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Sample records for abortus inmunidad vacunas

  1. Cytogenetics of aborters and abortuses.

    PubMed

    Kajii, T; Ferrier, A

    1978-05-01

    783 aborters and 430 abortuses were studied in a prospective cytogenetic survey which attempted to link chromosome abnormalities and history of recurrent abortion. 425 female and 358 male spontaneous aborters and their 430 abortuses (310 were karotyped) showed 4 women and 2 men as balanced translocation carriers (3 Robertsonian and 3 reciprocal translocations) and a woman with an XXX karotype. 5 of the abortuses were successfully karotyped; 4 had inherited unbalanced translocation products, and the other had a balanced 13q14q translocation plus trisomy 18. Apparently, translocation chromosomes carried by aborters were transmitted to their abortuses. Structural chromosome abnormalities were found with higher frequency (.8%) among aborters than among the general adult population (.3%). Translocation carriers were more frequent among the aborters with histories of recurrent abortions (2.7%) as well as among aborters with a history of perinatal deaths (3.6%) than among those persons with no such histories (.6%). Data on 18 couples whose 2 or 3 successive spontaneous abortuses were karotyped are presented.

  2. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  3. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  4. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucella Abortus Vaccine. 113.65... Bacterial Vaccines § 113.65 Brucella Abortus Vaccine. Brucella Abortus Vaccine shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine from smooth colonial forms of the Brucella abortus organism...

  5. Immunochemical identification of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, N; Freer, E; Weintraub, A; Ramirez, M; Lind, S; Moreno, E

    1994-01-01

    Sera from Brucella abortus-infected and -vaccinated bovines recognized four lipopolysaccharide (LPS) determinants: two in the O-polysaccharide (A and C), one in the core oligosaccharide from rough Brucella LPS (R), and one in lipid A (LA). From 46 different hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against various LPS moieties, 9 different specificities were identified. Two epitopes, A and C/Y, were present in the O-polysaccharide. Two epitopes were found in the core oligosaccharide (R1 and R2) of rough Brucella LPS. MAbs against R1 and R2 epitopes reacted against LPS from different rough Brucella species; however, MAbs directed to the R2 epitope also reacted against enterobacterial LPS from deep rough mutants. Three epitopes (LA1, LA2, and LA3) were located in the lipid A backbone. Different sets of MAbs recognized two epitopes in the lipid A-associated outer membrane protein (LAOmp3-1 and LAOmp3-2). LPS preparations from smooth brucellae had small amounts of rough-type LPS. Although LPS from rough brucellae did not show smooth-type LPS in western blots (immunoblots), two hybridomas generated from mice immunized with rough B. abortus produced antibodies against smooth B. abortus LPS. Results are discussed in relation to the structure and function of B. abortus LPS and to previous findings on the epitopic density of the molecule. Images PMID:7496947

  6. IMMUNOLOGICAL ROLE OF BRUCELLA ABORTUS CELL WALLS

    PubMed Central

    Foster, John W.; Ribi, Edgar

    1962-01-01

    Foster, John W. (University of Georgia, Athens) and Edgar Ribi. Immunological role of Brucella abortus cell walls. J. Bacteriol. 84:258–268. 1962—Cell walls and protoplasm were prepared from organisms disrupted in a refrigerated pressure cell. Cell walls were purified by sedimentation in a linear glycerol gradient. Antigens capable of protecting mice against infection with Brucella abortus and of reacting with antiserum prepared against whole cells were present chiefly in the cell wall; substances lethal to mice and responsible for primary inflammation of rabbit skin were also associated with the cell wall. Limited activity of protoplasm in these biological tests may or may not be due to contamination with cell-wall material. A substance extracted from whole cells with aqueous ether possessed an immunizing potency superior to that of killed whole cells or cell walls. Images PMID:13894243

  7. Brucella abortus Infection Acquired in Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Pier Luigi; Mastrandrea, Scilla; Rappelli, Paola; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2000-01-01

    We report an outbreak of laboratory-acquired Brucella abortus infection originating in the accidental breakage of a centrifuge tube. A total of 12 laboratory workers were infected (attack rate of 31%), with an incubation time ranging from 6 weeks to 5 months. Antibody titers were evaluated weekly in all personnel exposed, allowing the diagnosis of the infection in most cases before the onset of clinical symptoms, so that specific therapy could be administrated. PMID:10790142

  8. Bactericidal Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on Intramacrophage Brucella abortus 544

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Hamed; Salouti, Mojtaba; Shapouri, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is an infectious disease that is caused by Brucella spp. As Brucella spp. are intramacrophage pathogens, the treatment of this infection is very difficult. On the other hand, due to the side effects of the brucellosis treatment regime, it is necessary to find new antimicrobial agents against it. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles against Brucella abortus 544 in the intramacrophage condition. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles was determined by an agar well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of silver nanoparticles against B. abortus 544 were determined by a broth macrodilution method. The effect of time on the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles was analyzed. The effect of silver nanoparticles on the intramacrophage survival of B. abortus 544 was studied on mice peritoneal macrophages. Results: The well diffusion agar study showed that silver nanoparticles have an antimicrobial effect on B. abortus 544. The MIC and MBC of silver nanoparticles against B. abortus 544 were; 6 ppm and 8 ppm, respectively. The silver nanoparticles showed antibacterial effects within 40 minutes. The results of the macrophage culture indicated that silver nanoparticles have antibacterial activity against intramacrophage B. abortus 544, and the highest efficiency was observed at a concentration of 8-10 ppm of silver nanoparticles. Conclusions: The results showed that silver nanoparticles have an antimicrobial effect against intramacrophage B. abortus 544. PMID:25147682

  9. Bactericidal Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on Intramacrophage Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hamed; Salouti, Mojtaba; Shapouri, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease that is caused by Brucella spp. As Brucella spp. are intramacrophage pathogens, the treatment of this infection is very difficult. On the other hand, due to the side effects of the brucellosis treatment regime, it is necessary to find new antimicrobial agents against it. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles against Brucella abortus 544 in the intramacrophage condition. The antimicrobial effect of silver nanoparticles was determined by an agar well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of silver nanoparticles against B. abortus 544 were determined by a broth macrodilution method. The effect of time on the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles was analyzed. The effect of silver nanoparticles on the intramacrophage survival of B. abortus 544 was studied on mice peritoneal macrophages. The well diffusion agar study showed that silver nanoparticles have an antimicrobial effect on B. abortus 544. The MIC and MBC of silver nanoparticles against B. abortus 544 were; 6 ppm and 8 ppm, respectively. The silver nanoparticles showed antibacterial effects within 40 minutes. The results of the macrophage culture indicated that silver nanoparticles have antibacterial activity against intramacrophage B. abortus 544, and the highest efficiency was observed at a concentration of 8-10 ppm of silver nanoparticles. The results showed that silver nanoparticles have an antimicrobial effect against intramacrophage B. abortus 544.

  10. Protective effects of recombinant Brucella abortus Omp28 against infection with a virulent strain of Brucella abortus 544 in mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong Ju; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Dae Geun; Min, Wongi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Suk

    2012-09-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Brucella (B.) abortus have been extensively studied, but their immunogenicity and protective ability against B. abortus infection are still unclear. In the present study, B. abortus Omp28, a group 3 antigen, was amplified by PCR and cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system. Recombinant Omp28 (rOmp28) was expressed in Escherichia coli and was then purified. Immunogenicity of rOmp28 was confirmed by Western blot analysis with Brucella-positive mouse serum. Furthermore, humoral- or cell-mediated immune responses measured by the production of IgG1 or IgG2a in rOmp28-immunized mice and the ability of rOmp28 immunization to protect against B. abortus infection were evaluated in a mouse model. In the immunogenicity analysis, the mean titers of IgG1 and IgG2a produced by rOmp28-immunized mice were 20-fold higher than those of PBS-treated mice throughout the entire experimental period. Furthermore, spleen proliferation and bacterial burden in the spleen of rOmp28-immunized mice were approximately 1.5-fold lower than those of PBS-treated mice when challenged with virulent B. abortus. These findings suggest that rOmp28 from B. abortus is a good candidate for manufacturing an effective subunit vaccine against B. abortus infection in animals.

  11. Aneuploidy in abortuses following IVF and ICSI

    PubMed Central

    Frattarelli, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare aneuploidy rates in first trimester pregnancy losses following IVF ± ICSI. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of karyotypes of abortuses following conventional IVF (n = 159) and ICSI (n = 196). Results 50.1% of losses were found to be cytogenetically abnormal among all patients undergoing IVF ± ICSI. A significant increase in fetal aneuploidy rate was noted with increasing maternal age (<30 years = 26.1% vs. 31 to 34 years. = 38.2% vs. 35 to 39 years. = 51.3% vs. >39 years. = 65.9%). Aneuploidy rates were similar in the ICSI vs. conventional IVF groups (52.6% vs. 47.2% [p 0.31, RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.90, 1.38]). More sex chromosome anomalies were noted in the ICSI group. Conclusions The aneuploidy rate in first trimester abortuses significantly increases with increasing maternal age. ICSI was not shown to significantly increase the aneuploidy rate. However, more sex chromosome anomalies were found among pregnancies resulting from ICSI. PMID:19224361

  12. Immune response triggered by Brucella abortus following infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-07-17

    Brucella abortus live vaccines have been used successfully to control bovine brucellosis worldwide for decades. However, due to some limitations of these live vaccines, efforts are being made for the development of new safer and more effective vaccines that could also be used in other susceptible species. In this context, understanding the protective immune responses triggered by B. abortus is critical for the development of new vaccines. Such understandings will enhance our knowledge of the host/pathogen interactions and enable to develop methods to evaluate potential vaccines and innovative treatments for animals or humans. At present, almost all the knowledge regarding B. abortus specific immunological responses comes from studies in mice. Active participation of macrophages, dendritic cells, IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T-cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells are vital to overcome the infection. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the immune responses triggered by vaccination versus infection by B. abortus, in different hosts.

  13. Lung lesions in bovine fetuses aborted by Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    López, A; Hitos, F; Pérez, A; Navarro-Fierro, R R

    1984-01-01

    Considering the poor facilities available for microbiological diagnosis in some countries where Brucella abortus is a frequent cause of bovine abortion, a study was conducted to determine if isolation of B. abortus from an aborted bovine fetus could be predicted from a detailed histological study of the formalized lung. Thirty-nine samples of B. abortus positive and 20 negative fetal samples were examined for the presence of 14 different pulmonary lesions. Differences in the frequency of observed lesions between the positive and negative groups, were determined by odds ratios and chi square statistic. The confidence of the prediction was calculated by means of the logistic computer model. The frequency of eight lung lesions was found to be significantly (p less than 0.05) different between the groups; nevertheless, these lesions were not specific enough to be able to incriminate B. abortus as the cause of abortion. PMID:6434166

  14. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  15. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 113.65 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... shall be incubated at 35 to 37 ° C for 96 hours. If growth not typical of Brucella abortus organisms is... streaked on one potato agar plate in such a manner as to produce confluent colonies. Artificial reflected...

  16. 9 CFR 113.65 - Brucella Abortus Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 113.65 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... shall be incubated at 35 to 37 °C for 96 hours. If growth not typical of Brucella abortus organisms is... streaked on one potato agar plate in such a manner as to produce confluent colonies. Artificial reflected...

  17. Brucella abortus RB51 in milk of vaccinated adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina Leite; Poester, Fernando Padilla; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Resende, Thiago Magalhães; Vaz, Adil Knackfuss; Ferraz, Sandra Maria; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shedding of Brucella abortus in the milk of cows vaccinated with a full dose of RB51 during lactation. Eighteen cows, nine previously vaccinated with S19 as calves and nine non-vaccinated, were immunized subcutaneously with 1.3×10(10)CFU of B. abortus RB51, 30-60days after parturition. Milk samples from all animals were collected daily until day 7, and at weekly interval for the next 9 weeks after vaccination. To evaluate the shedding of B. abortus, milk samples were submitted for culture and PCR. No B. abortus was isolated from any sample tested. Only one sample, collected on first day after vaccination from a cow previously vaccinated, was faintly positive in the PCR. In conclusion, the public health hazard associated with milk consumption from cows vaccinated with RB51 in post-partum is very low, despite vaccination with the full dose and regardless of previous S19 vaccination.

  18. Can Chlamydia abortus be transmitted by embryo transfer in goats?

    PubMed

    Oseikria, M; Pellerin, J L; Rodolakis, A; Vorimore, F; Laroucau, K; Bruyas, J F; Roux, C; Michaud, S; Larrat, M; Fieni, F

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine (i) whether Chlamydia abortus would adhere to or penetrate the intact zona pellucida (ZP-intact) of early in vivo-derived caprine embryos, after in vitro infection; and (ii) the efficacy of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) washing protocol for bovine embryos. Fifty-two ZP-intact embryos (8-16 cells), obtained from 14 donors were used in this experiment. The embryos were randomly divided into 12 batches. Nine batches (ZP-intact) of five embryos were incubated in a medium containing 4 × 10(7)Chlamydia/mL of AB7 strain. After incubation for 18 hours at 37 °C in an atmosphere of 5% CO2, the embryos were washed in batches in 10 successive baths of a phosphate buffer saline and 5% fetal calf serum solution in accordance with IETS guidelines. In parallel, three batches of ZP-intact embryos were used as controls by being subjected to similar procedures but without exposure to C. abortus. The 10 wash baths were collected separately and centrifuged for 1 hour at 13,000 × g. The washed embryos and the pellets of the 10 centrifuged wash baths were frozen at -20 °C before examination for evidence of C. abortus using polymerase chain reaction. C. abortus DNA was found in all of the infected batches of ZP-intact embryos (9/9) after 10 successive washes. It was also detected in the 10th wash fluid for seven batches of embryos, whereas for the two other batches, the last positive wash bath was the eighth and the ninth, respectively. In contrast, none of the embryos or their washing fluids in the control batches were DNA positive. These results report that C. abortus adheres to and/or penetrates the ZP of in vivo caprine embryos after in vitro infection, and that the standard washing protocol recommended by the IETS for bovine embryos, failed to remove it. The persistence of these bacteria after washing makes the embryo a potential means of transmission of the bacterium during embryo transfer from

  19. High-resolution melt PCR analysis for rapid identification of Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B among C. abortus strains and field isolates.

    PubMed

    Vorimore, Fabien; Cavanna, Noémie; Vicari, Nadia; Magnino, Simone; Willems, Hermann; Rodolakis, Annie; Siarkou, Victoria I; Laroucau, Karine

    2012-09-01

    We describe a novel high-resolution melt assay that clearly differentiates Chlamydia abortus live vaccine strain 1B from field C. abortus strains and field wild-type isolates based on previously described single nucleotide polymorphisms. This modern genotyping technique is inexpensive, easy to use, and less time-consuming than PCR-RFLP.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Chlamydia abortus Isolates from Yaks in Qinghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaocai; Cao, Xiaoan; Fu, Baoquan; Chao, Yilin; Cai, Jinshan; Zhou, Jizhang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the yak population has exhibited reproductive disorders, which are considered to be associated with Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus) in Qinghai, China. In this study, a total of 9 aborted fetuses (each from a different herd) and 126 vaginal swab samples from the 9 herds were collected and analyzed. C. abortus DNA was detected from all of the 9 aborted fetuses and 30 of the 126 vaginal swab samples (23.81%) from yak cows in the selected herds. Four C. abortus strains were isolated from embryonated egg yolk sacs inoculated with foetal organ suspensions. The isolated C. abortus strains were further identified, which showed identical restriction profiles with the C. abortus reference strain using AluI restriction enzyme in the RFLP test. Moreover, the isolated C. abortus strains and C. abortus-positive vaginal swab samples were genotyped by multiple loci variable number tandem repeat analysis and all belonged to the genotype 2 group. These findings suggested that C. abortus played a substantial role in yak abortion in Qinghai, China. PMID:26060818

  1. Brucella abortus Cell Cycle and Infection Are Coordinated.

    PubMed

    De Bolle, Xavier; Crosson, Sean; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular pathogens. The recent development of methods and genetically engineered strains allowed the description of cell-cycle progression of Brucella abortus, including unipolar growth and the ordered initiation of chromosomal replication. B. abortus cell-cycle progression is coordinated with intracellular trafficking in the endosomal compartments. Bacteria are first blocked at the G1 stage, growth and chromosome replication being resumed shortly before reaching the intracellular proliferation compartment. The control mechanisms of cell cycle are similar to those reported for the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and they are crucial for survival in the host cell. The development of single-cell analyses could also be applied to other bacterial pathogens to investigate their cell-cycle progression during infection.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Brucella abortus Chromosome II Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Merz, Christian A.; Manning, Simon P.; Giovagnoli-Kurtz, Renée; Williams, Leanne E.; Mujer, Cesar V.; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Redkar, Rajendra J.; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale genomic rearrangements including inversions, deletions, and duplications are significant in bacterial evolution. The recently completed Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330 genomes have facilitated the investigation of such events in the Brucella spp. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed in identifying genomic differences between B. melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308. Analysis of 45 SSH clones revealed several deletions on chromosomes of B. abortus and B. melitensis that encoded proteins of various metabolic pathways. A 640-kb inversion on chromosome II of B. abortus has been reported previously (S. Michaux Charachon, G. Bourg, E. Jumas Bilak, P. Guigue Talet, A. Allardet Servent, D. O'Callaghan, and M. Ramuz, J. Bacteriol. 179:3244-3249, 1997) and is further described in this study. One end of the inverted region is located on a deleted TATGC site between open reading frames BMEII0292 and BMEII0293. The other end inserted at a GTGTC site of the cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase A (PDEA) gene (BMEII1009), dividing PDEA into two unequal DNA segments of 160 and 977 bp. As a consequence of inversion, the 160-bp segment that encodes the N-terminal region of PDEA was relocated at the opposite end of the inverted chromosomal region. The splitting of the PDEA gene most likely inactivated the function of this enzyme. A recombination mechanism responsible for this inversion is proposed. PMID:14526025

  3. Molecular characterization of Brucella abortus chromosome II recombination.

    PubMed

    Tsoktouridis, Georgios; Merz, Christian A; Manning, Simon P; Giovagnoli-Kurtz, Renée; Williams, Leanne E; Mujer, Cesar V; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2003-10-01

    Large-scale genomic rearrangements including inversions, deletions, and duplications are significant in bacterial evolution. The recently completed Brucella melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330 genomes have facilitated the investigation of such events in the Brucella spp. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) was employed in identifying genomic differences between B. melitensis 16M and Brucella abortus 2308. Analysis of 45 SSH clones revealed several deletions on chromosomes of B. abortus and B. melitensis that encoded proteins of various metabolic pathways. A 640-kb inversion on chromosome II of B. abortus has been reported previously (S. Michaux Charachon, G. Bourg, E. Jumas Bilak, P. Guigue Talet, A. Allardet Servent, D. O'Callaghan, and M. Ramuz, J. Bacteriol. 179:3244-3249, 1997) and is further described in this study. One end of the inverted region is located on a deleted TATGC site between open reading frames BMEII0292 and BMEII0293. The other end inserted at a GTGTC site of the cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase A (PDEA) gene (BMEII1009), dividing PDEA into two unequal DNA segments of 160 and 977 bp. As a consequence of inversion, the 160-bp segment that encodes the N-terminal region of PDEA was relocated at the opposite end of the inverted chromosomal region. The splitting of the PDEA gene most likely inactivated the function of this enzyme. A recombination mechanism responsible for this inversion is proposed.

  4. Immunization of Mice with Recombinant Brucella abortus Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (Ohr) Protein Protects Against a Virulent Brucella abortus 544 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Brucella abortus ohr gene coding for an organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was cloned into a maltose fusion protein expression system (pMAL), inserted into Escherichia coli, and purified, and its immunogenicity was evaluated by western blot analysis using Brucella-positive mouse sera. The purified recombinant Ohr (rOhr) was treated with adjuvant and injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. A protective immune response analysis revealed that rOhr induced a significant increase in both the IgG1 and IgG2a titers, and IgG2a reached a higher level than IgG1 after the second and third immunizations. Additionally, immunization with rOhr induced high production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF, MCP-1, IL-12p70, and IL-6, but a lesser amount of IL-10, suggesting that rOhr predominantly elicited a cell-mediated immune response. In addition, immunization with rOhr caused a significantly higher degree of protection against a virulent B. abortus infection compared with a positive control group consisting of mice immunized with maltose-binding protein. These findings showed that B. abortus rOhr was able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice, which suggested that this recombinant protein could be a potential vaccine candidate for animal brucellosis.

  5. Deletion of the BCSP31 gene of Brucella abortus by replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Halling, S M; Detilleux, P G; Tatum, F M; Judge, B A; Mayfield, J E

    1991-01-01

    The 31-kDa salt-extractable immunogenic protein, BCSP31, was deleted from several Brucella abortus strains by replacement with a marker gene encoding resistance to the antibiotics kanamycin and neomycin. The BCSP31 gene replacement plasmids, constructed with ColE1-derived vectors, were introduced by electroporation into B. abortus strain 19 (S19), into a rough variant of B. abortus S19, and into B. abortus S2308, and antibiotic-resistant transformants were isolated. B. abortus S19 is an attenuated strain used as a vaccine for prevention of bovine brucellosis in the United States, and B. abortus S2308 is a commonly used challenge strain. The antibiotic-resistant isolates were all obtained by recombination; none were spontaneous mutants. Loss of the gene encoding BCSP31 and presence of the marker gene were confirmed by Southern analysis. Vector sequences were either absent or linked to the genome, indicating that ColE1-derived plasmids are not maintained in B. abortus. Survival of B. abortus mutant strains in the macrophagelike cell line J774 and in HeLa cells was examined and shown to be indistinguishable from that of the parental strain. Images PMID:1937745

  6. Brucella abortus in coyotes. I. A serologic and bacteriologic survey in eastern Texas.

    PubMed

    Davis, D S; Boeer, W J; Mims, J P; Heck, F C; Adams, L G

    1979-07-01

    Prevalence of Brucella abortus serum antibodies in coyotes from east central Texas was determined by the buffered Brucella antigen (card test), rivanol, standard agglutination tube, and cold complement fixation tube tests. Eighteen percent (9 of 51) of the coyotes were positive serologically. B. abortus biotype 1 was isolated from various tissues from 7 of 43 coyotes by bacteriologic culture. Congenital transmission was found.

  7. Brucella abortus DNA is a major bacterial agonist to activate the host innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Guimarães, Gabriela; Costa Franco, Miriam Maria Silva; Marim, Fernanda Martins; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2014-12-01

    Immunity against Brucella abortus depends on the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Signaling pathways triggered by Brucella DNA involves TLR9, AIM2 and possibly STING and MAVS. Herein, we review the advances in B. abortus DNA sensing by host innate immune receptors and the progress in this field.

  8. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C.; Rhyan, Jack C.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P.; Hennager, Steven G.; Pavuk, Alana A.; Sprino, Phillip J.; Boyle, Stephen M.; Berrier, Randall J.; Salman, Mo D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk. PMID:26904509

  9. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C; Rhyan, Jack C; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P; Hennager, Steven G; Pavuk, Alana A; Sprino, Phillip J; Boyle, Stephen M; Berrier, Randall J; Salman, Mo D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk.

  10. Molecular typing for epidemiological evaluation of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Heo, Eun Jeong; Nam, Hyang Mi; Jung, Suk Chan; Cho, Donghee

    2009-08-01

    To investigate genotype relationships among regional groups of Brucella isolates, variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted according to previously reported methods. Field strains of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis were isolated from 9 provinces in the Republic of Korea during the years 1996-2006 and each of the isolates was classified by eight loci of HOOF-Prints. On the basis of the alleles, the 33 B. abortus and 21 B. canis field strains were divided into 22 and 18 distinct genotypes, respectively. Phylogenetic cluster analysis of Brucella isolates could be discriminated with geographical region in the Republic of Korea. Simpson's diversity index values of B. abortus and B. canis isolates ranged from 0 to 0.85. The stability of each locus was determined with in vivo and in vitro experiments. After twenty passages in blood agar, the VNTR numbers of loci 1 and 7 in B. abortus isolates and loci 5, 7, and 8 in B. canis isolates changed. The same change of the VNTR numbers at loci 1 and 7 was observed with B. abortus RB51 strains isolated from vaccinated cattle for the in vivo experiment. Although B. canis and B. abortus isolates were discriminated to herd levels by the HOOF-Prints, this method needs further improvement for the high variable locus. This study represents the first epidemiological data of molecular typing of B. abortus and B. canis reported in Korea.

  11. A dual-targeting approach to inhibit Brucella abortus replication in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Czyż, Daniel M.; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Shuman, Howard A.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and an etiological agent of the zoonotic disease known as brucellosis. Brucellosis can be challenging to treat with conventional antibiotic therapies and, in some cases, may develop into a debilitating and life-threatening chronic illness. We used multiple independent assays of in vitro metabolism and intracellular replication to screen a library of 480 known bioactive compounds for novel B. abortus anti-infectives. Eighteen non-cytotoxic compounds specifically inhibited B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche, which suggests these molecules function by targeting host cell processes. Twenty-six compounds inhibited B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture, thirteen of which are non-cytotoxic to human host cells and attenuate B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche. The most potent non-cytotoxic inhibitors of intracellular replication reduce B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture and perturb features of mammalian cellular biology including mitochondrial function and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. The efficacy of these molecules as inhibitors of B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche suggests “dual-target” compounds that coordinately perturb host and pathogen are promising candidates for development of improved therapeutics for intracellular infections. PMID:27767061

  12. European Chlamydia abortus livestock isolate genomes reveal unusual stability and limited diversity, reflected in geographical signatures.

    PubMed

    Seth-Smith, H M B; Busó, Leonor Sánchez; Livingstone, M; Sait, M; Harris, S R; Aitchison, K D; Vretou, Evangelia; Siarkou, V I; Laroucau, K; Sachse, K; Longbottom, D; Thomson, N R

    2017-05-04

    Chlamydia abortus (formerly Chlamydophila abortus) is an economically important livestock pathogen, causing ovine enzootic abortion (OEA), and can also cause zoonotic infections in humans affecting pregnancy outcome. Large-scale genomic studies on other chlamydial species are giving insights into the biology of these organisms but have not yet been performed on C. abortus. Our aim was to investigate a broad collection of European isolates of C. abortus, using next generation sequencing methods, looking at diversity, geographic distribution and genome dynamics. Whole genome sequencing was performed on our collection of 57 C. abortus isolates originating primarily from the UK, Germany, France and Greece, but also from Tunisia, Namibia and the USA. Phylogenetic analysis of a total of 64 genomes shows a deep structural division within the C. abortus species with a major clade displaying limited diversity, in addition to a branch carrying two more distantly related Greek isolates, LLG and POS. Within the major clade, seven further phylogenetic groups can be identified, demonstrating geographical associations. The number of variable nucleotide positions across the sampled isolates is significantly lower than those published for C. trachomatis and C. psittaci. No recombination was identified within C. abortus, and no plasmid was found. Analysis of pseudogenes showed lineage specific loss of some functions, notably with several Pmp and TMH/Inc proteins predicted to be inactivated in many of the isolates studied. The diversity within C. abortus appears to be much lower compared to other species within the genus. There are strong geographical signatures within the phylogeny, indicating clonal expansion within areas of limited livestock transport. No recombination has been identified within this species, showing that different species of Chlamydia may demonstrate different evolutionary dynamics, and that the genome of C. abortus is highly stable.

  13. Phellinus baumii extract influences pathogenesis of Brucella abortus in phagocyte by disrupting the phagocytic and intracellular trafficking pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J; Kim, D H; Kim, D G; Lee, H J; Min, W; Rhee, M H; Yun, B S; Kim, S

    2013-02-01

    To clarify the effects of Phellinus baumii ethanol extract (PBE) on Brucella abortus pathogenesis in phagocytes focusing on the phagocytic and intracellular trafficking pathway. The effects of PBE on Br. abortus infection in macrophages were evaluated through an adherence and infection assays and an analysis of LAMP-1 staining. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the F-actin polymerization associated with PBE during Br. abortus uptake were detected by immunoblotting and FACS, respectively. The survival of Br. abortus in pure culture was remarkably reduced by PBE in a dose-dependent manner. PBE-treated cells showed significantly decreased uptake, intracellular replication and adherence of Br. abortus. The declines of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and F-actin polymerization following Br. abortus entry were apparent in PBE-treated cells compared with the control. Moreover, the co-localization of Br. abortus-containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was elevated in PBE-treated cells compared with the control during intracellular trafficking. Phellinus baumii ethanol extract may possess the modulatory effect on pathogenesis of Br. abortus through disrupting the phagocytic and intracellular trafficking pathway in phagocyte. The potential modulation of PBE to Br. abortus pathogenesis could provide an alternative approach to control of brucellosis, contributing to attenuate Br. abortus manifestation in hosts. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Brucella abortus Synthesizes Phosphatidylcholine from Choline Provided by the Host

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Altabe, Silvia; de Mendoza, Diego; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2006-01-01

    The Brucella cell envelope is characterized by the presence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), a common phospholipid in eukaryotes that is rare in prokaryotes. Studies on the composition of Brucella abortus 2308 phospholipids revealed that the synthesis of PC depends on the presence of choline in the culture medium, suggesting that the methylation biosynthetic pathway is not functional. Phospholipid composition of pmtA and pcs mutants indicated that in Brucella, PC synthesis occurs exclusively via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway. Transformation of Escherichia coli with an expression vector containing the B. abortus pcs homologue was sufficient for PC synthesis upon induction with IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside), while no PC formation was detected when bacteria were transformed with a vector containing pmtA. These findings imply that Brucella depends on choline provided by the host cell to form PC. We could not detect any obvious associated phenotype in the PC-deficient strain under vegetative or intracellular growth conditions in macrophages. However, the pcs mutant strain displays a reproducible virulence defect in mice, which suggests that PC is necessary to sustain a chronic infection process. PMID:16484204

  15. Chlamydia abortus in Cows Oviducts, Occasional Event or Causal Connection?

    PubMed

    Appino, S; Vincenti, L; Rota, A; Pellegrini, S; Chieppa, M N; Cadoni, V; Pregel, P

    2015-06-01

    Fifty-seven genital tracts of regularly slaughtered culled Piedmontese cows, aged 7.4 ± 4.3 years (mean ± SD), range: 2.6-15.6 years, were grossly and microscopically examined. DNA extracted from oviducts was subjected to PCR to evaluate the presence of Chlamydia spp. The 15 PCR-positive oviducts were subjected to Sanger sequencing and showed the presence of Chamydia abortus, with an identity range between 99 and 100%. Nine of the PCR-positive samples belonged to the 24 animals with a normal macroscopic appearance of the whole genital tract (percentage of positive oviducts in normal genital tracts 9/24 = 37.5%), while six belonged to the 33 genital tracts with lesions in one or more organs (percentage of positive oviducts in pathological genital tracts 6/33 = 18.1%); of these, a single animal had salpingitis. The detection of C. abortus in bovine oviducts is of particular interest because it has never been previously investigated or reported.

  16. Immunogenicity and protective effect of recombinant Brucella abortus Ndk (rNdk) against a virulent strain B. abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we particularly evaluated the protective effect of recombinant protein encoded by Brucella abortus 544 ndk (nucleoside diphosphate kinase) gene against B. abortus infection in the BALB/c mice. Cloning and expression of B. abortus Ndk was accomplished by PCR amplification into a pMAL expression system, and purification of a recombinant Ndk (rNdk). As for the determination of IgG responses, rNdk induced vigorous IgG production, especially higher in IgG2a compared to IgG1 with titers of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively, whereas titers of these in mice immunized with MBP were 2.4 of IgG2a and 2.6 of IgG1. The analysis of cytokine has revealed that rNdk can strongly induce production of IFN-γ as well as proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, MCP1 and IL-6) but not much IL-10, suggesting rNdk elicited predominantly cell-mediated immune responses. Furthermore, the spleen proliferation and bacterial burden in the spleen of rNdk immunized mice were significantly lower than those of MBP-immunized mice against virulent B. abortus challenge (P < 0.01). Conclusionly, rNdk immunization enables to elicit both of the humoral and cellular response, ultimately enhancing protection level in experimental mice, suggesting that rNdk of B. abortus might be a useful candidate for subunit vaccine for brucellosis in animals.

  17. Vaccination with Brucella abortus rough mutant RB51 protects BALB/c mice against virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Jones, S M; Blasco, J M; Enright, F M; Schurig, G G; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with live Brucella abortus RB51, a stable rough mutant, produced protection against challenge with virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis. Passive-transfer experiments indicated that vaccinated mice were protected against B. abortus 2308 through cell-mediated immunity, against B. ovis PA through humoral immunity, and against B. melitensis 16M through both forms of immunity. Live bacteria were required for the induction of protective cell-mediated immunity; vaccination with whole killed cells of strain RB51 failed to protect mice against B. abortus 2308 despite development of good delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Protective antibodies against the heterologous species were generated in vaccinated mice primarily through anamnestic responses following challenge infections. Growth of the antigenically unrelated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in the spleens of vaccinated mice indicated that nonspecific killing by residual activated macrophages contributed minimally to protection. These results encourage the continued investigation of strain RB51 as an alternative vaccine against heterologous Brucella species. However, its usefulness against B. ovis would be limited if, as suggested here, epitopes critical for protective cell-mediated immunity are not shared between B. abortus and B. ovis. Images PMID:7927779

  18. [Detection of a clonal complex with Brucella abortus biovar 2 genotype as founder in B. abortus isolates from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Daiana; Conde, Sandra B; Salustio, Eduardo; Samartino, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. Up to date, eight biovars of B. abortus have been described. In Argentina, biovar 1 is the most frequently isolated. However, biovar 2, which is more pathogenic than biovar 1, is also found. Molecular methods for subtyping isolates are necessary for allowing epidemiological surveillance and control of eradication programs. Due to the genetic homogeneity of the genus Brucella, the development of molecular typing tools has been difficult. The publication of microorganism genomes facilitates the design of this approach. The aim of this work was to employ a Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) scheme for strains from Argentina isolated in our laboratory. From the 56 isolates analyzed, 47 different genotypic profiles were obtained. All the strains typed as biovar 2 showed the same profile. This scheme allowed assigning each isolate to the biovar it belongs to. All the genotypes were related using the goeBURST analysis and biovar 2 was proposed as founder.

  19. Biotyping and Genotyping (MLVA16) of Brucella abortus Isolated from Cattle in Brazil, 1977 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Minharro, Sílvia; Silva Mol, Juliana P.; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Pauletti, Rebeca B.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Melzer, Falk; Poester, Fernando P.; Dasso, Maurício G.; Pinheiro, Elaine S.; Soares Filho, Paulo M.; Santos, Renato L.; Heinemann, Marcos B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide distributed zoonosis that causes important economic losses to animal production. In Brazil, information on the distribution of biovars and genotypes of Brucella spp. is scarce or unavailable. This study aimed (i) to biotype and genotype 137 Brazilian cattle isolates (from 1977 to 2008) of B. abortus and (ii) to analyze their distribution. B. abortus biovars 1, 2 and 3 (subgroup 3b) were confirmed and biovars 4 and 6 were first described in Brazil. Genotyping by the panel 1 revealed two groups, one clustering around genotype 40 and another around genotype 28. Panels 2A and 2B disclosed a high diversity among Brazilian B. abortus strains. Eighty-nine genotypes were found by MLVA16. MLVA16 panel 1 and 2 showed geographic clustering of some genotypes. Biotyping and MLVA16 genotyping of Brazilian B. abortus isolates were useful to better understand the epidemiology of bovine brucellosis in the region. PMID:24324670

  20. Improved immunogenicity of tetanus toxoid by Brucella abortus S19 LPS adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Gharegozlou, Behnaz

    2014-09-01

    Adjuvants are used to increase the immunogenicity of new generation vaccines, especially those based on recombinant proteins. Despite immunostimulatory properties, the use of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as an adjuvant has been hampered due to its toxicity and pyrogenicity. Brucella abortus LPS is less toxic and has no pyrogenic properties compared to LPS from other gram negative bacteria. To evaluate the adjuvant effect of B. abortus (vaccine strain, S19) LPS for tetanus toxoid antigen (TT) and to investigate the protective effect of different tetanus vaccine preparations. LPS was extracted and purified from B. abortus S19 and KDO, glycan, phosphate content, and protein contamination were measured. Adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) was used as a linker for conjugation of TT to LPS. Different amounts of B. abortus LPS, TT, TT conjugated with LPS, and TT mixed with LPS or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) were injected into mice and antibody production against TT was measured. The protective effect of induced antibodies was determined by LD50. Immunization of mice with TT+LPS produced the highest anti-TT antibody titer in comparison to the group immunized with TT without any adjuvant or the groups immunized with TT-LPS or TT+CFA. Tetanus toxid-S19 LPS also produced a 100% protective effect against TT in immunized mice. These data indicate that B. abortus LPS enhances the immune responses to TT and suggest the possible use of B. abortus LPS as an adjuvant in vaccine preparations.

  1. Brucella abortus Invasion of Synoviocytes Inhibits Apoptosis and Induces Bone Resorption through RANKL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana María; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; García Samartino, Clara; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human active brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this paper, we describe the role of synoviocytes in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. Our results indicate that Brucella abortus infection inhibited synoviocyte apoptosis through the upregulation of antiapoptotic factors (cIAP-2, clusterin, livin, and P21/CIP/CDNK1A). In contrast, infection did not change the expression of proteins that have been involved in apoptosis induction such as Bad, Bax, cleaved procaspase 3, CytC, and TRAIL, among others; or their expression was reduced, as occurs in the case of P-p53(S15). In addition, B. abortus infection induced upregulation of adhesion molecules (CD54 and CD106), and the adhesion of monocytes and neutrophils to infected synoviocytes was significantly higher than to uninfected cells. Despite this increased adhesion, B. abortus-infected synoviocytes were able to inhibit apoptosis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes and neutrophils. Moreover, B. abortus infection increased soluble and membrane RANKL expression in synoviocytes that further induced monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with synovial fibroblasts may have an important role in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. PMID:23509146

  2. Brucella abortus invasion of synoviocytes inhibits apoptosis and induces bone resorption through RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana María; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; García Samartino, Clara; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2013-06-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human active brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this paper, we describe the role of synoviocytes in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis. Our results indicate that Brucella abortus infection inhibited synoviocyte apoptosis through the upregulation of antiapoptotic factors (cIAP-2, clusterin, livin, and P21/CIP/CDNK1A). In contrast, infection did not change the expression of proteins that have been involved in apoptosis induction such as Bad, Bax, cleaved procaspase 3, CytC, and TRAIL, among others; or their expression was reduced, as occurs in the case of P-p53(S15). In addition, B. abortus infection induced upregulation of adhesion molecules (CD54 and CD106), and the adhesion of monocytes and neutrophils to infected synoviocytes was significantly higher than to uninfected cells. Despite this increased adhesion, B. abortus-infected synoviocytes were able to inhibit apoptosis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes and neutrophils. Moreover, B. abortus infection increased soluble and membrane RANKL expression in synoviocytes that further induced monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with synovial fibroblasts may have an important role in the pathogenesis of brucellar arthritis.

  3. Characterization of culture supernatant proteins from Brucella abortus and its protection effects against murine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ju; Lim, Jeong Ju; Kim, Dae Geun; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we characterized the secreted proteins of Brucella abortus into the enriched media under the bacterial laboratory growth condition and investigated the pathogenic importance of culture supernatant (CS) proteins to B. abortus infection. CS proteins from stationary phase were concentrated and analyzed using 2D electrophoresis. In MALDI TOF/TOF analysis, more than 27 proteins including CuZn SOD, Dps, Tat, OMPs, Adh, LivF, Tuf, SucC, GroEL and DnaK were identified. Cytotoxic effects of CS proteins were found to increase in a dose-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. Upon B. abortus challenge into phagocytes, however, CS proteins pre-treated cells exhibited lower bacterial uptake and intracellular replication compared to untreated cells. Immunization with CS proteins induced a strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses and exhibited significant higher degree of protection against virulence of B. abortus infection compared to mice immunized with Brucella broth protein (BBP). Taken together, these results indicate that B. abortus secreted a number of soluble immunogenic proteins under laboratory culture condition, which can promote antibody production resulted in enhancing host defense against to subsequently bacterial infection. Moreover, further analysis of CS proteins may help to understand the pathogenic mechanism of B. abortus infection and host-pathogen interaction.

  4. NLRP12 negatively regulates proinflammatory cytokine production and host defense against Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Tatiana N; Gomes, Marco Túlio R; Oliveira, Luciana S; Campos, Priscila C; Machado, Gabriela G; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2017-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of brucellosis, which causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. This bacterium infects and proliferates mainly in macrophages and dendritic cells, where it is recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Our group recently demonstrated the role of AIM2 and NLRP3 in Brucella recognition. Here, we investigated the participation of NLRP12 in innate immune response to B. abortus. We show that NLRP12 inhibits the early production of IL-12 by bone marrow-derived macrophages upon B. abortus infection. We also observed that NLRP12 suppresses in vitro NF-κB and MAPK signaling in response to Brucella. Moreover, we show that NLRP12 modulates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in B. abortus infected-macrophages. Furthermore, we show that mice lacking NLRP12 are more resistant in the early stages of B. abortus infection: NLRP12(-/-) infected-mice have reduced bacterial burdens in the spleens and increased production of IFN-γ and IL-1β compared with wild-type controls. In addition, NLRP12 deficiency leads to reduction in granuloma number and size in mouse livers. Altogether, our findings suggest that NLRP12 plays an important role in negatively regulating the early inflammatory responses against B. abortus.

  5. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Chlamydia abortus infection in Tibetan sheep in Gansu province, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Yin, Ming-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, an important pathogen in a variety of animals, is associated with abortion in sheep. In the present study, 1732 blood samples, collected from Tibetan sheep between June 2013 and April 2014, were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test, aiming to evaluate the seroprevalence and risk factors of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. 323 of 1732 (18.65%) samples were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1:16. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors associated with seroprevalence, which could provide foundation to prevent and control C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Gender of Tibetan sheep was left out of the final model because it is not significant in the logistic regression analysis (P > 0.05). Region, season, and age were considered as major risk factors associated with C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Our study revealed a widespread and high prevalence of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep in Gansu province, northwest China, with higher exposure risk in different seasons and ages and distinct geographical distribution.

  6. Survival of Brucella abortus in milk fermented with a yoghurt starter culture.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga Estrada, Armida; Mota de la Garza, Lydia; Sánchez Mendoza, Miroslava; Santos López, Eva María; Filardo Kerstupp, Santiago; López Merino, Ahidé

    2005-01-01

    In countries such as Mexico, brucellosis is still an important public health problem due to the consumption of non-pasteurized milk and dairy products, contaminated with Brucella spp. The aim of this study was to look into the survival of Brucella abortus during fermentation of milk with a yoghurt starter culture and storage at refrigeration temperature. Sterile skim milk was inoculated with B. abortus at two concentrations, 10(5) and 10(8) CFU/ml simultaneously with a yoghurt starter culture of lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecie bulgaricus). Inoculated flasks were incubated at 42 degrees C, followed by refrigeration at 4 degrees C. Samples were taken during fermentation and during storage and viable count of B. abortus and lactic acid bacteria and pH were determined. Results showed that after 10 days of storage at 4 degrees C, B. abortus was recovered in fermented milk at a level of 10(5) CFU/ml, despite the low pH below 4.0. Therefore B. abortus is able to survive in fermented milk. This finding may imply that non-pasteurized fermented milk contaminated with Brucella abortus could be a means of transmission of these bacteria.

  7. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Chlamydia abortus Infection in Tibetan Sheep in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Yin, Ming-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, an important pathogen in a variety of animals, is associated with abortion in sheep. In the present study, 1732 blood samples, collected from Tibetan sheep between June 2013 and April 2014, were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test, aiming to evaluate the seroprevalence and risk factors of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. 323 of 1732 (18.65%) samples were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1 : 16. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors associated with seroprevalence, which could provide foundation to prevent and control C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Gender of Tibetan sheep was left out of the final model because it is not significant in the logistic regression analysis (P > 0.05). Region, season, and age were considered as major risk factors associated with C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Our study revealed a widespread and high prevalence of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep in Gansu province, northwest China, with higher exposure risk in different seasons and ages and distinct geographical distribution. PMID:25401129

  8. Risks of Brucella abortus spillover in the Greater Yellowstone area.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, B

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent spillover of Brucella abortus from wildlife reservoirs to domestic cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) has prevented the United States from completely eradicating bovine brucellosis. Risks to cattle are a function of the size and location of wildlife and livestock populations, the degree and nature of spatio-temporal interactions between the various hosts, the level of disease in wildlife, and the susceptibility of livestock herds. While the brucellosis prevalence in wild, free-ranging GYA bison (Bison bison) is high, current management actions have successfully limited contact between bison and cattle. Under current management practices, the risks to cattle in the GYA are predominantly from wild elk (Cervus elaphus). Intra- and inter-species transmission events, while uncommon, are nevertheless crucial for the maintenance of brucellosis in the GYA. Future management actions should focus on decreasing elk herd densities and group sizes and on understanding the behavioural and environmental drivers that result in co-mingling that makes transmission possible.

  9. Toll-like receptor 4-linked Janus kinase 2 signaling contributes to internalization of Brucella abortus by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Kim, Dae Geun; Lee, Hu Jang; Min, Wongi; Rhee, Man Hee; Cho, Jae Youl; Watarai, Masahisa; Kim, Suk

    2013-07-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen that uses a crafty strategy to invade and proliferate within host cells, but the distinct signaling pathways associated with phagocytic mechanisms of B. abortus remain unclear. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-linked signaling interacting with Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) plays an essential role in B. abortus phagocytosis by macrophages. The effects of TLR4-JAK2 signaling on B. abortus phagocytosis in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were observed through an infection assay and confocal microscopy. We determined that the uptake of B. abortus was negatively affected by the dysfunction of TLR4 and JAK2. F-actin polymerization detected by flow cytometry and F-actin assay was amplified for B. abortus entry, whereas that event was attenuated by the disruption of TLR4 and JAK2. Importantly, JAK2 phosphorylation and actin skeleton reorganization were suppressed immediately after B. abortus infection in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from TLR4(-/-) mice, showing the cooperation of JAK2 with TLR4. Furthermore, small GTPase Cdc42 participated in the intermediate pathway of TLR4-JAK2 signaling on B. abortus phagocytosis. Consequently, TLR4-associated JAK2 activation in the early cellular signaling events plays a pivotal role in B. abortus-induced phagocytic processes in macrophages, implying the pathogenic significance of JAK2-mediated entry. Here, we elucidate that this specific phagocytic mechanism of B. abortus might provide achievable strategies for inhibiting B. abortus invasion.

  10. Diversification and Distribution of Ruminant Chlamydia abortus Clones Assessed by MLST and MLVA.

    PubMed

    Siarkou, Victoria I; Vorimore, Fabien; Vicari, Nadia; Magnino, Simone; Rodolakis, Annie; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Sachse, Konrad; Longbottom, David; Laroucau, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the most common infectious cause of abortion in small ruminants worldwide and has zoonotic potential. We applied multilocus sequence typing (MLST) together with multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) to genotype 94 ruminant C. abortus strains, field isolates and samples collected from 1950 to 2011 in diverse geographic locations, with the aim of delineating C. abortus lineages and clones. MLST revealed the previously identified sequence types (STs) ST19, ST25, ST29 and ST30, plus ST86, a recently-assigned type on the Chlamydiales MLST website and ST87, a novel type harbouring the hemN_21 allele, whereas MLVA recognized seven types (MT1 to MT7). Minimum-spanning-tree analysis suggested that all STs but one (ST30) belonged to a single clonal complex, possibly reflecting the short evolutionary timescale over which the predicted ancestor (ST19) has diversified into three single-locus variants (ST86, ST87 and ST29) and further, through ST86 diversification, into one double-locus variant (ST25). ST descendants have probably arisen through a point mutation evolution mode. Interestingly, MLVA showed that in the ST19 population there was a greater genetic diversity than in other STs, most of which exhibited the same MT over time and geographical distribution. However, the evolutionary pathways of C. abortus STs seem to be diverse across geographic distances with individual STs restricted to particular geographic locations. The ST30 singleton clone displaying geographic specificity and represented by the Greek strains LLG and POS was effectively distinguished from the clonal complex lineage, supporting the notion that possibly two separate host adaptations and hence independent bottlenecks of C. abortus have occurred through time. The combination of MLST and MLVA assays provides an additional level of C. abortus discrimination and may prove useful for the investigation and surveillance of

  11. Vaccination of elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus strain RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase genes does not induce adequate protection against experimental brucella abortus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA). In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the d...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus SKN 13 Isolated from Placenta of Aborted Cattle in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, H. C.; Chandel, B. S.; Patel, Kirit B.; Patel, A. C.; Shrimali, M. D.; Patel, S. S.; Bhagat, A. G.; Rajgor, Manish; Patel, Mitul A.; Patel, Maulik; Kala, Jitendra; Patel, Bhumika

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is generally known to cause brucellosis in cattle and buffalo. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Brucella abortus SKN 13, isolated from aborted cattle placenta in the area of Gujarat, India, providing precious resources for comparative genomic analyses of Brucella field strains. PMID:27789633

  13. A B lymphocyte mitogen is a Brucella abortus virulence factor required for persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Juan Manuel; Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Mucci, Juan; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2006-01-01

    Microbial pathogens with the ability to establish chronic infections have evolved strategies to actively modulate the host immune response. Brucellosis is a disease caused by a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that if not treated during the initial phase of the infection becomes chronic as the bacteria persist for the lifespan of the host. How this pathogen and others achieve this action is a largely unanswered question. We report here the identification of a Brucella abortus gene (prpA) directly involved in the immune modulation of the host. PrpA belongs to the proline-racemase family and elicits a B lymphocyte polyclonal activation that depends on the integrity of its proline-racemase catalytic site. Stimulation of splenocytes with PrpA also results in IL-10 secretion. Construction of a B. abortus-prpA mutant allowed us to assess the contribution of PrpA to the infection process. Mice infected with B. abortus induced an early and transient nonresponsive status of splenocytes to both Escherichia coli LPS and ConA. This phenomenon was not observed when mice were infected with a B. abortus-prpA mutant. Moreover, the B. abortus-prpA mutant had a reduced capacity to establish a chronic infection in mice. We propose that an early and transient nonresponsive immune condition of the host mediated by this B cell polyclonal activator is required for establishing a successful chronic infection by Brucella. PMID:17053080

  14. Nucleic acid vaccination of Brucella abortus ribosomal L7/L12 gene elicits immune response.

    PubMed

    Kurar, E; Splitter, G A

    1997-12-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines provide an exciting approach for antigen presentation to the immune system. As a test of this new methodology, the immune response to the in vivo-expressed Brucella abortus ribosomal L7/12 gene in the muscle cells of mice was examined. To accomplish this goal the eukaryotic expression systems pcDNA3 and p6 were used. Single intramuscular injection of the L7/L12 gene driven by the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pcDNA3) or bovine MHC 1 promoter (p6) resulted in intracellular expression of the B. abortus L7/L12 immunodominant protein encoded by this gene. This application facilitated directed antigen presentation to the immune system and established specific antibody and T-cell responses compared with vector only (pcDNA3) negative controls and B. abortus S19 injected positive controls. Although pcDNA3-encoded L7/L12 gene-inoculated mice possessed significant protection, p6-L7/L12 did not engender significant protection against B. abortus S2308 infection compared to positive control mice. These data suggest a promising antigen-specific response, and L7/L12 nucleic acid vaccination may be an initial step in the development of genetically engineered candidate vaccines against brucellosis. This study for the first time focuses on DNA immunization of a gene from B. abortus.

  15. N-Formyl-Perosamine Surface Homopolysaccharides Hinder the Recognition of Brucella abortus by Mouse Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Cristina; Gurdián-Murillo, Stephany; Lomonte, Bruno; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen of monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and placental trophoblasts. This bacterium causes a chronic disease in bovines and in humans. In these hosts, the bacterium also invades neutrophils; however, it fails to replicate and just resists the killing action of these leukocytes without inducing significant activation or neutrophilia. Moreover, B. abortus causes the premature cell death of human neutrophils. In the murine model, the bacterium is found within macrophages and dendritic cells at early times of infection but seldom in neutrophils. Based on this observation, we explored the interaction of mouse neutrophils with B. abortus. In contrast to human, dog, and bovine neutrophils, naive mouse neutrophils fail to recognize smooth B. abortus bacteria at early stages of infection. Murine normal serum components do not opsonize smooth Brucella strains, and neutrophil phagocytosis is achieved only after the appearance of antibodies. Alternatively, mouse normal serum is capable of opsonizing rough Brucella mutants. Despite this, neutrophils still fail to kill Brucella, and the bacterium induces cell death of murine leukocytes. In addition, mouse serum does not opsonize Yersinia enterocolitica O:9, a bacterium displaying the same surface polysaccharide antigen as smooth B. abortus. Therefore, the lack of murine serum opsonization and absence of murine neutrophil recognition are specific, and the molecules responsible for the Brucella camouflage are N-formyl-perosamine surface homopolysaccharides. Although the mouse is a valuable model for understanding the immunobiology of brucellosis, direct extrapolation from one animal system to another has to be undertaken with caution. PMID:27001541

  16. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Chlamydia abortus infection in free-ranging white yaks in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Si-Yuan; Huang, Si-Yang; Yin, Ming-Yang; Tan, Qi-Dong; Liu, Guang-Xue; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhou, Ji-Zhang; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-20

    Chlamydia is gram-negative obligate bacteria which causes a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. To date, there are a few reports about the seroprevalence of Chlamydia and the risk factors associated with Chlamydia infection in yaks in the world. In this study, 974 blood samples were collected from white yaks (Bos grunniens) in Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu province, northwest China from June 2013 to April 2014. Antibodies against Chlamydia abortus were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test, and 158 of 974 (16.22%) white yaks were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1:16. The risk factors associated with seroprevalence were evaluated by a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Region, gender and age of white yak were left out of the final model, due to its insignificance in the logistic regression analysis (P > 0.05). However, season was considered as a major risk factor associated with C. abortus infection in white yaks. To our knowledge, this is the first survey of C. abortus seroprevalence in white yaks in China, which extends the host range for C. abortus and has important implications for public health and the local Tibetan economy.

  17. The role of TREM-2 in internalization and intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pan; Lu, Qiang; Cui, Guimei; Guan, Zhenhong; Yang, Li; Sun, Changjiang; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-02-15

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is a cell surface receptor primarily expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. TREM-2 functions as a phagocytic receptor for bacteria as well as an inhibitor of Toll like receptors (TLR) induced inflammatory cytokines. However, the role of TREM-2 in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. To investigate whether TREM-2 is involved in Brucella intracellular survival, we chose bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs), in which TREM-2 is stably expressed, as cell model. Colony formation Units (CFUs) assay suggests that TREM-2 is involved in the internalization of Brucella abortus (B. abortus) by macrophages, while silencing of TREM-2 decreases intracellular survival of B. abortus. To further study the underlying mechanisms of TREM-2-mediated bacterial intracellular survival, we examined the activation of B. abortus-infected macrophages through determining the kinetics of activation of the three MAPKs, including ERK, JNK and p38, and measuring TNFα production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Brucella (BrLPS) or B. abortus stimulation. Our data show that TREM-2 deficiency promotes activation of Brucella-infected macrophages. Moreover, our data also demonstrate that macrophage activation promotes killing of Brucella by enhancing nitric oxygen (NO), but not reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, macrophage apoptosis or cellular death. Taken together, these findings provide a novel interpretation of Brucella intracellular growth through inhibition of NO production produced by TREM-2-mediated activated macrophages.

  18. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination.

  19. Isolation of Chlamydia abortus from a laboratory worker diagnosed with atypical pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nieves; Caro, M Rosa; Gallego, M Carmen; Murcia-Belmonte, Antonio; Álvarez, Daniel; Del Río, Laura; Cuello, Francisco; Buendía, Antonio J; Salinas, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the aetiological agent of atypical pneumonia in human can sometimes be a tedious process, especially in cases where Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species and Chlamydia pneumoniae are ruled out. In such cases, a correct anamnesis of the patient is basic to clarify which pathogens might have produced the infection. For this reason, health professionals including veterinarians and laboratory personnel working with zoonotic pathogens should keep their doctors informed. A human case of atypical pneumonia linked to Chlamydia abortus is reported. A 47-year-old male, a veterinarian researcher into chlamydiae, developed respiratory symptoms, breathing problems and high fever. Serological analyses ruled out the involvement of several respiratory pathogens, such as M. pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Rickettsia conorii and C. pneumoniae, and Chlamydia abortus was identified as the possible aetiological agent of the infection. The isolation of C. abortus from the patient's sputum and subsequent molecular analysis confirmed the presence of this microorganism. As far as we know, although C. abortus has not been previously described as capable of causing pneumonia in humans, this is the first reported case of atypical pneumonia in which C. abortus is thought to have played an aetiological role.

