specific IgG antibodies to Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide, as a tool for diagnosis of brucellosis in cattle. The pilot test strips were examined using blood sera from sick (78 samples) and healthy (35 samples) cows. The results obtained by immunochromatographic assay, using a portable optical densitometer for digital video detection, correlate well with the results obtained by immunoenzyme assay and are in agreement with the results of the disease diagnosis. The new test system allows detection of antibodies within 10 min and can be proposed as an alternative to the methods available for serodiagnosis of brucellosis.

  5. Crucial role of gamma interferon-producing CD4+ Th1 cells but dispensable function of CD8+ T cell, B cell, Th2, and Th17 responses in the control of Brucella melitensis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Vitry, Marie-Alice; De Trez, Carl; Goriely, Stanislas; Dumoutier, Laure; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Carlier, Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis that causes abortion in domestic animals and chronic febrile disease associated with serious complications in humans. There is currently no approved vaccine against human brucellosis, and antibiotic therapy is long and costly. Development of a safe protective vaccine requires a better understanding of the roles played by components of adaptive immunity in the control of Brucella infection. The importance of lymphocyte subsets in the control of Brucella growth has been investigated separately by various research groups and remains unclear or controversial. Here, we used a large panel of genetically deficient mice to compare the importance of B cells, transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP-1), and major histocompatibility complex class II-dependent pathways of antigen presentation as well as T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17-mediated responses on the immune control of Brucella melitensis 16 M infection. We clearly confirmed the key function played by gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing Th1 CD4(+) T cells in the control of B. melitensis infection, whereas IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cells or B cell-mediated humoral immunity plays only a modest role in the clearance of bacteria during primary infection. In the presence of a Th1 response, Th2 or Th17 responses do not really develop or play a positive or negative role during the course of B. melitensis infection. On the whole, these results could improve our ability to develop protective vaccines or therapeutic treatments against brucellosis.

  6. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.

    ABSTRACT The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogenBrucella abortuscontrols the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required forB. abortussurvival under nonoptimal growth conditionsin vitroand for maintenance of chronic infection in anin vivomouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined.bab1_1070is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditionsin vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstratemore » that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However,B. abortusWrbA-relatedprotein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductasein vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion ofwrpA(ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stressin vitroor attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpAstrain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulatesB. abortusinteraction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose thatB. abortusWrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. IMPORTANCEBrucella abortusis an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system ofB. abortuscontrols the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of GSR-regulated genes

  7. The Dutch Brucella abortus monitoring programme for cattle: the impact of false-positive serological reactions and comparison of serological tests.

    PubMed

    Emmerzaal, A; de Wit, J J; Dijkstra, Th; Bakker, D; van Zijderveld, F G

    2002-02-01

    The Dutch national Brucella abortus eradication programme for cattle started in 1959. Sporadic cases occurred yearly until 1995; the last infected herd was culled in 1996. In August 1999 the Netherlands was declared officially free of bovine brucellosis by the European Union. Before 1999, the programme to monitor the official Brucella-free status of bovine herds was primarily based on periodical testing of dairy herds with the milk ring test (MRT) and serological testing of all animals older than 1 year of age from non-dairy herds, using the micro-agglutination test (MAT) as screening test. In addition, serum samples of cattle that aborted were tested with the MAT. The high number of false positive reactions in both tests and the serum agglutination test (SAT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for confirmation seemed to result in unnecessary blockade of herds, subsequent testing and slaughter of animals. For this reason, a validation study was performed in which three indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), the CFT and the SAT were compared using a panel of sera from brucellosis-free cattle, sera from experimentally infected cattle, and sera from cattle experimentally infected with bacteria which are known to induce cross-reactive antibodies (Pasteurella, Salmonella, Yersinia, and Escherichia). Moreover, four ELISAs and the MRT were compared using a panel of 1000 bulk milk samples from Brucella-free herds and 12 milk samples from Brucella abortus- infected cattle. It is concluded that the ELISA obtained from ID-Lelystad is the most suitable test to monitor the brucelosis free status of herds because it gives rise to fewer false-positive reactions than the SAT.

  8. Effects of Opsonization and Gamma Interferon on Growth of Brucella Melitensis 16M in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    bacterial CFU (Fig. 3). Macrophages cultured without brucel - lae or cultured with brucellae but without IFN-7 made ɘ.3 nmol of nitrite/200 JJLI well...receptors used for the uptake of nonopsonized brucel - lae are unknown. Synergy between the receptor for the Fc domain of immunoglobulin G (FcR) and

  9. Characterization of Periplasmic Protein BP26 Epitopes of Brucella melitensis Reacting with Murine Monoclonal and Sheep Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Qiao, Jun; Chen, Chuangfu; Gao, Goege F.; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    More than 35,000 new cases of human brucellosis were reported in 2010 by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. An attenuated B. melitensis vaccine M5-90 is currently used for vaccination of sheep and goats in China. In the study, a periplasmic protein BP26 from M5-90 was characterized for its epitope reactivity with mouse monoclonal and sheep antibodies. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against recombinant BP26 (rBP26) were produced, which were tested for reactivity with a panel of BP26 peptides, three truncated rBP26 and native BP26 containing membrane protein extracts (NMP) of B. melitensis M5-90 in ELISA and Western-Blot. The linear, semi-conformational and conformational epitopes from native BP26 were identified. Two linear epitopes recognized by mAbs were revealed by 28 of 16mer overlapping peptides, which were accurately mapped as the core motif of amino acid residues 93DRDLQTGGI101 (position 93 to 101) or residues 104QPIYVYPD111, respectively. The reactivity of linear epitope peptides, rBP26 and NMP was tested with 137 sheep sera by ELISAs, of which the two linear epitopes had 65–70% reactivity and NMP 90% consistent with the results of a combination of two standard serological tests. The results were helpful for evaluating the reactivity of BP26 antigen in M5-90. PMID:22457830

  10. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cellsmore » from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.« less

  11. Brucella

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brucella are intracellular pathogens that cause reproductive losses in animals and zoonotic infections in people. Although named by preferred host species, members of the Brucella genus are capable of infecting multiple species. In preferred hosts, clinical symptoms are generally minimal whereas m...

  12. Analyses of Brucella pathogenesis, host immunity, and vaccine targets using systems biology and bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    He, Yongqun

    2012-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning.

  13. Analyses of Brucella Pathogenesis, Host Immunity, and Vaccine Targets using Systems Biology and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun

    2011-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes zoonotic brucellosis in humans and various animals. Out of 10 classified Brucella species, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, and B. canis are pathogenic to humans. In the past decade, the mechanisms of Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity have been extensively investigated using the cutting edge systems biology and bioinformatics approaches. This article provides a comprehensive review of the applications of Omics (including genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics) and bioinformatics technologies for the analysis of Brucella pathogenesis, host immune responses, and vaccine targets. Based on more than 30 sequenced Brucella genomes, comparative genomics is able to identify gene variations among Brucella strains that help to explain host specificity and virulence differences among Brucella species. Diverse transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression studies have been conducted to analyze gene expression profiles of wild type Brucella strains and mutants under different laboratory conditions. High throughput Omics analyses of host responses to infections with virulent or attenuated Brucella strains have been focused on responses by mouse and cattle macrophages, bovine trophoblastic cells, mouse and boar splenocytes, and ram buffy coat. Differential serum responses in humans and rams to Brucella infections have been analyzed using high throughput serum antibody screening technology. The Vaxign reverse vaccinology has been used to predict many Brucella vaccine targets. More than 180 Brucella virulence factors and their gene interaction networks have been identified using advanced literature mining methods. The recent development of community-based Vaccine Ontology and Brucellosis Ontology provides an efficient way for Brucella data integration, exchange, and computer-assisted automated reasoning. PMID:22919594

  14. B cell-deficient mice display markedly enhanced resistance to the intracellular bacterium Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Radhika; Parent, Michelle A; Elzer, Philip H; Baldwin, Cynthia L

    2011-04-15

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause lifelong infections in humans and livestock. Here we evaluated the contribution of B cells in control of murine brucellosis in the more susceptible BALB/c and the more resistant C57BL/6 mice by infecting B cell-deficient mice. Strikingly, in the absence of B cells in both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, 99% and 99.5% of the infection found in wild type mice was cleared, respectively. This augmented clearance was not reversed in either strain by passive transfer of immune serum. In C57BL/6 mice, the clearance of infection coincided with an increase in interferon γ (IFN-γ)-producing CD4 and CD8 T cells and a reduction in interleukin 10 (IL-10)-producing cells. In BALB/c mice, this clearance was IFN-γ-dependent, as B cell/IFN-γ dual knockout mice were unable to clear the infection, and was inversely related to the levels of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Furthermore, B cells were found to produce TGF-β and IL-10 during early stages of infection in BALB/c wild-type and C57BL/6 wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, we demonstrate that the establishment of the high plateau phase of infection is dependent on non-antibody-mediated B cell effector mechanisms, including B regulatory functions, during murine brucellosis. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. Serological activity of white-tail deer against several species of Brucella.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Meléndez, J A; Martínez-Muñoz, A; Avalos-Ramírez, R; Cerutti-Pereyra, N; Riojas-Valdés, V M

    1998-01-01

    In Mexico, brucellosis is a widely distributed disease of domesticated ruminants, but its frequency in wild ruminants has not been documented. Since northeast Mexico is the main distribution area of white-tailed deer and has been reported as an area positive for brucellosis in domesticated species, the present study was conducted in order to determine serological activity against several species of the genus Brucella in white-tailed deer. A total of 208 sera of white-tailed deer were collected during the springs of 1994 and 1995 in the north part of the states of Nuevo León and Coahuila. Each serum was analyzed for the detection of antibodies against two smooth (B. abortus and B. melitensis) and one rough (B. ovis) species of the genus Brucella. The serological tests used for the determination of the presence of antibodies against Brucella were card and plate agglutination for B. abortus, plate agglutination and rivanol precipitation for B. melitensis, and agar gel immunodiffusion for B. ovis. Each assay had positive and negative controls. None of the analyzed samples was found to be positive, and only two sera showed partial plate agglutination against B. melitensis at a dilution of 1:25; however, at higher dilutions and to the rivanol precipitation test the same samples were negative. Therefore, the percentage of positive sera was estimated at 0% (0/208). This result makes evident the absence of positive white-tailed deer against Brucella in the sampled area, despite that this disease is considered present in domesticated species. Therefore, white-tailed deer does not have, at the present time, an important role for the dispersion of the disease. The same result has been reported in other countries.

  16. Brucella

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Brucella encompasses a group of gram negative bacteria that survive almost exclusively in infected hosts with preference for localization in intracellular compartments of cells. The genus has traditionally been divided into species based on microbe characteristics and host preference, bu...

  17. Brucella melitensis VirB12 recombinant protein is a potential marker for serodiagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Mirkalantari, Shiva; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Nazari, Mahboobeh; Irajian, Gholam Reza; Amirmozafari, Nour

    2017-03-03

    The numerous drawbacks of current serological tests for diagnosis of brucellosis which mainly results from cross reactivity with LPS from other gram-negative bacteria have generated an increasing interest to find more specific non-LPS antigens. Previous studies had indicated that Brucella VirB12 protein, a cell surface protein and component of type IV secretion system, induces antibody response during animal infection. However, this protein has not yet been tested as a serological diagnostic marker in human brucellosis. Recombinant VirB12 protein was prepared and evaluated the efficacy of it in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for brucellosis with sera collected from different region of Iran and the results were compared with a commercial ELISA kit. Sera from human brucellosis patients strongly reacted to the purified recombinant VirB12. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of recombinant VirB12-based ELISA related to the commercial-ELISA method were 87.8, 94, 90, 80 and 96.6% respectively. We concluded that antigenic VirB12 have a property value that can be considered as a candidate for using in serodiagnostic tests for human brucellosis.

  18. Serological diagnosis of bovine brucellosis using B. melitensis strain B115.

    PubMed

    Corrente, Marialaura; Desario, Costantina; Parisi, Antonio; Grandolfo, Erika; Scaltrito, Domenico; Vesco, Gesualdo; Colao, Valeriana; Buonavoglia, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis is diagnosed by official tests, such as Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and Complement Fixation test (CFT). Both tests detect antibodies directed against the lipolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella cell wall. Despite their good sensitivity, those tests do not discriminate between true positive and false positive serological reactions (FPSR), the latter being generated by animals infected with other Gram negative microorganisms that share components of Brucella LPS. In this study, an antigenic extract from whole Brucella melitensis B115 strain was used to set up an ELISA assay for the serological diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. A total of 148 serum samples from five different groups of animals were tested: Group A: 28 samples from two calves experimentally infected with Yersinia enterocolitica O:9; Group B: 30 samples from bovines infected with Brucella abortus; Group C: 50 samples from brucellosis-free herds; Group D: 20 samples RBPT positive and CFT negative; Group E: 20 samples both RBPT and CFT positive. Group D and Group E serum samples were from brucellosis-free herds. Positive reactions were detected only by RBPT and CFT in calves immunized with Y. enterocolitica O:9. Sera from Group B animals tested positive also in the ELISA assay, whereas sera from the remaining groups were all negative. The results obtained encourage the use of the ELISA assay to implement the serological diagnosis of brucellosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative assessment of passive surveillance in disease-free and endemic situation: Example of Brucella melitensis surveillance in Switzerland and in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Hadorn, Daniela C; Haracic, Sabina Seric; Stärk, Katharina DC

    2008-01-01

    Background Globalization and subsequent growth in international trade in animals and animal products has increased the importance of international disease reporting. Efficient and reliable surveillance systems are needed in order to document the disease status of a population at a given time. In this context, passive surveillance plays an important role in early warning systems. However, it is not yet routinely integrated in the assessment of disease surveillance systems because different factors like the disease awareness (DA) of people reporting suspect cases influence the detection performance of passive surveillance. In this paper, we used scenario tree methodology in order to evaluate and compare the quality and benefit of abortion testing (ABT) for Brucella melitensis (Bm) between the disease free situation in Switzerland (CH) and a hypothetical disease free situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), taking into account DA levels assumed for the current endemic situation in BH. Results The structure and input parameters of the scenario tree were identical for CH and BH with the exception of population data in small ruminants and the DA in farmers and veterinarians. The sensitivity analysis of the stochastic scenario tree model showed that the small ruminant population structure and the DA of farmers were important influential parameters with regard to the unit sensitivity of ABT in both CH and BH. The DA of both farmers and veterinarians was assumed to be higher in BH than in CH due to the current endemic situation in BH. Although the same DA cannot necessarily be assumed for the modelled hypothetical disease free situation as for the actual endemic situation, it shows the importance of the higher vigilance of people reporting suspect cases on the probability that an average unit processed in the ABT-component would test positive. Conclusion The actual sensitivity of passive surveillance approaches heavily depends on the context in which they are applied

  20. Comparative assessment of passive surveillance in disease-free and endemic situation: example of Brucella melitensis surveillance in Switzerland and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Hadorn, Daniela C; Haracic, Sabina Seric; Stärk, Katharina D C

    2008-12-22

    Globalization and subsequent growth in international trade in animals and animal products has increased the importance of international disease reporting. Efficient and reliable surveillance systems are needed in order to document the disease status of a population at a given time. In this context, passive surveillance plays an important role in early warning systems. However, it is not yet routinely integrated in the assessment of disease surveillance systems because different factors like the disease awareness (DA) of people reporting suspect cases influence the detection performance of passive surveillance. In this paper, we used scenario tree methodology in order to evaluate and compare the quality and benefit of abortion testing (ABT) for Brucella melitensis (Bm) between the disease free situation in Switzerland (CH) and a hypothetical disease free situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), taking into account DA levels assumed for the current endemic situation in BH. The structure and input parameters of the scenario tree were identical for CH and BH with the exception of population data in small ruminants and the DA in farmers and veterinarians. The sensitivity analysis of the stochastic scenario tree model showed that the small ruminant population structure and the DA of farmers were important influential parameters with regard to the unit sensitivity of ABT in both CH and BH. The DA of both farmers and veterinarians was assumed to be higher in BH than in CH due to the current endemic situation in BH. Although the same DA cannot necessarily be assumed for the modelled hypothetical disease free situation as for the actual endemic situation, it shows the importance of the higher vigilance of people reporting suspect cases on the probability that an average unit processed in the ABT-component would test positive. The actual sensitivity of passive surveillance approaches heavily depends on the context in which they are applied. Scenario tree modelling allows for

  1. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  2. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of cgs, the Brucella abortus Cyclic β(1-2) Glucan Synthetase Gene: Genetic Complementation of Rhizobium meliloti ndvB and Agrobacterium tumefaciens chvB Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Briones, Gabriel; Tolmasky, Marcelo; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    The animal pathogen Brucella abortus contains a gene, cgs, that complemented a Rhizobium meliloti nodule development (ndvB) mutant and an Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal virulence (chvB) mutant. The complemented strains recovered the synthesis of cyclic β(1-2) glucan, motility, virulence in A. tumefaciens, and nitrogen fixation in R. meliloti; all traits were strictly associated with the presence of an active cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthetase protein in the membranes. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the presence in B. abortus of an 8.49-kb open reading frame coding for a predicted membrane protein of 2,831 amino acids (316.2 kDa) and with 51% identity to R. meliloti NdvB. Four regions of the B. abortus protein spanning amino acids 520 to 800, 1025 to 1124, 1284 to 1526, and 2400 to 2660 displayed similarities of higher than 80% with R. meliloti NdvB. Tn3-HoHo1 mutagenesis showed that the C-terminal 825 amino acids of the Brucella protein, although highly conserved in Rhizobium, are not necessary for cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthesis. Confirmation of the identity of this protein as B. abortus cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthetase was done by the construction of a B. abortus Tn3-HoHo1 insertion mutant that does not form cyclic β(1-2) glucan and lacks the 316.2-kDa membrane protein. The recovery of this mutant from the spleens of inoculated mice was decreased by 3 orders of magnitude compared with that of the parental strain; this result suggests that cyclic β(1-2) glucan may be a virulence factor in Brucella infection. PMID:9721274

  3. BvrR/BvrS-Controlled Outer Membrane Proteins Omp3a and Omp3b Are Not Essential for Brucella abortus Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, Lorea; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Moriyón, Ignacio; Grilló, María-Jesús; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    The Brucella abortus two-component regulatory system BvrR/BvrS controls the expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) Omp3a (Omp25) and Omp3b (Omp22). Disruption of bvrS or bvrR generates avirulent mutants with altered cell permeability, higher sensitivity to microbicidal peptides, and complement. Consequently, the role of Omp3a and Omp3b in virulence was examined. Similar to bvrS or bvrR mutants, omp3a and omp3b mutants displayed increased attachment to cells, indicating surface alterations. However, they showed unaltered permeability; normal expression of Omp10, Omp16, Omp19, Omp2b, and Omp1; native hapten polysaccharide; and lipopolysaccharide and were resistant to complement and polymyxin B at ranges similar to those of the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Likewise, omp3a and omp3b mutants were able to replicate in murine macrophages and in HeLa cells, were resistant to the killing action of human neutrophils, and persisted in mice, like the WT strain. Murine macrophages infected with the omp3a mutant generated slightly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha than the WT, whereas the bvrS mutant induced lower levels of this cytokine. Since the absence of Omp3a or Omp3b does not result in attenuation, it can be concluded that BvrR/BvrS influences additional Brucella properties involved in virulence. Our results are discussed in the light of previous works suggesting that disruption of omp3a generates attenuated Brucella strains, and we speculate on the role of group 3 Omps. PMID:17664262

  4. The Lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus BvrS/BvrR Mutants Contains Lipid A Modifications and Has Higher Affinity for Bactericidal Cationic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, Lorea; Moriyón, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Weiss, David S.; Koch, Michel H. J.; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    The two-component BvrS/BvrR system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction abrogates expression of some major outer membrane proteins and increases bactericidal peptide sensitivity. Here, we report that BvrS/BvrR mutants have increased surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility to killing by nonimmune serum. The bvrS and bvrR mutant lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) bound more polymyxin B, chimeras constructed with bvrS mutant cells and parental LPS showed augmented polymyxin B resistance, and, conversely, parental cells and bvrS mutant LPS chimeras were more sensitive and displayed polymyxin B-characteristic outer membrane lesions, implicating LPS as being responsible for the phenotype of the BvrS/BvrR mutants. No qualitative or quantitative changes were detected in other envelope and outer membrane components examined: periplasmic β(1-2) glucans, native hapten polysaccharide, and phospholipids. The LPS of the mutants was similar to parental LPS in O-polysaccharide polymerization and fine structure but showed both increased underacylated lipid A species and higher acyl-chain fluidity that correlated with polymyxin B binding. These lipid A changes did not alter LPS cytokine induction, showing that in contrast to other gram-negative pathogens, recognition by innate immune receptors is not decreased by these changes in LPS structure. Transcription of Brucella genes required for incorporating long acyl chains into lipid A (acpXL and lpxXL) or implicated in lipid A acylation control (bacA) was not affected. We propose that in Brucella the outer membrane homeostasis depends on the functioning of BvrS/BvrR. Accordingly, disruption of BvrS/BvrR damages the outer membrane, thus contributing to the severe attenuation manifested by bvrS and bvrR mutants. PMID:16077108

  5. Identification of lptA, lpxE, and lpxO, Three Genes Involved in the Remodeling of Brucella Cell Envelope.

    PubMed

    Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Salvador-Bescós, Miriam; Bárcena-Varela, Marina; Aragón-Aranda, Beatriz; Martínez-Gómez, Estrella; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; de Miguel, María J; Bartholomew, Toby Leigh; Hanniffy, Sean; Grilló, María-Jesús; Vences-Guzmán, Miguel Ángel; Bengoechea, José A; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moriyón, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite

    2017-01-01

    The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause a worldwide extended zoonosis. One of the pathogenicity mechanisms of these bacteria is their ability to avoid rapid recognition by innate immunity because of a reduction of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS), free-lipids, and other envelope molecules. We investigated the Brucella homologs of lptA, lpxE , and lpxO , three genes that in some pathogens encode enzymes that mask the LPS PAMP by upsetting the core-lipid A charge/hydrophobic balance. Brucella lptA , which encodes a putative ethanolamine transferase, carries a frame-shift in B. abortus but not in other Brucella spp. and phylogenetic neighbors like the opportunistic pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi. Consistent with the genomic evidence, a B. melitensis lptA mutant lacked lipid A-linked ethanolamine and displayed increased sensitivity to polymyxin B (a surrogate of innate immunity bactericidal peptides), while B. abortus carrying B. melitensis lptA displayed increased resistance. Brucella lpxE encodes a putative phosphatase acting on lipid A or on a free-lipid that is highly conserved in all brucellae and O. anthropi. Although we found no evidence of lipid A dephosphorylation, a B. abortus lpxE mutant showed increased polymyxin B sensitivity, suggesting the existence of a hitherto unidentified free-lipid involved in bactericidal peptide resistance. Gene lpxO putatively encoding an acyl hydroxylase carries a frame-shift in all brucellae except B. microti and is intact in O. anthropi . Free-lipid analysis revealed that lpxO corresponded to olsC , the gene coding for the ornithine lipid (OL) acyl hydroxylase active in O. anthropi and B. microti , while B. abortus carrying the olsC of O. anthropi and B. microti synthesized hydroxylated OLs. Interestingly, mutants in lptA, lpxE , or olsC were not attenuated in dendritic cells or mice. This lack of an obvious effect on virulence together with the presence

  6. MULTIPLE-LOCUS VARIABLE-NUMBER TANDEM REPEAT ANALYSIS OF BRUCELLA ISOLATES FROM THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Kumkrong, Khurawan; Chankate, Phanita; Tonyoung, Wittawat; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Kerdsin, Anusak; Kalambaheti, Thareerat

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis-induced abortion can result in significant economic loss to farm animals. Brucellosis can be transmitted to humans during slaughter of infected animals or via consumption of contaminated food products. Strain identification of Brucella isolates can reveal the route of transmission. Brucella strains were isolated from vaginal swabs of farm animal, cow milk and from human blood cultures. Multiplex PCR was used to identify Brucella species, and owing to high DNA homology among Brucella isolates, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) based on the number of tandem repeats at 16 different genomic loci was used for strain identification. Multiplex PCR categorized the isolates into B. abortus (n = 7), B. melitensis (n = 37), B. suis (n = 3), and 5 of unknown Brucella spp. MLVA-16 clustering analysis differentiated the strains into various genotypes, with Brucella isolates from the same geographic region being closely related, and revealed that the Thai isolates were phylogenetically distinct from those in other countries, including within the Southeast Asian region. Thus, MLVA-16 typing has utility in epidemiological studies.

  7. The bhuQ Gene Encodes a Heme Oxygenase That Contributes to the Ability of Brucella abortus 2308 To Use Heme as an Iron Source and Is Regulated by Irr

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Jenifer F.; Martinson, David A.; Menscher, Evan A.

    2012-01-01

    The Brucella BhuQ protein is a homolog of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum heme oxygenases HmuD and HmuQ. To determine if this protein plays a role in the ability of Brucella abortus 2308 to use heme as an iron source, an isogenic bhuQ mutant was constructed and its phenotype evaluated. Although the Brucella abortus bhuQ mutant DCO1 did not exhibit a defect in its capacity to use heme as an iron source or evidence of increased heme toxicity in vitro, this mutant produced increased levels of siderophore in response to iron deprivation compared to 2308. Introduction of a bhuQ mutation into the B. abortus dhbC mutant BHB2 (which cannot produce siderophores) resulted in a severe growth defect in the dhbC bhuQ double mutant JFO1 during cultivation under iron-restricted conditions, which could be rescued by the addition of FeCl3, but not heme, to the growth medium. The bhuQ gene is cotranscribed with the gene encoding the iron-responsive regulator RirA, and both of these genes are repressed by the other major iron-responsive regulator in the alphaproteobacteria, Irr. The results of these studies suggest that B. abortus 2308 has at least one other heme oxygenase that works in concert with BhuQ to allow this strain to efficiently use heme as an iron source. The genetic organization of the rirA-bhuQ operon also provides the basis for the proposition that BhuQ may perform a previously unrecognized function by allowing the transcriptional regulator RirA to recognize heme as an iron source. PMID:22636783

  8. Brucellosis seroprevalence in Bali cattle with reproductive failure in South Sulawesi and Brucella abortus biovar 1 genotypes in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Muflihanah, Hanah; Hatta, Mochammad; Rood, Ente; Scheelbeek, Pauline; Abdoel, Theresia H; Smits, Henk L

    2013-11-26

    Brucellosis is a major cause of infertility and reproductive failure in livestock. While cattle in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago suffers from reproductive problems information on bovine brucellosis in the region is fragmentary. The control of brucellosis requires a major and prolonged effort and confirmation of the infection by isolation with detailed knowledge of the spread of the infection is essential when planning a control program. Serological investigation of Brucella infection in beef cattle tended under extensive farming conditions revealed a high seroprevalence (19.3%; 95% CI, 17-22) in the compliment fixation tests. The results of a rapid and simple field test correlated well with the Rose Bengal test (kappa, 0.917) and indicated an acceptable sensitivity (87.5%) and specificity (98.1%) compared with the complement fixation test. Reproductive failure was reported for 39.0% of the cows with a loss of calves due to abortion or early death amounting to 19.3%. Past reproductive failure did not, however, correlate with seropositivity in the complement fixation test (RP = 1.21; P = 0.847). B. abortus biovar 1 was freshly isolated from the hygromas of two cows and together with thirty banked isolates collected since 1990 from different parts of Sulawesi and Timor eight related genotypes could be distinguished with one genotype being identical to that of an isolate (BfR91) from Switzerland. The Indonesian genotypes formed together with BfR91 and one African and one North American isolate a distinct branch on the B. abortus biovar 1 dendogram. Bovine brucellosis appears to be widespread in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago and calls for urgent intervention. The fresh isolation of the pathogen together with the observed high seroprevalence demonstrates the presence and frequent exposure of cattle in the area to the pathogen. The application of a rapid and simple field test for brucellosis could be very useful for the quick screening of cattle at the pen side.