  20. Therapeutic Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum Vaccination Transiently Reduces Bovine Mastitis Associated with Chlamydophila Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Biesenkamp-Uhe, Carolin; Li, Yihang; Hehnen, Hans-Robert; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Infections with Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum are highly prevalent in cattle and have been associated with bovine mastitis. A prospective cohort study was conducted with a herd of 140 Holstein dairy cows to investigate the influence of Chlamydophila infection on subclinical inflammation of the bovine mammary gland as characterized by somatic cell numbers in milk. PCR detection of C. abortus and low serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila spp. were significantly associated with subclinical mastitis. To examine the effect of the infection by response modification, immune perturbation was done by two subcutaneous administrations of an experimental vaccine preparation of inactivated C. abortus and C. pecorum elementary bodies. Vaccination against Chlamydophila highly significantly decreased milk somatic cell numbers, thus reducing bovine mastitis, and increased antibody levels against Chlamydophila but did not eliminate shedding of C. abortus in milk as detected by PCR. The protective effect peaked at 11 weeks after vaccination and lasted for a total of 14 weeks. Vaccination with the Chlamydophila vaccine, a mock vaccine, or a combination vaccine against bovine viral diseases highly significantly increased C. abortus shedding in milk for 1 week, presumably mediated by the vaccine adjuvant. In summary, this study shows an etiological involvement of the widespread Chlamydophila infections in bovine mastitis, a herd disease of critical importance for the dairy industry. Furthermore, this investigation shows the potential for temporary improvement of chlamydial disease by therapeutic vaccination. Chlamydophila vaccination of cattle might serve as a testing ground for vaccines against human chlamydial infections. PMID:17118976

  1. Therapeutic Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum vaccination transiently reduces bovine mastitis associated with Chlamydophila infection.

    PubMed

    Biesenkamp-Uhe, Carolin; Li, Yihang; Hehnen, Hans-Robert; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Infections with Chlamydophila abortus and C. pecorum are highly prevalent in cattle and have been associated with bovine mastitis. A prospective cohort study was conducted with a herd of 140 Holstein dairy cows to investigate the influence of Chlamydophila infection on subclinical inflammation of the bovine mammary gland as characterized by somatic cell numbers in milk. PCR detection of C. abortus and low serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila spp. were significantly associated with subclinical mastitis. To examine the effect of the infection by response modification, immune perturbation was done by two subcutaneous administrations of an experimental vaccine preparation of inactivated C. abortus and C. pecorum elementary bodies. Vaccination against Chlamydophila highly significantly decreased milk somatic cell numbers, thus reducing bovine mastitis, and increased antibody levels against Chlamydophila but did not eliminate shedding of C. abortus in milk as detected by PCR. The protective effect peaked at 11 weeks after vaccination and lasted for a total of 14 weeks. Vaccination with the Chlamydophila vaccine, a mock vaccine, or a combination vaccine against bovine viral diseases highly significantly increased C. abortus shedding in milk for 1 week, presumably mediated by the vaccine adjuvant. In summary, this study shows an etiological involvement of the widespread Chlamydophila infections in bovine mastitis, a herd disease of critical importance for the dairy industry. Furthermore, this investigation shows the potential for temporary improvement of chlamydial disease by therapeutic vaccination. Chlamydophila vaccination of cattle might serve as a testing ground for vaccines against human chlamydial infections.

  2. Immunoproteomics of Brucella abortus RB51 as candidate antigens in serological diagnosis of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Sung, So-Ra; Lee, Kichan; Lee, Hyang-Keun; Kang, Sung-Il; Lee, Jin Ju; Jung, Suk Chan; Park, Yong Ho; Her, Moon

    2014-08-15

    The current brucellosis serodiagnostic assays are chiefly based on detecting anti-LPS (lipopolysaccharide) antibodies. However, cross-reaction with some gram-negative bacteria can occasionally induce due to similar O-polysaccharide (OPS) structure. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify new candidate antigens from Brucella abortus RB51, a mutant strain lacking the LPS portion, which might be valuable in brucellosis diagnosis. To detect potential antigens, immobilized pH gradients (IPG) strips with three ranges (pH 3-5.6, 4-7 and 6-11) were applied. After separating the insoluble proteins of B. abortus RB51 using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), their immunogenicity was evaluated by western blotting using four types of antisera - B. abortus, Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 and Escherichia coli O157:H7-positive, and B. abortus-negative bovine sera. Among the several immunogenic spots, the spots showing specific reactivity with only the B. abortus-positive antisera, were considered as candidate antigens. Overall, eleven immuno-reactive proteins were identified, as follows: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, histidinol dehydrogenase, chaperonin DnaK, chaperonin GroES, beta-ketoadipyl CoA thiolase, two-component response regulator, the cell-division protein FtsZ, aldehyde dehydrogenase, 50s ribosomal protein L10 and invasion protein B. These selected highly immunogenic protein spots might be useful as alternative antigens for brucellosis and helpful in reducing the cross-reactivity.

  3. Rapid and specific identification of Brucella abortus using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin Ju; Lee, Kichan; Sung, So-Ra; Jung, Suk Chan

    2015-06-01

    A rapid and accurate diagnosis of brucellosis is required to reduce and prevent the spread of disease among animals and the risk of transfer to humans. In this study, a Brucella abortus-specific (Ba) LAMP assay was developed, that had six primers designed from the BruAb2_0168 region of chromosome I. The specificity of this LAMP assay was confirmed with Brucella reference strains, B. abortus vaccine strains, B. abortus isolates and phylogenetically or serologically related strains. The detection limit of target DNA was up to 20 fg/μl within 60 min. The sensitivity of the new LAMP assay was equal to or slightly higher than other PCR based assays. Moreover, this Ba-LAMP assay could specifically amplify all B. abortus biovars compared to previous PCR assays. To our knowledge, this is the first report of specific detection of B. abortus using a LAMP assay. The Ba-LAMP assay can offer a rapid, sensitive and accurate diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in the field.

  4. Protective adaptive immunity to Chlamydophila abortus infection and control of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA).

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Mara S; Wattegedera, Sean; Meridiani, Ilaria; Entrican, Gary

    2009-03-16

    Ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) remains a major problem in sheep-rearing countries despite the availability of protective vaccines. The causative agent, Chlamydophila abortus, is a Gram-negative bacterium that can induce a persistent, subclinical infection in non-pregnant sheep. The development of a new safe, effective and practical vaccine requires a detailed understanding of host-pathogen interactions and the identification of clear correlates of protection. Since disease (abortion) is only observed during pregnancy, the nature of host immunity to C. abortus and the specialised immunological features that permit maternal acceptance of the semi-allogeneic fetus are central to the pathogenesis of OEA. We review the current literature on persistence of C. abortus, host immunity to infection and mechanisms of abortion. We identify the key outstanding questions surrounding OEA and discuss the current knowledge gaps with a view to developing improved control strategies.

  5. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Pires, Simone F.; Chapeaurouge, Alexander D.; Perales, Jonas; Santos, Renato L.; Andrade, Hélida M.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h) was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF). Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation. PMID:27104343

  6. Brucella abortus is Prevalent in Both Humans and Animals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A K M A; Saegerman, C; Berkvens, D; Melzer, F; Neubauer, H; Fretin, D; Abatih, E; Dhand, N; Ward, M P

    2017-01-09

    To determine the role of different Brucella (B.) spp. in Bangladesh, 62 animal samples and 500 human sera were tested. Animal samples from cattle, goats and sheep (including milk, bull semen, vaginal swabs and placentas) were cultured for Brucella spp. Three test-positive human sera and all animal samples were screened by Brucella genus-specific real-time PCR (RT-PCR), and positive samples were then tested by IS711 RT-PCR to detect B. abortus and B. melitensis DNA. Only B. abortus DNA was amplified from 13 human and six animal samples. This is the first report describing B. abortus as the aetiological agent of brucellosis in occupationally exposed humans in Bangladesh. Of note is failure to detect B. melitensis DNA, the species most often associated with human brucellosis worldwide. Further studies are required to explore the occurrence of Brucella melitensis in Bangladesh.

  7. Proteomic Profile of Brucella abortus-Infected Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants.

    PubMed

    Mol, Juliana P S; Pires, Simone F; Chapeaurouge, Alexander D; Perales, Jonas; Santos, Renato L; Andrade, Hélida M; Lage, Andrey P

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes significant economic losses worldwide. The differential proteomic profile of bovine chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants at early stages of infection with B. abortus (0.5, 2, 4, and 8 h) was determined. Analysis of CAM explants at 0.5 and 4 h showed the highest differences between uninfected and infected CAM explants, and therefore were used for the Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE). A total of 103 spots were present in only one experimental group and were selected for identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI/ToF-ToF). Proteins only identified in extracts of CAM explants infected with B. abortus were related to recognition of PAMPs by TLR, production of reactive oxygen species, intracellular trafficking, and inflammation.

  8. The Aggregation of Brucella abortus Occurs Under Microaerobic Conditions and Promotes Desiccation Tolerance and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Almirón, Marta A; Roset, Mara S; Sanjuan, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus causes brucellosis mainly in cattle. The infection is transmitted to humans by ingestion of animal products or direct contact with infected material. While the intracellular lifestyle of Brucella is well characterized, its extracellular survival is poorly understood. In nature, bacterial persistence is associated with biofilms, where aggregated cells are protected from adversity. The inability of Brucella abortus to aggregate under aerobiosis and that fact that the replicative niche of Brucella is characterized by microaerobic conditions prompted us to investigate the capacity of this pathogen to aggregate and grow in biofilms under microaerobiotic conditions. The results show that B. abortus aggregates and produces biofilms. The aggregates tolerate desiccation better than planktonic cells do, adhere and displace even in the absence of the lipopolysaccharide-O antigen, flagella, the transcriptional regulator VjbR, or the enzymes that synthesize, transport, and modify cyclic β (1,2) glucan.

  9. In silico functional elucidation of uncharacterized proteins of Chlamydia abortus strain LLG

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sharma, Dixit; Singh, Vikram; Rani, Jyoti; Marotta, Francessco; Kumar, Manoj; Mal, Gorakh; Singh, Birbal

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study reports structural modeling, molecular dynamics profiling of hypothetical proteins in Chlamydia abortus genome database. Methodology: The hypothetical protein sequences were extracted from C. abortus LLG Genome Database for functional elucidation using in silico methods. Results: Fifty-one proteins with their roles in defense, binding and transporting other biomolecules were unraveled. Forty-five proteins were found to be nonhomologous to proteins present in hosts infected by C. abortus. Of these, 31 proteins were related to virulence. The structural modeling of two proteins, first, WP_006344020.1 (phosphorylase) and second, WP_006344325.1 (chlamydial protease/proteasome-like activity factor) were accomplished. The conserved active sites necessary for the catalytic function were analyzed. Conclusion: The finally concluded proteins are envisioned as possible targets for developing drugs to curtail chlamydial infections, however, and should be validated by molecular biological methods. PMID:28344832

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Brucella abortus isolated from cattle in Brazil, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mayra Silva; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Soares, Paulo Martins Filho; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Orzil, Lívia; de Souza, Patrícia Gomes; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to genotype Brucella abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil between 2009 and 2013, and to analyze their distribution to support the Programa Nacional de Controle e Erradicação de Brucelose e Tuberculose (PNCEBT) (National Brucellosis and Tuberculosis Control and Eradication Program). One hundred forty B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil between 2009 and 2013 were genotyped using a set of 18 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) (MLVA16+HOOF-Print 3 and 4). The multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) composed by eight markers (MLVA8) revealed eight different genotypes among B. abortus strains, including five previously described and three new ones. Analysis of the MLVA16 loci revealed fifty-eight distinct genotypes, from which three were identical, thirty-eight were considered very close, and seventeen were considered distant compared to those previously described and deposited in MLVAbank. Analysis of the HOOF-Prints 3 and 4 revealed the larger number of different alleles among all VNTR assessed, exhibiting maximum resolution when associated with MLVA16 markers. This study also provides insights on the genotypes of B. abortus circulating in Brazil, which certainly contribute for the better understanding of the epidemiology and control of bovine brucellosis in the country. Moreover, our data showed a high genetic diversity among the B. abortus strains isolated between 2009 and 2013, and a close relationship among these strains and Brazilian B. abortus deposited by MLVAbank. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BetB) as an essential virulence factor of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Jae Hong; Kim, Dae Geun; Kim, Dong Hyeok; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Min, Won Gi; Rhee, Man Hee; Lim, Jong Hwan; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2014-01-10

    The pathogenic mechanisms of Brucellosis used to adapt to the harsh intracellular environment of the host cell are not fully understood. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of B. abortus betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BetB) (Gene Bank ID: 006932) using a betB deletion mutant constructed from virulent B. abortus 544. In test under stress conditions, including osmotic- and acid stress-resistance, the betB mutant had a lower osmotic-resistance than B. abortus wild-type. In addition, the betB mutant showed higher internalization rates compared to the wild-type strain; however, it also displayed replication failures in HeLa cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. During internalization, compared to the wild-type strain, the betB mutant was more adherent to the host surface and showed enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinases, two processes that promote phagocytic activity, in host cells. During intracellular trafficking, colocalization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was elevated in betB mutant-infected cells compared to the wild-type cells. In mice, the betB mutant was predominantly cleared from spleens compared to the wild-type strain after 2 weeks post-infection, and the vaccination test with the live betB mutant showed effective protection against challenge infection with the virulent wild-type strain. These findings suggested that the B. abortus betB gene substantially affects the phagocytic pathway in human phagocytes and in host cells in mice. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential use of the B. abortus betB mutant as a live vaccine for the control of brucellosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Epidemiology of brucellosis in domestic animals caused by Brucella melitensis, Brucella suis and Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Díaz Aparicio, E

    2013-04-01

    Brucellosis is a disease that causes severe economic losses for livestock farms worldwide. Brucella melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis, which are transmitted between animals both vertically and horizontally, cause abortion and infertility in their primary natural hosts - goats and sheep (B. melitensis), cows (B. abortus) and sows (B. suis). Brucella spp. infect not only their preferred hosts but also other domestic and wild animal species, which in turn can act as reservoirs of the disease for other animal species and humans. Brucellosis is therefore considered to be a major zoonosis transmitted by direct contact with animals and/or their secretions, or by consuming milk and dairy products.

  13. Murine and bovine γδ T cells enhance innate immunity against Brucella abortus infections.

    PubMed

    Skyberg, Jerod A; Thornburg, Theresa; Rollins, Maryclare; Huarte, Eduardo; Jutila, Mark A; Pascual, David W

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells have been postulated to act as a first line of defense against infectious agents, particularly intracellular pathogens, representing an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human γδ T cells expand in the blood of brucellosis patients and are active against Brucella in vitro. However, the role of γδ T cells in vivo during experimental brucellosis has not been studied. Here we report TCRδ(-/-) mice are more susceptible to B. abortus infection than C57BL/6 mice at one week post-infection as measured by splenic colonization and splenomegaly. An increase in TCRγδ cells was observed in the spleens of B. abortus-infected C57BL/6 mice, which peaked at two weeks post-infection and occurred concomitantly with diminished brucellae. γδ T cells were the major source of IL-17 following infection and also produced IFN-γ. Depletion of γδ T cells from C57BL/6, IL-17Rα(-/-), and GMCSF(-/-) mice enhanced susceptibility to B. abortus infection although this susceptibility was unaltered in the mutant mice; however, when γδ T cells were depleted from IFN-γ(-/-) mice, enhanced susceptibility was observed. Neutralization of γδ T cells in the absence of TNF-α did not further impair immunity. In the absence of TNF-α or γδ T cells, B. abortus-infected mice showed enhanced IFN-γ, suggesting that they augmented production to compensate for the loss of γδ T cells and/or TNF-α. While the protective role of γδ T cells was TNF-α-dependent, γδ T cells were not the major source of TNF-α and activation of γδ T cells following B. abortus infection was TNF-α-independent. Additionally, bovine TCRγδ cells were found to respond rapidly to B. abortus infection upon co-culture with autologous macrophages and could impair the intramacrophage replication of B. abortus via IFN-γ. Collectively, these results demonstrate γδ T cells are important for early protection to B. abortus infections.

  14. Genetic stability of Brucella abortus isolates from an outbreak by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus is one of the most important zoonoses in the world. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA16) has been shown be a useful tool to epidemiological traceback studies in B. abortus infection. Thus, the present study aimed (i) to evaluate the genetic diversity of B. abortus isolates from a brucellosis outbreak, and (ii) to investigate the in vivo stability of the MLVA16 markers. Results Three-hundred and seventy-five clinical samples, including 275 vaginal swabs and 100 milk samples, were cultured from a brucellosis outbreak in a cattle herd, which adopted RB51 vaccination and test-and-slaughter policies. Thirty-seven B. abortus isolates were obtained, eight from milk and twenty-nine from post-partum/abortion vaginal swabs, which were submitted to biotyping and genotyping by MLVA16. Twelve B. abortus isolates obtained from vaginal swabs were identified as RB51. Twenty four isolates, seven obtained from milk samples and seventeen from vaginal swabs, were identified as B. abortus biovar 3, while one isolate from vaginal swabs was identified as B. abortus biovar 1. Three distinct genotypes were observed during the brucellosis outbreak: RB observed in all isolates identified as RB51; W observed in all B. abortus biovar 3 isolates; and Z observed in the single B. abortus biovar 1 isolate. Epidemiological and molecular data show that the B. abortus biovar 1 genotype Z strain is not related to the B. abortus biovar 3 genotype W isolates, and represents a new introduction B. abortus during the outbreak. Conclusions The results of the present study on typing of multiple clinical B. abortus isolates from the same outbreak over a sixteen month period indicate the in vivo stability of MLVA16 markers, a low genetic diversity among B. abortus isolates and the usefulness of MLVA16 for epidemiological studies of bovine brucellosis. PMID:25015840

  15. Colonization of mouse placentas by Brucella abortus inoculated during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Bosseray, N.

    1980-01-01

    Pregnant mice were challenged at Day 3, 7, 11 or 15 of pregnancy with Brucella abortus Strain 544 and killed at Day 18 of pregnancy for the enumeration of brucella in the spleens and individual placentas. Whatever the route of challenge--i.p., i.v. or s.c. into the foot-pad (F-s.c.) no abortions or foetal deaths were observed. Placental colonization involved either all, none or only some of the placentas in the same uterus (partial placental colonization: 25% of the mice). In the latter case, the probability of colonization was the same for all sites of implantation. Placentas were independent units as regards colonization and bacterial proliferation. Placental colonization was expressed either by (1) the class of placental infection within the uterus, which might be total, partial or nil; (2) the ratio of infected to total placentas analysed per group; or (3) the mean degree of infection per group. Whatever means of expression was chosen, placental colonization increased with the dose of challenge in parallel with splenic infection in the mouse. The challenge doses required at Day 7 to infect 50% of the placentas differed according to the route (i.p. = 54; i.v. = 5.6 x 10(2) and F-s.c. = 3.6 x 10(4) brucella). Placentas were more frequently and more intensively colonized when the challenge was performed at Days 7 and 11 than at Days 3 and 15 at pregnancy. Mice immunized with H.38 B. melitensis killed vaccine 36 days before pregnancy were found to be protected against an i.p. challenge with 2 x 10(5) brucella at Day 7 of pregnancy. PMID:6775668

  16. Genetic characterization of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus geographical clusters in Italy.

    PubMed

    De Massis, Fabrizio; Garofolo, Giuliano; Cammà, Cesare; Ippoliti, Carla; Candeloro, Luca; Ancora, Massimo; Calistri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains isolated in 199 cattle and sheep from 156 brucellosis outbreaks which occurred in 8 regions of Southern Italy in 2011, was determined using a Multiple-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis approach. The existence of possible genetic clusters was verified through a hierarchical cluster analysis based on 'single link', which is closely related to the minimum spanning tree. The Hamming weighted distance matrix was adopted in the analysis. All calculations were performed using R and the additional libraries phangorn and Cluster. For a number of clusters, ranging from 2 to 15, the average silhouette width was calculated. The number of clusters adopted was identified according to the maximum average silhouette width. For B. abortus and B. melitensis, 6 and 11 genetic clusters were identified, respectively. Three out of 6 B. abortus clusters included the 96.7% of all B. abortus isolates. Clusters were clearly geographically separated, and this highlighted the known epidemiological links among them. Brucella melitensis genotypes resulted more heterogeneous; the 3 more representative genetic clusters included 79.7% of all B. melitensis isolates. A clear geographical clusterization of genotypes is recognizable only for 1 cluster, whereas the others are more widespread across Southern Italy. The genetic characterization of Brucella strains isolated from animals may be a useful tool to better understand the epidemiology and dissemination patterns of this pathogen through host populations.

  17. Highly Sensitive Bacteriophage-Based Detection of Brucella abortus in Mixed Culture and Spiked Blood

    PubMed Central

    Sergueev, Kirill V.; Filippov, Andrey A.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.

    2017-01-01

    For decades, bacteriophages (phages) have been used for Brucella species identification in the diagnosis and epidemiology of brucellosis. Traditional Brucella phage typing is a multi-day procedure including the isolation of a pure culture, a step that can take up to three weeks. In this study, we focused on the use of brucellaphages for sensitive detection of the pathogen in clinical and other complex samples, and developed an indirect method of Brucella detection using real-time quantitative PCR monitoring of brucellaphage DNA amplification via replication on live Brucella cells. This assay allowed the detection of single bacteria (down to 1 colony-forming unit per milliliter) within 72 h without DNA extraction and purification steps. The technique was equally efficient with Brucella abortus pure culture and with mixed cultures of B. abortus and α-proteobacterial near neighbors that can be misidentified as Brucella spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi and Afipia felis. The addition of a simple short sample preparation step enabled the indirect phage-based detection of B. abortus in spiked blood, with the same high sensitivity. This indirect phage-based detection assay enables the rapid and sensitive detection of live B. abortus in mixed cultures and in blood samples, and can potentially be applied for detection in other clinical samples and other complex sample types. PMID:28604602

  18. Penetration and intracellular growth of Brucella abortus in nonphagocytic cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Detilleux, P G; Deyoe, B L; Cheville, N F

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant ruminants, Brucella abortus localizes and replicates within the rough endoplasmic reticulum of trophoblastic epithelial cells. In this study, Vero cells were exposed to B. abortus to investigate its internalization and intracellular growth in nonphagocytic cells. A new double-fluorescence staining procedure to discriminate between extracellular and intracellular bacteria was developed. Studies with the double-fluorescence staining procedure and quantitative bacteriologic culture of disrupted host cells showed that various B. abortus strains replicated within Vero cells, including smooth virulent (strains 2308S and 544), smooth attenuated (strain 19), and rough (strains 45/20 and 2308R) strains. Rough brucellae were more adherent and entered a greater number of Vero cells. Intracellular replication occurred in a larger percentage of cells with smooth virulent (2308S and 544) strains than with smooth attenuated (19) or rough (45/20 and 2308R) strains. Differences in adhesiveness and invasiveness were correlated to hydrophobicity of the organism, as measured by hydrocarbon adherence. Ultrastructurally, intracellular smooth (2308S) and rough (45/20) brucellae were consistently found within cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope. The results suggest that transfer to the rough endoplasmic reticulum is the limiting step in the infection of nonphagocytic cells by B. abortus. Images PMID:2114362

  19. Invasion and replication of Brucella abortus in three different trophoblastic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Samartino, L E; Traux, R E; Enright, F M

    1994-06-01

    This study was performed to compare the replication of the pathogenic strain Brucella abortus 2308 in three trophoblastic cell lines derived bovine placentas at different gestational stages. The trophoblastic cell lines were obtained from a 13-15 day embryo, from 5-month placentomal tissue and from an 8-month extra-placentomal portion of the placenta. The infection rate was similar in all cell lines at 4 h. Colony-forming Units were counted at 4, 8, 12, 24 and 30 h post-inoculation. At 12, 16, 24 and 30 h B. abortus rapidly replicated within the 5-month and 8-month trophoblastic cell lines, but grew slowly within trophoblastic cells derived from embryonic tissue. Electron microscopic studies consistently showed clusters of B. abortus in trophoblastic cells derived from 5- and 8-month placentas, while few cells of the embryonic line were infected and these contained only 1-2 bacteria per cell. It was concluded that B. abortus can infect trophoblastic cells throughout the gestational period but bacterial multiplication does not occur in these cells before middle or late gestation.

  20. Characterization of a murine model of intranasal infection suitable for testing vaccines against C. abortus.

    PubMed

    Buendía, A J; Nicolás, L; Ortega, N; Gallego, M C; Martinez, C M; Sanchez, J; Caro, M R; Navarro, J A; Salinas, J

    2007-01-15

    Mouse models have been widely used to test candidate vaccines against Chlamydophila abortus infection in mice. Although the induction of a systemic infection by endogenous or intraperitoneal inoculation is a useful tool for understanding the immune mechanism involved in the protection conferred by the vaccination, a different approach is necessary to understand other factors of the infection, such as mucosal immunity or the colonization of target organs. To test whether C. abortus intranasal model of infection in mice is a useful tool for testing vaccines in a first group of experiments mice, were infected intranasally with C. abortus to characterize the model of infection. When this model was used to test vaccines, two inactivated experimental vaccines, one of them adjuvated with QS-21 and another with aluminium hydroxide, and a live attenuated vaccine (strain 1B) were used. Non-vaccinated control mice died within the first 8 days, after displaying substantial loss of weight. Histologically, the mice showed lobar fibrinopurulent bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Prior immunization with QS-21 adjuvated vaccine or 1B vaccine presented mortality and the recipients showed a greater number of T cells in the lesions, especially CD8(+) T cells, than the control mice and mice immunized with vaccine adjuvated with aluminium hydroxide. The results confirm that the C. abortus intranasal model of infection in mice is a useful tool for testing vaccines.

  1. On the link between cell cycle and infection of the Alphaproteobacterium Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Deghelt, Michaël; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; De Bolle, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the Brucella genus are responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. These bacteria are known to have a peculiar intracellular trafficking, with a first long and non-proliferative endosomal stage and a second proliferation stage, often associated with its localization of the bacteria in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the status of the bacterial cell cycle during the non-proliferative phase was still unknown. In a recent study [Nat. Communic. 5:4366], we followed the cell cycle of B. abortus in culture and inside the host cells. In culture, B. abortus initiates the replication of its large chromosome before the small chromosome. The origin and terminator regions of these two chromosomes display distinct localization and dynamics within B. abortus. In HeLa cells and RAW264.7 macrophages, the bacteria in G1 (i.e. before the initiation of chromosomes replication) are preferentially found during the endosomal stage of the infection. During this period, growth is also arrested. The cell cycle arrest and resume during the B. abortus trafficking in host cell suggest that like the model Alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, these bacteria are able to block their cell cycle at the G1 phase when starvation is sensed. PMID:28357212

  2. Highly Sensitive Bacteriophage-Based Detection of Brucella abortus in Mixed Culture and Spiked Blood.

    PubMed

    Sergueev, Kirill V; Filippov, Andrey A; Nikolich, Mikeljon P

    2017-06-10

    For decades, bacteriophages (phages) have been used for Brucella species identification in the diagnosis and epidemiology of brucellosis. Traditional Brucella phage typing is a multi-day procedure including the isolation of a pure culture, a step that can take up to three weeks. In this study, we focused on the use of brucellaphages for sensitive detection of the pathogen in clinical and other complex samples, and developed an indirect method of Brucella detection using real-time quantitative PCR monitoring of brucellaphage DNA amplification via replication on live Brucella cells. This assay allowed the detection of single bacteria (down to 1 colony-forming unit per milliliter) within 72 h without DNA extraction and purification steps. The technique was equally efficient with Brucella abortus pure culture and with mixed cultures of B. abortus and α-proteobacterial near neighbors that can be misidentified as Brucella spp., Ochrobactrum anthropi and Afipia felis. The addition of a simple short sample preparation step enabled the indirect phage-based detection of B. abortus in spiked blood, with the same high sensitivity. This indirect phage-based detection assay enables the rapid and sensitive detection of live B. abortus in mixed cultures and in blood samples, and can potentially be applied for detection in other clinical samples and other complex sample types.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Brucella abortus in Northern Ireland—1991 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Andrew; Mallon, Thomas; Skuce, Robin; Groussaud, Pauline; Dainty, Amanda; Graham, Judith; Jones, Kerri; Pollock, Lorraine; Whatmore, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses worldwide. Bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus has far reaching animal health and economic impacts at both the local and national levels. Alongside traditional veterinary epidemiology, the use of molecular typing has recently been applied to inform on bacterial population structure and identify epidemiologically-linked cases of infection. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat VNTR analysis (MLVA) was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of a well-characterised Brucella abortus epidemic in Northern Ireland involving 387 herds between 1991 and 2012. Results MLVA identified 98 unique B. abortus genotypes from disclosing isolates in the 387 herds involved in the epidemic. Clustering algorithms revealed the relatedness of many of these genotypes. Combined with epidemiological information on chronology of infection and geographic location, these genotype data helped to identify 7 clonal complexes which underpinned the outbreak over the defined period. Hyper-variability of some VNTR loci both within herds and individual animals led to detection of multiple genotypes associated with single outbreaks. However with dense sampling, these genotypes could still be associated with specific clonal complexes thereby permitting inference of epidemiological links. MLVA- based epidemiological monitoring data were congruent with an independent classical veterinary epidemiology study carried out in the same territory. Conclusions MLVA is a useful tool in ongoing disease surveillance of B. abortus outbreaks, especially when combined with accurate epidemiological information on disease tracings, geographical clustering of cases and chronology of infection. PMID:26325586

  4. Brucella abortus Exposure during an Orthopedic Surgical Procedure—New Mexico, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Megin; Thompson, Deborah; Carothers, Joshua T.; Klauber, Judy; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Guerra, Marta A.; Benoit, Tina J.; Traxler, Rita M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a periprosthetic Brucella abortus infection in a case-patient undergoing hip replacement revision surgery, and the subsequent investigation of laboratory and surgical staff exposures. Although exposures are rare, it is important to have infection prevention recommendations for surgical procedures among patients with suspected or unidentified Brucella spp. infection. PMID:25026630

  5. Abortion and premature birth in cattle following vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Fluegel Dougherty, Amanda M; Cornish, Todd E; O'Toole, Donal; Boerger-Fields, Amy M; Henderson, Owen L; Mills, Ken W

    2013-09-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is the vaccine strain currently licensed for immunizing cattle against brucellosis in the United States. Most cattle are vaccinated as heifer calves at 4-12 months of age. Adult cattle may be vaccinated in selected high-risk situations. Two herds of pregnant adult cattle in the brucellosis-endemic area of Wyoming were vaccinated with a standard label dose (1.0-3.4 × 10(10) organisms) of RB51. Reproductive losses in the vaccinated herds were 5.3% (herd A) and 0.6% (herd B) and included abortions, stillbirths, premature calves, and unbred cows (presumed early abortion). Brucella abortus was cultured from multiple tissues of aborted and premature calves (7/9), and from placenta. Isolates were identified as B. abortus strain RB51 by standard strain typing procedures and a species-specific polymerase chain reaction. Bronchopneumonia with intralesional bacteria and placentitis were observed microscopically. There was no evidence of involvement of other infectious or toxic causes of abortion. Producers, veterinarians, and laboratory staff should be alert to the risk of abortion when pregnant cattle are vaccinated with RB51, to potential human exposure, and to the importance of distinguishing field from vaccinal strains of B. abortus.

  6. Characterization and protective property of Brucella abortus cydC and looP mutants.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Kim, Suk; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-01

    Brucella abortus readily multiplies in professional or nonprofessional phagocytes in vitro and is highly virulent in mice. Isogenic mutants of B. abortus biovar 1 strain IVKB9007 lacking the ATP/GDP-binding protein motif A (P-loop) (named looP; designated here the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 mutant) and the ATP-binding/permease protein (cydC; designated here the IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutant) were identified and characterized by transposon mutagenesis using the mini-Tn5Km2 transposon. Both mutants were found to be virtually incapable of intracellular replication in both murine macrophages (RAW264.7) and the HeLa cell line, and their virulence was significantly impaired in BALB/c mice. Respective complementation of the IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants restored their ability to survive in vitro and in vivo to a level comparable with that of the wild type. These findings indicate that the cydC and looP genes play important roles in the virulence of B. abortus. In addition, intraperitoneal immunization of mice with a dose of the live IVKB9007 looP::Tn5 and IVKB9007 cydC::Tn5 mutants provided a high degree of protection against challenge with pathogenic B. abortus strain 544. Both mutants should be evaluated further as a live attenuated vaccine against bovine brucellosis for their ability to stimulate a protective immune response.

  7. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to saline (control; n=7) or single vaccination (n=24) with 1010 CFU of B. abortus strain RB51 (RB51). Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with 10**10 CFU of RB51 at 11 months after initial vaccination (n=16). When comp...

  8. Use of dried blood on filter paper in the ELISA for Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    McLean, G; Hilbink, F

    1989-09-29

    An ELISA for Brucella abortus antibody detection using blood collected on filter paper is described. The method gave similar results to the complement fixation test. The signal-noise ratio was good. The system offers considerable advantages when transport of serum samples to the laboratory causes problems.

  9. Identification of Immunologically Relevant Proteins of Chlamydophila abortus Using Sera from Experimentally Infected Pregnant Ewes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Marques, P. X.; Souda, Puneet; O'Donovan, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Gutierrez, E. J.; Worrall, S.; McElroy, M.; Proctor, A.; Brady, C.; Sammin, D.; Basset, H. F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Markey, B. E.; Nally, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is an intracellular pathogen and the etiological agent of enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE). C. abortus has a biphasic development cycle; extracellular infectious elementary bodies (EB) attach and penetrate host cells, where they give rise to intracellular, metabolically active reticulate bodies (RB). RB divide by binary fission and subsequently mature to EB, which, on rupture of infected cells, are released to infect new host cells. Pregnant ewes were challenged with 2 × 106 inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. abortus cultured in yolk sac (comprising both EB and RB). Serum samples were collected at 0, 7, 14, 21, 27, 30, 35, 40, and 43 days postinfection (dpi) and used to identify antigens of C. abortus expressed during disease. Additionally, sera from fetal lambs were collected at 30, 35, 40, and 43 dpi. All serum samples collected from experimentally infected pregnant ewes reacted specifically with several antigens of EB as determined by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D gel electrophoresis; reactive antigens identified by mass spectrometry included the major outer membrane protein (MOMP), polymorphic outer membrane protein (POMP), and macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) lipoprotein. PMID:20554807

  10. Experimental Infection of Richardson's Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii) with Attenuated and Virulent Strains of Brucella abortus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposure of non-target species to wildlife vaccines is an important concern when evaluating a candidate vaccine for use in the field. A previous investigation of the safety of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (sRB51) in various non-target species suggested that Richardson’s ground squirrels (Spermophil...

  11. Mice lacking components of adaptive immunity show increased Brucella abortus virB mutant colonization.

    PubMed

    Rolán, Hortensia García; Tsolis, Renée M

    2007-06-01

    The Brucella abortus type IV secretion system (T4SS), encoded by the virB genes, is essential for survival in mononuclear phagocytes in vitro. In the mouse model, a B. abortus virB mutant was initially able to colonize the spleen at the level of the wild type for approximately 3 to 5 days, which coincided with the development of adaptive immunity. To investigate the relationship between survival in macrophages cultivated in vitro and persistence in tissues in vivo, we tested the ability of mutant mice lacking components of adaptive immunity to eliminate the virB mutant from the spleen during a mixed infection with the B. abortus wild type. Ifng(-/-) or beta(2)m(-/-) mice were able to clear the virB mutant to the same degree as control mice. However, spleens of Rag1(-/-) mice and Igh6(-/-) mice were more highly colonized by the virB mutant than control mice after 14 to 21 days, suggesting that, in these mice, there is not an absolute requirement for the T4SS to mediate persistence of B. abortus in the spleen. Macrophages isolated from Igh6(-/-) mice killed the virB mutant to the same extent as macrophages from control mice, showing that the reduced ability of these mice to clear the virB mutant from the spleen does not correlate with diminished macrophage function in vitro. These results show that in the murine model host, the T4SS is required for persistence beyond 3 to 5 days after infection and suggest that the T4SS may contribute to evasion of adaptive immune mechanisms by B. abortus.

  12. Genetic diversity of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Kazakhstan using MLVA-16.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, Alexandr; Ramanculov, Erlan; Shevtsova, Elena; Kairzhanova, Alma; Tarlykov, Pavel; Filipenko, Maxim; Dymova, Maya; Abisheva, Gulzada; Jailbekova, Aygul; Kamalova, Dinara; Chsherbakov, Andrei; Tulegenov, Samat; Akhmetova, Assel; Sytnik, Igor; Karibaev, Talgat; Mukanov, Kasim

    2015-08-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic disease in Central Asia characterized by high infection rates in humans and animals. Currently, little is known about the genetic diversity of Brucella spp. circulating in the region, despite the high prevalence of brucellosis. This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains circulating in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We genotyped 128 B. melitensis and 124 B. abortus strains collected in regions with the highest prevalence of brucellosis. Genotyping was performed using multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Analysis of a subset of 8 loci (MLVA-8) of 128 B. melitensis strains identified genotypes 42 (n=108), 43 (n=2), and 63 (n=19) related to the 'East Mediterranean' group. An MLVA-16 assay sorted 128 B. melitensis strains into 25 different genotypes. Excluding one variable locus, MLVA-15 of B. melitensis was distinct from strains originating in the Mediterranean region; however, 77% of them were identical to strains isolated in China. A minimum spanning tree for B. melitensis using MLVA-15 analysis clustered the local strains together with strains previously collected in China. MLVA-8 analysis of 124 B. abortus strains identified them as genotype 36, suggesting Eurasian distribution of this lineage. Complete MLVA-16 assay analysis clustered the strains into five genotypes, revealing little diversity of B. abortus when compared on the global scale. A minimum spanning tree for B. abortus obtained using MLVA-15 analysis clustered the 2 most prevalent genotypes (n=117) together with strains previously collected in China. Thus, MLVA analysis was used to characterize 252 strains of Brucella collected in Kazakhstan. The analysis revealed genetic homogeneity among the strains. Interestingly, identical MLVA-15 profiles were found in seemingly unrelated outbreaks in China, Turkey, and Kazakhstan. Further analysis is needed for better understanding of the epidemiology of

  13. Examination of taxonomic uncertainties surrounding Brucella abortus bv. 7 by phenotypic and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Garin-Bastuji, Bruno; Mick, Virginie; Le Carrou, Gilles; Allix, Sebastien; Perrett, Lorraine L; Dawson, Claire E; Groussaud, Pauline; Stubberfield, Emma J; Koylass, Mark; Whatmore, Adrian M

    2014-03-01

    Brucella taxonomy is perpetually being reshuffled, at both the species and intraspecies levels. Biovar 7 of Brucella abortus was suspended from the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names Brucella classification in 1988, because of unpublished evidence that the reference strain 63/75 was a mixture of B. abortus biovars 3 and 5. To formally clarify the situation, all isolates previously identified as B. abortus bv. 7 in the AHVLA and ANSES strain collections were characterized by classical microbiological and multiple molecular approaches. Among the 14 investigated strains, including strain 63/75, only four strains, isolated in Kenya, Turkey, and Mongolia, were pure and showed a phenotypic profile in agreement with the former biovar 7, particularly agglutination with both anti-A/anti-M monospecific sera. These results were strengthened by molecular strategies. Indeed, genus- and species-specific methods allowed confirmation that the four pure strains belonged to the B. abortus species. The combination of most approaches excluded their affiliation with the recognized biovars (biovars 1 to 6 and 9), while some suggested that they were close to biovar 3.These assays were complemented by phylogenetic and/or epidemiological methods, such as multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis. The results of this polyphasic investigation allow us to propose the reintroduction of biovar 7 into the Brucella classification, with at least three representative strains. Interestingly, the Kenyan strain, sharing the same biovar 7 phenotype, was genetically divergent from other three isolates. These discrepancies illustrate the complexity of Brucella taxonomy. This study suggests that worldwide collections could include strains misidentified as B. abortus bv. 7, and it highlights the need to verify their real taxonomic position.

  14. Examination of Taxonomic Uncertainties Surrounding Brucella abortus bv. 7 by Phenotypic and Molecular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Garin-Bastuji, Bruno; Le Carrou, Gilles; Allix, Sebastien; Perrett, Lorraine L.; Dawson, Claire E.; Groussaud, Pauline; Stubberfield, Emma J.; Koylass, Mark; Whatmore, Adrian M.

    2014-01-01

    Brucella taxonomy is perpetually being reshuffled, at both the species and intraspecies levels. Biovar 7 of Brucella abortus was suspended from the Approved Lists of Bacterial Names Brucella classification in 1988, because of unpublished evidence that the reference strain 63/75 was a mixture of B. abortus biovars 3 and 5. To formally clarify the situation, all isolates previously identified as B. abortus bv. 7 in the AHVLA and ANSES strain collections were characterized by classical microbiological and multiple molecular approaches. Among the 14 investigated strains, including strain 63/75, only four strains, isolated in Kenya, Turkey, and Mongolia, were pure and showed a phenotypic profile in agreement with the former biovar 7, particularly agglutination with both anti-A/anti-M monospecific sera. These results were strengthened by molecular strategies. Indeed, genus- and species-specific methods allowed confirmation that the four pure strains belonged to the B. abortus species. The combination of most approaches excluded their affiliation with the recognized biovars (biovars 1 to 6 and 9), while some suggested that they were close to biovar 3.These assays were complemented by phylogenetic and/or epidemiological methods, such as multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis. The results of this polyphasic investigation allow us to propose the reintroduction of biovar 7 into the Brucella classification, with at least three representative strains. Interestingly, the Kenyan strain, sharing the same biovar 7 phenotype, was genetically divergent from other three isolates. These discrepancies illustrate the complexity of Brucella taxonomy. This study suggests that worldwide collections could include strains misidentified as B. abortus bv. 7, and it highlights the need to verify their real taxonomic position. PMID:24362435

  15. In Vitro Antibacterial Effects of Five Volatile Oil Extracts Against Intramacrophage Brucella Abortus 544

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Saour, George; Hamou, Razan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause a highly contagious disease in sheep, goats, cattle and one-humped camels. It is responsible for one of the most important zoonosis in human. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Mentha piperita, Origanum majorana, Citrus lemon, Cinnamomum verum and Myristica fragrans essential volatile oil extracts on human macrophages infected by B. abortus 544. Methods: Essential volatile oil extracts from M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon, C. verum and M. fragrans were extracted. Human macrophages were cultured at a density of 2×105 cells per well in sterile 96-well microtiter plates, and infected with B. abortus 544 at a ratio of 1:100 bacteria/cell. Then essential volatile oil extracts were added at a concentration of 1%. At specified times; cells were washed, lysed with 0.1% Triton, and plated on 2YT agar to determine the number of intracellular bacteria. Results: Cinnamomum verum volatile oil at a concentration of 1% had the highest antibacterial activity against B. abortus 544 inside human macrophages. Its inhibitory effect observed from 24 h and continued till 144 h after the infection. Moreover, C. verum (0.1%) in combination with 1% concentration of M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon or M. fragrans volatile oil extracts produced a synergistic inhibitory effect against B. abortus 544. Conclusion: The results indicate that, among the five selected oil extracts, C. verum volatile oil applied either separately or in combination with other oil extracts had the most effective antimicrobial activity against Brucella. PMID:23115441

  16. Intranasal Infection with Chlamydia abortus Induces Dose-Dependent Latency and Abortion in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Longbottom, David; Livingstone, Morag; Maley, Stephen; van der Zon, Arjan; Rocchi, Mara; Wilson, Kim; Wheelhouse, Nicholas; Dagleish, Mark; Aitchison, Kevin; Wattegedera, Sean; Nath, Mintu; Entrican, Gary; Buxton, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Latency is a key feature of the animal pathogen Chlamydia abortus, where infection remains inapparent in the non-pregnant animal and only becomes evident during a subsequent pregnancy. Often the first sign that an animal is infected is abortion occurring late in gestation. Despite this, little is understood of the underlying mechanisms that control latency or the recrudescence of infection that occurs during subsequent pregnancy. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model of latency by mimicking the natural route of infection through the intranasal inoculation of non-pregnant sheep with C. abortus. Methodology/Principal Findings Three groups of sheep (groups 1, 2 and 3) were experimentally infected with different doses of C. abortus (5×103, 5×105 and 5×107 inclusion forming units (IFU), respectively) prior to mating and monitored over 2 breeding cycles for clinical, microbiological, pathological, immunological and serological outcomes. Two further groups received either negative control inoculum (group 4a,b) or were inoculated subcutaneously on day 70 of gestation with 2×106 IFU C. abortus (group 5). Animals in groups 1, 2 and 5 experienced an abortion rate of 50–67%, while only one animal aborted in group 3 and none in group 4a,b. Pathological, microbiological, immunological and serological analyses support the view that the maternal protective immune response is influenced by initial exposure to the bacterium. Conclusions/Significance The results show that intranasal administration of non-pregnant sheep with a low/medium dose of C. abortus results in a latent infection that leads in a subsequent pregnancy to infection of the placenta and abortion. In contrast a high dose stimulates protective immunity, resulting in a much lower abortion rate. This model will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of infection underlying latency and onset of disease, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines for

  17. Characterization of genomic island 3 and genetic variability of Chilean field strains of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Sandra; Salgado, Paulina; Valenzuela, Patricio; Vidal, Roberto; Oñate, Angel A

    2011-07-01

    One of the capabilities developed by bacteria is the ability to gain large fragments of DNA from other bacteria or to lose portions of their own genomes. Among these exchangeable fragments are the genomic islands (GIs). Nine GIs have been identified in Brucella, and genomic island 3 (GI-3) is shared by two pathogenic species, B. melitensis and B. abortus. GI-3 encodes mostly unknown proteins. One of the aims of this study was to perform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on field isolates of B. abortus from Chile to determine whether these isolates are clonally related. Furthermore, we focused on the characterization of GI-3, studying its organization and the genetic conservation of the GI-3 sequence using techniques such as tiling-path PCR (TP-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR). Our results, after PFGE was performed on 69 field isolates of B. abortus from Chile, showed that the strains were genetically homogeneous. To increase the power of genetic discrimination among these strains, we used multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis with 16 loci (MLVA-16). The results obtained by MLVA-16 showed that the strains of B. abortus were genetically heterogeneous and that most of them clustered according to their geographic origin. Of the genetic loci studied, panel 2B was the one describing the highest diversity in the analysis, as well as locus Bruce19 in panel 2A. In relation to the study of GI-3, our experimental analysis by TP-PCR identified and confirmed that GI-3 is present in all wild strains of B. abortus, demonstrating the high stability of gene cluster GI-3 in Chilean field strains.

  18. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and he...

  19. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus I. A water soluble antigen precipitated by sera of some naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1977-01-01

    Selected sera from cattle naturally infected with Brucella abortus precipitate water soluble antigens extracted by sonication from B. abortus. One of these antigens resembles antigen E (Baughn and Freeman) as it is excluded from Sephadex G-200 gels, migrates anodally when electrophoresed at pH 8.6, resists heating at 100 degrees C for ten minutes and appears to be susceptible to papain digestion. Precipitins specific for this antigen remained in sera from which all detectable Brucella agglutinating antibody had been removed by adsorption with live or heat killed B. abortus. The antigen has been extracted from smooth and rough strains of B abortus. Precipitins specific for this antigen have been detected in antisera produced against Brucella canis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:405088

  20. Molecular typing of isolates obtained from aborted foetuses in Brucella-free Holstein dairy cattle herd after immunisation with Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Böttcher, Denny; El-Diasty, Mohamed; El-Beskawy, Mohamed; Rasheed, Nesma; Schmoock, Gernot; Roesler, Uwe; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis is endemic in Egypt in spite of application of surveillance and control measures. An increase of abortions was reported in a Holstein dairy cattle herd with 600 animals in Damietta governorate in Egypt after immunisation with Brucella (B.) abortus RB51 vaccine. Twenty one (10.6%) of 197 vaccinated cows aborted after 3 months. All aborted cows had been tested seronegative for brucellosis in the past 3 years. B. abortus was isolated from four foetuses. Conventional biochemical and bacteriological identification and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed two B. abortus biovar (bv.) 1 smooth and two B. abortus rough strains. None of the B. abortus isolates were identified as RB51. Genotyping analysis by multiple locus of variable number tandem repeats analysis based on 16 markers (MLVA-16) revealed two different profiles with low genetic diversity. B. abortus bv1 was introduced in the herd and caused abortions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Naturally occurring lesions of the uterine tube in sheep and serologic evidence of exposure to Chlamydophila abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, L; Barker, I K; Foster, R A; McEwen, S A; Menzies, P I; Shewen, P E

    2000-01-01

    The uterine tubes from 405 ewes, collected at an abattoir, were assessed grossly and microscopically for abnormalities that correlated with serological evidence of exposure to Chlamydophila abortus. Gross lesions were found in 41 ewes and 86 had microscopic lesions. Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of serum was used as an indication of exposure of individual ewes to C. abortus; 52 were found to be positive. Chi-squared analysis indicated no association between EIA-positive animals and lesions of the uterine tube. PMID:11041501

  2. Effects of partial deletion of the wzm and wzt genes on lipopolysaccharide synthesis and virulence of Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuran; Wang, Lin; Lu, Tiancheng; Yang, Yanling; Chen, Si; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xulong; Yan, Guangmou; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xiaoxu; Meng, Lingyi; Wang, Xinglong

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide human and animal infectious disease, and the effective methods of its control are immunisation of animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines with virulence in the control of cattle Brucellosis. In the present study, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes and partial knockout mutants of wzm and wzt were constructed to evaluate the resulting difference in virulence of B. abortus S19. PCR analysis revealed that the target genes were knocked out. The mutants were rough mutants and they could be differentiated from natural infection by the Rose Bengal plate and standard agglutination tests. The molecular weights of lipopolysaccharides of the Δwzm and Δwzt mutants were clustered between 25 and 40 kDa, and 30 and 35 kDa separately, and were markedly different from those in B. abortus S19. The virulence of B. abortus Δwzm and Δwzt was decreased compared with that of B. abortus S19 in mice. All these results identified that there were several differences between the wzm and wzt genes on lipopolysaccharide synthesis and on the virulence of B. abortus.

  3. Genotyping of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus strains currently circulating in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Jun; Di, Dong-Dong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Cheng; Yan, Hao; Tian, Li-Li; Jing, Zhi-Gang; Li, Jin-Ping; Jiang, Hai; Fan, Wei-Xing

    2016-10-01

    Brucellosis is a well-known zoonotic disease that can cause severe economic and healthcare losses. Xinjiang, one of the biggest livestock husbandry sectors in China, has gone through increasing incidence of brucellosis in cattle and small ruminants recently. In this paper, 50 B. melitensis strains and 9 B. abortus strains collected from across Xinjiang area (from 2010 to 2015) were genotyped using multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Based on 8 loci (MLVA-8), 50 B. melitensis strains were classified into three genotypes. Genotypes 42 (n=38, 76%) and 63 (n=11, 22%) were part of the East Mediterranean group, and one genotype with pattern of 1-5-3-13-2-4-3-2 represents a single-locus variant from genotype 63. MLVA-16 resolved 50 B. melitensis strains into 28 genotypes, of which 15 are unique to Xinjiang and 10 are in common with those in adjacent country Kazakhstan and neighboring provinces of China. Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) analysis implies that B. melitensis strains collected from across Kazakhstan, Xinjiang and China areas may share a common origin. Nine B. abortus strains were sorted into three genotypes by MLVA-8, genotypes 36 (n=7, 77.8%), 86 (n=1, 11.1%) and a new genotype with pattern of 4-5-3-13-2-2-3-1. Each B. abortus strain showed distinct MLVA-16 genotypes, suggesting that B. abortus species may possess more genetic diversity than B. melitensis. Using MLST, most B. melitensis strains (n=49) were identified as sequence type ST8, and most B. abortus strains (n=8) were recognized as ST2. Two new sequence types, ST37 and ST38, represented by single strain from B. melitensis and B. abortus species respectively, were also detected in this study. These results could facilitate the pathogen surveillance in the forthcoming eradication programs and serve as a guide in source tracking in case of new outbreaks occur.

  4. Occurrence of oxidative stress in dairy cows seropositives for Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Perin, Géssica; Fávero, Juscivete F; Severo, Diego R T; Silva, Anielen D; Machado, Gustavo; Araújo, Hugo L; Lilenbaum, Walter; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Jordão, Ricardo S; Stefani, Lenita M; Bottari, Nathieli B; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2017-09-01

    Bovine brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus that leads to economic losses due to animal discard and commercial restrictions. Since positive animals for brucellosis are culled, little is known about the pathogenesis of this disease. Therefore, the aims of this study were to evaluate possible changes in the activity of deaminase adenosine (ADA) and the oxidative stress in cows seropositives for brucellosis (Experiment I), and to evaluate the seroprevalence of B. abortus in dairy cows from the Western state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil (Experiment II). The Experiment I evaluated 20 pregnant cows: ten seropositives for B. abortus and ten seronegatives that were used as controls. The ADA activity and markers of oxidative stress (TBARS, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) were evaluated in these animals. A reduction in the activity of ADA and catalase enzymes in seropositive animals was observed (p < 0.001). Conversely, there was an increase in TBARS levels and superoxide dismutase activity in cows infected by B. abortus (p < 0.001). The presence of oxidative stress and a reduction of ADA might be related to the modulation of the inflammatory response. The experiment II was performed due to a high number of herds with restrictions imposed by cases of brucellosis in the state of Santa Catarina in the last two years, and thus, the seroprevalence for B. abortus was evaluated in 1242 serum samples of cows of 69 herds. The serodiagnosis was performed using two tests: buffered acidified antigen and 2-mercaptoethanol. However, none of the serum samples were positive for B. abortus. Although we did not find seropositive animals for brucellosis in our study, the disease still requires continued surveillance, due to its economic impact, and to the oxidative stress caused by it, which may have contributed to cases of abortion in three seropositive cows (Experiment I) in the final third of the gestation

  5. Prime-booster vaccination of cattle with an influenza viral vector Brucella abortus vaccine induces a long-term protective immune response against Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2016-01-20

    This study analyzed the duration of the antigen-specific humoral and T-cell immune responses and protectiveness of a recently-developed influenza viral vector Brucella abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing Brucella proteins Omp16 and L7/L12 and containing the adjuvant Montadine Gel01 in cattle. At 1 month post-booster vaccination (BV), both humoral (up to 3 months post-BV; GMT IgG ELISA titer 214±55 to 857±136, with a prevalence of IgG2a over IgG1 isotype antibodies) and T-cell immune responses were observed in vaccinated heifers (n=35) compared to control animals (n=35, injected with adjuvant/PBS only). A pronounced T-cell immune response was induced and maintained for 12 months post-BV, as indicated by the lymphocyte stimulation index (2.7±0.4 to 10.1±0.9 cpm) and production of IFN-γ (13.7±1.7 to 40.0±3.0 ng/ml) at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-BV. Prime-boost vaccination provided significant protection against B. abortus infection at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months (study duration) post-BV (7 heifers per time point; alpha=0.03-0.01 vs. control group). Between 57.1 and 71.4% of vaccinated animals showed no signs of B. abortus infection (or Brucella isolation) at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-BV; the severity of infection, as indicated by the index of infection (P=0.0003 to <0.0001) and rates of Brucella colonization (P=0.03 to <0.0001), was significantly lower for vaccinated diseased animals than appropriate control animals. Good protection from B. abortus infection was also observed among pregnant vaccinated heifers (alpha=0.03), as well as their fetuses and calves (alpha=0.01), for 12 months post-BV. Additionally, 71.4% of vaccinated heifers calved successfully whereas all pregnant control animals aborted (alpha=0.01). Prime-boost vaccination of cattle with Flu-BA induces an antigen-specific humoral and pronounced T cell immune response and most importantly provides good protectiveness, even in pregnant heifers, for at least 12 months post-BV.

  6. Vector Development for the Expression of Foreign Proteins in the Vaccine Strain Brucella abortus S19

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, Diego J.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Vigliocco, Ana M.; Frasch, Alberto C. C.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    A vector for the expression of foreign antigens in the vaccine strain Brucella abortus S19 was developed by using a DNA fragment containing the regulatory sequences and the signal peptide of the Brucella bcsp31 gene. This fragment was cloned in broad-host-range plasmid pBBR4MCS, resulting in plasmid pBEV. As a reporter protein, a repetitive antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. The recombinant fusion protein is stably expressed and secreted into the Brucella periplasmic space, inducing a good antibody response against the T. cruzi antigen. The expression of the repetitive antigen in Brucella neither altered its growth pattern nor generated a toxic or lethal effect during experimental infection. The application of this strategy for the generation of live recombinant vaccines and the tagging of B. abortus S19 vaccine is discussed. This is the first time that a recombinant protein has been expressed in the periplasm of brucellae. PMID:9673273

  7. A case of unusual septic knee arthritis with Brucella abortus after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Hyunseong; Kim, Taejung; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    We present a 51-year-old male patient with Brucella abortus septic arthritis in the right knee following arthroscopic meniscus surgery. He had eaten a traditional dish of raw minced cattle conceptus (bovine fetus) that was prepared after the cow was slaughtered. Despite treatment with empirical antibiotics and debridement of the postoperative surgical wound, the infection persisted without improvement. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing identified Brucella abortus from tissue samples obtained from the patient. After confirmation of the diagnosis of brucellar infection, antibiotics were replaced with doxycycline and rifampin, which were used for 4 months. In patients with a non-specific arthralgia who eat raw meat or live close to animals, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis due to infection with Brucella spp.