  9. LOV Histidine Kinase Modulates the General Stress Response System and Affects the virB Operon Expression in Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Sycz, Gabriela; Carrica, Mariela Carmen; Tseng, Tong-Seung; Bogomolni, Roberto A.; Briggs, Winslow R.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Paris, Gastón

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, and its success as an intracellular pathogen relies on its ability to adapt to the harsh environmental conditions that it encounters inside the host. The Brucella genome encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain upstream from the kinase, LOVHK, which plays an important role in light-regulated Brucella virulence. In this report we study the intracellular signaling pathway initiated by the light sensor LOVHK using an integrated biochemical and genetic approach. From results of bacterial two-hybrid assays and phosphotransfer experiments we demonstrate that LOVHK functionally interacts with two response regulators: PhyR and LovR, constituting a functional two-component signal-transduction system. LOVHK contributes to the activation of the General Stress Response (GSR) system in Brucella via PhyR, while LovR is proposed to be a phosphate-sink for LOVHK, decreasing its phosphorylation state. We also show that in the absence of LOVHK the expression of the virB operon is down-regulated. In conclusion, our results suggest that LOVHK positively regulates the GSR system in vivo, and has an effect on the expression of the virB operon. The proposed regulatory network suggests a similar role for LOVHK in other microorganisms. PMID:25993430

  10. Animal and human dose-response models for Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Teske, Sondra S; Huang, Yin; Tamrakar, Sushil B; Bartrand, Timothy A; Weir, Mark H; Haas, Charles N

    2011-10-01

    Human Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. Disease transmission often occurs through the handling of domestic livestock, as well as ingestion of unpasteurized milk and cheese, but can have enhanced infectivity if aerosolized. Because there is no human vaccine available, rising concerns about the threat of Brucellosis to human health and its inclusion in the Center for Disease Control's Category B Bioterrorism/Select Agent List make a better understanding of the dose-response relationship of this microbe necessary. Through an extensive peer-reviewed literature search, candidate dose-response data were appraised so as to surpass certain standards for quality. The statistical programming language, "R," was used to compute the maximum likelihood estimation to fit two models, the exponential and the approximate beta-Poisson (widely used for quantitative risk assessment) to dose-response data. Dose-response models were generated for prevalent species of Brucella: Br. suis, Br. melitensis, and Br. abortus. Dose-response models were created for aerosolized Br. suis exposure to guinea pigs from pooled studies. A parallel model for guinea pigs inoculated through both aerosol and subcutaneous routes with Br. melitensis showed that the median infectious dose corresponded to a 30 colony-forming units (CFU) dose of Br. suis, much less than the N(50) dose of about 94 CFU for Br. melitensis organisms. When Br. melitensis was tested subcutaneously on mice, the N(50) dose was higher, 1,840 CFU. A dose-response model was constructed from pooled data for mice, rhesus macaques, and humans inoculated through three routes (subcutaneously/aerosol/intradermally) with Br. melitensis. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Mass vaccination as a complementary tool in the control of a severe outbreak of bovine brucellosis due to Brucella abortus in Extremadura, Spain.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Cristina; Sáez, José Luis; Alvarez, Julio; Cortés, María; Pereira, Gema; Reyes, Aurelia; Rubio, Félix; Martín, Javier; García, Nerea; Domínguez, Lucas; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, María; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, Javier

    2010-11-01

    We report the evolution of an outbreak of bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the region of Extremadura (Spain) involving more than 1000 herds and nearly 40,000 animals. S19 vaccination of young cattle combined with a test and slaughter strategy did not result in a rapid decrease in herd prevalence and animal incidence; these parameters showed a constant decreasing trend only when a combination of restriction of cattle movements, increased test frequency, S19 vaccination and mass RB51 vaccination (with yearly revaccinations) were applied to all susceptible populations. These measures were applied for 5 years; abortions following RB51 vaccination of pregnant cows were limited to the first inoculation and the involvement of the vaccine strain could only be demonstrated in 78 out of 897 abortions. Our results demonstrate the usefulness - and lack of significant side effects - of RB51 mass vaccination as a complementary tool to control bovine brucellosis outbreaks in areas where the disease cannot be contained using more conservative approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunologic responses of bison to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51: comparison of parenteral to ballistic delivery via compressed pellets or photopolymerized hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Christie, R J; Grainger, D W; Stoffregen, W S

    2006-02-27

    This study compared responses of bison calves to 10(10)CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) delivered by parenteral or ballistic methods. Two types of biobullet payloads were evaluated; compacted SRB51 pellets or SRB51 encapsulated in photopolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels. Bison were vaccinated with saline, parenteral SRB51 alone, or in combination with Spirovac, or ballistically with compressed SRB51 or hydrogel biobullets. Bison parenterally vaccinated with SRB51 had greater (P<0.05) immunologic responses when compared to control bison. Co-administration of Spirovac as an adjuvant did not influence immunologic responses. As compared to compressed SRB51 biobullets, ballistic vaccination with hydrogel biobullets increased cellular immune responses at some sampling times. Our data suggest that hydrogel formulations of SRB51 may be a superior alternative to compressed SRB51 tablets for ballistic vaccination of bison. Although preliminary, data suggests that immunologic responses of bison to SRB51 hydrogel bullets are similar to responses after parenteral vaccination with SRB51.

  13. Serological profile of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) female calves vaccinated with standard Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine using rose bengal, 2-mercaptoethanol and complement fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Nardi, G Júnior; Ribeiro, M G; Jorge, A M; Megid, J; Silva, L M P

    2012-03-01

    The serological profiles of 21 female buffaloes vaccinated between 3 and 8 months of age using Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) were evaluated by rose bengal (RBT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. The serum strains were collected in day zero, 15, 30, 45, 60th days and subsequently to each 30 months, until 720th day after vaccination. No animal showed reaction in day zero. In 15th day above 95% of animals revealed reaction in all tests. All the animals presented absence of reactions in CFT, RBT and 2ME tests at 270, 300 and 360 days after vaccination, respectively. Our finding highlighted early response in CFT compared than other conventional agglutination tests. None of animals presented oscillation of titers or reactions in any test after 360 day of study, which enables the use of these tests after this period without interference of antibodies from S19 vaccine origin between 3 and 8 months in buffalo heifers. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibitory Effect of the Ethanol Extract of a Rice Bran Mixture Comprising Angelica gigas, Cnidium officinale, Artemisia princeps, and Camellia sinensis on Brucella abortus Uptake by Professional and Nonprofessional Phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Baek, Eun Jin; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Chun Hee; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-10-28

    In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of a rice bran mixture extract (RBE) on Brucella abortus pathogenesis in professional (RAW 264.7) and nonprofessional (HeLa) phagocytes. We fermented the rice bran mixture and then extracted it with 50% ethanol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the components in RBE. Our results clearly showed that RBE caused a significant reduction in the adherence of B. abortus in both cell lines. Furthermore, analysis of phagocytic signaling proteins by western blot assay revealed that RBE pretreatment resulted in inhibition of phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, leading to decline of internalization compared with the controls. Additionally, the intensity of F-actin observed by fluorescence microscopy and FACS was remarkably reduced in RBE-pretreated cells compared with control cells. However, the intracellular replication of B. abortus within phagocytes was not affected by RBE. Taken together, these findings suggest that the phagocytic receptor blocking and suppressive effects of RBE on the MAPK-linked phagocytic signaling pathway could negatively affect the invasion of B. abortus into phagocytes.

  15. Evaluation of Th1/Th2-Related Immune Response against Recombinant Proteins of Brucella abortus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Im, Young Bin; Park, Woo Bin; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-06-28

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Brucella, a genus of gram-negative bacteria. Cytokines have key roles in the activation of innate and acquired immunities. Despite several research attempts to reveal the immune responses, the mechanism of Brucella infection remains unclear. Therefore, immune responses were analyzed in mice immunized with nine recombinant proteins. Cytokine production profiles were analyzed in the RAW 264.7 cells and naive splenocytes after stimulation with three recombinant proteins, metal-dependent hydrolase (r0628), bacterioferritin (rBfr), and thiamine transporter substrate-binding protein (rTbpA). Immune responses were analyzed by ELISA and ELISpot assay after immunization with proteins in mice. The production levels of NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 were time-dependently increased after having been stimulated with proteins in the RAW 264.7 cells. In naive splenocytes, the production of IFN-γ and IL-2 was increased after stimulation with the proteins. It was concluded that two recombinant proteins, r0628 and rTbpA, showed strong immunogenicity that was induced with Th1-related cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α more than Th2-related cytokines IL-6, IL-4, and IL-5 in vitro. Conversely, a humoral immune response was activated by increasing the number of antigen-secreting cells specifically. Furthermore, these could be candidate diagnosis antigens for better understanding of brucellosis.

  16. Differential phenotyping of Brucella species using a newly developed semi-automated metabolic system.

    PubMed

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Scholz, Holger C; Tomaso, Herbert; Bahn, Peter; Göllner, Cornelia; Karges, Wolfram; Appel, Bernd; Hensel, Andreas; Neubauer, Heinrich; Nöckler, Karsten

    2010-10-23

    A commercial biotyping system (Taxa Profile™, Merlin Diagnostika) testing the metabolization of various substrates by bacteria was used to determine if a set of phenotypic features will allow the identification of members of the genus Brucella and their differentiation into species and biovars. A total of 191 different amines, amides, amino acids, other organic acids and heterocyclic and aromatic substrates (Taxa Profile™ A), 191 different mono-, di-, tri- and polysaccharides and sugar derivates (Taxa Profile™ C) and 95 amino peptidase- and protease-reactions, 76 glycosidase-, phosphatase- and other esterase-reactions, and 17 classic reactions (Taxa Profile™ E) were tested with the 23 reference strains representing the currently known species and biovars of Brucella and a collection of 60 field isolates. Based on specific and stable reactions a 96-well "Brucella identification and typing" plate (Micronaut™) was designed and re-tested in 113 Brucella isolates and a couple of closely related bacteria.Brucella species and biovars revealed characteristic metabolic profiles and each strain showed an individual pattern. Due to their typical metabolic profiles a differentiation of Brucella isolates to the species level could be achieved. The separation of B. canis from B. suis bv 3, however, failed. At the biovar level, B. abortus bv 4, 5, 7 and B. suis bv 1-5 could be discriminated with a specificity of 100%. B. melitensis isolates clustered in a very homogenous group and could not be resolved according to their assigned biovars. The comprehensive testing of metabolic activity allows cluster analysis within the genus Brucella. The biotyping system developed for the identification of Brucella and differentiation of its species and biovars may replace or at least complement time-consuming tube testing especially in case of atypical strains. An easy to handle identification software facilitates the applicability of the Micronaut™ system for microbiology

  17. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Chinese Brucella strains isolated from 1953 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guo-Zhong; Cui, Bu-Yun; Piao, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Li, Lan-Yu; Liu, Xi; Xiao, Pei; Zhao, Zhong-Zhi; Xu, Li-Qing; Jiang, Hai; Li, Zhen-Jun

    2017-05-02

    Brucellosis was a common human and livestock disease caused by Brucella strains, the category B priority pathogens by the US Center for Disease Control (CDC). Identified as a priority disease in human and livestock populations, the increasing incidence in recent years in China needs urgent control measures for this disease but the molecular background important for monitoring the epidemiology of Brucella strains at the national level is still lacking. A total of 600 Brucella isolates collected during 60 years (from 1953 to 2013) in China were genotyped by multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and the variation degree of MLVA11 loci was calculated by the Hunter Gaston Diversity Index (HGDI) values. The charts and map were processed by Excel 2013, and cluster analysis and epidemiological distribution was performed using BioNumerics (version 5.1). The 600 representative Brucella isolates fell into 104 genotypes with 58 singleton genotypes by the MLVA11 assay, including B. melitensis biovars 2 and 3 (five main genotypes), B. abortus biovars 1 and 3 (two main genotypes), B. suis biovars 1 and 3 (three main genotypes), and B. canis (two main genotypes) respectively. While most B. suis biovar 1 and biovar 3 were respectively found in northern provinces and southern provinces, B. melitensis and B. abortus strains were dominant in China. Canine Brucellosis was only found in animals without any human cases reported. Eight Brucellosis epidemic peaks emerged during the 60 years between 1953 and 2013: 1955 - 1959, 1962 - 1969, 1971 - 1975, 1977 - 1983, 1985 - 1989, 1992 - 1997, 2000 - 2008 and 2010 - 2013 in China. Brucellosis has its unique molecular epidemiological patterns with specific spatial and temporal distribution according to MLVA. IDOP-D-16-00101.

  18. Detection and characterization of Brucella spp. in bovine milk in small-scale urban and peri-urban farming in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Lindahl-Rajala, Elisabeth; Hoffman, Tove; Fretin, David; Godfroid, Jacques; Sattorov, Nosirjon; Boqvist, Sofia; Lundkvist, Åke; Magnusson, Ulf

    2017-03-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses globally, and Central Asia remains a Brucella hotspot. The World Health Organization classifies brucellosis as a neglected zoonotic disease that is rarely in the spotlight for research and mainly affects poor, marginalized people. Urban and peri-urban farming is a common practice in many low-income countries, and it increases the incomes of families that are often restrained by limited economic resources. However, there is a concern that the growing number of people and livestock living close together in these areas will increase the transmission of zoonotic pathogens such as Brucella. This study investigates the presence of Brucella DNA in bovine milk in the urban and peri-urban area of Dushanbe, Tajikistan. Brucella DNA was detected in 10.3% of 564 cow milk samples by IS711-based real-time PCR. This finding is concerning because consumption of unpasteurized dairy products is common in the region. Furthermore, Brucella DNA was detected in the milk of all seropositive cows, but 8.3% of the seronegative cows also showed the presence of Brucella DNA. In addition, sequence analysis of the rpoB gene suggests that one cow was infected with B. abortus and another cow was most likely infected with B. melitensis. The discrepancies between the serology and real-time PCR results highlight the need to further investigate whether there is a need for implementing complementary diagnostic strategies to detect false serological negative individuals in Brucella surveillance, control, and eradication programmes. Furthermore, vaccination of cattle with S19 in addition to vaccination of small ruminants with Rev 1 might be needed in order to control Brucella infections in the livestock population but further research focusing on the isolation of Brucella is required to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the Brucella spp. circulating among the livestock in this region.

  19. Detection and characterization of Brucella spp. in bovine milk in small-scale urban and peri-urban farming in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl-Rajala, Elisabeth; Hoffman, Tove; Fretin, David; Godfroid, Jacques; Sattorov, Nosirjon; Boqvist, Sofia; Lundkvist, Åke; Magnusson, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonoses globally, and Central Asia remains a Brucella hotspot. The World Health Organization classifies brucellosis as a neglected zoonotic disease that is rarely in the spotlight for research and mainly affects poor, marginalized people. Urban and peri-urban farming is a common practice in many low-income countries, and it increases the incomes of families that are often restrained by limited economic resources. However, there is a concern that the growing number of people and livestock living close together in these areas will increase the transmission of zoonotic pathogens such as Brucella. This study investigates the presence of Brucella DNA in bovine milk in the urban and peri-urban area of Dushanbe, Tajikistan. Brucella DNA was detected in 10.3% of 564 cow milk samples by IS711-based real-time PCR. This finding is concerning because consumption of unpasteurized dairy products is common in the region. Furthermore, Brucella DNA was detected in the milk of all seropositive cows, but 8.3% of the seronegative cows also showed the presence of Brucella DNA. In addition, sequence analysis of the rpoB gene suggests that one cow was infected with B. abortus and another cow was most likely infected with B. melitensis. The discrepancies between the serology and real-time PCR results highlight the need to further investigate whether there is a need for implementing complementary diagnostic strategies to detect false serological negative individuals in Brucella surveillance, control, and eradication programmes. Furthermore, vaccination of cattle with S19 in addition to vaccination of small ruminants with Rev 1 might be needed in order to control Brucella infections in the livestock population but further research focusing on the isolation of Brucella is required to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the Brucella spp. circulating among the livestock in this region. PMID:28296882

  20. Brucella abortus Depends on Pyruvate Phosphate Dikinase and Malic Enzyme but Not on Fbp and GlpX Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatases for Full Virulence in Laboratory Models

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Martínez-Gómez, Estrella; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Grilló, María Jesús; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Iriarte, Maite

    2014-01-01

    The brucellae are the etiological agents of brucellosis, a worldwide-distributed zoonosis. These bacteria are facultative intracellular parasites and thus are able to adjust their metabolism to the extra- and intracellular environments encountered during an infectious cycle. However, this aspect of Brucella biology is imperfectly understood, and the nutrients available in the intracellular niche are unknown. Here, we investigated the central pathways of C metabolism used by Brucella abortus by deleting the putative fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (fbp and glpX), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pckA), pyruvate phosphate dikinase (ppdK), and malic enzyme (mae) genes. In gluconeogenic but not in rich media, growth of ΔppdK and Δmae mutants was severely impaired and growth of the double Δfbp-ΔglpX mutant was reduced. In macrophages, only the ΔppdK and Δmae mutants showed reduced multiplication, and studies with the ΔppdK mutant confirmed that it reached the replicative niche. Similarly, only the ΔppdK and Δmae mutants were attenuated in mice, the former being cleared by week 10 and the latter persisting longer than 12 weeks. We also investigated the glyoxylate cycle. Although aceA (isocitrate lyase) promoter activity was enhanced in rich medium, aceA disruption had no effect in vitro or on multiplication in macrophages or mouse spleens. The results suggest that B. abortus grows intracellularly using a limited supply of 6-C (and 5-C) sugars that is compensated by glutamate and possibly other amino acids entering the Krebs cycle without a critical role of the glyoxylate shunt. PMID:24936050

  1. Metabolic Control of Virulence Genes in Brucella abortus: HutC Coordinates virB Expression and the Histidine Utilization Pathway by Direct Binding to Both Promoters ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sieira, Rodrigo; Arocena, Gastón M.; Bukata, Lucas; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2010-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) are multicomponent machineries involved in the translocation of effector molecules across the bacterial cell envelope. The virB operon of Brucella abortus codes for a T4SS that is essential for virulence and intracellular multiplication of the bacterium in the host. Previous studies showed that the virB operon of B. abortus is tightly regulated within the host cells. In order to identify factors implicated in the control of virB expression, we searched for proteins of Brucella that directly bind to the virB promoter (PvirB). Using different procedures, we isolated a 27-kDa protein that binds specifically to PvirB. This protein was identified as HutC, the transcriptional repressor of the histidine utilization (hut) genes. Analyses of virB and hut promoter activity revealed that HutC exerts two different roles: it acts as a coactivator of transcription of the virB operon, whereas it represses the hut genes. Such activities were observed both intracellularly and in bacteria incubated under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting experiments revealed the structure, affinity, and localization of the HutC-binding sites and supported the regulatory role of HutC in both hut and virB promoters. Taken together, these results indicate that Brucella coopted the function of HutC to coordinate the Hut pathway with transcriptional regulation of the virB genes, probably as a way to sense its own metabolic state and develop adaptive responses to overcome intracellular host defenses. PMID:19854911

  2. Brucella proteomes--a review.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Estock, Frank; Elzer, Phil; Mujer, Cesar V

    2002-12-20

    The proteomes of selected Brucella spp. have been extensively analyzed by utilizing current proteomic technology involving 2-DE and MALDI-MS. In Brucella melitensis, more than 500 proteins were identified. The rapid and large-scale identification of proteins in this organism was accomplished by using the annotated B. melitensis genome which is now available in the GenBank. Coupled with new and powerful tools for data analysis, differentially expressed proteins were identified and categorized into several classes. A global overview of protein expression patterns emerged, thereby facilitating the simultaneous analysis of different metabolic pathways in B. melitensis. Such a global characterization would not have been possible by using time consuming and traditional biochemical approaches. The era of post-genomic technology offers new and exciting opportunities to understand the complete biology of different Brucella species.

  3. Development of a Selective Culture Medium for Primary Isolation of the Main Brucella Species▿

    PubMed Central

    De Miguel, M. J.; Marín, C. M.; Muñoz, P. M.; Dieste, L.; Grilló, M. J.; Blasco, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriological diagnosis of brucellosis is performed by culturing animal samples directly on both Farrell medium (FM) and modified Thayer-Martin medium (mTM). However, despite inhibiting most contaminating microorganisms, FM also inhibits the growth of Brucella ovis and some B. melitensis and B. abortus strains. In contrast, mTM is adequate for growth of all Brucella species but only partially inhibitory for contaminants. Moreover, the performance of both culture media for isolating B. suis has never been established properly. We first determined the performance of both media for B. suis isolation, proving that FM significantly inhibits B. suis growth. We also determined the susceptibility of B. suis to the antibiotics contained in both selective media, proving that nalidixic acid and bacitracin are highly inhibitory, thus explaining the reduced performance of FM for B. suis isolation. Based on these results, a new selective medium (CITA) containing vancomycin, colistin, nystatin, nitrofurantoin, and amphotericin B was tested for isolation of the main Brucella species, including B. suis. CITA's performance was evaluated using reference contaminant strains but also field samples taken from brucella-infected animals or animals suspected of infection. CITA inhibited most contaminant microorganisms but allowed the growth of all Brucella species, to levels similar to those for both the control medium without antibiotics and mTM. Moreover, CITA medium was more sensitive than both mTM and FM for isolating all Brucella species from field samples. Altogether, these results demonstrate the adequate performance of CITA medium for the primary isolation of the main Brucella species, including B. suis. PMID:21270216

  4. [Characterization of the genetic variability of field strains of Brucella canis isolated in Antioquia].

    PubMed

    Vidal Arboleda, Juana L; Ortiz Roman, Luisa F; Olivera Angel, Martha

    2017-12-22

    Brucella canis is a facultative intracellular pathogen responsible for canine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that affects canines, causing abortions and reproductive failure; and the production of non-specific symptoms in humans. In 2005 the presence of B. canis in Antioquia was demonstrated and the strains were identified as type 2. The sequencing of the genome of a field strain denoted Brucella canis str. Oliveri, showed species-specific indel events, which led us to investigate the genomic characteristics of the B. canis strain isolated and to establish the phylogenetic relationships and the divergence time of B. canis str. Oliveri. Conventional PCR sequencing was performed in 30 field strains identifying 5 indel events recognized in B. canis str. Oliveri. ADN from Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis and vaccine strains from Brucella abortus were used as control, and it was determined that all of the studied field strains shared 4 out of the 5 indels of the sequenced Oliveri strain, indicating the presence of more than one strain circulating in the region. Phylogenetic analysis was performed with 24 strains of Brucella using concatenated sequences of genetic markers for species differentiation. The molecular clock hypothesis and Tajima's relative rate test were tested, showing that the Oliveri strain, similarly to other canis species, diverged from B. suis. The molecular clock hypothesis between Brucella species was rejected and an evolution rate and a similar genetic distance between the B. canis were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. In addition, CD4+ T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4+ T cells from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2−/− and TLR4−/− mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response. PMID:24769793

  6. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. In addition, CD4(+) T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4(+) T cells from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response.

  7. Characterization of Genomic Island 3 and Genetic Variability of Chilean Field Strains of Brucella abortus▿

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, Sandra; Salgado, Paulina; Valenzuela, Patricio; Vidal, Roberto; Oñate, Angel A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the capabilities developed by bacteria is the ability to gain large fragments of DNA from other bacteria or to lose portions of their own genomes. Among these exchangeable fragments are the genomic islands (GIs). Nine GIs have been identified in Brucella, and genomic island 3 (GI-3) is shared by two pathogenic species, B. melitensis and B. abortus. GI-3 encodes mostly unknown proteins. One of the aims of this study was to perform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on field isolates of B. abortus from Chile to determine whether these isolates are clonally related. Furthermore, we focused on the characterization of GI-3, studying its organization and the genetic conservation of the GI-3 sequence using techniques such as tiling-path PCR (TP-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR). Our results, after PFGE was performed on 69 field isolates of B. abortus from Chile, showed that the strains were genetically homogeneous. To increase the power of genetic discrimination among these strains, we used multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis with 16 loci (MLVA-16). The results obtained by MLVA-16 showed that the strains of B. abortus were genetically heterogeneous and that most of them clustered according to their geographic origin. Of the genetic loci studied, panel 2B was the one describing the highest diversity in the analysis, as well as locus Bruce19 in panel 2A. In relation to the study of GI-3, our experimental analysis by TP-PCR identified and confirmed that GI-3 is present in all wild strains of B. abortus, demonstrating the high stability of gene cluster GI-3 in Chilean field strains. PMID:21543580

  8. Computational prediction of secretion systems and secretomes of Brucella: identification of novel type IV effectors and their interaction with the host.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause brucellosis in various mammals including humans. Brucella survive inside the host cells by forming vacuoles and subverting host defence systems. This study was aimed to predict the secretion systems and the secretomes of Brucella spp. from 39 complete genome sequences available in the databases. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify the type IV secretion effectors and their interactions with host proteins. We predicted the secretion systems of Brucella by the KEGG pathway and SecReT4. Brucella secretomes and type IV effectors (T4SEs) were predicted through genome-wide screening using JVirGel and S4TE, respectively. Protein-protein interactions of Brucella T4SEs with their hosts were analyzed by HPIDB 2.0. Genes coding for Sec and Tat pathways of secretion and type I (T1SS), type IV (T4SS) and type V (T5SS) secretion systems were identified and they are conserved in all the species of Brucella. In addition to the well-known VirB operon coding for the type IV secretion system (T4SS), we have identified the presence of additional genes showing homology with T4SS of other organisms. On the whole, 10.26 to 14.94% of total proteomes were found to be either secreted (secretome) or membrane associated (membrane proteome). Approximately, 1.7 to 3.0% of total proteomes were identified as type IV secretion effectors (T4SEs). Prediction of protein-protein interactions showed 29 and 36 host-pathogen specific interactions between Bos taurus (cattle)-B. abortus and Ovis aries (sheep)-B. melitensis, respectively. Functional characterization of the predicted T4SEs and their interactions with their respective hosts may reveal the secrets of host specificity of Brucella.

  9. Identification of Brucella ovis exclusive genes in field isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía Paula; García-Effrón, Guillermo; Robles, Carlos Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella ovis is one of the most important infectious diseases of sheep. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of genes both inside and outside the specific B. ovis pathogenicity island 1 (BOPI-1) in a large collection of field isolates of B. ovis and other Brucella spp. from Argentina. The BOV_A0500 gene from B. ovis BOPI-1 was identified in all 104 B. ovis isolates studied. The BOPI-1 complete sequence was found to be conserved in 10 B. ovis strains from the collection, for which whole genome sequencing was performed. The BOV_0198 gene, which is outside BOPI-1 and considered exclusive to B. ovis, showed 90-100% identity with genomic regions of B. ovis, B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. canis, B. suis, B. microti, B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis. The results demonstrate that BOPI-1 is the only exclusive genetic region of B. ovis and marine Brucella spp. and that it is highly conserved in B. ovis field isolates from Argentina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Promotion and Rescue of Intracellular Brucella neotomae Replication during Coinfection with Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Kirby, James E

    2017-05-01

    We established a new Brucella neotomae in vitro model system for study of type IV secretion system-dependent (T4SS) pathogenesis in the Brucella genus. Importantly, B. neotomae is a rodent pathogen, and unlike B. abortus , B. melitensis , and B. suis , B. neotomae has not been observed to infect humans. It therefore can be handled more facilely using biosafety level 2 practices. More particularly, using a series of novel fluorescent protein and lux operon reporter systems to differentially label pathogens and track intracellular replication, we confirmed T4SS-dependent intracellular growth of B. neotomae in macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, B. neotomae exhibited early endosomal (LAMP-1) and late endoplasmic reticulum (calreticulin)-associated phagosome maturation. These findings recapitulate prior observations for human-pathogenic Brucella spp. In addition, during coinfection experiments with Legionella pneumophila , we found that defective intracellular replication of a B. neotomae T4SS virB4 mutant was rescued and baseline levels of intracellular replication of wild-type B. neotomae were significantly stimulated by coinfection with wild-type but not T4SS mutant L. pneumophila Using confocal microscopy, it was determined that intracellular colocalization of B. neotomae and L. pneumophila was required for rescue and that colocalization came at a cost to L. pneumophila fitness. These findings were not completely expected based on known temporal and qualitative differences in the intracellular life cycles of these two pathogens. Taken together, we have developed a new system for studying in vitro Brucella pathogenesis and found a remarkable T4SS-dependent interplay between Brucella and Legionella during macrophage coinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Studies of Antigens for Complement Fixation and Gel Diffusion Tests in the Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Brucella ovis and Other Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Donald M.; Jones, Lois M.; Varela-Diaz, Victor M.