  8. Infection of cattle in Kenya with Brucella abortus biovar 3 and Brucella melitensis biovar 1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Muendo, Esther N; Mbatha, Peter M; Macharia, Joseph; Abdoel, Theresia H; Janszen, Paul V; Pastoor, Rob; Smits, Henk L

    2012-01-01

    Brucella melitensis biovar 1 was isolated from bovine milk samples from a herd in central Kenya, and Brucella abortus biovar 3 was isolated from aborted fetus materials and vaginal discharge fluids from cattle in central and eastern provinces of Kenya. All infections including those with B. melitensis were in cattle with reproductive problems kept in mixed herds indicating that cross infection occurs from small ruminants. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis genotyping revealed a close molecular homology of the B. melitensis isolates with an isolate from Israel and a close homology of the B. abortus isolates with an isolate from Uganda indicating that these genotypes have a wide geographic distribution. Infection of cattle with B. melitensis may complicate the control of brucellosis in this country.

  9. Comparative proteome analysis of laboratory grown Brucella abortus 2308 and Brucella melitensis 16M.

    PubMed

    Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Wagner, Mary Ann; Mujer, Cesar V; Miller-Scandle, Tabbi L; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2006-07-01

    Brucella species are pathogenic agents that cause brucellosis, a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects a large variety of domesticated animals and humans. Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus are considered major health threats because of their highly infectious nature and worldwide occurrence. The availability of the annotated genomes for these two species has allowed a comparative proteomics study of laboratory grown B. melitensis 16M and B. abortus 2308 by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Computer-assisted analysis of the different 2-D gel images of strains 16M and 2308 revealed significant quantitative and qualitative differences in their protein expression patterns. Proteins involved in membrane transport, particularly the high affinity amino acids binding proteins, and those involved in Sec-dependent secretion systems related to type IV and type V secretion systems, were differentially expressed. Differential expression of these proteins may be responsible for conferring specific host preference in the two strains 2308 and 16M.

  10. Predator or prey? Chlamydophila abortus infections of a free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellani 9GU.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Mirjam; Polkinghorne, Adam; Dumrese, Claudia; Ziegler, Urs; Greub, Gilbert; Pospischil, Andreas; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2008-05-01

    Limited evidence exists to suggest that the ability to invade and escape protozoan host cell bactericidal activity extends to members of the Chlamydiaceae, intracellular pathogens of humans and animals and evolutionary descendants of amoeba-resisting Chlamydia-like organisms. PCR and microscopic analyses of Chlamydophila abortus infections of Acanthamoeba castellani revealed uptake of this chlamydial pathogen but, unlike the well-described inhabitant of A. castellani, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, Cp. abortus did not appear to propagate and is likely digested by its amoebal host. These data raise doubts about the ability of free-living amoebae to serve as hosts and vectors of pathogenic members of the Chlamydiaceae but reveal opportunities, via comparative genomics, to understand virulence mechanisms used by Chlamydia-like organisms to avoid amoebal digestion.

  11. Chlamydophila abortus infection in the mouse: a useful model of the ovine disease.

    PubMed

    Caro, M R; Buendía, A J; Del Rio, L; Ortega, N; Gallego, M C; Cuello, F; Navarro, J A; Sanchez, J; Salinas, J

    2009-03-16

    Chlamydophila (C.) abortus is an obligate intracellular bacterium able to colonize the placenta of several species of mammals, which may induce abortion in the last third of pregnancy. The infection affects mainly small ruminants resulting in major economic losses in farming industries worldwide. Furthermore, its zoonotic risk has been reported in pregnant farmers or abattoir workers. Mouse models have been widely used to study both the pathology of the disease and the role of immune cells in controlling infection. Moreover, this animal experimental model has been considered a useful tool to evaluate new vaccine candidates and adjuvants that could prevent abortion and reduce fetal death. Future studies using these models will provide and reveal information about the precise mechanisms in the immune response against C. abortus and will increase the knowledge about poorly understood issues such as chlamydial persistence.

  12. Seroprevalence of Brucella abortus and B. canis in household dogs in southwestern Nigeria: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, S I B; Adesokan, H K; Ajala, O O; Odetokun, W O; Perrett, L L; Stack, J A

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary serological study of 366 household dogs in Lagos and Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria, was carried out to determine antibodies due to exposure to Brucella abortus and B. canis, using the rose bengal test (RBT) and the rapid slide agglutination (RSA) test, respectively. Results showed that 5.46 % (20/366) and 0.27 % (1/366) of the dogs screened were seropositive to B. abortus and B. canis, respectively. Of all dogs, 36 had a history of being fed foetuses from cows and 11 (30.6 %) of these tested positive in the RBT. Our findings, although based on a limited sample size and a dearth of clinical details, revealed that dogs in Nigeria may be infected with Brucella spp. given the wide range of risk factors. Further studies are recommended to elucidate the epidemiology of brucellosis in dogs and its possible zoonotic consequences in the country.

  13. Immunogenic response induced by wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants from Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ran; Yan, Guang-Mou; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xu-Long; Yang, Yan-Ling; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Si; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xing-Long

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease affecting humans and animals worldwide. Effective methods of control include inducing immunity in animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines for control of cattle brucellosis, as it has low virulence. In this paper, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes were constructed and partially knocked out to evaluate the effects on the induction of immunity to Brucella abortus S19 mutants. Cytokine secretion in vitro, INF-γ induction in vivo and antibody dynamics were evaluated. These data suggested that the immunity-eliciting ability of the wzm and wzt gene deletion mutants was similar, although reduced compared with the S19 strain. The results demonstrated that the wzt gene may be more important in the regulation of the induction of immunity than the wzm gene.

  14. Seroprevalence of antibodies to Chlamydophila abortus in Ovine in the State of Alagoas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro Junior, José Wilton; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Piatti, Rosa Maria; Oliveira, Andréa Alice da Fonseca; da Silva, Aline Melo; de Oliveira Abreu, Sílvio Romero; Anderlini, Giulliano Aires; Valença, Rômulo Menna Barreto

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a seroepidemiological investigation and to identify risk factors associated with infection of Chlamydophila abortus of sheep herds in the Brazilian state of Alagoas. The study was conducted with samples of 274 ewes with ages equal to or higher than 24 months in 25 herds and in 23 towns located in three regions of the state (Sertão, Agreste and Eastern Alagoas). Anti-C. abortus antibodies were detected using the microcomplement fixation test. The risk factors, were determined based on questionnaires consisting of objective questions, about the farmer and general characteristics of the herd like size, sanitary situation and reproductive management. Among 274 sera samples analyzed for C. abortus, 59 (21.5%) were positive with titers ≥32, 187 (68.3%) negative and 28 (10.2%) suspect with titers ≥16. In the 23 towns studied, 20 had positive animals. Among herds 21 (77.7%) of had positive animals. The only variable which appeared to be significant in the multivariate analysis was the region, and Sertão was the most significant (p<0.001; OR=3.48; T.I. 1.79 – 6.76). Results indicate that infection by Chlamydophila abortus is widespread on sheep farms in the State of Alagoas. Others studies, however, have to be conducted to isolate the agent in order to confirm the role of the bacteria is reproductive disturbances in sheeps. In addition to that, control and prophylactic measures along with health promoting programs have to be encouraged on the studied farms so that infection reates are reduced. PMID:24031504

  15. Heterologous expression of Brucella abortus GroEL heat-shock protein in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Anderson; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Ribeiro, Luciana A; Le Loir, Yves; Oliveira, Sérgio C; Langella, Philippe; Azevedo, Vasco

    2006-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular pathogen that mainly infects cattle and humans. Current vaccines rely on live attenuated strains of B. abortus, which can revert to their pathogenic status and thus are not totally safe for use in humans. Therefore, the development of mucosal live vaccines using the food-grade lactic acid bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, as an antigen delivery vector, is an attractive alternative and a safer vaccination strategy against B. abortus. Here, we report the construction of L. lactis strains genetically modified to produce B. abortus GroEL heat-shock protein, a candidate antigen, in two cellular locations, intracellular or secreted. Results Only the secreted form of GroEL was stably produced in L. lactis, suggesting a detrimental effect of GroEL protein when intracellularly produced in this bacterium. Only trace amounts of mature GroEL were detected in the supernatant fraction of induced lactococcal cultures, and the GroEL precursor remained stacked in the cell fraction. Attempts to raise the secretion yields were made, but even when GroEL was fused to a synthetic propeptide, secretion of this antigen was not improved. Conclusion We found that L. lactis is able to produce, and to secrete, a stable form of GroEL into the extracellular medium. Despite the low secretion efficiency of GroEL, which suggest that this antigen interacts with the cell envelope of L. lactis, secretion seems to be the best way to achieve both production and protein yields, regardless of cellular location. The L. lactis strain secreting GroEL has potential for in vivo immunization. PMID:16556312

  16. Epidemiology of Brucellosis and Genetic Diversity of Brucella abortus in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsova, Elena; Shevtsov, Alexandr; Mukanov, Kasim; Filipenko, Maxim; Kamalova, Dinara; Sytnik, Igor; Syzdykov, Marat; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Akhmetova, Assel; Zharova, Mira; Karibaev, Talgat; Tarlykov, Pavel; Ramanculov, Erlan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a major zoonotic infection in Kazakhstan. However, there is limited data on its incidence in humans and animals, and the genetic diversity of prevalent strains is virtually unstudied. Additionally, there is no detailed overview of Kazakhstan brucellosis control and eradication programs. Here, we analyzed brucellosis epidemiological data, and assessed the effectiveness of eradication strategies employed over the past 70 years to counteract this infection. We also conducted multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of Brucella abortus strains found in Kazakhstan. We analyzed official data on the incidence of animal brucellosis in Kazakhstan. The records span more than 70 years of anti-brucellosis campaigns, and contain a brief description of the applied control strategies, their effectiveness, and their impact on the incidence in humans. The MLVA-16 method was used to type 94 strains of B. abortus and serial passages of B. abortus 82, a strain used in vaccines. MLVA-8 and MLVA-11 analyses clustered strains into a total of four and seven genotypes, respectively; it is the first time that four of these genotypes have been described. MLVA-16 analysis divided strains into 28 distinct genotypes having genetic similarity coefficient that varies from 60 to100% and a Hunter & Gaston diversity index of 0.871. MST analysis reconstruction revealed clustering into "Kazakhstani-Chinese (Central Asian)", "European" and "American" lines. Detection of multiple genotypes in a single outbreak confirms that poorly controlled trade of livestock plays a crucial role in the spread of infection. Notably, the MLVA-16 profile of the B. abortus 82 strain was unique and did not change during 33 serial passages. MLVA genotyping may thus be useful for epidemiological monitoring of brucellosis, and for tracking the source(s) of infection. We suggest that countrywide application of MLVA genotyping would improve the control of brucellosis in Kazakhstan. PMID

  17. A rapid cycleave PCR method for distinguishing the vaccine strain Brucella abortus A19 in China.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenlong; Zhang, Yueyong; Tan, Pengfei; Xu, Zouliang; Chen, Yuqi; Mao, Kairong; Chen, Yiping

    2016-05-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. Immunization with attenuated vaccines has proved to be an effective method of prevention; however, it may also interfere with diagnosis. Brucella abortus strain A19, which is homologous to B. abortus strain S19, is widely used for the prevention of bovine brucellosis in China. For effective monitoring of the control of brucellosis, it is essential to distinguish A19 from field strains. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-based assays offer a new approach to such discrimination studies. In the current study, we developed a cycleave PCR assay that successfully distinguished attenuated vaccine strains A19 and S19 from 22 strains of B. abortus and 57 strains of 5 other Brucella species. The assay gave a negative reaction with 4 non-Brucella species. The minimum sensitivity of the assay, evaluated using 10-fold dilutions of chromosomal DNA, was 7.6 fg for the A19 strain and 220 fg for the single non-A19/non-S19 Brucella strain tested (B. abortus 104M). The assay was also reproducible (intra- and interassay coefficients of variation: 0.003-0.01 and 0.004-0.025, respectively). The cycleave assay gave an A19/S19-specific reaction in 3 out of 125 field serum samples, with the same 3 samples being positive in an alternative A19/S19-specific molecular assay. The cycleave assay gave a total of 102 Brucella-specific reactions (3 being the A19/S19-specific reactions), whereas an alternative Brucella-specific assay gave 92 positive reactions (all also positive in the cycleave assay). Therefore, this assay represents a simple, rapid, sensitive, and specific tool for use in brucellosis control.

  18. Virulent Brucella abortus prevents lysosome fusion and is distributed within autophagosome-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Pizarro-Cerdá, J; Moreno, E; Sanguedolce, V; Mege, J L; Gorvel, J P

    1998-05-01

    Virulent and attenuated Brucella abortus strains attach to and penetrate nonprofessional phagocytic HeLa cells. Compared to pathogenic Brucella, the attenuated strain 19 hardly replicates within cells. The majority of the strain 19 bacteria colocalized with the lysosome marker cathepsin D, suggesting that Brucella-containing phagosomes had fused with lysosomes, in which they may have degraded. The virulent bacteria prevented lysosome-phagosome fusion and were found distributed in the perinuclear region within compartments resembling autophagosomes.

  19. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.; Winter, A.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 {times} 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peak differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished.

  20. Transposon-Derived Brucella abortus Rough Mutants Are Attenuated and Exhibit Reduced Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Chris A.; Adams, L. Garry; Ficht, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    The O antigen of Brucella abortus has been described as a major virulence determinant based on the attenuated survival of fortuitously isolated rough variants. However, the lack of genetic definition of these mutants and the virulence of naturally occurring rough species, Brucella ovis and Brucella canis, has confused interpretation. To better characterize the role of O antigen in virulence and survival, transposon mutagenesis was used to generate B. abortus rough mutants defective in O-antigen presentation. Sequence analysis of DNA flanking the site of Tn5 insertion was used to verify insertion in genes encoding lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic functions. Not surprisingly, each of the rough mutants was attenuated for survival in mice, but unexpected differences among the mutants were observed. In an effort to define the basis for the observed differences, the structure of the rough LPS and the sensitivity of these mutants to individual killing mechanisms were examined in vitro. All of the B. abortus rough mutants exhibited a 4- to 5-log-unit increase, compared to the smooth parental strain, in sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. Little change was evident in the sensitivity of these organisms to hydrogen peroxide, consistent with an inability of O antigen to exclude relatively small molecules. Sensitivity to polymyxin B, which was employed as a model cationic, amphipathic peptide similar to defensins found in phagocytic cells, revealed survival differences among the rough mutants similar to those observed in the mouse. One mutant in particular exhibited hypersensitivity to polymyxin B and reduced survival in mice. This mutant was characterized by a truncated rough LPS. DNA sequence analysis of this mutant revealed a transposon interruption in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase (pmm), suggesting that this activity may be required for the synthesis of a full-length core polysaccharide in addition to O antigen. B. abortus O antigen appears to be essential

  1. Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination in elk. I. Efficacy of reduced dosage.

    PubMed

    Cook, Walter E; Williams, Elizabeth S; Thorne, E Tom; Kreeger, Terry J; Stout, Glen; Bardsley, Katie; Edwards, Hank; Schurig, Gerhardt; Colby, Lesley A; Enright, Fred; Elzer, Philip H

    2002-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is a serious zoonotic disease affecting some populations of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and bison (Bison bison) in the Greater Yellowstone Area, USA. The fear that elk and/or bison may spread Brucella abortus to livestock has prompted efforts to reduce or eliminate the disease in wildlife. Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine has recently been approved for use in cattle. Unlike strain 19 vaccine, RB51 does not cause false positive reactions on standard brucellosis serologic tests. If effective, it may become the vaccine of choice for wildlife. In February 1995, 45 serologically negative female elk calves were trapped and taken to the Sybille Wildlife Research and Conservation Education Unit near Wheatland, Wyoming, USA. In May 1995, 16 of these elk calves were hand-vaccinated with 1 x 10(9) colony forming units (CFU) of RB51, 16 were vaccinated with 1 x 10(8) CFU RB51 by biobullet, and 13 were given a saline placebo. The elk were bred in fall of 1996 and they were challenged with 1 x 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival inoculation in March 1997. Thirteen (100%) control elk aborted, 14 (88%) hand-vaccinated elk aborted, and 12 (75%) biobullet vaccinated elk aborted or produced nonviable calves. These results suggest that a single dose of 1 x 10(8) to 1 x 10(9) CFU RB51 does not provide significant protection against B. abortus induced abortion in elk. However, the vaccine appears to be safe at this dose and additional study may reveal a more effective RB51 vaccine regimen for elk.

  2. Overview of the activity of a Brucella abortus preparation, Bru-Pel.

    PubMed

    Youngner, J S; Feingold, D S; Keleti, G

    1978-11-01

    The properties of a nonviable, aqueous ether-extracted Brucela abortus preparation, Bru-Pel, are described. In addition to inducing a "virus-type" interferon response and protecting mice against challenge with otherwise lethal doses of Semliki Forest virus, Bru-Pel is demonstrated to have potent antitumor properties in mice. These antitumor effects appear to be mediated by an increase in nonspecific resistance similar to that seen with other experimental antitumor agents.

  3. In vitro antibacterial effects of five volatile oil extracts against intramacrophage Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Al-Mariri, Ayman; Saour, George; Hamou, Razan

    2012-06-01

    Brucellaabortus is a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause a highly contagious disease in sheep, goats, cattle and one-humped camels. It is responsible for one of the most important zoonosis in human. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Mentha piperita, Origanum majorana, Citrus lemon, Cinnamomum verum and Myristica fragrans essential volatile oil extracts on human macrophages infected by B. abortus 544. Essential volatile oil extracts from M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon, C. verum and M. fragrans were extracted. Human macrophages were cultured at a density of 2×10(5) cells per well in sterile 96-well microtiter plates, and infected with B. abortus 544 at a ratio of 1:100 bacteria/cell. Then essential volatile oil extracts were added at a concentration of 1%. At specified times; cells were washed, lysed with 0.1% Triton, and plated on 2YT agar to determine the number of intracellular bacteria. Cinnamomum verum volatile oil at a concentration of 1% had the highest antibacterial activity against B. abortus 544 inside human macrophages. Its inhibitory effect observed from 24 h and continued till 144 h after the infection. Moreover, C. verum (0.1%) in combination with 1% concentration of M. piperita, O. majorana, C. lemon or M. fragrans volatile oil extracts produced a synergistic inhibitory effect against B. abortus 544. The results indicate that, among the five selected oil extracts, C. verum volatile oil applied either separately or in combination with other oil extracts had the most effective antimicrobial activity against Brucella.

  4. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-05-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN.

  5. Comparison of Biological and Immunological Characterization of Lipopolysaccharides From Brucella abortus RB51 and S19

    PubMed Central

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Kaboudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Alamian, Saeed; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough stable mutant strain, which has been widely used as a live vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in cattle instead of B. abortus strain S19. B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has unique properties in comparison to other bacterial LPS. Objectives: In the current study, two types of LPS, smooth (S-LPS) and rough (R-LPS) were purified from B. abortus S19 and RB51, respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate biological and immunological properties of purified LPS as an immunogenical determinant. Materials and Methods: Primarily, S19 and RB51 LPS were extracted and purified by two different modifications of the phenol water method. The final purity of LPS was determined by chemical analysis (2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO), glycan, phosphate and protein content) and different staining methods, following sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times at biweekly intervals with the same amount of purified LPSs. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring specific IgG levels and also different cytokine levels, such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, were determined for assessing T-cell immune response. Results: Biochemical analysis data and SDS-PAGE profile showed that the chemical nature of S19 LPS is different from RB51 LPS. Both S and R-LPS induce an immune response. T-cell immune response induced by both S and R-LPS had almost the same pattern whereas S19 LPS elicited humoral immunity, which was higher than RB51 LPS. Conclusions: Purified LPS can be considered as a safe adjuvant and can be used as a component in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer and allergies. PMID:26862376

  6. Brucella abortus Induces the Premature Death of Human Neutrophils through the Action of Its Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Mora-Cartín, Ricardo; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; de Diego, Juana L.; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Buret, Andre G.; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2015-01-01

    Most bacterial infections induce the activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), enhance their microbicidal function, and promote the survival of these leukocytes for protracted periods of time. Brucella abortus is a stealthy pathogen that evades innate immunity, barely activates PMNs, and resists the killing mechanisms of these phagocytes. Intriguing clinical signs observed during brucellosis are the low numbers of Brucella infected PMNs in the target organs and neutropenia in a proportion of the patients; features that deserve further attention. Here we demonstrate that B. abortus prematurely kills human PMNs in a dose-dependent and cell-specific manner. Death of PMNs is concomitant with the intracellular Brucella lipopolysaccharide (Br-LPS) release within vacuoles. This molecule and its lipid A reproduce the premature cell death of PMNs, a phenomenon associated to the low production of proinflammatory cytokines. Blocking of CD14 but not TLR4 prevents the Br-LPS-induced cell death. The PMNs cell death departs from necrosis, NETosis and classical apoptosis. The mechanism of PMN cell death is linked to the activation of NADPH-oxidase and a modest but steadily increase of ROS mediators. These effectors generate DNA damage, recruitments of check point kinase 1, caspases 5 and to minor extent of caspase 4, RIP1 and Ca++ release. The production of IL-1β by PMNs was barely stimulated by B. abortus infection or Br-LPS treatment. Likewise, inhibition of caspase 1 did not hamper the Br-LPS induced PMN cell death, suggesting that the inflammasome pathway was not involved. Although activation of caspases 8 and 9 was observed, they did not seem to participate in the initial triggering mechanisms, since inhibition of these caspases scarcely blocked PMN cell death. These findings suggest a mechanism for neutropenia in chronic brucellosis and reveal a novel Brucella-host cross-talk through which B. abortus is able to hinder the innate function of PMN. PMID:25946018

  7. Evaluation of transmission of Brucella abortus strain 19 in bison by intravaginal, intrauterine, and intraconjunctival inoculation.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, Samantha R; Nol, Pauline; McCollum, Matt; Salman, Mo; Rhyan, Jack C

    2013-07-01

    Bovine brucellosis, caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus, is endemic in bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) populations in the area of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Two strategies have been proposed to reduce the risk of transmission of disease in bison: remote vaccination with the vaccine RB51, and the use of immunocontraception of bison to decrease shedding of organisms from infected females. The frequent occurrence of venereal transmission in bison would complicate either of these strategies, requiring vaccination of males as well as females, and rendering immunocontraception less effective in reducing transmission of B. abortus. To address the question of venereal transmission, we inoculated each of 18 bison cows with 4.5 × 10(8) colony-forming units of B. abortus strain 19, as a surrogate of field strain, by three routes: intraconjunctival (IC), intravaginal (VI), and intracervical/intrauterine (AI). Bison semen was mixed with strain 19 inoculum for the latter route. Bison were monitored by serology and culture for 12 wk, at which time they were euthanized and specimens collected for culture. All IC-inoculated animals seroconverted on multiple tests and one was culture positive at 12 wk postexposure. Seven of eight VI bison developed suspect or positive serologic tests and four were positive at one or more time points. Weak transient serologic responses (suspect) were seen in four of five AI bison. Results showed that IC inoculation with strain 19 was a suitable surrogate for field strain to demonstrate exposure to the B. abortus. The seroconversion of four of eight VI bison indicated exposure of the immune system to the agent and the need for further studies on venereal transmission in bison.

  8. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4(+) T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection.

  9. Serological crossreactivity between Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 I immunoblot analysis of the antibody response to Brucella protein antigens in bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, R; Hilbink, F; Hansen, M F; Penrose, M; de Lisle, G W; Letesson, J J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Searson, J; Fossati, C A; Cloeckaert, A

    1995-12-01

    Sera from three groups of Brucella abortus infected cattle were examined in immunoblots with the following antigens: sodium dodecyl sulfate/mercapto ethanol (SDS/ME) extracts of two rought B. abortus strains (45/20 and RB51) and rough B. ovis, smooth lipopolysaccharides (SLPS) from B. abortus strain 99 and Y. enterocolitica 0:9, and a cytoplasmic extract from smooth B. abortus strain 19-S. The sera groups were: (1) 26 sera from animals, experimentally infected with B. abortus strain 544, which were all positive in the conventional brucellosis serological tests; (2) 152 sera from naturally infected cattle herds with varying titres in the conventional brucellosis tests, and (3) 30 sera from naturally infected cattle with varying titres in the conventional brucellosis tests and from which B. abortus was cultured. B. abortus strain 99 and Y. enterocolitica serotype 0:9 SLPS staining showed up frequently in all sera groups and correlated well with the strength in the conventional brucellosis tests, confirming the immunodominance of SLPS in B. abortus infections. Another immunodominant component of 50-80 kDa was found in the rough B. abortus 45/20 antigen preparation but not in the B. abortus RB51 and in the B. ovis cell extracts. This component was also recognised by sera from Y. enterocolitica 0:9 infected cattle and is probably a protein-lipopolysaccharide complex. Although many of the sera from B. abortus infected cattle with high titres in the conventional brucellosis tests showed complex protein staining patterns in blots, no protein bands other than the 50-80 kDa bands were found to be immunodominant.

  10. Mechanisms of binding of Brucella abortus to mononuclear phagocytes from cows naturally resistant or susceptible to brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G A; Adams, L G; Sowa, B A

    1994-06-01

    During the course of bovine brucellosis, Brucella abortus adheres to and infects cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Potential mechanisms of binding, as measured by numbers of phagocytosed bacteria, were studied in two populations of cattle genetically resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to infection with B. abortus. Live B. abortus gained entry into cultured bovine macrophages without organism-specific opsonization. Bacterial entry into macrophages from R was inhibited by the peptide RGDS, outer membrane-peptidoglycan complex from B. abortus strain RB51, anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibody, anti-C3 antiserum, fibronectin, purified O-antigen from B. abortus lipopolysaccharide, mannan and heat-aggregated IgG. Bacterial entry into macrophages from S was inhibited by outer membrane-peptidoglycan complex, anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibody, O-antigen and heat-aggregated IgG. The peptide RGES did not inhibit entry into macrophages from R or S. These data support the existence of organism-related receptors on monocyte-derived macrophages for B. abortus which mediate binding in the absence of serum. Secondly, there are demonstrable differences in mechanisms of binding of B. abortus to cells from cattle genetically resistant or susceptible to infection by this organism. These findings further substantiate the importance of phagocytosis and clearance functions of the mononuclear phagocyte system in resistance to bovine brucellosis. Perpetuation of infection in susceptible cattle may occur by establishing an intracellular reservoir of viable organisms. Further studies are necessary to investigate receptor affinities, and the potential for an alternate receptor for this organism in S cattle.

  11. Simultaneous differential detection of Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila pecorum and Coxiella burnetii from aborted ruminant's clinical samples using multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chlamydiosis and Q fever, two zoonosis, are important causes of ruminants' abortion around the world. They are caused respectively by strictly intracellular and Gram negative bacterium Chlamydophila abortus (Cp. abortus) and Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). Chlamydophila pecorum (Cp. pecorum) is commonly isolated from the digestive tract of clinically inconspicuous ruminants but the abortive and zoonotic impact of this bacterium is still unknown because Cp. pecorum is rarely suspected in abortion cases of small ruminants. We have developed a multiplex PCR (m-PCR) for rapid simultaneous differential detection of Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii in clinical samples taken from infected animals. Results Specific PCR primers were designed and a sensitive and specific m-PCR was developed to detect simultaneously, in one tube reaction, three specific fragments of 821, 526 and 687-bp long for Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii respectively. This m-PCR assay was performed on 253 clinical samples taken from infected ruminant's flocks that have showed problems of abortion diseases. Thus, 67 samples were infected by either one of the three pathogens: 16 (13 vaginal swabs and 3 placentas) were positive for Cp. abortus, 2 were positive for Cp. pecorum (1 vaginal swab and 1 placenta) and 49 samples (33 vaginal swabs, 11 raw milks, 4 faeces and 1 placenta) were positive for C. burnetii. Two vaginal swabs were m-PCR positive of both Cp. abortus and C. burnetii and none of the tested samples was shown to be infected simultaneously with the three pathogens. Conclusion We have successfully developed a rapid multiplex PCR that can detect and differentiate Cp. abortus, Cp. pecorum and C. burnetii; with a good sensitivity and specificity. The diagnosis of chlamydiosis and Q fever may be greatly simplified and performed at low cost. In addition, the improvement in diagnostic techniques will enhance our knowledge regarding the prevalence and the pathogenetic

  12. Brucella abortus promotes a fibrotic phenotype in hepatic stellate cells with concomitant autophagy pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Dennis, Vida A; Comerci, Diego José; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2017-10-09

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. The present study demonstrates that B. abortus infection induces the activation of the autophagic pathway in hepatic stellate cells to create a microenvironment that promote a profibrogenic phenotype through the induction of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen deposition and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion. Autophagy was revealed by up-regulation of the LC3II/LC3I ratio and beclin-1 expression as well as inhibition of p62 expression in infected cells. The above findings were dependent on the type IV secretion system (VirB) and the secreted BPE005 protein; which were partially corroborated using the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin - a PI3-kinase inhibitor - and leupeptin plus E64 (inhibitors of lysosomal proteases). Activation of the autophagic pathway in hepatic stellate cells during Brucella infection could have an important contribution in attenuating inflammatory hepatic injury by inducing fibrosis. However, with time, B. abortus infection induced beclin-1 cleavage with concomitant cleavage of caspase-3 indicating the onset of apoptosis of LX-2 cells, as was confirmed by the TUNEL assay and Hoechst staining. These results demonstrate that the crosstalk of LX-2 cells and B. abortus induces autophagy and fibrosis with concomitant apoptosis of LX-2 cells, which may explain some potential mechanisms of liver damage observed in human brucellosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Purification and properties of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase extracted from Brucella abortus strain 19

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, L.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Recent work showed that a recombinant 20 kDa protein from Brucella abortus expressed in E. coli is a Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Western blot and ELISA results indicated that cattle with brucellosis have antibody to SOD. Here the authors report the purification and properties of the native B. abortus Cu-Zn SOD. SOD was extracted from methanol-killed Brucella abortus strain 19 with 0.1 M sodium citrate-1.0 M sodium chloride solution. The extract was dialyzed and protein precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 70-100% saturation was collected. The SOD was purified by HPLC anion exchange chromatography. SOD activity was assayed with a coupled enzyme assay using xanthine oxidase-cytochrome C reduction assay. The authors determined that the Brucella SOD is present in two molecular forms both inhibitable with KCN with Ki's of 0.32 mM and 4.98 mM, respectively. No other form of SOD was identified in the extract. Polyclonal antibody to SOD and polyclonal antibody to SOD synthetic peptide residues 134-143 inhibited SOD activity by 50% and 13%, respectively. Both SOD and the synthetic peptide inhibited binding of anti-SOD antibody to SOD by 60% and 20%, respectively. Based on these results the SOD and its amphipathic peptide will be considered as candidates for the design of synthetic multiple peptide vaccines and diagnostic reagents for bovine brucellosis.

  14. Evaluation of serologic and cellular immune responses of cattle to a nonlipopolysaccharide antigen from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E M; Shapiro, S J; Nicoletti, P

    1990-02-01

    Cows naturally infected with Brucella abortus developed antibody (Ab) responses to a nonlipopolysaccharide antigen (NLA) purified from B abortus strain 1119-3. Sera from strain 19-vaccinated cows did not have detectable amounts of Ab. Weak lymphoproliferative responses to NLA were observed in blood mononuclear cell suspensions obtained from infected cows. There was no evidence of NLA-specific lymphoproliferation in cell suspensions from healthy cows. Nonlipopolysaccharide antigen binding to bovine blood mononuclear cells was observed by antigen-consumption assays and direct binding of radiolabeled antigen. Cells from infected cows bound less NLA than did cells from healthy cows when assays were conducted with intact blood mononuclear cell preparations (monocytes plus lymphocytes). Monocytes obtained from any group did not bind NLA. Purified B lymphocytes from infected and healthy vaccinated cows bound about 3 times more NLA than did T lymphocytes, but there were no apparent differences between the 2 groups in extent of binding. Results of the study indicate that bovine lymphocytes have binding sites for a NLA purified from B abortus strain 1119-3.

  15. The Chlamydophila abortus genome sequence reveals an array of variable proteins that contribute to interspecies variation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Nicholas R.; Yeats, Corin; Bell, Kenneth; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Livingstone, Morag; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M.; Harris, Barbara; Doggett, Jon; Ormond, Doug; Mungall, Karen; Clarke, Kay; Feltwell, Theresa; Hance, Zahra; Sanders, Mandy; Quail, Michael A.; Price, Claire; Barrell, Bart G.; Parkhill, Julian; Longbottom, David

    2005-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydophila abortus strain S26/3 (formerly the abortion subtype of Chlamydia psittaci) is an important cause of late gestation abortions in ruminants and pigs. Furthermore, although relatively rare, zoonotic infection can result in acute illness and miscarriage in pregnant women. The complete genome sequence was determined and shows a high level of conservation in both sequence and overall gene content in comparison to other Chlamydiaceae. The 1,144,377-bp genome contains 961 predicted coding sequences, 842 of which are conserved with those of Chlamydophila caviae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Within this conserved Cp. abortus core genome we have identified the major regions of variation and have focused our analysis on these loci, several of which were found to encode highly variable protein families, such as TMH/Inc and Pmp families, which are strong candidates for the source of diversity in host tropism and disease causation in this group of organisms. Significantly, Cp. abortus lacks any toxin genes, and also lacks genes involved in tryptophan metabolism and nucleotide salvaging (guaB is present as a pseudogene), suggesting that the genetic basis of niche adaptation of this species is distinct from those previously proposed for other chlamydial species. PMID:15837807

  16. Detection of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus in Costa Rican sheep flocks

    PubMed Central

    Villagra-Blanco, R.; Dolz, G.; Montero-Caballero, D.; Romero-Zúñiga, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 359 sheep samples from 15 flocks were analyzed for the presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus using a commercial Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Antibodies were detected in 19 (5.29%) sheep from 12 (80%) flocks. Seropositive animals were found in all analyzed regions (Central, Chorotega, Atlantic Huetar, North Huetar and Central Pacific) determining prevalence between 0.28% and 4.4%, and intra-flock positivity between 3.7% and 25.0%. The survey revealed two risk factors associated with seropositivity; introducing animals (males and females), embryos, or semen from other farms or from abroad without any sanitary certification, and flocks not having quarantine areas or separated boxes for diseased animals. No clinical signs of disease were observed in positive seroreactors. C. abortus seems to be present in Costa Rica in a very low prevalence in sheep flocks. Further studies, to isolate the bacteria are required. Finally, implementation of control measures to prevent the spread of C. abortus is recommended. PMID:26623377

  17. Detection of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus in Costa Rican sheep flocks.

    PubMed

    Villagra-Blanco, R; Dolz, G; Montero-Caballero, D; Romero-Zúñiga, J J

    2015-01-01

    A total of 359 sheep samples from 15 flocks were analyzed for the presence of antibodies against Chlamydophila abortus using a commercial Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Antibodies were detected in 19 (5.29%) sheep from 12 (80%) flocks. Seropositive animals were found in all analyzed regions (Central, Chorotega, Atlantic Huetar, North Huetar and Central Pacific) determining prevalence between 0.28% and 4.4%, and intra-flock positivity between 3.7% and 25.0%. The survey revealed two risk factors associated with seropositivity; introducing animals (males and females), embryos, or semen from other farms or from abroad without any sanitary certification, and flocks not having quarantine areas or separated boxes for diseased animals. No clinical signs of disease were observed in positive seroreactors. C. abortus seems to be present in Costa Rica in a very low prevalence in sheep flocks. Further studies, to isolate the bacteria are required. Finally, implementation of control measures to prevent the spread of C. abortus is recommended.

  18. Proteomic analysis of Brucella abortus cell envelope and identification of immunogenic candidate proteins for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Joseph P; Comerci, Diego; Alefantis, Timothy G; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian; Chafin, Ryan; Grewal, Paul; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; DelVecchio, Vito G

    2006-07-01

    Brucella abortus is the etiologic agent of bovine brucellosis and causes a chronic disease in humans known as undulant fever. In livestock the disease is characterized by abortion and sterility. Live, attenuated vaccines such as S19 and RB51 have been used to control the spread of the disease in animals; however, they are considered unsafe for human use and they induce abortion in pregnant cattle. For the development of a safer and equally efficacious vaccine, immunoproteomics was utilized to identify novel candidate proteins from B. abortus cell envelope (CE). A total of 163 proteins were identified using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS. Some of the major protein components include outer-membrane protein (OMP) 25, OMP31, Omp2b porin, and 60 kDa chaperonin GroEL. 2-DE Western blot analyses probed with antiserum from bovine and a human patient infected with Brucella identified several new immunogenic proteins such as fumarate reductase flavoprotein subunit, F0F1-type ATP synthase alpha subunit, and cysteine synthase A. The elucidation of the immunome of B. abortus CE identified a number of candidate proteins for developing vaccines against Brucella infection in bovine and humans.

  19. Intracellularly induced cyclophilins play an important role in stress adaptation and virulence of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Roset, Mara S; García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-02-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells.

  20. Characterization of Brucella abortus mutant strain Δ22915, a potential vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanqing; Tian, Mingxing; Li, Peng; Liu, Jiameng; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2017-04-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella spp., is an important zoonosis worldwide. Vaccination is an effective strategy for protection against Brucella infection in livestock in developing countries and in wildlife in developed countries. However, current vaccine strains including S19 and RB51 are pathogenic to humans and pregnant animals, limiting their use. In this study, we constructed the Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S2308 mutant strain Δ22915, in which the putative lytic transglycosylase gene BAB_RS22915 was deleted. The biological properties of mutant strain Δ22915 were characterized and protection of mice against virulent S2308 challenge was evaluated. The mutant strain Δ22915 showed reduced survival within RAW264.7 cells and survival in vivo in mice. In addition, the mutant strain Δ22915 failed to escape fusion with lysosomes within host cells, and caused no observable pathological damage. RNA-seq analysis indicated that four genes associated with amino acid/nucleotide transport and metabolism were significantly upregulated in mutant strain Δ22915. Furthermore, inoculation of ∆22915 at 10(5) colony forming units induced effective host immune responses and long-term protection of BALB/c mice. Therefore, mutant strain ∆22915 could be used as a novel vaccine candidate in the future to protect animals against B. abortus infection.

  1. Intracellularly Induced Cyclophilins Play an Important Role in Stress Adaptation and Virulence of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells. PMID:23230297

  2. Brucella abortus Transits through the Autophagic Pathway and Replicates in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Nonprofessional Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Méresse, Stéphane; Parton, Robert G.; van der Goot, Gisou; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Lopez-Goñi, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen that replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment. In this study, we have examined the intracellular pathway of the virulent B. abortus strain 2308 (S2308) and the attenuated strain 19 (S19) in HeLa cells. At 10 min after inoculation, both bacterial strains are transiently detected in phagosomes characterized by the presence of early endosomal markers such as the early endosomal antigen 1. At ∼1 h postinoculation, bacteria are located within a compartment positive for the lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker sec61β but negative for the mannose 6-phosphate receptors and cathepsin D. Interestingly, this compartment is also positive for the autophagosomal marker monodansylcadaverin, suggesting that S2308 and S19 are located in autophagic vacuoles. At 24 h after inoculation, attenuated S19 is degraded in lysosomes, while virulent S2308 multiplies within a LAMP- and cathepsin D-negative but sec61β- and protein disulfide isomerase-positive compartment. Furthermore, treatment of infected cells with the pore-forming toxin aerolysin from Aeromonas hydrophila causes vacuolation of the bacterial replication compartment. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that pathogenic B. abortus exploits the autophagic machinery of HeLa cells to establish an intracellular niche favorable for its replication within the ER. PMID:9826346

  3. The role of innate immune signals in immunity to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio R; Campos, Priscila C; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Costa, Miriam Maria S; Marim, Fernanda M; Pereira, Guilherme S M; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity serves as the first line of defense against infectious agents such as intracellular bacteria. The innate immune platform includes Toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoid acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors and other cytosolic nucleic acid sensors, nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptors, adaptors, kinases and other signaling molecules that are required to elicit effective responses against different pathogens. Our research group has been using the Gram-negative bacteria Brucella abortus as a model of pathogen. We have demonstrated that B. abortus triggers MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in macrophages in a MyD88 and IRAK-4-dependent manner. Furthermore, we claimed that so far TLR9 is the most important single TLR during Brucella infection. The identification of host receptors that recognize pathogen-derived nucleic acids has revealed an essential role for nucleic acid sensing in the triggering of immunity to intracellular pathogens. Besides TLRs, herein we describe recent advances in NOD1, NOD2, and type I IFN receptors in innate immune pathways during B. abortus infection.

  4. Brucella abortus in captive bison. I. Serology, bacteriology, pathogenesis, and transmission to cattle.

    PubMed

    Davis, D S; Templeton, J W; Ficht, T A; Williams, J D; Kopec, J D; Adams, L G

    1990-07-01

    Two groups of six, non-brucellosis vaccinated, brucellosis seronegative pregnant American bison (Bison bison) were individually challenged with 1 x 10(7) colony forming units (CFU) of Brucella abortus strain 2308. Three days after challenge, each bison group was placed in a common paddock with six non-vaccinated, brucellosis susceptible, pregnant domestic heifers. In a parallel study, two groups of six susceptible, pregnant cattle were simultaneously challenged with the identical dose as the bison and each group was placed with six susceptible cattle in order to compare bison to cattle transmission to that observed in cattle to cattle transmission. Blood samples were collected from bison and cattle weekly for at least 1 mo prior to exposure to B. abortus and for 180 days post-exposure (PE). Sera from the bison and cattle were evaluated by the Card, rivanol precipitation, standard plate agglutination, standard tube agglutination, cold complement fixation tube, warm complement fixation tube, buffered acidified plate antigen, rapid screening, bovine conjugated enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, bison or bovine conjugated enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and the hemolysis-in-gel techniques for the presence of antibodies to Brucella spp. At the termination of pregnancy by abortion or birth of a live-calf, quarter milk samples, vaginal swabs, and placenta were collected from the dam. Rectal swabs were collected from live calves, and mediastinal lymph nodes, abomasal contents and lung were taken at necropsy from aborted fetuses for culture of Brucella spp. These tissues and swabs were cultured on restrictive media for the isolation and identification of Brucella spp. Pathogenesis of brucellosis in bison was studied in an additional group of six pregnant bison which were challenged with 1 x 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. One animal was euthanatized each week PE. Tissues were collected at necropsy and later examined bacteriologically and histologically. Lesions of

  5. Inhibitory effect of red ginseng acidic polysaccharide from Korean red ginseng on phagocytic activity and intracellular replication of Brucella abortus in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Won Gi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee

    2016-01-01

    Korean red ginseng (KRG) has long been used in traditional Korean and Oriental medicine. However, the anti-bacterial mechanism and therapeutic efficiency of KGR for intracellular Brucella infection are still unclear. In this study, the bactericidal activity of Korean red ginseng acidic polysaccharide (RGAP) on Brucella (B.) abortus and its cytotoxic effects on RAW 264.7 cells were evaluated. In addition, B. abortus internalization and intracellular replication in macrophages were investigated after RGAP treatment. RGAP-incubated cells displayed a marked reduction in the adherence, internalization and intracellular growth of B. abortus in macrophages. Furthermore, decreased F-actin fluorescence was observed relative to untreated B. abortus-infected cells. Western blot analysis of intracellular signaling proteins revealed reduced ERK, JNK and p38α phosphorylation levels in B. abortus-infected RGAP-treated cells compared to the control. Moreover, elevated co-localization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) were observed in RGAP-treated cells compared with the control. Overall, the results of this study suggest that RGAP can disrupt phagocytic activity of B. abortus via suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling proteins ERK, JNK and p38 levels and inhibit intracellular replication of B. abortus by enhancing phagolysosome fusion, which may provide an alternative control of brucellosis. PMID:26726017

  6. Evaluation and comparison of different blood culture techniques for bacteriological isolation of Salmonella typhi and Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria-Ruiz, M M; Cardona-Castro, N M

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to evaluate and compare various noncommercial methods of blood culture for the isolation of Salmonella typhi and Brucella abortus from fresh human blood samples that had been artificially inoculated with 1 to 50 microorganisms per ml of blood. The methods compared included the Ruiz-Castañeda blood culture, broth blood culture, leukocyte lysis and direct plating on agar (WBL-P), leukocyte lysis and filtration, Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and filtration, Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and leukocyte lysis methods. Results with the WBL-P technique showed that S. typhi was isolated in 18 h, and its recovery rate was 36.6% (calculated from the number of CFU recovered per milliliter versus the number inoculated). B. abortus was isolated in 48 h by the same technique, and its recovery rate was 48.8%. The isolation times for the other blood culture techniques were between 36 and 44 h for S. typhi and 66 h for B. abortus. The techniques which relied on filtering systems for the recovery of S. typhi and B. abortus performed poorly. The WBL-P technique for the isolation of S. typhi and B. abortus is faster than the other methods tested. PMID:7790452

  7. Prevalence and molecular identification of Chlamydia abortus in commercial dairy goat farms in a hot region in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Campos-Hernández, Eleuterio; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Saltijeral-Oaxaca, Jorge Antonio; Escalante-Ochoa, Cristina; López-Heydeck, Sandra M; de Oca-Jiménez, Roberto Montes

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and presence of Chlamydia abortus in Saanen breed female goats from commercial dairy goat farms under intensive production in the municipality of Guanajuato, Mexico. Sera were collected to determine the prevalence of anti-C. abortus IgG antibodies using recombinant enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (rELISA) and cell culture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to prove the presence of the pathogen in swab samples collected from the vagina and rectum of selected animals. Additionally, foetal tissue samples from a sudden abortion were collected. C. abortus prevalence in female goats of commercial milking farms sampled in Guanajuato, Mexico, was 4.87% (n = 246). Seropositive animals were found in six out of nine (66.6%) dairy goat farms sampled, and prevalence among animals in individual farms ranged between 3.44 and 13.51%. C. abortus was detected using PCR in spleen tissue from the aborted foetus. PCR-based detection, as well as isolation from vaginal and rectal swabs, was not possible in the present study. Isolation through cell culture was also unsuccessful from aborted foetal tissue samples. In conclusion, the results from rELISA and PCR show that C. abortus is present in dairy goat farms in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

  8. Evaluation of bison (Bison bison) semen from Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA, bulls for Brucella abortus shedding.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rebecca K; Clarke, P Ryan; McCollum, Matt P; Nol, Pauline; Johnson, Kammy R; Thompson, Brent D; Ramsey, Jennifer M; Anderson, Neil J; Rhyan, Jack C

    2013-07-01

    To determine if bison (Bison bison) bulls from Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Montana, USA, shed an infective dose of Brucella abortus in semen, 50 YNP bulls were captured on public lands in Montana during the winter and early spring (April-May) of 2010 and 2011. The bulls were immobilized, and blood and semen samples were collected for serology and Brucella culture. Thirty-five bulls (70%) were antibody-positive, and B. abortus was cultured from semen in three (9%) of the 35 antibody-positive or suspect bulls, though not at concentrations considered an infective dose. Eight bulls (six antibody-positive, two negative) had palpable lesions of the testes, epididymides, or seminal vesicles consistent with B. abortus infection. Breeding soundness exams and semen analysis suggested that antibody-positive bulls were more likely to have nonviable ejaculate (8/35; 23%) than bulls without detectable antibody (2/15; 13%).

  9. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-04-30

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies.

  10. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María I.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus. PMID:27900285

  11. GTPases of the Rho subfamily are required for Brucella abortus internalization in nonprofessional phagocytes: direct activation of Cdc42.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Verri, C; Chaves-Olarte, E; von Eichel-Streiber, C; López-Goñi, I; Thelestam, M; Arvidson, S; Gorvel, J P; Moreno, E

    2001-11-30

    Members of the genus Brucella are intracellular alpha-Proteobacteria responsible for brucellosis, a chronic disease of humans and animals. Little is known about Brucella virulence mechanisms, but the abilities of these bacteria to invade and to survive within cells are decisive factors for causing disease. Transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy of infected nonprofessional phagocytic HeLa cells revealed minor membrane changes accompanied by discrete recruitment of F-actin at the site of Brucella abortus entry. Cell uptake of B. abortus was negatively affected to various degrees by actin, actin-myosin, and microtubule chemical inhibitors. Modulators of MAPKs and protein-tyrosine kinases hampered Brucella cell internalization. Inactivation of Rho small GTPases using clostridial toxins TcdB-10463, TcdB-1470, TcsL-1522, and TcdA significantly reduced the uptake of B. abortus by HeLa cells. In contrast, cytotoxic necrotizing factor from Escherichia coli, known to activate Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 small GTPases, increased the internalization of both virulent and non-virulent B. abortus. Expression of dominant-positive Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 forms in HeLa cells promoted the uptake of B. abortus, whereas expression of dominant-negative forms of these GTPases in HeLa cells hampered Brucella uptake. Cdc42 was activated upon cell contact by virulent B. abortus, but not by a noninvasive isogenic strain, as proven by affinity precipitation of active Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The polyphasic approach used to discern the molecular events leading to Brucella internalization provides new alternatives for exploring the complexity of the signals required by intracellular pathogens for cell invasion.

  12. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María I; Morrone Seijo, Susana M; Guaimas, Francisco F; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus.

  13. Comprehensive Identification of Immunodominant Proteins of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis Using Antibodies in the Sera from Naturally Infected Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Wareth, Gamal; Eravci, Murat; Weise, Christoph; Roesler, Uwe; Melzer, Falk; Sprague, Lisa D.; Neubauer, Heinrich; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a debilitating zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. The diagnosis of brucellosis is challenging, as accurate species level identification is not possible with any of the currently available serology-based diagnostic methods. The present study aimed at identifying Brucella (B.) species-specific proteins from the closely related species B. abortus and B. melitensis using sera collected from naturally infected host species. Unlike earlier reported investigations with either laboratory-grown species or vaccine strains, in the present study, field strains were utilized for analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of the naturally isolated strains of these two closely related species revealed 402 differentially expressed proteins, among which 63 and 103 proteins were found exclusively in the whole cell extracts of B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains, respectively. The sera from four different naturally infected host species, i.e., cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat were applied to identify the immune-binding protein spots present in the whole protein extracts from the isolated B. abortus and B. melitensis field strains and resolved on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Comprehensive analysis revealed that 25 proteins of B. abortus and 20 proteins of B. melitensis were distinctly immunoreactive. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate/malate dehydrogenase from B. abortus, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein from B. melitensis and fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase from both species were reactive with the sera of all the tested naturally infected host species. The identified proteins could be used for the design of serological assays capable of detecting pan-Brucella, B. abortus- and B. melitensis-specific antibodies. PMID:27144565

  14. Ability of Brucella abortus rough vaccine strains to elicit DC and innate immunity in lung using a murine respiratory model.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Zimmerman, Kurt; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Lawler, Heather; Heid, Bettina; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2010-10-08

    Brucella abortus strains RB51 and RB51SOD are live attenuated vaccine strains which protect mice against virulent B. abortus strain 2308 intraperitoneal challenge. By comparison, limited information is available on how Brucella vaccines stimulate pulmonary immunity against respiratory infection, another route of exposure in humans. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the ability of intranasally delivered vaccine strains RB51 and RB51SOD to induce innate immunity. Based on parameters assessed, rough strain RB51 induces a better innate immune response in lung versus strain RB51SOD. Additional studies to further delineate strain RB51's ability to stimulate DC and adaptive immunity are warranted.

  15. MLVA16 Typing of Portuguese Human and Animal Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Chambel, Lélia; Tenreiro, Tania; Cardoso, Regina; Flor, Lídia; Dias, Isabel Travassos; Pacheco, Teresa; Garin-Bastuji, Bruno; Le Flèche, Philippe; Vergnaud, Gilles; Tenreiro, Rogério; de Sá, Maria Inácia Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological relationship of isolates from different Portuguese geographical regions and to assess the diversity among isolates, the MLVA16Orsay assay (panels 1, 2A and 2B) was performed with a collection of 126 Brucella melitensis (46 human and 80 animal isolates) and 157 B. abortus field isolates, seven vaccine strains and the representative reference strains of each species. The MLVA16Orsay showed a similar high discriminatory power (HGDI 0.972 and 0.902) for both species but panel 1 and 2A markers displayed higher diversity (HGDI 0.693) in B. abortus compared to B. melitensis isolates (HGDI 0.342). The B. melitensis population belong to the “Americas” (17%) and “East Mediterranean” (83%) groups. No isolate belonged to the “West Mediterranean” group. Eighty-five percent of the human isolates (39 in 46) fit in the “East-Mediterranean” group where a single lineage known as MLVA11 genotype 116 is responsible for the vast majority of Brucella infections in humans. B. abortus isolates formed a consistent group with bv1 and bv3 isolates in different clusters. Four MLVA11 genotypes were observed for the first time in isolates from S. Jorge and Terceira islands from Azores. From the collection of isolates analysed in this study we conclude that MLVA16Orsay provided a clear view of Brucella spp. population, confirming epidemiological linkage in outbreak investigations. In particular, it suggests recent and ongoing colonisation of Portugal with one B. melitensis lineage usually associated with East Mediterranean countries. PMID:22905141

  16. Different resistance patterns of reference and field strains of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Karina L.; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Poester, Fernando P.; Martins, Paulo S.; Pauletti, Rebeca B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of the B. abortus reference strains and field isolates on media containing different inhibitor agents. Reference strains were seeded on tryptose agar containing: i-erythritol (1.0 mg/mL), fuchsin (20 μg/mL and 80 μg/mL), thionin (2.5 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL), rifampicin (200 μg/mL) and safranin O (200 μg/mL). Field isolates were tested only on media containing i-erythritol, rifampicin and thionin. Furthermore, each suspension was also inoculated on tryptose agar incubated in air, to test its ability to grow without CO 2 . Sensitivity to fuchsin was similar among reference strains evaluated. Growth of S19, 544 and 2308 but not RB51 were inhibited on media containing rifampicin. Medium with safranin O showed no inhibition for RB51, 544 and 2308, but it partially inhibited the S19 growth as well as medium containing i-erythritol. Treatment/control growth ratio for 2308 on tryptose agar containing thionin (2.5 μg/mL) was approximatelly 1.0, whereas S19 and RB51 showed 0.85 and 0.89 ratios, respectively. Growth of 544, S19 and RB51 but not 2308 was completely inhibited on medium with thionin (10 μg/mL). All field strains grew on medium containing i-erythritol, but were completelly inhibited by rifampicin. With exception of A1 ( B. abortus biovar 3) all field isolates grew on medium with thionin, although some strains showed a treatment/control growth ratio of 0.75–0.80 (10 μg/mL). These results showed that tryptose agar with thionin, i-erythritol or rifampicin could be useful for differentiating vaccine, challenge and field strains of B. abortus. PMID:26221116

  17. Proinflammatory Response of Human Trophoblastic Cells to Brucella abortus Infection and upon Interactions with Infected Phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Andrea G; Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2016-02-01

    Trophoblasts are targets of infection by Brucella spp. but their role in the pathophysiology of pregnancy complications of brucellosis is unknown. Here we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in the human trophoblastic cell line Swan-71 and that the intracellular survival of the bacterium depends on a functional virB operon. The infection elicited significant increments of interleukin 8 (IL8), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and IL6 secretion, but levels of IL1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) did not vary significantly. Such proinflammatory response was not modified by the absence of the Brucella TIR domain-containing proteins BtpA and BtpB. The stimulation of Swan-71 cells with conditioned medium (CM) from B. abortus-infected human monocytes (THP-1 cells) or macrophages induced a significant increase of IL8, MCP-1 and IL6 as compared to stimulation with CM from non-infected cells. Similar results were obtained when stimulation was performed with CM from infected neutrophils. Neutralization studies showed that IL1beta and/or TNF-alpha mediated the stimulating effects of CM from infected phagocytes. Reciprocally, stimulation of monocytes and neutrophils with CM from Brucella-infected trophoblasts increased IL8 and/or IL6 secretion. These results suggest that human trophoblasts may provide a local inflammatory environment during B. abortus infections either through a direct response to the pathogen or through interactions with monocytes/macrophages or neutrophils, potentially contributing to the pregnancy complications of brucellosis.