    1972-01-01

    Sonically treated and saline-extracted antigens of Brucella ovis, B. canis, B. abortus, and B. melitensis were compared in gel diffusion, complement fixation, and serum absorption tests. All the sonically extracted antigens showed cross-reactions with sera from animals infected or immunized with these species, whereas the saline-extracted antigens were specific for the surface of the rough or smooth colonial phase of the species or strain. The saline-extracted antigens of B. ovis and B. melitensis were both eluted as a single peak in the void volume by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography, in gel diffusion had staining characteristics of lipoproteins, but in immunoelectrophoresis showed distinct mobility patterns. Serological activity for both gel diffusion and complement fixation tests was demonstrated in the immunoglobulin G-containing fraction of sera taken from sheep 12 to 412 days after infection with B. ovis. The gel diffusion test with saline extract of B. ovis is as sensitive as the complement fixation test for the diagnosis of ram epididymitis and is more practical. Images PMID:4624210

  12. Determination by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA to Brucella melitensis major outer membrane proteins and whole-cell heat-killed antigens in sera of patients with brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Araj, G F; Kaufmann, A F

    1989-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to compare Brucella melitensis major outer membrane proteins (MOMP) and whole-cell heat-killed antigens (HK) in measuring antibrucella immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA in sera of brucellosis patients and controls. Antibodies to MOMP were generally similar to those against HK, and the correlation coefficients between the two antigens and IgG, IgM, and IgA in patients varied between 0.73 and 0.94. Both antigens are comparably suitable in detecting antibrucella immunoglobulin isotypes for the serologic diagnosis of patients with brucellosis, with high (greater than or equal to 95%) sensitivity and specificity. PMID:2768476

  13. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  14. Analysis of the Kinetics and Regulation of Cytokine Gene Expression During the Primary In Vivo Immune Response to Killed Brucella Abortus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-10

    R. Beining, D. Hochstein, Y. L. Lee, R . D. Angus , and B. Golding. 1992. LPS from Brucella abonus is less toxic than that from Escherichia coli...abonus endotoxin and LPS. Ann. Inst. Pasteur Microbial. 138:98. 76. RlIi, N. B. K., S. C. Cheung, I. Rosztoczy, and P. M. Pitha. 1992. Mouse genotype

  15. Generation and characterization of β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharide probes from Brucella abortus cyclic β-glucan and their recognition by C-type lectins of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongtao; Palma, Angelina S; Zhang, Yibing; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Mitchell, Daniel A; Guidolin, Leticia S; Weigel, Wilfried; Mulloy, Barbara; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    The β1,2-glucans produced by bacteria are important in invasion, survival and immunomodulation in infected hosts be they mammals or plants. However, there has been a lack of information on proteins which recognize these molecules. This is partly due to the extremely limited availability of the sequence-defined oligosaccharides and derived probes for use in the study of their interactions. Here we have used the cyclic β1,2-glucan (CβG) of the bacterial pathogen Brucella abortus, after removal of succinyl side chains, to prepare linearized oligosaccharides which were used to generate microarrays. We describe optimized conditions for partial depolymerization of the cyclic glucan by acid hydrolysis and conversion of the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, with degrees of polymerization 2–13, to neoglycolipids for the purpose of generating microarrays. By microarray analyses, we show that the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGNR, like the closely related DC-SIGN we investigated earlier, binds to the β1,2-gluco-oligosaccharides, as does the soluble immune effector serum mannose-binding protein. Exploratory studies with DC-SIGN are suggestive of the recognition also of the intact CβG by this receptor. These findings open the way to unravelling mechanisms of immunomodulation mediated by β1,2-glucans in mammalian systems. PMID:27053576

  16. Identification of the Quorum-Sensing Target DNA Sequence and N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Responsiveness of the Brucella abortus virB promoter▿

    PubMed Central

    Arocena, Gastón M.; Sieira, Rodrigo; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2010-01-01

    VjbR is a LuxR-type quorum-sensing (QS) regulator that plays an essential role in the virulence of the intracellular facultative pathogen Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis. It was previously described that VjbR regulates a diverse group of genes, including the virB operon. The latter codes for a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that is central for the pathogenesis of Brucella. Although the regulatory role of VjbR on the virB promoter (PvirB) was extensively studied by different groups, the VjbR-binding site had not been identified so far. Here, we identified the target DNA sequence of VjbR in PvirB by DNase I footprinting analyses. Surprisingly, we observed that VjbR specifically recognizes a sequence that is identical to a half-binding site of the QS-related regulator MrtR of Mesorhizobium tianshanense. As shown by DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, generation of a palindromic MrtR-like-binding site in PvirB increased both the affinity and the stability of the VjbR-DNA complex, which confirmed that the QS regulator of Brucella is highly related to that of M. tianshanense. The addition of N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone dissociated VjbR from the promoter, which confirmed previous reports that indicated a negative effect of this signal on the VjbR-mediated activation of PvirB. Our results provide new molecular evidence for the structure of the virB promoter and reveal unusual features of the QS target DNA sequence of the main regulator of virulence in Brucella. PMID:20400542

  17. Polymorphisms at the 3' untranslated region of SLC11A1 gene are associated with protection to Brucella infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Iacoboni, Paola A; Hasenauer, Flavia C; Caffaro, M Eugenia; Gaido, Analia; Rossetto, Cristina; Neumann, Roberto D; Salatin, Antonio; Bertoni, Emiliano; Poli, Mario A; Rossetti, Carlos A

    2014-08-15

    Goats are susceptible to brucellosis and the detection of Brucella-infected animals is carried out by serological tests. In other ruminant species, polymorphisms in microsatellites (Ms) of 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the solute carrier family 11 member A1 (SLC11A1) gene were associated with resistance to Brucella abortus infection. Goats present two polymorphic Ms at the 3'UTR end of SLC11A1 gene, called regions A and B. Here, we evaluated if polymorphisms in regions A and/or B are associated with Brucella infection in goats. Serum (for the detection of Brucella-specific antibodies) and hair samples (for DNA isolation and structure analysis of the SLC11A1 gene) were randomly collected from 229 adult native goats from the northwest of Argentina. Serological status was evaluated by buffer plate antigen test (BPAT) complemented by the fluorescent polarization assay (FPA), and the genotype of the 3'UTR of the SLC11A1 gene was determined by capillary electrophoresis and confirmed by sequence analysis. Polymorphisms in regions A and B of the 3'UTR SLC11A1 gene were found statistically significant associated with protection to Brucella infection. Specifically, the association study indicates statistical significance of the allele A15 and B7/B7 genotype with absence of Brucella-specific antibodies (p=0.0003 and 0.0088, respectively). These data open a promising opportunity for limiting goat brucellosis through selective breeding of animals based on genetic markers associated with natural resistance to B. melitensis infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescence Immunofiltration Assay of Brucella Melitensis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    second urease -labelled antibody directed against fluorescein. The assay system is useful for measuring protein, virus and bacteria in aqueous...binding site for the signal-generating urease -labelled antibody, it is a highly fluorescent molecule and has signal-generating capacity of its own

  19. [Determination of in vitro susceptibilities of Brucella spp. strains against 11 different antibacterial gents isolated from blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Keşli, Recep; Bilgin, Hüseyin; Yılmaz, Halim

    2017-07-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease and still continuous to be a major public health problem. In this study, it was aimed to identify the Brucella strains to the species level isolated from blood cultures, and to determine the rate of antimicrobial susceptibility against eleven antibacterial agents. A total of 106 Brucella spp. strains were included in the study, which were isolated from blood cultures in University of Health Sciences, Konya Training and Research Hospital, Medical Microbiology Laboratory between January 2011 and June 2013. Identification of the isolated strains were mainly based on conventional methods. In vitro antibacterial susceptibilities of azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, gentamicin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, tigecycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, were evaluated by using the gradient (E-test, bioMerieux, France) strip method. The bacterial suspensions adjusted to 0.5 McFarland turbidity was inoculated to Mueller Hinton agar plates, supplemented with 5% sheep blood, and E-test strips of selected antibacterial were applied. The plates were incubated in ambient air 48 hours at 37ºC and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 were used as quality control strains for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Minimum inhibitors concentration (MIC) values were interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines for slow-growing bacteria such as Haemophilus spp. Of the 106 Brucella spp. strains included in to the study, 90 were identified as Brucella melitensis, and 16 were Brucella abortus. MIC90 values of azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, gentamicin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifampicin, streptomycin, tetracycline, tigecycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were determined as 1 µg/ml, 0.25 µg/ml, 0.19 µg/ml, 0.25 µg/ml, 0.19 µg/ml, 0.75 µg/ml, 0.25 µg/ml, 0.75 µg/ml, 0.38 µg/ml, 0.64 µg/ml, and 0

  20. Comparison of potential protection conferred by three immunization strategies (protein/protein, DNA/DNA, and DNA/protein) against Brucella infection using Omp2b in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Golshani, Maryam; Rafati, Sima; Nejati-Moheimani, Mehdi; Ghasemian, Melina; Bouzari, Saeid

    2016-12-25

    In the present study, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the Brucella outer membrane protein 2b (Omp2b) was evaluated in BALB/c mice using Protein/Protein, DNA/DNA and DNA/Protein vaccine strategies. Immunization of mice with three vaccine regimens elicited a strong specific IgG response (higher IgG2a titers over IgG1 titers) and provided Th1-oriented immune response. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the DNA/Pro regimen induced higher levels of IFN-γ/IL-2 and conferred more protection levels against B. melitenisis and B. abortus challenge than did the protein or DNA alone. In conclusion, Omp2b is able to stimulate specific immune responses and to confer cross protection against B. melitensis and B. abortus infection. Therefore, it could be introduced as a new potential candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against Brucella infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Brucella spp. by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Herman, L; De Ridder, H

    1992-01-01

    The application of two synthetic oligonucleotides as probes and as primers in the polymerase chain reaction is presented for a specific, sensitive, and quick identification of Brucella spp. The specific oligonucleotide sequences were chosen on the basis of a 16S rRNA sequence alignment between Brucella abortus and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Images PMID:1377903

  2. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Brucella abortus surveillance of cattle in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and a case for active disease surveillance as a training tool.

    PubMed

    Tukana, Andrew; Hedlefs, Robert; Gummow, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    There have been no surveys of the cattle population for brucellosis in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) for more than 15 years. This study used disease surveillance as a capacity building training tool and to examine some of the constraints that impede surveillance in PICTs. The study also developed and implemented a series of surveys for detecting antibodies to B. abortus in cattle in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands contributing to OIE requirements. The findings indicated lack of funds, lack of technical capacity, shortage of veterinarians, high turnover of in-country officials and lack of awareness on the impacts of animal diseases on public health that were constraining active disease surveillance. During the development and implementation of the surveys, constraints highlighted were outdated census data on farm numbers and cattle population, lack of funds for mobilisation of officials to carry out the surveys, lack of equipment for collecting and processing samples, lack of staff knowledge on blood sampling, geographical difficulties and security in accessing farms. Some of the reasons why these were constraints are discussed with likely solutions presented. The detection surveys had the objectives of building capacity for the country officials and demonstrating freedom from brucellosis in cattle for PNG, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands. PNG, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands all demonstrated freedom from bovine brucellosis in the areas surveyed using the indirect ELISA test. Fiji had an outbreak of brucellosis, and the objective was to determine its distribution and prevalence on untested farms. The Muaniweni district surveyed during the training had a 95 % confidence interval for true prevalence between 1.66 and 5.45 %. The study showed that active disease surveillance could be used as a tool for training officials thus, improves surveillance capacity in resource poor countries.

  4. Identification of Brucella spp. isolated from human brucellosis in Malaysia using high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Zahidi, Jama'ayah; Bee Yong, Tay; Hashim, Rohaidah; Mohd Noor, Azura; Hamzah, Siti Hawa; Ahmad, Norazah

    2015-04-01

    Molecular approaches have been investigated to overcome difficulties in identification and differentiation of Brucella spp. using conventional phenotypic methods. In this study, high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis was used for rapid identification and differentiation of members of Brucella genus. A total of 41 Brucella spp. isolates from human brucellosis were subjected to HRM analysis using 4 sets of primers, which identified 40 isolates as Brucella melitensis and 1 as Brucella canis. The technique utilized low DNA concentration and was highly reproducible. The assay is shown to be a useful diagnostic tool, which can rapidly differentiate Brucella up to species level. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Brucellae through the food chain: the role of sheep, goats and springbok (Antidorcus marsupialis) as sources of human infections in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Magwedere, K; Bishi, A; Tjipura-Zaire, G; Eberle, G; Hemberger, Y; Hoffman, L C; Dziva, F

    2011-12-01

    A confirmed case of human brucellosis motivated an investigation into the potential source of infection in Namibia. Since domestic animals are principal sources of Brucella infection in humans, 1692 serum samples were screened from sheep, goats and cattle from 4 presumably at-risk farms and 900 springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) serum samples from 29 mixed farming units for Brucella antibodies by the Rose-Bengal test (RBT) and positive cases confirmed by complement fixation test (CFT). To assess the prevalence of human brucellosis, 137 abattoir employees were tested for Brucella antibodies using the standard tube agglutination test (STAT) and by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cattle and sheep from all 4 farms were negative by RBT and CFT but 2 of the 4 farms (Ba and C) had 26/42 and 12/285 seropositive goats, respectively. Post mortem examination of seropositive goats revealed no gross pathological lesions typical of brucellosis except enlarged mesenteric and iliac lymph nodes seen in a single buck. Culture for brucellae from organs of seropositive animals was negative. None of the wildlife sera tested positive by either RBT or CFT. Interviews revealed that besides the case that prompted the investigation, a family and another person from other farms with confirmed brucellosis shared a common history of consumption of unpasteurised goat milk, home-made goat cheese and coffee with raw milk and prior contact with goats, suggesting goats as the likely source of infection. All 137 abattoir employees tested negative by STAT, but 3 were positive by ELISA. The 3 abattoir workers were clinically normal and lacked historical connections with clinical cases. Although goats are often associated with B. melitensis, these studies could not explicitly implicate this species owing to cross-reactivity with B. abortus, which can also infect goats. Nevertheless, these data reinforce the need for a better National Control Programme for brucellosis in Namibia.

  6. Doxycycline-rifampin versus doxycycline-streptomycin in treatment of human brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis. The GECMEI Group. Grupo de Estudio de Castilla-la Mancha de Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    PubMed

    Solera, J; Rodríguez-Zapata, M; Geijo, P; Largo, J; Paulino, J; Sáez, L; Martínez-Alfaro, E; Sánchez, L; Sepulveda, M A; Ruiz-Ribó, M D

    1995-09-01

    Brucellosis is a common zoonosis in many parts of the world; the best regimen for the treatment of brucellosis has not been clearly determined. We have carried out a multicenter, open, controlled trial in five general hospitals in Spain to compare the efficacy and safety of doxycycline and rifampin (DR) versus doxycycline and streptomycin (DS) for the treatment of human brucellosis. The study included 194 ambulatory or hospitalized patients with acute brucellosis, without endocarditis or neurobrucellosis. The diagnostic criterion was isolation of Brucella species from blood or other tissues (n = 120) or a standard tube agglutination titer of 1/160 or more for anti-Brucella antibodies with compatible clinical findings (n = 74). Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 100 mg of doxycycline twice daily plus rifampin, 900 mg/day, in a single morning dose for 45 days (DR group) or the same dose of doxycycline for 45 days plus streptomycin, 1 g/day, intramuscularly for 14 days (DS group). A lack of therapeutic efficacy developed in 8 of the 100 patients in the DR group (8%) and in 2 of the 94 patients in the DS group (2%)(P = 0.10). Relapses occurred in 16 of the 100 patients in the DR group (16%) but in only 5 of the 94 patients in the DS group (5.3%) (P = 0.02). When relapse was considered in combination with initial lack of efficacy, 26 patients in the DR group (24%) and 7 patients in the DS group (7.45%) failed to respond to therapy (P = 0.0016). In general, therapy was well tolerated and only four patients (4%) in the DR group and two (2%) in the DS group had episodes of adverse effects necessitating discontinuation of treatment (P> 0.2). We conclude that a doxycycline-and-rifampin regimen is less effective than the doxycycline-and-streptomycin regimen in patients with acute brucellosis.

  7. Brucella lipopolysaccharide reinforced Salmonella delivering Brucella immunogens protects mice against virulent challenge.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-06-01

    Intracellular pathogen Salmonella exhibits natural infection broadly analogous to Brucella, this phenomenon makes Salmonella a pragmatic choice for an anti-Brucella vaccine delivery platform. In this study we developed and formulated a combination of four attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium live vector strains delivering heterologous Brucella antigens (rBs), namely lumazine synthase, proline racemase subunit A, lipoprotein outer membrane protein-19, and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase. With an aim to develop a cross-protecting vaccine, Brucella pan-species conserved rBs were selected. The present study compared the efficacy of smooth and rough variants of Salmonella delivery vector and also evaluated the inclusion of purified Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the formulation. Immunization of SPF-BALB/c mice with the vaccine combinations significantly (P≤0.05) reduced splenic wild-type Brucella abortus 544 colonization as compared to non-immunized mice as well as Salmonella only immunized mice. Increased induction of Brucella specific-IgG, sIgA production, and antigen-specific splenocyte proliferative responses were observed in the mice immunized with the formulations as compared to naïve or vector only immunized mice. Modulatory effects of rB and LPS on production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, and interferon-γ were detected in splenocytes of mice immunized with the formulation. Rough Salmonella variant in combination with LPS could further enhance the efficacy of the delivery when applied intraperitoneally. Taken together, it is compelling that Brucella LPS-augmented Salmonella vector delivering immunogenic Brucella proteins may be more suitable than the current non-ideal live Brucella abortus vaccine. The vaccine system also provides a basis for the development of cross-protecting vaccine capable of preventing multispecies brucellosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [A rare cause of infection in chronic dialysis patients: Malta fever (febris undulans melitensis)].

    PubMed

    Stich-Kreitner, V; Piper, C; Schassan, H H; von Egidy, H

    1988-08-15

    A 45-years-old Greek patient developed septicaemia in his 10th year of hemodialysis treatment. Clinical investigation was directed first on bacterial infection of the arteriovenous shunt, on urosepsis or bronchopulmonary infection. Then, serologically (Widal's reaction and ELISA-test) and in different blood-cultures Brucella melitensis was detected as causative agent for Malta fever (Febris undulans). The focus of infection is suspected in unpasteurized sheep-milk cheese of mediterranean origine, wherein Brucella species can survive for months. The patient was treated effectively by a combination of amoxycilline and clavulanic acid.

  9. Biosafety concerns related to Brucella and its potential use as a bioweapon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brucellosis is endemic throughout the world and causes approximately 500,000 new human infections worldwide annually. Brucella melitensis is the most virulent species in humans and is associated with the majority of human infections under field and laboratory conditions. In the U.S., billions have ...

  10. Isolation of a novel 'atypical' Brucella strain from a bluespotted ribbontail ray (Taeniura lymma).

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Riße, Karin; Schauerte, Nicole; Geiger, Christina; Blom, Jochen; Scholz, Holger C

    2017-02-01

    A pleomorphic Gram-negative, motile coccobacillus was isolated from the gills of a wild-caught bluespotted ribbontail ray after its sudden death during quarantine. Strain 141012304 was observed to grow aerobically, to be clearly positive for cytochrome oxidase, catalase, urease and was initially identified as "Brucella melitensis" or "Ochrobactrum anthropi" by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and VITEK2-compact ® , respectively. Affiliation to the genus Brucella was confirmed by bcsp31 and IS711 PCR as well as by Brucella species-specific multiplex PCR, therein displaying a characteristic banding pattern recently described for Brucella strains obtained from amphibian hosts. Likewise, based on recA sequencing, strain 141012304 was found to form a separate lineage, within the so called 'atypical' Brucella, consisting of genetically more distantly related strains. The closest similarity was detected to brucellae, which have recently been isolated from edible bull frogs. Subsequent next generation genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the ray strain represents a novel Brucella lineage within the atypical group of Brucella and in vicinity to Brucella inopinata and Brucella strain BO2, both isolated from human patients. This is the first report of a natural Brucella infection in a saltwater fish extending the host range of this medically important genus.

  11. Phosphatidylethanolamine Synthesis Is Required for Optimal Virulence of Brucella abortus▿

    PubMed Central

    Bukata, Lucas; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2008-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope contains the zwitterionic phospholipids phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Synthesis of PC occurs exclusively via the PC synthase pathway, implying that the pathogen depends on the choline synthesized by the host cell to form PC. Notably, PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process, which suggests that the membrane lipid content is relevant for Brucella virulence. In this study we investigated the first step of PE biosynthesis in B. abortus, which is catalyzed by phosphatidylserine synthase (PssA). Disruption of pssA abrogated the synthesis of PE without affecting the growth in rich complex medium. In minimal medium, however, the mutant required choline supplementation for growth, suggesting that at least PE or PC is necessary for Brucella viability. The absence of PE altered cell surface properties, but most importantly, it impaired several virulence traits of B. abortus, such as intracellular survival in both macrophages and HeLa cells, the maturation of the replicative Brucella-containing vacuole, and mouse colonization. These results suggest that membrane phospholipid composition is critical for the interaction of B. abortus with the host cell. PMID:18931122

  12. Ontology-based representation and analysis of host-Brucella interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical ontologies are representations of classes of entities in the biomedical domain and how these classes are related in computer- and human-interpretable formats. Ontologies support data standardization and exchange and provide a basis for computer-assisted automated reasoning. IDOBRU is an ontology in the domain of Brucella and brucellosis. Brucella is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes brucellosis, the most common zoonotic disease in the world. In this study, IDOBRU is used as a platform to model and analyze how the hosts, especially host macrophages, interact with virulent Brucella strains or live attenuated Brucella vaccine strains. Such a study allows us to better integrate and understand intricate Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity mechanisms. Different levels of host-Brucella interactions based on different host cell types and Brucella strains were first defined ontologically. Three important processes of virulent Brucella interacting with host macrophages were represented: Brucella entry into macrophage, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular replication. Two Brucella pathogenesis mechanisms were ontologically represented: Brucella Type IV secretion system that supports intracellular trafficking and replication, and Brucella erythritol metabolism that participates in Brucella intracellular survival and pathogenesis. The host cell death pathway is critical to the outcome of host-Brucella interactions. For better survival and replication, virulent Brucella prevents macrophage cell death. However, live attenuated B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 induces caspase-2-mediated proinflammatory cell death. Brucella-associated cell death processes are represented in IDOBRU. The gene and protein information of 432 manually annotated Brucella virulence factors were represented using the Ontology of Genes and Genomes (OGG) and Protein Ontology (PRO), respectively. Seven inference rules were defined to capture the knowledge of host-Brucella

  13. [Molecular typing of 12 Brucella strains isolated in Guizhou province in 2010-2013].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Chen, Hong; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Jingzhu; Li, Shijun; Hang, Yan; Tang, Guangpeng; Wang, Dingming; Chen, Guichun

    2015-09-01

    To identify and characterize the Brucella strains from Guizhou province in 2010-2013. A total of 12 strains of Brucella suspicious bacteria were isolated in Guizhou province from 2010 to 2013. Four strains (GZLL3, GZLL4, GZLL11 and SH2) were isolated from goat blood samples and eight strains (SH4, GZZY, GZSQ, GZZA, BR13001, BR13004, BR13005 and BR13006) were isolated from blood samples of patient 12 Brucella suspicious strains were identified and characterized using conventional methods. Brucella genus specific gene BCSP31-based PCR (BCSP31-PCR) was used to identify the genus of Brucella and IS711 insert sequence-based PCR (AMOS-PCR) was applied to identify the species of Brucella strains. Goats and patients originated Brucella strains were comparatively analysed using Pulse-field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Both of conventional methods and PCR identified the 12 Brucella suspicious strains as B. melitensis biotype 3. BCSP31-PCR identification results showed that a specific DNA bands (223 bp) were detected in all the 12 strains and positive control samples with no DNA band in negative samples. AMOS-PCR amplified a 731 bp-DNA bands in all the 12 strains, with 731 bp, 498 bp and 275 bp in M5, S2 and A19 strains, respectively, and no DNA band was detected in the negative control samples. PFGE analysis showed that 12 Brucella isolates from patients and goats showed consistent PFGE patterns with the digestion of restriction enzyme Xba I. The epidemic species/type of Brucella in both human and animal in Guizhou province was B. melitensis biotype 3 and goat was the main animal source of infection of brucellosis in Guizhou province.

  14. Brucella-Salmonella lipopolysaccharide chimeras are less permeable to hydrophobic probes and more sensitive to cationic peptides and EDTA than are their native Brucella sp. counterparts.

    PubMed Central

    Freer, E; Moreno, E; Moriyón, I; Pizarro-Cerdá, J; Weintraub, A; Gorvel, J P

    1996-01-01

    A rough (R) Brucella abortus 45/20 mutant was more sensitive to the bactericidal activity of polymyxin B and lactoferricin B than was its smooth (S) counterpart but considerably more resistant than Salmonella montevideo. The outer membrane (OM) and isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. montevideo showed a higher affinity for these cationic peptides than did the corresponding B. abortus OM and LPS. We took advantage of the moderate sensitivity of R B. abortus to cationic peptides to construct live R B. abortus-S-LPS chimeras to test the activities of polymyxin B, lactoferricin B, and EDTA. Homogeneous and abundant peripheral distribution of the heterologous S-LPS was observed on the surface of the chimeras, and this coating had no effect on the viability or morphology of the cells. When the heterologous LPS corresponded to the less sensitive bacterium S B. abortus S19, the chimeras were more resistant to cationic peptides; in contrast, when the S-LPS was from the more sensitive bacterium S. montevideo, the chimeras were more susceptible to the action of peptides and EDTA. A direct correlation between the amount of heterologous S-LPS on the surface of chimeric Brucella cells and peptide sensitivity was observed. Whereas the damage produced by polymyxin B in S. montevideo and B. abortus-S. montevideo S-LPS chimeras was manifested mainly as OM blebbing and inner membrane rolling, lactoferricin B caused inner membrane detachment, vacuolization, and the formation of internal electron-dense granules in these cells. Native S and R B. abortus strains were permeable to the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN). In contrast, only reduced amounts of NPN partitioned into the OMs of the S. montevideo and B. abortus-S. montevideo S-LPS chimeras. Following peptide exposure, accelerated NPN uptake similar to that observed for S. montevideo was detected for the B. abortus-S. montevideo LPS chimeras. The partition of NPN into native or EDTA-, polymyxin B-, or

  15. Brucella-Salmonella lipopolysaccharide chimeras are less permeable to hydrophobic probes and more sensitive to cationic peptides and EDTA than are their native Brucella sp. counterparts.

    PubMed

    Freer, E; Moreno, E; Moriyón, I; Pizarro-Cerdá, J; Weintraub, A; Gorvel, J P

    1996-10-01

    A rough (R) Brucella abortus 45/20 mutant was more sensitive to the bactericidal activity of polymyxin B and lactoferricin B than was its smooth (S) counterpart but considerably more resistant than Salmonella montevideo. The outer membrane (OM) and isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of S. montevideo showed a higher affinity for these cationic peptides than did the corresponding B. abortus OM and LPS. We took advantage of the moderate sensitivity of R B. abortus to cationic peptides to construct live R B. abortus-S-LPS chimeras to test the activities of polymyxin B, lactoferricin B, and EDTA. Homogeneous and abundant peripheral distribution of the heterologous S-LPS was observed on the surface of the chimeras, and this coating had no effect on the viability or morphology of the cells. When the heterologous LPS corresponded to the less sensitive bacterium S B. abortus S19, the chimeras were more resistant to cationic peptides; in contrast, when the S-LPS was from the more sensitive bacterium S. montevideo, the chimeras were more susceptible to the action of peptides and EDTA. A direct correlation between the amount of heterologous S-LPS on the surface of chimeric Brucella cells and peptide sensitivity was observed. Whereas the damage produced by polymyxin B in S. montevideo and B. abortus-S. montevideo S-LPS chimeras was manifested mainly as OM blebbing and inner membrane rolling, lactoferricin B caused inner membrane detachment, vacuolization, and the formation of internal electron-dense granules in these cells. Native S and R B. abortus strains were permeable to the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN). In contrast, only reduced amounts of NPN partitioned into the OMs of the S. montevideo and B. abortus-S. montevideo S-LPS chimeras. Following peptide exposure, accelerated NPN uptake similar to that observed for S. montevideo was detected for the B. abortus-S. montevideo LPS chimeras. The partition of NPN into native or EDTA-, polymyxin B-, or

  16. "HOOF-Print" Genotyping and Haplotype Inference Discriminates among Brucella spp Isolates From a Small Spatial Scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We demonstrate that the “HOOF-Print” assay provides high power to discriminate among Brucella isolates collected on a small spatial scale (within Portugal). Additionally, we illustrate how haplotype identification using non-random association among markers allows resolution of B. melitensis biovars ...

  17. Natural Brucella infection in Argentine wild foxes*

    PubMed Central

    Szyfres, B.; Tomé, J. González

    1966-01-01

    In the course of an investigation in 1962-64 into the natural occurrence of brucellosis among grey foxes in Argentina, agglutination tests were performed on 728 sera of the foxes Dusicyon gymnocercus antiquus and D. griseus griseus, captured in the provinces of Buenos Aires and Rio Negro. Agglutination titres of from 1:25 to 1:800 were found in 173 (23.8%) of the foxes tested, 11.3% having titres of 1:100 or more. In bacteriological testing, eight cultures of Brucella abortus, biotype 1, were obtained. Discussing their findings, the authors point out that it cannot be stated definitely whether Brucella is naturally shed by foxes or to what extent infected foxes contribute to the dissemination of brucellosis. PMID:5296540

  18. Brucella and Osteoarticular Cell Activation: Partners in Crime

    PubMed Central

    Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Arriola Benitez, Paula C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common presentation of human active disease although its prevalence varies widely. The three most common forms of osteoarticular involvement are sacroiliitis, spondylitis, and peripheral arthritis. The molecular mechanisms implicated in bone damage have been recently elucidated. B. abortus induces bone damage through diverse mechanisms in which TNF-α and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)-the natural modulator of bone homeostasis are involved. These processes are driven by inflammatory cells, like monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, Th17 CD4+ T, and B cells. In addition, Brucella abortus has a direct effect on osteoarticular cells and tilts homeostatic bone remodeling. These bacteria inhibit bone matrix deposition by osteoblasts (the only bone cells involved in bone deposition), and modify the phenotype of these cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokine secretion, contributing to bone matrix degradation. B. abortus also affects osteoclasts (cells naturally involved in bone resorption) by inducing an increase in osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation; thus, increasing mineral and organic bone matrix resorption, contributing to bone damage. Given that the pathology induced by Brucella species involved joint tissue, experiments conducted on synoviocytes revealed that besides inducing the activation of these cells to secrete chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines and MMPS, the infection also inhibits synoviocyte apoptosis. Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that replicates preferentially in the endoplasmic reticulum of macrophages. The analysis of B. abortus-infected synoviocytes indicated that bacteria also replicate in their reticulum suggesting that they could use this cell type for intracellular replication during the osteoarticular localization of the disease. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of osteoarticular brucellosis discovered recently shed light on how the

  19. 16S rRNA and Omp31 Gene Based Molecular Characterization of Field Strains of B. melitensis from Aborted Foetus of Goats in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Vikas Kumar; Nayakwadi, Shivasharanappa

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a reemerging infectious zoonotic disease of worldwide importance. In human, it is mainly caused by Brucella melitensis, a natural pathogen for goats. In India, a large number of goats are reared in semi-intensive to intensive system within the close vicinity of human being. At present, there is no vaccination and control strategy for caprine brucellosis in the country. Thus, to formulate an effective control strategy, the status of etiological agent is essential. To cope up with these, the present study was conducted to isolate and identify the prevalent Brucella species in caprine brucellosis in India. The 30 samples (fetal membrane, fetal stomach content and vaginal swabs) collected throughout India from the aborted fetus of goats revealed the isolation of 05 isolates all belonging to Brucella melitensis biovars 3. All the isolates produced amplification products of 1412 and 720 bp in polymerase chain reaction with genus and species specific 16S rRNA and omp31 gene based primers, respectively. Moreover, the amplification of omp31 gene in all the isolates confirmed the presence of immuno dominant outer membrane protein (31 kDa omp) in all the field isolates of B. melitensis in aborted foetus of goats in India. These findings can support the development of omp31 based specific serodiagnostic test as well as vaccine for the control of caprine brucellosis in India. PMID:24453799

  20. Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB/Btp1 specifically targets the host adaptor protein MAL/TIRAP to promote infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenna; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Gao, Junguang; Zhan, Shaoxia; Xinying, Du; Huang, Liuyu; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang; Li, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune Responses and Protection against Experimental Brucella suis biovar 1 Challenge in Non-vaccinated or RB51-Vaccinated Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty Hereford heifers, approximately 9 months of age, were vaccinated with saline (control) or 2 x 10**10 CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine. Immunologic responses after inoculation demonstrated significantly greater (P<0.05) antibody and proliferative responses to RB51 antigens i...

  2. Serological trail of Brucella infection in an urban slum population in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Martha Olivera; Ristow, Paula; Ko, Albert I.; Di-Lorenzo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Brucellosis is a re-emerging zoonosis with new cases reported each year in many Latin American countries, but it is mostly under-recognized. This study presents a serological investigation of infection with Brucella abortus and Brucella canis in a poor urban community in the city of Salvador, Brazil. Methodology Human sera (n = 180) were randomly selected from 3,171 samples taken from healthy individuals during 2003-2004 and tested with C-ELISA for B. abortus and I-ELISA for B. canis. Results Thirteen percent (24/180) of the individuals were positive for B. abortus and 4.6 % (8/174) were positive for B. canis. Among the variables studied only age (older than 45 years) appeared to be a risk factor for the detection of Brucella antibodies. Conclusion These results indicate the presence of Brucella infection in this settlement and highlight the need to understand the epidemiology of infection under these circumstances to establish the necessary measures for surveillance and control. PMID:23000868

  3. Serologic evidence of Brucella infection in pinnipeds along the coast of Hokkaido, the northernmost main island of Japan.