  18. Different resistance patterns of reference and field strains of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina L; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Poester, Fernando P; Martins Filho, Paulo S; Pauletti, Rebeca B; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of the B. abortus reference strains and field isolates on media containing different inhibitor agents. Reference strains were seeded on tryptose agar containing: i-erythritol (1.0 mg/mL), fuchsin (20 μg/mL and 80 μg/mL), thionin (2.5 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL), rifampicin (200 μg/mL) and safranin O (200 μg/mL). Field isolates were tested only on media containing i-erythritol, rifampicin and thionin. Furthermore, each suspension was also inoculated on tryptose agar incubated in air, to test its ability to grow without CO 2 . Sensitivity to fuchsin was similar among reference strains evaluated. Growth of S19, 544 and 2308 but not RB51 were inhibited on media containing rifampicin. Medium with safranin O showed no inhibition for RB51, 544 and 2308, but it partially inhibited the S19 growth as well as medium containing i-erythritol. Treatment/control growth ratio for 2308 on tryptose agar containing thionin (2.5 μg/mL) was approximatelly 1.0, whereas S19 and RB51 showed 0.85 and 0.89 ratios, respectively. Growth of 544, S19 and RB51 but not 2308 was completely inhibited on medium with thionin (10 μg/mL). All field strains grew on medium containing i-erythritol, but were completelly inhibited by rifampicin. With exception of A1 ( B. abortus biovar 3) all field isolates grew on medium with thionin, although some strains showed a treatment/control growth ratio of 0.75-0.80 (10 μg/mL). These results showed that tryptose agar with thionin, i-erythritol or rifampicin could be useful for differentiating vaccine, challenge and field strains of B. abortus.

  19. TLR7 and TLR3 Sense Brucella abortus RNA to Induce Proinflammatory Cytokine Production but They Are Dispensable for Host Control of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Priscila C.; Gomes, Marco Túlio R.; Guimarães, Erika S.; Guimarães, Gabriela; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2017-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium that causes brucellosis, a worldwide zoonotic disease leading to undulant fever in humans and abortion in cattle. The immune response against this bacterium relies on the recognition of microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, and DNA; however, the immunostimulatory potential of B. abortus RNA remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that dendritic cells (DCs) produce significant amounts of IL-12, IL-6, and IP-10/CXCL10, when stimulated with purified B. abortus RNA. IL-12 secretion by DCs stimulated with RNA depends on TLR7 while IL-6 depends on TLR7 and partially on TLR3. Further, only TLR7 plays a role in IL-12 production induced by B. abortus infection. Moreover, cytokine production in DCs infected with B. abortus or stimulated with bacterial RNA was reduced upon pretreatment with MAPK/NF-κB inhibitors. By confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that TLR7 is colocalized with B. abortus in LAMP-1+ Brucella-containing vacuoles. Additionally, type I IFN expression and IP-10/CXCL10 secretion in DCs stimulated with bacterial RNA were dependent on TLR3 and TLR7. Our results suggest that TLR3 and TLR7 are not required to control Brucella infection in vivo, but they play an important role on sensing B. abortus RNA in vitro. PMID:28167945

  20. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  1. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  2. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccination is an effective tool for reducing the prevalence of brucellosis in natural hosts. In this study, we characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 (RB51) vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (Hand RB51), single pneumatic dart delivery (Dart ...

  3. A Live Vaccine from Brucella abortus Strain 82 for Control of Cattle Brucellosis in the Russian Federation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the first half of the 20th century, widespread regulatory efforts to control cattle brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics were essentially nonexistent, and control was limited to selective test and slaughter of serologic agglutination reactors. By the 1950...

  4. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-08

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection.

  5. Host-pathogen interactions in specific pathogen-free chickens following aerogenous infection with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Isabelle; Berndt, Angela; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Sachse, Konrad; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2015-03-15

    Although Chlamydia (C.) psittaci infections are recognized as an important factor causing economic losses and impairing animal welfare in poultry production, the specific mechanisms leading to severe clinical outcomes are poorly understood. In the present study, we comparatively investigated pathology and host immune response, as well as systemic dissemination and expression of essential chlamydial genes in the course of experimental aerogeneous infection with C. psittaci and the closely related C. abortus, respectively, in specific pathogen-free chicks. Clinical signs appeared sooner and were more severe in the C. psittaci-infected group. Compared to C. abortus infection, more intense systemic dissemination of C. psittaci correlated with higher and faster infiltration of immune cells, as well as more macroscopic lesions and epithelial pathology, such as hyperplasia and erosion. In thoracic air sac tissue, mRNA expression of immunologically relevant factors, such as IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22, LITAF and iNOS was significantly stronger up-regulated in C. psittaci- than in C. abortus-infected birds between 3 and 14 days post-infection. Likewise, transcription rates of the chlamydial genes groEL, cpaf and ftsW were consistently higher in C. psittaci during the acute phase. These findings illustrate that the stronger replication of C. psittaci in its natural host also evoked a more intense immune response than in the case of C. abortus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracellular Trafficking Modulation by Ginsenoside Rg3 Inhibits Brucella abortus Uptake and Intracellular Survival within RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-03-28

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, has various pharmacological and biological activities; however, its effects against Brucella infection are still unclear. Herein, the inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg3 against intracellular parasitic Brucella infection were evaluated through bacterial infection, adherence assays, and LAMP-1 colocalization, as well as immunoblotting and FACS for detecting MAPK signaling proteins and F-actin polymerization, respectively. The internalization, intracellular growth, and adherence of Brucella abortus in Rg3-treated RAW 264.7 cells were significantly decreased compared with the Rg3-untreated control. Furthermore, an apparent reduction of F-actin content and intensity of F-actin fluorescence in Rg3-treated cells was observed compared with B. abortus-infected cells without treatment by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. In addition, treating cells with Rg3 decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling proteins such as ERK 1/2 and p38 compared with untreated cells. Moreover, the colocalization of B. abortus-containing phagosomes with LAMP-1 was markedly increased in Rg3-treated cells. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg3 inhibits B. abortus infection in mammalian cells and can be used as an alternative approach in the treatment of brucellosis.

  7. Dextran sulfate sodium upregulates MAPK signaling for the uptake and subsequent intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Hop, Huynh Tan; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Kim, Dong Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-02-01

    Brucellosis is one of the major zoonoses worldwide that inflicts important health problems in animal and human. Here, we demonstrated that dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) significantly increased adhesion of Brucella (B.) abortus in murine macrophages compared to untreated cells. Even without infection, Brucella uptake into macrophages increased and F-actin reorganization was induced compared with untreated cells. Furthermore, DSS increased the phosphorylation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and p38α) in Brucella-infected, DSS-treated cells compared with the control cells. Lastly, DSS markedly increased the intracellular survival of Brucella abortus in macrophages by up to 48 h. These results suggest that DSS enhanced the adhesion and phagocytosis of B. abortus into murine macrophages by stimulating the MAPK signaling proteins phospho-ERK1/2 and p38α and that DSS increased the intracellular survival of B. abortus by inhibiting colocalization of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) with the late endosome marker LAMP-1. This study emphasizes the enhancement of the phagocytic and intracellular modulatory effects of DSS, which may suppress the innate immune system and contribute to prolonged Brucella survival and chronic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Late production of CXCL8 in ruminant oro-nasal turbinate cells in response to Chlamydia abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Doull, L; Wattegedera, S R; Longbottom, D; Mwangi, D; Nath, M; Glass, E J; Entrican, G

    2015-11-15

    Chlamydia abortus is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is an important cause of ovine abortion worldwide. There are reports of abortions in cattle, but these are very rare compared to the reported incidence in sheep. The bacterium is transmitted oro-nasally and can establish a sub-clinical infection until pregnancy, when it can invade the placenta and induce an inflammatory cascade leading to placentitis and abortion. Early host-pathogen interactions could explain differential pathogenesis and subsequent disease outcome in ruminant species. In this study, we assessed the ability of sheep and cattle oro-nasal turbinate cells to sense and respond to C. abortus infection. The cells expressed toll like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) mRNA. In response to C. abortus infection, both ovine and bovine turbinate cells produce CXCL8 mRNA and protein late in the bacterial developmental cycle, but do not produce IL-1β or TNF-α. The UV-inactivated bacteria did not elicit a CXCL8 response, suggesting that intracellular multiplication of the bacteria is important for activating the signalling pathways. The production of innate immune cytokines from cattle and sheep turbinate cells in response to C. abortus infection was found to be largely similar.

  9. Genome Sequences of Human and Livestock Isolates of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus from the Country of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Sidamonidze, Ketevan; Hang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Dzavashvili, George; Zhgenti, Ekaterine; Trapaidze, Nino; Imnadze, Paata

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brucellosis, which is among the most widespread global zoonotic diseases, is endemic in the nation of Georgia and causes substantial human morbidity and economic loss. Here, we report whole-genome sequences of three Brucella melitensis and seven Brucella abortus isolates from cattle, sheep, and humans that represent genetic groups discovered in Georgia. PMID:28183751

  10. Development of a dual vaccine for prevention of Brucella abortus infection and Escherichia coli O157:H7 intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Iannino, Florencia; Herrmann, Claudia K; Roset, Mara S; Briones, Gabriel

    2015-05-05

    Zoonoses that affect human and animal health have an important economic impact. In the study now presented, a bivalent vaccine has been developed that has the potential for preventing the transmission from cattle to humans of two bacterial pathogens: Brucella abortus and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). A 66kDa chimeric antigen, composed by EspA, Intimin, Tir, and H7 flagellin (EITH7) from STEC, was constructed and expressed in B. abortus Δpgm vaccine strain (BabΔpgm). Mice orally immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) elicited an immune response with the induction of anti-EITH7 antibodies (IgA) that clears an intestinal infection of E. coli O157:H7 three times faster (t=4 days) than mice immunized with BabΔpgm carrier strain (t=12 days). As expected, mice immunized with BabΔpgm(EITH7) strain also elicited a protective immune response against B. abortus infection. A Brucella-based vaccine platform is described capable of eliciting a combined protective immune response against two bacterial pathogens with diverse lifestyles-the intracellular pathogen B. abortus and the intestinal extracellular pathogen STEC.

  11. [Multiplication of Brucella abortus and production of nitric oxide in two macrophage cell lines of different origin].

    PubMed

    Serafino, J; Conde, S; Zabal, O; Samartino, L

    2007-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a bacterium which causes abortions and infertility in cattle and undulant fever in humans. It multiplies intracellularly, evading the mechanisms of cellular death. Nitric oxide (NO) is important in the regulation of the immune response. In the present work, we studied the ability of three B. abortus strains to survive intracellularly in two macrophage cell lines. The bacterial multiplication in both cell lines was determined at two different times in UFC/ ml units. Moreover the inoculated cells were also observed under light-field and fluorescence microscopy stained with Giemsa and acridine orange, respectively. The stain of both cellular lines showed similar results with respect to the UFC/ml determination. The presence of B. abortus was confirmed by electronic microscopy. In both macrophage cell lines inoculated with the rough strain RB51, the multiplication diminished and the level of NO was higher, compared with cells inoculated with smooth strains (S19 and 2308). These results suggest that the absence of O-chain of LPS probably affects the intracellular growth of B. abortus.

  12. Comparison of abortion and infection after experimental challenge of pregnant bison and cattle with Brucella abortus strain 2308

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comparative study was conducted using data from naive bison (n=45) and cattle (n=46) from 8 and 6 studies, respectively, in which a standardized Brucella abortus strain 2308 experimental challenge was administered. The incidence of abortion, fetal infection, uterine or mammary infection, or infec...

  13. Abortive Potency of Chlamydophila abortus in Pregnant Mice Is Not Directly Correlated with Placental and Fetal Colonization Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bouakane, Amel; Benchaîeb, Ilhem; Rodolakis, Annie

    2003-01-01

    Abortion, placental and fetal colonization, and levels of gamma interferon were analyzed for four Chlamydophila abortus strains presenting antigenic variations in a mouse model. Expression of virulence of these strains varied and indicated that abortion was not directly related to the number of bacteria in the placenta, and thus, other factors may have an important role in activating the abortion process. PMID:14638821

  14. Brucella abortus mutants lacking ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins are highly attenuated in virulence and confer protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 is an attenuated vaccine strain that has been most frequently used for bovine brucellosis. Although it is known to provide good protection in cattle, it still has some drawbacks including resistance to rifampicin, residual virulence and pathogenicity in humans. Thus, there has been a continuous interest on new safe and effective bovine vaccine candidates. In the present study, we have constructed unmarked mutants by deleting singly cydD and cydC genes, which encode ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, from the chromosome of the virulent Brucella abortus isolate from Korean cow (referred to as IVK15). Both IVK15ΔcydD and ΔcydC mutants showed increased sensitivity to metal ions, hydrogen peroxide and acidic pH, which are mimic to intracellular environment during host infection. Additionally, the mutants exhibited a significant growth defect in RAW264.7 cells and greatly attenuated in mice. Vaccination of mice with either IVK15ΔcydC or IVK15ΔcydD mutant could elicit an anti-Brucella specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgG subclass responses as well as enhance the secretion of interferon-gamma, and provided better protection against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308 than with the commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. Collectively, these results suggest that both IVK15ΔcydC and IVK15ΔcydD mutants could be an attenuated vaccine candidate against B. abortus.

  15. GLUTAMATE METABOLISM IN BRUCELLA ABORTUS STRAINS OF LOW AND HIGH VIRULENCE

    PubMed Central

    Dasinger, B. L.; Wilson, J. B.

    1962-01-01

    Dasinger, B. L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and J. B. Wilson. Glutamate metabolism in Brucella abortus strains of low and high virulence. J. Bacteriol. 84:911–915. 1962.—Brucella abortus strains of low virulence oxidize glutamate at a high rate, whereas strains of high virulence oxidize glutamate at a relatively low rate. Results indicated that this observation was not related to differences in pathway of glutamate oxidation or to differences in total enzyme activity. Permeability studies showed that the maximal rates of glutamate accumulation were 2.8 μmoles per 2 min per g (wet wt) for a strain of high virulence and 6.2 μmoles per 2 min per g for a strain of low virulence, but equal intracellular steady-state concentrations were attained by both types of strains. Evidence is presented which suggests that the site of glutamate oxidation is separate from the pool of glutamate being measured. Unequal rates of permeability at these sites could be the reason for the differences in rate of glutamate oxidation. PMID:14028057

  16. Comparison of Chemical Components of Cell Walls of Brucella abortus Strains of Low and High Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, G D; Foster, J W; Badakhsh, F F

    1970-09-01

    Amino acid, carbohydrate, and lipid components of cell walls of Brucella abortus strain 19A (low virulence) and strain 2308 (high virulence) were compared by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and by use of an amino acid analyzer. A total of 15 amino acids were detected by both chromatographic methods. Each amino acid was present in greater amounts in strain 2308 than in strain 19A when equal amounts of hydrolysates of cell wall and endotoxin-containing preparations were analyzed. A component with the same R(F) value as ethanolamine was present in strain 2308 cell wall hydrolysates but was not revealed by TLC of strain 19A cell wall hydrolysates. This component was not detected with the amino acid analyzer. TLC of cell walls tagged with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene prior to hydrolysis showed that phenylalanine was a terminal amino acid in cell walls of B. abortus strains 19A and 2308, B. suis strain 1776, and B. melitensis strain 2500. Carbohydrates detected in cell walls of strains 19A and 2308 by TLC were tentatively identified as glucose, mannose, rhamnose, and galactose. Colorimetric tests were also positive for 2-keto-3-deoxy-octulosonic acid, heptose, and dideoxyhexose. At least seven lipid components were detected by TLC of ether extracts of cell walls of strains 19A and 2308. It is suggested that one or more lipids is important in maintaining cell wall structure, because isolated cell walls rapidly became fragmented after exposure to ether.

  17. G1-arrested newborn cells are the predominant infectious form of the pathogen Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Deghelt, Michaël; Mullier, Caroline; Sternon, Jean-François; Francis, Nayla; Laloux, Géraldine; Dotreppe, Delphine; Van der Henst, Charles; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; De Bolle, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, such as Brucella abortus, display a biphasic infection process starting with a non-proliferative stage of unclear nature. Here, we study the cell cycle of B. abortus at the single-cell level, in culture and during infection of HeLa cells and macrophages. The localization of segregation and replication loci of the two bacterial chromosomes indicates that, immediately after being engulfed by host-cell endocytic vacuoles, most bacterial cells are newborn. These bacterial cells do not initiate DNA replication for the next 4 to 6 h, indicating a G1 arrest. Moreover, growth is completely stopped during that time, reflecting a global cell cycle block. Growth and DNA replication resume later, although bacteria still reside within endosomal-like compartments. We hypothesize that the predominance of G1-arrested bacteria in the infectious population, and the bacterial cell cycle arrest following internalization, may constitute a widespread strategy among intracellular pathogens to colonize new proliferation niches. PMID:25006695

  18. Myeloid decidual dendritic cells and immunoregulation of pregnancy: defective responsiveness to Coxiella burnetii and Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Gorvel, Laurent; Ben Amara, Amira; Ka, Mignane B.; Textoris, Julien; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a component of the placental immune system, but their role in pregnancy is still poorly understood. Decidual DCs (dDCs) were selected from at-term pregnancy on the basis of CD14 and CD11c expression. A phenotypic analysis revealed that dDCs are characterized by the expression of monocyte-derived DC (moDCs) markers and specific markers such as HLA-G and its ligand ILT4. As demonstrated by whole-genome microarray, dDCs expressed a specific gene program markedly distinct from that of moDCs; it included estrogen- and progesterone-regulated genes and genes encoding immunoregulatory cytokines, which is consistent with the context of foeto-maternal tolerance. A functional analysis of dDCs showed that they were unable to mature in response to bacterial ligands such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan, as assessed by the expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86. When dDCs were incubated with bacteria known for their placenta tropism, Coxiella burnetii and Brucella abortus, they were also unable to mature and to produce inflammatory cytokines. It is likely that the defective maturation of dDCs and their inability to produce inflammatory cytokines is related to the spontaneous release of IL-10 by these cells. Taken together, these results suggest that dDCs exhibit an immunoregulatory program, which may favor the pathogenicity of C. burnetii or B. abortus. PMID:25566514

  19. Identification of a protective protein from stationary-phase exoproteome of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shikha; Kumar, Subodh; Dohre, Sudhir; Afley, Prachiti; Sengupta, Nabonita; Alam, Syed I

    2014-02-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease. No Brucella vaccine is available for use in humans, and existing animal vaccines have limitations. To search the putative vaccine candidates, we studied the exoproteome of Brucella abortus NCTC 10093 using 2-DE-MS approach. Twenty-six proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Outer membrane protein 25, d-galactose periplasmic-binding protein, oligopeptide ABC transporter protein and isopropylmalate synthase were found to be the most abundant proteins. Most proteins (6, 23%) were predicted to be involved in amino acid transport and metabolism followed by carbohydrate transport and metabolism (4, 15%). Outer membrane protein 25, Omp2b porin and one hypothetical protein were predicted as outer membrane proteins. In addition, Omp28, Omp31 and one ribosomal protein (L9) were also identified. The ribosomal protein L9 was produced as a recombinant protein and was studied in mouse model for vaccine potential. It was found to be immunogenic in terms of generating serum antibody response and release of IFN-γ from mice spleen cells. Recombinant L9-immunized mice were protected against challenge with virulent B. abortus strain 544, suggesting usefulness of ribosomal protein L9 as a good vaccine candidate against brucellosis.

  20. An evaluation of ELISA using recombinant Brucella abortus bacterioferritin (Bfr) for bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-04-01

    To date, detection of antibodies against the lipopolysaccharide portion is the backbone of most serodiagnostic methods for brucellosis screening. However this pose a risk for false positive reactions related to other pathogens especially that of Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 which has the most prominent cross reactivity with Brucella spp. In this study, cloning and expression of Brucella abortus bacterioferritin (Bfr) was accomplished by PCR amplification into an expression vector system, and purification of a recombinant B. abortus Bfr (rBfr). The immunogenicity of rBfr was confirmed by Western blot with Brucella-positive bovine serum. To determine whether rBfr has a potential benefit for use in the serodiagnosis of bovine brucellosis, rBfr-based ELISA was performed. Interestingly, rBfr was able to detect anti-Brucella antibodies in positive sera in a dependent manner of TAT values but did not show an immunoreaction with negative samples. Particularly, average OD492 values at the lowest, medium and highest TAT titer levels were 1.4, 2.2 and 2.6-fold increase compared with the cutoff value, respectively. The accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of rBfr showed 89.09%, 93.6% and 85.33%, respectively. These findings suggest that rBfr might be a good candidate for serological diagnosis development of bovine brucellosis.

  1. Brucella abortus induces TNF-α-dependent astroglial MMP-9 secretion through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central nervous system (CNS) invasion by bacteria of the genus Brucella results in an inflammatory disorder called neurobrucellosis. We have recently demonstrated that B. abortus infects microglia and astrocytes, eliciting the production of a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines which contribute to CNS damage. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) have been implicated in inflammatory tissue destruction in a range of pathological situations in the CNS. Increased MMP secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in a variety of CNS diseases characterized by tissue-destructive pathology. Methods In this study, the molecular mechanisms that regulate MMP secretion from Brucella-infected astrocytes in vitro were investigated. MMP-9 was evaluated in culture supernatants by ELISA, zymography and gelatinolytic activity. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways was evaluated by Western blot and using specific inhibitors. The role of TNF-α was evaluated by ELISA and by assays with neutralizing antibodies. Results B. abortus infection induced the secretion of MMP-9 from murine astrocytes in a dose-dependent fashion. The phenomenon was independent of bacterial viability and was recapitulated by L-Omp19, a B. abortus lipoprotein model, but not its LPS. B. abortus and L-Omp19 readily activated p38 and Erk1/2 MAPK, thus enlisting these pathways among the kinase pathways that the bacteria may address as they invade astrocytes. Inhibition of p38 or Erk1/2 significantly diminished MMP-9 secretion, and totally abrogated production of this MMP when both MAPK pathways were inhibited simultaneously. A concomitant abrogation of B. abortus- and L-Omp19-induced TNF-α production was observed when p38 and Erk1/2 pathways were inhibited, indicating that TNF-α could be implicated in MMP-9 secretion. MMP-9 secretion induced by B. abortus or L-Omp19 was completely abrogated when experiments were conducted in the presence of a TNF-α neutralizing

  2. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. IMPORTANCE Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of

  3. A Multiplex Approach to Molecular Detection of Brucella abortus and/or Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Sreevatsan, Srinand; Bookout, Jack B.; Ringpis, Fidel; Perumaalla, Veera S.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Adams, L. Garry; Hagius, Sue D.; Elzer, Philip H.; Bricker, Betsy J.; Kumar, Girish K.; Rajasekhar, M.; Isloor, Srikrishna; Barathur, Raj R.

    2000-01-01

    A multiplex amplification and detection platform for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis and Brucella abortus infection simultaneously in bovine milk and nasal secretions was developed. This system (designated the bovine pathogen detection assay [BPDA]-PCR) consists of duplex amplification of species-specific targets (a region of the BCSP31K gene of B. abortus and a repeat-sequence region in the hsp65 gene of M. bovis, respectively). This is followed by a solid-phase probe capture hybridization of amplicons for detection. On the basis of spiking experiments with normal milk, the analytical sensitivity of the assay was 800 CFU equivalents/ml of milk for B. abortus and as low as 4 CFU equivalents per ml of milk for M. bovis. BPDA-PCR was validated with 45 liver samples from lemmings experimentally infected with B. abortus. The assay sensitivity, based on culture status as a “gold standard,” was 93.9%. In this experiment, BPDA-PCR also identified five culture-negative liver samples as positive (41.7%). Field studies for the evaluation of BPDA-PCR were performed with samples from dairy animals from geographically distinct regions (India, Mexico, and Argentina). A high prevalence of shedding of B. abortus (samples from India) and M. bovis (samples from Mexico) was identified by BPDA-PCR. In samples from India, B. abortus shedding was identified in 86% of milk ring test-positive animals (n = 15) and 80% of milk ring test-negative cows (n = 5). In samples from Mexico, M. bovis was identified by PCR in 32.6% of pools (n = 46) of milk that each contained milk from 10 animals and in 56.2% of nasal swabs (n = 121) from cattle from tuberculin test-positive herds. In contrast, the Argentine cattle (n = 70) had a modest prevalence of M. bovis shedding in nasal swabs (2.9%) and milk (1.4%) and of B. abortus in milk (11.4%). On the basis of these analyses, we identify BPDA-PCR as an optimal tool for both screening of herds and testing of individual animals in a disease

  4. Seroprevalence and molecular characterization of Chlamydia abortus in frozen fetal and placental tissues of aborting ewes in northeastern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Hireche, Sana; Ababneh, Mustafa Mohammed Kheir; Bouaziz, Omar; Boussena, Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    Enzootic abortion of ewes is one of the most serious health problems in sheep flocks worldwide. It has a significant economic impact because abortion, decrease in milk production and weak lambs. Besides, the bacteria is zoonotic. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with Chlamydia abortus infection in 552 ewes in Constantine using a C. abortus-specific indirect ELISA kit. Chlamydial DNA was investigated in ten ovine fetuses and eight placentas using PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and DNA sequencing. The study concluded that 7.2 % of ewes were seropositive and 33.3 % of sheep flocks had at least one seropositive ewe. Adjacent farmworker visits (OR = 7.667, 95 % CI (OR) = 2.307; 27.203) was defined as a risk factor. Deliveries of weak lambs (OR = 2.920, 95 % CI (OR) = 1.022; 8.342) and septicemia in lambs (OR = 9.971, 95 % CI (OR) = 2.383; 41.713) were significantly associated with chlamydial infection. PCR-RFLP analysis revealed positive signals to C. abortus in six fetuses and four placentas. Sequencing of the omp2 gene revealed that the Algerian strain is 96 % similar with C. abortus FAS strain. C. abortus plays a major role in abortion in northeastern Algeria. Appropriate control measures must be implemented to reduce economic losses and to avoid human contamination.

  5. Studies on recombinant glucokinase (r-glk) protein of Brucella abortus as a candidate vaccine molecule for brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Vrushabhendrappa; Singh, Amit Kumar; Balakrishna, Konduru; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2014-09-29

    Brucellosis is one of the most prevalent zoonotic diseases of worldwide distribution caused by the infection of genus Brucella. Live attenuated vaccines such as B. abortus S19, B. abortus RB51 and B. melitensis Rev1 are found most effective against brucellosis infection in animals, contriving a number of serious side effects and having chances to revert back into their active pathogenic form. In order to engineer a safe and effective vaccine candidate to be used in both animals and human, a recombinant subunit vaccine molecule comprising the truncated region of glucokinase (r-glk) gene from B. abortus S19 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 host. Female BALB/c mice immunized with purified recombinant protein developed specific antibody titer of 1:64,000. The predominant IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes signified development of Th1 directed immune responses. In vitro cell cytotoxicity assay using anti-r-glk antibodies incubated with HeLa cells showed 81.20% and 78.5% cell viability against lethal challenge of B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M, respectively. The lymphocyte proliferative assay indicated a higher splenic lymphocyte responses at 25μg/ml concentration of protein which implies the elevated development of memory immune responses. In contrast to control, the immunized group of mice intra-peritoneal (I.P.) challenged with B. abortus 544 were significantly protected with no signs of necrosis and vacuolization in their liver and spleen tissue. The elevated B-cell response associated with Th1 adopted immunity, significant in vitro cell viability as well as protection afforded in experimental animals after challenge, supplemented with histopathological analysis are suggestive of r-glk protein as a prospective candidate vaccine molecule against brucellosis.

  6. Transcriptional analysis of in vitro expression patterns of Chlamydophila abortus polymorphic outer membrane proteins during the chlamydial developmental cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wheelhouse, Nicholas; Aitchison, Kevin; Spalding, Lucy; Livingstone, Morag; Longbottom, David

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is the aetiological agent of ovine enzootic abortion. Sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis of the genome of C. abortus strain S26/3 has revealed variation in the loci encoding the polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps). These Pmps resemble autotransporter proteins of the type V secretion system, suggesting an important role in chlamydial pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterise the transcriptional expression patterns of this family during the developmental cycle of C. abortus. McCoy cells were infected with C. abortus and analysed for pmp mRNA expression over a 72 h period. Few pmp transcripts were detected in the early stages of the developmental cycle. Peak expression occurred at 48 h post-infection (p.i.) other than for pmp5E, where it was observed at 24 h p.i. Overall, expression of pmps 5E, 18D and 10G were found to be 40 to 100-fold higher than the lowest expressing pmps (6H, 13G and 15G) at 24 h p.i., while pmps 18D and 17G were 14 to 16-fold higher than the lowest (11G, 14G and 15G) at 48 h. Levels of expression for all the other pmp genes were below one copy per genome at any time point. The expression of all the pmps reduced to near base-line levels by 60 h p.i. These results demonstrate that pmp expression in C. abortus is mid to late cycle, consistent with conversion of the reticulate body to the elementary body. The low level of pmp transcription may be indicative of heterogeneity in expression, suggesting a possible role for some of the Pmps in antigenic variation and chlamydial pathogenesis. PMID:19454212

  7. Cell mediated immune response after challenge in Omp25 liposome immunized mice contributes to protection against virulent Brucella abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2013-02-06

    Brucellosis is a disease affecting various domestic and wild life species, and is caused by a bacterium Brucella. Keeping in view the serious economic and medical consequences of brucellosis, efforts have been made to prevent the infection through the use of vaccines. Cell-mediated immune responses [CMI] involving interferon gamma and cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for removal of intracellular Brucella. Omp25 has been reported to be involved in virulence of Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella ovis. In our previous study, we have shown the protective efficacy of recombinant Omp25, when administered intradermally. In this study, the recombinant Omp25 was formulated in PC-PE liposomes and PLGA microparticles, to enhance the protective immunity generated by it. Significant protection was seen with prime and booster liposome immunization in Balb/c mice against virulent B. abortus 544 as it was comparable to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. However, microparticle prime and booster immunization failed to give better protection when compared to B. abortus S-19 vaccine strain. This difference can be attributed to the stimulation of cell mediated immune response in PC-PE liposome immunized mice even after challenge which converted to cytotoxicity seen in CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. However, in PLGA microparticle immunized mice, cell mediated immunity was not generated after challenge as observed by decreased cytotoxicity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) enriched lymphocytes. Our study emphasizes on the importance of liposome encapsulating Omp25 immunization in conferring protection against B. abortus 544 challenge in Balb/c mice with a single dose immunization regimen.

  8. Bacterial survival, lymph node pathology, and serological responses of bison (Bison bison) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 or strain 19.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Cheville, N F; Kunkle, R A; Palmer, M V; Jensen, A E

    1997-01-01

    From August 1993 to June 1994, 3 month-old bison (Bison bison) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51, n = 6), strain 19 (S19, n = 3), or with saline (n = 1) and serologic responses and persistence of vaccine strains within lymph nodes were monitored. Bison vaccinated with S19 had granulomatous lymphadenitis and greater peak numbers of B. abortus than those vaccinated with SRB51. Bison vaccinated with RB51 had similar histological lesions and B. abortus were still present in lymph nodes at 16 weeks. Although antibodies against RB51 were produced, standard tube agglutination test responses of RB51-vaccinates remained negative. The histological lesions of B. abortus infections in bison were similar to those observed in cattle, but bison did not clear SRB51 as rapidly as cattle.

  9. TLR9 is required for MAPK/NF-κB activation but does not cooperate with TLR2 or TLR6 to induce host resistance to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Pereira, Guilherme de Sousa; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Splitter, Gary; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2016-05-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence, leading to undulant fever in humans and abortion in domestic animals. B. abortus is recognized by several pattern-recognition receptors triggering pathways during the host innate immune response. Therefore, here, we determined the cooperative role of TLR9 with TLR2 or TLR6 receptors in sensing Brucella Furthermore, we deciphered the host innate immune response against B. abortus or its DNA, emphasizing the role of TLR9-MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. TLR9 is required for the initial host control of B. abortus, but this TLR was dispensable after 6 wk of infection. The susceptibility of TLR9(-/-)-infected animals to Brucella paralleled with lower levels of IFN-γ produced by mouse splenocytes stimulated with this pathogen compared with wild-type cells. However, no apparent cooperative interplay was observed between TLR2-TLR9 or TLR6-TLR9 receptors to control infection. Moreover, B. abortus or its DNA induced activation of MAPK/NF-κB pathways and production of IL-12 and TNF-α by macrophages partially dependent on TLR9 but completely dependent on MyD88. In addition, B. abortus-derived CpG oligonucleotides required TLR9 to promote IL-12 and TNF-α production by macrophages. By confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that TLR9 redistributed and colocalized with lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 upon Brucella infection. Thus, B. abortus induced TLR9 traffic, leading to cell signaling activation and IL-12 and TNF-α production. Although TLR9 recognized Brucella CpG motifs, our results suggest a new pathway of B. abortus DNA-activating macrophages independent of TLR9.

  10. Effect of Preventive Chlamydia abortus Vaccination in Offspring Development in Sheep Challenged Experimentally

    PubMed Central

    García-Seco, Teresa; Pérez-Sancho, Marta; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Alejandro; Díez-Guerrier, Alberto; García, Nerea; Pozo, Pilar; Goyache, Joaquín; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Ovine enzootic abortion, caused by Chlamydia abortus, leads to important economic losses worldwide. In addition to reproductive failures, infection may impact lamb growth during the first weeks after birth, yet this effect has not been well characterized. Vaccination can help to control the disease but variable efficacy values have been described, possibly related with factors associated with the host, the vaccine, the parameter used for efficacy determination, and the challenge conditions. In this context, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated standard commercial vaccine and a 1/2 diluted dose in pregnant sheep challenged with C. abortus by examining multiple indicators of vaccine effect (including incidence of reproductive failures, bacterial excretion, and evolution of weight gain of viable lambs during the first month of life). Three groups of ewes [control non-vaccinated, C (n = 18); vaccinated with standard dose, SV (n = 16); and vaccinated with 1/2 dose, DV (n = 17)], were challenged approximately 90 days post-mating and tested using direct PCR (tissue samples and vaginal swabs) and ELISA (serum) until 31 days post-reproductive outcome. There were not significant differences in the proportions of reproductive failures or bacterial shedding after birth/abortion regardless the vaccination protocol. However, a beneficial effect of vaccination on offspring growth was detected in both vaccinated groups compared with the controls, with a mean increase in weight measured at 30 days of life of 1.5 and 2.5 kg (p = 0.056) and an increase in the geometric mean of the daily gain of 8.4 and 9.7% in lambs born from DV and SV ewes compared with controls, respectively. Our results demonstrate the effect of an inactivated vaccine in the development of the offspring of C. abortus-infected ewes at a standard and a diluted dose, an interesting finding given the difficulty in achieving sufficient antigen concentration in the production of enzootic

  11. Effect of Preventive Chlamydia abortus Vaccination in Offspring Development in Sheep Challenged Experimentally.

    PubMed

    García-Seco, Teresa; Pérez-Sancho, Marta; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Alejandro; Díez-Guerrier, Alberto; García, Nerea; Pozo, Pilar; Goyache, Joaquín; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Ovine enzootic abortion, caused by Chlamydia abortus, leads to important economic losses worldwide. In addition to reproductive failures, infection may impact lamb growth during the first weeks after birth, yet this effect has not been well characterized. Vaccination can help to control the disease but variable efficacy values have been described, possibly related with factors associated with the host, the vaccine, the parameter used for efficacy determination, and the challenge conditions. In this context, we evaluated the efficacy of an inactivated standard commercial vaccine and a 1/2 diluted dose in pregnant sheep challenged with C. abortus by examining multiple indicators of vaccine effect (including incidence of reproductive failures, bacterial excretion, and evolution of weight gain of viable lambs during the first month of life). Three groups of ewes [control non-vaccinated, C (n = 18); vaccinated with standard dose, SV (n = 16); and vaccinated with 1/2 dose, DV (n = 17)], were challenged approximately 90 days post-mating and tested using direct PCR (tissue samples and vaginal swabs) and ELISA (serum) until 31 days post-reproductive outcome. There were not significant differences in the proportions of reproductive failures or bacterial shedding after birth/abortion regardless the vaccination protocol. However, a beneficial effect of vaccination on offspring growth was detected in both vaccinated groups compared with the controls, with a mean increase in weight measured at 30 days of life of 1.5 and 2.5 kg (p = 0.056) and an increase in the geometric mean of the daily gain of 8.4 and 9.7% in lambs born from DV and SV ewes compared with controls, respectively. Our results demonstrate the effect of an inactivated vaccine in the development of the offspring of C. abortus-infected ewes at a standard and a diluted dose, an interesting finding given the difficulty in achieving sufficient antigen concentration in the production of enzootic

  12. A Homologue of an Operon Required for DNA Transfer in Agrobacterium Is Required in Brucella abortus for Virulence and Intracellular Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Sieira, Rodrigo; Comerci, Diego J.; Sánchez, Daniel O.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a Brucella abortus 2308 genome project carried out in our laboratory, we identified, cloned, and sequenced a genomic DNA fragment containing a locus (virB) highly homologous to bacterial type IV secretion systems. The B. abortus virB locus is a collinear arrangement of 13 open reading frames (ORFs). Between virB1 and virB2 and downstream of ORF12, two degenerated, palindromic repeat sequences characteristic of Brucella intergenic regions were found. Gene reporter studies demonstrated that the B. abortus virB locus constitutes an operon transcribed from virB1 which is turned on during the stationary phase of growth. A B. abortus polar virB1 mutant failed to replicate in HeLa cells, indicating that the virB operon plays a critical role in intracellular multiplication. Mutants with polar and nonpolar mutations introduced in virB10 showed different behaviors in mice and in the HeLa cell infection assay, suggesting that virB10 per se is necessary for the correct function of this type IV secretion apparatus. Mouse infection assays demonstrated that the virB operon constitutes a major determinant of B. abortus virulence. It is suggested that putative effector molecules secreted by this type IV secretion system determine routing of B. abortus to an endoplasmic reticulum-related replication compartment. PMID:10940027

  13. Adrenal steroids modulate the immune response during Brucella abortus infection by a mechanism that depends on the regulation of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, María Virginia; Velásquez, Lis Noelia; Barrionuevo, Paula; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Human brucellosis is a protean disease with a diversity of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from infection with Brucella species. Recent reports suggest a cross-regulation between adrenal steroids (cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]) and the immune system. Monocytes and macrophages are the main replication niche for Brucella. Therefore, we investigated the role of adrenal hormones on the modulation of the immune response mediated by macrophages in B. abortus infection. Cortisol treatment during B. abortus infection significantly inhibits cytokine, chemokine, and MMP-9 secretion. In contrast, DHEA treatment had no effect. However, DHEA treatment increases the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD86), the adhesion molecule CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II expression on the surface of B. abortus-infected monocytes. It is known that B. abortus infection inhibits MHC-I and MHC-II expression induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) treatment. DHEA reverses B. abortus downmodulation of the MHC-I and -II expression induced by IFN-γ. Taken together, our data indicate that DHEA immune intervention may positively affect monocyte activity during B. abortus infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Pheno- and genotyping of Brucella abortus biovar 5 isolated from a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus: First case reported in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Diana; Thompson, Carolina; Draghi, Graciela; Canavesio, Vilma; Jacobo, Roberto; Zimmer, Patricia; Elena, Sebastián; Nicola, Ana M; de Echaide, Susana Torioni

    2014-09-17

    An isolate of Brucella spp. from an aborted water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) fetus was characterized based on its pheno- and genotype. The phenotype was defined by carbon dioxide requirement, hydrogen sulfide production, sensitivity to thionin and basic fuchsin and agglutination with Brucella A and M monospecific antisera. The genotype was based on the amplification of the following genes: bcsp31, omp2ab, and eri and the species-specific localization of the insertion sequence IS711 in the Brucella chromosome via B. abortus-B. melitensis-B. ovis-B. suis (AMOS)-PCR. Unexpectedly, the isolate showed a phenotype different from B. abortus bv 1, the most prevalent strain in cattle in Argentina, and from vaccine strain 19, currently used in bovines and water buffaloes. Genotyping supported the phenotypic results, as the analysis of the omp2ab gene sequence showed an identical pattern to either B. abortus bv 5 or B. melitensis. Finally, the AMOS PCR generated a 1700-bp fragment from the isolate, different than those amplified from B. abortus bv 1 (498bp) and B. melitensis (731bp), confirming the presence of B. abortus bv 5. The OIE/FAO Reference Laboratory for Brucellosis confirmed this typing. This is the first report of B. abortus bv 5 from a water buffalo in the Americas.

  15. The effects of red ginseng saponin fraction-A (RGSF-A) on phagocytosis and intracellular signaling in Brucella abortus infected RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Simborio, Hannah Leah; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Rhee, Man Hee; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2015-06-01

    This study indicated that RGSF-A caused a marked reduction in the adherence, internalization and intracellular growth of Brucella abortus in RGSF-A-treated cells. Furthermore, a decline in the intensity of F-actin fluorescence was observed in RGSF-A-treated cells compared with untreated B. abortus-infected cells. In addition, an evaluation of phagocytic signaling proteins by Western blot analysis revealed an apparent reduction of ERK and p38α phosphorylation levels in B. abortus-infected RGSF-A-treated cells compared with the control. Upon intracellular trafficking of the pathogen, a higher number of B. abortus-containing phagosomes colocalized with LAMP-1 in RGSF-A-treated cells compared with control cells. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of B. abortus uptake could be mediated by suppression in the activation of MAPKs signaling proteins phospho-ERK 1/2, and p38 levels. On the other hand, inhibition of intracellular replication results from the enhancement of phagolysosome fusion in host macrophages. This study highlights the phagocytic and intracellular modulating effect of RGSF-A and its potential as an alternative remedy to control B. abortus infection.

  16. Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 vaccine immunogenicity test: Evaluation of three mice (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and two challenge strains (544 and 2308).

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina Leite; Dorneles, Elaine Maria Seles; Pauletti, Rebeca Barbosa; Poester, Fernando Padilla; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of different mouse strains (BALB/c, Swiss and CD-1) and different challenge strains (Brucella abortus 544 and 2308) in the study of B. abortus vaccine (S19 and RB51) immunogenicity test in the murine model. No significant difference in B. abortus vaccine potency assay was found with the use of B. abortus 544 or B. abortus 2308 as challenge strain. Results of variance analysis showed an interaction between treatment and mouse strain; therefore these parameters could not be compared separately. When CD-1 groups were compared, those vaccinated showed significantly lower counts than non-vaccinated ones (P<0.05), independently of the vaccine received (S19 or RB51). Similar results were observed on BALB/c groups. However, in Swiss mouse groups, S19 was more protective than RB51 (P<0.05), which showed protection when compared to the non-vaccinated group (P<0.05). In summary, data from the present study showed that CD-1, BALB/c and Swiss mice strains, as well as both challenge strains, B. abortus strains 544 and 2308, can be used in immunogenicity tests of S19 and RB51 vaccines.

  17. Monocyte-derived macrophages from Zebu (Bos taurus indicus) are more efficient to control Brucella abortus intracellular survival than macrophages from European cattle (Bos taurus taurus).

    PubMed

    Macedo, A A; Costa, E A; Silva, A P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2013-02-15

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases in the world. Considering its strict zoonotic nature, understanding of the pathogenesis and immunity of Brucella spp. in natural animal hosts is essential to prevent human infections. Natural resistance against brucellosis has been demonstrated in cattle, and it is associated with the ability of macrophages to prevent intracellular replication of Brucella abortus. Identification of breeds that are resistant to B. abortus may contribute for controlling and eradicating brucellosis in cattle. This study aimed to compare macrophages from Nelore (Bos taurus indicus) or Holstein (Bos taurus taurus) regarding their resistance to B. abortus infection. Macrophages from Nelore were significantly more efficient in controlling intracellular growth of B. abortus when compared to Holstein macrophages even under intralysosomal iron restricting conditions. Furthermore, Nelore macrophages had higher transcription levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and TNF-α at 12h post-infection (hpi) and higher levels of IL-12 at 24 hpi when compared to Holstein macrophages. Conversely, Holstein macrophages had higher levels of IL-10 transcripts at 24 hpi. Macrohages from Nelore also generated more nitric oxide (NO) in response to B. abortus infection when compared to Holstein macrophages. In conclusion, cultured Nelore macrophages are more effective in controlling intracellular replication of B. abortus, suggesting that Nelore cattle is likely to have a higher degree of natural resistance to brucellosis than Holstein.

  18. Adrenal Steroids Modulate the Immune Response during Brucella abortus Infection by a Mechanism That Depends on the Regulation of Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, María Virginia; Velásquez, Lis Noelia; Barrionuevo, Paula; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán

    2015-01-01

    Human brucellosis is a protean disease with a diversity of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from infection with Brucella species. Recent reports suggest a cross-regulation between adrenal steroids (cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]) and the immune system. Monocytes and macrophages are the main replication niche for Brucella. Therefore, we investigated the role of adrenal hormones on the modulation of the immune response mediated by macrophages in B. abortus infection. Cortisol treatment during B. abortus infection significantly inhibits cytokine, chemokine, and MMP-9 secretion. In contrast, DHEA treatment had no effect. However, DHEA treatment increases the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD86), the adhesion molecule CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II expression on the surface of B. abortus-infected monocytes. It is known that B. abortus infection inhibits MHC-I and MHC-II expression induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) treatment. DHEA reverses B. abortus downmodulation of the MHC-I and -II expression induced by IFN-γ. Taken together, our data indicate that DHEA immune intervention may positively affect monocyte activity during B. abortus infection. PMID:25733519

  19. Protective immune-response of aluminium hydroxide gel adjuvanted phage lysate of Brucella abortus S19 in mice against direct virulent challenge with B. abortus 544.

    PubMed

    Jain, Lata; Rawat, Mayank; Prajapati, Awadhesh; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Bablu; Chaturvedi, V K; Saxena, H M; Ramakrishnan, Sarvanan; Kumar, Jatin; Kerketta, Priscilla

    2015-09-01

    The prophylactic efficacies of plain and alum adsorbed lysate were evaluated by direct virulent challenge in mice model. A recently isolated brucellaphage 'ϕLd' was used for generation of lysates. Twenty four h incubated Brucella abortus S19 broth cultures standardized to contain approximately 10(8) CFU/ml were found suitable for generation of lysates. Three lysate batches produced through separate cycles did not show any significant variation with respect to protein and polysaccharide contents, endotoxin level and phage counts, indicating that compositionally stable lysate preparations can be generated through an optimized production process. Three polypeptides of ∼16, 19 and 23 kDa could be identified as immuno-dominant antigens of the lysate which induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in a dose dependent manner. Results of efficacy evaluation trial confirmed dose-dependent protective potencies of lysate preparation. The lysate with an antigenic dose of 0.52 μg protein and 60 μg CHO adsorbed on aluminium gel (0.1 percent aluminium concentration) exhibited the highest protective potency which was greater than that induced by standard S19 vaccine. Phage lysate methodology provides a very viable option through which an improved immunizing preparation with all desirable traits can be developed against brucellosis, and integrated with immunization programmes in a more efficient manner.

  20. Brucella abortus as a potential vaccine candidate: induction of interleukin-12 secretion and enhanced B7.1 and B7.2 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 surface expression in elutriated human monocytes stimulated by heat-inactivated B. abortus.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, M; Golding, H; Manischewitz, J; Webb, D; Golding, B

    1996-08-01

    Development of a vaccine which is capable of generating a strong cellular immune response associated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production and cytotoxic T-cell development requires that the immunogen be capable of inducing the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12), which is a pivotal factor for the differentiation of Th1 or Tc1 cells. We have previously shown that the heat-inactivated gram-negative bacterium Brucella abortus can induce IFN-gamma secretion by T cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that B. abortus and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from B. abortus can induce IL-12 p40 mRNA expression and protein secretion by human elutriated monocytes (99% pure). p40 mRNA was detected within 4 h, and p40 protein could be measured at 24 h. This induction was abrogated by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody, suggesting that monocytes recognize B. abortus via their receptor for LPS. The biological activity of IL-12 secreted by B. abortus-stimulated monocytes was demonstrated by its ability to upregulate IFN-gamma mRNA expression in T cells separated from monocytes and B. abortus by a transwell membrane. The B. abortus-induced IL-12 also enhanced NK cytolytic activity against K562 target cells. B. abortus was shown to rapidly increase the expression of the costimulatory molecules B7.1 and B7.2 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 on human monocytes. Together, these data indicate that B. abortus can directly activate human monocytes and provide the cytokine milieu which would direct the immune response towards Th1-Tc1 differentiation.

  1. Brucella abortus as a potential vaccine candidate: induction of interleukin-12 secretion and enhanced B7.1 and B7.2 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 surface expression in elutriated human monocytes stimulated by heat-inactivated B. abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, M; Golding, H; Manischewitz, J; Webb, D; Golding, B

    1996-01-01

    Development of a vaccine which is capable of generating a strong cellular immune response associated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production and cytotoxic T-cell development requires that the immunogen be capable of inducing the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12), which is a pivotal factor for the differentiation of Th1 or Tc1 cells. We have previously shown that the heat-inactivated gram-negative bacterium Brucella abortus can induce IFN-gamma secretion by T cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that B. abortus and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from B. abortus can induce IL-12 p40 mRNA expression and protein secretion by human elutriated monocytes (99% pure). p40 mRNA was detected within 4 h, and p40 protein could be measured at 24 h. This induction was abrogated by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody, suggesting that monocytes recognize B. abortus via their receptor for LPS. The biological activity of IL-12 secreted by B. abortus-stimulated monocytes was demonstrated by its ability to upregulate IFN-gamma mRNA expression in T cells separated from monocytes and B. abortus by a transwell membrane. The B. abortus-induced IL-12 also enhanced NK cytolytic activity against K562 target cells. B. abortus was shown to rapidly increase the expression of the costimulatory molecules B7.1 and B7.2 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 on human monocytes. Together, these data indicate that B. abortus can directly activate human monocytes and provide the cytokine milieu which would direct the immune response towards Th1-Tc1 differentiation. PMID:8757841

  2. Brucella abortus Invasion of Osteocytes Modulates Connexin 43 and Integrin Expression and Induces Osteoclastogenesis via Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Gentilini, María Virginia; Velásquez, Lis Noelia; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common localization of human active disease. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells of bone. They secrete factors that regulate the differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts during bone remodeling. The aim of this study is to determine if Brucella abortus infection modifies osteocyte function. Our results indicate that B. abortus infection induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL), proinflammatory cytokines, and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) secretion by osteocytes. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes induced bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMM) to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or osteoprotegerin (OPG), RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that TNF-α and RANKL are involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes. Connexin 43 (Cx43) and the integrins E11/gp38, integrin-α, integrin-β, and CD44 are involved in cell-cell interactions necessary for osteocyte survival. B. abortus infection inhibited the expression of Cx43 but did not modify the expression of integrins. Yet the expression of both Cx43 and integrins was inhibited by supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages. B. abortus infection was not capable of inducing osteocyte apoptosis. However, supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages induced osteocyte apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that B. abortus infection could alter osteocyte function, contributing to bone damage. PMID:26459511

  3. First report of orchitis in man caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Douce, Richard

    2012-09-01

    We present a 44-year-old man from a rural community in northern Ecuador who worked on a cattle farm where he was involved with primary veterinary care, including assistance during births (or calving) and placenta retention and artificial insemination, with minimal precautions. In September of 2009, quite abruptly, he developed asthenia and hypersomnia without any apparent cause or symptoms like fever, chills, or night sweats. On November 14, 2009, he suffered from pain and edema in the right testicle that coincided with pain in the abdomen. Clinical, serological, and bacteriological investigations confirmed the first case of unilateral orchitis in man in Ecuador caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1. Because brucellosis is a neglected disease, special attention should be given to it in the training of medical and veterinary students.

  4. Brucella abortus S19 vaccine protects dairy cattle against natural infection with Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Michael; Bardenstein, Svetlana; Keningswald, Gaby; Banai, Menachem

    2016-11-21

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that can cause severe illness in humans and considerable economic loss in the livestock industry. Although small ruminants are the preferential host for Brucella melitensis, this pathogen has emerged as a cause for Brucella outbreaks in cattle. S19 vaccination is implemented in many countries where B. abortus is endemic but its effectiveness against B. melitensis has not been validated. Here we show that vaccine effectiveness in preventing disease transmission between vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts, as determined by seroconversion, was 87.2% (95% CI 69.5-94.6%). Furthermore, vaccination was associated with a reduced risk for abortion. Together, our data emphasize the role S19 vaccination could play in preventing B. melitensis outbreaks in areas where this pathogen is prevalent in small ruminant populations.

  5. Brucella abortus Strain 2308 Wisconsin Genome: Importance of the Definition of Reference Strains.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Castillo-Zeledón, Amanda; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Roop Ii, R Martin; Comerci, Diego J; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Caswell, Clayton C; Baker, Kate S; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R; Moreno, Edgardo; Letesson, Jean J; De Bolle, Xavier; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial infectious disease affecting a wide range of mammals and a neglected zoonosis caused by species of the genetically homogenous genus Brucella. As in most studies on bacterial diseases, research in brucellosis is carried out by using reference strains as canonical models to understand the mechanisms underlying host pathogen interactions. We performed whole genome sequencing analysis of the reference strain B. abortus 2308 routinely used in our laboratory, including manual curated annotation accessible as an editable version through a link at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucella#Genomics. Comparison of this genome with two publically available 2308 genomes showed significant differences, particularly indels related to insertional elements, suggesting variability related to the transposition of these elements within the same strain. Considering the outcome of high resolution genomic techniques in the bacteriology field, the conventional concept of strain definition needs to be revised.

  6. An ecological perspective on Brucella abortus in the western United States.

    PubMed

    Cross, P C; Maichak, E J; Brennan, A; Scurlock, B M; Henningsen, J; Luikart, G

    2013-04-01

    After a hiatus during the 1990s, outbreaks of Brucella abortus in cattle are occurring more frequently in some of the western states of the United States, namely, Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. This increase is coincidentwith increasing brucellosis seroprevalence in elk (Cervus elaphus), which is correlated with elk density. Vaccines are a seductive solution, but their use in wildlife systems remains limited by logistical, financial, and scientific constraints. Cattle vaccination is ongoing in the region. Livestock regulations, however, tend to be based on serological tests that test for previous exposure and available vaccines do not protect against seroconversion. The authors review recent ecological studies of brucellosis, with particular emphasis on the Greater Yellowstone Area, and highlight the management options and implications of this work, including the potential utility of habitat modifications and targeted hunts, as well as scavengers and predators. Finally, the authors discuss future research directions that will help us to understand and manage brucellosis in wildlife.

  7. First Report of Orchitis in Man Caused by Brucella abortus Biovar 1 in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Saegerman, Claude; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Douce, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present a 44-year-old man from a rural community in northern Ecuador who worked on a cattle farm where he was involved with primary veterinary care, including assistance during births (or calving) and placenta retention and artificial insemination, with minimal precautions. In September of 2009, quite abruptly, he developed asthenia and hypersomnia without any apparent cause or symptoms like fever, chills, or night sweats. On November 14, 2009, he suffered from pain and edema in the right testicle that coincided with pain in the abdomen. Clinical, serological, and bacteriological investigations confirmed the first case of unilateral orchitis in man in Ecuador caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1. Because brucellosis is a neglected disease, special attention should be given to it in the training of medical and veterinary students. PMID:22826490

  8. Structure and properties of the outer membranes of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Moriyón, I; López-Goñi, I

    1998-03-01

    The brucellae are Gram-negative bacteria characteristically able to multiply facultatively within phagocytic cells and which cause a zoonosis of world-wide importance. This article reviews the structure and topology of the main components (lipopolysaccharide, native hapten polysaccharide, free lipids and proteins) of the outer membranes of Brucella abortus and B. melitensis, as well as some distinctive properties (permeability and interactions with cationic peptides) of these membranes. On these data, an outer membrane model is proposed in which, as compared to other Gram-negatives, there is a stronger hydrophobic anchorage for the lipopolysaccharide, free lipids, porin proteins and lipoproteins, and a reduced surface density of anionic groups, which could be partially or totally neutralized by ornithine lipids. This model accounts for the permeability of Brucella to hydrophobic permeants and for its resistance to the bactericidal oxygen-independent systems of phagocytes.

  9. Differentiation of cytotoxic adherent cells from peroxidase positive cells after intraperitoneal injection of Brucella abortus organisms.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Collet, B; Toujas, L

    1983-01-01

    The relations between the cytotoxic adherent cells (CAC) and the peroxidase positive adherent cells (PPAC) which appeared after i.p. injection of Brucella abortus were investigated. A kinetic study showed that PPAC preceeded CAC. Twenty-four hours after bacterial injection, almost all adherent cells stained for peroxidase and no cytotoxic activity could be recorded. Cells sampled at this moment acquired cytotoxic properties by cultivation in LPS containing medium. The treatment of the bacterial organisms by HCl or chloroform: methanol (C:M) suppressed their ability of inducing CAC but not that of inducing LPS-activatable PPAC. The substances extracted by C:M could activate PPAC into CAC in vitro. The data presented suggest that CAC differentiate from PPAC, that the recruitment of PPAC is not always followed by their transformation into CAC and that different components of the bacterial organisms might be necessary to achieve the steps of cell recruitment and maturation.