    PubMed

    Abe, Erika; Ohishi, Kazue; Ishinazaka, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kei; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2017-04-01

    Brucella infection in Hokkaido was serologically surveyed in four species of pinnipeds inhabiting Cape Erimo during 2008-2013 and the Shiretoko Peninsula in 1999 by ELISA using Brucella abortus and B. canis as antigens. Anti-Brucella positive sera showed higher absorbance to B. abortus than B. canis in almost all samples. Anti-B. abortus antibodies were detected in serum samples from 24% (n = 55) of Western Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina stejnegeri) in Cape Erimo and from 66% (n = 41) of spotted seals (P. largha), 15% (n = 20) of ribbon seals (Histriophoca fasciata) and 18% (n = 17) of Western Steller's sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus jubatus) in the Shiretoko Peninsula. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected at higher absorbance in 1- to 4-year-old harbor seals than in the pups and mature animals, suggesting either that Brucella infection mainly occurs after weaning or that it is maternally transmitted to pups with premature or suppressed immunity. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in both immature and mature spotted seals and ribbon seals, with higher absorbance in the former. The antibodies were detected only in mature Western Steller's sea lions. Western blot analysis of the serum samples showed some differences in band appearances, namely discrete versus smeary, and in the number of bands, indicating that multiple different Brucella may be prevalent in pinnipeds in Hokkaido. Alternatively, the Brucella of pinnipeds may have some intra-species diversity. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Species identification and molecular typing of human Brucella isolates from Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Abu S; Habibi, Nazima; Osman, Amr; Shaheed, Faraz; Khan, Mohd W

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of major concern in Kuwait and the Middle East. Human brucellosis can be caused by several Brucella species with varying degree of pathogenesis, and relapses are common after apparently successful therapy. The classical biochemical methods for identification of Brucella are time-consuming, cumbersome, and provide information limited to the species level only. In contrast, molecular methods are rapid and provide differentiation at intra-species level. In this study, four molecular methods [16S rRNA gene sequencing, real-time PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 were evaluated for the identification and typing of 75 strains of Brucella isolated in Kuwait. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of all isolates showed 90-99% sequence identity with B. melitensis and real-time PCR with genus- and species- specific primers identified all isolates as B. melitensis. The results of ERIC-PCR suggested the existence of 75 ERIC genotypes of B. melitensis with a discriminatory index of 0.997. Cluster classification of these genotypes divided them into two clusters, A and B, diverging at ~25%. The maximum number of genotypes (n = 51) were found in cluster B5. MLVA-8 analysis identified all isolates as B. melitensis, and MLVA-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 typing divided the isolates into 10, 32 and 71 MLVA types, respectively. Furthermore, the combined minimum spanning tree analysis demonstrated that, compared to MLVA types discovered all over the world, the Kuwaiti isolates were a distinct group of MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 types in the East Mediterranean Region.

  5. Species identification and molecular typing of human Brucella isolates from Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Amr; Shaheed, Faraz; Khan, Mohd W.

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of major concern in Kuwait and the Middle East. Human brucellosis can be caused by several Brucella species with varying degree of pathogenesis, and relapses are common after apparently successful therapy. The classical biochemical methods for identification of Brucella are time-consuming, cumbersome, and provide information limited to the species level only. In contrast, molecular methods are rapid and provide differentiation at intra-species level. In this study, four molecular methods [16S rRNA gene sequencing, real-time PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA)-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 were evaluated for the identification and typing of 75 strains of Brucella isolated in Kuwait. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of all isolates showed 90–99% sequence identity with B. melitensis and real-time PCR with genus- and species- specific primers identified all isolates as B. melitensis. The results of ERIC-PCR suggested the existence of 75 ERIC genotypes of B. melitensis with a discriminatory index of 0.997. Cluster classification of these genotypes divided them into two clusters, A and B, diverging at ~25%. The maximum number of genotypes (n = 51) were found in cluster B5. MLVA-8 analysis identified all isolates as B. melitensis, and MLVA-8, MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 typing divided the isolates into 10, 32 and 71 MLVA types, respectively. Furthermore, the combined minimum spanning tree analysis demonstrated that, compared to MLVA types discovered all over the world, the Kuwaiti isolates were a distinct group of MLVA-11 and MLVA-16 types in the East Mediterranean Region. PMID:28800594

  6. The role of 'atypical' Brucella in amphibians: are we facing novel emerging pathogens?

    PubMed

    Mühldorfer, K; Wibbelt, G; Szentiks, C A; Fischer, D; Scholz, H C; Zschöck, M; Eisenberg, T

    2017-01-01

    To discuss together the novel cases of Brucella infections in frogs with the results of published reports to extend our current knowledge on 'atypical' brucellae isolated from amphibians and to discuss the challenges we face on this extraordinary emerging group of pathogens. Since our first description, an additional 14 isolates from four different frog species were collected. Novel isolates and a subset of Brucella isolates previously cultured from African bullfrogs were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and broth microdilution susceptibility testing. MALDI-TOF MS worked very efficiently for an accurate bacterial identification to the genus level. Within the cluster analysis, 'atypical' brucellae grouped distant from Brucella melitensis and were even more separated by FT-IR spectroscopy with respect to their geographical origin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of 14 antimicrobial substances are provided as baseline data on antimicrobial susceptibility. The case history of Brucella infections in amphibians reveals a variety of pathologies ranging from localized manifestations to systemic infections. Some isolates seem to be capable of causing high mortality in zoological exhibitions putting higher demands on the management of endangered frog species. There is considerable risk in overlooking and misidentifying 'atypical' Brucella in routine diagnostics. Brucella have only recently been described in cold-blooded vertebrates. Their presence in frog species native to Africa, America and Australia indicates a more common occurrence in amphibians than previously thought. This study provides an extensive overview of amphibian brucellae by highlighting the main features of their clinical significance, diagnosis and zoonotic potential. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Detection and differentiation of the six Brucella species by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Revol, A; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    1997-11-01

    Brucelosis is a severe acute febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Its current diagnosis is based on clinical observations that may be complemented by serology and microbiological culture tests; however, the former is limited in sensitivity and specificity, the latter is time consuming. To improve brucelosis diagnosis we developed a test which is specific and sensitive and is capable of differentiating the six species of Brucella. Four primers were designed from B. abortus sequences at the well-conserved Omp2 locus that are able to amplify the DNAs of all six species of Brucella. Our test detected all six species of Brucella. Their differentiation resulted directly from differences in the amplification patterns or was achieved indirectly using a RFLP present in one of the PCR products. The sensitivity and specificity of the new test were then determined; it was applied successfully in confirming the diagnosis of a patient whose clinical history and serology indicated infection with Brucella. The results make possible the use of a PCR test for Brucella detection and differentiation without relying on the measurement of the antibodies or microorganism culture. Our first results showed that the PCR test can confirm the presence of Brucella in blood samples of infected patients.

  8. Detection and differentiation of the six Brucella species by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Rincón, A. M.; Revol, A.; Barrera-Saldaña, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucelosis is a severe acute febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Its current diagnosis is based on clinical observations that may be complemented by serology and microbiological culture tests; however, the former is limited in sensitivity and specificity, the latter is time consuming. To improve brucelosis diagnosis we developed a test which is specific and sensitive and is capable of differentiating the six species of Brucella. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four primers were designed from B. abortus sequences at the well-conserved Omp2 locus that are able to amplify the DNAs of all six species of Brucella. RESULTS: Our test detected all six species of Brucella. Their differentiation resulted directly from differences in the amplification patterns or was achieved indirectly using a RFLP present in one of the PCR products. The sensitivity and specificity of the new test were then determined; it was applied successfully in confirming the diagnosis of a patient whose clinical history and serology indicated infection with Brucella. CONCLUSIONS: The results make possible the use of a PCR test for Brucella detection and differentiation without relying on the measurement of the antibodies or microorganism culture. Our first results showed that the PCR test can confirm the presence of Brucella in blood samples of infected patients. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:9407549

  9. Brucella vulpis sp. nov., isolated from mandibular lymph nodes of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Scholz, Holger C; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Hammerl, Jens A; Zygmunt, Michel S; Cloeckaert, Axel; Koylass, Mark; Whatmore, Adrian M; Blom, Jochen; Vergnaud, Gilles; Witte, Angela; Aistleitner, Karin; Hofer, Erwin

    2016-05-01

    Two slow-growing, Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, coccoid bacteria (strains F60T and F965), isolated in Austria from mandibular lymph nodes of two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. In a recent study, both isolates were assigned to the genus Brucella but could not be attributed to any of the existing species. Hence, we have analysed both strains in further detail to determine their exact taxonomic position and genetic relatedness to other members of the genus Brucella. The genome sizes of F60T and F965 were 3 236 779 and 3 237 765 bp, respectively. Each genome consisted of two chromosomes, with a DNA G+C content of 57.2 %. A genome-to-genome distance of >80 %, an average nucleotide identity (ANI) of 97 % and an average amino acid identity (AAI) of 98 % compared with the type species Brucella melitensis confirmed affiliation to the genus. Remarkably, 5 % of the entire genetic information of both strains was of non-Brucella origin, including as-yet uncharacterized bacteriophages and insertion sequences as well as ABC transporters and other genes of metabolic function from various soil-living bacteria. Core-genome-based phylogenetic reconstructions placed the novel species well separated from all hitherto-described species of the genus Brucella, forming a long-branched sister clade to the classical species of Brucella. In summary, based on phenotypic and molecular data, we conclude that strains F60T and F965 are members of a novel species of the genus Brucella, for which the name Brucella vulpis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain F60T ( = BCCN 09-2T = DSM 101715T).

  10. In Situ Microscopy Analysis Reveals Local Innate Immune Response Developed around Brucella Infected Cells in Resistant and Susceptible Mice

    PubMed Central

    Copin, Richard; Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; De Trez, Carl; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Magez, Stefan; Akira, Shizuo; Ryffel, Bernhard; Carlier, Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Brucella are facultative intracellular bacteria that chronically infect humans and animals causing brucellosis. Brucella are able to invade and replicate in a broad range of cell lines in vitro, however the cells supporting bacterial growth in vivo are largely unknown. In order to identify these, we used a Brucella melitensis strain stably expressing mCherry fluorescent protein to determine the phenotype of infected cells in spleen and liver, two major sites of B. melitensis growth in mice. In both tissues, the majority of primary infected cells expressed the F4/80 myeloid marker. The peak of infection correlated with granuloma development. These structures were mainly composed of CD11b+ F4/80+ MHC-II+ cells expressing iNOS/NOS2 enzyme. A fraction of these cells also expressed CD11c marker and appeared similar to inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs). Analysis of genetically deficient mice revealed that differentiation of iNOS+ inflammatory DC, granuloma formation and control of bacterial growth were deeply affected by the absence of MyD88, IL-12p35 and IFN-γ molecules. During chronic phase of infection in susceptible mice, we identified a particular subset of DC expressing both CD11c and CD205, serving as a reservoir for the bacteria. Taken together, our results describe the cellular nature of immune effectors involved during Brucella infection and reveal a previously unappreciated role for DC subsets, both as effectors and reservoir cells, in the pathogenesis of brucellosis. PMID:22479178

  11. Brucella BioR regulator defines a complex regulatory mechanism for bacterial biotin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huimin; Chen, Zeliang; Srinivas, Swaminath

    2013-08-01

    The enzyme cofactor biotin (vitamin H or B7) is an energetically expensive molecule whose de novo biosynthesis requires 20 ATP equivalents. It seems quite likely that diverse mechanisms have evolved to tightly regulate its biosynthesis. Unlike the model regulator BirA, a bifunctional biotin protein ligase with the capability of repressing the biotin biosynthetic pathway, BioR has been recently reported by us as an alternative machinery and a new type of GntR family transcriptional factor that can repress the expression of the bioBFDAZ operon in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, quite unusually, a closely related human pathogen, Brucella melitensis, has four putative BioR-binding sites (both bioR and bioY possess one site in the promoter region, whereas the bioBFDAZ [bio] operon contains two tandem BioR boxes). This raised the question of whether BioR mediates the complex regulatory network of biotin metabolism. Here, we report that this is the case. The B. melitensis BioR ortholog was overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, and its solution structure was found to be dimeric. Functional complementation in a bioR isogenic mutant of A. tumefaciens elucidated that Brucella BioR is a functional repressor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the four predicted BioR sites of Brucella plus the BioR site of A. tumefaciens can all interact with the Brucella BioR protein. In a reporter strain that we developed on the basis of a double mutant of A. tumefaciens (the ΔbioR ΔbioBFDA mutant), the β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity of three plasmid-borne transcriptional fusions (bioBbme-lacZ, bioYbme-lacZ, and bioRbme-lacZ) was dramatically decreased upon overexpression of Brucella bioR. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that the expression of bioBFDA and bioY is significantly elevated upon removal of bioR from B. melitensis. Together, we conclude that Brucella BioR is not only a negative autoregulator but also a repressor of

  12. Brucella BioR Regulator Defines a Complex Regulatory Mechanism for Bacterial Biotin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huimin; Srinivas, Swaminath

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme cofactor biotin (vitamin H or B7) is an energetically expensive molecule whose de novo biosynthesis requires 20 ATP equivalents. It seems quite likely that diverse mechanisms have evolved to tightly regulate its biosynthesis. Unlike the model regulator BirA, a bifunctional biotin protein ligase with the capability of repressing the biotin biosynthetic pathway, BioR has been recently reported by us as an alternative machinery and a new type of GntR family transcriptional factor that can repress the expression of the bioBFDAZ operon in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, quite unusually, a closely related human pathogen, Brucella melitensis, has four putative BioR-binding sites (both bioR and bioY possess one site in the promoter region, whereas the bioBFDAZ [bio] operon contains two tandem BioR boxes). This raised the question of whether BioR mediates the complex regulatory network of biotin metabolism. Here, we report that this is the case. The B. melitensis BioR ortholog was overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, and its solution structure was found to be dimeric. Functional complementation in a bioR isogenic mutant of A. tumefaciens elucidated that Brucella BioR is a functional repressor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the four predicted BioR sites of Brucella plus the BioR site of A. tumefaciens can all interact with the Brucella BioR protein. In a reporter strain that we developed on the basis of a double mutant of A. tumefaciens (the ΔbioR ΔbioBFDA mutant), the β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity of three plasmid-borne transcriptional fusions (bioBbme-lacZ, bioYbme-lacZ, and bioRbme-lacZ) was dramatically decreased upon overexpression of Brucella bioR. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that the expression of bioBFDA and bioY is significantly elevated upon removal of bioR from B. melitensis. Together, we conclude that Brucella BioR is not only a negative autoregulator but also a repressor of

  13. Identification of Protective Brucella Antigens and their Expressions in Vaccinia Virus to Prevent Disease in Animals and Humans.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    see figure appendix; B. abortus sequence in similarity arrangement with secD of E.coli, H. influenzae, M. leprae and S. coelicalor). Highly related...low similarity (E. coil and M. leprae approx 13.5% similarity). The Brucella and E. coil sequences were 25% similar (see figures appendix). In E...1987. Micobacterial growth inhibition by interferon-g activated bone marrow macrophages and differential susceptibility among strains of Mycobacterium

  14. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  15. Seroprevalence of Brucella spp. in Cattle, Molecular Characterization in Milk, and the Analysis of Associated Risk Factors with Seroprevalence in Humans, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Diasty, Mohamed M; Ahmed, Heba A; Sayour, Ashraf E; El Hofy, Fatma I; Tahoun, Asmaa B M B; Shafik, Saleh M

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Brucella spp. in humans and cattle at Sharkia Governorate, Egypt. In addition, identification of Brucella spp. in milk samples by PCR and culture with the evaluation of the risk factors associated with Brucella spp. seroprevalence in humans were carried out. Overall, the seroprevalence of Brucella antibodies in the examined cattle was 23.8%, while in human participants it was 21%. The examination of 205 milk samples using PCR revealed that 6.3% were positive for B. abortus biovar 1 and the results were confirmed by culture methods. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that consumption of unpasteurized dairy products, occupational contact with animals, and knowledge about the disease are risk factors associated with infection in humans. This study documented the endemic status of brucellosis in Egypt. Hygienic measures and increased awareness about the disease are recommended to minimize the spread of infection from animals to humans.

  16. Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Brucellosis and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Brucella Isolates in Hamedan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Torkaman Asadi, Fatemeh; Hashemi, Seyyed Hamid; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Naseri, Zahra

    2017-05-24

    Current drug regimens for brucellosis are associated with relatively high rates of therapeutic failure or relapse. Reduced antimicrobial susceptibility of Brucella spp. has been proposed recently as a potential cause of therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic resistance pattern of Brucella melitensis clinical isolates by E-test method in Hamadan, west of Iran. In a 15-month period, all patients with suspected brucellosis were enrolled. Blood specimens were collected for diagnosis of brucellosis by BACTEC system and serological tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates to 7 antibiotics was assessed by the E-test method. One hundred forty-nine patients with brucellosis were evaluated. 38.3% of cultures of clinical samples were positive for BACTEC system, of which 91.2% were associated with a positive serological test result. No significant associations were found between serology and the culture method. All Brucella isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, streptomycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. However, decreased sensitivity to rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was found in 35.1% and 3.5% of isolates, respectively. Because of the high rates of intermediate sensitivity to rifampin among Brucella isolates, this drug should be prescribed with caution. We recommend restricting the use of rifampin for treatment of brucellosis except as an alternative drug for special situations.

  17. [FEATURES OF MASS-SPECTROMETRIC PROTEIN PROFILES OF STRAINS OF BRUCELLOSIS CAUSATIVE AGENT DURING PREPARATION OF CULTURE ON VARIOUS NUTRIENT MEDIA].

    PubMed

    Ulshina, D V; Kovalev, D A; Zhirov, A M; Zharinova, N V; Khudoleev, A A; Kogotkova, O I; Efremenko, V I; Evchenko, N I; Kulichenko, A N

    2016-01-01

    Carry out comparative analysis using time-of-flight mass-spectrometry with matrix laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF MS) of protein profiles of brucellosis causative agents (Brucella melitensis Rev-1 and Brucella abortus 19BA), cultivated in various nutrient media: Albimi agar, brucellagar and erythrit-agar. Vaccine,strains: Brucella melitensis Rev-1 and Brucella abortus 19BA. Protein profiling in linear mode on Microflex "Bruker Daltonics" MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometer. A number of characteristic features of brucella mass-spectra was detected: in particular, preservation of the total qualitative composition of protein profiles of cultures and significant differences in the intensity of separate peaks depending on the nutrient medium used. Based on the analysis of the data obtained, use of Albimi agar as the nutrient medium for preparation of brucella culture samples for mass-spectrometric analysis was shown to be optimal.

  18. Utilization of a specific in vitro lymphocyte immunostimulation assay as an aid in detection of brucella-infected cattle not detected by serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneene, J M; Johnson, D W; Anderson, R K; Muscoplat, C C

    1978-01-01

    Studies using the in vitro lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) were conducted with cattle in a dairy herd with a high percentage of reactors to several serological tests for brucellosis. Lymphocytes were prepared from peripheral bovine blood by the Ficoll-diatrizoate technique. Lymphocytes were cultured using microtitration culture plates. Brucella abortus soluble antigen, at a concentration of 4.4 microgram/culture, was added to the appropriate wells of microtitration culture plates and incubated for 6 days. The lymphocyte stimulation responses were measured by assaying for [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. Seroagglutination tests were conducted simultaneously with the LST, and tissues were collected after slaughter of the cattle for bacteriological culture to isolate B. abortus. All 21 animals studied were serologically negative for anti-brucella antibodies. Two of the 21 animals were classified as infected with Brucella by the LST, and B. abortus biotype 1 was isolated from tissues of these same two animals. The LST exhibited significant sensitivity and specificity in this study, and more observations of this nature might strengthen the application of this assay as an aid in the diagnosis of brucellosis. PMID:103888

  19. BrucellaBase: Genome information resource.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Khader, L K M Abdul; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-09-01

    Brucella sp. causes a major zoonotic disease, brucellosis. Brucella belongs to the family Brucellaceae under the order Rhizobiales of Alphaproteobacteria. We present BrucellaBase, a web-based platform, providing features of a genome database together with unique analysis tools. We have developed a web version of the multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (Whatmore et al., 2007) and phylogenetic analysis of Brucella spp. BrucellaBase currently contains genome data of 510 Brucella strains along with the user interfaces for BLAST, VFDB, CARD, pairwise genome alignment and MLST typing. Availability of these tools will enable the researchers interested in Brucella to get meaningful information from Brucella genome sequences. BrucellaBase will regularly be updated with new genome sequences, new features along with improvements in genome annotations. BrucellaBase is available online at http://www.dbtbrucellosis.in/brucellabase.html or http://59.99.226.203/brucellabase/homepage.html. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bison PRNP genotyping and potential association with Brucella spp. seroprevalence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seabury, C.M.; Halbert, N.D.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Templeton, J.W.; Derr, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    The implication that host cellular prion protein (PrPC) may function as a cell surface receptor and/or portal protein for Brucella abortus in mice prompted an evaluation of nucleotide and amino acid variation within exon 3 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) for six US bison populations. A non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (T50C), resulting in the predicted amino acid replacement M17T (Met ??? Thr), was identified in each population. To date, no variation (T50: Met) has been detected at the corresponding exon 3 nucleotide and/or amino acid position for domestic cattle. Notably, 80% (20 of 25) of the Yellowstone National Park bison possessing the C/C genotype were Brucella spp. seropositive, representing a significant (P = 0.021) association between seropositivity and the C/C genotypic class. Moreover, significant differences in the distribution of PRNP exon 3 alleles and genotypes were detected between Yellowstone National Park bison and three bison populations that were either founded from seronegative stock or previously subjected to test-and-slaughter management to eradicate brucellosis. Unlike domestic cattle, no indel polymorphisms were detected within the corresponding regions of the putative bison PRNP promoter, intron 1, octapeptide repeat region or 3???-untranslated region for any population examined. This study provides the first evidence of a potential association between nucleotide variation within PRNP exon 3 and the presence of Brucella spp. antibodies in bison, implicating PrPC in the natural resistance of bison to brucellosis infection. ?? 2005 International Society for Animal Genetics.

  1. An oral vaccine based on U-Omp19 induces protection against B. abortus mucosal challenge by inducing an adaptive IL-17 immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Pasquevich, Karina A; Ibañez, Andrés E; Coria, Lorena M; García Samartino, Clara; Estein, Silvia M; Zwerdling, Astrid; Barrionuevo, Paula; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Seither, Christine; Warzecha, Heribert; Oliveira, Sergio C; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Cassataro, Juliana

    2011-01-14

    As Brucella infections occur mainly through mucosal surfaces, the development of mucosal administered vaccines could be radical for the control of brucellosis. In this work we evaluated the potential of Brucella abortus 19 kDa outer membrane protein (U-Omp19) as an edible subunit vaccine against brucellosis. We investigated the protective immune response elicited against oral B. abortus infection after vaccination of mice with leaves from transgenic plants expressing U-Omp19; or with plant-made or E. coli-made purified U-Omp19. All tested U-Omp19 formulations induced protection against Brucella when orally administered without the need of adjuvants. U-Omp19 also induced protection against a systemic challenge when parenterally administered. This built-in adjuvant ability of U-Omp19 was independent of TLR4 and could be explained at least in part by its capability to activate dendritic cells in vivo. While unadjuvanted U-Omp19 intraperitoneally administered induced a specific Th1 response, following U-Omp19 oral delivery a mixed specific Th1-Th17 response was induced. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in mice orally vaccinated with U-Omp19 resulted in a loss of the elicited protection, indicating that this cell type mediates immune protection. The role of IL-17 against Brucella infection has never been explored. In this study, we determined that if IL-17A was neutralized in vivo during the challenge period, the mucosal U-Omp19 vaccine did not confer mucosal protection. On the contrary, IL-17A neutralization during the infection did not influence at all the subsistence and growth of this bacterium in PBS-immunized mice. All together, our results indicate that an oral unadjuvanted vaccine based on U-Omp19 induces protection against a mucosal challenge with Brucella abortus by inducing an adaptive IL-17 immune response. They also indicate different and important new aspects i) IL-17 does not contribute to reduce the bacterial burden in non vaccinated mice and ii) IL-17 plays

  2. First isolation and characterization of Brucella microti from wild boar.

    PubMed

    Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Dán, Ádám; Drees, Kevin; Foster, Jeffrey T; Bányai, Krisztián; Marton, Szilvia; Szeredi, Levente; Jánosi, Szilárd; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2015-07-11

    Brucella microti was first isolated from common vole (Microtus arvalis) in the Czech Republic in Central Europe in 2007. As B. microti is the only Brucella species known to live in soil, its distribution, ecology, zoonotic potential, and genomic organization is of particular interest. The present paper is the first to report the isolation of B. microti from a wild boar (Sus scrofa), which is also the first isolation of this bacterial species in Hungary. The B. microti isolate was cultured, after enrichment in Brucella-selective broth, from the submandibular lymph node of a female wild boar that was taken by hunters in Hungary near the Austrian border in September 2014. Histological and immunohistological examinations of the lymph node sections with B. abortus-, B. suis- and B. canis-specific sera gave negative results. The isolate did not require CO2 for growth, was oxidase, catalase, and urease positive, H2S negative, grew well in the presence of 20 μg/ml basic fuchsin and thionin, and had brownish pigmentation after three days of incubation. It gave strong positive agglutination with anti-A and anti-M but had a negative reaction with anti-R monospecific sera. The API 20 NE test identified it as Ochrobactrum anthropi with 99.9% identity, and it showed B. microti-specific banding pattern in the Bruce- and Suis-ladder multiplex PCR systems. Whole genome re-sequencing identified 30 SNPs in orthologous loci when compared to the B. microti reference genome available in GenBank, and the MLVA analysis yielded a unique profile. Given that the female wild boar did not develop any clinical disease, we hypothesize that this host species only harboured the bacterium, serving as a possible reservoir capable of maintaining and spreading this pathogen. The infectious source could have been either a rodent, a carcass that had been eaten or infection occurred via the boar rooting in soil. The low number of discovered SNPs suggests an unexpectedly high level of genetic homogeneity

  3. Brucella taxonomy and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ficht, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Taxonomy and nomenclature represent man-made systems designed to enhance understanding of the relationship between organisms by comparison of discrete sets of properties. Initial efforts at bacterial taxonomy were flawed as a result of the previous use of nonsystematic approaches including common names resulting in confusing and inaccurate nomenclature. A decision was made to start afresh with bacterial nomenclature and to avoid the hazards experienced in the taxonomic classification of higher organisms. This was achieved by developing new rules designed to simplify classification and avoid unnecessary and confusing changes. This article reviews the work of a number of scientists attempting to reconcile new molecular data describing the phylogenetic relationship between Brucella organisms and a broader family of organisms with widely variant phenotypes that include human virulence and host range against a backdrop of strict regulatory requirements that fail to recognize significant differences between organisms with similar nomenclature. PMID:20521932

  4. Epidemiology of Brucella infection in the human, livestock and wildlife interface in the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Assenga, Justine A; Matemba, Lucas E; Muller, Shabani K; Malakalinga, Joseph J; Kazwala, Rudovick R

    2015-08-08

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of public health importance worldwide. In Tanzania, the disease is underreported due to insufficient awareness, inadequate diagnostic protocols, including lack of appropriate reagents for diagnosis. Livestock and wildlife are considered potential sources of infection to humans; however, the role played by these carriers in the epidemiology of the disease in the ecosystems in Tanzania is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of anti-Brucella antibodies in humans, wildlife and livestock; and molecular prevalence of Brucella spp in cattle and goats in the Katavi- Rukwa ecosystem. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in humans at 0.6 % (95 % CI: 0.1, 2.1 %); cattle at 6.8 % (95 % CI: 5.4, 8.5 %), goats at 1.6 % (95 % CI: 0.4, 4.1 %) and buffaloes at 7.9 % (95 % CI: 1.7, 21.4 %). One of the two sampled lions tested positive. Cattle had a significantly higher prevalence of anti-Brucella antibodies as compared to goats (P < 0.05). A significantly higher seroprevalence was found in female than in male cattle and in adult than in young cattle (P < 0.05). There was an agreement of 95 and 89 % in cattle and goats, respectively, for the Rose Bengal plate Test (RBPT) and Competitive Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (c-ELISA) in detecting Brucella infection. Eight (3.5 %) out of 231 milk samples tested were positive for Brucella spp on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), and Brucella abortus biovar 1 was detected in cattle milk. However, no Brucella spp were detected in goat milk. This study has shown the presence of anti- Brucella antibodies in humans, livestock, and wildlife in the Katavi- Rukwa ecosystem. Transmission of the infection between wildlife, livestock and humans is likely to continue due to increasing human activities in the human wildlife interface. This information is an important contribution to public health policy development in the human wildlife interface of the Katavi- Rukwa ecosystem.

  5. Brucella endocarditis: an occupational hazard!

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sanjeev Kumar; Rajani, Ali Raza; Hussain, Kosar; Dande, Mangesh Manoharrao

    2013-04-22

    A young man presented with a 2-month history of fever and malaise. Cardiac auscultation revealed the presence of a diastolic murmur. Subsequently, a cardiac echocardiogram was done, which showed a large vegetation adherent to an anterior mitral leaflet. The blood culture was positive for Brucella species. The patient was given antibiotic therapy for brucellosis and referred for surgery. Brucella endocarditis is one of the rarest, yet most notorious complications of this infection. This condition requires a high degree of clinical suspicion in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Estimating loss of Brucella abortus antibodies from age-specific serological data in elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benavides, J. A.; Caillaud, D.; Scurlock, B. M.; Maichak, E. J.; Edwards, W.H.; Cross, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Serological data are one of the primary sources of information for disease monitoring in wildlife. However, the duration of the seropositive status of exposed individuals is almost always unknown for many free-ranging host species. Directly estimating rates of antibody loss typically requires difficult longitudinal sampling of individuals following seroconversion. Instead, we propose a Bayesian statistical approach linking age and serological data to a mechanistic epidemiological model to infer brucellosis infection, the probability of antibody loss, and recovery rates of elk (Cervus canadensis) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. We found that seroprevalence declined above the age of ten, with no evidence of disease-induced mortality. The probability of antibody loss was estimated to be 0.70 per year after a five-year period of seropositivity and the basic reproduction number for brucellosis to 2.13. Our results suggest that individuals are unlikely to become re-infected because models with this mechanism were unable to reproduce a significant decline in seroprevalence in older individuals. This study highlights the possible implications of antibody loss, which could bias our estimation of critical epidemiological parameters for wildlife disease management based on serological data.

  7. Prevalence of Brucella abortus antibodies in equines of a tropical region of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-González, Rosa I.; González-Reyes, Ismael; Flores-Gutiérrez, Gerardo H.