  10. An ecological perspective on the changing face of Brucella abortus in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Maichak, Eric J.; Brennan, Angela; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Henningsen, John C.; Luikart, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    After a hiatus during the 1990s, outbreaks of Brucella abortus in cattle are occurring more frequently in some of the western states of the United States, namely, Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. This increase is coincident with increasing brucellosis seroprevalence in elk (Cervus elaphus), which is correlated with elk density. Vaccines are a seductive solution, but their use in wildlife systems remains limited by logistical, financial, and scientific constraints. Cattle vaccination is ongoing in the region. Livestock regulations, however, tend to be based on serological tests that test for previous exposure and available vaccines do not protect against seroconversion. The authors review recent ecological studies of brucellosis, with particular emphasis on the Greater Yellowstone Area, and highlight the management options and implications of this work, including the potential utility of habitat modifications and targeted hunts, as well as scavengers and predators. Finally, the authors discuss future research directions that will help us to understand and manage brucellosis in wildlife.

  11. Properties of a cell-wall-defective variant of Brucella abortus of bovine origin.

    PubMed Central

    Corbel, M. J.; Scott, A. C.; Ross, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    The properties of an atypical Brucella strain isolated from lymph node tissue of a cow slaughtered as a brucellosis reactor were examined. The organism was Gram negative and highly pleomorphic, existing as cocci, coccobacilli, rods, branched and irregular forms which stained with fluorescent antibody conjugates prepared against rough and smooth Brucella abortus strains. It produced lecithinase and required at least 15% v/v equine or bovine serum for growth. It did not need supplementary CO2 for growth, produced H2S and was inhibited by brucella dyes and partially by i-erythritol. Growth inhibition or lysis was produced by brucella-phages. The organism was not pathogenic for guinea-pigs or mice but evoked antibodies mainly to rough Brucella antigens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 1 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6820027

  12. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant.

  13. Immunological characteristics in cattle of allergens derived from smooth Brucella abortus S99.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, B; Miler, J J; Dolan, L; McKeon, F; O'Meara, M

    1980-10-18

    Allergens prepared from a smooth strain of Brucella abortus (S99) were used in an intradermal test for the diagnosis of brucellosis in cattle. The development and testing of the allergen from the initial less purified stages is described. The removal of serological activity noted in some of the earlier preparations can be related to the elimination of molecules of high molecular weight. The final allergen is of a high order of sensitivity and specificity and does not cause production of complement fixing or agglutinating antibodies. Intradermal testing with such an allergen could be a most useful addition to present serological procedures as it could be carried out at the same time as tuberculin testing. As a routine surveillance test, particularly in low prevalence areas, it would eliminate the necessity for extensive blood sampling and in many cases detect the infected herd before serological tests would have become positive.

  14. Evaluation of Brucella abortus strain RB51 and strain 19 in pronghorn antelope.

    PubMed

    Elzer, Philip H; Smith, J; Roffe, T; Kreeger, T; Edwards, J; Davis, D

    2002-10-01

    Free-roaming elk and bison in the Greater Yellowstone Area remain the only wildlife reservoirs for Brucella abortus in the United States, and the large number of animals and a lack of holding facilities make it unreasonable to individually vaccinate each animal. Therefore, oral delivery is being proposed as a possible option to vaccinate these wild ungulates. One of the main problems associated with oral vaccination is the potential exposure of nontarget species to the vaccines. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two Brucella vaccines, strain 19 (S19) and the rough strain RB51 (SRB51), in pregnant pronghorn antelope. We conclude that S19 and SRB51 rarely colonize maternal and fetal tissues of pregnant pronghorn and were not associated with fetal death. Oral delivery of either vaccine at this dose appears to be nonhazardous to pregnant pronghorn.

  15. Interferon-γ expression in trophoblast cells in pregnant ewes challenged with Chlamydophila abortus.

    PubMed

    Worrall, S; Sammin, D J; Bassett, H F; Reid, C R; Gutierrez, J; Marques, P X; Nally, J E; O'Donovan, J; Williams, E J; Proctor, A; Markey, B K

    2011-08-01

    Pregnant ewes were challenged with Chlamydia abortus at 91-98 days of gestation and euthanised at 14, 21 and 28 days post-challenge. IFNγ mRNA labelling appeared to be co-localised with Chlamydial lipopolysaccharide within trophoblast cells in discrete areas lining the primary villi in the limbus and hilar zone of the placentomes from challenged sheep on days 21 and 28 post-infection. The presence of IFNγ was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. No labelling was seen in tissues from the non-infected ewes. The presence of IFNγ in trophoblast cells from infected ewes may indicate an attempt to restrict the replication of the organism and be an important trigger for the inflammatory responses that develop on the fetal side of the placenta in enzootic abortion.

  16. Isolation and characterisation of local strains of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rekiki, Abdessalem; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; Souriau, Armel; Jemli, Jemaa; Hammami, Salah; Rodolakis, Annie

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiosis is one of the major diseases that can lead to abortion in ewes. Since 1997, in 5 regions of Tunisia, Chlamydia-related abortions have been reported in 15 sheep and goat flocks. One hundred and sixty-six sera and 50 vaginal swab samples were collected from adult ewes. Chlamydial antigens were detected in 29 (58%) of the vaginal swabs using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) while 9 (18%) were positive by cell culture. Five strains were recovered from 4 different sheep flocks. Monoclonal antibody profiles and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region showed that these isolates were C. abortus. Using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), these Tunisian strains were shown to exhibit the same pattern as strains isolated in France.

  17. Brucella abortus Strain 2308 Wisconsin Genome: Importance of the Definition of Reference Strains

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Esquivel, Marcela; Ruiz-Villalobos, Nazareth; Castillo-Zeledón, Amanda; Jiménez-Rojas, César; Roop II, R. Martin; Comerci, Diego J.; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Caswell, Clayton C.; Baker, Kate S.; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Moreno, Edgardo; Letesson, Jean J.; De Bolle, Xavier; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial infectious disease affecting a wide range of mammals and a neglected zoonosis caused by species of the genetically homogenous genus Brucella. As in most studies on bacterial diseases, research in brucellosis is carried out by using reference strains as canonical models to understand the mechanisms underlying host pathogen interactions. We performed whole genome sequencing analysis of the reference strain B. abortus 2308 routinely used in our laboratory, including manual curated annotation accessible as an editable version through a link at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucella#Genomics. Comparison of this genome with two publically available 2308 genomes showed significant differences, particularly indels related to insertional elements, suggesting variability related to the transposition of these elements within the same strain. Considering the outcome of high resolution genomic techniques in the bacteriology field, the conventional concept of strain definition needs to be revised. PMID:27746773

  18. Evaluation of Brucella abortus strain RB51 and strain 19 in pronghorn antelope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elzer, P.H.; Smith, J.; Roffe, T.; Kreeger, T.; Edwards, J.; Davis, D.

    2002-01-01

    Free-roaming elk and bison in the Greater Yellowstone Area remain the only wildlife reservoirs for Brucella abortus in the United States, and the large number of animals and a lack of holding facilities make it unreasonable to individually vaccinate each animal. Therefore, oral delivery is being proposed as a possible option to vaccinate these wild ungulates. One of the main problems associated with oral vaccination is the potential exposure of nontarget species to the vaccines. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two Brucella vaccines, strain 19 (S19) and the rough strain RB51 (SRB51), in pregnant pronghorn antelope. We conclude that S19 and SRB51 rarely colonize maternal and fetal tissues of pregnant pronghorn and were not associated with fetal death. Oral delivery of either vaccine at this dose appears to be nonhazardous to pregnant pronghorn.

  19. Evaluation of Brucella abortus Phosphoglucomutase (pgm) Mutant as a New Live Rough-Phenotype Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ugalde, Juan Esteban; Comerci, Diego José; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Ugalde, Rodolfo Augusto

    2003-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 is the vaccine most frequently used against bovine brucellosis. Although it induces good protection levels, it cannot be administered to pregnant cattle, revaccination is not advised due to interference in the discrimination between infected and vaccinated animals during immune-screening procedures, and the vaccine is virulent for humans. Due to these reasons, there is a continuous search for new bovine vaccine candidates that may confer protection levels comparable to those conferred by S19 but without its disadvantages. A previous study characterized the phenotype associated with the phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene disruption in Brucella abortus S2308, as well as the possible role for the smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in virulence and intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells (J. E. Ugalde, C. Czibener, M. F. Feldman, and R. A. Ugalde, Infect. Immun. 68:5716-5723, 2000). In this report, we analyze the protection, proliferative response, and cytokine production induced in BALB/c mice by a Δpgm deletion strain. We show that this strain synthesizes O antigen with a size of approximately 45 kDa but is rough. This is due to the fact that the Δpgm strain is unable to assemble the O side chain in the complete LPS. Vaccination with the Δpgm strain induced protection levels comparable to those induced by S19 and generated a proliferative splenocyte response and a cytokine profile typical of a Th1 response. On the other hand, we were unable to detect a specific anti-O-antigen antibody response by using the fluorescence polarization assay. In view of these results, the possibility that the Δpgm mutant could be used as a vaccination strain is discussed. PMID:14573645

  20. Immune Responses of Bison and Efficacy after Booster Vaccination with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    PubMed Central

    McGill, J. L.; Sacco, R. E.; Hennager, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 1010 CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against brucellosis in

  1. The lipopolysaccharide core of Brucella abortus acts as a shield against innate immunity recognition.

    PubMed

    Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Iriarte, Maite; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Martirosyan, Anna; von Bargen, Kristine; Grilló, María-Jesús; Jerala, Roman; Brandenburg, Klaus; Llobet, Enrique; Bengoechea, José A; Moreno, Edgardo; Moriyón, Ignacio; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity recognizes bacterial molecules bearing pathogen-associated molecular patterns to launch inflammatory responses leading to the activation of adaptive immunity. However, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the gram-negative bacterium Brucella lacks a marked pathogen-associated molecular pattern, and it has been postulated that this delays the development of immunity, creating a gap that is critical for the bacterium to reach the intracellular replicative niche. We found that a B. abortus mutant in the wadC gene displayed a disrupted LPS core while keeping both the LPS O-polysaccharide and lipid A. In mice, the wadC mutant induced proinflammatory responses and was attenuated. In addition, it was sensitive to killing by non-immune serum and bactericidal peptides and did not multiply in dendritic cells being targeted to lysosomal compartments. In contrast to wild type B. abortus, the wadC mutant induced dendritic cell maturation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. All these properties were reproduced by the wadC mutant purified LPS in a TLR4-dependent manner. Moreover, the core-mutated LPS displayed an increased binding to MD-2, the TLR4 co-receptor leading to subsequent increase in intracellular signaling. Here we show that Brucella escapes recognition in early stages of infection by expressing a shield against recognition by innate immunity in its LPS core and identify a novel virulence mechanism in intracellular pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. These results also encourage for an improvement in the generation of novel bacterial vaccines.

  2. The Lipopolysaccharide Core of Brucella abortus Acts as a Shield Against Innate Immunity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Iriarte, Maite; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Martirosyan, Anna; von Bargen, Kristine; Grilló, María-Jesús; Jerala, Roman; Brandenburg, Klaus; Llobet, Enrique; Bengoechea, José A.; Moreno, Edgardo

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity recognizes bacterial molecules bearing pathogen-associated molecular patterns to launch inflammatory responses leading to the activation of adaptive immunity. However, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the gram-negative bacterium Brucella lacks a marked pathogen-associated molecular pattern, and it has been postulated that this delays the development of immunity, creating a gap that is critical for the bacterium to reach the intracellular replicative niche. We found that a B. abortus mutant in the wadC gene displayed a disrupted LPS core while keeping both the LPS O-polysaccharide and lipid A. In mice, the wadC mutant induced proinflammatory responses and was attenuated. In addition, it was sensitive to killing by non-immune serum and bactericidal peptides and did not multiply in dendritic cells being targeted to lysosomal compartments. In contrast to wild type B. abortus, the wadC mutant induced dendritic cell maturation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. All these properties were reproduced by the wadC mutant purified LPS in a TLR4-dependent manner. Moreover, the core-mutated LPS displayed an increased binding to MD-2, the TLR4 co-receptor leading to subsequent increase in intracellular signaling. Here we show that Brucella escapes recognition in early stages of infection by expressing a shield against recognition by innate immunity in its LPS core and identify a novel virulence mechanism in intracellular pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. These results also encourage for an improvement in the generation of novel bacterial vaccines. PMID:22589715

  3. The role of NLRP3 and AIM2 in inflammasome activation during Brucella abortus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Marco Tulio R.; Miraglia, Maria Cruz; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is essential for detection and elimination of bacterial pathogens. Upon inflammasome activation, caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to their mature forms IL-1β and IL-18, respectively, and the cell undergoes inflammatory death termed pyroptosis. Here we reviewed recent findings demonstrating that Brucella abortus ligands activate NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes which leads to control of infection. This protective effect is due to inflammatory response caused by IL-1β and IL-18 rather than cell death. Brucella DNA is sensed by AIM2 and bacteria induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is detected by NLRP3. However, deregulation of proinflammatory cytokine production can lead to immunopathology. Nervous system invasion by bacteria of the genus Brucella results in an inflammatory disorder termed neurobrucellosis. Herein we discuss the mechanism of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in glial cells infected with B. abortus. Our results demonstrate that the ASC inflammasome is indispensable for inducing the activation of caspase-1 and secretion of IL-1β upon infection of astrocytes and microglia with Brucella. Moreover, our results demonstrate that secretion of IL-1β by Brucella-infected glial cells depends on NLRP3 and AIM2 and leads to neurobrucellosis. Further, the inhibition of the host cell inflammasome as an immune evasion strategy has been described for bacterial pathogens. We discuss here that the bacterial type IV secretion system VirB is required for inflammasome activation in host cells during infection. Taken together, our results indicate that Brucella is sensed by ASC inflammasomes mainly NLRP3 and AIM2 that collectively orchestrate a robust caspase-1 activation and proinflammatory response. PMID:27405866

  4. Investigating genetic diversity of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Italy with MLVA-16.

    PubMed

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; De Massis, Fabrizio; Zilli, Katiuscia; Ancora, Massimo; Cammà, Cesare; Calistri, Paolo; Foster, Jeffrey T

    2013-10-01

    Despite the eradication of brucellosis from most of Europe, the disease remains relatively common in a variety of livestock in southern European countries. It is therefore surprising that with such high prevalence rates, there have been few genetic characterizations of brucellosis outbreaks in this region. We conducted a genetic assessment of 206 isolates of Brucella abortus and B. melitensis from Italy using Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs). We determined genetic diversity and geographic distribution of these Brucella VNTR genotypes from 160 farms in eight regions of Southern Italy in a fine-scale analysis using 16 VNTR loci in a MLVA-16 methodology. In a broad scale analysis, we then used a reduced dataset of 11 VNTR loci (MLVA-11) to compare genotypes from Italy to a global database. In the 84 isolates of B. melitensis, there were 56 genotypes using MLVA-16; 43 of these genotypes were found only once. At a broad scale, 81 of these isolates were part of an Italian sub-group within the West Mediterranean group. One of the two B. melitensis isolates from a human patient shared the same genotype as a livestock isolate, suggesting a possible epidemiological connection. In 122 B. abortus isolates, there were 34 genotypes by MLVA-16; 16 of these genotypes were found only once. At a broad scale with MLVA-11, one genotype was predominant, comprising 77.8% of the isolates and was distributed throughout Southern Italy. These data on the current lineages of Brucella present in Italy should form the basis for epidemiological studies of Brucella throughout the country, while placing these strains in a global context.

  5. Intratracheal infection as an efficient route for testing vaccines against Chlamydia abortus in sheep.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, D; Salinas, J; Buendía, A J; Ortega, N; del Río, L; Sánchez, J; Navarro, J A; Gallego, M C; Murcia-Belmonte, A; Cuello, F; Caro, M R

    2015-09-01

    Pregnant ewes have been widely used to test vaccines against Chlamydia abortus. However, this model entails many disadvantages such as high economic costs and long periods of pregnancy. The murine model is very useful for specific studies but cannot replace the natural host for the later stages of vaccine evaluation. Therefore, a non-pregnant model of the natural host might be useful for a vaccine trial to select the best vaccine candidates prior to use of the pregnant model. With this aim, two routes of infection were assessed in young non-pregnant sheep, namely, intranasal (IN) and intratracheal (IT). In addition, groups of non-vaccinated sheep and sheep immunised with an inactivated vaccine were established to investigate the suitability of the model for testing vaccines. After the experimental infection, isolation of the microorganism in several organs, with pathological and immunohistochemical analyses, antibody production assessment and investigation by PCR of the presence of chlamydia in the vagina or rectum were carried out. Experimental IT inoculation of C. abortus induced pneumonia in sheep during the first few days post-infection, confirming the suitability of the IT route for testing vaccines in the natural host. The course of infection and the resulting pathological signs were less severe in vaccinated sheep compared with non-vaccinated animals, demonstrating the success of vaccination. IN infection did not produce evident lesions or demonstrate the presence of chlamydial antigen in the lungs and cannot be considered an appropriate model for testing vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies.

  7. The role of NLRP3 and AIM2 in inflammasome activation during Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Marim, Fernanda M; Franco, Miriam M Costa; Gomes, Marco Tulio R; Miraglia, Maria Cruz; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2017-02-01

    The innate immune system is essential for the detection and elimination of bacterial pathogens. Upon inflammasome activation, caspase-1 cleaves pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18 to their mature forms IL-1β and IL-18, respectively, and the cell undergoes inflammatory death termed pyroptosis. Here, we reviewed recent findings demonstrating that Brucella abortus ligands activate NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasomes which lead to control of infection. This protective effect is due to the inflammatory response caused by IL-1β and IL-18 rather than cell death. Brucella DNA is sensed by AIM2 and bacteria-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is detected by NLRP3. However, deregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production can lead to immunopathology. Nervous system invasion by bacteria of the genus Brucella results in an inflammatory disorder termed neurobrucellosis. Herein, we discuss the mechanism of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in glial cells infected with B. abortus. Our results demonstrate that the ASC inflammasome is indispensable for inducing the activation of caspase-1 and secretion of IL-1β upon infection of astrocytes and microglia with Brucella. Moreover, our results demonstrate that secretion of IL-1β by Brucella-infected glial cells depends on NLRP3 and AIM2 and leads to neurobrucellosis. Further, the inhibition of the host cell inflammasome as an immune evasion strategy has been described for bacterial pathogens. We discuss here that the bacterial type IV secretion system VirB is required for inflammasome activation in host cells during infection. Taken together, our results indicate that Brucella is sensed by ASC inflammasomes mainly NLRP3 and AIM2 that collectively orchestrate a robust caspase-1 activation and pro-inflammatory response.

  8. Efficacy of single calfhood vaccination of elk with Brucella abortus strain 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Jones, L.C.; Coffin, K.; Drew, M.L.; Sweeney, Steven J.; Hagius, S.D.; Elzer, P.H.; Davis, D.

    2004-01-01

    Brucellosis has been eradicated from cattle in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho, USA. However, free-ranging elk (Cervus elaphus) that use feedgrounds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks still have high seroprevalence to the disease and have caused loss of brucellosis-free status in Wyoming. Management tools to control or eliminate the disease are limited; however, wildlife vaccination is among the methods currently used by wildlife managers in Wyoming. We conducted a controlled challenge study of single calfhood vaccination. Elk calves, caught in January and February of 1999 and 2000 and acclimated to captivity for 3 weeks, were randomly assigned to control or vaccinate groups. The vaccinate groups received Brucetta abortus vaccine strain 19 (S19) by hand-delivered intramuscular injection. Calves were raised to adulthood and bred at either 2.5 or 3.5 years of age for 2000 and 1999 captures, respectively. Eighty-nine (44 controls, 45 vaccinates) pregnant elk entered the challenge portion of the study. We challenged elk at mid-gestation with pathogenic B. abortus strain 2308 by intraconjunctival instillation. Abortion occurred in significantly more (P = 0.002) controls (42; 93%) than vaccinates (32; 71%), and vaccine protected 25% of the vaccinate group. We used Brucella culture of fetus/calf tissues to determine the efficacy of vaccination for preventing infection, and we found that the number of infected fetuses/calves did not differ between controls and vaccinates (P = 0.14). Based on these data, single calfhood vaccination with S19 has low efficacy, will likely have only little to moderate effect on Brucella prevalence in elk, and is unlikely to eradicate the disease in wildlife of the GYA.

  9. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Results Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. Conclusions In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further. PMID:23802650

  10. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hielpos, M Soledad; Ferrero, Mariana C; Fernández, Andrea G; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site.

  11. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Andrea G.; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site. PMID:26448160

  12. Rough lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus RB51 as a common antigen for serological detection of B. ovis, B. canis, and B. abortus RB51 exposure using indirect enzyme immunoassay and fluorescence polarization assay.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K; Smith, P; Conde, S; Draghi de Benitez, G; Gall, D; Halbert, G; Kenny, K; Massengill, C; Muenks, Q; Rojas, X; Perez, B; Samartino, L; Silva, P; Tollersrud, T; Jolley, M

    2004-01-01

    Rough lipopolysaccharide (RLPS) antigens were prepared from cultures of Brucella abortus RB51, B. ovis, and B. canis. The preparations were standardized by weight and tested with sera from cattle immunized with B. abortus RB51, sheep infected with B. ovis, and dogs infected with B. canis. Populations of unexposed animals of each species were also tested. The tests used were the indirect enzyme immunoassay (IELISA) using RLPS and the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using RLPS core fractions, labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. The IELISA using B. abortus RB51 RLPS antigen resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 94.8% and 97.3%, respectively, when testing bovine sera, 98.5% and 97.8% when testing ovine sera, and 95.8% and 100% when testing dog sera. The IELISA using B. ovis RLPS antigen gave sensitivity and specificity values of 80.5% and 91.7%, respectively with bovine sera, 98.9% and 93.8% with sheep sera, and 70.8% and 79.8% with dog sera. The IELISA using B. canis RLPS antigen resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 97.0% and 97.4%, respectively, with bovine sera, 96.2% and 96.3% with sheep sera, and 95.8% and 98.8% with dog sera. Labeling RLPS core from B. ovis and B. canis with fluorescein was not successful. B. abortus RB51 core labeled with fluorescein resulted in sensitivity and specificity values of 93.5% and 99.8%, respectively, with bovine sera and 78.1% and 99.0% with sheep sera. It was not possible to test the dog sera in the FPA.

  13. Brucella abortusΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants are highly attenuated and confer long-term protective immunity against virulent Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Park, Soyeon; Kim, Kiju; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2016-01-04

    We constructed double deletion (ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD) mutants from virulent Brucella abortus biovar 1 field isolate (BA15) by deleting the genes encoding an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter (cydC and cydD genes) and a phosphoribosylamine-glycine ligase (purD). Both BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD double-mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages or in BALB/c mice. Both double-mutants were readily cleared from spleens by 4 weeks post-inoculation even when inoculated at the dose of 10(8) CFU per mouse. Moreover, the inoculated mice showed no splenomegaly, which indicates that the mutants are highly attenuated. Importantly, the attenuation of in vitro and in vivo growth did not impair the ability of these mutants to confer long-term protective immunity in mice against challenge with B. abortus strain 2308. Vaccination of mice with either mutant induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and provided significantly better protection than commercial B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine. These results suggest that highly attenuated BA15ΔcydCΔcydD and BA15ΔcydCΔpurD mutants can be used effectively as potential live vaccine candidates against bovine brucellosis.

  14. [Intensity of the epizootic process in sheep infected with S. abortus ovis and Chlamydia psittaci var. ovis].

    PubMed

    Vodas, K; Elitsina, P

    1986-01-01

    An attempt was made to analyze comparatively the intensity of the epizootic process in young female sheep, ewes (second pregnancy, with no records of abortions in their first pregnancy) and their lambs either with an infection of Salmonella abortus ovis only or with a mixed infection of S. abortus ovis and Chlamydia psittaci var. ovis. This was reached through following up and studying the parameters morbidity, mortality, lethality, index of infectedness, index of deadlines, and fertility. It was found that the intensity of the apparent epizootic process was highest with young females affected with a mixed infection, and it was lowest with ewes affected with a pure infection (Salmonella abortion). The intensity of the inapparent epizootic process was best manifested in the young females affected with a pure Salmonella abortion. With these animals both the index of infectedness and the index of deadlines had highest values.

  15. Infection of cattle with Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, L B; Tessaro, S V

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if cattle could be infected with a strain of Brucella abortus biovar 1 isolated from a bison in Wood Buffalo National Park. Three pregnant cows inoculated conjunctivally with 5.7 x 10(8) cfu of the bacterium, and their subsequent calves, showed seroconversion on standard serological tests for bovine brucellosis, and large numbers of the bacterium were isolated from numerous tissues at necropsy. A 4th cow that was moved into the pen that previously contained the inoculated cows subsequently showed seroconversion, and the same strain of B. abortus biovar 1 was isolated from numerous tissues. Although this strain from bison in Wood Buffalo National Park has existed in isolation from cattle for over 60 years, it remains infectious and contagious for cattle. PMID:8809394

  16. Detection of Brucella abortus DNA in aborted goats and sheep in Egypt by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Tomaso, Herbert; Roesler, Uwe; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2015-06-03

    Brucellosis is a major zoonoses affects wide range of domesticated as well as wild animals. Despite the eradication program of brucellosis in Egypt, the disease is still endemic among cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, and camels. In the present study, abortion occurred naturally among 25 animals (10 cows, 5 buffaloes, 9 Egyptian Baladi goats and 1 ewe) shared the same pasture were investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). DNA of Brucella (B.) abortus was detected in serum of goats and sheep which has aborted recently by species-specific RT-PCR. The results suggest cross-species infection of B. abortus from cattle to non-preferred hosts raised in close contact. This article will renew our knowledge about the Brucella agent causing abortion in small ruminants in Egypt. Information provided in this study is important for surveillance program, because eradication programs and vaccination strategies may have to be adapted accordingly.

  17. Dissemination and genetic diversity of chlamydial agents in Polish wildfowl: Isolation and molecular characterisation of avian Chlamydia abortus strains.

    PubMed

    Szymańska-Czerwińska, Monika; Mitura, Agata; Niemczuk, Krzysztof; Zaręba, Kinga; Jodełko, Agnieszka; Pluta, Aneta; Scharf, Sabine; Vitek, Bailey; Aaziz, Rachid; Vorimore, Fabien; Laroucau, Karine; Schnee, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Wild birds are considered as a reservoir for avian chlamydiosis posing a potential infectious threat to domestic poultry and humans. Analysis of 894 cloacal or fecal swabs from free-living birds in Poland revealed an overall Chlamydiaceae prevalence of 14.8% (n = 132) with the highest prevalence noted in Anatidae (19.7%) and Corvidae (13.4%). Further testing conducted with species-specific real-time PCR showed that 65 samples (49.2%) were positive for C. psittaci whereas only one was positive for C. avium. To classify the non-identified chlamydial agents and to genotype the C. psittaci and C. avium-positive samples, specimens were subjected to ompA-PCR and sequencing (n = 83). The ompA-based NJ dendrogram revealed that only 23 out of 83 sequences were assigned to C. psittaci, in particular to four clades representing the previously described C. psittaci genotypes B, C, Mat116 and 1V. Whereas the 59 remaining sequences were assigned to two new clades named G1 and G2, each one including sequences recently obtained from chlamydiae detected in Swedish wetland birds. G1 (18 samples from Anatidae and Rallidae) grouped closely together with genotype 1V and in relative proximity to several C. abortus isolates, and G2 (41 samples from Anatidae and Corvidae) grouped closely to C. psittaci strains of the classical ABE cluster, Matt116 and M56. Finally, deep molecular analysis of four representative isolates of genotypes 1V, G1 and G2 based on 16S rRNA, IGS and partial 23S rRNA sequences as well as MLST clearly classify these isolates within the C. abortus species. Consequently, we propose an expansion of the C. abortus species to include not only the classical isolates of mammalian origin, but also avian isolates so far referred to as atypical C. psittaci or C. psittaci/C. abortus intermediates.

  18. Intracellular Production of Brucella L Forms I. Recovery of L Forms from Tissue Culture Cells Infected with Brucella abortus1

    PubMed Central

    Hatten, Betty A.; Sulkin, S. Edward

    1966-01-01

    Hatten, Betty A. (The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas), and S. Edward Sulkin. Intracellular production of Brucella L forms. I. Recovery of L forms from tissue culture cells infected with Brucella abortus. J. Bacteriol. 91:285–296. 1966.—Infectivity of virulent Brucella abortus strain 3183 was less for hamster macrophages after a 2-hr adsorption period than for an attenuated strain (S19) and its tissue culture variant (30). Both strains S19 and 30 were very toxic for the cells, but 3183 was not toxic. Two types of L forms were recovered from a large percentage of hamster kidney cell cultures when disintegration of infected cells was accelerated by tissue culture medium of high pH. One type grew in finely granular microcolonies, was isolated from cells infected for short periods of time, and often reverted to the bacterial form. The other type occurred in small irregularly shaped forms which later developed into round bodies. Both stained specifically with fluorescein-conjugated B. abortus antiserum. Semisolid media containing 0.7% agar provided optimal subsurface L-form growth. L forms also grew well in Thioglycollate Medium but grew poorly in other liquid media. Surface L-form growth was supported by several agar media, but CO2 was required for optimal growth. Monolayers infected with strain 3183 and examined immediately after adsorption contained occasional small, round bodies. Bizarre forms increased in number with time and, after 24 to 72 hr, large pink-staining inclusions were often present which persisted for several days. Also appearing at about the same time were smaller, dark-staining forms which were first seen in clusters but later dispersed and finally occurred in chainlike configurations. Direct fluorescent-antibody stains of infected cells established that the intracellular forms were related to the infecting strain of B. abortus. Images PMID:16562102

  19. Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella abortus Promote Bacterial Internalization by Human Monocytes and Modulate Their Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells. PMID:23189190

  20. Abortion caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in a free-ranging bison (Bison bison) from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Rhyan, J C; Quinn, W J; Stackhouse, L S; Henderson, J J; Ewalt, D R; Payeur, J B; Johnson, M; Meagher, M

    1994-07-01

    A near-term aborted bison (Bison bison) fetus was collected near Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming (USA). On necropsy, the fetus liver had a small capsular tear, and there was a small quantity of blood in the peritoneal cavity. Microscopic lesions included mild, purulent bronchopneumonia and mild, multifocal, interstitial pneumonia. Brucella abortus biovar 1 was isolated from fetal abomasal contents, lung, and heart blood.

  1. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test for specific and rapid detection of Brucella abortus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Karthik, K; Rathore, Rajesh; Thomas, Prasad; Arun, T R; Viswas, K N; Agarwal, R K; Manjunathachar, H V; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the major causative agent of abortion in cattle and a zoonotic pathogen, needs to be diagnosed at an early stage. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test is easy to perform and also promising to be adapted at field level. To develop a LAMP assay for specific and rapid detection of B. abortus from clinical samples of cattle. LAMP primers were designed targeting BruAb2_0168 region using specific software tool and LAMP was optimized. The developed LAMP was tested for its specificity with 3 Brucella spp. and 11 other non-Brucella spp. Sensitivity of the developed LAMP was also carried out with known quantity of DNA. Cattle whole blood samples and aborted fetal stomach contents were collected and used for testing with developed LAMP assay and results were compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The developed LAMP assay works at 61 °C for 60 min and the detection limit was observed to be 100-fold more than the conventional PCR that is commonly used for diagnosis of B. abortus. Clinical sensitivity and specificity of the developed LAMP assay was 100% when compared with Rose Bengal plate test and standard tube agglutination test. SYB® green dye I was used to visualize the result with naked eye. The novelty of the developed LAMP assay for specifically detecting B. abortus infection in cattle along with its inherent rapidness and high sensitivity can be employed for detecting this economically important pathogen of cattle at field level as well be exploited for screening of human infections.

  2. Dissemination and genetic diversity of chlamydial agents in Polish wildfowl: Isolation and molecular characterisation of avian Chlamydia abortus strains

    PubMed Central

    Szymańska-Czerwińska, Monika; Mitura, Agata; Niemczuk, Krzysztof; Zaręba, Kinga; Jodełko, Agnieszka; Pluta, Aneta; Scharf, Sabine; Vitek, Bailey; Aaziz, Rachid; Vorimore, Fabien; Laroucau, Karine; Schnee, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Wild birds are considered as a reservoir for avian chlamydiosis posing a potential infectious threat to domestic poultry and humans. Analysis of 894 cloacal or fecal swabs from free-living birds in Poland revealed an overall Chlamydiaceae prevalence of 14.8% (n = 132) with the highest prevalence noted in Anatidae (19.7%) and Corvidae (13.4%). Further testing conducted with species-specific real-time PCR showed that 65 samples (49.2%) were positive for C. psittaci whereas only one was positive for C. avium. To classify the non-identified chlamydial agents and to genotype the C. psittaci and C. avium-positive samples, specimens were subjected to ompA-PCR and sequencing (n = 83). The ompA-based NJ dendrogram revealed that only 23 out of 83 sequences were assigned to C. psittaci, in particular to four clades representing the previously described C. psittaci genotypes B, C, Mat116 and 1V. Whereas the 59 remaining sequences were assigned to two new clades named G1 and G2, each one including sequences recently obtained from chlamydiae detected in Swedish wetland birds. G1 (18 samples from Anatidae and Rallidae) grouped closely together with genotype 1V and in relative proximity to several C. abortus isolates, and G2 (41 samples from Anatidae and Corvidae) grouped closely to C. psittaci strains of the classical ABE cluster, Matt116 and M56. Finally, deep molecular analysis of four representative isolates of genotypes 1V, G1 and G2 based on 16S rRNA, IGS and partial 23S rRNA sequences as well as MLST clearly classify these isolates within the C. abortus species. Consequently, we propose an expansion of the C. abortus species to include not only the classical isolates of mammalian origin, but also avian isolates so far referred to as atypical C. psittaci or C. psittaci/C. abortus intermediates. PMID:28350846

  3. Seroprevalence of brucellosis in sheep and isolation of Brucella abortus biovar 6 in Kassala State, Eastern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Gumaa, M M; Osman, H M; Omer, M M; El Sanousi, E M; Godfroid, J; Ahmed, A M

    2014-12-01

    Brucellosis is one of the important zoonotic diseases among livestock. This study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of brucellosis and isolate Brucella spp. in sheep in Kassala State in the east of Sudan. Two thousand and five serum samples were randomly collected from nine different localities. All serum samples were examined by the Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and the modified RBPT (mRBPT). Forty-three (2.15%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6,3.0) and 68 (3.4%, 95% CI: 2.6, 4.2) samples were positive with the RBPT and the mRBPT, respectively. According to a known diagnostic sensitivity of 86.6% and a known diagnostic specificity of 97.6% for the mRBPT, the true prevalence was estimated to be 1.2% (95% CI: 0.3, 2.2). Different tissue samples were collected from 41 mRBPT seropositive animals. Brucella abortus biovar 6 was isolated from a pyometra of a seropositive ewe. It is important to note that B. abortus biovar 6 cannot be differentiated from Brucella melitensis biovar 2 by routine bacteriology. Only phage typing performed in reference laboratories will allow accurate identification of the strain. The fact that B. abortus biovar 6 does not require CO2 for growth, combined with the fact that it has been isolated from a small ruminant in this study, could easily have led to misidentification (as B. melitensis biovar 2), to wrong epidemiological inferences and to the implementation of inappropriate control measures. The results presented here suggest that sheep are spillover hosts, as previously described for camels, and that the actual reservoir of B. abortus biovar 6 is cattle in Kassala State, Eastern Sudan. This study highlights the importance of isolating and identifying Brucella spp. in different livestock species in order to accurately decipher brucellosis epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus S99: Designated Antigenic Smooth Reference Strain Used in Diagnostic Tests in India

    PubMed Central

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Padmashree, B. S.; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S.; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rahman, Habibur

    2014-01-01

    Brucella abortus strain S99 is widely used for the preparation of colored, plain, recombinant and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens for the preparation of Brucella diagnostic kits. The genome of this strain was sequenced and the length of the genome was 3,253,175 bp, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,365 protein coding genes and 53 RNA genes were predicted. PMID:25146137

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Brucella abortus S99: Designated Antigenic Smooth Reference Strain Used in Diagnostic Tests in India.

    PubMed

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Padmashree, B S; Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Rahman, Habibur

    2014-08-21

    Brucella abortus strain S99 is widely used for the preparation of colored, plain, recombinant and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens for the preparation of Brucella diagnostic kits. The genome of this strain was sequenced and the length of the genome was 3,253,175 bp, with 57.2% G+C content. A total of 3,365 protein coding genes and 53 RNA genes were predicted.

  6. Chlamydiaceae Genomics Reveals Interspecies Admixture and the Recent Evolution of Chlamydia abortus Infecting Lower Mammalian Species and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sandeep J.; Marti, Hanna; Didelot, Xavier; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Read, Timothy D.; Dean, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacteria that cause a diversity of severe infections among humans and livestock on a global scale. Identification of new species since 1989 and emergence of zoonotic infections, including abortion in women, underscore the need for genome sequencing of multiple strains of each species to advance our knowledge of evolutionary dynamics across Chlamydiaceae. Here, we genome sequenced isolates from avian, lower mammalian and human hosts. Based on core gene phylogeny, five isolates previously classified as Chlamydia abortus were identified as members of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia pecorum. Chlamydia abortus is the most recently emerged species and is a highly monomorphic group that lacks the conserved virulence-associated plasmid. Low-level recombination and evidence for adaptation to the placenta echo evolutionary processes seen in recently emerged, highly virulent niche-restricted pathogens, such as Bacillus anthracis. In contrast, gene flow occurred within C. psittaci and other Chlamydiaceae species. The C. psittaci strain RTH, isolated from a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), is an outlying strain with admixture of C. abortus, C. psittaci, and its own population markers. An average nucleotide identity of less than 94% compared with other Chlamydiaceae species suggests that RTH belongs to a new species intermediary between C. psittaci and C. abortus. Hawks, as scavengers and predators, have extensive opportunities to acquire multiple species in their intestinal tract. This could facilitate transformation and homologous recombination with the potential for new species emergence. Our findings indicate that incubator hosts such as birds-of-prey likely promote Chlamydiaceae evolution resulting in novel pathogenic lineages. PMID:26507799

  7. Chlamydiaceae Genomics Reveals Interspecies Admixture and the Recent Evolution of Chlamydia abortus Infecting Lower Mammalian Species and Humans.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sandeep J; Marti, Hanna; Didelot, Xavier; Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Read, Timothy D; Dean, Deborah

    2015-10-27

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacteria that cause a diversity of severe infections among humans and livestock on a global scale. Identification of new species since 1989 and emergence of zoonotic infections, including abortion in women, underscore the need for genome sequencing of multiple strains of each species to advance our knowledge of evolutionary dynamics across Chlamydiaceae. Here, we genome sequenced isolates from avian, lower mammalian and human hosts. Based on core gene phylogeny, five isolates previously classified as Chlamydia abortus were identified as members of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia pecorum. Chlamydia abortus is the most recently emerged species and is a highly monomorphic group that lacks the conserved virulence-associated plasmid. Low-level recombination and evidence for adaptation to the placenta echo evolutionary processes seen in recently emerged, highly virulent niche-restricted pathogens, such as Bacillus anthracis. In contrast, gene flow occurred within C. psittaci and other Chlamydiaceae species. The C. psittaci strain RTH, isolated from a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), is an outlying strain with admixture of C. abortus, C. psittaci, and its own population markers. An average nucleotide identity of less than 94% compared with other Chlamydiaceae species suggests that RTH belongs to a new species intermediary between C. psittaci and C. abortus. Hawks, as scavengers and predators, have extensive opportunities to acquire multiple species in their intestinal tract. This could facilitate transformation and homologous recombination with the potential for new species emergence. Our findings indicate that incubator hosts such as birds-of-prey likely promote Chlamydiaceae evolution resulting in novel pathogenic lineages. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Lack of endogenous IL-10 enhances production of proinflammatory cytokines and leads to Brucella abortus clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Patrícia P; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Carvalho, Natália B; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Teane M A; Teixeira, Henrique C; Faria, Ana C; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2013-01-01

    IL-10 is a cytokine that regulates the balance between pathogen clearance and immunopathology. Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic disease in humans and domestic animals. Here we evaluated the contribution of IL-10 in host immune response and pathology during B. abortus infection. To assess the role of IL-10 in vivo, IL-10 knockout (KO) or 129 Sv/Ev (wild-type) mice were infected with B. abortus and the number of viable bacteria from the spleen was determined at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 14-weeks postinfection. IL-10 KO mice showed reduced bacterial loads in the spleen when compared to wild-type mice during all time points studied. Additionally, at 14-weeks postinfection IL-10 KO mice had totally cleared the infection. This clearance was preceded by an enhanced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-17 responses in both the serum and the spleen of IL-10 KO mice. Additionally, dendritic cells from infected IL-10 KO mice produced elevated levels of IL-12 and TNF-α compared to wild-type animals. Histopathology analysis was performed and both KO and wild-type mice developed multifocal granulomas and necrosis in the liver. However, at six-weeks postinfection reduced numbers of granulomas was detected in IL-10 KO mice compared to wild-type animals. This reduced liver pathology at later stage of infection was accompanied by increased numbers of CD4+CD25+foxp3+ T cells and expression of TGF-β in IL-10 KO splenocytes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IL-10 modulates the proinflammatory immune response to B. abortus infection and the lack of IL-10 increases resistance to Brucella infection.

  9. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Delpino, M Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.

  10. Human peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express Th1-like cytokine mRNA and proteins following in vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, M B; Golding, H; Betts, M; Yamauchi, A; Bloom, E T; Butler, L E; Stevan, L; Golding, B

    1995-01-01

    Defining the pattern of lymphokine production associated with Brucella abortus is critical for advancing the development of B. abortus as a vaccine carrier. In the present study we investigated the ability of heat-inactivated B. abortus or lipopolysaccharide from B. abortus to induce lymphokine production from purified human T cells in vitro. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, and IL-5 induction was assayed by mRNA-specific PCR and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bioassay for protein production. Following depletion of monocytes and B cells, B. abortus increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 mRNA expression in purified T cells compared with expression in unstimulated cells. In contrast, no IL-5 mRNA expression and only transient low-level IL-4 mRNA expression and no IL-4 protein secretion were detected. Phytohemagglutinin or phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin induced mRNA and protein for all these cytokines. Similar results were obtained with LPS purified from B. abortus. Removal of NK cells did not reduce lymphokine production, and enriched NK cells did not express IFN-gamma mRNA or secrete IFN-gamma protein in response to B. abortus, indicating that NK cells were not the responding population. Both CD4+ and CD8+ populations produced IFN-gamma and IL-2 in response to B. abortus. Preincubation of resting T cells with B. abortus or LPS from B. abortus for 7 days induced their differentiation into Th1-like cells as judged by their subsequent lymphokine response to phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin. These results suggest that B. abortus can induce differentiation of Th0 into Th1-type cells. PMID:7790090

  11. Brucella abortus Cyclic β-1,2-Glucan Mutants Have Reduced Virulence in Mice and Are Defective in Intracellular Replication in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Gabriel; Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Roset, Mara; Vigliocco, Ana; Paulo, Patricia Silva; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2001-01-01

    Null cyclic β-1,2-glucan synthetase mutants (cgs mutants) were obtained from Brucella abortus virulent strain 2308 and from B. abortus attenuated vaccinal strain S19. Both mutants show greater sensitivity to surfactants like deoxycholic acid, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and Zwittergent than the parental strains, suggesting cell surface alterations. Although not to the same extent, both mutants display reduced virulence in mice and defective intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells. The B. abortus S19 cgs mutant was completely cleared from the spleens of mice after 4 weeks, while the 2308 mutant showed a 1.5-log reduction of the number of brucellae isolated from the spleens after 12 weeks. These results suggest that cyclic β-1,2-glucan plays an important role in the residual virulence of the attenuated B. abortus S19 strain. Although the cgs mutant was cleared from the spleens earlier than the wild-type parental strain (B. abortus S19) and produced less inflammatory response, its ability to confer protection against the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 was fully retained. Equivalent levels of induction of spleen gamma interferon mRNA and anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) subtype antibodies were observed in mice injected with B. abortus S19 or the cgs mutant. However, the titer of anti-LPS antibodies of the IgG1 subtype induced by the cgs mutant was lower than that observed with the parental S19 strain, thus suggesting that the cgs mutant induces a relatively exclusive Th1 response. PMID:11401996

  12. The Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase is required for optimal resistance to oxidative killing by murine macrophages and wild-type virulence in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jason M; Valderas, Michelle Wright; Kovach, Michael E; Grippe, Vanessa K; Robertson, Gregory T; Ng, Wai-Leung; Richardson, John M; Winkler, Malcolm E; Roop, R Martin

    2005-05-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of cell lysates from Brucella abortus 2308 and the isogenic hfq mutant Hfq3 revealed that the RNA binding protein Hfq (also known as host factor I or HF-I) is required for the optimal stationary phase production of the periplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase SodC. An isogenic sodC mutant, designated MEK2, was constructed from B. abortus 2308 by gene replacement, and the sodC mutant exhibited much greater susceptibility to killing by O(2)(-) generated by pyrogallol and the xanthine oxidase reaction than the parental 2308 strain supporting a role for SodC in protecting this bacterium from O(2)(-) of exogenous origin. The B. abortus sodC mutant was also found to be much more sensitive to killing by cultured resident peritoneal macrophages from C57BL6J mice than 2308, and the attenuation displayed by MEK2 in cultured murine macrophages was enhanced when these phagocytes were treated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The attenuation displayed by the B. abortus sodC mutant in both resting and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages was alleviated, however, when these host cells were treated with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Consistent with its increased susceptibility to killing by cultured murine macrophages, the B. abortus sodC mutant also displayed significant attenuation in experimentally infected C57BL6J mice compared to the parental strain. These experimental findings indicate that SodC protects B. abortus 2308 from the respiratory burst of host macrophages. They also suggest that reduced SodC levels may contribute to the attenuation displayed by the B. abortus hfq mutant Hfq3 in the mouse model.

  13. A repA-based ELISA for discriminating cattle vaccinated with Brucella suis 2 from those naturally infected with Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Ning; Liu, Wan-Hua; Ren, Juan-Juan; Tang, Pan; Qiu, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Ching-Dong; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    The commonest ways of diagnosing brucellosis in animals include the Rose-Bengal plate agglutination test, the buffered plate agglutination test (BPA), the slide agglutination test, the complement fixation test, and the indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA). However, these methods cannot discriminate the Brucella vaccine strain (Brucella suis strain 2; B. suis S2) from naturally acquired virulent strains. Of the six common Brucella species, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and B. suis are the commonest species occurring in China. To develop an ELISA assay that can differentiate between cows inoculated with B. suis S2 and naturally infected with B. abortus and B. melitensis, genomic sequences from six Brucella spp. (B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, Brucella canis, Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis) were compared using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool software. One particular gene, the repA-related gene, was found to be a marker that can differentiate B. suis from B. abortus and B. melitensis. The repA-related gene of B. suis was PCR amplified and subcloned into the pET-32a vector. Expressed repA-related protein was purified and used as an antigen. The repA-based ELISA was optimized and used as specific tests. In the present study, serum from animals inoculated with the B. suis S2 vaccine strain had positive repA-based ELISA results. In contrast, the test-positive reference sera against B. abortus and B. melitensis had negative repA-based ELISA results. The concordance rate between B. abortus antibody-negative (based on the repA-based ELISA) and the Brucella gene-positive (based on the 'Bruce ladder' multiplex PCR) was 100%. Therefore, the findings suggest that the repA-based ELISA is a useful tool for differentiating cows vaccinated with the B. suis S2 and naturally infected with B. abortus and B. melitensis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating Strains of Brucella abortus in Cattle in Santo Domingo De Los Tsáchilas Province – Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar Ivan; Contreras-Zamora, Javier; Benitez Ortiz, Washington; Guerrero-Viracocha, Karina; Salcan-Guaman, Holger; Minda, Elizabeth; Ron Garrido, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    The Province of Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas in Ecuador represents the largest informal cattle market. Because of its strategic position, cattle movement is very high and therefore we selected this region, to determine the strain variation of Brucella sp. Part of the study aimed at the isolation, biotyping, and genotyping of Brucella species from milk and supra-mammary lymph nodes of sero-positive bovines, using selective Farrell medium, biochemical assays, and IS711-PCR, AMOS-PCR, and HOOF-Prints techniques. In total, 656 animals from 12 sero-positive dairy herds and from the provincial slaughterhouse were diagnosed by Rose Bengal and Wright’s Slow Agglutination test with EDTA. Amongst these animals, 50 animals were sero-positive for brucellosis. Twenty-five lymph nodes and 25 milk samples from each group of positive reactors were transferred to culture medium. Isolation was possible from 4 (16%) lymph nodes and 9 (36%) milk samples; out of these, 10 isolates were diagnosed as Brucella sp. All four isolates of lymphatic tissue corresponded to Brucella abortus biotype 1, confirmed as field strains by molecular analysis. Milk isolations, showed biochemically a more dispersed pattern in which B. abortus biotypes 1 and 4 were found; yet four samples gave a pattern similar to B. abortus biotype 2; however, only biotypes 1 and 4 were confirmed by molecular analysis. The concordance between biochemical and molecular diagnostic tests reached 76.9%. PMID:25806363

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle, Elk, and Bison in the United States, 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Tod; Quance, Christine; Edwards, William H.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Linfield, Tom; Rhyan, Jack; Berte, Angela; Harris, Beth

    2012-01-01

    A variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) protocol targeting 10 loci in the Brucella abortus genome was used to assess genetic diversity among 366 field isolates recovered from cattle, bison, and elk in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Texas during 1998 to 2011. Minimum spanning tree (MST) and unweighted-pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analyses of VNTR data identified 237 different VNTR types, among which 14 prominent clusters of isolates could be identified. Cattle isolates from Texas segregated into three clusters: one comprised of field isolates from 1998 to 2005, one comprised of vaccination-associated infections, and one associated with an outbreak in Starr County in January 2011. An isolate obtained from a feral sow trapped on property adjacent to the Starr County herd in May 2011 clustered with the cattle isolates, suggesting a role for feral swine as B. abortus reservoirs in Starr County. Isolates from a 2005 cattle outbreak in Wyoming displayed VNTR-10 profiles matching those of strains recovered from Wyoming and Idaho elk. Additionally, isolates associated with cattle outbreaks in Idaho in 2002, Montana in 2008 and 2011, and Wyoming in 2010 primarily clustered with isolates recovered from GYA elk. This study indicates that elk play a predominant role in the transmission of B. abortus to cattle located in the GYA. PMID:22427502

  16. An influenza viral vector Brucella abortus vaccine induces good cross-protection against Brucella melitensis infection in pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2015-07-17

    Brucella melitensis can be transmitted and cause disease in cattle herds as a result of inadequate management of mixed livestock farms. Ideally, vaccines against Brucella abortus for cattle should also provide cross-protection against B. melitensis. Previously we created a novel influenza viral vector B. abortus (Flu-BA) vaccine expressing the Brucella ribosomal proteins L7/L12 or Omp16. This study demonstrated Flu-BA vaccine with adjuvant Montanide Gel01 provided 100% protection against abortion in vaccinated pregnant heifers and good cross-protection of the heifers and their calves or fetuses (90-100%) after challenge with B. melitensis 16M; the level of protection provided by Flu-BA was comparable to the commercial vaccine B. abortus S19. In terms of the index of infection and colonization of Brucella in tissues, both vaccines demonstrated significant (P=0.02 to P<0.0001) protection against B. melitensis 16M infection compared to the negative control group (PBS+Montanide Gel01). Thus, we conclude the Flu-BA vaccine provides cross-protection against B. melitensis infection in pregnant heifers.

  17. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus IV. Studies with a double immunodiffusion test for antibody against A2.

    PubMed

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1981-04-01

    A double immunodiffusion test for precipitins against Brucella antigen A2 was developed and applied to a variety of samples. The A2 precipitins were produced by a heifer infected with B. abortus strain 2308, cattle vaccinated with killed B. melitensis strain H38 or live B. abortus strain 19 and by a dog infected with B. canis. Precipitins were also detected in the second International Standard for anti-Brucella abortus serum, in several anti-B. canis sera and at low levels in one anti-B. ovis serum tested. Antisera produced in calves against Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9 had no anti-A2 activity despite titers greater than or equal to 1/1024 and greater than or equal to 1/80 in standard Brucella agglutination and CF tests, respectively. The test for A2 precipitins lacked specificity as weak reactions were obtained with five of 295 sera from brucellosis-free herds. This test was relatively insensitive, detecting precipitins in only 16 of 24 sera from infected cattle and 27 of 54 sera positive by complement fixation and enzyme labelled antiglobulin tests performed with whole cell and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens, respectively. The A2 precipitins were detected in nine sera from five cattle, in two infected herds, which were negative by agglutination and complement fixation tests.

  18. The bovine immune response to Brucella abortus IV. Studies with a double immunodiffusion test for antibody against A2.

    PubMed Central

    Stemshorn, B; Nielsen, K

    1981-01-01

    A double immunodiffusion test for precipitins against Brucella antigen A2 was developed and applied to a variety of samples. The A2 precipitins were produced by a heifer infected with B. abortus strain 2308, cattle vaccinated with killed B. melitensis strain H38 or live B. abortus strain 19 and by a dog infected with B. canis. Precipitins were also detected in the second International Standard for anti-Brucella abortus serum, in several anti-B. canis sera and at low levels in one anti-B. ovis serum tested. Antisera produced in calves against Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9 had no anti-A2 activity despite titers greater than or equal to 1/1024 and greater than or equal to 1/80 in standard Brucella agglutination and CF tests, respectively. The test for A2 precipitins lacked specificity as weak reactions were obtained with five of 295 sera from brucellosis-free herds. This test was relatively insensitive, detecting precipitins in only 16 of 24 sera from infected cattle and 27 of 54 sera positive by complement fixation and enzyme labelled antiglobulin tests performed with whole cell and smooth lipopolysaccharide antigens, respectively. The A2 precipitins were detected in nine sera from five cattle, in two infected herds, which were negative by agglutination and complement fixation tests. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6790144

  19. Detection of antibodies against Brucella abortus, Leptospira spp., and Apicomplexa protozoa in water buffaloes in the Northeast of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Konrad, José L; Campero, Lucía M; Caspe, Gastón S; Brihuega, Bibiana; Draghi, Graciela; Moore, Dadin P; Crudeli, Gustavo A; Venturini, María C; Campero, Carlos M

    2013-11-01

    Water buffalo industry has become a profitable activity worldwide, including the Northeast of Argentina (NEA). However, research on diseases affecting this species is scarce. The aim of the present study was to detect antibodies against Brucella abortus, Leptospira spp., Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, and Sarcocystis spp. in 500 water buffalo cows from five ranches (100 animals each) in the NEA. Serum samples were tested for B. abortus by fluorescence polarization assay, Leptospira spp. by microagglutination test, and N. caninum, T. gondii, and Sarcocystis spp. by indirect fluorescent antibody tests. Overall, the proportion of seropositive animals was 6.4, 22.2, 42.2, 25.4, and 50.8 % for brucellosis, leptospirosis, neosporosis, toxoplasmosis, and sarcocystosis, respectively. The proportion of seropositive animals for all diseases was statistically different among herds (p < 0.05). Statistical differences were also detected among age groups for brucellosis and neosporosis (p < 0.05). The detection of specific antibodies to B. abortus, Leptospira spp., and several Apicomplexa protozoans in water buffaloes in the NEA is reported in this study.

  20. Brucella abortus Ornithine Lipids Are Dispensable Outer Membrane Components Devoid of a Marked Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Chacón-Díaz, Carlos; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Grilló, María-Jesús

    2011-01-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria facultative intracellular parasites that cause an important zoonosis. These bacteria escape early detection by innate immunity, an ability associated to the absence of marked pathogen-associated molecular patterns in the cell envelope lipopolysaccharide, lipoproteins and flagellin. We show here that, in contrast to the outer membrane ornithine lipids (OL) of other Gram negative bacteria, Brucella abortus OL lack a marked pathogen-associated molecular pattern activity. We identified two OL genes (olsB and olsA) and by generating the corresponding mutants found that olsB deficient B. abortus did not synthesize OL or their lyso-OL precursors. Liposomes constructed with B. abortus OL did not trigger IL-6 or TNF-α release by macrophages whereas those constructed with Bordetella pertussis OL and the olsB mutant lipids as carriers were highly active. The OL deficiency in the olsB mutant did not promote proinflammatory responses or generated attenuation in mice. In addition, OL deficiency did not increase sensitivity to polymyxins, normal serum or complement consumption, or alter the permeability to antibiotics and dyes. Taken together, these observations indicate that OL have become dispensable in the extant brucellae and are consistent within the trend observed in α-Proteobacteria animal pathogens to reduce and eventually eliminate the envelope components susceptible of recognition by innate immunity. PMID:21249206

  1. Reduced Susceptibility to Rifampicin and Resistance to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents among Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Pauletti, Rebeca; Reinato Stynen, Ana Paula; Pinto da Silva Mol, Juliana; Seles Dorneles, Elaine Maria; Alves, Telma Maria; de Sousa Moura Souto, Monalisa; Minharro, Silvia; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility profile of Brazilian Brucella abortus isolates from cattle to eight antimicrobial agents that are recommended for the treatment of human brucellosis and to correlate the susceptibility patterns with origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotype of the strains. Screening of 147 B. abortus strains showed 100% sensitivity to doxycycline and ofloxacin, one (0.68%) strain resistant to ciprofloxacin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to streptomycin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and five strains (3.40%) resistant to gentamicin. For rifampicin, three strains (2.04%) were resistant and 54 strains (36.73%) showed reduced sensitivity. Two strains were considered multidrug resistant. In conclusion, the majority of B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil were sensitive to the antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of human brucellosis; however, a considerable proportion of strains showed reduced susceptibility to rifampicin and two strains were considered multidrug resistant. Moreover, there was no correlation among the drug susceptibility pattern, origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotypes of these strains.

  2. A potent Brucella abortus 2308 Δery live vaccine allows for the differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Yin, Shuanghong; Guo, Fei; Meng, Ren; Chen, Chuangfu; Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhiqiang; Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Hu, Shengwei; Ni, Wei; Li, Tiansen; Zhang, Ke

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. However, the current Brucella abortus vaccines (S19 and RB51) are deficient; they can cause abortion in pregnant animals. Moreover, when the vaccine S19 is used, tests cannot differentiate natural from vaccinated infection. Therefore, a safer and more potent vaccine is needed. A Brucella abortus 2308 ery promoter mutant (Δery) was constructed to overcome these drawbacks. The growth of the Δery mutant was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice and induced high protective immunity in mice. Moreover, Δery induced an anti-Brucella-specific IgG (immunoglobulin G) response and stimulated the expression of interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Furthermore, the expression of EryA antigen allowed for the serological differentiation between natural and vaccinated infection in mice. These results indicate that the Δery mutant is a potential attenuated live vaccine candidate against virulent Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) infection.

  3. Circulating Strains of Brucella abortus in Cattle in Santo Domingo De Los Tsáchilas Province - Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar Ivan; Contreras-Zamora, Javier; Benitez Ortiz, Washington; Guerrero-Viracocha, Karina; Salcan-Guaman, Holger; Minda, Elizabeth; Ron Garrido, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    The Province of Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas in Ecuador represents the largest informal cattle market. Because of its strategic position, cattle movement is very high and therefore we selected this region, to determine the strain variation of Brucella sp. Part of the study aimed at the isolation, biotyping, and genotyping of Brucella species from milk and supra-mammary lymph nodes of sero-positive bovines, using selective Farrell medium, biochemical assays, and IS711-PCR, AMOS-PCR, and HOOF-Prints techniques. In total, 656 animals from 12 sero-positive dairy herds and from the provincial slaughterhouse were diagnosed by Rose Bengal and Wright's Slow Agglutination test with EDTA. Amongst these animals, 50 animals were sero-positive for brucellosis. Twenty-five lymph nodes and 25 milk samples from each group of positive reactors were transferred to culture medium. Isolation was possible from 4 (16%) lymph nodes and 9 (36%) milk samples; out of these, 10 isolates were diagnosed as Brucella sp. All four isolates of lymphatic tissue corresponded to Brucella abortus biotype 1, confirmed as field strains by molecular analysis. Milk isolations, showed biochemically a more dispersed pattern in which B. abortus biotypes 1 and 4 were found; yet four samples gave a pattern similar to B. abortus biotype 2; however, only biotypes 1 and 4 were confirmed by molecular analysis. The concordance between biochemical and molecular diagnostic tests reached 76.9%.

  4. The ferrous iron transporter FtrABCD is required for the virulence of Brucella abortus 2308 in mice.

    PubMed

    Elhassanny, Ahmed E M; Anderson, Eric S; Menscher, Evan A; Roop, R Martin

    2013-06-01

    Iron transport has been linked to the virulence of Brucella strains in both natural and experimental hosts. The genes designated BAB2_0837-0840 in the Brucella abortus 2308 genome sequence are predicted to encode a CupII-type ferrous iron transporter homologous to the FtrABCD transporter recently described in Bordetella. To study the role of the Brucella FtrABCD in iron transport, an isogenic ftrA mutant was constructed from B. abortus 2308. Compared with the parental strain, the B. abortus ftrA mutant displays a decreased capacity to use non-haem iron sources in vitro, a growth defect in a low iron medium that is enhanced at pH 6, and studies employing radiolabelled FeCl3 confirmed that FtrABCD transports ferrous iron. Transcription of the ftrA gene is induced in B. abortus 2308 in response to iron deprivation and exposure to acid pH, and similar to other Brucella iron acquisition genes that have been examined the iron-responsiveness of ftrA is dependent upon the iron response regulator Irr. The B. abortus ftrA mutant exhibits significant attenuation in both cultured murine macrophages and experimentally infected mice, supporting the proposition that ferrous iron is a critical iron source for these bacteria in the mammalian host.

  5. Mutation of purD and purF genes further attenuates Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Barate, Abhijit Kashinath; Kim, Suk; Watarai, Masahisa; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, transposon mutagenesis was used to further attenuate Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine strain. Two purD and purF mutants were constructed, characterized and evaluated for attenuation via intracellular survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 and HeLa cells, and by clearance in BALB/c mice. The purD and purF mutants showed significantly decreased intracellular survival, and complementation of these mutants with intact copies of purD or purF genes of RB51 strain was able to restore these defects. In addition, the pur mutants presented significantly lowered persistence in mice. Immunization with purD and purF mutants protected mice against a challenge with the virulent B. abortus strain 544 at a level similar to that of the parent RB51. These data suggest that genes encoding the early stages of purine biosynthesis (purD and purF) are required for intracellular survival and virulence of B. abortus.

  6. Reduced Susceptibility to Rifampicin and Resistance to Multiple Antimicrobial Agents among Brucella abortus Isolates from Cattle in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa Pauletti, Rebeca; Reinato Stynen, Ana Paula; Pinto da Silva Mol, Juliana; Seles Dorneles, Elaine Maria; Alves, Telma Maria; de Sousa Moura Souto, Monalisa; Minharro, Silvia; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan; Lage, Andrey Pereira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility profile of Brazilian Brucella abortus isolates from cattle to eight antimicrobial agents that are recommended for the treatment of human brucellosis and to correlate the susceptibility patterns with origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotype of the strains. Screening of 147 B. abortus strains showed 100% sensitivity to doxycycline and ofloxacin, one (0.68%) strain resistant to ciprofloxacin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to streptomycin, two strains (1.36%) resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and five strains (3.40%) resistant to gentamicin. For rifampicin, three strains (2.04%) were resistant and 54 strains (36.73%) showed reduced sensitivity. Two strains were considered multidrug resistant. In conclusion, the majority of B. abortus strains isolated from cattle in Brazil were sensitive to the antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of human brucellosis; however, a considerable proportion of strains showed reduced susceptibility to rifampicin and two strains were considered multidrug resistant. Moreover, there was no correlation among the drug susceptibility pattern, origin, biotype and MLVA16-genotypes of these strains. PMID:26181775

  7. Field study of vaccination of cattle with Brucella abortus strains RB51 and 19 under high and low disease prevalence.

    PubMed

    Lord, V R; Schurig, G G; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Marcano, M J; Melendez, G E

    1998-08-01

    To assess humoral and protective immunity in cattle vaccinated by 12 months with Brucella abortus vaccine strains RB51 and 19 under field conditions of high and low brucellosis prevalence. 450 seronegative female cattle: 330 three to eight months old (calves), and 120 ten to twelve months old (heifers). Ranch A had high prevalence (39%) of brucellosis, and ranch B had low prevalence (2%), as determined by results of conventional serologic testing: agar gel immunodiffusion and the ring test. Seronegative cattle were vaccinated once or twice with 5 x 10(9) colony-forming units of B abortus strain RB51 or once with strain 19. After vaccinating 285 cattle with strain RB51 and 165 with strain 19, 74 (26%) and 30 (18%), respectively, were bred to seropositive bulls, then were kept within the infected herd of origin. All cattle vaccinated with strain 19 seroconverted 30 days later. All 285 cattle vaccinated with strain RB51 had negative results for all serologic tests, including agar gel immunodiffusion. All RB51-vaccinated cattle that became pregnant had negative results for the ring test and for conventional serologic tests after their first calving. Strain RB51 can be used as a live organism vaccine without inducing antibody titers that interfere with serodiagnosis, and induced 100% protection against field strain B abortus-induced abortion in cattle vaccinated at least 1 year before mating to an infected bull. Vaccination with strain 19 under similar conditions was less effective than vaccination with strain RB51.

  8. Profiling antibody responses to infections by Chlamydia abortus enables identification of potential virulence factors and candidates for serodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Forsbach-Birk, Vera; Foddis, Corinna; Simnacher, Ulrike; Wilkat, Max; Longbottom, David; Walder, Gernot; Benesch, Christiane; Ganter, Martin; Sachse, Konrad; Essig, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE) due to infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia (C.) abortus is an important zoonosis leading to considerable economic loss to agriculture worldwide. The pathogen can be transmitted to humans and may lead to serious infection in pregnant women. Knowledge about epidemiology, clinical course and transmission to humans is hampered by the lack of reliable diagnostic tools. Immunoreactive proteins, which are expressed in infected animals and humans, may serve as novel candidates for diagnostic marker proteins and represent putative virulence factors. In order to broaden the spectrum of immunogenic C. abortus proteins we applied 2D immunoblot analysis and screening of an expression library using human and animal sera. We have identified 48 immunoreactive proteins representing potential diagnostic markers and also putative virulence factors, such as CAB080 (homologue of the "macrophage infectivity potentiator", MIP), CAB167 (homologue of the "translocated actin recruitment protein", TARP), CAB712 (homologue of the "chlamydial protease-like activity factor", CPAF), CAB776 (homologue of the "Polymorphic membrane protein D", PmpD), and the "hypothetical proteins" CAB063, CAB408 and CAB821, which are predicted to be type III secreted. We selected two putative virulence factors for further characterization, i.e. CAB080 (cMIP) and CAB063, and studied their expression profiles at transcript and protein levels. Analysis of the subcellular localization of both proteins throughout the developmental cycle revealed CAB063 being the first C. abortus protein shown to be translocated to the host cell nucleus.

  9. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Brucella abortus triggers protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Darwin; Fernández, Pablo; Rivera, Alejandra; Andrews, Edilia; Oñate, Angel

    2012-02-08

    Brucella infections mainly occur through mucosal surfaces. Thus, the development of mucosal administered vaccines could be instrumental for the control of brucellosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of recombinant Lactococcus lactis secreting Brucella abortus Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) as oral antigen delivery system, when administered alone or in combination with L. lactis expressing IL-12. To this end, mice were vaccinated by oral route with L. lactis NZ9000 transformed with pSEC derivatives encoding for SOD (pSEC:SOD) and IL-12 (pSEC:scIL-12). In animals receiving L. lactis pSEC:SOD alone, anti-SOD-specific IgM antibodies were detected in sera at day 28 post-vaccination, together with an IgG2a dominated IgG response. SOD-specific sIgA was also detected in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. In addition, T-cell-proliferative responses upon re-stimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein extracts were observed up to 6 months after the last boost, suggesting the induction of long term memory. Vaccinated animals were also protected against challenge with the virulent B. abortus 2308 strain. Responses were mildly improved when L. lactis pSEC:SOD was co-administered with L. lactis pSEC:scIL-12. These results indicated that vaccines based on lactococci-derived live carriers are promising interventions against B. abortus infections.

  10. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Brucella abortus recombinant protein cocktail (rOmp19+rP39) against B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M infection in murine model.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, Ganesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Balakrishna, Konduru; Murali, Harishchandra Sripathy; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant proteins Omp19 (rO) and P39 (rP) from Brucella abortus were evaluated individually and compared with the cocktail protein (rO+rP) against B. abortus 544 and Brucella melitensis 16M infection in BALB/c mouse model. Intra-peritoneal (I.P.) immunization with rO+rP cocktail developed substantially higher antibody titers predominant with Th1 mediated isotypes (IgG2a/2b). Western blot analysis using anti-rO+rP antibodies showed specific reactivity with native Omp19 (19 kDa) and P39 (39 kDa) among whole cell proteins of B. abortus and B. melitensis. Splenocytes extracted from rO+rP immunized mice induced significantly (P<0.001) higher proliferative responses at 30 μg/ml with considerable expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12) than rO and rP. Macrophage cell (RAW 264.7) monolayer supplemented with anti-rO+rP polysera exhibited enhanced viability against challenge with B. abortus 544 (72.27%) and B. melitensis 16M (68.57%). On the other hand, individual anti-rO and anti-rP polysera resulted in relatively lesser protection against the pathogens (64.79%, 54.45% and 47.13%, 45.11%, respectively). Immunized group of mice when I.P. challenged with 5 × 10(4) CFU of B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M were found significantly (P<0.001) protected in the rO+rP group (log units of protection, spleen: 2.38, 2.12; liver: 1.04, 0.81, respectively) than in rO (spleen: 1.43, 1.21; liver: 0.7, 0.47) and rP (spleen: 1.24, 1.17; liver: 0.65, 0.34). Findings from this study depicted that rO+rP cocktail is highly immunogenic with the Th1 predominant serum antibody titers and T-cell mediated immune protection, would be a valuable intervention in the development of a safer and improved Brucella vaccine.

  11. Influenza viral vectors expressing the Brucella OMP16 or L7/L12 proteins as vaccines against B. abortus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We generated novel, effective candidate vaccine against Brucella abortus based on recombinant influenza viruses expressing the Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 or outer membrane protein (Omp)-16 from the NS1 open reading frame. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and protectiveness of vaccine candidate in laboratory animals. Methods and Results Four recombinant influenza A viral constructs of the subtypes Н5N1 or H1N1 expressing the Brucella proteins L7/L12 or Omp16 were obtained by a reverse genetics method: Flu-NS1-124-L7/L12-H5N1, Flu-NS1-124-Omp16-H5N1, Flu-NS1-124-L7/L12-H1N1 and Flu-NS1-124-Omp16-H1N1. Despite of substantial modification of NS1 gene, all constructs replicated well and were retain their Brucella inserts over five passages in embryonated chicken eggs (CE). Administration of the mono- or bivalent vaccine formulation via prime-boost intranasal (i.n.), conjunctival (c.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization was safe in mice; no deaths, body weight loss or pathomorphological changes were observed over 56 days. Moreover, guinea pigs vaccinated i.n. with vaccine vectors did not shed the vaccine viruses through their upper respiratory tract after the prime and booster vaccination. These findings confirmed the replication-deficient phenotype of viral vectors. The highest antibody response to Brucella antigen was obtained with constructs expressing L7/L12 (ELISA, GMT 242.5-735.0); whereas the highest T-cell immune response- with construct expressing Omp16 (ELISPOT, 337 ± 52-651 ± 45 spots/4×105cells), which was comparable (P > 0.05) to the response induced by the commercial vaccine B. abortus 19. Interestingly, c. immunization appeared to be optimal for eliciting T-cell immune response. In guinea pigs, the highest protective efficacy after challenge with B. abortus 544 was achieved with Omp16 expressing constructs in both monovalent or bivalent vaccine formulations; protective efficacy was

  12. Immunotoxic effect of thiamethoxam in immunized mice with Brucella abortus cultural filtrate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Salema, L. H.; Alwan, M. J.; Yousif, Afaf Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned for determination the toxic effect of thiamethoxam (TMX) in immunized mice with Brucella abortus culture filtrate antigen (CFBAgs) (as a vaccine) and its role of TMX on decrease activity of B. abortus antigen on eliciting of humoral and cellular immunity. Materials and Methods: To achieve these goals 60 female mice were used, 7-8 weeks age, they were divided equally into three groups (20 in each group) and treated as follows: 1st group: Mice were immunized with CFBAgs intraperitoneally in two doses, 2 weeks intervals with (protein concentration 2 mg\\ml), 2nd group: Mice immunized as in the 1st group and was administrated orally with 1/10 lethal dose 50% of TMX (83.7 mg/kg B.W.) for 4 weeks daily, 3rd group was administrated orally with 0.3 ml normal saline served as a control group. At day 28 post immunization (PI) delayed type hypersensitivity (skin test) was done, and serum samples were collected at day 30 (PI) for detection of passive hemagglutination test (PHA); interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which was done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test in addition to phagocytes assay. Results: The results of skin test post injection with soluble antigen of B. abortus intradermally showed a high significantly mean values at p≤0.05 of footpad skin thickness in the 1st group of mice which recorded (0.51±0.002 mm) as compared with the 2nd group of mice which showed (0.08±0.002 mm) after 24 h; the mean values of skin thickness were declined in the 1st mice (0.46±0.002) and 2nd mice (0.070±0.001) at 48 h; control group showed a negative results. These results were agreed with results of serum levels of IFN-γ (pg/ml) that showed that a significant increase the vaccinated 1st group (406.36±1.52), than those values in the 2nd group (151.61±0.89) and negative result in 3rd group (46.47±0.60), in addition to results of PHA test which showed a significant increase in antibody titer in the 1st group (139±12.16) with low level of serum antibody

  13. Novel vector vaccine against Brucella abortus based on influenza A viruses expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins: evaluation of protection in pregnant heifers.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-10-14

    The present study provides the first information about the protection of a novel influenza viral vector vaccine expressing the Brucella proteins ribosomal L7/L12 or Omp16 containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in pregnant heifers. Immunization of pregnant heifers was conducted via the conjunctival (n=10) or subcutaneous (n=10) route using cross prime and booster vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. The vector vaccine was evaluated in comparison with positive control groups vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 (n=10) or B. abortus RB51 (n=10) and a negative (PBS+Montanide Gel01; n=10) control group. Via both the conjunctival or subcutaneous route, evaluation of protectiveness against abortion, effectiveness of vaccination and index of infection (in heifers and their fetuses or calves) demonstrated the vector vaccine provided good protection against B. abortus 544 infection compared to the negative control group (PBS+Montanide Gel01) and comparable protection to commercial vaccines B. abortus S19 or B. abortus RB51.

  14. Analysis of Humoral Immune Responses to Surface and Virulence-Associated Chlamydia abortus Proteins in Ovine and Human Abortions by Use of a Newly Developed Line Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Jürgen Benjamin; Simnacher, Ulrike; Longbottom, David; Livingstone, Morag; Maile, Julia; Soutschek, Erwin; Walder, Gernot; Boden, Katharina; Sachse, Konrad; Essig, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia abortus is the causative agent of enzootic abortion of ewes and poses a significant zoonotic risk for pregnant women. Using proteomic analysis and gene expression library screening in a previous project, we identified potential virulence factors and candidates for serodiagnosis, of which nine were scrutinized here with a strip immunoassay. We have shown that aborting sheep exhibited a strong antibody response to surface (MOMP, MIP, Pmp13G) and virulence-associated (CPAF, TARP, SINC) antigens. While the latter disappeared within 18 weeks following abortion in a majority of the animals, antibodies to surface proteins persisted beyond the duration of the study. In contrast, nonaborting experimentally infected sheep developed mainly antibodies to surface antigens (MOMP, MIP, Pmp13G), all of which did not persist. We were also able to detect antibodies to these surface antigens in C abortus-infected women who had undergone septic abortion, whereas a group of shepherds and veterinarians with occupational exposure to C abortus-infected sheep revealed only sporadic immune responses to the antigens selected. The most specific antigen for the serodiagnosis of human C abortus infections was Pmp13G, which showed no cross-reactivity with other chlamydiae infecting humans. We suggest that Pmp13G-based serodiagnosis accomplished by the detection of antibodies to virulence-associated antigens such as CPAF, TARP, and SINC may improve the laboratory diagnosis of human and animal C abortus infections.

  15. Analysis of Humoral Immune Responses to Surface and Virulence-Associated Chlamydia abortus Proteins in Ovine and Human Abortions by Use of a Newly Developed Line Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Simnacher, Ulrike; Longbottom, David; Livingstone, Morag; Maile, Julia; Soutschek, Erwin; Walder, Gernot; Boden, Katharina; Sachse, Konrad; Essig, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia abortus is the causative agent of enzootic abortion of ewes and poses a significant zoonotic risk for pregnant women. Using proteomic analysis and gene expression library screening in a previous project, we identified potential virulence factors and candidates for serodiagnosis, of which nine were scrutinized here with a strip immunoassay. We have shown that aborting sheep exhibited a strong antibody response to surface (MOMP, MIP, Pmp13G) and virulence-associated (CPAF, TARP, SINC) antigens. While the latter disappeared within 18 weeks following abortion in a majority of the animals, antibodies to surface proteins persisted beyond the duration of the study. In contrast, nonaborting experimentally infected sheep developed mainly antibodies to surface antigens (MOMP, MIP, Pmp13G), all of which did not persist. We were also able to detect antibodies to these surface antigens in C. abortus-infected women who had undergone septic abortion, whereas a group of shepherds and veterinarians with occupational exposure to C. abortus-infected sheep revealed only sporadic immune responses to the antigens selected. The most specific antigen for the serodiagnosis of human C. abortus infections was Pmp13G, which showed no cross-reactivity with other chlamydiae infecting humans. We suggest that Pmp13G-based serodiagnosis accomplished by the detection of antibodies to virulence-associated antigens such as CPAF, TARP, and SINC may improve the laboratory diagnosis of human and animal C. abortus infections. PMID:27194684

  16. DNA sequence and expression of the 36-kilodalton outer membrane protein gene of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Ficht, T A; Bearden, S W; Sowa, B A; Adams, L G

    1989-01-01

    The cloning of the gene(s) encoding a 36-kilodalton (kDa) cell envelope protein of Brucella abortus has been previously described (T. A. Ficht, S. W. Bearden, B. A. Sowa, and L. G. Adams, Infect, Immun. 56:2036-2046, 1988). In an attempt to define the nature of the previously described duplication at this locus we have sequenced 3,500 base pairs of genomic DNA encompassing this region. The duplication represented two similar open reading frames which shared more than 85% homology at the nucleotide level but differed primarily because of the absence of 108 nucleotides from one of the two gene copies. These two genes were read from opposite strands and potentially encoded proteins which are 96% homologous. The predicted gene products were identical over the first 100 amino acids, including 22-amino-acid-long signal sequences. The amino acid composition of the predicted proteins was similar to that obtained for the Brucella porin isolated by Verstreate et al. (D. R. Verstreate, M. T. Creasy, N. T. Caveney, C. L. Baldwin, M. W. Blab, and A. J. Winter, Infect. Immun. 35:979-989, 1982) and presumably represented two copies of the porin gene, tentatively identified as omp 2a (silent) and omp 2b (expressed). The homology between the two genes extended to and included Shine-Dalgarno sequences 7 base pairs upstream from the ATG start codons. Homology at the 3' ends extended only as far as the termination codon, but both genes had putative rho-independent transcription termination sites. Localization of the promoters proved more difficult, since the canonical procaryotic sequences could not be identified in the region upstream of either gene. Promoter activity was demonstrated by ligation to a promoterless lacZ gene in pMC1871. However, only one active promoter could be identified by using this system. A 36-kDa protein was synthesized in E. coli with the promoter in the native orientation and was identical in size to the protein produced in laboratory-grown B. abortus. When

  17. Survival of Brucella abortus aqpX mutant in fresh and ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Rodríguez, María Del Rosario; Díaz-Aparicio, Efrén; Arellano-Reynoso, Beatriz; García-Lobo, Juan M; Gimeno, Miquel; Palomares-Reséndiz, Erika G; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the survival of a Brucella abortus aqpX mutant during the elaboration and conservation of fresh and ripened cheeses at 4 °C and 24 °C. The pH values and water activity were monitored for each type of cheese. The fresh cheese was elaborated with raw milk inoculated with 6×10⁸ colony-forming units (CFU)/mL each of parental and mutant strain. Ripening cheeses were elaborated with both raw and pasteurized milk and inoculated with 12×10⁸ CFU/mL each of parental and mutant strains. In fresh cheese, survival was observed during elaboration and conservation for 7 days at 4 °C in mutant and parental strains. The number of survivors of the mutant strain was 10 times lower compared with the parental strain at pH 5 and a(w) of 0.930. In the cheese elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 24 °C, both strains survived until day 17 at pH 4.0 and a(w) of 0.89. However, when the cheese was elaborated with pasteurized milk, the parental strain survived until day 31 of ripening, and the mutant strain survived 24 days at pH 4 and a(w) of 0.886. The survival of the mutant strain showed a diminution of one logarithm during elaboration and ripening of cheese as compared with the parental strain. When the cheese was elaborated with raw milk and ripened at 4 °C, survival of the parental strain was 24 days, whereas the mutant strain survived only 17 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90). Regarding the cheese elaborated with pasteurized milk and maturated at 4 °C, both strains survived 31 days (pH 5 and a(w) 0.90), with the same survival diminution during elaboration and ripening. Our results show that in both types of cheese, the mutated aqpX strain survived 10 times less than the parental strain, which shows that the aqpX gene can be related to the survival of Brucella abortus in this type of cheese.

  18. Immune responses of bison and efficacy after booster vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; McGill, J L; Sacco, R E; Hennager, S G

    2015-04-01

    Thirty-one bison heifers were randomly assigned to receive saline or a single vaccination with 10(10) CFU of Brucella abortus strain RB51. Some vaccinated bison were randomly selected for booster vaccination with RB51 at 11 months after the initial vaccination. Mean antibody responses to RB51 were greater (P < 0.05) in vaccinated bison after initial and booster vaccination than in nonvaccinated bison. The proliferative responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the vaccinated bison were greater (P < 0.05) than those in the nonvaccinated bison at 16 and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination but not after the booster vaccination. The relative gene expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was increased (P < 0.05) in the RB51-vaccinated bison at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after the initial vaccination and at 8 weeks after the booster vaccination. The vaccinated bison had greater (P < 0.05) in vitro production of IFN-γ at all sampling times, greater interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in various samplings after the initial and booster vaccinations, and greater IL-6 production at one sampling time after the booster vaccination. Between 170 and 180 days of gestation, the bison were intraconjunctivally challenged with approximately 1 × 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308. The incidences of abortion and infection were greater (P < 0.05) in the nonvaccinated bison after experimental challenge than in the bison receiving either vaccination treatment. Booster-vaccinated, but not single-vaccinated bison, had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of infection in fetal tissues and maternal tissues compared to that in the controls. Compared to the nonvaccinated bison, both vaccination treatments lowered the colonization (measured as the CFU/g of tissue) of Brucella organisms in all tissues, except in retropharyngeal and supramammary lymph nodes. Our study suggests that RB51 booster vaccination is an effective vaccination strategy for enhancing herd immunity against

  19. DETECTION OF Leptospira spp. AND Brucella abortus ANTIBODIES IN FREE-LIVING JAGUARS (Panthera onca) IN TWO PROTECTED AREAS OF NORTHERN PANTANAL, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    ONUMA, Selma Samiko Miyazaki; KANTEK, Daniel Luis Zanella; CRAWSHAW, Peter Gransden; MORATO, Ronaldo Gonçalves; MAY-JÚNIOR, Joares Adenilson; de MORAIS, Zenaide Maria; FERREIRA, José Soares; de AGUIAR, Daniel Moura

    2015-01-01

     This study aimed to assess the exposure of free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) to Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus in two conservation units in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The presence of antibodies in blood samples of eleven jaguars was investigated using autochthonous antigens isolated in Brazil added to reference antigen collection applied to diagnosis of leptospirosis by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The Rose Bengal test was applied for B. abortus antibodies. Two (18.2%) jaguars were seroreactive for the Leptospira spp. antigen and the serovar considered as most infective in both animals was a Brazilian isolate of serovar Canicola (L01). All jaguars were seronegative for B. abortus. These data indicate that the inclusion of autochthonous antigens in serological studies can significantly increase the number of reactive animals, as well as modify the epidemiological profile of Leptospira spp. infection. PMID:25923900

  20. Detection of Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus antibodies in free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) in two protected areas of northern Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Selma Samiko Miyazaki; Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; Crawshaw Júnior, Peter Gransden; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; May-Júnior, Joares Adenilson; Morais, Zenaide Maria de; Ferreira Neto, José Soares; Aguiar, Daniel Moura de

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the exposure of free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) to Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus in two conservation units in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The presence of antibodies in blood samples of eleven jaguars was investigated using autochthonous antigens isolated in Brazil added to reference antigen collection applied to diagnosis of leptospirosis by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The Rose Bengal test was applied for B. abortus antibodies. Two (18.2%) jaguars were seroreactive for the Leptospira spp. antigen and the serovar considered as most infective in both animals was a Brazilian isolate of serovar Canicola (L01). All jaguars were seronegative for B. abortus. These data indicate that the inclusion of autochthonous antigens in serological studies can significantly increase the number of reactive animals, as well as modify the epidemiological profile of Leptospira spp. infection.

  1. Neutrophils Exert a Suppressive Effect on Th1 Responses to Intracellular Pathogen Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Lepidi, Hubert; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the first line of defense against microbial pathogens. In addition to their role in innate immunity, PMNs may also regulate events related to adaptive immunity. To investigate the influence of PMNs in the immune response during chronic bacterial infections, we explored the course of brucellosis in antibody PMN-depleted C57BL/6 mice and in neutropenic mutant Genista mouse model. We demonstrate that at later times of infection, Brucella abortus is killed more efficiently in the absence of PMNs than in their presence. The higher bacterial removal was concomitant to the: i) comparatively reduced spleen swelling; ii) augmented infiltration of epithelioid histiocytes corresponding to macrophages/dendritic cells (DCs); iii) higher recruitment of monocytes and monocyte/DCs phenotype; iv) significant activation of B and T lymphocytes, and v) increased levels of INF-γ and negligible levels of IL4 indicating a balance of Th1 over Th2 response. These results reveal that PMNs have an unexpected influence in dampening the immune response against intracellular Brucella infection and strengthen the notion that PMNs actively participate in regulatory circuits shaping both innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:23458832

  2. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  3. New Features in the Lipid A Structure of Brucella suis and Brucella abortus Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Casabuono, Adriana C; Czibener, Cecilia; Del Giudice, Mariela G; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Ugalde, Juan E; Couto, Alicia S

    2017-09-18

    Brucellaceae are Gram-negative bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the most distributed worldwide zoonosis, transmitted to humans by contact with either infected animals or their products. The lipopolysaccharide exposed on the cell surface has been intensively studied and is considered a major virulence factor of Brucella. In the last years, structural studies allowed the determination of new structures in the core oligosaccharide and the O-antigen of this lipopolysaccharide. In this work, we have reinvestigated the lipid A structure isolated from B. suis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharides. A detailed study by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in the positive and negative ion modes of the lipid A moieties purified from both species was performed. Interestingly, a new feature was detected: the presence of a pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue substituting the backbone. LID-MS/MS analysis of some of the detected ions allowed assurance that the Lipid A structure composed by the diGlcN3N disaccharide, mainly hexa-acylated and penta-acylated, bearing one phosphate and one pyrophosphorylethanolamine residue. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  4. Mouse running activity is lowered by Brucella abortus treatment: a potential model to study chronic fatigue.

    PubMed

    Ottenweller, J E; Natelson, B H; Gause, W C; Carroll, K K; Beldowicz, D; Zhou, X D; LaManca, J J

    1998-03-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome, which can occur after acute infection and last for years, is characterized by severe and persistent fatigue. Others have reported decreases in mouse running activity following infection and have suggested this may provide an animal model for studying chronic fatigue. Voluntary running is a highly motivated activity in mice, which will often run 5-7 mi/day in our laboratory. Following 2 weeks of acclimation to running wheels with food and water available ad lib, female BALB/c mice received 0.2-mL tail vein injections of killed Brucella abortus (BA) or saline vehicle. Subsequently the effects on voluntary running and grooming behavior were determined. Injection of BA caused an immediate large decrease in running and a lack of grooming. Vehicle injections produced no changes in behavior. After the first several days of reduced running behavior, levels of running and grooming slowly returned back to normal over the next 2-4 weeks, with substantial individual differences in the rate of recovery. The pattern of running during recovery was intriguing in that BA mice first ran at normal levels just after the lights went out, but they stopped after only 1-2 h. As recovery proceeded, they gradually increased the duration of the running bout during the night. Because this model uses voluntary exertion and the ability to run for longer periods of time characterizes recovery, the model may be a good one for studying the biologic underpinnings of chronic fatigue.

  5. Brucella abortus choloylglycine hydrolase affects cell envelope composition and host cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Comerci, Diego J

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization.

  6. Characterization, occurrence, and molecular cloning of a 39-kilodalton Brucella abortus cytoplasmic protein immunodominant in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Denoel, P A; Vo, T K; Tibor, A; Weynants, V E; Trunde, J M; Dubray, G; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antisera recognizing a 39-kDa protein (P39) of brucellin, a cytoplasmic extract from Brucella melitensis rough strain B115, were produced. The P39 was purified by anion-exchange chromatography. Eleven of fourteen Brucella-infected cows whose infections had been detected by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) test with brucellergen also developed a DTH reaction when purified P39 was used as the trigger. The T-cell proliferative responses to P39 of peripheral blood lymphocytes from Brucella-infected cows were also positive. None of the animals infected with other bacterial species that are presumed to induce immunological cross-reactions with Brucella spp. reacted to P39, either in DTH tests or in lymphocyte proliferation assays. A lambda gt11 genomic library of Brucella abortus was screened with a monoclonal antibody specific for P39, and the gene coding for this protein was subsequently isolated. The nucleotide sequence of the P39 gene was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence is in accordance with the sequence of an internal peptide isolated from P39. PMID:9009303

  7. A proficiency testing method for detecting antibodies against Brucella abortus in quantitative and qualitative serological tests.

    PubMed

    Gall, D; Nielsen, K; Nicola, A; Renteria, T

    2008-12-01

    A proficiency testing panel for detecting antibodies against Brucella abortus was developed and evaluated by both primary binding and conventional serological tests, using the guidelines of the World Organisation for Animal Health and the International Organization for Standardization Guide 43-1. All serological tests were judged satisfactory. Among the primary binding tests, the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA 2) and the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA 1), with standard deviation indices (z-scores) of -0.06 and 0.10, respectively, performed best. Similarly, E(n) numbers (i.e. a way of comparing different measurements of performance) of 0 for both the competitive ELISA 2 and the indirect ELISA 1 indicated that these tests performed best in the initial round of proficiency testing. The conventional serological tests all passed the panel. Comparing data from both the quantitative and qualitative tests demonstrated that this proficiency testing scheme was fit for the purpose for which it was designed.

  8. Use of polymerase chain reaction to detect Brucella abortus biovar 1 in infected goats.

    PubMed

    Leal-Klevezas, D S; Martínez-Vázquez, I O; García-Cantú, J; López-Merino, A; Martínez-Soriano, J P

    2000-07-03

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to diagnose goat brucellosis and compare its sensitivity against some of the most commonly used serological and bacteriological techniques. Twenty two female and one male out of 300 clinically healthy, mixed-breed goats were randomly chosen from a ranch located at Marín, Nuevo León, Mexico. Milk and blood samples were taken from each animal and used to obtain both microbiological cultures and DNA of the pathogen, and sera was tested against Rose Bengal antigen (RBT). Results showed that 86% of the blood samples were positive on the PCR test, while 60% were positive on the serological test. The pathogen was isolated from only one blood culture. Sixty four percent of the milk samples were positive on PCR tests, but failed to yield bacteria in culture. Biochemical and PCR specific assay demonstrated that Brucella abortus biovar 1 was associated with the infection. This study demonstrates the higher sensitivity of PCR over RBT and blood culture and its potential towards a rapid identification of Brucella strains.

  9. Immune responses of elk to vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Kreeger, Terry J; Palmer, Mitchell V

    2002-10-01

    In a study conducted from January to August 2000, elk (Cervus elaphus) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51, n = 6) or injected with 0.15 M NaCl solution (n = 3) at approximately 6 mo of age. Beginning at 2 wk and continuing to 25 wk after vaccination, SRB51-vaccinated elk had greater antibody responses (P < 0.05) to SRB51 when compared to nonvaccinated elk. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from SRB51-vaccinated elk had greater (P < 0.05) proliferative responses to SRB51 at 18 wk after vaccination when compared to responses of nonvaccinated elk. Strain RB51 was recovered from blood samples of all vaccinates at 2 wk, and three of six vaccinates at 4 wk after vaccination. The SRB51 vaccine strain was recovered from the superficial cervical lymph node of all vaccinates sampled at 6 wk after vaccination. but not from lymph node samples obtained from vaccinates at 12 or 18 wk after vaccination. At 34 wk after vaccination, SRB51 was recovered from the bronchial lymph node of one of five vaccinates but not from other tissues. Strain RB51 was not recovered at any time from samples obtained from nonvaccinated elk. This study suggests that following vaccination with SRB51, elk remain bacteremic for a prolonged period of time, rapidly develop high antibody titers, and are slower to develop detectable proliferative responses in PBMC when compared to responses of cattle or bison (Bison bison).

  10. Prepatellar bursitis due to Brucella abortus: case report and analysis of the local immune response.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Jorge C; Delpino, M Victoria; Scian, Romina; Deodato, Bettina; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2010-12-01

    A case of prepatellar bursitis in a man with chronic brucellosis is presented. Brucella abortus biotype 1 was isolated from the abundant yellowish fluid obtained from the bursa. Clinical and epidemiological data did not suggest a direct inoculation of the agent in the bursa. However, the patient mentioned occasional local trauma due to recreational sports, which may have constituted a predisposing factor. As determined by ELISA, there were higher levels of IgG against Brucella LPS and cytosolic proteins detected in the patient's bursal synovial fluid when compared with serum. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, gamma interferon, interleukin 8 and MCP-1) were higher than in synovial fluids obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and a patient with septic arthritis, and a zymographic analysis revealed a gelatinase of about 92 kDa. These findings indicate that it may be possible to diagnose brucellar bursitis by measuring specific antibodies in the bursal synovial fluid. In addition, our findings suggest a role of increased local levels of proinflammatory cytokines and gelatinases in the inflammatory manifestations of brucellar bursitis.

  11. Improvement of the Brucella abortus B19 vaccine by its preparation in a glycerol based medium.

    PubMed

    Sangari, F J; Agüero, J; García-Lobo, J M

    1996-03-01

    The Brucella abortus B19 vaccine strain differs from other Brucella strains in its sensitivity to erythritol. However, erythritol tolerant (Eri(t)) mutants arise from sensitive cultures of B19 at high rate, and may cause persistence and/or abortion when the vaccine is inoculated on adult cattle. Twelve different batches of B19 have been examined for the presence of Eri(t) mutants. All contained Eri(t) variants at a proportion ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-6). In order to eliminate these mutants from the vaccine cultures, we have developed a minimal medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source, named MMG30. Growth of the parental strain B19 (erythritol sensitive) in this medium was fairly good compared with the growth of its Eri(t) derivatives. Culture of the 12 different batches of B19 in liquid MMG30 produced up to a thousandfold decrease in the proportion of Eri(t) mutants present in the vaccine cultures. Use of this medium to grow B19 could represent an easy and considerable improvement of the vaccine, by the reduction of the presence of potentially dangerous Eri(t) mutants.

  12. Neutrophils exert a suppressive effect on Th1 responses to intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Martirosyan, Anna; Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Alfaro-Alarcón, Alejandro; Lepidi, Hubert; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    2013-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the first line of defense against microbial pathogens. In addition to their role in innate immunity, PMNs may also regulate events related to adaptive immunity. To investigate the influence of PMNs in the immune response during chronic bacterial infections, we explored the course of brucellosis in antibody PMN-depleted C57BL/6 mice and in neutropenic mutant Genista mouse model. We demonstrate that at later times of infection, Brucella abortus is killed more efficiently in the absence of PMNs than in their presence. The higher bacterial removal was concomitant to the: i) comparatively reduced spleen swelling; ii) augmented infiltration of epithelioid histiocytes corresponding to macrophages/dendritic cells (DCs); iii) higher recruitment of monocytes and monocyte/DCs phenotype; iv) significant activation of B and T lymphocytes, and v) increased levels of INF-γ and negligible levels of IL4 indicating a balance of Th1 over Th2 response. These results reveal that PMNs have an unexpected influence in dampening the immune response against intracellular Brucella infection and strengthen the notion that PMNs actively participate in regulatory circuits shaping both innate and adaptive immunity.

  13. Comparison of Buffered, Acidified Plate Antigen to Standard Serologic Tests for the Detection of Serum Antibodies to Brucella abortus in Elk (Cervus canadensis).

    PubMed

    Clarke, P Ryan; Edwards, William H; Hennager, Steven G; Block, Jean F; Yates, Angela M; Ebel, Eric; Knopp, Douglas J; Fuentes-Sanchez, Antonio; Jennings-Gaines, Jessica; Kientz, Rebecca L; Simunich, Marilyn

    2015-07-01

    Brucellosis (caused by the bacterium Brucella abortus) is a zoonotic disease endemic in wild elk (Cervus canadensis) of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, US. Because livestock and humans working with elk or livestock are at risk, validated tests to detect the B. abortus antibody in elk are needed. Using the κ-statistic, we evaluated the buffered, acidified plate antigen (BAPA) assay for agreement with the results of the four serologic tests (card test [card], complement fixation test [CF], rivanol precipitation plate agglutination test [RIV], standard plate agglutination test [SPT]) that are approved by the US Department of Agriculture for the detection of the B. abortus antibody in elk. From 2006 to 2010, serum samples collected from elk within B. abortus-endemic areas (n = 604) and nonendemic areas (n = 707) and from elk culture-positive for B. abortus (n = 36) were split and blind tested by four elk serum diagnostic laboratories. κ-Values showed a high degree of agreement for the card (0.876), RIV (0.84), and CF (0.774) test pairings and moderate agreement for the SPT (0.578). Sensitivities for the BAPA, card, RIV, CF, and SPT were 0.859, 0.839, 0.899, 1.00, and 0.813, whereas specificities were 0.986, 0.993, 0.986, 0.98, and 0.968, respectively. The positive predictive values and the negative predictive values were calculated for 2.6%, 8.8%, and 16.2% prevalence levels. These findings suggest the BAPA test is a suitable screening test for the B. abortus antibodies in elk.

  14. Improving the molecular diagnosis of Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus infection with a species-specific duplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Opota, Onya; Jaton, Katia; Branley, James; Vanrompay, Daisy; Erard, Veronique; Borel, Nicole; Longbottom, David; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-10-01

    Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus are closely related intracellular bacteria exhibiting different tissue tropism that may cause severe but distinct infection in humans. C. psittaci causes psittacosis, a respiratory zoonotic infection transmitted by birds. C. abortus is an abortigenic agent in small ruminants, which can also colonize the human placenta and lead to foetal death and miscarriage. Infections caused by C. psittaci and C. abortus are underestimated mainly due to diagnosis difficulties resulting from their strict intracellular growth. We developed a duplex real-time PCR to detect and distinguish these two bacteria in clinical samples. The first PCR (PCR1) targeted a sequence of the 16S-23S rRNA operon allowing the detection of both C. psittaci and C. abortus. The second PCR (PCR2) targeted the coding DNA sequence CPSIT_0607 unique to C. psittaci. The two PCRs showed 100 % detection for ≥ 10 DNA copies per reaction (1000 copies ml(- 1)). Using a set of 120 samples, including bacterial reference strains, clinical specimens and infected cell culture material, we monitored 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for the detection of C. psittaci and C. abortus for PCR1. When PCR1 was positive, PCR2 could discriminate C. psittaci from C. abortus with a positive predictive value of 100 % and a negative predictive value of 88 %. In conclusion, this new duplex PCR represents a low-cost and time-saving method with high-throughput potential, expected to improve the routine diagnosis of psittacosis and pregnancy complication in large-scale screening programs and also during outbreaks.

  15. Comparative evaluation of the protective efficacy of two formulations of a recombinant Chlamydia abortus subunit candidate vaccine in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Pais, Roshan; Ohandjo, Adaugo; He, Cheng; He, Qing; Omosun, Yusuf; Igietseme, J U; Eko, F O

    2015-04-08

    Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus) is the causative agent of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) and poses a zoonotic risk to pregnant women. Current live attenuated 1B vaccines are efficacious but cause disease in vaccinated animals and inactivated vaccines are only marginally protective. We tested the ability of a new C. abortus subunit vaccine candidate based on the conserved and immunogenic polymorphic membrane protein D (Pmp18D) formulated in CpG1826+FL (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 Ligand; Flt3L) or Vibrio cholerae ghosts (VCG) to induce innate and cross protective immunity against genital C. abortus infection. We found that delivery of rPmp18D with VCG was more effective than with CpG+FL in up-regulating the expression of molecules critically involved in T cell activation and differentiation, including MHC II, CD40, CD80, and CD86, activation of TLRs and NLRP3 inflammasome engagement, and secretion of IL-1β and TNF-α but not IL-10 and IL-4. rVCG-Pmp18D-immunized mice elicited more robust antigen-specific IFN-γ, IgA and IgG2c antibody responses compared to CpG+FL-delivered rPmp18D. Based on the number of mice with positive vaginal cultures, length of vaginal shedding, and number of inclusion forming units recovered following challenge with the heterologous C. abortus strain B577, vaccine delivery with VCG induced superior protective immunity than delivery with a combination of CpG1826 and FL, a nasal DC-targeting adjuvant. These results demonstrate that the ability of VCG to enhance protective immunity against genital C. abortus infection is superior to that of CpG+FL adjuvants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Jake E; Isaak, Dale D; Leonhardt, Jack A; Vernati, Giulia; Pate, Jessie C; Andrews, Gerard P

    2011-03-11

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA). All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence and induction of

  17. Comparative evaluation of the protective efficacy of two formulations of a recombinant Chlamydia abortus subunit candidate vaccine in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qing; Pais, Roshan; Ohandjo, Adaugo; He, Cheng; He, Qing; Omosun, Yusuf; Igietseme, J. U.; Eko, F. O.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia abortus (C. abortus) is the causative agent of ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) and poses a zoonotic risk to pregnant women. Current live attenuated 1B vaccines are efficacious but cause disease in vaccinated animals and inactivated vaccines are only marginally protective. We tested the ability of a new C. abortus subunit vaccine candidate based on the conserved and immunogenic polymorphic membrane protein D (Pmp18D) formulated in CpG1826+FL (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 Ligand; Flt3L) or Vibrio cholerae ghosts (VCG) to induce innate and cross protective immunity against genital C. abortus infection. We found that delivery of rPmp18D with VCG was more effective than with CpG+FL in up-regulating the expression of molecules critically involved in T cell activation and differentiation, including MHC II, CD40, CD80, and CD86, activation of TLRs and NLRP3 inflammasome engagement, and secretion of IL-1β and TNF-α but not IL-10 and IL-4. rVCG-Pmp18D-immunized mice elicited more robust antigen-specific IFN-γ IgA and IgG2c antibody responses compared to CpG+FL-delivered rPmp18D. Based on the number of mice with positive vaginal cultures, length of vaginal shedding, and number of inclusion forming units recovered following challenge with the heterologous C. abortus strain B577, vaccine delivery with VCG induced superior protective immunity than delivery with a combination of CpG1826 and FL, a nasal DC-targeting adjuvant. These results demonstrate that the ability of VCG to enhance protective immunity against genital C. abortus infection is superior to that of CpG+FL adjuvants. PMID:25698486

  18. RecA and RadA Proteins of Brucella abortus Do Not Perform Overlapping Protective DNA Repair Functions following Oxidative Burst

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Christelle M.; Booth, Natha J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Gee, Jason M.; Roop, R. Martin; Kovach, Michael E.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Elzer, Philip H.; Ennis, Don G.

    2006-01-01

    Very little is known about the role of DNA repair networks in Brucella abortus and its role in pathogenesis. We investigated the roles of RecA protein, DNA repair, and SOS regulation in B. abortus. While recA mutants in most bacterial species are hypersensitive to UV damage, surprisingly a B. abortus recA null mutant conferred only modest sensitivity. We considered the presence of a second RecA protein to account for this modest UV sensitivity. Analyses of the Brucella spp. genomes and our molecular studies documented the presence of only one recA gene, suggesting a RecA-independent repair process. Searches of the available Brucella genomes revealed some homology between RecA and RadA, a protein implicated in E. coli DNA repair. We considered the possibility that B. abortus RadA might be compensating for the loss of RecA by promoting similar repair activities. We present functional analyses that demonstrated that B. abortus RadA complements a radA defect in E. coli but could not act in place of the B. abortus RecA. We show that RecA but not RadA was required for survival in macrophages. We also discovered that recA was expressed at high constitutive levels, due to constitutive LexA cleavage by RecA, with little induction following DNA damage. Higher basal levels of RecA and its SOS-regulated gene products might protect against DNA damage experienced following the oxidative burst within macrophages. PMID:16816190

  19. B. abortus RNA is the component involved in the down-modulation of MHC-I expression on human monocytes via TLR8 and the EGFR pathway.

    PubMed

    Milillo, M Ayelén; Velásquez, Lis N; Trotta, Aldana; Delpino, M Victoria; Marinho, Fábio V; Balboa, Luciana; Vermeulen, Mónica; Espindola, Sonia L; Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Fernández, Gabriela C; Oliveira, Sergio Costa; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-08-01

    Despite eliciting a potent CD8+ T cell response, Brucella abortus is able to persist and establish a chronic infection inside its host. We have previously reported that the infection of human monocytes/macrophages with B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced MHC-I cell surface expression down-modulating cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses. MHC-I down-modulation depends on bacterial viability and results from the capacity of B. abortus to retain the MHC-I molecules within the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, we recently demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway is involved in this phenomenon and that this is an early event during infection. However, the components and mechanisms whereby B. abortus is able to down-modulate MHC-I remained to be elucidated. In this study we demonstrated that the down-modulation of MHC-I expression is not mediated by well-known Brucella virulence factors but instead by B. abortus RNA, a PAMP associated to viability (vita-PAMP). Surprisingly, completely degraded RNA was also able to inhibit MHC-I expression to the same extent as intact RNA. Accordingly, B. abortus RNA and its degradation products were able to mimic the MHC-I intracellular retention within the Golgi apparatus observed upon infection. We further demonstrated that TLR8, a single-stranded RNA and RNA degradation products sensor, was involved in MHC-I inhibition. On the other hand, neutralization of the EGFR reversed the MHC-I inhibition, suggesting a connection between the TLR8 and EGFR pathways. Finally, B. abortus RNA-treated macrophages display diminished capacity of antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells. Overall, our results indicate that the vita-PAMP RNA as well as its degradation products constitute novel virulence factors whereby B. abortus, by a TLR8-dependent mechanism and through the EGFR pathway, inhibits the IFN-γ-induced MHC-I surface expression on human monocytes/macrophages. Thus, bacteria can hide within infected cells and avoid the

  20. Profiling Antibody Responses to Infections by Chlamydia abortus Enables Identification of Potential Virulence Factors and Candidates for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Forsbach-Birk, Vera; Foddis, Corinna; Simnacher, Ulrike; Wilkat, Max; Longbottom, David; Walder, Gernot; Benesch, Christiane; Ganter, Martin; Sachse, Konrad; Essig, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE) due to infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia (C.) abortus is an important zoonosis leading to considerable economic loss to agriculture worldwide. The pathogen can be transmitted to humans and may lead to serious infection in pregnant women. Knowledge about epidemiology, clinical course and transmission to humans is hampered by the lack of reliable diagnostic tools. Immunoreactive proteins, which are expressed in infected animals and humans, may serve as novel candidates for diagnostic marker proteins and represent putative virulence factors. In order to broaden the spectrum of immunogenic C. abortus proteins we applied 2D immunoblot analysis and screening of an expression library using human and animal sera. We have identified 48 immunoreactive proteins representing potential diagnostic markers and also putative virulence factors, such as CAB080 (homologue of the “macrophage infectivity potentiator”, MIP), CAB167 (homologue of the “translocated actin recruitment protein”, TARP), CAB712 (homologue of the “chlamydial protease-like activity factor”, CPAF), CAB776 (homologue of the “Polymorphic membrane protein D”, PmpD), and the “hypothetical proteins” CAB063, CAB408 and CAB821, which are predicted to be type III secreted. We selected two putative virulence factors for further characterization, i.e. CAB080 (cMIP) and CAB063, and studied their expression profiles at transcript and protein levels. Analysis of the subcellular localization of both proteins throughout the developmental cycle revealed CAB063 being the first C. abortus protein shown to be translocated to the host cell nucleus. PMID:24260366

  1. Survey of Omp19 immunogenicity against Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis: influence of nanoparticulation versus traditional immunization.

    PubMed

    Abkar, Morteza; Lotfi, Abbas Sahebghadam; Amani, Jafar; Eskandari, Khadijeh; Ramandi, Mehdi Fasihi; Salimian, Jafar; Brujeni, Gholamreza Nikbakht; Alamian, Saeed; Kamali, Mehdi; Koushki, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Brucellosis is the most common zoonotic bacterial disease. Prevention of human brucellosis is achieved through pasteurization of dairy products, appropriate sanitation and vaccination of domestic animals against the Brucella species. B. abortus unlipidated 19 kDa outer membrane protein (U-Omp19) is a promising candidate for a subunit vaccine against brucellosis. This study investigates immunogenicity of Omp19 alone and with Freund's adjuvant (Omp19-IFA) and N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC/Omp19) nanoparticles, as well as the effect of Omp19 administration route on immunological responses and protection. The omp19 gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, the recombinant Omp19 was loaded onto TMC nanoparticles by ionic gelation with tripolyphosphate. Particle size and loading efficiency of the nanoparticles were determined. Omp19-IFA was administered intraperitoneally while TMC/Omp19 nanoparticles were administered orally and intraperitoneally. The results indicated that intraperitoneal (i.p.) immunization by Omp19-IFA and TMC/Omp19 nanoparticles induced Th1 and Th2 immune responses, respectively, whereas oral immunization of TMC/Omp19 nanoparticles induced a mixed Th1/Th17 immune response. Moreover, oral immunization increased IgA levels in feces. Immunized mice were challenged with virulent B. melitensis 16 M and B. abortus 544. Oral immunization with TMC/Omp19 nanoparticles induced a remarkably high protection level against B. melitensis and B. abortus. The results showed that immunization route has a pivotal role in immune response polarization and protective efficiency of Omp19 antigen. Also, it was deduced that the higher protection level achieved through oral administration of TMC/Omp19 nanoparticles may be due to the elicited Th17 response.

  2. Variables Associated with Infections of Cattle by Brucella abortus., Leptospira spp. and Neospora spp. in Amazon Region in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chiebao, D P; Valadas, S Y O B; Minervino, A H H; Castro, V; Romaldini, A H C N; Calhau, A S; De Souza, R A B; Gennari, S M; Keid, L B; Soares, R M

    2015-10-01

    The frequency of Neospora spp., Leptospira spp. and Brucella abortus infections in adult cattle was determined in herds of the State of Pará, Brazil, which is an important region for cattle production located in the Amazon region. A total of 3466 adult female cattle from 176 herds were tested, leading to a frequency of seropositive animals of 14.7%, 3.7% and 65.5% and a herd positivity of 87.4%, 41.3% and 98.8% for infections caused by Neospora spp., B. abortus and Leptospira spp., respectively. The five most frequently diagnosed serologic responses to Leptospira spp. were those against serovars hardjo, wolfii, grippotyphosa, hebdomadis and shermani. The following associations were found: practice of artificial insemination, large farm size, large herd size, large number of dogs and high number of total abortions per year with the presence of antibodies against serovar hardjo; positive results to serovar grippotyphosa with the presence of dogs; inappropriate disposal of aborted foetuses with positivity to serovar hebdomadis. Serovar grippotyphosa was also associated with number of episodes of abortions. Neospora spp. positive herds were associated with episodes of abortion and B. abortus infection with the disposal of dead animals and aborted foetuses on pastures and with the use of artificial insemination. In conclusion, the high frequency of brucellosis, leptospirosis and neosporosis in the region may be a consequence of social, natural and raising conditions as: (i) climate conditions that favour the survival and spread of pathogens in the environment; (ii) farms located in regions bordering forest areas; (iii) farms in areas of difficult access to the veterinary service; (iv) extensive beef herds raised at pastures with different age and productive groups inter-mingled; and (v) minimal concerns regarding hygiene practices and disease prevention measures.