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determinate the seroprevalence rate of equine brucellosis in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. Serum samples from 420 equines were analyzed with the Rose Bengal test at cell concentrations of 3% (RBT-3%) and 8% (RBT-8%), and positive results were confirmed with the Rivanol test (RT). Risk factors were determined with the prevalence ratio (PR) and the use of variables generated from a questionnaire administered to the animals’ owners. Serum from 1 stallion had positive results with both the RBT-8% and the RT, for a seroprevalence rate of 0.238%. Drinking of water from a pond that was also used by cattle and dogs was the only associated risk factor for this animal (PR = 0.25). However, the results were considered false-positive, because the results for other horses in the same environmental conditions were negative. Although brucellosis is considered endemic in ruminants in the study area, the results obtained suggest that equines are not a reservoir of brucellosis and do not play an important role in the epidemiologic patterns of this disease in northeastern Mexico. PMID:17042384

  8. Immunization with Brucella VirB Proteins Reduces Organ Colonization in Mice through a Th1-Type Immune Response and Elicits a Similar Immune Response in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E.; Comercio, Elida A.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  9. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Gamma Interferon Loaded onto Albumin Nanoparticles: In Vitro and In Vivo Activities against Brucella abortus▿

    PubMed Central

    Segura, S.; Gamazo, C.; Irache, J. M.; Espuelas, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) when it was either adsorbed onto or loaded into albumin nanoparticles. Brucella abortus-infected macrophages and infected BALB/c mice were selected as the models for testing of the therapeutic potentials of these cytokine delivery systems, in view of the well-established role of IFN-γ-activated macrophages for the control of Brucella sp. infections. Whereas the encapsulation of IFN-γ inside the matrix of nanoparticles completely abrogated its activity, adsorbed IFN-γ increased by 0.75 log unit the bactericidal effect induced by RAW macrophages activated with free IFN-γ, along with a higher level of production of nitric oxide. In infected BALB/c-mice, IFN-γ adsorbed onto nanoparticles was also more active than free cytokine in reducing the number of bacteria in the spleens, and the effect was mediated by an increased ratio of IFN-γ-secreting (Th1) to interleukin-4-secreting (Th2) cells. Overall, albumin nanoparticles would be suitable as carriers that target IFN-γ to macrophages and, thus, potentiate their therapeutic activity. PMID:17220401

  11. [Evasion of anti-infectious immunity by Brucella - A review].

    PubMed

    Quan, Wurong; Yang, Yongjie

    2016-05-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella species, is a worldwide zoonosis. As facultative intracellular pathogens, Brucella possess non-classical virulence factor, but its virulence is very powerful and can elicit chronic infections of both animals and humans. Evasion of host anti-infectious immunity is a prerequisite for chronic infections, this ability appears increasingly crucial for Brucella virulence. As successful pathogens, Brucella can escape or suppress innate immunity and modulate adaptive immunity to establish long lasting infections in host cells. In this review, we address the molecular mechanisms of Brucella to evade anti-infectious immunity. This will shed new insights on Brucella virulence and will, potentially, open new prophylactic avenues.

  12. Progress in Brucella vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Xinghong; SKYBERG, Jerod A.; CAO, Ling; CLAPP, Beata; THORNBURG, Theresa; PASCUAL, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. are zoonotic, facultative intracellular pathogens, which cause animal and human disease. Animal disease results in abortion of fetuses; in humans, it manifests flu-like symptoms with an undulant fever, with osteoarthritis as a common complication of infection. Antibiotic regimens for human brucellosis patients may last several months and are not always completely effective. While there are no vaccines for humans, several licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in livestock. The performance of these animal vaccines is dependent upon the host species, dose, and route of immunization. Newly engineered live vaccines, lacking well-defined virulence factors, retain low residual virulence, are highly protective, and may someday replace currently used animal vaccines. These also have possible human applications. Moreover, due to their enhanced safety and efficacy in animal models, subunit vaccines for brucellosis show great promise for their application in livestock and humans. This review summarizes the progress of brucellosis vaccine development and presents an overview of candidate vaccines. PMID:23730309

  13. Role of the Omp25/Omp31 Family in Outer Membrane Properties and Virulence of Brucella ovis▿

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Hernández, Paola; Fernández-Lago, Luis; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Martín-Martín, Ana I.; Cloeckaert, Axel; Grilló, María-Jesús; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2007-01-01

    The genes coding for the five outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of the Omp25/Omp31 family expected to be located in the outer membrane (OM) of rough virulent Brucella ovis PA were inactivated to evaluate their role in virulence and OM properties. The OM properties of the mutant strains and of the mutants complemented with the corresponding wild-type genes were analyzed, in comparison with the parental strain and rough B. abortus RB51, in several tests: (i) binding of anti-Omp25 and anti-Omp31 monoclonal antibodies, (ii) autoagglutination of bacterial suspensions, and (iii) assessment of susceptibility to polymyxin B, sodium deoxycholate, hydrogen peroxide, and nonimmune ram serum. A tight balance of the members of the Omp25/Omp31 family was seen to be essential for the stability of the B. ovis OM, and important differences between the OMs of B. ovis PA and B. abortus RB51 rough strains were observed. Regarding virulence, the absence of Omp25d and Omp22 from the OM of B. ovis PA led to a drastic reduction in spleen colonization in mice. While the greater susceptibility of the Δomp22 mutant to nonimmune serum and its difficulty in surviving in the stationary phase might be on the basis of its dramatic attenuation, no defects in the OM able to explain the attenuation of the Δomp25d mutant were found, especially considering that the fully virulent Δomp25c mutant displayed more important OM defects. Accordingly, Omp25d, and perhaps Omp22, could be directly involved in the penetration and/or survival of B. ovis inside host cells. This aspect, together with the role of Omp25d and Omp22 in the virulence both of B. ovis in rams and of other Brucella species, should be thoroughly evaluated in future studies. PMID:17562767

  14. Understanding Virulence in the Brucellae and Francisellae: Towards Efficacious Treatments for Two Potential Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rasley, A; Parsons, D A; El-Etr, S

    2009-12-30

    Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Brucellae species are highly infectious pathogens classified as select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the potential for use in bioterrorism attacks. These organisms are known to be facultative intracellular pathogens that preferentially infect human monocytes. As such, understanding how the host responds to infection with these organisms is paramount in detecting and combating human disease. We have compared the ability of fully virulent strains of each pathogen and their non-pathogenic near neighbors to enter and survive inside the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and have quantified the cellular responsemore » to infection with the goal of identifying both unique and common host response patterns. We expanded the scope of these studies to include experiments with pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague. Nonpathogenic strains of each organism were impaired in their ability to survive intracellularly compared with their pathogenic counterparts. Furthermore, infection of THP-1 cells with pathogenic strains of Y. pestis and F. tularensis resulted in marked increases in the secretion of the inflammatory chemokines IL-8, RANTES, and MIP-1{beta}. In contrast, B. melitensis infection failed to elicit any significant increases in a panel of cytokines tested. These differences may underscore distinct strategies in pathogenic mechanisms employed by these pathogens.« less

  15. Rapid Methods for the Laboratory Identification of Pathogenic Microorganisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    for the use of plant proteins, called lectins, in diagnostic microbiology. We studied lectin interactions with Staphylococcus, Legionella, Streptococcus ...commercial sources (BBL and Difco). Thethree Brucella species: suis abortus, and melitensis were also purchased from BBL and Difco. Lectins were obtained...that are killed by antibiotic treatment rather than formalin. Lee Laboratories in Georgia has offered to prepare these antigens for us according to our

  16. Brucella canis Is an Intracellular Pathogen That Induces a Lower Proinflammatory Response than Smooth Zoonotic Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Altamirano-Silva, Pamela; González-Espinoza, Gabriela; Medina, María-Concepción; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Bouza-Mora, Laura; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Wong, Melissa; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Rojas, Norman; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis is a disease of dogs and a zoonotic risk. B. canis harbors most of the virulence determinants defined for the genus, but its pathogenic strategy remains unclear since it has not been demonstrated that this natural rough bacterium is an intracellular pathogen. Studies of B. canis outbreaks in kennel facilities indicated that infected dogs displaying clinical signs did not present hematological alterations. A virulent B. canis strain isolated from those outbreaks readily replicated in different organs of mice for a protracted period. However, the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12 in serum were close to background levels. Furthermore, B. canis induced lower levels of gamma interferon, less inflammation of the spleen, and a reduced number of granulomas in the liver in mice than did B. abortus. When the interaction of B. canis with cells was studied ex vivo, two patterns were observed, a predominant scattered cell-associated pattern of nonviable bacteria and an infrequent intracellular replicative pattern of viable bacteria in a perinuclear location. The second pattern, responsible for the increase in intracellular multiplication, was dependent on the type IV secretion system VirB and was seen only if the inoculum used for cell infections was in early exponential phase. Intracellular replicative B. canis followed an intracellular trafficking route undistinguishable from that of B. abortus. Although B. canis induces a lower proinflammatory response and has a stealthier replication cycle, it still displays the pathogenic properties of the genus and the ability to persist in infected organs based on the ability to multiply intracellularly. PMID:26438796

  17. Brucella spp. infection in large ruminants in an endemic area of Egypt: cross-sectional study investigating seroprevalence, risk factors and livestock owner's knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs).

    PubMed

    Holt, Hannah R; Eltholth, Mahmoud M; Hegazy, Yamen M; El-Tras, Wael F; Tayel, Ahmed A; Guitian, Javier

    2011-05-19

    Brucellosis is regarded as one of the major zoonotic infections worldwide. It was first reported in Egypt in 1939 and is now endemic, the predominate species of Brucella in cattle and buffalo in Egypt is B. melitensis. The aim of the study was to estimate seroprevalence of Brucella spp. in cattle and buffalo reared in households in an Egyptian village, identify risk factors for animals testing seropositive and to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) of livestock owners with regards to brucellosis. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a village in Menufiya Governorate of Egypt. In June and July 2009, 107 households were selected using systematic sample and all lactating cattle and buffalo present in the household were sampled and tested for antibodies against Brucella spp. In addition, a questionnaire collecting information on potential risk factors for Brucella spp. infection in cattle and buffalo was administered to the household member responsible for rearing the livestock. Between December 2009 and February 2010 households were revisited and a second questionnaire regarding KAPs associated with brucellosis was administered. True individual and household seroprevalence were estimated to be 11.0% (95% CI: 3.06% to 18.4%) and 15.5% (95% CI: 6.61% to 24.7%), respectively. Cattle and buffalo kept in a household with sheep and goats had 6.32 (95% CI: 1.44 to 27.9) times the odds of testing seropositive for Brucella spp., compared to cattle and buffalo that were not. Most participants in the study stated that livestock owners assist in the parturition of ruminants without wearing gloves and that some farmers sell animals which they suspect are Brucella infected to butchers or at market. Many participants made their livestock's milk into cheese and other dairy products without pasteurising it. Brucellosis was endemic at high levels, in the current study. Although livestock owners had good general knowledge of brucellosis, they still appeared to

  18. Brucella spp. infection in large ruminants in an endemic area of Egypt: cross-sectional study investigating seroprevalence, risk factors and livestock owner's knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is regarded as one of the major zoonotic infections worldwide. It was first reported in Egypt in 1939 and is now endemic, the predominate species of Brucella in cattle and buffalo in Egypt is B. melitensis. The aim of the study was to estimate seroprevalence of Brucella spp. in cattle and buffalo reared in households in an Egyptian village, identify risk factors for animals testing seropositive and to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) of livestock owners with regards to brucellosis. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in a village in Menufiya Governorate of Egypt. In June and July 2009, 107 households were selected using systematic sample and all lactating cattle and buffalo present in the household were sampled and tested for antibodies against Brucella spp. In addition, a questionnaire collecting information on potential risk factors for Brucella spp. infection in cattle and buffalo was administered to the household member responsible for rearing the livestock. Between December 2009 and February 2010 households were revisited and a second questionnaire regarding KAPs associated with brucellosis was administered. Results True individual and household seroprevalence were estimated to be 11.0% (95% CI: 3.06% to 18.4%) and 15.5% (95% CI: 6.61% to 24.7%), respectively. Cattle and buffalo kept in a household with sheep and goats had 6.32 (95% CI: 1.44 to 27.9) times the odds of testing seropositive for Brucella spp., compared to cattle and buffalo that were not. Most participants in the study stated that livestock owners assist in the parturition of ruminants without wearing gloves and that some farmers sell animals which they suspect are Brucella infected to butchers or at market. Many participants made their livestock's milk into cheese and other dairy products without pasteurising it. Conclusions Brucellosis was endemic at high levels, in the current study. Although livestock owners had good general knowledge of

  19. Human brucellosis in northwest Ecuador: typifying Brucella spp., seroprevalence, and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Ron-Garrido, Lenin; Abatih, Emmanuel; Celi-Erazo, Maritza; Vizcaíno-Ordóñez, Laura; Calva-Pacheco, Jaime; González-Andrade, Pablo; Berkvens, Dirk; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Fretin, David; Saegerman, Claude

    2014-02-01

    Human brucellosis in Ecuador is underreported and based only on passive surveillance. Since 2008, brucellosis was removed from the list of communicable diseases in the country. Until now, the true human brucellosis picture has not yet been determined. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of the disease, identify risk factors associated with brucellosis seropositivity in humans, and isolate circulating strains of Brucella spp. in the northwestern part of Ecuador. Between 2006 and 2008, a large transect survey was conducted, based on blood sampling of people from the northwestern part of Ecuador (n=3733) together with an epidemiological inquiry. On the basis of three diagnostic tests used in parallel, the overall seroprevalence was estimated as 1.88% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.48-2.38). Based on a multivariable random effects logistic regression analysis, the main risk factors associated with human brucellosis seropositivity were contact with livestock (odds ratio [OR]=3.0; CI 1.25-7.08), consumption of fetus and placenta (OR=2.5; CI 1.18-5.22), and involvement in activities at risk for brucellosis infection (OR=1.8; CI 1.00-3.35). Noticeable variation in brucellosis seropositivity among humans within cantons was observed. The circulating strain was Brucella abortus biotype 4. This study emphasized that contact with livestock, consumption of fetus and placenta, and occupational hazard group were all significant risk factors for the transmission of brucellosis among individuals in the northwestern part of Ecuador. Alongside encouraging the launching of educational campaigns against brucellosis, especially in rural areas where 36% of the population lives, controlling this zoonotic disease in animals will directly benefit its prevention in humans, especially because there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against brucellosis in humans.

  20. Prevalence of Brucella spp in humans1

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Catharina de Paula Oliveira Cavalcanti; Teles, José Andreey Almeida; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; Silva, Stemberg Oliveira Firmino; Cruz, Maria Vilma Rocha Andrade; da Silva-Júnior, Francisco Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine the seroprevalence of Brucella spp in humans. Method: this is an observational study, developed with 455 individuals between 18 and 64 years old, who use the Estratégia de Saúde da Família (Brazil's family health strategy). The serum samples of volunteers underwent buffered acid antigen tests, such as screening, agar gel immunodiffusion and slow seroagglutination test in tubes and 2-Mercaptoethanol. Results: among the samples, 1.98% has responded to buffered-acid antigen, 2.85% to agar gel immunodiffusion test and 1.54% to the slow seroagglutination tests on tubes/2-Mercaptoethanol. The prevalence of Brucella spp was 4.4%, represented by the last two tests. Conclusion: the results of this research suggest that the studied population is exposed to Brucella spp infection. PMID:26487143

  1. Prevalence of Brucella spp in humans.

    PubMed

    Soares, Catharina de Paula Oliveira Cavalcanti; Teles, José Andreey Almeida; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; Silva, Stemberg Oliveira Firmino; Cruz, Maria Vilma Rocha Andrade; da Silva-Júnior, Francisco Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    to determine the seroprevalence of Brucella spp in humans. this is an observational study, developed with 455 individuals between 18 and 64 years old, who use the Estratégia de Saúde da Família (Brazil's family health strategy). The serum samples of volunteers underwent buffered acid antigen tests, such as screening, agar gel immunodiffusion and slow seroagglutination test in tubes and 2-Mercaptoethanol. among the samples, 1.98% has responded to buffered-acid antigen, 2.85% to agar gel immunodiffusion test and 1.54% to the slow seroagglutination tests on tubes/2-Mercaptoethanol. The prevalence of Brucella spp was 4.4%, represented by the last two tests. the results of this research suggest that the studied population is exposed to Brucella spp infection.

  2. Metal acquisition and virulence in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Roop, R. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Similar to other bacteria, Brucella strains require several biologically essential metals for their survival in vitro and in vivo. Acquiring sufficient levels of some of these metals, particularly iron, manganese and zinc, is especially challenging in the mammalian host, where sequestration of these micronutrients is a well-documented component of both the innate and acquired immune responses. This review describes the Brucella metal transporters that have been shown to play critical roles in the virulence of these bacteria in experimental and natural hosts. PMID:22632611

  3. Can Chlamydia abortus be transmitted by embryo transfer in goats?

    PubMed

    Oseikria, M; Pellerin, J L; Rodolakis, A; Vorimore, F; Laroucau, K; Bruyas, J F; Roux, C; Michaud, S; Larrat, M; Fieni, F

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether Chlamydia abortus would adhere to or penetrate the intact zona pellucida (ZP-intact) of early in vivo-derived caprine embryos, after in vitro infection; and (ii) the efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing protocol for bovine embryos. Fifty-two ZP-intact embryos (8-16 cells), obtained from 14 donors were used in this experiment. The embryos were randomly divided into 12 batches. Nine batches (ZP-intact) of five embryos were incubated in a medium containing 4 × 10(7)Chlamydia/mL of AB7 strain. After incubation for 18 hours at 37 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2, the embryos were washed in batches in 10 successive baths of a phosphate buffer saline and 5% fetal calf serum solution in accordance with IETS guidelines. In parallel, three batches of ZP-intact embryos were used as controls by being subjected to similar procedures but without exposure to C. abortus. The 10 wash baths were collected separately and centrifuged for 1 hour at 13,000 × g. The washed embryos and the pellets of the 10 centrifuged wash baths were frozen at -20 °C before examination for evidence of C. abortus using polymerase chain reaction. C. abortus DNA was found in all of the infected batches of ZP-intact embryos (9/9) after 10 successive washes. It was also detected in the 10th wash fluid for seven batches of embryos, whereas for the two other batches, the last positive wash bath was the eighth and the ninth, respectively. In contrast, none of the embryos or their washing fluids in the control batches were DNA positive. These results report that C. abortus adheres to and/or penetrates the ZP of in vivo caprine embryos after in vitro infection, and that the standard washing protocol recommended by the IETS for bovine embryos, failed to remove it. The persistence of these bacteria after washing makes the embryo a potential means of transmission of the bacterium during embryo transfer from

  4. Brucellosis in camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Darfur, Western Sudan.

    PubMed

    Musa, M T; Eisa, M Z M; El Sanousi, E M; Abdel Wahab, M B; Perrett, L

    2008-01-01

    In a field outbreak of brucellosis in 21 camels mixed with cattle, sheep and goats, five camels, three of which showed clinical signs, were serologically positive. In a subsequent abattoir survey of apparently healthy camels, six animals were seropositive, albeit with titres that tended to be lower than those found in the field outbreak. Of the six seropositive slaughtered camels, five were shown to have lymph nodes (prescapular and supramammary) infected with brucellae (Brucella melitensis biovar 3, two camels; Brucella abortus biovar 6, three camels). Infection of camels with B. abortus biovar 6 had not previously been reported. Infection of the supramammary lymph nodes presents a potential hazard to those who consume raw camels' milk, a common practice in nomadic camel owners.

  5. Establishment of Chronic Infection: Brucella's Stealth Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Waqas; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes zoonotic infection known as brucellosis which results in abortion and infertility in natural host. Humans, especially in low income countries, can acquire infection by direct contact with infected animal or by consumption of animal products and show high morbidity, severe economic losses and public health problems. However for survival, host cells develop complex immune mechanisms to defeat and battle against attacking pathogens and maintain a balance between host resistance and Brucella virulence. On the other hand as a successful intracellular pathogen, Brucella has evolved multiple strategies to evade immune response mechanisms to establish persistent infection and replication within host. In this review, we mainly summarize the “Stealth” strategies employed by Brucella to modulate innate and the adaptive immune systems, autophagy, apoptosis and possible role of small noncoding RNA in the establishment of chronic infection. The purpose of this review is to give an overview for recent understanding how this pathogen evades immune response mechanisms of host, which will facilitate to understanding the pathogenesis of brucellosis and the development of novel, more effective therapeutic approaches to treat brucellosis. PMID:27014640

  6. Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Víquez-Ruiz, Eunice; Rojas-Campos, Norman; Baker, Kate S; Oviedo-Sánchez, Gerardo; Amuy, Ernesto; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R; Moreno, Edgardo; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2017-06-01

    Several species of Brucella are known to be zoonotic, but B. neotomae infection has been thought to be limited to wood rats. In 2008 and 2011, however, B. neotomae was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of 2 men with neurobrucellosis. The nonzoonotic status of B. neotomae should be reassessed.

  7. Brucella neotomae Infection in Humans, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Víquez-Ruiz, Eunice; Rojas-Campos, Norman; Baker, Kate S.; Oviedo-Sánchez, Gerardo; Amuy, Ernesto; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Moreno, Edgardo

    2017-01-01

    Several species of Brucella are known to be zoonotic, but B. neotomae infection has been thought to be limited to wood rats. In 2008 and 2011, however, B. neotomae was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of 2 men with neurobrucellosis. The nonzoonotic status of B. neotomae should be reassessed. PMID:28518028

  8. A Protein-Conjugate Approach to Develop a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Antigen Detection Test for the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24901521

  9. Host response to Brucella infection: review and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Elfaki, Mohamed G; Alaidan, Alwaleed Abdullah; Al-Hokail, Abdullah Abdulrahman

    2015-07-30

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic and contagious infectious disease caused by infection with Brucella species. The infecting brucellae are capable of causing a devastating multi-organ disease in humans with serious health complications. The pathogenesis of Brucella infection is influenced largely by host factors, Brucella species/strain, and the ability of invading brucellae to survive and replicate within mononuclear phagocytic cells, preferentially macrophages (Mf). Consequently, the course of human infection may appear as an acute fatal or progress into chronic debilitating infection with periodical episodes that leads to bacteremia and death. The existence of brucellae inside Mf represents one of the strategies used by Brucella to evade the host immune response and is responsible for treatment failure in certain human populations treated with anti-Brucella drugs. Moreover, the persistence of brucellae inside Mf complicates the diagnosis and may affect the host cell signaling pathways with consequent alterations in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, there is an urgent need to pursue the development of novel drugs and/or vaccine targets against human brucellosis using high throughput technologies in genomics, proteomics, and immunology.

  10. Evaluation of plasma sphingosine 1-phosphate, hepcidin and cardiovascular damage biomarkers (cardiac troponin I and homocysteine) in rats infected with brucellosis and vaccinated (Rev-1, RB-51).

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, Kaveh; Nasrollahi Nargesabad, Reza; Vousooghi, Nasim

    2017-08-01

    Brucellosis is known as one of important zoonosis. Studying the histological and biochemical effects of the disease could help to increase our knowledge about it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes of plasma parameters after intraperitoneal injection of two species of Brucella (Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus) and two vaccines (Rev-1, RB-51) in the rat. Forty male rats were divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group). Two groups received suspensions of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis and two other groups were injected intraperitoneally with two mentioned vaccines and the last group received only distilled water. The results showed a significant increase in sphingosine 1-phosphate, Malondialdehyde, hepcidin, homocysteine, cardiac troponin I and copper levels and a considerable decrease in the levels of iron and zinc (P ≤ 0.01) in infected groups compared to the control animals. In vaccinated groups, hepcidin was increased but other parameters were not changed in comparison to the control group. It can be concluded that increase of homocysteine and cardiac troponin I in brucellosis could be a warning for cardiac adverse effects. Besides, increase of sphingosine 1-phosphate probably indicates its stimulant and modulatory effects in anti- Brucellosis biochemical pathways of the host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One alternative in the Bison remote vaccination environmental impact statement (EIS) for Yellowstone National Park includes inoculation of both calves and yearlings. Although RB51 vaccination of bison does protect against experimental challenge, it was unknown whether booster vaccination might enhan...

  12. Brucella dissociation is essential for macrophage egress and bacterial dissemination.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jianwu; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Ficht, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that smooth Brucella can dissociate into rough mutants that are cytotoxic to macrophages. However, the in vivo biological significance and/or mechanistic details of Brucella dissociation and cytotoxicity remain incomplete. In the current report, a plaque assay was developed using Brucella strains exhibiting varying degrees of cytotoxicity. Infected monolayers were observed daily using phase contrast microscopy for plaque formation while Brucella uptake and replication were monitored using an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Visible plaques were detected at 4-5 days post infection (p.i.) with cytotoxic Brucella 16MΔmanBA at an MOI of 0.1. IFA staining demonstrated that the plaques consisted of macrophages with replicating Brucella. Visible plaques were not detected in monolayers infected with non-cytotoxic 16MΔmanBAΔvirB2 at an MOI of 0.1. However, IFA staining did reveal small groups of macrophages (foci) with replicating Brucella in the monolayers infected with 16MΔmanBAΔvirB2. The size of the foci observed in macrophage monolayers infected with rough Brucella correlated directly with cytotoxicity measured in liquid culture, suggesting that cytotoxicity was essential for Brucella egress and dissemination. In monolayers infected with 16M, small and large foci were observed. Double antibody staining revealed spontaneous rough mutants within the large, but not the small foci in 16M infected monolayers. Furthermore, plaque formation was observed in the large foci derived from 16M infections. Finally, the addition of gentamicin to the culture medium inhibited plaque formation, suggesting that cell-to-cell spread occurred only following release of the organisms from the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Brucella-induced cytotoxicity is critical for Brucella egress and dissemination.

  13. Brucella dissociation is essential for macrophage egress and bacterial dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jianwu; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Ficht, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that smooth Brucella can dissociate into rough mutants that are cytotoxic to macrophages. However, the in vivo biological significance and/or mechanistic details of Brucella dissociation and cytotoxicity remain incomplete. In the current report, a plaque assay was developed using Brucella strains exhibiting varying degrees of cytotoxicity. Infected monolayers were observed daily using phase contrast microscopy for plaque formation while Brucella uptake and replication were monitored using an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Visible plaques were detected at 4–5 days post infection (p.i.) with cytotoxic Brucella 16MΔmanBA at an MOI of 0.1. IFA staining demonstrated that the plaques consisted of macrophages with replicating Brucella. Visible plaques were not detected in monolayers infected with non-cytotoxic 16MΔmanBAΔvirB2 at an MOI of 0.1. However, IFA staining did reveal small groups of macrophages (foci) with replicating Brucella in the monolayers infected with 16MΔmanBAΔvirB2. The size of the foci observed in macrophage monolayers infected with rough Brucella correlated directly with cytotoxicity measured in liquid culture, suggesting that cytotoxicity was essential for Brucella egress and dissemination. In monolayers infected with 16M, small and large foci were observed. Double antibody staining revealed spontaneous rough mutants within the large, but not the small foci in 16M infected monolayers. Furthermore, plaque formation was observed in the large foci derived from 16M infections. Finally, the addition of gentamicin to the culture medium inhibited plaque formation, suggesting that cell-to-cell spread occurred only following release of the organisms from the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Brucella-induced cytotoxicity is critical for Brucella egress and dissemination. PMID:24634889

  14. The new strains Brucella inopinata BO1 and Brucella species 83-210 behave biologically like classic infectious Brucella species and cause death in murine models of infection.

    PubMed

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P; Iturralde, María; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S

    2014-08-01

    Recently, novel atypical Brucella strains isolated from humans and wild rodents have been reported. They are phenotypically close to Ochrobactrum species but belong to the genus Brucella, based on genetic relatedness, although genetic diversity is higher among the atypical Brucella strains than between the classic species. They were classified within or close to the novel species Brucella inopinata. However, with the exception of Brucella microti, the virulence of these novel strains has not been investigated in experimental models of infection. The type species B. inopinata strain BO1 (isolated from a human) and Brucella species strain 83-210 (isolated from a wild Australian rodent) were investigated. A classic infectious Brucella reference strain, B. suis 1330, was also used. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and CD1 mice models and C57BL/6 mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used as infection models. Strains BO1 and 83-210 behaved similarly to reference strain 1330 in all mouse infection models: there were similar growth curves in spleens and livers of mice and similar intracellular replication rates in BMDMs. However, unlike strain 1330, strains BO1 and 83-210 showed lethality in the 3 mouse models. The novel atypical Brucella strains of this study behave like classic intracellular Brucella pathogens. In addition, they cause death in murine models of infection, as previously published for B. microti, another recently described environmental and wildlife species. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3085 Brucella spp...

  20. A history of the development of Brucella vaccines.

    PubMed

    Avila-Calderón, Eric Daniel; Lopez-Merino, Ahidé; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Contreras-Rodríguez, Araceli

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis affecting animal and human health. In the last several decades, much research has been performed to develop safer Brucella vaccines to control the disease mainly in animals. Till now, no effective human vaccine is available. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the importance of methodologies used to develop Brucella vaccines in pursuing this challenge.

  1. Knowledge of Brucella as a food-borne pathogen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although Brucella spp. are known for causing reproductive losses in domestic livestock, they are also capable of infecting humans and causing clinical disease. Human infection with Brucella is almost exclusively a result of direct contact with infected animals or consumption of products made from un...

  2. Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella and methods for the detection of Brucella

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, Paula M; Radnedge, Lyndsay; Andersen, Gary L

    Nucleotide sequences specific to Brucella that serves as a marker or signature for identification of this bacterium were identified. In addition, forward and reverse primers and hybridization probes derived from these nucleotide sequences that are used in nucleotide detection methods to detect the presence of the bacterium are disclosed.

  3. European Chlamydia abortus livestock isolate genomes reveal unusual stability and limited diversity, reflected in geographical signatures.

    PubMed

    Seth-Smith, H M B; Busó, Leonor Sánchez; Livingstone, M; Sait, M; Harris, S R; Aitchison, K D; Vretou, Evangelia; Siarkou, V I; Laroucau, K; Sachse, K; Longbottom, D; Thomson, N R

    2017-05-04

    Chlamydia abortus (formerly Chlamydophila abortus) is an economically important livestock pathogen, causing ovine enzootic abortion (OEA), and can also cause zoonotic infections in humans affecting pregnancy outcome. Large-scale genomic studies on other chlamydial species are giving insights into the biology of these organisms but have not yet been performed on C. abortus. Our aim was to investigate a broad collection of European isolates of C. abortus, using next generation sequencing methods, looking at diversity, geographic distribution and genome dynamics. Whole genome sequencing was performed on our collection of 57 C. abortus isolates originating primarily from the UK, Germany, France and Greece, but also from Tunisia, Namibia and the USA. Phylogenetic analysis of a total of 64 genomes shows a deep structural division within the C. abortus species with a major clade displaying limited diversity, in addition to a branch carrying two more distantly related Greek isolates, LLG and POS. Within the major clade, seven further phylogenetic groups can be identified, demonstrating geographical associations. The number of variable nucleotide positions across the sampled isolates is significantly lower than those published for C. trachomatis and C. psittaci. No recombination was identified within C. abortus, and no plasmid was found. Analysis of pseudogenes showed lineage specific loss of some functions, notably with several Pmp and TMH/Inc proteins predicted to be inactivated in many of the isolates studied. The diversity within C. abortus appears to be much lower compared to other species within the genus. There are strong geographical signatures within the phylogeny, indicating clonal expansion within areas of limited livestock transport. No recombination has been identified within this species, showing that different species of Chlamydia may demonstrate different evolutionary dynamics, and that the genome of C. abortus is highly stable.

  4. Characterisation of North American Brucella isolates from marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Whatmore, Adrian M; Dawson, Claire; Muchowski, Jakub; Perrett, Lorraine L; Stubberfield, Emma; Koylass, Mark; Foster, Geoffrey; Davison, Nicholas J; Quance, Christine; Sidor, Inga F; Field, Cara L; St Leger, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Extension of known ecological niches of Brucella has included the description of two novel species from marine mammals. Brucella pinnipedialis is associated predominantly with seals, while two major Brucella ceti clades, most commonly associated with porpoises or dolphins respectively, have been identified. To date there has been limited characterisation of Brucella isolates obtained from marine mammals outside Northern European waters, including North American waters. To address this gap, and extend knowledge of the global population structure and host associations of these Brucella species, 61 isolates from marine mammals inhabiting North American waters were subject to molecular and phenotypic characterisation enabling comparison with existing European isolates. The majority of isolates represent genotypes previously described in Europe although novel genotypes were identified in both B. ceti clades. Harp seals were found to carry B. pinnipedialis genotypes previously confined to hooded seals among a diverse repertoire of sequence types (STs) associated with this species. For the first time Brucella isolates were characterised from beluga whales and found to represent a number of distinct B. pinnipedialis genotypes. In addition the known host range of ST27 was extended with the identification of this ST from California sea lion samples. Finally the performance of the frequently used diagnostic tool Bruce-ladder, in differentiating B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis, was critically assessed based on improved knowledge of the global population structure of Brucella associated with marine mammals.

  5. Characterisation of North American Brucella isolates from marine mammals

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Claire; Muchowski, Jakub; Perrett, Lorraine L.; Stubberfield, Emma; Koylass, Mark; Foster, Geoffrey; Davison, Nicholas J.; Quance, Christine; Sidor, Inga F.; Field, Cara L.; St. Leger, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Extension of known ecological niches of Brucella has included the description of two novel species from marine mammals. Brucella pinnipedialis is associated predominantly with seals, while two major Brucella ceti clades, most commonly associated with porpoises or dolphins respectively, have been identified. To date there has been limited characterisation of Brucella isolates obtained from marine mammals outside Northern European waters, including North American waters. To address this gap, and extend knowledge of the global population structure and host associations of these Brucella species, 61 isolates from marine mammals inhabiting North American waters were subject to molecular and phenotypic characterisation enabling comparison with existing European isolates. The majority of isolates represent genotypes previously described in Europe although novel genotypes were identified in both B. ceti clades. Harp seals were found to carry B. pinnipedialis genotypes previously confined to hooded seals among a diverse repertoire of sequence types (STs) associated with this species. For the first time Brucella isolates were characterised from beluga whales and found to represent a number of distinct B. pinnipedialis genotypes. In addition the known host range of ST27 was extended with the identification of this ST from California sea lion samples. Finally the performance of the frequently used diagnostic tool Bruce-ladder, in differentiating B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis, was critically assessed based on improved knowledge of the global population structure of Brucella associated with marine mammals. PMID:28934239

  6. Evaluation of Lipopolysaccharides and Polysaccharides of Different Epitopic Structures in the Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Brucellosis in Small Ruminants and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Urmeneta, B.; Marín, C.; Aragón, V.; Blasco, J. M.; Díaz, R.; Moriyón, I.

    1998-01-01

    Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis have surface lipopolysaccharides and polysaccharides carrying B. melitensis-type (M) and B. abortus-type (A) epitopes as well as common (C) epitopes present in all smooth Brucella biotypes. Crude lipopolysaccharides, hydrolytic O polysaccharides, and native hapten polysaccharides of MC or AC specificity were evaluated in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with polyclonal, monoclonal, or protein G conjugates by using sera from cattle, sheep, and goats infected with AC, MC, or AMC Brucella biotypes. Regardless of the antigen, the levels of antibodies were lower in goats than in sheep and highest in cattle. The diagnostic performance of the assay was not affected by the absence of lipid A-core epitopes, the presence of contaminating outer membrane proteins, the AC or MC epitopic structure of the absorbed antigen, or the conjugate used. Moreover, with sera from cattle vaccinated with B. abortus S19 (AC) or from sheep and goats vaccinated with B. melitensis Rev 1 (MC), AC and MC antigens showed similar levels of reactivity. The results show that antibodies to the C epitopes largely dominate in infection, and this is consistent with the existence of multiple overlapping C epitopes (V. Weynants, D. Gilson, A. Cloeckaert, A. Tibor, P. A. Denoel, F. Godfroid, J. N. Limet, and J.-J. Letesson, Infect. Immun. 65:1939–1943, 1997) rather than with one or two C epitopes. It is concluded that, by adaptation to the corresponding antibody levels, brucellosis in cattle, sheep, and goats can be diagnosed by immunosorbent assay with a single combination of conjugate and antigen. PMID:9801329

  7. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brucella papionis sp. nov., isolated from baboons (Papio spp.).

    PubMed

    Whatmore, Adrian M; Davison, Nicholas; Cloeckaert, Axel; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Zygmunt, Michel S; Brew, Simon D; Perrett, Lorraine L; Koylass, Mark S; Vergnaud, Gilles; Quance, Christine; Scholz, Holger C; Dick, Edward J; Hubbard, Gene; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E

    2014-12-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming coccoid bacteria (strains F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61) isolated from clinical specimens obtained from baboons (Papio spp.) that had delivered stillborn offspring were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, both strains, which possessed identical sequences, were assigned to the genus Brucella. This placement was confirmed by extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), where both strains possessed identical sequences, and whole-genome sequencing of a representative isolate. All of the above analyses suggested that the two strains represent a novel lineage within the genus Brucella. The strains also possessed a unique profile when subjected to the phenotyping approach classically used to separate species of the genus Brucella, reacting only with Brucella A monospecific antiserum, being sensitive to the dyes thionin and fuchsin, being lysed by bacteriophage Wb, Bk2 and Fi phage at routine test dilution (RTD) but only partially sensitive to bacteriophage Tb, and with no requirement for CO2 and no production of H2S but strong urease activity. Biochemical profiling revealed a pattern of enzyme activity and metabolic capabilities distinct from existing species of the genus Brucella. Molecular analysis of the omp2 locus genes showed that both strains had a novel combination of two highly similar omp2b gene copies. The two strains shared a unique fingerprint profile of the multiple-copy Brucella-specific element IS711. Like MLSA, a multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) showed that the isolates clustered together very closely, but represent a distinct group within the genus Brucella. Isolates F8/08-60(T) and F8/08-61 could be distinguished clearly from all known species of the genus Brucella and their biovars by both phenotypic and molecular properties. Therefore, by applying the species concept for the genus Brucella suggested by the ICSP

  9. A Brucella spp. Isolate from a Pac-Man Frog (Ceratophrys ornata) Reveals Characteristics Departing from Classical Brucellae

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Lloréns, Pedro F.; Quance, Chris R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Stuber, Tod P.; Edwards, John F.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; O'Callaghan, David; Keriel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Brucella are highly infectious bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a frequent worldwide zoonosis. The Brucella genus has recently expanded from 6 to 11 species, all of which were associated with mammals; The natural host range recently expanded to amphibians after some reports of atypical strains from frogs. Here we describe the first in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of a Brucella strains isolated from a frog. Strain B13-0095 was isolated from a Pac-Man frog (Ceratophyrus ornate) at a veterinary hospital in Texas and was initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi. We found that B13-0095 belongs to a group of early-diverging brucellae that includes Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and the B. inopinata-like strain BO2, with traits that depart significantly from those of the “classical” Brucella spp. Analysis of B13-0095 genome sequence revealed several specific features that suggest that this isolate represents an intermediate between a soil associated ancestor and the host adapted “classical” species. Like strain BO2, B13-0095 does not possess the genes required to produce the perosamine based LPS found in classical Brucella, but has a set of genes that could encode a rhamnose based O-antigen. Despite this, B13-0095 has a very fast intracellular replication rate in both epithelial cells and macrophages. Finally, another major finding in this study is the bacterial motility observed for strains B13-0095, BO1, and BO2, which is remarkable for this bacterial genus. This study thus highlights several novel characteristics in strains belonging to an emerging group within the Brucella genus. Accurate identification tools for such atypical Brucella isolates and careful evaluation of their zoonotic potential, are urgently required. PMID:27734009

  10. A Brucella spp. Isolate from a Pac-Man Frog (Ceratophrys ornata) Reveals Characteristics Departing from Classical Brucellae.

    PubMed

    Soler-Lloréns, Pedro F; Quance, Chris R; Lawhon, Sara D; Stuber, Tod P; Edwards, John F; Ficht, Thomas A; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; O'Callaghan, David; Keriel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Brucella are highly infectious bacterial pathogens responsible for brucellosis, a frequent worldwide zoonosis. The Brucella genus has recently expanded from 6 to 11 species, all of which were associated with mammals; The natural host range recently expanded to amphibians after some reports of atypical strains from frogs. Here we describe the first in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of a Brucella strains isolated from a frog. Strain B13-0095 was isolated from a Pac-Man frog ( Ceratophyrus ornate ) at a veterinary hospital in Texas and was initially misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi . We found that B13-0095 belongs to a group of early-diverging brucellae that includes Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and the B. inopinata -like strain BO2, with traits that depart significantly from those of the "classical" Brucella spp. Analysis of B13-0095 genome sequence revealed several specific features that suggest that this isolate represents an intermediate between a soil associated ancestor and the host adapted "classical" species. Like strain BO2, B13-0095 does not possess the genes required to produce the perosamine based LPS found in classical Brucella , but has a set of genes that could encode a rhamnose based O-antigen. Despite this, B13-0095 has a very fast intracellular replication rate in both epithelial cells and macrophages. Finally, another major finding in this study is the bacterial motility observed for strains B13-0095, BO1, and BO2, which is remarkable for this bacterial genus. This study thus highlights several novel characteristics in strains belonging to an emerging group within the Brucella genus. Accurate identification tools for such atypical Brucella isolates and careful evaluation of their zoonotic potential, are urgently required.

  11. Brucella endocarditis: a report from Iran.

    PubMed

    Esmailpour, Negin; Borna, Sima; Nejad, Mehrnaz Rasooli; Badie, Sina Moradmand; Badie, Banafsheh Moradmand; Hadadi, Azar

    2010-01-01

    Endocarditis is a rare focal complication of brucellosis but the most common cause of mortality. The diagnosis of the complications of endemic diseases is therefore important. We evaluated Brucella endocarditis cases in a teaching hospital in Iran between April 1998 and March 2006. Nine patients with a median age of 38.11 years were recorded, of whom seven (77.7%) were male. Underlying cardiopathy was present in three patients (33.3%). The median duration of the symptoms prior to diagnosis was 5.33 months. Endocarditis involved the aortic valve in six cases (66.6%), the mitral valve in two cases (22.2%) and the aortic valve plus the mitral valve in one case (11.1%). Serologic tests were positive in eight (88.8%) and blood culture was positive in two (22.2%). Aortic valve replacement surgery was undertaken for five patients (55.5%). One patient died due to arrhythmia. A high degree of suspicion is therefore necessary in order to ameliorate the course of Brucella endocarditis.

  12. Differential diagnosis between complete mole and hydropic abortus by deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Nobunaga, T; Azuma, C; Kimura, T; Tokugawa, Y; Takemura, M; Kamiura, S; Saji, F; Tanizawa, O

    1990-08-01

    We used a new method of deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprint analysis to obtain the differential diagnosis between complete mole and hydropic abortus. This method with a deoxyribonucleic acid minisatellite probe requires only a small amount of tissue sample and peripheral blood, and presents individual specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (deoxyribonucleic acid "fingerprints") by simultaneous detection of many hypervariable regions (minisatellite regions) widely dispersed in the human genome. Southern blot hybridization showed that in cases of complete mole, all polymorphic fragments were exclusively inherited from the father. Some of the polymorphic bands of paternal deoxyribonucleic acid were not observed in molar deoxyribonucleic acid. However, in the hydropic abortus, the polymorphic fragments could be traced back to its parent. These results indicate that deoxyribonucleic acid fingerprints could distinguish the abnormal fertilization of complete mole (androgenesis) from the normal fertilization of hydropic abortus by identifying the difference in genetic variations between complete mole and hydropic abortus at the deoxyribonucleic acid level.

  13. Factors affecting Brucella spp. blood cultures positivity in children.

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Devrim, Ilker; Memur, Seyma; Günay, Ilker; Gülfidan, Gamze; Celegen, Mehmet; Bayram, Nuri; Karaarslan, Utku; Bağ, Ozlem; Işgüder, Rana; Oztürk, Aysel; Inan, Seyhan; Unal, Nurrettin

    2013-03-01

    Brucella infections have a wide spectrum of symptoms especially in children, making the diagnosis a complicated process. The gold standard for the final diagnosis for brucellosis is to identify the Brucella spp. isolated from blood or bone marrow cultures. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the factors affecting the isolation of Brucella spp. from blood cultures. In our study, the ratio of fever, presence of hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In addition, C-reactive protein levels and liver function enzymes were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In our opinion, while evaluating the febrile child with suspected Brucella infection, we highly recommend sampling blood cultures regardless of the history of previous antimicrobial therapy and duration of the symptoms.

  14. Persistence Testing of Brucella suis on Outdoor Materials ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This report presents the results of an investigation to evaluate Brucella suis persistence on five materials (typically found in the outdoor environment) under various environmental conditions and exposure durations.

  15. The changing nature of the Brucella-containing vacuole.

    PubMed

    Celli, Jean

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria of the genus Brucella are intracellular vacuolar pathogens of mammals that cause the worldwide zoonosis brucellosis, and reside within phagocytes of infected hosts to promote their survival, persistence and proliferation. These traits are essential to the bacterium's ability to cause disease and have been the subject of much investigation to gain an understanding of Brucella pathogenic mechanisms. Although the endoplasmic reticulum-derived nature of the Brucella replicative niche has been long known, major strides have recently been made in deciphering the molecular mechanisms of its biogenesis, including the identification of bacterial determinants and host cellular pathways involved in this process. Here I will review and discuss the most recent advances in our knowledge of Brucella intracellular pathogenesis, with an emphasis on bacterial exploitation of the host endoplasmic reticulum-associated functions, and how autophagy-related processes contribute to the bacterium's intracellular cycle. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Brucella species survey in polar bears (ursus maritimus) of northern Alaska.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Todd M; Holcomb, Darce; Elzer, Philip; Estepp, Jessica; Perry, Quinesha; Hagius, Sue; Kirk, Cassandra

    2010-07-01

    We report on the presence of specific antibodies to Brucella spp. and Yersinia enterocolitica in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from northern Alaska (southern Beaufort Sea) during 2003-2006. Based on numerous known stressors (e.g., climate change and loss of sea ice habitat, contaminants), there is increased concern regarding the status of polar bears. Considering these changes, it is important to assess exposure to potentially pathogenic organisms and to improve understanding of transmission pathways. Brucella or specific antibodies to Brucella spp. has been reported in marine mammals. Various assays were used to elucidate the pathway or source of exposure (e.g., "marine" vs. "terrestrial" Brucella spp.) of northern Alaska polar bears to Brucella spp. The standard plate test (SPT) and the buffered Brucella antigen card test (BBA) were used for initial screening for antibodies specific to Brucella. We then evaluated positive reactors (presence of serum antibody specific for Brucella spp.) using immunoblots and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA; based on pinniped-derived Brucella spp. antigen). Annual prevalence of antibody (BBA and SPT) for Brucella spp. ranged from 6.8% to 18.5% over 2003-2006, with an overall prevalence of 10.2%. Prevalence of Brucella spp. antibody did vary by age class. Western blot analyses indicated 17 samples were positive for Brucella spp. antibody; of these, 13 were negative by marine (pinniped) derived Brucella antigen cELISA and four were positive by marine cELISA. Of the four samples positive for Brucella antibody by marine cELISA, three cross-reacted with Y. enterocolitica and Brucella spp. (one sample was Brucella negative and Y. enterocolitica positive). It appears the polar bear antibody does not react with the antigens used on the marine cELISA assay, potentially indicating a terrestrial (nonpinniped) source of Brucella spp.

  17. Epizootiology of Brucella infection in Australian fur seals.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Duignan, Pádraig J; Taylor, Trevor; Nielsen, Ole; Kirkwood, Roger; Gibbens, John; Arnould, John P Y

    2011-04-01

    Novel members of the bacterial genus Brucella have recently emerged as pathogens of various marine mammal species and as potential zoonotic agents. We investigated the epizootiology of Brucella infection in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) by establishing demographic and temporal variations in antibody prevalence, attempting isolation of the causative agent, and determining whether this potential pathogen is involved in frequent abortions observed in this pinniped species. Two competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (cELISAs), an indirect ELISA, and a fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) were used to test sera for Brucella antibodies. The FPA and cELISA proved suitable for use in this species. Significant differences in antibody prevalence were found between age classes of seals sampled between 2007 and 2009 at one colony. Pups sampled at this site (n=134) were negative for Brucella antibodies by all serologic tests but 17 of 45 (38%) of juveniles were antibody-positive. Antibody prevalence in adult females was significantly higher than in juveniles (P=0.044). Antibody prevalence for adult females between 2003 and 2009 varied significantly over time (P=0.011), and for individuals sampled between 2003 and 2005, the likelihood of pregnancy was greater in individuals positive for Brucella antibodies (P=0.034). Inflammatory lesions suggestive of infectious agents were found in 14 of 39 aborted Australian fur seal pups, but pathologic changes were not uniformly consistent for Brucella infection. Culture and PCR investigations on fetal tissues were negative for Brucella. Culture and PCR on selected fresh or frozen tissues from 36 juvenile and adult animals were also negative. We suspect that the prevalence of active infection with Brucella in Australian fur seals is low relative to antibody prevalence.

  18. Phenotypic and molecular characterisation of Brucella isolates from marine mammals

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Claire E; Stubberfield, Emma J; Perrett, Lorraine L; King, Amanda C; Whatmore, Adrian M; Bashiruddin, John B; Stack, Judy A; MacMillan, Alastair P

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the genus Brucella are the causative organisms of brucellosis in animals and man. Previous characterisation of Brucella strains originating from marine mammals showed them to be distinct from the terrestrial species and likely to comprise one or more new taxa. Recently two new species comprising Brucella isolates from marine mammals, B. pinnipedialis and B. ceti, were validly published. Here we report on an extensive study of the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of marine mammal Brucella isolates and on how these characteristics relate to the newly described species. Results In this study, 102 isolates of Brucella originating from eleven species of marine mammals were characterised. Results obtained by analysis using the Infrequent Restriction Site (IRS)-Derivative PCR, PCR-RFLP of outer membrane protein genes (omp) and IS711 fingerprint profiles showed good consistency with isolates originating from cetaceans, corresponding to B. ceti, falling into two clusters. These correspond to isolates with either dolphins or porpoises as their preferred host. Isolates originating predominantly from seals, and corresponding to B. pinnipedialis, cluster separately on the basis of IS711 fingerprinting and other molecular approaches and can be further subdivided, with isolates from hooded seals comprising a distinct group. There was little correlation between phenotypic characteristics used in classical Brucella biotyping and these groups. Conclusion Molecular approaches are clearly valuable in the division of marine mammal Brucella into subtypes that correlate with apparent ecological divisions, whereas conventional bioyping is of less value. The data presented here confirm that there are significant subtypes within the newly described marine mammal Brucella species and add to a body of evidence that could lead to the recognition of additional species or sub-species within this group. PMID:19091076

  19. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  20. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Brucella suis Outer Membrane Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    13-09-20061 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cloning, expression and purification of Brucella suis outer membrane proteins 5b. GRANT NUMBER...attractive for this purpose. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified seven predicted OMPs of Brucella suis . The recombinant proteins were...fused with 6-his and V5 epitope tags at their C termini to facilitate detection and purification. The B. suis surface genes were PCR synthesized based

  1. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Chlamydia abortus Infection in Tibetan Sheep in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Yin, Ming-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, an important pathogen in a variety of animals, is associated with abortion in sheep. In the present study, 1732 blood samples, collected from Tibetan sheep between June 2013 and April 2014, were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test, aiming to evaluate the seroprevalence and risk factors of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. 323 of 1732 (18.65%) samples were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1 : 16. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors associated with seroprevalence, which could provide foundation to prevent and control C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Gender of Tibetan sheep was left out of the final model because it is not significant in the logistic regression analysis (P > 0.05). Region, season, and age were considered as major risk factors associated with C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Our study revealed a widespread and high prevalence of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep in Gansu province, northwest China, with higher exposure risk in different seasons and ages and distinct geographical distribution. PMID:25401129

  2. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis. PMID:26528442

  3. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis.

  4. A review of Brucella infection in marine mammals, with special emphasis on Brucella pinnipedialis in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Brucella spp. were isolated from marine mammals for the first time in 1994. Two novel species were later included in the genus; Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis, with cetaceans and seals as their preferred hosts, respectively. Brucella spp. have since been isolated from a variety of marine mammals. Pathological changes, including lesions of the reproductive organs and associated abortions, have only been registered in cetaceans. The zoonotic potential differs among the marine mammal Brucella strains. Many techniques, both classical typing and molecular microbiology, have been utilised for characterisation of the marine mammal Brucella spp. and the change from the band-based approaches to the sequence-based approaches has greatly increased our knowledge about these strains. Several clusters have been identified within the B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis species, and multiple studies have shown that the hooded seal isolates differ from other pinniped isolates. We describe how different molecular methods have contributed to species identification and differentiation of B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis, with special emphasis on the hooded seal isolates. We further discuss the potential role of B. pinnipedialis for the declining Northwest Atlantic hooded seal population. PMID:21819589

  5. Brucella papionis sp. nov., isolated from baboons (Papio spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Nicholas; Cloeckaert, Axel; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Zygmunt, Michel S.; Brew, Simon D.; Perrett, Lorraine L.; Koylass, Mark S.; Vergnaud, Gilles; Quance, Christine; Scholz, Holger C.; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.

    2014-01-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming coccoid bacteria (strains F8/08-60T and F8/08-61) isolated from clinical specimens obtained from baboons (Papio spp.) that had delivered stillborn offspring were subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, both strains, which possessed identical sequences, were assigned to the genus Brucella. This placement was confirmed by extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), where both strains possessed identical sequences, and whole-genome sequencing of a representative isolate. All of the above analyses suggested that the two strains represent a novel lineage within the genus Brucella. The strains also possessed a unique profile when subjected to the phenotyping approach classically used to separate species of the genus Brucella, reacting only with Brucella A monospecific antiserum, being sensitive to the dyes thionin and fuchsin, being lysed by bacteriophage Wb, Bk2 and Fi phage at routine test dilution (RTD) but only partially sensitive to bacteriophage Tb, and with no requirement for CO2 and no production of H2S but strong urease activity. Biochemical profiling revealed a pattern of enzyme activity and metabolic capabilities distinct from existing species of the genus Brucella. Molecular analysis of the omp2 locus genes showed that both strains had a novel combination of two highly similar omp2b gene copies. The two strains shared a unique fingerprint profile of the multiple-copy Brucella-specific element IS711. Like MLSA, a multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) showed that the isolates clustered together very closely, but represent a distinct group within the genus Brucella. Isolates F8/08-60T and F8/08-61 could be distinguished clearly from all known species of the genus Brucellaand their biovars by both phenotypic and molecular properties. Therefore, by applying the species concept for the genus Brucellasuggested by the ICSP Subcommittee on

  6. Comparative whole genome analysis of six diagnostic brucellaphages.

    PubMed

    Farlow, Jason; Filippov, Andrey A; Sergueev, Kirill V; Hang, Jun; Kotorashvili, Adam; Nikolich, Mikeljon P

    2014-05-15

    Whole genome sequencing of six diagnostic brucellaphages, Tbilisi (Tb), Firenze (Fz), Weybridge (Wb), S708, Berkeley (Bk) and R/C, was followed with genomic comparisons including recently described genomes of the Tb phage from Mexico (TbM) and Pr phage to elucidate genomic diversity and candidate host range determinants. Comparative whole genome analysis revealed high sequence homogeneity among these brucellaphage genomes and resolved three genetic groups consistent with defined host range phenotypes. Group I was composed of Tb and Fz phages that are predominantly lytic for Brucella abortus and Brucella neotomae; Group II included Bk, R/C, and Pr phages that are lytic mainly for B. abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis; Group III was composed of Wb and S708 phages that are lytic for B. suis, B. abortus and B. neotomae. We found that the putative phage collar protein is a variable locus with features that may be contributing to the host specificities exhibited by different brucellaphage groups. The presence of several candidate host range determinants is illustrated herein for future dissection of the differential host specificity observed among these phages. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Diversification and Distribution of Ruminant Chlamydia abortus Clones Assessed by MLST and MLVA.

    PubMed

    Siarkou, Victoria I; Vorimore, Fabien; Vicari, Nadia; Magnino, Simone; Rodolakis, Annie; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Sachse, Konrad; Longbottom, David; Laroucau, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the most common infectious cause of abortion in small ruminants worldwide and has zoonotic potential. We applied multilocus sequence typing (MLST) together with multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) to genotype 94 ruminant C. abortus strains, field isolates and samples collected from 1950 to 2011 in diverse geographic locations, with the aim of delineating C. abortus lineages and clones. MLST revealed the previously identified sequence types (STs) ST19, ST25, ST29 and ST30, plus ST86, a recently-assigned type on the Chlamydiales MLST website and ST87, a novel type harbouring the hemN_21 allele, whereas MLVA recognized seven types (MT1 to MT7). Minimum-spanning-tree analysis suggested that all STs but one (ST30) belonged to a single clonal complex, possibly reflecting the short evolutionary timescale over which the predicted ancestor (ST19) has diversified into three single-locus variants (ST86, ST87 and ST29) and further, through ST86 diversification, into one double-locus variant (ST25). ST descendants have probably arisen through a point mutation evolution mode. Interestingly, MLVA showed that in the ST19 population there was a greater genetic diversity than in other STs, most of which exhibited the same MT over time and geographical distribution. However, the evolutionary pathways of C. abortus STs seem to be diverse across geographic distances with individual STs restricted to particular geographic locations. The ST30 singleton clone displaying geographic specificity and represented by the Greek strains LLG and POS was effectively distinguished from the clonal complex lineage, supporting the notion that possibly two separate host adaptations and hence independent bottlenecks of C. abortus have occurred through time. The combination of MLST and MLVA assays provides an additional level of C. abortus discrimination and may prove useful for the investigation and surveillance of

  8. A "One Health" surveillance and control of brucellosis in developing countries: moving away from improvisation.

    PubMed

    Godfroid, Jacques; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Pappas, Georgios; Roth, Felix; Matope, Gift; Muma, John; Marcotty, Tanguy; Pfeiffer, Dirk; Skjerve, Eystein

    2013-05-01

    Although a "One Health" approach has been successfully implemented for emerging infectious zoonotic diseases with pandemic potential, we still lack a conceptual framework to address enzootic diseases like brucellosis. The vast majority of published brucellosis studies in the developing world rely solely on serology. An important shortcoming of brucellosis serology is the impossibility to infer which (smooth) Brucella spp. induced antibodies in the host. In this respect, mixed farming and especially raising small ruminants along with cattle, a common practice in the developing world, is reported to be a risk factor and a central question that has to be answered is whether cattle are infected with B. melitensis or with B. abortus or with both Brucella species. Therefore the isolation, identification and molecular characterization of Brucella spp. in human and the different livestock species needs to be undertaken to define a sound conceptual framework, identify the source of infection and plan appropriate control measures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of Detection of Brucella sp. by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei Ling; Nielsen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a review of most of the currently used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for identification of Brucella bacteria in biological samples. We focused in particular on methods using single-pair primers, multiplex primers, real-time PCRs, PCRs for marine Brucella, and PCRs for molecular biotyping. These methods are becoming very important tools for the identification of Brucella, at the species level and recently also at the biovar level. These techniques require minimum biological containment and can provide results in a very short time. In addition, genetic fingerprinting of isolates aid in epidemiological studies of the disease and its control. PCR-based methods are more useful and practical than conventional methods used to identify Brucella spp., and new methods for Brucella spp identification and typing are still being developed. However, the sensitivity, specificity, and issues of quality control and quality assurance using these methods must be fully validated on clinical samples before PCR can be used in routine laboratory testing for brucellosis. PMID:20718083

  10. Outbreaks of brucellosis related to the consumption of unpasteurized camel milk.

    PubMed

    Garcell, Humberto G; Garcia, Elias G; Pueyo, Pedro V; Martín, Isis R; Arias, Ariadna V; Alfonso Serrano, Ramon N

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonosis reported in Qatar, mainly related to exposure to infected camels. An outbreak of human brucellosis in 14 members of a family living in a rural area in Qatar is reported herein. Clinical, epidemiological and laboratory results from all 14 patients with Brucella and 12 non-confirmed family members were collected from files. All patients reported fever for a maximum of 14 days, associated with arthralgia (6 patients), weakness (4 patients), headache (4 patients), diarrhea (2 patients) and abdominal pain (2 patients). The median age of the patients was 10 years and that of non-cases was 16 years, with a predominance of males (92.9%). Elevated levels of transaminases were observed in patients. A mixed infection caused by Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis was identified by blood culture and serology. The source of the infection was the milk of an infected camel. The outbreak of brucellosis melitensis/abortus related to the consumption of camel milk constitutes a gap in the prevention and control of the potential sources of brucellosis in animal farms. Proper control and education of the population are required. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Chlamydia abortus infection in free-ranging white yaks in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Huang, Si-Yang; Yin, Ming-Yang; Tan, Qi-Dong; Liu, Guang-Xue; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-20

    Chlamydia is gram-negative obligate bacteria which causes a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. To date, there are a few reports about the seroprevalence of Chlamydia and the risk factors associated with Chlamydia infection in yaks in the world. In this study, 974 blood samples were collected from white yaks (Bos grunniens) in Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu province, northwest China from June 2013 to April 2014. Antibodies against Chlamydia abortus were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test, and 158 of 974 (16.22%) white yaks were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1:16. The risk factors associated with seroprevalence were evaluated by a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Region, gender and age of white yak were left out of the final model, due to its insignificance in the logistic regression analysis (P > 0.05). However, season was considered as a major risk factor associated with C. abortus infection in white yaks. To our knowledge, this is the first survey of C. abortus seroprevalence in white yaks in China, which extends the host range for C. abortus and has important implications for public health and the local Tibetan economy.