  3. Overexpression of Brucella putative glycosyltransferase WbkA in B. abortus RB51 leads to production of exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dabral, Neha; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Seleem, Mohamed N; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis in mammals. Brucella strains containing the O-polysaccharide in their cell wall structure exhibit a smooth phenotype whereas the strains devoid of the polysaccharide show rough phenotype. B. abortus strain RB51 is a stable rough attenuated mutant which is used as a licensed live vaccine for bovine brucellosis. Previous studies have shown that the wboA gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for the synthesis of O-polysaccharide, is disrupted in B. abortus RB51 by an IS711 element. Although complementation of strain RB51 with a functional wboA gene results in O-polysaccharide synthesis in the cytoplasm, it does not result in smooth phenotype. The aim of this study was to determine if overexpression of Brucella WbkA or WbkE, two additional putative glycosyltransferases essential for O-polysaccharide synthesis, in strain RB51 would result in the O-polysaccharide synthesis and smooth phenotype. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of wbkA or wbkE gene in RB51 does not result in O-polysaccharide expression as shown by Western blotting with specific antibodies. However, wbkA, but not wbkE, overexpression leads to the development of a clumping phenotype and the production of exopolysaccharide(s) containing mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Moreover, we found that the clumping recombinant strain displays increased adhesion to polystyrene plates. The recombinant strain was similar to strain RB51 in its attenuation characteristic and in its ability to induce protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in mice.

  4. Overexpression of Brucella putative glycosyltransferase WbkA in B. abortus RB51 leads to production of exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dabral, Neha; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis in mammals. Brucella strains containing the O-polysaccharide in their cell wall structure exhibit a smooth phenotype whereas the strains devoid of the polysaccharide show rough phenotype. B. abortus strain RB51 is a stable rough attenuated mutant which is used as a licensed live vaccine for bovine brucellosis. Previous studies have shown that the wboA gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase required for the synthesis of O-polysaccharide, is disrupted in B. abortus RB51 by an IS711 element. Although complementation of strain RB51 with a functional wboA gene results in O-polysaccharide synthesis in the cytoplasm, it does not result in smooth phenotype. The aim of this study was to determine if overexpression of Brucella WbkA or WbkE, two additional putative glycosyltransferases essential for O-polysaccharide synthesis, in strain RB51 would result in the O-polysaccharide synthesis and smooth phenotype. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of wbkA or wbkE gene in RB51 does not result in O-polysaccharide expression as shown by Western blotting with specific antibodies. However, wbkA, but not wbkE, overexpression leads to the development of a clumping phenotype and the production of exopolysaccharide(s) containing mannose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-acetylgalactosamine. Moreover, we found that the clumping recombinant strain displays increased adhesion to polystyrene plates. The recombinant strain was similar to strain RB51 in its attenuation characteristic and in its ability to induce protective immunity against virulent B. abortus challenge in mice. PMID:26157707

  5. Influence of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide as an adjuvant on the immunogenicity of HPV-16 L1VLP vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kianmehr, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ardestani, Susan Kaboudanian; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has less toxicity and no pyrogenic properties in comparison with other bacterial LPS. It is a toll-like receptor 4 agonist and has been shown to have the potential use as a vaccine adjuvant. In this study, the immunostimulatory properties of LPS from smooth and rough strains of B. abortus (S19 and RB51) as adjuvants were investigated for the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 virus-like particles (L1VLPs) vaccines. C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously three times either with HPV-16 L1VLPs alone, or in combination with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (R-LPS), aluminum hydroxide or a mixture of them as adjuvant. The humoral immunity was evaluated by measuring the specific and total IgG levels, and also the T-cell immune response of mice was evaluated by measuring different cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Results showed that serum anti-HPV16 L1VLP IgG antibody titers was significantly higher in mice immunized with a combination of VLPs and R-LPS or S-LPS compared with other immunized groups. Co-administration of HPV-16 L1VLPs with R-LPS elicited the highest levels of splenocytes cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-17 and TNF-α) and also effectively induced improvement of a Th1-type cytokine response characterized with a high ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10. The data indicate that B. abortus LPS particularly RB51-LPS enhances the immune responses to HPV-16 L1VLPs and suggests its potential as an adjuvant for the development of a potent prophylactic HPV vaccine and other candidate vaccines.

  6. Effectiveness of natural and synthetic complexes of porin and O polysaccharide as vaccines against Brucella abortus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A J; Rowe, G E; Duncan, J R; Eis, M J; Widom, J; Ganem, B; Morein, B

    1988-01-01

    A single vaccination of mice with a complex of porin and smooth lipopolysaccharide (porin-S-LPS) extracted from virulent Brucella abortus 2308 provided significant protection (P less than 0.01 to P less than 0.001) against challenge with the same strain, equivalent to that achieved by vaccination with living attenuated B. abortus 19. The porin-S-LPS vaccine given without adjuvant or in several adjuvants (trehalose dimycolate and muramyl dipeptide; the pluronic polymer L-121 and muramyl dipeptide; or complexed with Quil A in immunostimulating complexes) provided equivalent protection. In contrast, one vaccination with porin complexed with rough LPS (porin-R-LPS) from a rough mutant of strain 2308 provided no protection with any adjuvant tested. In one experiment, two inoculations with the porin-R-LPS resulted in a low level of protection, probably owing to priming of the animals for production of O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies. However, one vaccination with rough-strain porin covalently bound to purified O polysaccharide conferred protection equal to that obtained with natural complexes of porin-S-LPS or with living strain 19. A synthetic vaccine containing long chains of O polysaccharide was more effective than one prepared with short chains. Protective vaccines caused the formation of increased concentrations of circulating O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies, although there were individual exceptions to the quantitative association between O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies and protection. Antibodies specific for porin or R-LPS were found in negligible quantities in vaccinated mice. These results provide additional evidence that the O polysaccharide will constitute an essential component of an effective subcellular vaccine against B. abortus and that O-polysaccharide-specific antibodies play an important role in protective immunity in brucellosis. PMID:2844673

  7. Brucella abortus ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity against wild type challenge in a mouse model of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Cheng, Jason X; Crosson, Sean

    2016-09-30

    The Brucella abortus general stress response (GSR) system regulates activity of the alternative sigma factor, σ(E1), which controls transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for persistence in a BALB/c mouse chronic infection model. We evaluated the host response to infection by a B. abortus strain lacking σ(E1) (ΔrpoE1), and identified pathological and immunological features that distinguish ΔrpoE1-infected mice from wild-type (WT), and that correspond with clearance of ΔrpoE1 from the host. ΔrpoE1 infection was indistinguishable from WT in terms of splenic bacterial burden, inflammation and histopathology up to 6weeks post-infection. However, Brucella-specific serum IgG levels in ΔrpoE1-infected mice were 5 times higher than WT by 4weeks post-infection, and remained significantly higher throughout the course of a 12-week infection. Total IgG and Brucella-specific IgG levels peaked strongly in ΔrpoE1-infected mice at 6weeks, which correlated with reduced splenomegaly and bacterial burden relative to WT-infected mice. Given the difference in immune response to infection with wild-type and ΔrpoE1, we tested whether ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity to wild-type challenge. Mice immunized with ΔrpoE1 completely resisted WT infection and had significantly higher serum titers of Brucella-specific IgG, IgG2a and IFN-γ after WT challenge relative to age-matched naïve mice. We conclude that immunization of BALB/c mice with the B. abortus GSR pathway mutant, ΔrpoE1, elicits an adaptive immune response that confers significant protective immunity against WT infection.

  8. Brucella abortus Invasion of Osteocytes Modulates Connexin 43 and Integrin Expression and Induces Osteoclastogenesis via Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Secretion.

    PubMed

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Gentilini, María Virginia; Velásquez, Lis Noelia; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-10-12

    Osteoarticular brucellosis is the most common localization of human active disease. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells of bone. They secrete factors that regulate the differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts during bone remodeling. The aim of this study is to determine if Brucella abortus infection modifies osteocyte function. Our results indicate that B. abortus infection induced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL), proinflammatory cytokines, and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) secretion by osteocytes. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes induced bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMM) to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or osteoprotegerin (OPG), RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that TNF-α and RANKL are involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected osteocytes. Connexin 43 (Cx43) and the integrins E11/gp38, integrin-α, integrin-β, and CD44 are involved in cell-cell interactions necessary for osteocyte survival. B. abortus infection inhibited the expression of Cx43 but did not modify the expression of integrins. Yet the expression of both Cx43 and integrins was inhibited by supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages. B. abortus infection was not capable of inducing osteocyte apoptosis. However, supernatants from B. abortus-infected macrophages induced osteocyte apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that B. abortus infection could alter osteocyte function, contributing to bone damage. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Determination of stability of Brucella abortus RB51 by use of genomic fingerprint, oxidative metabolism, and colonial morphology and differentiation of strain RB51 from B. abortus isolates from bison and elk.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, A E; Ewalt, D R; Cheville, N F; Thoen, C O; Payeur, J B

    1996-01-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 and isolates from cattle, bison, and elk were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and standard techniques for biotyping Brucella species, which included biochemical, morphological, and antigenic techniques, phage susceptibility, and antibiotic resistance. The objectives were to ascertain the stability of RB51 and to differentiate RB51 from other brucellae. Genomic restriction endonuclease patterns produced by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated a unique fingerprint for RB51 relative to other brucellae. Comparisons of the oxidative metabolic profiles of RB51 after time in vivo (14 weeks) and in vitro (75 passages) showed no change in characteristic patterns of oxygen uptake on selected amino acid and carbohydrate substrates. Strain RB51 was biotyped as a typical rough B. abortus biovar 1 (not strain 19) after animal passage or a high number of passages in vitro and remained resistant to rifampin or penicillin and susceptible to tetracycline. No reactions with A or M antiserum or with a monoclonal antibody to the O antigen of Brucella lipopolysaccharides were detected; however, RB51 agglutinated with R antiserum. The results indicate that the genomic fingerprint and rough colonial morphology of RB51 are stable characteristics and can be used to differentiate this vaccine strain from Brucella isolates from cattle, bison, and elk. PMID:8904427

  10. Pathogenic outcome following experimental infection of sheep with Chlamydia abortus variant strains LLG and POS.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Morag; Wheelhouse, Nicholas; Ensor, Hannah; Rocchi, Mara; Maley, Stephen; Aitchison, Kevin; Wattegedera, Sean; Wilson, Kim; Sait, Michelle; Siarkou, Victoria; Vretou, Evangelia; Entrican, Gary; Dagleish, Mark; Longbottom, David

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the pathogenesis of two variant strains (LLG and POS) of Chlamydia abortus, in comparison to a typical wild-type strain (S26/3) which is known to be responsible for late term abortion in small ruminants. Challenge with the three strains at mid-gestation resulted in similar pregnancy outcomes, with abortion occurring in approximately 50-60% of ewes with the mean gestational lengths also being similar. However, differences were observed in the severity of placental pathology, with infection appearing milder for strain LLG, which was reflected in the lower number of organisms shed in vaginal swabs post-partum and less gross pathology and organisms present in placental smears. Results for strain POS were somewhat different than LLG with a more focal restriction of infection observed. Post-abortion antibody responses revealed prominent differences in seropositivity to the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) present in elementary body (EB) preparations under denaturing conditions, most notably with anti-LLG and anti-POS convalescent sera where there was no or reduced detection of MOMP present in EBs derived from the three strains. These results and additional analysis of whole EB and chlamydial outer membrane complex preparations suggest that there are conformational differences in MOMP for the three strains. Overall, the results suggest that gross placental pathology and clinical outcome is not indicative of bacterial colonization and the severity of infection. The results also highlight potential conformational differences in MOMP epitopes that perhaps impact on disease diagnosis and the development of new vaccines.

  11. Exploring the Diversity of Field Strains of Brucella abortus Biovar 3 Isolated in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sanogo, Moussa; Fretin, David; Thys, Eric; Saegerman, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most widespread bacterial zoonotic diseases in the world, affecting both humans and domestic and wild animals. Identification and biotyping of field strains of Brucella are of key importance for a better knowledge of the epidemiology of brucellosis, for identifying appropriate antigens, for managing disease outbreaks and for setting up efficient preventive and control programmes. Such data are required both at national and regional level to assess potential threats for public health. Highly discriminative genotyping methods such as the multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) allow the comparison and assessment of genetic relatedness between field strains of Brucella within the same geographical area. In this study, MLVA biotyping data retrieved from the literature using a systematic review were compared using a clustering analysis and the Hunter-Gaston diversity index (HGDI). Thus, the analysis of the 42 MLVA genotyping results found in the literature on West Africa [i.e., from Ivory Coast (1), Niger (1), Nigeria (34), The Gambia (3), and Togo (3)] did not allow a complete assessment of the actual diversity among field strains of Brucella. However, it provided some preliminary indications on the co-existence of 25 distinct genotypes of Brucella abortus biovar 3 in this region with 19 genotypes from Nigeria, three from Togo and one from Ivory Coast, The Gambia, and Niger. The strong and urgent need for more sustainable molecular data on prevailing strains of Brucella in this sub-region of Africa and also on all susceptible species including humans is therefore highlighted. This remains a necessary stage to allow a comprehensive understanding of the relatedness between field strains of Brucella and the epidemiology of brucellosis within West Africa countries. PMID:28713359

  12. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  13. Biosafety of parenteral Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in bison calves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Olsen, S.C.; Gidlewski, T.; Jensen, A.E.; Palmer, M.V.; Huber, R.

    1999-01-01

    Vaccination is considered among the primary management tools for reducing brucellosis prevalence in Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) ungulates. Before their use, however, vaccine safety and efficacy must be demonstrated. Twenty-seven female bison (Bison bison) calves (approx 5 months old) were vaccinated with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 (1.5 x 1010 colony forming units [CFU], subcutaneously) as part of routine management. We assessed the persistence, pathology, shedding, and transmission associated with RB51 by serial necropsy, bacteriology, histopathology, and serology of 20 of these 27 vaccinated calves, and RB51 serology of 10 nonvaccinated, commingling adult females. With the exception of 1 calf, RB51 dot-blot titers at necropsy were <1:80. Strain RB51 was cultured from lymph nodes in 4 of 4 calves at 14 weeks postvaccination (PV), 4 of 4 calves at 18 weeks PV, 1 of 4 calves at 22 weeks PV, 3 of 4 at 26 weeks PV, and 0 of 4 calves at 30 weeks PV. No gross lesions were observed. Mild histologic changes occurred only in a few draining lymph nodes early in sampling. Adverse clinical effects were not observed in vaccinates. Swabs from nasopharynx, conjunctiva, rectum, and vagina were uniformly culture negative for RB51. Strain RB51 dot-blot assays of bison cows were negative at a 1:20 dilution at 26 weeks PV. Our results suggest that RB51 persists longer in bison calves than in domestic cattle and is systemically distributed within lymphatic tissues. However, bison apparently clear the RB51 vaccine strain without shedding, transmission, or significant adverse reactions.

  14. Immune responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strains RB51 or RB51 overexpressing superoxide dismutase and Glycosyltransferase genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vaccination is a tool that could be beneficial in managing the high prevalence of brucellosis in free-ranging bison in Yellowstone National Park. In this study, we characterized immunologic responses and protection against experimental challenge after vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus stra...

  15. Comparative analysis of the early transcriptome of Brucella abortus - infected monocyte-derived macrophages from cattle naturally resistant or susceptible to brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, C.A.; Galindo, C.L.; Everts, R.E.; Lewin, H.A.; Garner, H.R.; Adams, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic infectious disease that has a significant economic impact on animal production and human public health. We characterized the gene expression profile of B. abortus-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) from naïve cattle naturally resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to brucellosis using a cDNA microarray technology. Our data indicate that 1) B. abortus induced a slightly increased genome activation in R MDMs and a down-regulated transcriptome in S MDMs, during the onset of infection, 2) R MDMs had the ability to mount a type 1 immune response against B. abortus infection which was impaired in S cells, and 3) the host cell activity was not altered after 12h post-B. abortus infection in R MDMs while the cell cycle was largely arrested in infected S MDMs at 12h p.i. These results contribute to understand of how host responses may be manipulated to prevent infection by brucellae. PMID:20932540

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Brucella strains isolated from autochthonous livestock reveals the dominance of B. abortus biovar 3a in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bertu, Wilson J; Ducrotoy, Marie J; Muñoz, Pilar M; Mick, Virginie; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Bryssinckx, Ward; Kwaga, Jacob K P; Kabir, Junaid; Welburn, Susan C; Moriyón, Ignacio; Ocholi, Reuben A

    2015-10-22

    Brucellosis is a worldwide widespread zoonosis caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Control of this disease in a given area requires an understanding of the Brucella species circulating in livestock and humans. However, because of the difficulties intrinsic to Brucella isolation and typing, such data are scarce for resource-poor areas. The paucity of bacteriological data and the consequent imperfect epidemiological picture are particularly critical for Sahelian and Sub-Sahara African countries. Here, we report on the characterization of 34 isolates collected between 1976 and 2012 from cattle, sheep and horses in Nigeria. All isolates were identified as Brucella abortus by Bruce-ladder PCR and assigned to biovar 3 by conventional typing. Further analysis by enhanced AMOS-ERY PCR showed that all of them belonged to the 3a sub-biovar, and MLVA analysis grouped them in a cluster clearly distinct from that formed by European B. abortus biovar 3b strains. Nevertheless, MLVA detected heterogeneity within the Nigerian biovar 3a strains. The close genetic profiles of the isolates from cattle, sheep and horses, suggest that, at least in some parts of Nigeria, biovar 3a circulates among animal species that are not the preferential hosts of B. abortus. Consistent with previous genetic analyses of 7 strains from Ivory Cost, Gambia and Togo, the analysis of these 34 Nigerian strains supports the hypothesis that the B. abortus biovar 3a lineage is dominant in West African countries.

  17. Induction of immune responses by two recombinant proteins of brucella abortus, outer membrane proteins 2b porin and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Yong; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Eui; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-06-28

    The diagnosis of Brucella abortus is mainly based on serological methods using antibody against LPS, which has diagnostic problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, we evaluated two proteins of B. abortus, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SodC) and outer membrane proteins 2b porin (Omp2b). The genes were cloned and expressed in a pMAL system, and the recombinant proteins, rOmp2b and rSodC, were purified as fusion forms with maltosebinding protein. The identity of the proteins was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with sera of mice infected with B. abortus. Production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse splenocytes after stimulation with the proteins. Moreover, cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated in BALB/c mice after immunization with the proteins. TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were significantly inducible in RAW 264.7 cells. Splenocytes of naive mice produced IFN-γ and IL-4 significantly by stimulation. Moreover, number of IgG, IFN-γ, and IL-4 producing cells were increased in immunized mice with the two proteins. Production of IgG and IgM with rOmp2b was higher than those with rSodC in immunized mice. These results suggest that the two recombinant proteins of B. abortus may be potential LPS-free proteins for diagnosis.

  18. Serological response to administration of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in beef and dairy heifers, using needle-free and standard needle-based injection systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to compare immunologic responses of heifers vaccinated with 10**10 colony-forming units (CFU) of Brucella abortus strain RB51 (SRB51) by standard needle-and-syringe system or a needle-free injection system. Heifers were randomly assigned to control and vaccination gro...

  19. Vaccination with recombinant Semliki Forest virus particles expressing translation initiation factor 3 of Brucella abortus induces protective immunity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Alex; Sáez, Darwin; Céspedes, Sandra; Andrews, Edilia; Oñate, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant replicons of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) can be used to induce high-level, transient expression of heterologous proteins in vivo. We constructed infectious but replication-deficient SFV particles carrying recombinant RNA encoding the Brucella abortus translation initiation factor 3 (IF3). The recombinant SFV particles (SFV-IF3 particles) were then evaluated for their ability to induce immune responses and to protect BALB/c mice against a challenge with B. abortus 2308 following vaccination. Animals inoculated with SFV-IF3 developed IF3-specific IgM antibodies at day 14 post-immunization. In vitro stimulation of splenocytes from vaccinated mice with either recombinant IF3 (rIF3) or crude Brucella protein extracts resulted in a T-cell proliferative response and induction of interferon gamma secretion, but not interleukin-4. In addition, mice immunized with SFV-IF3 exhibited a significant level of resistance against challenge with the virulent B. abortus strain 2308 (P<0.01). These findings indicate that an SFV-based vector carrying RNA encoding Brucella IF3 has potential for use as a vaccine to induce protection against B. abortus infections.

  20. Molecular characterization, occurrence, and immunogenicity in infected sheep and cattle of two minor outer membrane proteins of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, A; Saman, E; de Wergifosse, P; Cloeckaert, A; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1996-01-01

    Screening of a Brucella abortus genomic library with two sets of monoclonal antibodies allowed the isolation of the genes corresponding to two minor outer membrane proteins (OMP10 and OMP19) found in this bacterial species. Sequence analysis of the omp10 gene revealed an open reading frame capable of encoding a protein of 126 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of the insert producing the OMP19 protein contains two overlapping open reading frames, the largest of which (177 codons) was shown to encode the protein of interest. Analysis of the N-terminal sequences of both putative proteins revealed features of a bacterial signal peptide, and homology to the bacterial lipoprotein processing sequence was also observed. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies specific for OMP10 or OMP19 showed that both proteins are present in the 34 Brucella strains tested, representing all six Brucella species and all their biovars. The OMP19 detected in the five Brucella ovis strains examined migrated at an apparent molecular weight that is slightly higher than those of the other Brucella species, confirming the divergence of B. ovis from these species. OMP10 and OMP19 were produced in recombinant Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity for serological analysis. A large fraction of sera from sheep naturally infected with Brucella melitensis were reactive with these proteins in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas sera from B. abortus-infected cattle were almost completely unreactive in this assay. PMID:8557326

  1. Expression of human serum albumin--L7/L12 (Brucella abortus ribosomal protein) fusion protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Iraj; Rezaee, Abbas; Emaneini, Mohammad; Hosseini, Ahmad Zavaran; Tabbaraee, Bahman; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2009-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in pregnant cattle and undulant fever in humans. The immunogenic B. abortus ribosomal protein L7/L12 is a promising candidate antigen for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis. It has already been expressed in several bacteria and has been used as DNA vaccine. In order to construct yeast expressing vector for the tHSA-L7/L12 fusion protein, the l7/l12 ribosomal gene was amplified by PCR. The expression plasmid pYtHSA-L7/L12 was constructed by inserting the L7/L12 gene into the pYHSA5 shuttle vector (containing inulinase signal sequence, HSA gene and Gal10 promoter). The recombinant vector was transformed into S. cerevisiae and was then induced by galactose. The secreted recombinant fusion protein was detected in supernatant by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by western blot analysis using anti-HSA and anti-L7/L12 antibodies. Fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and its amount was approximately 500 microg/liter.

  2. Differential composition of culture supernatants from wild-type Brucella abortus and its isogenic virB mutants.

    PubMed

    Delpino, M Victoria; Comerci, Diego J; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Mujer, Cesar V; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C; Delvecchio, Vito G

    2009-07-01

    The virB genes coding type IV secretion system are necessary for the intracellular survival and replication of Brucella spp. In this study, extracellular proteins from B. abortus 2308 (wild type, WT) and its isogenic virB10 polar mutant were compared. Culture supernatants harvested in the early stationary phase were concentrated and subjected to 2D electrophoresis. Spots present in the WT strain but absent in the virB10 mutant (differential spots) were considered extracellular proteins released in a virB-related manner, and were identified by MALDI-TOF analysis and matching with Brucella genomes. Among the 11 differential proteins identified, DnaK chaperone (Hsp70), choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH) and a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were chosen for further investigation because of their homology with extracellular and/or virulence factors from other bacteria. The three proteins were obtained in recombinant form and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared. By Western blot with these mAbs, the three proteins were detected in supernatants from the WT but not in those from the virB10 polar mutant or from strains carrying non-polar mutations in virB10 or virB11 genes. These results suggest that the expression of virB genes affects the extracellular release of DnaK, PPIase and CGH, and possibly other proteins from B. abortus.

  3. Inactivation of the ABC transporter ATPase gene in Brucella abortus strain 2308 attenuated the virulence of the bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Han, Xiangan; Liu, Haiwen; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Song, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zongping; Yu, Shengqing

    2013-06-28

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen of human and other animals. Brucella lipopolysaccharide has been identified as an important virulence factor. In this study, the ABC transporter ATPase gene (BAB1_0542) of B. abortus strain S2308 was inactivated by deleting a 446-bp fragment from the gene, thereby generating the mutant strain, S2308ΔATP. Real time PCR analysis confirmed the inactivation of this gene with no polar effect on the transcription of adjacent genes on the chromosome. The mutant was identified as a rough phenotype strain using heat agglutination test and crystal violet staining. The mutant strain had a different growth rate in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB), compared to the wild type S2308 strain. Moreover, the mutant strain showed attenuated virulence in vitro and in vivo in RAW264.7 macrophages and Balb/c mice, respectively. Complementation of the mutant strain recovered the smooth phenotype of the bacteria and the complemented strain C2308ΔATP survived for more than four weeks in Balb/c mice, comparable to wild type strain S2308. Furthermore, immunization with the mutant strain protected mice from virulent strain challenge, which suggests the potential for the mutant strain S2308ΔATP as a future vaccine candidate. MHC I, MHC II and co-stimulatory molecule expression levels in mice following infection of S2308ΔATP and S2308 were also investigated.

  4. Pseudorabies Virus and Brucella abortus from an Expanding Wild Pig ( Sus scrofa ) Population in Southern Oklahoma, USA.

    PubMed

    Gaskamp, Joshua A; Gee, Kenneth L; Campbell, Tyler A; Silvy, Nova J; Webb, Stephen L

    2016-04-28

    Wild pigs ( Sus scrofa ) are causing increasing ecologic and economic damage at a global scale. Because wild pigs can carry ≥65 diseases that affect livestock, their widespread expansion threatens native wildlife and livestock. We screened wild pigs from south-central Oklahoma, US for antibodies against Brucella abortus , pseudorabies virus (PRV), and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRS). These pathogens were chosen because they are part of eradication programs in the US and could have large economic impacts on domestic livestock if transmitted from wild animals. We tested 282 serum samples during spring 2010 (n=149) and 2011 (n=133) and found an overall exposure rate to PRV of 24.1% (n=68); PRV was detected at two of three study sites. Two wild pigs had detectable antibody to B. abortus , and one had detectable antibody to PRRS. On average, 27% of wild pigs within a sounder were positive for PRV antibody, with 44% of the sounders (16/36) having at least one positive individual. These data highlight that wild pigs could carry pathogens that affect domestic livestock. Because the US is free of these pathogens in commercial livestock operations, continued surveillance and vaccination of domestic livestock are needed. Commercial livestock producers at the wildlife-livestock interface may benefit from spatial prioritization of risk zones to facilitate strategic control efforts.

  5. The Brucella abortus virulence regulator, LovhK, is a sensor kinase in the general stress response signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Sook; Willett, Jonathan W; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Fiebig, Aretha; Crosson, Sean

    2014-11-01

    In the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, the general stress response (GSR) signalling system determines survival under acute stress conditions in vitro, and is required for long-term residence in a mammalian host. To date, the identity of the Brucella sensor kinase(s) that function to perceive stress and directly activate GSR signalling have remained undefined. We demonstrate that the flavin-binding sensor histidine kinase, LovhK (bab2_0652), functions as a primary B. abortus GSR sensor. LovhK rapidly and specifically phosphorylates the central GSR regulator, PhyR, and activates transcription of a set of genes that closely overlaps the known B. abortus GSR regulon. Deletion of lovhK severely compromises cell survival under defined oxidative and acid stress conditions. We further show that lovhK is required for cell survival during the early phase of mammalian cell infection and for establishment of long-term residence in a mouse infection model. Finally, we present evidence that particular regions of primary structure within the two N-terminal PAS domains of LovhK have distinct sensory roles under specific environmental conditions. This study elucidates new molecular components of a conserved signalling pathway that regulates B. abortus stress physiology and infection biology.

  6. Generation and characterization of murine monoclonal antibodies to genus-specific 31-kilodalton recombinant cell surface protein of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tuteja, Urmil; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2007-08-01

    In the present study hybridomas were produced from fusion with splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with the recombinant 31-kDa cell surface protein (r31CSP) specific for Brucella species. A set of eight stabilized hybridoma cell lines was generated against r31CSP. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced by all these clones exhibited reactivity for r31CSP as well as with the protein of 31-kDa, derived from whole-cell lysate of 31-kDa Brucella abortus 544. Four of eight MAbs were IgG1, two IgG2b, and two IgM in nature. These MAbs did not show any cross-reaction with whole-cell lysate of Yersinia enterocolitica O: 9, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli 0157 by Western blotting. Reactivity of these MAbs was further assessed with other organisms of Brucella species namely, B. abortus S99, B. canis, B. melitensis 16M, B. suis, and a clinical isolate of B. melitensis. Collectively, these data suggest that these MAbs may have the potential for use in the detection of Brucella species with high specificity.

  7. Chlamydia abortus YhbZ, a truncated Obg family GTPase, associates with the Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    The stringent stress response is vital for bacterial survival under adverse environmental conditions. Obligate intracellular Chlamydia lack key stringent response proteins, but nevertheless can interrupt the cell cycle and enter stasis or persistence upon amino acid starvation. A possible key protein retained is YhbZ, a homologue of the ObgE guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) superfamily connecting the stringent stress response to ribosome maturation. Curiously, chlamydial YhbZ lacks the ObgE C-terminal domain thought to be essential for binding the large ribosomal subunit. We expressed recombinant Chlamydia abortus YhbZ and showed it to be a functional GTPase, with similar activity to other Obg GTPase family members. As Chlamydia are resistant to genetic manipulation, we performed heterologous expression and gradient centrifugation experiments in Escherichia coli and found that, despite the missing C-terminal domain, C. abortus YhbZ co-fractionates with the E. coli 50S large ribosomal subunit. In addition, overexpression of chlamydial YhbZ in E. coli leads to growth defects and elongation, as reported for other Obg members. YhbZ did not complement an E. coli obgE temperature-sensitive mutant, indicating the C-terminal acidic domain may have an additional role. This data supports a role for YhbZ linking the chlamydial stress response to ribosome function and cellular growth.

  8. Comparison of abortion and infection after experimental challenge of pregnant bison and cattle with Brucella abortus strain 2308.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C

    2011-12-01

    A comparative study was conducted using data from naive bison (n = 45) and cattle (n = 46) from 8 and 6 studies, respectively, in which a standardized Brucella abortus strain 2308 experimental challenge was administered during midgestation. The incidence of abortion, fetal infection, uterine or mammary infection, or infection in maternal tissues after experimental challenge was greater (P < 0.05) in bison than in cattle. In animals that did abort, the time between experimental challenge and abortion was shorter (P < 0.05) for bison than for cattle. Brucella colonization of four target tissues and serologic responses on the standard tube agglutination test at the time of abortion did not differ (P > 0.05) between cattle and bison. The results of our study suggest that naive bison and cattle have similarities and differences after experimental exposure to a virulent B. abortus strain. Although our data suggest that bison may be more susceptible to infection with Brucella, some pathogenic characteristics of brucellosis were similar between bison and cattle.

  9. Identification of the 1B vaccine strain of Chlamydia abortus in aborted placentas during the investigation of toxaemic and systemic disease in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sargison, N D; Truyers, I G R; Howie, F E; Thomson, J R; Cox, A L; Livingstone, M; Longbottom, D

    2015-09-01

    One hundred and forty Cheviot and 100 Suffolk cross Mule primiparous 1-2-year-old ewes, from a flock of about 700 ewes, were vaccinated with an attenuated live 1B strain Chlamydia abortus vaccine about 4 weeks before ram introduction (September 2011). Between 08 March and 01 April 2012, 50 2-year-old ewes aborted and 29 of these died, despite antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory treatment and supportive care. Seven fetuses and three placentae from five 2-year-old ewes were submitted for pathological investigation. The aborted fetuses showed stages of autolysis ranging from being moderately fresh to putrefaction. Unusual, large multifocal regions of thickened membranes, with a dull red granular surface and moderate amounts of grey-white surface exudate were seen on each of the placentae. Intracellular, magenta-staining, acid fast inclusions were identified in Ziehl Neelsen-stained placental smears. Immunohistochemistry for Chlamydia-specific lipopolysaccharide showed extensive positive labelling of the placental epithelia. Molecular analyses of the aborted placentae demonstrated the presence of the 1B vaccine-type strain of C. abortus and absence of any wild-type field strain. The vaccine strain bacterial load of the placental tissue samples was consistent with there being an association between vaccination and abortion. Initial laboratory investigations resulted in a diagnosis of chlamydial abortion. Further investigations led to the identification of the 1B vaccine strain of C. abortus in material from all three of the submitted aborted placentae. Timely knowledge and understanding of any potential problems caused by vaccination against C. abortus are prerequisites for sustainable control of chlamydial abortion. This report describes the investigation of an atypical abortion storm in sheep, and describes the identification of the 1B vaccine strain of C. abortus in products of abortion. The significance of this novel putative association between the vaccine strain

  10. Serological Diagnosis of Ovine Enzootic Abortion by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with a Recombinant Protein Fragment of the Polymorphic Outer Membrane Protein POMP90 of Chlamydophila abortus

    PubMed Central

    Longbottom, David; Fairley, Susan; Chapman, Stephanie; Psarrou, Evgenia; Vretou, Evangelia; Livingstone, Morag

    2002-01-01

    Ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) resulting from infection of sheep and goats with Chlamydophila abortus is of major economic importance worldwide. Over the last 50 years the serological diagnosis of infection has been based mainly on the complement fixation test (CFT), which lacks both sensitivity and specificity because of cross-reactive antibodies to other gram-negative bacteria, including another common chlamydial pathogen of sheep, Chlamydophila pecorum. In the present study, a series of overlapping recombinant antigens representing the polymorphic outer membrane protein POMP90 of C. abortus was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a panel of 143 serum samples from sheep experimentally infected with C. abortus, from sheep clinically free of OEA, and from specific-pathogen-free lambs experimentally infected with different subtypes of C. pecorum. The results were compared to those obtained by CFT and another recently described test, an indirect ELISA (iELISA) with the recombinant OMP91B (rOMP91B) fragment (rOMP91B iELISA) (D. Longbottom, E. Psarrou, M. Livingstone, and E. Vretou, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 195:157-161, 2001). The rOMP90-3 and rOMP90-4 ELISAs were identified as being more sensitive and specific than CFT. Assays with both fragments were evaluated further with a panel of 294 field serum samples from flocks with documented histories of abortion, from flocks with no clinical histories of abortion but which had a high proportion of samples seropositive by CFT, and from animals with no histories of abortion but from which various C. pecorum subtypes had been isolated. ELISAs with both POMP90 fragments outperformed CFT with serum samples from C. pecorum-infected animals, producing no false-positive results. However, the ELISA with the rOMP90-4 fragment appeared to be more sensitive than the one with rOMP90-3, as it identified more of the OEA-positive samples. The ELISA with the rOMP90-4 fragment was also able to identify apparently healthy

  11. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  12. Early Transcriptional Responses of Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants to Wild Type, ΔvirB2 or ΔbtpB Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Costa, Erica A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Sun, Yao-Hui; Tsolis, Reneé M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the Brucella-induced inflammatory response in the bovine placenta is not completely understood. In this study we evaluated the role of the B. abortus Type IV secretion system and the anti-inflammatory factor BtpB in early interactions with bovine placental tissues. Transcription profiles of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants inoculated with wild type (strain 2308), ΔvirB2 or ΔbtpB Brucella abortus were compared by microarray analysis at 4 hours post infection. Transcripts with significant variation (>2 fold change; P<0.05) were functionally classified, and transcripts related to defense and inflammation were assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR. Infection with wild type B. abortus resulted in slightly more genes with decreased than increased transcription levels. Conversely, infection of trophoblastic cells with the ΔvirB2 or the ΔbtpB mutant strains, that lack a functional T4SS or that has impaired inhibition of TLR signaling, respectively, induced more upregulated than downregulated genes. Wild type Brucella abortus impaired transcription of host genes related to immune response when compared to ΔvirB and ΔbtpB mutants. Our findings suggest that proinflammatory genes are negatively modulated in bovine trophoblastic cells at early stages of infection. The virB operon and btpB are directly or indirectly related to modulation of these host genes. These results shed light on the early interactions between B. abortus and placental tissue that ultimately culminate in inflammatory pathology and abortion. PMID:25259715

  13. Identification of Brucella abortus genes in elk (Cervus elaphus) using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) reveals novel markers of infection.

    PubMed

    Lowry, J E; Goodridge, L; Vernati, G; Fluegel, A M; Edwards, W H; Andrews, G P

    2010-05-19

    Elk in the Greater Yellowstone Area are a major reservoir for brucellosis, which represents an obstacle to eradication of the disease in domestic livestock. Furthermore, immune responses to Brucella abortus infection in the wild host are not well-understood. In this regard, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) was employed to identify novel B. abortus antigens expressed during infection in elk. Sera collected from sero-positive Wyoming elk were pooled and absorbed against in vitro-grown cultures of B. abortus. Approximately 35,000 E. coli clones, expressing B. abortus DNA, were then screened by colony immunoblot, yielding ten genes with immuno-reactive products, to include seven proteins secreted beyond the inner membrane. Three products, an outer membrane protein (D15), malate dehydrogenase (Mdh), and an ion transporter (AfuA), were examined by Western blot against individual elk serum samples. Sero-reactivity was significantly more frequent for both Mdh and D15 in naturally infected animals, compared to vaccinated and uninfected elk, indicating that antibody to these two antigens is a predictor of natural infection. Cross-reactivity of all three proteins was next examined with serum samples from confirmed brucellosis-positive cattle. While variable patterns of reactivity were seen with the antigens, the sample group was equivalently reactive to AfuA and Mdh, compared to elk, suggesting that these antigens are commonly expressed during infection in both hosts. We conclude that the application of IVIAT to B. abortus may not only facilitate the identification of serologic markers for brucellosis in elk, but may provide further insight into biological processes of the pathogen in different hosts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a liposome containing Brucella abortus S19 outer membrane protein in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, F.; Prasad, A.; Bahekar, V. S.; Rana, S. K.; Rajendra, L.; Sharma, G. K.; Srinivasan, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of liposome as an adjuvant and a vaccine carrier has been cited previously in the literature. It has also been shown to be effective in enhancing the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. BALB/c mice immunized subcutaneously with outer membrane protein (OMP) of Brucella abortus S19 vaccine strain entrapped in a commercial cationic liposome (S19-OMP-liposome) for vaccine delivery, showed enhanced protection (P<0.05) compared to groups of mice inoculated with S19 OMP alone, S19 live B. abortus vaccine and liposome alone, when challenged intra-peritoneally with virulent B. abortus strain 544 at 30 days post-immunization (DPI). The S19-OMP-liposome preparation was found to be safer compared to the live B. abortus S19 vaccine at 15 days post challenge (DPC), as evidenced by the significant difference in spleen weight between S19-OMP-liposome, S19 OMP and S19 live as well as the liposome control groups (P<0.01). Antibody isotype response profiles of the experimental groups indicated that the immune response was Th1 cell mediated. The protective advantage conferred to mice immunized with S19-OMP entrapped in liposome over those immunized with the live B. abortus S19 version, could probably be related to the significantly different response of IgG2b at 30 DPI (P<0.01), IgG2a (P<0.01), IgG2b (P<0.01) and IgG3 (P<0.05) at the DPC stages, respectively. PMID:27656221

  15. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  16. Brucella abortus inhibits major histocompatibility complex class II expression and antigen processing through interleukin-6 secretion via Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A; García Samartino, Clara; Wallach, Jorge C; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection.

  17. Key role of Toll-like receptor 2 in the inflammatory response and major histocompatibility complex class ii downregulation in Brucella abortus-infected alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Hielpos, M Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Oliveira, Sergio C; Baldi, Pablo C

    2014-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival.

  18. Serological crossreactivity between Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 II the use of Yersinia outer proteins for the specific detection of Yersinia enterocolitica infections in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, R; Hilbink, F; Hansen, M F; Ross, G P; Joyce, M A; Fenwick, S; Heesemann, J; Wolf-Watz, H; Nielsen, K

    1995-12-01

    Yersinia outer protein (YOP) preparations from Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis were used as antigens in immunoblots for the detection of Yersinia infections in experimentally and naturally infected ruminants. Sera from 9 groups of animals were used: (1) 51 sera from cattle which were false-positive in the standard brucellosis serological tests, (2) 52 sera from brucellosis-negative cattle, (3) 51 sera from a deer herd in which 16 animals were positive in the brucellosis tests and Yersina species were isolated from 5 animals, (4) 50 sera from a deer herd in which sera from all animals were negative in the brucellosis tests, (5) 107 sera from brucellosis-negative cattle which were received from throughout New Zealand, (6) 30 sera from cattle naturally infected with B. abortus and from which B. abortus was isolated, (7) 55 sera from cattle naturally infected with B. abortus, (8) 26 sera from cattle experimentally infected with B. abortus, with mostly high titres in the conventional brucellosis tests, and (9) sera taken weekly from 3 cattle experimentally infected with Y. enterocolitica 0:9. In all 3 Y. enterocolitica 0:9 experimentally infected animals the antibody reactivity against major YOPs in the Y. enterocolitica and in the Y. pseudotuberculosis YOP preparation correlated well with the strength in the classical brucellosis tests and with the staining of smooth lipopolysaccharides (SLPS) in blots, thus confirming the usefulness of YOPs for the detection of Yersinia infections. Sera from naturally infected cattle and deer herds, regardless of whether they were false positive or negative in the brucellosis tests, showed high frequencies of staining in YOP blots (53-58% in cattle and 80-100% in deer), indicating a high prevalence of field infections with Yersinia species in New Zealand. In two of the three sera groups from B. abortus infected animals, antibodies against YOPs were detected with high frequency, showing that dual infections may be common

  19. Experimental infection of nontarget species of rodents and birds with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Januszewski, M.C.; Olsen, S.C.; McLean, R.G.; Clark, L.; Rhyan, Jack C.

    2001-01-01

    The Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 (SRB51) is being considered for use in the management of bnucellosis in wild bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Area (USA). Evaluation of the vaccines safety in non-target species was considered necessary prior to field use. Between June 1998 and December 1999, ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii, n = 21), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus, n = 14), prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster, n = 21), and ravens (Corvus corax, n = 13) were orally inoculated with SRB51 or physiologic saline. Oral and rectal swabs and blood samples were collected for bacteriologic evaluation. Rodents were necropsied at 8 to 10 wk and 12 to 21 wk post inoculation (PI), and ravens at 7 and 11 wk PI. Spleen, liver and reproductive tissues were collected for bacteriologic and histopathologic evaluation. No differences in clinical signs, appetite, weight loss or gain, or activity were observed between saline- and SRB51-inoculated animals in all four species. Oral and rectal swabs from all species were negative throughout the study. In tissues obtained from SRB51-inoculated animals, the organism was isolated from six of seven (86%) ground squirrels, one of six (17%) deer mice, none of seven voles, and one of five (20%) ravens necropsied at 8, 8, 10, and 7 wk PI, respectively. Tissues from four of seven (57%) SRB51-inoculated ground squirrels were culture positive for the organism 12 wk PI; SRB51 was not recovered from deer mice, voles. or ravens necropsied 12, 21, or 11 wk, respectively, PI. SRB51 was not recovered from saline-inoculated ground squirrels, deer mice, or voles at any time but was recovered from one saline-inoculated raven at necropsy, 7 wk PI, likely attributable to contact with SRB51-inoculated ravens in an adjacent aviary room. Spleen was time primary tissue site of colonization in ground squirrels, followed by the liver and reproductive organs. The results indicate oral exposure to

  20. Structural, Functional, and Immunogenic Insights on Cu,Zn Superoxide Dismutase Pathogenic Virulence Factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Bruns, Cami K.; Belzer, Carol A.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Kroll, J. Simon; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen and general pathogenicity factors and are therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomic details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and of SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly, and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes, and suggest general targets for antibacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors of or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. IMPORTANCE By protecting microbes against

  1. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    DOE PAGES

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen, general pathogenicity factors and therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomicmore » details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes and suggest general targets for anti-bacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors or vaccines against these harmful pathogens. IMPORTANCE By protecting microbes against reactive oxygen

  2. Protection efficacy of the Brucella abortus ghost vaccine candidate lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36) in murine models

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Ae Jeong; MOON, Ja Young; KIM, Won Kyong; KIM, Suk; HUR, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus cells were lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36). Next, the protection efficacy of the lysed fragment as a vaccine candidate was evaluated. Group A mice were immunized with sterile PBS, group B mice were intraperitoneally (ip) immunized with 3 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of B. abortus strain RB51, group C mice were immunized ip with 3 × 108 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate, and group D mice were orally immunized with 3 × 109 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific serum IgG titers were considerably higher in groups C and D than in group A. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were significantly higher in groups B–D than in group A. After an ip challenge with B. abortus 544, only group C mice showed a significant level of protection as compared to group A. Overall, these results show that ip immunization with a vaccine candidate lysed by GI24 can effectively protect mice from systemic infection with virulent B. abortus. PMID:27349900

  3. Seminal vesiculitis and orchitis caused by Brucella abortus biovar 1 in young bison bulls from South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Rhyan, J C; Holland, S D; Gidlewski, T; Saari, D A; Jensen, A E; Ewalt, D R; Hennager, S G; Olsen, S C; Cheville, N F

    1997-10-01

    Specimens of blood, lymph nodes, spleens, and genitalia were collected at slaughter from seven 3- and 4-year-old male bison that had recently become seropositive for brucellosis. The animals were from a captive herd of approximately 3,500 bison located in central South Dakota. Brucella abortus biovar 1 was isolated from 2 or more specimens from each of 6 bison. Severe necrotizing and pyogranulomatous orchitis was present in 1 testicle from 1 bull, and 4 animals had mild to marked seminal vesiculitis. Immunohistochemical staining labeled organisms in seminal vesicles and the testicle with orchitis. Ultrastructurally, intact bacilli were present in cytoplasmic vacuoles of some macrophages; other macrophages contained intracytoplasmic aggregates of calcified coccobacilli.

  4. Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in cross bred cattle calves in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Basera, Sanjay Singh; Tewari, Kamal; Yadav, Shweta; Joshi, Sumit; Singh, Brajesh; Mukherjee, Falguni

    2012-03-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine has been evaluated in an organised dairy farm in India. All the cattle (r = 29) vaccinated with strain RB51 'responded' to the vaccine as demonstrated by iELISA using acetone killed strain RB51 antigen. The percentage responders at day 35, 60 and 90 post vaccination were 100%, 95% and 20%, respectively. Strain RB51 was able to elicit a good IFN-gamma response from vaccinated animals. The post-vaccination time point analysis indicated that the cumulative IFN-gamma response of whole blood from vaccinates stimulated with heat killed RB51 antigen was elicited in 80% of calves at 60 days post vaccination. Absence of strain RB51 in the secretions and excretion and lack of local or systemic reaction indicated the safety of the vaccine.

  5. Evaluation of Chlamydophila abortus DNA extraction protocols for polymerase chain reaction diagnosis in paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nieves; Navarro, José A; Nicolás, Laura; Buendía, Antonio J; Caro, María R; Del Río, Laura; Martínez, Carlos M; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús; Gallego, María C

    2007-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has gained increasing importance as a tool for directly demonstrating the presence of Chlamydophila in the placentas of aborted sheep and goats. However, because of the zoonotic potential of the disease, it is advisable to use fixed materials. To evaluate 4 different DNA extraction protocols in paraffin-embedded sections for PCR, previously immunohistochemically diagnosed placental samples from outbreaks of abortions in goats and sheep were used. The samples were also used to evaluate the effect of the duration of fixation in formalin on PCR. A protocol that uses Tris-HCl pH 8.5 with EDTA and subsequent digestion with proteinase K was found to be an easy protocol for obtaining excellent PCR products for Chlamydophila abortus diagnosis from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens. It was also found that if samples are fixed in formalin for more than 2 weeks, the PCR technique is affected more adversely than immunohistochemical methods.

  6. Immune Responses and Safety after Dart or Booster Vaccination of Bison with Brucella abortus Strain RB51

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C.

    2012-01-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 1010 to 2.0 × 1010 CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 1010 CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 1010 CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) immunologic responses at various times after vaccination than nonvaccinated bison. Booster vaccination with RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity. PMID:22461528

  7. Efficacy of Dart or Booster Vaccination with Strain RB51 in Protecting Bison against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (hand RB51), by single pneumatic dart delivery (dart RB51), or as two vaccinations approximately 13 months apart (booster RB51) in comparison to control bison. All bison were challenged intraconjunctivally in midgestation with 107 CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 (S2308). Bison were necropsied and sampled within 72 h of abortion or delivery of a live calf. Compared to nonvaccinated bison, bison in the booster RB51 treatment had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of abortion, uterine infection, or infection in maternal tissues other than the mammary gland at necropsy. Bison in single-vaccination treatment groups (hand RB51 and dart RB51) did not differ (P > 0.05) from the control group in the incidence of abortion or recovery of S2308 from uterine, mammary, fetal, or maternal tissues at necropsy. Compared to nonvaccinated animals, all RB51 vaccination groups had reduced (P < 0.05) mean colonization or incidence of infection in at least 2 of 4 target tissues, with the booster RB51 group having reduced (P < 0.05) colonization and incidence of infection in all target tissues. Our data suggest that booster vaccination of bison with RB51 enhances protective immunity against Brucella challenge compared to single vaccination with RB51 by hand or by pneumatic dart. Our study also suggests that an initial vaccination of calves followed by booster vaccination as yearlings should be an effective strategy for brucellosis control in bison. PMID:22496493

  8. Purified native haptens of Brucella abortus B19 and B. melitensis 16M reveal the lipopolysaccharide origin of the antigens.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, M S; Dubray, G; Bundle, D R; Perry, M P

    1988-01-01

    Purification of the Brucella polysaccharide referred to as native hapten (NH) and extracted from cells by the autoclaving procedure, was accomplished by ultrafiltration, followed by repetitive gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography on a "TSK-G2000-SW" column. The purified NH was analysed by SDS-PAGE, gas-liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy, and 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy. NH from B. abortus B19 (NH-A) was shown to have a structure identical to that of A polysaccharide from B. abortus 1119-3, a linear homopolymer of alpha-1,2-linked-4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyrannosyl residues. The structure of the NH from B. melitensis 16M (NH-M) was identified as a linear homopolysaccharide of the same sugar but composed of a pentasaccharide repeating unit in which four alpha 1,2-linked-4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyrannosyl residues are linked alpha-1,3 to the last monosaccharide of the sequence. This structure is similar to that determined for the Brucella M polysaccharide from B. melitensis 16M. The discovery in highly purified NH preparations of covalently bound monosaccharides characteristic of lipopolysaccharide inner core regions e.g., quinovosamine, mannose and 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (KDO), indicates that this polysaccharide is derived from lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by hydrolytic conditions fortuitously generated during the extraction protocol. The antigenically important polysaccharides of Brucella are now established to be either A or M antigens. Polysaccharide B is a cyclic glucan with no structural or serological relationship to A or M polysaccharides, its apparent activity in diagnostic tests of infected cattle results from O polysaccharide contamination. This artefact, previously referred to as NH, results from LPS hydrolysis under the extraction conditions used to prepare polysaccharide B.

  9. Intracellular Production of Brucella L Forms II. Induction and Survival of Brucella abortus L Forms in Tissue Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Hatten, Betty A.; Sulkin, S. Edward

    1966-01-01

    Hatten, Betty A. (The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas), and S. Edward Sulkin. Intracellular production of Brucella L forms. II. Induction and survival of Brucella abortus L forms in tissue culture. J. Bacteriol. 91:14–20. 1966.—Intracellular survival of altered brucellae, possibly L forms, was not greatly affected by penicillin or streptomycin in concentrations ranging from 5.0 to 40 μg/ml, but a combination of these two antibiotics (2.5 to 20 μg/ml each) reduced the number of positive L-form cultures. Tetracycline (2.0 μg/ml) decreased the number of positive L-form cultures at about the same rate as combinations of the higher concentrations of penicillin and streptomycin. Various concentrations of tetracycline (0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml) with 5.0 μg/ml of penicillin or streptomycin significantly reduced the number of positive L-form cultures. L forms were recovered for several days after elimination of bacteria from the cultures by all of the antibiotics tested. L-form production was not dependent upon the presence of antibiotics in the culture medium, but they were recovered in greater numbers when bacteria were still present in the hamster kidney cells. Addition of thallium acetate to infected cells (at varying intervals of time after infection) to control bacterial growth and conversion to the L phase during cellular disintegration decreased the number of positive L-form cultures obtained over a 10-day period. Comparison of the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria recovered from infected tissue culture cells with the stock strain of Brucella abortus indicated that some resistance to penicillin and tetracycline had developed. A marked resistance to streptomycin was observed in those bacteria recovered from cells maintained in the presence of this antibiotic. PMID:4955246

  10. Microarray-based identification of differentially expressed genes in intracellular Brucella abortus within RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Zhang, Min; Ding, Chan; Ding, Jiabo; Chen, Guanghua; Yu, Shengqing

    2013-01-01

    Brucella spp. is a species of facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that induces abortion and causes sterility in domesticated mammals and chronic undulant fever in humans. Important determinants of Brucella's virulence and potential for chronic infection include the ability to circumvent the host cell's internal surveillance system and the capability to proliferate within dedicated and non-dedicated phagocytes. Hence, identifying genes necessary for intracellular survival may hold the key to understanding Brucella infection. In the present study, microarray analysis reveals that 7.82% (244/3334) of all Brucella abortus genes were up-regulated and 5.4% (180/3334) were down-regulated in RAW264.7 cells, compared to free-living cells in TSB. qRT-PCR verification further confirmed a >5-fold up-regulation for fourteen genes. Functional analysis classified araC, ddp, and eryD as to partake in information storage and processing, alp, flgF and virB9 to be involved in cellular processes, hpcd and aldh to play a role in metabolism, mfs and nikC to be involved in both cellular processes and metabolism, and four hypothetical genes (bruAb1_1814, bruAb1_0475, bruAb1_1926, and bruAb1_0292) had unknown functions. Furthermore, we constructed a B. abortus 2308 mutant Δddp where the ddp gene is deleted in order to evaluate the role of ddp in intracellular survival. Infection assay indicated significantly higher adherence and invasion abilities of the Δddp mutant, however it does not survive well in RAW264.7 cells. Brucella may survive in hostile intracellular environment by modulating gene expression.

  11. Performance of skin tests with allergens from B. melitensis B115 and rough B. abortus mutants for diagnosing swine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; De Miguel, M J; Marín, C M; Barberán, M; Conde-Álvarez, R; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2014-01-10

    Swine brucellosis by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease whose control is based on serological testing and culling. However, current serological tests detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O/PS) moiety of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS), and thus lack specificity when infections by Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 and other gram-negative bacteria carrying cross-reacting O/PS occur. The skin test with the protein-rich brucellin extract obtained from rough B. melitensis B115 is assumed to be specific for discriminating these false positive serological reactions (FPSR). However, B115 strain, although unable to synthesize S-LPS, accumulates O/PS internally, which could cause diagnostic problems. Since the brucellin skin test has been seldom used in pigs and FPSR are common in these animals, we assessed its performance using cytosoluble protein extracts obtained from B. abortus rough mutants in manBcore or per genes (critical for O/PS biosynthesis) and B. melitensis B115. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were determined in B. suis biovar 2 culture positive and brucellosis free sows, and apparent prevalence in sows of unknown individual bacteriological and serological status belonging to B. suis biovar 2 naturally infected herds. Moreover, the specificity in discriminating brucellosis from FPSR was assessed in brucellosis free boars showing FPSR. The skin test with B. abortus ΔmanBcore and B. melitensis B115 allergens performed similarly, and the former one resulted in 100% specificity when testing animals showing FPSR in indirect ELISA, Rose Bengal and complement fixation serological tests. We conclude that O/PS-free genetically defined mutants represent an appropriate alternative to obtain Brucella protein extracts for diagnosing swine brucellosis.

  12. Immune responses and safety after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C

    2012-05-01

    One alternative for management of brucellosis in Yellowstone National Park bison (Bison bison) is vaccination of calves and yearlings. Although Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccination protects bison against experimental challenge, the effect of booster vaccinations was unknown. This study characterized immunologic responses after dart or booster vaccination of bison with Brucella abortus strain RB51. In two studies, 8- to 10-month-old female bison were inoculated with saline (n = 14), hand vaccinated with 1.1 × 10(10) to 2.0 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 21), or dart vaccinated with 1.8 × 10(10) CFU of RB51 (n = 7). A subgroup of hand vaccinates in study 1 was randomly selected for booster vaccination 15 months later with 2.2 × 10(10) CFU of RB51. Compared to single vaccinates, booster-vaccinated bison had greater serologic responses to RB51. However, there was a trend for antigen-specific proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from booster vaccinates to be reduced compared to responses of PBMC from single vaccinates. PBMC from booster vaccinates tended to have greater gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production than those from single vaccinates. In general, dart vaccination with RB51 induced immunologic responses similar to those of hand vaccination. All vaccinates (single hand, dart, or booster) demonstrated greater (P < 0.05) immunologic responses at various times after vaccination than nonvaccinated bison. Booster vaccination with RB51 in early gestation did not induce abortion or fetal infection. Our data suggest that booster vaccination does not induce strong anamnestic responses. However, phenotypic data on resistance to experimental challenge are required to fully assess the effect of booster vaccination on protective immunity.