  12. Identification and typing of Brucella spp. in stranded harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) on the Dutch coast.

    PubMed

    Maio, Elisa; Begeman, Lineke; Bisselink, Yvette; van Tulden, Peter; Wiersma, Lidewij; Hiemstra, Sjoukje; Ruuls, Robin; Gröne, Andrea; Roest, Hendrik-Ido-Jan; Willemsen, Peter; van der Giessen, Joke

    2014-09-17

    The presence of Brucella (B.) spp. in harbour porpoises stranded between 2008 and 2011 along the Dutch coast was studied. A selection of 265 tissue samples from 112 animals was analysed using conventional and molecular methods. In total, 4.5% (5/112) of the animals corresponding with 2.3% (6/265) Brucella positive tissue samples were Brucella positive by culture and these were all confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) based on the insertion element 711 (IS711). In addition, two more Brucella-positive tissue samples from two animals collected in 2011 were identified using real-time PCR resulting in an overall Brucella prevalence of 6.3% (7/112 animals). Brucella spp. were obtained from lungs (n=3), pulmonary lymph node (n=3) and lungworms (n=2). Multi Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) Analysis (MLVA) typing based on the MLVA-16 showed that the Brucella isolates were B. ceti. Additional in silico Multi Locus Sequence typing (MLST) after whole genome sequencing of the 6 Brucella isolates confirmed B. ceti ST 23. According to the Brucella 2010 MLVA database, the isolated Brucella strains encountered were of five genotypes, in two distinct subclusters divided in two different time periods of harbour porpoises collection. This study is the first population based analyses for Brucella spp. infections in cetaceans stranded along the Dutch coast. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Brucella infection inhibits macrophages apoptosis via Nedd4-dependent degradation of calpain2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guimei; Wei, Pan; Zhao, Yuxi; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Wanchun; Wang, Shuangxi; Peng, Qisheng

    2014-11-07

    The calcium-dependent protease calpain2 is involved in macrophages apoptosis. Brucella infection-induced up-regulation of intracellular calcium level is an essential factor for the intracellular survival of Brucella within macrophages. Here, we hypothesize that calcium-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 ubiquitinates calpain2 and inhibits Brucella infection-induced macrophage apoptosis via degradation of calpain2.Our results reveal that Brucella infection induces increases in Nedd4 activity in an intracellular calcium dependent manner. Furthermore, Brucella infection-induced degradation of calpain2 is mediated by Nedd4 ubiquitination of calpain2. Brucella infection-induced calpain2 degradation inhibited macrophages apoptosis. Treatment of Brucella infected macrophages with calcium chelator BAPTA or Nedd4 knock-down decreased Nedd4 activity, prevented calpain2 degradation, and resulted in macrophages apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation of Brucella pinnipedialis from Grey Seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, Varpu; Nylund, Minna; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Heikkinen, Petra; Kauhala, Kaarina; Jay, Maryne; Isomursu, Marja

    2017-10-01

    Brucella infection in seals was reported for the first time in 1994 around the coast of Scotland. Since then, marine mammal Brucella infections were found to be widely distributed in the northern hemisphere. Two Brucella species affect marine mammals: Brucella pinnipedialis in pinnipeds and Brucella ceti in cetaceans. We examined the livers of Baltic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the Finnish coast (n=122) hunted, found dead, or killed as by-catch in fishing gear in 2013-15 as part of population health monitoring. We detected B. pinnipedialis in the livers of three grey seals. The bacterium was isolated from livers displaying parasitic cholangitis. We also detected Brucella DNA in liver flukes (Pseudamphistomum truncatum) obtained from a Brucella-infected grey seal, suggesting that flukes might be possible vectors of this pathogen in the marine environment.

  15. Duplex PCR for differentiation of the vaccine strain Brucella suis S2 and B. suis biovar 1 from other strains of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Tan, Pengfei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Zouliang; Mao, Kairong; Peng, Daxin; Chen, Yiping

    2014-09-01

    Immunisation with attenuated Brucella spp. vaccines prevents brucellosis, but may also interfere with diagnosis. In this study, a duplex PCR was developed to distinguish Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from field strains of B. suis biovar 1 and other Brucella spp. The PCR detected 60 fg genomic DNA of B. suis S2 or biovar 1 field strains and was able to distinguish B. suis S2 and wild-type strains of B. suis biovar 1 among 76 field isolates representing all the common species and biovars, as well as four vaccine strains, of Brucella. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and trial of vaccines against Brucella.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-08-31

    The search for ideal brucellosis vaccines remains active today. Currently, no licensed human or canine anti-brucellosis vaccines are available. In bovines, the most successful vaccine (S19) is only used in calves, as adult vaccination results in orchitis in male, prolonged infection, and possible abortion complications in pregnant female cattle. Another widely deployed vaccine (RB51) has a low protective efficacy. An ideal vaccine should exhibit a safe profile as well as enhance protective efficacy. However, currently available vaccines exhibit one or more major drawbacks. Smooth live attenuated vaccines suffer shortcomings such as residual virulence and serodiagnostic interference. Inactivated vaccines, in general, confer relatively low levels of protection. Recent developments to improve brucellosis vaccines include generation of knockout mutants by targeting genes involved in metabolism, virulence, and the lipopolysaccharide synthesis pathway, as well as generation of DNA vaccines, mucosal vaccines, and live vectored vaccines, have all produced varying degrees of success. Herein, we briefly review the bacteriology, pathogenesis, immunological implications, candidate vaccines, vaccinations, and models related to Brucella .

  17. Development and trial of vaccines against Brucella

    PubMed Central

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The search for ideal brucellosis vaccines remains active today. Currently, no licensed human or canine anti-brucellosis vaccines are available. In bovines, the most successful vaccine (S19) is only used in calves, as adult vaccination results in orchitis in male, prolonged infection, and possible abortion complications in pregnant female cattle. Another widely deployed vaccine (RB51) has a low protective efficacy. An ideal vaccine should exhibit a safe profile as well as enhance protective efficacy. However, currently available vaccines exhibit one or more major drawbacks. Smooth live attenuated vaccines suffer shortcomings such as residual virulence and serodiagnostic interference. Inactivated vaccines, in general, confer relatively low levels of protection. Recent developments to improve brucellosis vaccines include generation of knockout mutants by targeting genes involved in metabolism, virulence, and the lipopolysaccharide synthesis pathway, as well as generation of DNA vaccines, mucosal vaccines, and live vectored vaccines, have all produced varying degrees of success. Herein, we briefly review the bacteriology, pathogenesis, immunological implications, candidate vaccines, vaccinations, and models related to Brucella. PMID:28859268

  18. Brucella ceti and Brucellosis in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; González-Barrientos, Rocío; Hernández-Mora, Gabriela; Morales, Juan-Alberto; Baquero-Calvo, Elías; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Moreno, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    Since the first case of brucellosis detected in a dolphin aborted fetus, an increasing number of Brucella ceti isolates has been reported in members of the two suborders of cetaceans: Mysticeti and Odontoceti. Serological surveys have shown that cetacean brucellosis may be distributed worldwide in the oceans. Although all B. ceti isolates have been included within the same species, three different groups have been recognized according to their preferred host, bacteriological properties, and distinct genetic traits: B. ceti dolphin type, B. ceti porpoise type, and B. ceti human type. It seems that B. ceti porpoise type is more closely related to B. ceti human isolates and B. pinnipedialis group, while B. ceti dolphin type seems ancestral to them. Based on comparative phylogenetic analysis, it is feasible that the B. ceti ancestor radiated in a terrestrial artiodactyl host close to the Raoellidae family about 58 million years ago. The more likely mode of transmission of B. ceti seems to be through sexual intercourse, maternal feeding, aborted fetuses, placental tissues, vertical transmission from mother to the fetus or through fish or helminth reservoirs. The B. ceti dolphin and porpoise types seem to display variable virulence in land animal models and low infectivity for humans. However, brucellosis in some dolphins and porpoises has been demonstrated to be a severe chronic disease, displaying significant clinical and pathological signs related to abortions, male infertility, neurobrucellosis, cardiopathies, bone and skin lesions, strandings, and death. PMID:22919595

  19. Seroprevalence and Potential Risk Factors for Brucella Spp. Infection in Traditional Cattle, Sheep and Goats Reared in Urban, Periurban and Rural Areas of Niger

    PubMed Central

    Boukary, Abdou Razac; Saegerman, Claude; Abatih, Emmanuel; Fretin, David; Alambédji Bada, Rianatou; De Deken, Reginald; Harouna, Halimatou Adamou; Yenikoye, Alhassane; Thys, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In Niamey, Niger, interactions within the interface between animals, humans and the environment induce a potential risk of brucellosis transmission between animals and from animals to humans. Currently, little is known about the transmission of Brucella in this context. Results 5,192 animals from 681 herds were included in the study. Serum samples and hygroma fluids were collected. A household survey enabled to identify the risk factors for transmission of brucellosis. The true adjusted herd-level prevalence of brucellosis ranged between 11.2% and 17.2% and the true adjusted animal-population level prevalence was 1.3% (95% CI: 0.9–1.8%) based on indirect ELISA test for Brucella antibodies. Animals aged of 1–4 years were found to be more susceptible than animals less than 1 year old (Odds ratio [OR] of 2.7; 95% CI: 1.43–5.28). For cattle, the odds of brucellosis seropositivity were higher in rural compared to the periurban areas (OR of 2.8; 95% CI: 1.48–5.17) whereas for small ruminants the risk of seropositivity appeared to be higher in urban compared to periurban areas (OR of 5.5; 95% CI: 1.48–20.38). At herd level, the risk of transmission was increased by transhumance (OR of 5.4; 95% CI: 2.84–10.41), the occurrence of abortions (OR of 3.0; 95% CI: 1.40–6.41), and for herds having more than 50 animals (OR of 11.0; 95% CI: 3.75–32.46). Brucella abortus biovar 3 was isolated from the hygromas. Conclusion brucellosis in Niger is a serious problem among cattle especially in the rural areas around Niamey and among sheep in the urban areas of Niamey. The seroprevalence varies across strata and animal species with important risk factors including herd size, abortion and transhumance at herd level and age at animal population level. For effective control of brucellosis, an integrated approach seems appropriate involving all stakeholders working in public and animal health. PMID:24358261

  20. Evaluation of a New and Rapid Serologic Test for Detecting Brucellosis: Brucella Coombs Gel Test.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Hayrunisa; Igan, Hakan; Uyanik, Muhammet Hamidullah

    2017-01-01

    Many serological tests have been used for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. A new serological method is identified as Brucella Coombs gel test based on the principle of centrifugation gel system similar to the gel system used in blood group determination. In this system, if Brucella antibodies were present in the serum, antigen and antibody would remain as a pink complex on the gel. Otherwise, the pink Brucella antigens would precipitate at the bottom of the gel card system. In this study, we aimed to compare the Brucella Coombs gel test, a new, rapid screen and titration method for detection of non-agglutinating IgG with the Brucella Coombs test. For this study, a total of 88 serum samples were obtained from 45 healthy persons and 43 individuals who had clinical signs and symptoms of brucellosis. For each specimen, Rose Bengal test, standard agglutination test, Coombs test and Brucella Coombs gel test were carried out. Sensitivity and specificity of Brucella Coombs gel test were found as 100.0 and 82.2%, respectively. Brucella Coombs gel test can be used as a screening test with high sensitivity. By the help of pink Brucella antigen precipitation, the tests' evaluation is simple and objective. In addition, determination of Brucella antibody by rapid titration offers another important advantage.

  1. 9 CFR 113.32 - Detection of Brucella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of Brucella contamination. 113.32 Section 113.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... tissue used as the source of cells or 1 ml of the extract of the tissue prior to the addition of...

  2. 9 CFR 113.32 - Detection of Brucella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of Brucella contamination. 113.32 Section 113.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... tissue used as the source of cells or 1 ml of the extract of the tissue prior to the addition of...

  3. 9 CFR 113.32 - Detection of Brucella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Detection of Brucella contamination. 113.32 Section 113.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... tissue used as the source of cells or 1 ml of the extract of the tissue prior to the addition of...

  4. 9 CFR 113.32 - Detection of Brucella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Detection of Brucella contamination. 113.32 Section 113.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... tissue used as the source of cells or 1 ml of the extract of the tissue prior to the addition of...

  5. 9 CFR 113.32 - Detection of Brucella contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of Brucella contamination. 113.32 Section 113.32 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... applicable Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production for the product. (a) One ml of the minced...

  6. Brucella ceti Infection in a Common Minke Whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) with Associated Pathology.

    PubMed

    Davison, Nicholas J; Perrett, Lorraine L; Dawson, Claire; Dagleish, Mark P; Haskins, Gary; Muchowski, Jakub; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2017-07-01

    There are three major lineages of marine mammal strains of Brucella spp.: Brucella ceti ST23, found predominantly in porpoises; B. ceti ST26, in pelagic delphinids and ziphiids; and Brucella pinnipedialis ST24/25, predominantly in seals. The isolation of Brucella spp. in mysticetes has been described only in common minke whales ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata ) in Norway and Scotland. We report a third case of Brucella infection and isolation in a minke whale associated with a large abscess. In contrast to the two previous reports that involved isolates of B. pinnipedialis ST24 or the porpoise-associated B. ceti complex ST23, this case was associated with the dolphin-associated B. ceti ST26. Thus, minke whales can be infected naturally with members of all the distinct major lineages of Brucella associated with marine mammals. This report is unique in that the B. ceti ST26 did not originate from a pelagic delphinid or a beaked whale.

  7. Control of animal brucellosis: The Malaysian experience.

    PubMed

    Zamri-Saad, M; Kamarudin, M I

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease characterized by reproductive failure in animals and undulent fever in humans. In cattle, it is caused by Brucella abortus while in goats by Brucella melitensis, the main cause of brucellosis in humans. Brucellosis in livestock has been associated with importation of animals from breeder herd of unknown disease status. The prevalence of bovine brucellosis Brucella abortus in 2014 ranged between 1% and 2% in Thailand and Indonesia, and 4%-5% in Malaysia and Myanmar. Prevalence of goat brucellosis Brucella melitensis is approximately 1% in Malaysia and Thailand. 'Test-and-slaughter' is the general policy against brucellosis adopted by most ASEAN countries to eradicate the disease. Under this program, the Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) is used as the screening test to identify infected farm/herd while the complement fixation test (CFT) is the confirmatory test. The test-and-slaughter eradication strategy that was implemented since 1979 had managed to keep the prevalence rate to less than 5%, from 3.3% in 1979, 0.23% in 1988, 1% in 1998 and 5% in 2016. The test-and-slaughter program seemed effective in reducing the prevalence of brucellosis but was unable to eradicate the disease due to several factors, which include failure to locate and identify the remaining affected animals and to control their movement, importation of breeder animals from non-brucellosis free countries and lack of participation by the farmers following unreliable test results. To support the eradication policy, research activities since 1980s have suggested combinations of serological tests to improve diagnosis while surveillance should be focused on hotspots areas. The prevalence can be further reduced by strictly sourcing breeder animals from brucella-free areas or countries. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A rare case of anterior mediastinal mass caused by Brucella infection.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2017-03-01

    A previously healthy man, who had undergone coronary artery bypass 10 years earlier and had been diagnosed with brucellosis due to Brucella septicemia after Brucella arthritis, presented with chest pain and high fever. Anti- Brucella antibiotics were started, but after 4 weeks, his high fever remained. An infected mass was confirmed by computed tomography, and surgical intervention was performed via a median sternotomy. A large amount of thick pus gushed from an abscess in the upper mediastinum. The abscess cavity had a thick granulation wall, and cultured pus was positive for Brucella only. The patient responded well to antibiotic therapy.

  9. Brucella pelvic tubo-ovarian abscess mimicking a pelvic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Seoud, Muhiedine A F; Kanj, Suha S; Habli, Munira; Araj, George F; Khalil, Ali M

    2003-01-01

    A 57-y-old woman presented with recurrent abdominal and pelvic pain of 6 months' duration with low-grade fever. A computed tomographic scan indicated an ovarian tumor. Laparotomy revealed a pelvic abscess. Her symptoms resolved following surgery and antibiotic therapy. Pathology revealed an extensive inflammatory process. Tissue culture grew Brucella sp. The diagnosis and management of this previously undescribed pelvic tubo-ovarian abscess present a particular challenge.

  10. Seroprevalence of Brucella antibodies in camels in Katsina State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Salisu, U S; Kudi, C A; Bale, J O O; Babashani, M; Kaltungo, B Y; Saidu, S N A; Asambe, A; Baba, A Y

    2017-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the status of Brucella infection in one-humped (Dromedary) camels in the North and Central senatorial districts of Katsina State, Nigeria. Nine hundred and eighty serum samples from live and slaughtered camels were tested. Modified Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and serum agglutination test (SAT) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, (EDTA) were used as screening and standard tests, respectively. The prevalence of Brucella antibodies were 110 (11.2%) and 103 (10.5%) for RBPT and SAT, respectively. Of the 472 and 508 serum samples tested from the herds and abattoirs, respectively, 63 (13.3%) and 47 (9.3%) were positive by RBPT while 62 (13.1%) and 41 (8.1%) were positive by SAT, respectively. Based on the results, it was concluded that Brucella antibodies were present in camels in the study area. Poor management practices and mixing of camels with other species of livestock as well as unrestricted movement of camels were proposed to be the reasons for the prevalence of the disease in the study area. In view of the public health importance of the disease, it is recommended that there is the need to develop a strategic plan to decrease spread of brucellosis in the study area.

  11. Molecular Survey on Brucellosis in Rodents and Shrews - Natural Reservoirs of Novel Brucella Species in Germany?

    PubMed

    Hammerl, J A; Ulrich, R G; Imholt, C; Scholz, H C; Jacob, J; Kratzmann, N; Nöckler, K; Al Dahouk, S

    2017-04-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease introduced from animal reservoirs to humans. In Germany, bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis were eradicated more than a decade ago and mandatory measures in livestock have been implemented to keep the officially brucellosis-free status. In contrast, surveillance of wildlife is still challenging, and reliable data on the prevalence of brucellae in small mammal populations do not exist. To assess the epidemiology of Brucella spp. in rodents and shrews, a molecular survey was carried out. A total of 537 rodents and shrews were trapped in four federal states located throughout Germany and investigated for the presence of Brucella. Using a two-step molecular assay based on the detection of the Brucella-specific bcsp31 and IS711 sequences in tissue samples, 14.2% (n = 76) of the tested animals were positive. These originated mainly from western and south-western Germany, where preliminary analyses indicate population density-dependent Brucella prevalence in voles (Myodes glareolus) and mice (Apodemus spp.). recA typing revealed a close relationship to a potentially novel Brucella species recently isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Austria. The molecular detection of brucellae in various rodent taxa and for the first time in shrew species shows that these animals may be naturally infected or at least have a history of exposure to Brucella spp. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Pathogenesis and immunobiology of brucellosis: review of Brucella-host interactions.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, Paul; Ficht, Thomas A; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Rossetti, Carlos A; Adams, L Garry

    2015-06-01

    This review of Brucella-host interactions and immunobiology discusses recent discoveries as the basis for pathogenesis-informed rationales to prevent or treat brucellosis. Brucella spp., as animal pathogens, cause human brucellosis, a zoonosis that results in worldwide economic losses, human morbidity, and poverty. Although Brucella spp. infect humans as an incidental host, 500,000 new human infections occur annually, and no patient-friendly treatments or approved human vaccines are reported. Brucellae display strong tissue tropism for lymphoreticular and reproductive systems with an intracellular lifestyle that limits exposure to innate and adaptive immune responses, sequesters the organism from the effects of antibiotics, and drives clinical disease manifestations and pathology. Stealthy brucellae exploit strategies to establish infection, including i) evasion of intracellular destruction by restricting fusion of type IV secretion system-dependent Brucella-containing vacuoles with lysosomal compartments, ii) inhibition of apoptosis of infected mononuclear cells, and iii) prevention of dendritic cell maturation, antigen presentation, and activation of naive T cells, pathogenesis lessons that may be informative for other intracellular pathogens. Data sets of next-generation sequences of Brucella and host time-series global expression fused with proteomics and metabolomics data from in vitro and in vivo experiments now inform interactive cellular pathways and gene regulatory networks enabling full-scale systems biology analysis. The newly identified effector proteins of Brucella may represent targets for improved, safer brucellosis vaccines and therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of pan-genome to identify the core genes and essential genes of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowen; Li, Yajie; Zang, Juan; Li, Yexia; Bie, Pengfei; Lu, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens, that cause a contagious zoonotic disease, that can result in such outcomes as abortion or sterility in susceptible animal hosts and grave, debilitating illness in humans. For deciphering the survival mechanism of Brucella spp. in vivo, 42 Brucella complete genomes from NCBI were analyzed for the pan-genome and core genome by identification of their composition and function of Brucella genomes. The results showed that the total 132,143 protein-coding genes in these genomes were divided into 5369 clusters. Among these, 1710 clusters were associated with the core genome, 1182 clusters with strain-specific genes and 2477 clusters with dispensable genomes. COG analysis indicated that 44 % of the core genes were devoted to metabolism, which were mainly responsible for energy production and conversion (COG category C), and amino acid transport and metabolism (COG category E). Meanwhile, approximately 35 % of the core genes were in positive selection. In addition, 1252 potential essential genes were predicted in the core genome by comparison with a prokaryote database of essential genes. The results suggested that the core genes in Brucella genomes are relatively conservation, and the energy and amino acid metabolism play a more important role in the process of growth and reproduction in Brucella spp. This study might help us to better understand the mechanisms of Brucella persistent infection and provide some clues for further exploring the gene modules of the intracellular survival in Brucella spp.

  14. Identification of Brucella spp. in feral swine (Sus scrofa) at abattoirs in Texas, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Various tissues, nasal swabs, urine, and blood samples were collected from 376 feral swine at two federally-inspected abattoirs in Texas during six separate sampling periods in 2015. Samples were tested for Brucella spp. by culture and serology. Brucella spp. were cultured from 13.0% of feral swin...

  15. Development of a rapid recombinase polymerase amplification assay for detection of Brucella in blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Yang, Mingjuan; Zhang, Guoxia; Liu, Shiwei; Wang, Xinhui; Ke, Yuehua; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Huang, Liuyu; Liu, Chao; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-04-01

    A rapid and sensitive recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay, Bruce-RPA, was developed for detection of Brucella. The assay could detect as few as 3 copies of Brucella per reaction within 20 min. Bruce-RPA represents a candidate point-of-care diagnosis assay for human brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation of Brucella inopinata-Like Bacteria from White's and Denny's Tree Frogs.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masanobu; Une, Yumi; Suzuki, Michio; Park, Eun-Sil; Imaoka, Koichi; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Brucella inopinata strain BO1 and B. sp. strain BO2 isolated from human patients, respectively, are genetically different from classical Brucella species. We isolated bacteria of the genus Brucella from two species of wild-caught tropical frogs kept in the facilities in Japan: White's tree frog, which inhabits Oceania, and Denny's tree frog, which inhabits Southeast Asia. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences and multilocus sequence analysis showed that two isolates of Brucella spp. showed significant similarity to BO1, BO2, and the isolates from other wild-caught frogs. These results suggest that a variety of frog species are susceptible to a novel clade of Brucella bacteria, including B. inopinata.

  17. Comparison of a New and Rapid Method: Brucella Coombs Gel Test With Other Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Kalem, Fatma; Ergün, Ayşe Gül; Durmaz, Süleyman; Doğan, Metin; Ertuğrul, Ömür; Gündem, Seval

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to detect reliability of Brucella Coombs gel test (BCGT) by comparing with with ELISA (IgG + IgM), Standard agglutination test, and Brucella immunocapture agglutination methods in serological diagnosis of brucellosis. Brucella Coombs gel test (BCGT), Brucella ELISA (IgG + IgM), Standard agglutination test, and Brucella immunocapture agglutination tests of 78 patients with presumptive diagnosis of brucellosis which were sent to Microbiology Laboratory of Konya Numune Hospital from various regions of Konya were studied. Of 78 patients with ELISA IgG and IgM, STA, BICA and BCGT; 26, 21, 10, 12 and 12 were positive. When compared with BICA, the sensitivity and specifity of BCGT were 100% and 100%, respectively. According to results BCGT can be used as a diagnostic test in routine laboratories after more comprehensive studies in control groups and patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Evaluation of PCR methods for detection of Brucella strains from culture and tissues.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, Alper; İça, Tuba; Savaşan, Serap; Sareyyüpoğlu, Barış; Akan, Mehmet; Diker, Kadir Serdar

    2017-04-01

    The genus Brucella causes significant economic losses due to infertility, abortion, stillbirth or weak calves, and neonatal mortality in livestock. Brucellosis is still a zoonosis of public health importance worldwide. The study was aimed to optimize and evaluate PCR assays used for the diagnosis of Brucella infections. For this aim, several primers and PCR protocols were performed and compared with Brucella cultures and biological material inoculated with Brucella. In PCR assays, genus- or species-specific oligonucleotide primers derived from 16S rRNA sequences (F4/R2, Ba148/928, IS711, BruP6-P7) and OMPs (JPF/JPR, 31ter/sd) of Brucella were used. All primers except for BruP6-P7 detected the DNA from reference Brucella strains and field isolates. In spiked blood, milk, and semen samples, F4-R2 primer-oriented PCR assays detected minimal numbers of Brucella. In spiked serum and fetal stomach content, Ba148/928 primer-oriented PCR assays detected minimal numbers of Brucella. Field samples collected from sheep and cattle were examined by bacteriological methods and optimized PCR assays. Overall, sensitivity of PCR assays was found superior to conventional bacteriological isolation. Brucella DNA was detected in 35.1, 1.1, 24.8, 5.0, and 8.0% of aborted fetus, blood, milk, semen, and serum samples by PCR assays, respectively. In conclusion, PCR assay in optimized conditions was found to be valuable in sensitive and specific detection of Brucella infections of animals.

  19. Detection of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus in Costa Rican sheep flocks

    PubMed Central

    Villagra-Blanco, R.; Dolz, G.; Montero-Caballero, D.; Romero-Zúñiga, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 359 sheep samples from 15 flocks were analyzed for the presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus using a commercial Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Antibodies were detected in 19 (5.29%) sheep from 12 (80%) flocks. Seropositive animals were found in all analyzed regions (Central, Chorotega, Atlantic Huetar, North Huetar and Central Pacific) determining prevalence between 0.28% and 4.4%, and intra-flock positivity between 3.7% and 25.0%. The survey revealed two risk factors associated with seropositivity; introducing animals (males and females), embryos, or semen from other farms or from abroad without any sanitary certification, and flocks not having quarantine areas or separated boxes for diseased animals. No clinical signs of disease were observed in positive seroreactors. C. abortus seems to be present in Costa Rica in a very low prevalence in sheep flocks. Further studies, to isolate the bacteria are required. Finally, implementation of control measures to prevent the spread of C. abortus is recommended. PMID:26623377

  20. Prevalence and molecular identification of Chlamydia abortus in commercial dairy goat farms in a hot region in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Campos-Hernández, Eleuterio; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Saltijeral-Oaxaca, Jorge Antonio; Escalante-Ochoa, Cristina; López-Heydeck, Sandra M; de Oca-Jiménez, Roberto Montes

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and presence of Chlamydia abortus in Saanen breed female goats from commercial dairy goat farms under intensive production in the municipality of Guanajuato, Mexico. Sera were collected to determine the prevalence of anti-C. abortus IgG antibodies using recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (rELISA) and cell culture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to prove the presence of the pathogen in swab samples collected from the vagina and rectum of selected animals. Additionally, foetal tissue samples from a sudden abortion were collected. C. abortus prevalence in female goats of commercial milking farms sampled in Guanajuato, Mexico, was 4.87% (n = 246). Seropositive animals were found in six out of nine (66.6%) dairy goat farms sampled, and prevalence among animals in individual farms ranged between 3.44 and 13.51%. C. abortus was detected using PCR in spleen tissue from the aborted foetus. PCR-based detection, as well as isolation from vaginal and rectal swabs, was not possible in the present study. Isolation through cell culture was also unsuccessful from aborted foetal tissue samples. In conclusion, the results from rELISA and PCR show that C. abortus is present in dairy goat farms in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

  1. Brucella Intracellular Life Relies on the Transmembrane Protein CD98 Heavy Chain.

    PubMed

    Keriel, Anne; Botella, Eric; Estrach, Soline; Bragagnolo, Gabriel; Vergunst, Annette C; Feral, Chloe C; O'Callaghan, David

    2015-06-01

    Brucella are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to escape host defenses and create a niche in which they can multiply. Although the importance of Brucella T4SS is clear, little is known about its interactions with host cell structures. In this study, we identified the eukaryotic protein CD98hc as a partner for Brucella T4SS subunit VirB2. This transmembrane glycoprotein is involved in amino acid transport, modulation of integrin signaling, and cell-to-cell fusion. Knockdown of CD98hc expression in HeLa cells demonstrated that it is essential for Brucella infection. Using knockout dermal fibroblasts, we confirmed its role for Brucella but found that it is not required for Salmonella infection. CD98hc transiently accumulates around the bacteria during the early phases of infection and is required for both optimal bacterial uptake and intracellular multiplication of Brucella. These results provide new insights into the complex interplay between Brucella and its host. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Construction of pTM series plasmids for gene expression in Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Bao, Yanqing; Gao, Jianpeng; Liu, Jiameng; Wang, Shaohui; Sun, Yingjie; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-04-01

    Brucellosis, the most common widespread zoonotic disease, is caused by Brucella spp., which are facultative, intracellular, Gram-negative bacteria. With the development of molecular biology techniques, more and more virulence-associated factors have been identified in Brucella spp. A suitable plasmid system is an important tool to study virulence genes in Brucella. In this study, we constructed three constitutive replication plasmids (pTM1-Cm, pTM2-Amp, and pTM3-Km) using the replication origin (rep) region derived from the pBBR1-MCS vector. Also, a DNA fragment containing multiple cloning sites (MCSs) and a terminator sequence derived from the pCold vector were produced for complementation of the deleted genes. Besides pGH-6×His, a plasmid containing the groE promoter of Brucella spp. was constructed to express exogenous proteins in Brucella with high efficiency. Furthermore, we constructed the inducible expression plasmid pZT-6×His, containing the tetracycline-inducible promoter pzt1, which can induce expression by the addition of tetracycline in the Brucella culture medium. The constructed pTM series plasmids will play an important role in the functional investigation of Brucella spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Brucella antibody seroprevalence in Antarctic seals (Arctocephalus gazella, Leptonychotes weddellii and Mirounga leonina).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Silje-Kristin; Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Forcada, Jaume; Hall, Ailsa; Godfroid, Jacques

    2013-09-03

    Brucellosis is a worldwide infectious zoonotic disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Brucella, and Brucella infections in marine mammals were first reported in 1994. A serosurvey investigating the presence of anti-Brucella antibodies in 3 Antarctic pinniped species was undertaken with a protein A/G indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the Rose Bengal test (RBT). Serum samples from 33 Weddell seals Leptonychotes weddelli were analysed, and antibodies were detected in 8 individuals (24.2%) with the iELISA and in 21 (65.6%) with the RBT. We tested 48 southern elephant seal Mirounga leonina sera and detected antibodies in 2 animals (4.7%) with both the iELISA and the RBT. None of the 21 Antarctic fur seals Arctocephalus gazella was found positive. This is the first report of anti-Brucella antibodies in southern elephant seals. The potential impact of Brucella infection in pinnipeds in Antarctica is not known, but Brucella spp. are known to cause abortion in terrestrial species and cetaceans. Our findings suggest that Brucella infection in pinnipeds is present in the Antarctic, but to date B. pinnipedialis has not been isolated from any Antarctic pinniped species, leaving the confirmation of infection pending.

  4. Brucella placentitis and seroprevalence in northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) of the Pribilof Islands, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Colleen G.; Tiller, Rebekah; Mathis, Demetrius; Stoddard, Robyn; Kersh, Gilbert J.; Dickerson, Bobette; Gelatt, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Brucella species infect a wide range of hosts with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. In mammals, one of the most significant consequences of Brucella infection is reproductive failure. There is evidence of Brucella exposure in many species of marine mammals, but the outcome of infection is often challenging to determine. The eastern Pacific stock of northern fur seals (NFSs, Callorhinus ursinus) has declined significantly, spawning research into potential causes for this trend, including investigation into reproductive health. The objective of the current study was to determine if NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska have evidence of Brucella exposure or infection. Archived DNA extracted from placentas (n = 119) and serum (n = 40) samples were available for testing by insertion sequence (IS) 711 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT), respectively. As well, placental tissue was available for histologic examination. Six (5%) placentas were positive by PCR, and a single animal had severe placentitis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis profiles were highly clustered and closely related to other Brucella pinnipedialis isolates. A single animal was positive on BMAT, and 12 animals had titers within the borderline range; 1 borderline animal was positive by PCR on serum. The findings suggest that NFSs on the Pribilof Islands are exposed to Brucella and that the organism has the ability to cause severe placental disease. Given the population trend of the NFS, and the zoonotic nature of this pathogen, further investigation into the epidemiology of this disease is recommended. PMID:24803576

  5. Brucella placentitis and seroprevalence in northern fur seals ( Callorhinus ursinus) of the Pribilof Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Colleen G; Tiller, Rebekah; Mathis, Demetrius; Stoddard, Robyn; Kersh, Gilbert J; Dickerson, Bobette; Gelatt, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Brucella species infect a wide range of hosts with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. In mammals, one of the most significant consequences of Brucella infection is reproductive failure. There is evidence of Brucella exposure in many species of marine mammals, but the outcome of infection is often challenging to determine. The eastern Pacific stock of northern fur seals (NFSs, Callorhinus ursinus) has declined significantly, spawning research into potential causes for this trend, including investigation into reproductive health. The objective of the current study was to determine if NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska have evidence of Brucella exposure or infection. Archived DNA extracted from placentas ( n = 119) and serum ( n = 40) samples were available for testing by insertion sequence (IS) 711 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT), respectively. As well, placental tissue was available for histologic examination. Six (5%) placentas were positive by PCR, and a single animal had severe placentitis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis profiles were highly clustered and closely related to other Brucella pinnipedialis isolates. A single animal was positive on BMAT, and 12 animals had titers within the borderline range; 1 borderline animal was positive by PCR on serum. The findings suggest that NFSs on the Pribilof Islands are exposed to Brucella and that the organism has the ability to cause severe placental disease. Given the population trend of the NFS, and the zoonotic nature of this pathogen, further investigation into the epidemiology of this disease is recommended.

  6. Successful Management of Infected Facial Filler with Brucella.

    PubMed

    Alshaer, Zahra; Alsaadi, Yazeed; Mrad, Mohamed Amir

    2018-06-11

    The widespread desire to maintain youth and beauty with minimally invasive procedures made the use of soft tissue fillers an attractive option to correct numerous aesthetic problems. However, many complications have emerged recently especially with the use of non-FDA-approved permanent materials. In this case report, we are demonstrating the effective management of a patient with Brucella isolated from a facial abscess at the site of prior permanent filler injection done 17 years ago. A 56-year-old woman presented complaining of painful swelling of the right cheek after a failed trial of filler evacuation and intralesional corticosteroid injection. The patient was interviewed carefully, and physical examination was performed, followed by culture and imaging. The patient had a facial abscess that was complicated by parotid infiltration by Brucella. Eventually she was managed successfully by anti-Brucella antibiotics for 6 months with no further complaints. A review of causative organisms in the literature along with recommendations for management is discussed. Permanent fillers have shown many complications that can occur even years after injection. Therefore, physicians should be careful when using permanent fillers and should restrict their use to certain situations. Moreover, rare infections must be kept in mind and careful history, including travel history and animal contact, needs to be considered particularly in the unusual scenarios. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Comparative Genomics of Early-Diverging Brucella Strains Reveals a Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wattam, Alice R.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Williams, Kelly P.; Mane, Shrinivasrao P.; Shukla, Maulik; Almeida, Nalvo F.; Dickerman, Allan W.; Mason, Steven; Moriyón, Ignacio; O’Callaghan, David; Whatmore, Adrian M.; Sobral, Bruno W.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Frace, Michael A.; De Castro, Cristina; Molinaro, Antonio; Boyle, Stephen M.; De, Barun K.; Setubal, João C.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brucella species are Gram-negative bacteria that infect mammals. Recently, two unusual strains (Brucella inopinata BO1T and B. inopinata-like BO2) have been isolated from human patients, and their similarity to some atypical brucellae isolated from Australian native rodent species was noted. Here we present a phylogenomic analysis of the draft genome sequences of BO1T and BO2 and of the Australian rodent strains 83-13 and NF2653 that shows that they form two groups well separated from the other sequenced Brucella spp. Several important differences were noted. Both BO1T and BO2 did not agglutinate significantly when live or inactivated cells were exposed to monospecific A and M antisera against O-side chain sugars composed of N-formyl-perosamine. While BO1T maintained the genes required to synthesize a typical Brucella O-antigen, BO2 lacked many of these genes but still produced a smooth LPS (lipopolysaccharide). Most missing genes were found in the wbk region involved in O-antigen synthesis in classic smooth Brucella spp. In their place, BO2 carries four genes that other bacteria use for making a rhamnose-based O-antigen. Electrophoretic, immunoblot, and chemical analyses showed that BO2 carries an antigenically different O-antigen made of repeating hexose-rich oligosaccharide units that made the LPS water-soluble, which contrasts with the homopolymeric O-antigen of other smooth brucellae that have a phenol-soluble LPS. The results demonstrate the existence of a group of early-diverging brucellae with traits that depart significantly from those of the Brucella species described thus far. PMID:22930339

  8. Marine Mammal Brucella Reference Strains Are Attenuated in a BALB/c Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg H; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Álvarez, María Pilar; Alcaraz, Ana; Godfroid, Jacques; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution with numerous animal host species. Since the novel isolation of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in 1994 the bacteria have been isolated from various marine mammal hosts. The marine mammal reference strains Brucella pinnipedialis 12890 (harbour seal, Phoca vitulina) and Brucella ceti 12891 (harbour porpoise, Phocoena phocoena) were included in genus Brucella in 2007, however, their pathogenicity in the mouse model is pending. Herein this is evaluated in BALB/c mice with Brucella suis 1330 as a control. Both marine mammal strains were attenuated, however, B. ceti was present at higher levels than B. pinnipedialis in blood, spleen and liver throughout the infection, in addition B. suis and B. ceti were isolated from brains and faeces at times with high levels of bacteraemia. In B. suis-infected mice serum cytokines peaked at day 7. In B. pinnipedialis-infected mice, levels were similar, but peaked predominantly at day 3 and an earlier peak in spleen weight likewise implied an earlier response. The inflammatory response induced pathology in the spleen and liver. In B. ceti-infected mice, most serum cytokine levels were comparable to those in uninfected mice, consistent with a limited inflammatory response, which also was indicated by restricted spleen and liver pathology. Specific immune responses against all three strains were detected in vitro after stimulation of splenocytes from infected mice with the homologous heat-killed brucellae. Antibody responses in vivo were also induced by the three brucellae. The immunological pattern of B. ceti in combination with persistence in organs and limited pathology has heretofore not been described for other brucellae. These two marine mammal wildtype strains show an attenuated pattern in BALB/c mice only previously described for Brucella neotomea.

  9. Brucella and Coxiella; if you don't look, you don't find.

    PubMed

    Lambourne, Jonathan R; Brooks, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Brucella and Coxiella are similar; both are obligate intracellular, zoonotic pathogens with a broad geographic distribution. Infection in animals is usually asymptomatic, but causes fetal loss and therefore has significant economic impact. Human infection may be asymptomatic or give rise to either organ-specific or multi-system disease. Organism culture is challenging for Coxiella and can lack sensitivity for Brucella. Therefore, infection is most commonly diagnosed by serology, but this may be negative in early infection and serology results may be challenging to interpret. Both Brucella and Coxiella are typically susceptible to a wide range of antimicrobials, but long courses may be needed. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  10. Electron tomography and cryo-SEM characterization reveals novel ultrastructural features of host-parasite interaction during Chlamydia abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Wilkat, M; Herdoiza, E; Forsbach-Birk, V; Walther, P; Essig, A

    2014-08-01

    Chlamydia (C.) abortus is a widely spread pathogen among ruminants that can be transmitted to women during pregnancy leading to severe systemic infection with consecutive abortion. As a member of the Chlamydiaceae, C. abortus shares the characteristic feature of an obligate intracellular biphasic developmental cycle with two morphological forms including elementary bodies (EBs) and reticulate bodies (RBs). In contrast to other chlamydial species, C. abortus ultrastructure has not been investigated yet. To do so, samples were fixed by high-pressure freezing and processed by different electron microscopic methods. Freeze-substituted samples were analysed by transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopical tomography and immuno-electron microscopy, and freeze-fractured samples were analysed by cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Here, we present three ultrastructural features of C. abortus that have not been reported up to now. Firstly, the morphological evidence that C. abortus is equipped with the type three secretion system. Secondly, the accumulation and even coating of whole inclusion bodies by membrane complexes consisting of multiple closely adjacent membranes which seems to be a C. abortus specific feature. Thirdly, the formation of small vesicles in the periplasmic space of RBs in the second half of the developmental cycle. Concerning the time point of their formation and the fact that they harbour chlamydial components, these vesicles might be morphological correlates of an intermediate step during the process of redifferentiation of RBs into EBs. As this feature has also been shown for C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae, it might be a common characteristic of the family of Chlamydiaceae.

  11. Enabling comparative modeling of closely related genomes: Example genus Brucella

    DOE PAGES

    Faria, José P.; Edirisinghe, Janaka N.; Davis, James J.; ...

    2014-03-08

    For many scientific applications, it is highly desirable to be able to compare metabolic models of closely related genomes. In this study, we attempt to raise awareness to the fact that taking annotated genomes from public repositories and using them for metabolic model reconstructions is far from being trivial due to annotation inconsistencies. We are proposing a protocol for comparative analysis of metabolic models on closely related genomes, using fifteen strains of genus Brucella, which contains pathogens of both humans and livestock. This study lead to the identification and subsequent correction of inconsistent annotations in the SEED database, as wellmore » as the identification of 31 biochemical reactions that are common to Brucella, which are not originally identified by automated metabolic reconstructions. We are currently implementing this protocol for improving automated annotations within the SEED database and these improvements have been propagated into PATRIC, Model-SEED, KBase and RAST. This method is an enabling step for the future creation of consistent annotation systems and high-quality model reconstructions that will support in predicting accurate phenotypes such as pathogenicity, media requirements or type of respiration.« less

  12. Enabling comparative modeling of closely related genomes: Example genus Brucella

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, José P.; Edirisinghe, Janaka N.; Davis, James J.

    For many scientific applications, it is highly desirable to be able to compare metabolic models of closely related genomes. In this study, we attempt to raise awareness to the fact that taking annotated genomes from public repositories and using them for metabolic model reconstructions is far from being trivial due to annotation inconsistencies. We are proposing a protocol for comparative analysis of metabolic models on closely related genomes, using fifteen strains of genus Brucella, which contains pathogens of both humans and livestock. This study lead to the identification and subsequent correction of inconsistent annotations in the SEED database, as wellmore » as the identification of 31 biochemical reactions that are common to Brucella, which are not originally identified by automated metabolic reconstructions. We are currently implementing this protocol for improving automated annotations within the SEED database and these improvements have been propagated into PATRIC, Model-SEED, KBase and RAST. This method is an enabling step for the future creation of consistent annotation systems and high-quality model reconstructions that will support in predicting accurate phenotypes such as pathogenicity, media requirements or type of respiration.« less

  13. Brucella ceti infection in dolphins from the Western Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Isidoro-Ayza, Marcos; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Pérez, Lola; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Muñoz, Pilar M; Alegre, Fernando; Barberán, Montserrat; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; González-Barrientos, Rocio; Moreno, Edgardo; Blasco, José María; Domingo, Mariano

    2014-09-17

    Brucella ceti infections have been increasingly reported in cetaceans. Brucellosis in these animals is associated with meningoencephalitis, abortion, discospondylitis', subcutaneous abscesses, endometritis and other pathological conditions B. ceti infections have been frequently described in dolphins from both, the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. In the Mediterranean Sea, only two reports have been made: one from the Italian Tyrrhenian Sea and the other from the Adriatic Sea. We describe the clinical and pathological features of three cases of B. ceti infections in three dolphins stranded in the Mediterranean Catalonian coast. One striped dolphin had neurobrucellosis, showing lethargy, incoordination and lateral swimming due to meningoencephalitis, A B. ceti infected bottlenose dolphin had discospondylitis, and another striped dolphin did not show clinical signs or lesions related to Brucella infection. A detailed characterization of the three B. ceti isolates was performed by bacteriological, molecular, protein and fatty acid analyses. All the B. ceti strains originating from Mediterranean dolphins cluster together in a distinct phylogenetic clade, close to that formed by B. ceti isolates from dolphins inhabiting the Atlantic Ocean. Our study confirms the severity of pathological signs in stranded dolphins and the relevance of B. ceti as a pathogen in the Mediterranean Sea.

  14. [Detection of Chlamydia abortus in bovine reproductive losses in the province of La Pampa, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Rojas, María Del C; Fort, Marcelo; Bettermann, Simone; Entrocassi, Carolina; Costamagna, Sixto R; Sachse, Konrad; Rodríguez Fermepin, Marcelo

    2018-01-16

    Reproductive losses linked to an infectious etiology in bovine cattle are a major economic concern worldwide. In Argentina, more than 50% of abortion cases have unknown causes. Species belonging to Chlamydiaceae family are frequent etiologic agents of abortion around the world; however, there is yet no information on their prevalence in Argentina. The objective of this work was to identify Chlamydia spp., and particularly C. abortus in reproductive losses from bovine cattle in La Pampa, Argentina. Real time PCR targeting Chlamydiaceae-specific DNA fragments was performed on 251 samples obtained from bovine abortions and stillborns, and ArrayTube was used for species identification on positive samples. Chlamydiaceae DNA was detected in 12 samples of aborted fetuses (4.78%), 83.33% (10/12) accounting for abortions and 16.66% (2/12) for stillborns. C. abortus was detected by ArrayTube in 5 cases (1.99% of all samples, and 41.67% of Chlamydiaceae positive samples). This study shows the first detection of Chlamydiaceae and C. abortus DNA on reproductive losses of bovine cattle in Argentina, and the described prevalence value (4.78%) should be taken as baseline value due to the type of samples analyzed. Detection of genetic material from Chlamydiaceae not matching any of the studied species could be due to intraspecies variants or local species not yet described. Further research on Chlamydia infections in bovine cattle in Argentina is imperative to describe their range, to analyze their economic and zoonotic implications and to make recommendations about prevention and control measures. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison and correlation of Simple Sequence Repeats distribution in genomes of Brucella species

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Jangampalli Adi Pradeep; Chakravarthi, Veeraraghavulu Praveen; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Kruti, Srinivasan Shanthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2011-01-01

    Computational genomics is one of the important tools to understand the distribution of closely related genomes including simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in an organism, which gives valuable information regarding genetic variations. The central objective of the present study was to screen the SSRs distributed in coding and non-coding regions among different human Brucella species which are involved in a range of pathological disorders. Computational analysis of the SSRs in the Brucella indicates few deviations from expected random models. Statistical analysis also reveals that tri-nucleotide SSRs are overrepresented and tetranucleotide SSRs underrepresented in Brucella genomes. From the data, it can be suggested that over expressed tri-nucleotide SSRs in genomic and coding regions might be responsible in the generation of functional variation of proteins expressed which in turn may lead to different pathogenicity, virulence determinants, stress response genes, transcription regulators and host adaptation proteins of Brucella genomes. Abbreviations SSRs - Simple Sequence Repeats, ORFs - Open Reading Frames. PMID:21738309

  16. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pseudomallei (formerly Pseudomonas pseudomallei) Hendra virus Nipah virus Rift Valley fever virus Venezuelan... CDC or APHIS. (i) The seizure of Bacillus anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Hendra virus, Nipah virus...

  17. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network.

    PubMed

    Hur, Junguk; Xiang, Zuoshuang; Feldman, Eva L; He, Yongqun

    2011-08-26

    Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were identified. The asserted

  18. BrucellaCapt versus classical tests in the serological diagnosis and management of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Aurora; Ariza, Javier; Rubio, Manuel; Masuet, Cristina; Díaz, Ramón

    2009-06-01

    The BrucellaCapt test is an immunocapture agglutination test suggested as a possible substitute for the Coombs test in the diagnosis of human brucellosis. Here it is compared with classical tests using 321 samples from 48 patients with brucellosis (6.9 +/- 1.7 samples per patient), including 20 patients with focal disease and 8 patients with a total of 9 relapse episodes (mean follow-up, 18 months). The BrucellaCapt test was used according to the manufacturer's instructions, and we also used a variant of the BrucellaCapt test in which the microtiter plates were not coated with antibodies against total human immunoglobulin (BCAPV). The correlation between the BrucellaCapt and BCAPV tests was 0.982 (P < 0.001), with 260 coincident pairs of titers (81%). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the BrucellaCapt and BCAPV tests with respect to the Coombs test were 0.969 and 0.960, respectively. Upon admission, the BrucellaCapt, BCAPV, and Coombs tests and the microagglutination test (MAT) were positive for all cases: titers were 1/2,560 by the BrucellaCapt test, 1/2,560 by the BCAPV test, 1/1,280 by the Coombs test, and 1/320 by the MAT. The decreases in the BrucellaCapt and BCAPV titers over time were pronounced in comparison with the Coombs titers. Cumulative probabilities of persistence 12 months after therapy were as follows: 80% by the BrucellaCapt test, 80% by the BCAPV test, 87% by the Coombs test, and 35% by the MAT. Serological changes during relapse were detected in seven cases (88%) by the Coombs test, in five cases by the BrucellaCapt and BCAPV tests, and in three cases by the MAT. The BrucellaCapt test is a sensitive, specific, and simple test for routine use in human brucellosis. Similar results were obtained with the BCAPV test. However, in some cases of relapse and chronic forms of the disease, the slight changes observed in low-affinity antibodies alone are better detected by the Coombs test.

  19. Ontology-based Brucella vaccine literature indexing and systematic analysis of gene-vaccine association network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vaccine literature indexing is poorly performed in PubMed due to limited hierarchy of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) annotation in the vaccine field. Vaccine Ontology (VO) is a community-based biomedical ontology that represents various vaccines and their relations. SciMiner is an in-house literature mining system that supports literature indexing and gene name tagging. We hypothesize that application of VO in SciMiner will aid vaccine literature indexing and mining of vaccine-gene interaction networks. As a test case, we have examined vaccines for Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in humans and animals. Results The VO-based SciMiner (VO-SciMiner) was developed to incorporate a total of 67 Brucella vaccine terms. A set of rules for term expansion of VO terms were learned from training data, consisting of 90 biomedical articles related to Brucella vaccine terms. VO-SciMiner demonstrated high recall (91%) and precision (99%) from testing a separate set of 100 manually selected biomedical articles. VO-SciMiner indexing exhibited superior performance in retrieving Brucella vaccine-related papers over that obtained with MeSH-based PubMed literature search. For example, a VO-SciMiner search of "live attenuated Brucella vaccine" returned 922 hits as of April 20, 2011, while a PubMed search of the same query resulted in only 74 hits. Using the abstracts of 14,947 Brucella-related papers, VO-SciMiner identified 140 Brucella genes associated with Brucella vaccines. These genes included known protective antigens, virulence factors, and genes closely related to Brucella vaccines. These VO-interacting Brucella genes were significantly over-represented in biological functional categories, including metabolite transport and metabolism, replication and repair, cell wall biogenesis, intracellular trafficking and secretion, posttranslational modification, and chaperones. Furthermore, a comprehensive interaction network of Brucella vaccines and genes were

  20. Host-Brucella interactions and the Brucella genome as tools for subunit antigen discovery and immunization against brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gabriel; Adams, Leslie G.; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Ficht, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most important approach to counteract infectious diseases. Thus, the development of new and improved vaccines for existing, emerging, and re-emerging diseases is an area of great interest to the scientific community and general public. Traditional approaches to subunit antigen discovery and vaccine development lack consideration for the critical aspects of public safety and activation of relevant protective host immunity. The availability of genomic sequences for pathogenic Brucella spp. and their hosts have led to development of systems-wide analytical tools that have provided a better understanding of host and pathogen physiology while also beginning to unravel the intricacies at the host-pathogen interface. Advances in pathogen biology, host immunology, and host-agent interactions have the potential to serve as a platform for the design and implementation of better-targeted antigen discovery approaches. With emphasis on Brucella spp., we probe the biological aspects of host and pathogen that merit consideration in the targeted design of subunit antigen discovery and vaccine development. PMID:23720712

  1. Brucella discriminates between mouse dendritic cell subsets upon in vitro infection.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Alexia; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Degos, Clara; de Chastellier, Chantal; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide re-emerging zoonosis. Brucella has been shown to infect and replicate within Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) in vitro grown bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). In this cell model, Brucella can efficiently control BMDC maturation. However, it has been shown that Brucella infection in vivo induces spleen dendritic cells (DC) migration and maturation. As DCs form a complex network composed by several subpopulations, differences observed may be due to different interactions between Brucella and DC subsets. Here, we compare Brucella interaction with several in vitro BMDC models. The present study shows that Brucella is capable of replicating in all the BMDC models tested with a high infection rate at early time points in GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs. GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs are more activated than the other studied DC models and consequently intracellular bacteria are not efficiently targeted to the ER replicative niche. Interestingly, GMCSF-DC and GMCSF-Flt3l DC response to infection is comparable. However, the key difference between these 2 models concerns IL10 secretion by GMCSF DCs observed at 48 h post-infection. IL10 secretion can explain the weak secretion of IL12p70 and TNFα in the GMCSF-DC model and the low level of maturation observed when compared to GMCSF-IL15 DCs and Flt3l DCs. These models provide good tools to understand how Brucella induce DC maturation in vivo and may lead to new therapeutic design using DCs as cellular vaccines capable of enhancing immune response against pathogens.

  2. Glutamate Decarboxylase-Dependent Acid Resistance in Brucella spp.: Distribution and Contribution to Fitness under Extremely Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. PMID:25381237

  3. The Change of a Medically Important Genus: Worldwide Occurrence of Genetically Diverse Novel Brucella Species in Exotic Frogs.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Holger C; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Shilton, Cathy; Benedict, Suresh; Whatmore, Adrian M; Blom, Jochen; Eisenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The genus Brucella comprises various species of both veterinary and human medical importance. All species are genetically highly related to each other, sharing intra-species average nucleotide identities (ANI) of > 99%. Infections occur among various warm-blooded animal species, marine mammals, and humans. Until recently, amphibians had not been recognized as a host for Brucella. In this study, however, we show that novel Brucella species are distributed among exotic frogs worldwide. Comparative recA gene analysis of 36 frog isolates from various continents and different frog species revealed an unexpected high genetic diversity, not observed among classical Brucella species. In phylogenetic reconstructions the isolates consequently formed various clusters and grouped together with atypical more distantly related brucellae, like B. inopinata, strain BO2, and Australian isolates from rodents, some of which were isolated as human pathogens. Of one frog isolate (10RB9215) the genome sequence was determined. Comparative genome analysis of this isolate and the classical Brucella species revealed additional genetic material, absent from classical Brucella species but present in Ochrobactrum, the closest genetic neighbor of Brucella, and in other soil associated genera of the Alphaproteobacteria. The presence of gene clusters encoding for additional metabolic functions, flanked by tRNAs and mobile genetic elements, as well as by bacteriophages is suggestive for a different ecology compared to classical Brucella species. Furthermore it suggests that amphibian isolates may represent a link between free living soil saprophytes and the pathogenic Brucella with a preferred intracellular habitat. We therefore assume that brucellae from frogs have a reservoir in soil and, in contrast to classical brucellae, undergo extensive horizontal gene transfer.

  4. Glutamate decarboxylase-dependent acid resistance in Brucella spp.: distribution and contribution to fitness under extremely acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel; De Biase, Daniela; Occhialini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Exposure of harbour seals Phoca vitulina to Brucella in declining populations across Scotland.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Joanna L; Stubberfield, Emma J; Foster, Geoffrey; Brownlow, Andrew; Hall, Ailsa J; Perrett, Lorraine L

    2017-09-20

    Since 2000 there has been a major decline in the abundance of Scottish harbour seals Phoca vitulina. The causes of the decline remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to establish the extent to which the seals in the regions of greatest decline have been exposed to Brucella, a bacterial pathogen that causes reproductive failure in terrestrial mammalian hosts. Tissues from dead seals collected between 1992 and 2013 were cultured for Brucella (n = 150). Serum samples collected from live capture-released seals (n = 343) between 1997 and 2012 were tested for Brucella antibodies using the Rose Bengal plate agglutination test (RBT) and a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA). In total, 16% of seals cultured had Brucella isolated from one or more tissues, but there were no pathological signs of infection. The cELISA results were more sensitive than the RBT results, showing that overall 25.4% of seals were seropositive, with the highest seroprevalence in juveniles. As there was no evidence of either a higher seroprevalence or higher circulating antibody levels in seropositive animals in the areas with the greatest declines, it was concluded that Brucella infection is likely not a major contributing factor to recent declines. However, the consistently high proportion of seals exposed to Brucella indicates possible endemicity in these populations, likely due to B. pinnipedialis, which has demonstrated a preference for pinniped hosts. Importantly, given the close proximity between seals, humans and livestock in many areas, there is the potential for cross-species infections.

  6. Host-pathogen interactions in specific pathogen-free chickens following aerogenous infection with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Berndt, Angela; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Sachse, Konrad; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2015-03-15

    Although Chlamydia (C.) psittaci infections are recognized as an important factor causing economic losses and impairing animal welfare in poultry production, the specific mechanisms leading to severe clinical outcomes are poorly understood. In the present study, we comparatively investigated pathology and host immune response, as well as systemic dissemination and expression of essential chlamydial genes in the course of experimental aerogeneous infection with C. psittaci and the closely related C. abortus, respectively, in specific pathogen-free chicks. Clinical signs appeared sooner and were more severe in the C. psittaci-infected group. Compared to C. abortus infection, more intense systemic dissemination of C. psittaci correlated with higher and faster infiltration of immune cells, as well as more macroscopic lesions and epithelial pathology, such as hyperplasia and erosion. In thoracic air sac tissue, mRNA expression of immunologically relevant factors, such as IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, LITAF and iNOS was significantly stronger up-regulated in C. psittaci- than in C. abortus-infected birds between 3 and 14 days post-infection. Likewise, transcription rates of the chlamydial genes groEL, cpaf and ftsW were consistently higher in C. psittaci during the acute phase. These findings illustrate that the stronger replication of C. psittaci in its natural host also evoked a more intense immune response than in the case of C. abortus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Obstetric outcomes of patients with abortus imminens in the first trimester.

    PubMed

    Evrenos, Ayşe Nur; Cakir Gungor, Ayse Nur; Gulerman, Cavidan; Cosar, Emine

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to find out the effect of abortus imminens (AI) on obstetric outcomes of pregnancies which continued beyond the 24th week of gestation. In this prospective study, 309 patients with AI were divided into high-risk group (with a risk factor for spontaneous abortus) (n = 92) and low-risk group (without a risk factor) (n = 217). The control group (n = 308) was chosen randomly. In AI group, preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), cesarean section (C/S) delivery, postpartum uterine atony and need of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) rates were significantly higher than control group. Gestational diabetes mellitus, PPROM, still birth, low APGAR scores were seen more frequently in the high-risk patients than in the control group. Furthermore in the high-risk group, preterm delivery, malpresentation, C/S delivery and need of NICU were increased much more than in the low-risk group. Gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, oligo/polyhydramniosis, intrauterine growth retardation, placenta previa, abruption of placenta, chorioamnionitis, congenital abnormalities, delivery induction, cephalopelvic disproportion, fetal distress and manual removal of placenta were not different among the groups. Patients with AI his