  13. Efficacy of dart or booster vaccination with strain RB51 in protecting bison against experimental Brucella abortus challenge.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S C; Johnson, C S

    2012-06-01

    This study characterized the efficacy of the Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine in bison when delivered by single intramuscular vaccination (hand RB51), by single pneumatic dart delivery (dart RB51), or as two vaccinations approximately 13 months apart (booster RB51) in comparison to control bison. All bison were challenged intraconjunctivally in midgestation with 10(7) CFU of B. abortus strain 2308 (S2308). Bison were necropsied and sampled within 72 h of abortion or delivery of a live calf. Compared to nonvaccinated bison, bison in the booster RB51 treatment had a reduced (P < 0.05) incidence of abortion, uterine infection, or infection in maternal tissues other than the mammary gland at necropsy. Bison in single-vaccination treatment groups (hand RB51 and dart RB51) did not differ (P > 0.05) from the control group in the incidence of abortion or recovery of S2308 from uterine, mammary, fetal, or maternal tissues at necropsy. Compared to nonvaccinated animals, all RB51 vaccination groups had reduced (P < 0.05) mean colonization or incidence of infection in at least 2 of 4 target tissues, with the booster RB51 group having reduced (P < 0.05) colonization and incidence of infection in all target tissues. Our data suggest that booster vaccination of bison with RB51 enhances protective immunity against Brucella challenge compared to single vaccination with RB51 by hand or by pneumatic dart. Our study also suggests that an initial vaccination of calves followed by booster vaccination as yearlings should be an effective strategy for brucellosis control in bison.

  14. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Rossi, Rolando C.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastián

    2014-05-01

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C{sub 3} symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.

  15. Real-time PCR Detection of Brucella Abortus: A Comparative Study of SYBR Green I, 5'-exonuclease, and Hybridization Probe Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, Deborah Trishelle; Hadfield, Ted; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

    2003-08-01

    Real-time PCR provides a means of detecting and quantifying DNA targets by monitoring PCR product accumulation during cycling as indicated by increased fluorescence. A number of different approaches can be used to generate the fluorescence signal. Three approaches—SYBR Green I (a double-stranded DNA intercalating dye), 5'-exonuclease (enzymatically released fluors), and hybridization probes (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)—were evaluated for use in a real-time PCR assay to detect Brucella abortus. The three assays utilized the same amplification primers to produce an identical amplicon. This amplicon spans a region of the B. abortus genome that includes portions of the alkB gene and the IS711 insertion element. All three assays were of comparable sensitivity, providing a linear assay over 7 orders of magnitude (from 7.5 ng down to 7.5 fg). However, the greatest specificity was achieved with the hybridization probe assay.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Brucella abortus vaccine strain 104M reveals a set of candidate genes associated with its virulence attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Hui, Yiming; Zai, Xiaodong; Xu, Junjie; Liang, Long; Wang, Bingxiang; Yue, Junjie; Li, Shanhu

    2015-01-01

    The Brucella abortus strain 104M, a spontaneously attenuated strain, has been used as a vaccine strain in humans against brucellosis for 6 decades in China. Despite many studies, the molecular mechanisms that cause the attenuation are still unclear. Here, we determined the whole-genome sequence of 104M and conducted a comprehensive comparative analysis against the whole genome sequences of the virulent strain, A13334, and other reference strains. This analysis revealed a highly similar genome structure between 104M and A13334. The further comparative genomic analysis between 104M and A13334 revealed a set of genes missing in 104M. Some of these genes were identified to be directly or indirectly associated with virulence. Similarly, a set of mutations in the virulence-related genes was also identified, which may be related to virulence alteration. This study provides a set of candidate genes associated with virulence attenuation in B.abortus vaccine strain 104M.

  17. FixL-like sensor FlbS of Brucella abortus binds haem and is necessary for survival within eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Roset, Mara S; Almirón, Marta A

    2013-09-17

    Replication of Brucella inside eukaryotic cells is essential for pathogenesis, and successful infection requires rapid adaptation to the intracellular milieu. Close relatives of Brucella use the two-component system FixLJ to survive inside the host. We aimed to identify a homologous sensor in Brucella abortus. A predicted protein with transmembrane and conserved histidine kinase domains was identified as the Fix-like Brucella sensor, FlbS. Although it lacks the PAS domain, recombinant FlbS binds haem in vitro. An internal in-frame deletion in flbS severely decreased B. abortus survival inside professional and non-professional phagocytes. This phenotype was reverted by genetic complementation. These results indicate the critical role of this haemoprotein in the intracellular lifestyle of Brucella.

  18. Evaluation of strain-specific primer sequences from an abortifacient strain of ovine Chlamydophila abortus (Chalmydia psittaci) for the detection of EAE by PCR.

    PubMed

    Creelan, J L; McCullough, S J

    2000-09-01

    Strain-specific primer sequences derived from the helicase gene of an ovine abortifacient strain (S26/3) of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci) were evaluated for the diagnosis of enzootic abortion in ewes (EAE) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). C abortus DNA was amplified from tissues submitted from ovine abortion cases using genus-specific and strain-specific primers in a standard thermal cycler. Amplification was followed by Southern blotting and hybridisation with a strain-specific probe. Real-time PCR was also evaluated using strain-specific primers in a microvolume fluorimeter-based thermal cycler (LightCycler). Detection using both PCR methods was compared with other diagnostic methods against the standard of McCoy cell culture isolation. In this paper we report the application of strain-specific PCR as a fast, sensitive, specific method for the detection of EAE.

  19. Immunogenicity of a Multi-Epitope DNA Vaccine Encoding Epitopes from Cu–Zn Superoxide Dismutase and Open Reading Frames of Brucella abortus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Escalona, Emilia; Sáez, Darwin; Oñate, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial zoonotic disease affecting several mammalian species that is transmitted to humans by direct or indirect contact with infected animals or their products. In cattle, brucellosis is almost invariably caused by Brucella abortus. Live, attenuated Brucella vaccines are commonly used to prevent illness in cattle, but can cause abortions in pregnant animals. It is, therefore, desirable to design an effective and safer vaccine against Brucella. We have used specific Brucella antigens that induce immunity and protection against B. abortus. A novel recombinant multi-epitope DNA vaccine specific for brucellosis was developed. To design the vaccine construct, we employed bioinformatics tools to predict epitopes present in Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase and in the open reading frames of the genomic island-3 (BAB1_0260, BAB1_0270, BAB1_0273, and BAB1_0278) of Brucella. We successfully designed a multi-epitope DNA plasmid vaccine chimera that encodes and expresses 21 epitopes. This DNA vaccine induced a specific humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice. It induced a typical T-helper 1 response, eliciting production of immunoglobulin G2a and IFN-γ particularly associated with the Th1 cell subset of CD4+ T cells. The production of IL-4, an indicator of Th2 activation, was not detected in splenocytes. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest that the vaccine induced a predominantly Th1 response. The vaccine induced a statistically significant level of protection in BALB/c mice when challenged with B. abortus 2308. This is the first use of an in silico strategy to a design a multi-epitope DNA vaccine against B. abortus. PMID:28232837

  20. Evaluation of DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus pcr detection in aborted fetuses or calves born from cows experimentally infected with strain 2308

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, M.; Keid, L.B.; Rocha, V.C.M.; Vejarano, M.P.; Ikuta, C.Y.; Rodriguez, C.A.R.; Ferreira, F.; Dias, R.A.; Ferreira Neto, J.S

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the detection of B. abortus by PCR in organs of aborted fetuses from infected cows, an important mechanism to find infected herds on the eradication phase of the program. So, different DNA extraction protocols were compared, focusing the PCR detection of B. abortus in clinical samples collected from aborted fetuses or calves born from cows challenged with the 2308 B. abortus strain. Therefore, two gold standard groups were built based on classical bacteriology, formed from: 32 lungs (17 positives), 26 spleens (11 positives), 23 livers (8 positives) and 22 bronchial lymph nodes (7 positives). All samples were submitted to three DNA extraction protocols, followed by the same amplification process with the primers B4 and B5. From the accumulated results for organ, the proportion of positives for the lungs was higher than the livers (p=0.04) or bronchial lymph nodes (p=0.004) and equal to the spleens (p=0.18). From the accumulated results for DNA extraction protocol, the proportion of positives for the Boom protocol was bigger than the PK (p< 0.0001) and GT (p=0.0004). There was no difference between the PK and GT protocols (p=0.5). Some positive samples from the classical bacteriology were negative to the PCR and vice-versa. Therefore, the best strategy for B. abortus detection in the organs of aborted fetuses or calves born from infected cows is the use, in parallel, of isolation by classical bacteriology and the PCR, with the DNA extraction performed by the Boom protocol. PMID:24031391

  1. Immunogenicity of a Multi-Epitope DNA Vaccine Encoding Epitopes from Cu-Zn Superoxide Dismutase and Open Reading Frames of Brucella abortus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Emilia; Sáez, Darwin; Oñate, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a bacterial zoonotic disease affecting several mammalian species that is transmitted to humans by direct or indirect contact with infected animals or their products. In cattle, brucellosis is almost invariably caused by Brucella abortus. Live, attenuated Brucella vaccines are commonly used to prevent illness in cattle, but can cause abortions in pregnant animals. It is, therefore, desirable to design an effective and safer vaccine against Brucella. We have used specific Brucella antigens that induce immunity and protection against B. abortus. A novel recombinant multi-epitope DNA vaccine specific for brucellosis was developed. To design the vaccine construct, we employed bioinformatics tools to predict epitopes present in Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase and in the open reading frames of the genomic island-3 (BAB1_0260, BAB1_0270, BAB1_0273, and BAB1_0278) of Brucella. We successfully designed a multi-epitope DNA plasmid vaccine chimera that encodes and expresses 21 epitopes. This DNA vaccine induced a specific humoral and cellular immune response in BALB/c mice. It induced a typical T-helper 1 response, eliciting production of immunoglobulin G2a and IFN-γ particularly associated with the Th1 cell subset of CD4(+) T cells. The production of IL-4, an indicator of Th2 activation, was not detected in splenocytes. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest that the vaccine induced a predominantly Th1 response. The vaccine induced a statistically significant level of protection in BALB/c mice when challenged with B. abortus 2308. This is the first use of an in silico strategy to a design a multi-epitope DNA vaccine against B. abortus.

  2. Molecular Characterization of a Brucella Species Large DNA Fragment Deleted in Brucella abortus Strains: Evidence for a Locus Involved in the Synthesis of a Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno, Nieves; Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S.; Fernández-Lago, Luis

    1999-01-01

    A Brucella melitensis 16M DNA fragment of 17,119 bp, which contains a large region deleted in B. abortus strains and DNA flanking one side of the deletion, has been characterized. In addition to the previously identified omp31 gene, 14 hypothetical genes have been identified in the B. melitensis fragment, most of them showing homology to genes involved in the synthesis of a polysaccharide. Considering that 10 of the 15 genes are missing in B. abortus and that all the polysaccharides described in the Brucella genus (lipopolysaccharide, native hapten, and polysaccharide B) have been detected in all the species, it seems likely that the genes described here might be part of a cluster for the synthesis of a novel Brucella polysaccharide. Several polysaccharides have been identified as important virulence factors, and the discovery of a novel polysaccharide in the brucellae which is probably not synthesized in B. abortus might be interesting for a better understanding of the pathogenicity and host preference differences observed between the Brucella species. However, the possibility that the genes described in this paper no longer encode the synthesis of a polysaccharide cannot be excluded. Brucellae belong to the alpha-2 subdivision of the class Proteobacteria, which includes other microorganisms living in association with eucaryotic cells, some of them synthesizing extracellular polysaccharides involved in the interaction with the host cell. The genes described in this paper might be a remnant of the common ancestor of the alpha-2 subdivision of the class Proteobacteria, and the brucellae might have lost such extracellular polysaccharide during evolution if it was not necessary for survival or for establishment of the infectious process. Nevertheless, further studies are necessary to identify the entire DNA fragment missing in B. abortus strains and to elucidate the mechanism responsible for such deletion, since only 9,948 bp of the deletion was present in the

  3. Analysis of the Kinetics and Regulation of Cytokine Gene Expression During the Primary In Vivo Immune Response to Killed Brucella Abortus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-10

    the Primary in vivo Immune Response to Killed Brucella abortus " beyond b rief excerpts 1S wi th the permiss10n o f the copyright owner, and will...the Kinetics and Regulation of Cytokine Gene Expression during the Primary in vivo Immune Response to Killed Brucella abonus Yichun lian; Candidate...in vitro studies, immunization of mice with Brucella abonus (BA) has previoUSly been characterized as a Th 1 response, associated with elevated IL-2

  4. Oral immunization of mice with gamma-irradiated Brucella neotomae induces protection against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Dabral, Neha; Martha-Moreno-Lafont; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Vemulapalli, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular coccobacilli that cause one of the most frequently encountered zoonosis worldwide. Humans naturally acquire infection through consumption of contaminated dairy and meat products and through direct exposure to aborted animal tissues and fluids. No vaccine against brucellosis is available for use in humans. In this study, we tested the ability of orally inoculated gamma-irradiated B. neotomae and B. abortus RB51 in a prime-boost immunization approach to induce antigen-specific humoral and cell mediated immunity and protection against challenge with virulent B. abortus 2308. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with B. abortus RB51 and B. neotomae and homologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with B. neotomae led to the production of serum and mucosal antibodies specific to the smooth LPS. The elicited serum antibodies included the isotypes of IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3. All oral vaccination regimens induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of secreting IFN-γ and TNF-α. Upon intra-peritoneal challenge, mice vaccinated with B. neotomae showed the highest level of resistance against virulent B. abortus 2308 colonization in spleen and liver. Experiments with different doses of B. neotomae showed that all tested doses of 10(9), 10(10) and 10(11) CFU-equivalent conferred significant protection against the intra-peritoneal challenge. However, a dose of 10(11) CFU-equivalent of B. neotomae was required for affording protection against intranasal challenge as shown by the reduced bacterial colonization in spleens and lungs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using gamma-irradiated B. neotomae as an effective and safe oral vaccine to induce protection against respiratory and systemic infections with virulent Brucella.

  5. Non-specific seroreactions against Brucella abortus in ruminants in New Zealand and the presence of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9.

    PubMed

    Hilbink, F; Fenwick, S G; Thompson, E J; Kittelberger, R; Penrose, M; Ross, G P

    1995-10-01

    The level of non-specific reactions found in the brucellosis serology of ruminants in New Zealand was very low until July 1992. This changed when, in an export consignment of 1071 deer, 35% reacted in the Brucella abortus tube agglutination test with titres varying from 50 to 200 IU. The reactors were also positive in the Rose-Bengal agglutination test and most of them reacted in the complement fixation test with titres varying from 10 to 80 IU. Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 was later isolated from one deer of this consignment. It was the first isolate of this serotype recovered in New Zealand from an animal. Shortly after, false reactors occurred more frequently than before in sera from Brucella abortus accredited free cattle herds. As the involvement of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 was suspected in these cases, faecal samples from reactors and in-contact animals were cultured for this organism. Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 was isolated from nine of 19 herds showing one or more false Brucella abortus seroreactions. Prior to 1990, Yersinia enterocolitica serotype 0:9 had not been isolated in New Zealand, despite the recovery of a number of other bio- or serotypes of the organism from humans and animals. From 1990 onward, serotype 0:9 began to be isolated from human faecal samples with increasing frequency. Since the first isolations from deer and cattle in 1992, it has now also been recovered from a cat and an alpaca and from cattle without any association with false positive Brucella abortus reactions. All serotype 0:9 isolates were of biotype 2.

  6. MLVA genotyping of Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus isolates from different animal species and humans and identification of Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 from cattle in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Wang, Heng; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Guiying; Ma, Junying; Xiao, Pei; Fan, Weixing; Di, Dongdong; Tian, Guozhong; Fan, Mengguang; Mi, Jingchuan; Yu, Ruiping; Song, Litao; Zhao, Hongyan; Piao, Dongri; Cui, Buyun

    2013-01-01

    In China, brucellosis is an endemic disease and the main sources of brucellosis in animals and humans are infected sheep, cattle and swine. Brucella melitensis (biovars 1 and 3) is the predominant species, associated with sporadic cases and outbreak in humans. Isolates of B. abortus, primarily biovars 1 and 3, and B. suis biovars 1 and 3 are also associated with sporadic human brucellosis. In this study, the genetic profiles of B. melitensis and B. abortus isolates from humans and animals were analyzed and compared by multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Among the B. melitensis isolates, the majority (74/82) belonged to MLVA8 genotype 42, clustering in the 'East Mediterranean' group. Two B. melitensis biovar 1 genotype 47 isolates, belonging to the 'Americas' group, were recovered; both were from the Himalayan blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur, a wild animal). The majority of B. abortus isolates (51/70) were biovar 3, genotype 36. Ten B. suis biovar 1 field isolates, including seven outbreak isolates recovered from a cattle farm in Inner Mongolia, were genetically indistinguishable from the vaccine strain S2, based on MLVA cluster analysis. MLVA analysis provided important information for epidemiological trace-back. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to associate Brucella cross-infection with the vaccine strain S2 based on molecular comparison of recovered isolates to the vaccine strain. MLVA typing could be an essential assay to improve brucellosis surveillance and control programs.

  7. Host Susceptibility to Brucella abortus Infection Is More Pronounced in IFN-γ knockout than IL-12/β2-Microglobulin Double-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Ana Paula M. S.; Oliveira, Fernanda S.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Vieira, Leda Q.; Azevedo, Vasco; Macedo, Gilson C.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. IFN-γ, IL-12, and CD8+ T lymphocytes are important components of host immune responses against B. abortus. Herein, IFN-γ and IL-12/β2-microglobulin (β2-m) knockout mice were used to determine whether CD8+ T cells and IL-12-dependent IFN-γ deficiency would be more critical to control B. abortus infection compared to the lack of endogenous IFN-γ. At 1 week after infection, IFN-γ KO and IL-12/β2-m KO mice showed increased numbers of bacterial load in spleens; however, at 3 weeks postinfection (p.i.), only IFN-γ KO succumbed to Brucella. All IFN-γ KO had died at 16 days p.i. whereas death within the IL-12/β2-m KO group was delayed and occurred at 32 days until 47 days postinfection. Susceptibility of IL-12/β2-m KO animals to Brucella was associated to undetectable levels of IFN-γ in mouse splenocytes and inability of these cells to lyse Brucella-infected macrophages. However, the lack of endogenous IFN-γ was found to be more important to control brucellosis than CD8+ T cells and IL-12-dependent IFN-γ deficiencies. PMID:22194770

  8. Transcription of non-classic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the bovine placenta throughout gestation and after Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Larissa Sarmento; da Silva Mol, Juliana Pinto; de Macedo, Auricélio Alves; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Dos Santos Ribeiro, Diego Luiz; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Carvalho Neta, Alcina Vieira

    2015-10-15

    Transcription of non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was assessed in the bovine placenta throughout gestation. Additionally, the effect of Brucella abortus infection on expression of non-classical MHC-I was also evaluated using a chorioallantoic membrane explant model of infection. The non-classical MHC-I genes MICB and NC3 had higher levels of transcription in the intercotyledonary region when compared to the placentome, which had higher levels of transcription at the second trimester of gestation. NC1 and classical MHC-I had very low levels of transcription throughout gestation. Trophoblastic cells of B. abortus-infected chorioallantoic membrane explants had an increase in transcription of non-classical MHC-I at 4h post infection. Therefore, this study provides an analysis of non-classical MHC-I transcription at different stages of gestation and different placental tissues, and during B. abortus infection. These findings provide additional knowledge on immune regulation in placental tissues, a known immune-privileged site.

  9. Seroprevalence for Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Austrian adults: a cross-sectional survey among military personnel and civilians.

    PubMed

    Tobudic, Selma; Nedomansky, Klara; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Müller, Maria; Faas, Angelus; Mooseder, Gerhard; Allerberger, Franz; Stanek, Gerold; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel.

  10. BrucELISA: an enzyme-antibody immunoassay for detection of Brucella abortus antibodies in milk: correlation with the Brucella ring test and with shedding of viable organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Boraker, D K; Stinebring, W R; Kunkel, J R

    1981-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-antibody immunosorbent assay (BrucELISA) is described for the detection of antibody to Brucella abortus in cow's milk. Three series of milk samples were obtained from an adult-vaccinated dairy herd infected with B. abortus. The BrucELISA system was used as a screening test for individual milks diluted 1:200 (BE 200 test), for undiluted bulk milks, and to determine antibody titer (BrucELISA titration assay). The BrucELISA results correlated highly with positive Brucella ring test reactions and culture positivity, eliminated false-positive Brucella ring test reactions, detected antibody in some samples which were Brucella ring test negative, and distinguished between vaccinated and infected animals. BrucELISA titration assay titers of greater than 1:800 were correlated with shedding, or were prognostic for animals which eventually became shedders. Binding of the enzyme-antibody conjugate to bovine immunoglobulin in the absence of rabbit anti-bovine immunoglobulin occurred with culture-positive or -negative milks showing titers of greater than 1:1,600 (the beta effect); the effect was also of predictive value in identifying eventual shedders. The BrucELISA system is a sensitive, specific, and inexpensive method for screening large numbers of individual or bulk milk samples for the presence of antibody to B. abortus. PMID:6793622

  11. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  12. Production of the Siderophore 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid Is Required for Wild-Type Growth of Brucella abortus in the Presence of Erythritol under Low-Iron Conditions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bellaire, Bryan H.; Elzer, Philip H.; Baldwin, Cynthia L.; Roop II, R. Martin

    2003-01-01

    Production of the siderophore 2,3-dihyroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) is required for the wild-type virulence of Brucella abortus in cattle. A possible explanation for this requirement was uncovered when it was determined that a B. abortus dhbC mutant (BHB1) defective in 2,3-DHBA production displays marked growth restriction in comparison to its parent strain, B. abortus 2308, when cultured in the presence of erythritol under low-iron conditions. This phenotype is not displayed when these strains are cultured under low-iron conditions in the presence of other readily utilizable carbon and energy sources. The addition of either exogenous 2,3-DHBA or FeCl3 relieves this growth defect, suggesting that the inability of the B. abortus dhbC mutant to display wild-type growth in the presence of erythritol under iron-limiting conditions is due to a defect in iron acquisition. Restoring 2,3-DHBA production to the B. abortus dhbC mutant by genetic complementation abolished the erythritol-specific growth defect exhibited by this strain in low-iron medium, verifying the relationship between 2,3-DHBA production and efficient growth in the presence of erythritol under low-iron conditions. The positive correlation between 2,3-DHBA production and growth in the presence of erythritol was further substantiated by the observation that the addition of erythritol to low-iron cultures of B. abortus 2308 stimulated the production of 2,3-DHBA by increasing the transcription of the dhbCEBA operon. Correspondingly, the level of exogenous iron needed to repress dhbCEBA expression in B. abortus 2308 was also greater when this strain was cultured in the presence of erythritol than that required when it was cultured in the presence of any of the other readily utilizable carbon and energy sources tested. The tissues of the bovine reproductive tract are rich in erythritol during the latter stages of pregnancy, and the ability to metabolize erythritol is thought to be important to the virulence of B

  13. The Outer Membrane of Brucella ovis Shows Increased Permeability to Hydrophobic Probes and Is More Susceptible to Cationic Peptides than Are the Outer Membranes of Mutant Rough Brucella abortus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Enrique; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Weintraub, Andrej; Bengoechea, José-Antonio; Moriyón, Ignacio; Hultenby, Kjell; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane (OM) to hydrophobic probes and its susceptibility to bactericidal cationic peptides were investigated for natural rough Brucella ovis and for mutant rough Brucella abortus strains. The OM of B. ovis displayed an abrupt and faster kinetic profile than rough B. abortus during the uptake of the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine. B. ovis was more sensitive than rough B. abortus to the action of cationic peptides. Bactenecins 5 and 7 induced morphological alterations on the OMs of both rough Brucella strains. B. ovis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) captured considerably more polymyxin B than LPSs from both rough and smooth B. abortus strains. Polymyxin B, poly-l-lysine, and poly-l-ornithine produced a thick coating on the surfaces of both strains, which was more evident in B. ovis than in rough B. abortus. The distinct functional properties of the OMs of these two rough strains correlate with some structural differences of their OMs and with their different biological behaviors in animals and culture cells. PMID:10531286

  14. Immune Response of Calves Vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 or RB51 and Revaccinated with RB51.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Lima, Graciela K; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Al Qublan, Hamzeh; Heinemann, Marcos B; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains have been successfully used to control bovine brucellosis worldwide; however, currently, most of our understanding of the protective immune response induced by vaccination comes from studies in mice. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the immune responses induced in cattle prime-immunized with B. abortus S19 or RB51 and revaccinated with RB51. Female calves, aged 4 to 8 months, were vaccinated with either vaccine S19 (0.6-1.2 x 1011 CFU) or RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 0, and revaccinated with RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 365 of the experiment. Characterization of the immune response was performed using serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 28, 210, 365, 393 and 575 post-immunization. Results showed that S19 and RB51 vaccination induced an immune response characterized by proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells; IFN-ɣ and IL-17A production by CD4+ T-cells; cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells; IL-6 secretion; CD4+ and CD8+ memory cells; antibodies of IgG1 class; and expression of the phenotypes of activation in T-cells. However, the immune response stimulated by S19 compared to RB51 showed higher persistency of IFN-ɣ and CD4+ memory cells, induction of CD21+ memory cells and higher secretion of IL-6. After RB51 revaccination, the immune response was chiefly characterized by increase in IFN-ɣ expression, proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and decrease of IL-6 production in both groups. Nevertheless, a different polarization of the immune response, CD4+- or CD8+-dominant, was observed after the booster with RB51 for S19 and RB51 prime-vaccinated animals, respectively. Our results indicate that after prime vaccination both vaccine strains induce a strong and complex Th1 immune response, although after RB51 revaccination the differences between immune profiles induced by prime-vaccination become accentuated.

  15. Immune Response of Calves Vaccinated with Brucella abortus S19 or RB51 and Revaccinated with RB51

    PubMed Central

    Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Lima, Graciela K.; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S. S.; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Al Qublan, Hamzeh; Heinemann, Marcos B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus S19 and RB51 strains have been successfully used to control bovine brucellosis worldwide; however, currently, most of our understanding of the protective immune response induced by vaccination comes from studies in mice. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the immune responses induced in cattle prime-immunized with B. abortus S19 or RB51 and revaccinated with RB51. Female calves, aged 4 to 8 months, were vaccinated with either vaccine S19 (0.6–1.2 x 1011 CFU) or RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 0, and revaccinated with RB51 (1.3 x 1010 CFU) on day 365 of the experiment. Characterization of the immune response was performed using serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 28, 210, 365, 393 and 575 post-immunization. Results showed that S19 and RB51 vaccination induced an immune response characterized by proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells; IFN-ɣ and IL-17A production by CD4+ T-cells; cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells; IL-6 secretion; CD4+ and CD8+ memory cells; antibodies of IgG1 class; and expression of the phenotypes of activation in T-cells. However, the immune response stimulated by S19 compared to RB51 showed higher persistency of IFN-ɣ and CD4+ memory cells, induction of CD21+ memory cells and higher secretion of IL-6. After RB51 revaccination, the immune response was chiefly characterized by increase in IFN-ɣ expression, proliferation of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and decrease of IL-6 production in both groups. Nevertheless, a different polarization of the immune response, CD4+- or CD8+-dominant, was observed after the booster with RB51 for S19 and RB51 prime-vaccinated animals, respectively. Our results indicate that after prime vaccination both vaccine strains induce a strong and complex Th1 immune response, although after RB51 revaccination the differences between immune profiles induced by prime-vaccination become accentuated. PMID:26352261

  16. Active immunization with Brucella abortus S19 phage lysate elicits serum IgG that protects guinea pigs against virulent B. abortus and protects mice by passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Jain, Lata; Rawat, Mayank; Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Kumar, Bablu

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is an economically important zoonosis of worldwide significance. Earlier (Jain et al., 2015) we reported methodology for generation of phage lysate preparations against Brucella abortus S19 using brucellaphage 'ϕLd'. In this study, using a fixed dose (Two mouse PD100) of lysates, the prophylactic efficacies of both plain and alum gel adjuvanted lysates were evaluated in guinea pig by direct virulent challenge and passive mouse protection test (PMPT). Strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses in guinea pigs and protection comparable to S19 vaccine was observed with low dose (1.0 μg protein and 120 μg carbohydrate adsorbed on 0.1% aluminium gel). Passive transfer of antibodies to mice using d 90 post immunization sera of guinea pig protected the animals against challenge. The study suggested the significance of humoral immunity in murine brucellosis. Further, the methodology can be explored to produce a new class of immunotherapeutic agents against bovine brucellosis.

  17. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Rossi, Rolando C.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C 3 symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity. PMID:24816110

  18. Subcutaneous immunization with a novel immunogenic candidate (urease) confers protection against Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis infections.

    PubMed

    Abkar, Morteza; Amani, Jafar; Sahebghadam Lotfi, Abbas; Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Alamian, Saeed; Kamali, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Brucellosis is a world prevalent endemic illness that is transmitted from domestic animals to humans. Brucella spp. exploits urease for survival in the harsh conditions of stomach during the gastrointestinal infection. In this study, we examined the immune response and the protection elicited by using recombinant Brucella urease (rUrease) vaccination in BALB/c mice. The urease gene was cloned in pET28a and the resulting recombinant protein was employed as subunit vaccine. Recombinant protein was administered subcutaneously and intraperitoneally. Dosage reduction was observed with subcutaneous (SC) vaccination when compared with intraperitoneal (IP) vaccination. rUrease induced mixed Th1-Th2 immune responses with high titers of specific IgG1 and IgG2a. In lymphocyte proliferation assay, splenocytes from IP and SC-vaccinated mice displayed a strong recall proliferative response with high amounts of IL-4, IL-12 and IFN-γ production. Vaccinated mice were challenged with virulent Brucella melitensis, B. abortus and B. suis. The SC vaccination route exhibited a higher degree of protection than IP vaccination (p value ≤ 0.05). Altogether, our results indicated that rUrease could be a useful antigen candidate for the development of subunit vaccines against brucellosis.

  19. The unexpected discovery of Brucella abortus Buck 19 vaccine in goats from Ecuador underlines the importance of biosecurity measures.

    PubMed

    Ron-Román, Jorge; Berkvens, Dirk; Barzallo-Rivadeneira, Daniela; Angulo-Cruz, Alexandra; González-Andrade, Pablo; Minda-Aluisa, Elizabeth; Benítez-Ortíz, Washington; Brandt, Jef; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Saegerman, Claude

    2017-03-01

    Very few, mostly old, and only preliminary serological studies of brucellosis in goats exist in Ecuador. In order to assess the current epidemiological situation, we performed a cross-sectional serological study in the goat populations of Carchi (n = 160 animals), Pichincha (n = 224 animals), and Loja provinces (n = 2024 animals). Only two positive serological results (RB negative and SAT-EDTA ≥400 IU/ml) were obtained in lactating goats from the same farm in Quito (Pichincha province). Additionally, milk was sampled from 220 animals in Pichincha province. The present study indicates a low apparent prevalence in Pichincha province and absence in Carchi and Loja provinces. A total of 25 positive milk ring tests (MRT) were obtained in Pichincha province yielding a prevalence of MRT of 11.16%. Subsequent culture was performed on the positive MRT samples. All results were negative, apart from a single sample, obtained from a serologically positive goat in Quito, that was positive for Brucella abortus strain 19 (B19). Several hypotheses are forwarded concerning this unexpected result. The most likely hypothesis is the possible accidental use of a needle, previously used for vaccination of cattle with the said vaccine, for the administration of drug treatment to the goat. This hypothesis underlines the necessity of biosecurity measures to prevent this type of accidents.

  20. Identification of a type IV secretion substrate of Brucella abortus that participates in the early stages of intracellular survival

    PubMed Central

    Döhmer, Peter H.; Valguarnera, Ezequiel; Czibener, Cecilia; Ugalde, Juan E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Brucella abortus, the etiological agent of bovine brucellosis, is an intracellular pathogen whose virulence is completely dependent on a type IV secretion system. This secretion system translocates effector proteins into the host cell to modulate the intracellular fate of the bacterium in order to establish a secure niche were it actively replicates. Although much has been done in understanding how this secretion system participates in the virulence process, few effector proteins have been identified to date. We describe here the identification of a type IV secretion substrate (SepA) that is only present in Brucella spp. and has no detectable homology to known proteins. This protein is secreted in a virB dependent manner in a two-step process involving a periplasmic intermediate and secretion is necessary for its function. The deletion mutant showed a defect in the early stages of intracellular replication in professional and non-professional phagocytes although it invades the cells more efficiently than the wild type parental strain. Our results indicate that, even though the mutant was more invasive, it had a defect in excluding the lysosomal marker Lamp-1 and was inactivated more efficiently during the early phases of the intracellular life cycle. PMID:24119283

  1. A Lysozyme-Like Protein in Brucella abortus Is Involved in the Early Stages of Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Del Giudice, Mariela G.

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of proteins in Gram-negative bacteria is a high-energy-consuming process that requires translocation across two membranes and a periplasmic space composed of a mesh-like layer, the peptidoglycan. To achieve this, bacteria have evolved complex secretion systems that cross these barriers, and in many cases there are specific peptidoglycanases that degrade the peptidoglycan to allow the proper assembly of the secretion machinery. We describe here the identification and characterization of a muramidase in Brucella abortus that participates in the intracellular multiplication in professional and nonprofessional phagocytes. We demonstrated that this protein has peptidoglycanase activity, that a strain with a clean deletion of the gene displayed a defect in the early stages of the intracellular multiplication curve, and that this is dependent on the lytic activity. While neither the attachment nor the invasion of the strain was affected, we demonstrated that it had a defect in excluding the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 but not in acquiring the reticulum endoplasmic marker calnexin, indicating that the gene participates in the early stages of the intracellular trafficking but not in the establishment of the replicative niche. Analysis of the assembly status and functionality of the VirB secretion apparatus indicated that the mutant has affected the proper function of this central virulence factor. PMID:23319555

  2. In silico analysis of Brucella abortus Omp2b and in vitro expression of SOmp2b

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose At present, there is no vaccine available for the prevention of human brucellosis. Brucella outer membrane protein 2b (Omp2b) is a 36 kD porin existed in common Brucella pathogens and it is considered as priority antigen for designing a new subunit vaccine. Materials and Methods In the current study, we aimed to predict and analyze the secondary and tertiary structures of the Brucella abortus Omp2b protein, and to predict T-cell and B-cell epitopes with the help of bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, cloning and expression of the short form of Omp2b (SOmp2b) was performed using pET28a expression vector and Escherichia coli BL21 host, respectively. The recombinant SOmp2b (rSOmp2b) was purified with Ni-NTA column. Results The recombinant protein was successfully expressed in E. coli host and purified under denaturation conditions. The yield of the purified rSOmp2b was estimated by Bradford method and found to be 220 µg/mL of the culture. Conclusion Our results indicate that Omp2b protein has a potential to induce both B-cell– and T-cell–mediated immune responses and it can be evaluated as a new subunit vaccine candidate against brucellosis. PMID:26866027

  3. Differentiation of Brucella abortus bv. 1, 2, and 4, Brucella melitensis, Brucella ovis, and Brucella suis bv. 1 by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, B J; Halling, S M

    1994-01-01

    Several PCR assays which identify the genus Brucella but do not discriminate among species have been reported. We describe a PCR assay that comprises five oligonucleotide primers which can identify selected biovars of four species of Brucella. Individual biovars within a species are not differentiated. The assay can identify three biovars (1, 2, and 4) of B. abortus, all three biovars of B. melitensis, biovar 1 of B. suis, and all B. ovis biovars. These biovars include all of the Brucella species typically isolated from cattle in the United States, a goal of the present research. The assay exploits the polymorphism arising from species-specific localization of the genetic element IS711 in the Brucella chromosome. Identity is determined by the size(s) of the product(s) amplified from primers hybridizing at various distances from the element. The performance of the assay with U.S. field isolates was highly effective. When 107 field isolates were screened by the described method, there was 100% agreement with the identifications made by conventional methods. Six closely related bacteria (Agrobacterium radiobacter, Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Rhizobium meliloti, and Rhodospirillum rubrum) and two control bacteria (Bordetella bronchiseptica and Escherichia coli) tested negative by the assay. Images PMID:7852552

  4. Comparison of fetal and maternal inflammatory responses in the ovine placenta after experimental infection with Chlamydophila abortus.

    PubMed

    Sammin, D J; Markey, B K; Quinn, P J; McElroy, M C; Bassett, H F

    2006-01-01

    Placentae from 13 pregnant ewes infected intravenously with Chlamydophila abortus, together with placentae from nine uninfected control ewes, were examined at 14, 21 or 28 days post-inoculation (p.i.). Chlamydial inclusions were present in the trophoblast at 14 days p.i. and were widespread by 21 days p.i. Chorioallantoic lesions (oedema, arteritis and thrombosis) were severe at 28 days p.i., the changes being particularly marked in the membrane surrounding placentomes. Lymphocytes constituted only a small proportion of the cellular infiltrate in the chorioallantois; neutrophil infiltration of the chorionic surface was evident where the trophoblast layer had sloughed, whereas macrophages represented the predominant cell type in the deeper stroma. In contrast, on the maternal side of the placenta, chlamydial inclusions were sparse at all timepoints, and even at 28 days p.i., lesions were restricted to focal endometritis at the placentomal limbus and occasional foci of septal necrosis. T lymphocytes were numerous within endometrial and septal lesions, the infiltrate consistently containing more CD8(+) than CD4(+) cells. The fetal response to chlamydial invasion of the placenta was innate in character, whereas the maternal response appeared to represent an acquired, chlamydia-specific immune response.

  5. SodA is a major metabolic antioxidant in Brucella abortus 2308 that plays a significant, but limited, role in the virulence of this strain in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel W; Baumgartner, John E; Gee, Jason M; Anderson, Eric S; Roop, R Martin

    2012-07-01

    The gene designated BAB1_0591 in the Brucella abortus 2308 genome sequence encodes the manganese-cofactored superoxide dismutase SodA. An isogenic sodA mutant derived from B. abortus 2308, designated JB12, displays a small colony phenotype, increased sensitivity in vitro to endogenous superoxide generators, hydrogen peroxide and exposure to acidic pH, and a lag in growth when cultured in rich and minimal media that can be rescued by the addition of all 20 amino acids to the growth medium. B. abortus JB12 exhibits significant attenuation in both cultured murine macrophages and experimentally infected mice, but this attenuation is limited to the early stages of infection. Addition of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin to infected macrophages does not alleviate the attenuation exhibited by JB12, suggesting that the basis for the attenuation of the B. abortus sodA mutant is not an increased sensitivity to exogenous superoxide generated through the oxidative burst of host phagocytes. It is possible, however, that the increased sensitivity of the B. abortus sodA mutant to acid makes it less resistant than the parental strain to killing by the low pH encountered during the early stages of the development of the brucella-containing vacuoles in macrophages. These experimental findings support the proposed role for SodA as a major cytoplasmic antioxidant in brucella. Although this enzyme provides a clear benefit to B. abortus 2308 during the early stages of infection in macrophages and mice, SodA appears to be dispensable once the brucellae have established an infection.

  6. SodA is a major metabolic antioxidant in Brucella abortus 2308 that plays a significant, but limited, role in the virulence of this strain in the mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Daniel W.; Baumgartner, John E.; Gee, Jason M.; Anderson, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    The gene designated BAB1_0591 in the Brucella abortus 2308 genome sequence encodes the manganese-cofactored superoxide dismutase SodA. An isogenic sodA mutant derived from B. abortus 2308, designated JB12, displays a small colony phenotype, increased sensitivity in vitro to endogenous superoxide generators, hydrogen peroxide and exposure to acidic pH, and a lag in growth when cultured in rich and minimal media that can be rescued by the addition of all 20 amino acids to the growth medium. B. abortus JB12 exhibits significant attenuation in both cultured murine macrophages and experimentally infected mice, but this attenuation is limited to the early stages of infection. Addition of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin to infected macrophages does not alleviate the attenuation exhibited by JB12, suggesting that the basis for the attenuation of the B. abortus sodA mutant is not an increased sensitivity to exogenous superoxide generated through the oxidative burst of host phagocytes. It is possible, however, that the increased sensitivity of the B. abortus sodA mutant to acid makes it less resistant than the parental strain to killing by the low pH encountered during the early stages of the development of the brucella-containing vacuoles in macrophages. These experimental findings support the proposed role for SodA as a major cytoplasmic antioxidant in brucella. Although this enzyme provides a clear benefit to B. abortus 2308 during the early stages of infection in macrophages and mice, SodA appears to be dispensable once the brucellae have established an infection. PMID:22556360

  7. Transcriptional regulator GntR of Brucella abortus regulates cytotoxicity, induces the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and affects expression of the type IV secretion system and quorum sensing system in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuli; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Jinliang; Xi, Li; Zhang, Junbo; Chen, Chuangfu

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms of Brucella are still poorly understood. GntR is a transcriptional regulator and plays an important role in the intracellular survival of Brucella. To investigate whether GntR is involved in the cytotoxicity of Brucella abortus (B. abortus), we created a 2308ΔgntR mutant of B. abortus 2308 (S2308). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assays using a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) show that high-dose infection with the parental strain produces a high level of cytotoxicity to macrophages, but the 2308ΔgntR mutant exhibits a very low level of cytotoxicity, indicating that mutation of GntR impairs the cytotoxicity of B. abortus to macrophages. After the macrophages are infected with 2308ΔgntR, the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) increase and are slightly higher than that for the S2308 infected group, indicating that the 2308ΔgntR mutant could induce the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The virulence factor detection experiments indicate that genes involved in the type IV secretion system (T4SS) and quorum sensing system (QSS) are down-regulated in 2308ΔgntR. The lower levels of survival of 2308ΔgntR under various stress conditions and the increased sensitivity of 2308ΔgntR to polymyxin B suggest that GntR is a virulence factor and that deletion of gntR reduces of B. abortus to stress conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GntR is involved in the cytotoxicity, virulence and intracellular survival of B. abortus during its infection.

  8. Roles of genomic island 3 (GI-3) BAB1_0267 and BAB1_0270 open reading frames (ORFs) in the virulence of Brucella abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Román, Luisa; Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; RobertoVidal; Oñate, Angel

    2014-08-06

    One of the properties of bacteria is their capacity to acquire large fragments of genomic DNA from other bacteria or to loose important parts of their own genome. Such fragments include genomic islands (GIs); nine GIs are present in Brucella, including genomic island 3 (GI-3), present in B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. ovis. The GI-3 have 29 open reading frames (ORFs) most of them with unknown function. Within the GI-3, the ORFs BAB1_0267 encodes a hypothetical protein sharing a SH3 domain and BAB1_270 a zinc-dependent metallopeptidase. We have obtained deletion mutants for BAB1_0267 and BAB1_0270 ORFs present within GI-3, which have been named the Δ0267 and Δ0270, respectively; in both cases the mutation did not affect the growth of bacteria. Both mutants were evaluated with respect to their growth rates, their ability to invade and replicate in the non-professional and professional phagocytes, HeLa and J774.A1 cells, respectively. Their persistence in the spleens of mice was also evaluated. The mutants efficiently invaded HeLa and J774.A1 cells but both mutants showed a decreased intracellular survival in macrophages and HeLa cells 72 and 96 h post-infection, respectively, and were non-detected in J774.A1 cells 120 h post infection. With respect to in vivo persistence Δ0267 was detected through the fourth week while Δ0270 decreased at 7 days disappearing the second week. Our results indicated that deletion of BAB1_0267 and BAB1_270 are necessary to establish an optimal infectious process in B. abortus 2308, having more effect the deletion of ORF BAB1_0270. Therefore these ORFs, principally BAB1_0270 are important virulent of B. abortus.

  9. The Attenuated Brucella abortus Strain 19 Invades, Persists in, and Activates Human Dendritic Cells, and Induces the Secretion of IL-12p70 but Not IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Mario; Eisenblätter, Martin; Jasny, Edith; Fehlings, Michael; Finke, Antje; Gayum, Hermine; Rüschendorf, Ursula; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Moos, Verena; Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Mielke, Martin E.; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vectors have been proposed as novel vaccine strategies to induce strong cellular immunity. Attenuated strains of Brucella abortus comprise promising vector candidates since they have the potential to induce strong CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell mediated immune responses in the absence of excessive inflammation as observed with other Gram-negative bacteria. However, some Brucella strains interfere with the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), which is essential for antigen-specific T-cell priming. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of human monocyte-derived DCs with the smooth attenuated B. abortus strain (S) 19, which has previously been employed successfully to vaccinate cattle. Methodology/Principal findings We first looked into the potential of S19 to hamper the cytokine-induced maturation of DCs; however, infected cells expressed CD25, CD40, CD80, and CD86 to a comparable extent as uninfected, cytokine-matured DCs. Furthermore, S19 activated DCs in the absence of exogeneous stimuli, enhanced the expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR, and was able to persist intracellularly without causing cytotoxicity. Thus, DCs provide a cellular niche for persisting brucellae in vivo as a permanent source of antigen. S19-infected DCs produced IL-12/23p40, IL-12p70, and IL-10, but not IL-23. While heat-killed bacteria also activated DCs, soluble mediators were not involved in S19-induced activation of human DCs. HEK 293 transfectants revealed cellular activation by S19 primarily through engagement of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2. Conclusions/Significance Thus, as an immunological prerequisite for vaccine efficacy, B. abortus S19 potently infects and potently activates (most likely via TLR2) human DCs to produce Th1-promoting cytokines. PMID:23805193

  10. Potential Role of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Joint Damage Induced by Brucella abortus Infection through Production and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; De Simone, Emilio A.; Vanzulli, Silvia I.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been elucidated. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are known to be central mediators of joint damage in inflammatory arthritides through the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade collagen and of cytokines and chemokines that mediate the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. In this study we show that Brucella abortus infects and replicates in human FLS (SW982 cell line) in vitro and that infection results in the production of MMP-2 and proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). Culture supernatants from Brucella-infected FLS induced the migration of monocytes and neutrophils in vitro and also induced these cells to secrete MMP-9 in a GM-CSF- and IL-6-dependent fashion, respectively. Reciprocally, culture supernatants from Brucella-infected monocytes and neutrophils induced FLS to produce MMP-2 in a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-dependent fashion. The secretion of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-2 by FLS did not depend on bacterial viability, since it was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) and by a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19). These responses were mediated by the recognition of B. abortus antigens through Toll-like receptor 2. The intra-articular injection of HKBA or L-Omp19 into the knee joint of mice resulted in the local induction of the proinflammatory mediators MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the generation of a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. These results suggest that FLS, and phagocytes recruited by them to the infection focus, may be involved in joint damage during brucellar arthritis through the production of MMPs and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:21730088

  11. Evaluation of the Recombinant 10-Kilodalton Immunodominant Region of the BP26 Protein of Brucella abortus for Specific Diagnosis of Bovine Brucellosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Subodh; Pal, Vijai; Bhardwaj, Bhupendra; Rai, Ganga Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Brucellosis is a disease with worldwide distribution affecting animals and human beings. Brucella abortus is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis. The cross-reactions of currently available diagnostic procedures for B. abortus infection result in false-positive reactions, which make the procedures unreliable. These tests are also unable to differentiate Brucella-infected and -vaccinated animals. The present work is focused on the use of a nonlipopolysaccharide (LPS) diagnostic antigen, a recombinant 10-kDa (r10-kDa) protein of B. abortus, for specific diagnosis of brucellosis. The purified recombinant protein was used as a diagnostic antigen in plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (p-ELISA) format to screen 408 bovine serum samples (70 presumptively negative, 308 random, and 30 vaccinated), and the results were compared with those of the Rose Bengal plate agglutination test (RBPT) and the standard tube agglutination test (STAT). Statistical analysis in presumptive negative samples revealed 100 and 98.41% specificity of p-ELISA with RBPT and STAT, and an agreement of 91.43% with the tests using Cohen's kappa statistics. In random samples, the agreement of p-ELISA was 77.92% and 80.52% with RBPT and STAT, respectively. p-ELISA investigation of vaccinated samples reported no false-positive results, whereas RBPT and STAT reported 30% and 96.6% false-positive results, respectively. The data suggest that p-ELISA with r10-kDa protein may be a useful method for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Furthermore, p-ELISA may also be used as a tool for differentiating Brucella-vaccinated and naturally infected animals. PMID:21852548

  12. Investigations concerning the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia abortus in sheep in correlation with management systems and abortion rate in Lower Saxony in 2004.

    PubMed

    Runge, Martin; Binder, Alfred; Schotte, Ulrich; Ganter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular bacteria Coxiella (C) burnetii and Chlamydia (Chl) abortus induce abortion in sheep and also affect humans. While Chl. abortus only infrequently infects humans, C burnetii is the aetiological agent of numerous Q fever outbreaks during the last decades. There is only limited knowledge about the prevalence of both pathogens in sheep, although sheep are involved in almost all Q fever outbreaks in Germany. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of both pathogens in flocks located in Lower Saxony, Germany, in correlation to the management form and abortion rate. Serum samples of 1714 sheep from 95 flocks located in Lower Saxony were investigated by ELISA. 2.7% of these samples were positive, 1.3% showed inconclusive results in the C. burnetii-ELISA. Elevated intra-flock seroprevalences were only detected in three migrating flocks. Chlamydia-specific antibodies could be detected in 15.1% serum samples of mainly shepherded and migrating flocks. In one of these flocks with a high intra-flock seroprevalence for C burnetii (27%) and Chlamydia (44.9%), C burnetii was detected in 21.6% of the placenta samples of normal births and in 12.5% of the colostrum samples by PCR. Aborted fetuses and the corresponding placentas were negative in C burnetii-PCR, but in most of them and also in many other placenta samples Chl. abortus could be detected by PCR and DNA microarray. This survey shows a low overall prevalence of C. burnetii in sheep in Lower Saxony in the year 2004. However, three migrating flocks with a high intra-flock prevalence are localized in the southern parts of Lower Saxony. Spreading of C burnetii could occur, because of the large radius of grazing of all three flocks.

  13. Antibody Responses to Recombinant Protein Fragments of the Major Outer Membrane Protein and Polymorphic Outer Membrane Protein POMP90 in Chlamydophila abortus-Infected Pregnant Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Morag; Entrican, Gary; Wattegedera, Sean; Buxton, David; McKendrick, Iain J.; Longbottom, David

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is one of the major causes of infectious abortion in pregnant sheep (enzootic abortion of ewes or EAE) worldwide. Organisms shed in infected placentas and uterine discharges at lambing time are the main sources of environmental contamination, responsible for transmission to susceptible animals and possible human contacts. In the present study, a recently developed test, based on a recombinant fragment of the polymorphic outer membrane protein POMP90 (rOMP90-4 indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [iELISA]) and one based on the variable segment 2 (VS2) region of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) (MOMP VS2 iELISA) were compared using sera from C. abortus-infected ewes at different stages throughout pregnancy. The rOMP90 iELISA detected antibody much earlier in pregnancy than the MOMP iELISA, which, like the complement fixation test, detected antibody only at the time of abortion or lambing. No anti-MOMP antibody response could be detected in three of seven experimentally infected ewes. Furthermore, the rOMP90 iELISA detected antibody in an animal that seroconverted during the course of the study, which the MOMP iELISA failed to detect. Overall, the results show that the rOMP90-4 iELISA is considerably more sensitive than the MOMP VS2 iELISA for identifying animals infected with C. abortus. Earlier detection of infection will allow appropriate control measures to be taken to reduce environmental contamination, thus limiting the spread of infection, financial losses, and the possible risks of zoonotic transmission to humans. PMID:15939753

  14. Critical role of ASC inflammasomes and bacterial type IV secretion system in caspase-1 activation and host innate resistance to Brucella abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Tulio R; Campos, Priscila C; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Corsetti, Patricia P; Bortoluci, Karina R; Cunha, Larissa D; Zamboni, Dario S; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2013-04-01

    Pathogens are detected by innate immune receptors that, upon activation, orchestrate an appropriate immune response. Recent studies revealed the intracellular signaling cascades involved in the TLR-initiated immune response to Brucella abortus infection. However, no report has elucidated the role of inflammasome receptors in Brucella recognition. Therefore, we decided to investigate the function of NLRC4, NLRP3, and AIM2 in sensing Brucella. In this study, we showed that NLRC4 is not required to induce caspase-1 activation and further secretion of IL-1β by B. abortus in macrophages. In contrast, we determined that AIM2, which senses Brucella DNA, and NLRP3 are partially required for caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion. Additionally, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species induced by Brucella were implicated in IL-1β production. Furthermore, AIM2, NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1 knockout mice were more susceptible to B. abortus infection than were wild-type animals, suggesting that multiple ASC-dependent inflammasomes contribute to host protection against infection. This protective effect is due to the inflammatory response caused by IL-1β and IL-18 rather than pyroptosis, because we observed augmented bacterial burden in IL-1R and IL-18 knockout mice. Finally, we determined that bacterial type IV secretion system VirB and live, but not heat-killed, Brucella are required for full inflammasome activation in macrophages during infection. Taken together, our results indicate that Brucella is sensed by ASC inflammasomes that collectively orchestrate a robust caspase-1 activation and proinflammatory response.

  15. Molecular prevalence of putative virulence-associated genes in Brucella melitensis and Brucella abortus isolates from human and livestock specimens in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hashemifar, Iman; Yadegar, Abbas; Jazi, Faramarz Masjedian; Amirmozafari, Nour

    2017-04-01

    Molecular prevalence of nine putative virulence factors in two more prevalent Brucella species in Iranian patients and livestock was investigated. During five years (2010-2015), 120 human and animal specimens were collected from three geographical areas of Iran. All samples were cultured in blood culture media and subcultured into Brucella agar medium. Nine primer pairs were designed for detection of VirB2, VirB5, VceC, BtpA, BtpB, PrpA, BetB, BPE275 and BSPB virulence factors using PCR and sequence analysis. Totally, 68 Brucella isolates including 60 B. melitensis and 8 B. abortus were isolated from the human and animal specimens examined. Approximately, all B. melitensis and B. abortus strains were positive (100%) regarding btpA, btpB, virB5, vceC, bpe275, bspB, and virB2 genes except for prpA and betB that were detected in 86% and 97% of the strains, respectively. Significant relationships were found between the presence of prpA and human B. melitensis isolates (P = 0.04), and also between the presence of betB and human isolates of B. abortus (P = 0.03). In conclusion, our results revealed that Iranian Brucella strains, regardless of human or animal sources, are extremely virulent due to high prevalence of virulence attributes in almost all strains studied.

  16. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1985-06-01

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cells from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.

  17. Cytokine response of T-cell subsets from Brucella abortus-infected mice to soluble Brucella proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Yang, J; Cheers, C

    1993-01-01

    Hot saline extracts of Brucella abortus 19 were separated by successive differential precipitation with 50 and 70% ammonium sulfate, yielding fractions SBP50, with predominantly 36-kDa proteins and a number of medium-sized proteins (26 to 33 kDa), and SBP70, with 14-kDa and lower-molecular-mass proteins. Both fractions stimulated specifically proliferation and cytokine production by spleen cells from brucella-infected mice, although the activity of SBP50 was much higher than that of SBP70. Further separation of SBP50 by a DEAE-Sepharose column resulted in three distinct subfractions which were confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The three subfractions were analyzed for their abilities to induce lymphocytes to proliferate and produce cytokines. The three subfractions were all active but with characteristic differences in magnitude. Subfraction 1 stimulated moderate proliferation, high interleukin 6 (IL-6) production, and relatively low production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Subfraction 2 was the strongest stimulus for proliferation and production of IL-6 and IFN-gamma, while subfraction 3 stimulated moderate cell proliferation, a high level of IFN-gamma, and a low level of IL-6. IL-2 production stimulated by the three subfractions was similar. SBP50 and all three subfractions stimulated purified T cells of both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets to produce IFN-gamma. The production of IFN-gamma by CD8+ T cells to brucella antigens was enhanced with exogenous IL-2. Images PMID:8514387

  18. Inhibitory effect of an ethanol extract of a rice bran mixture including Angelica gigas, Cnidium officinale, Artemisia princeps and Camellia sinensis on Brucella abortus uptake by professional and non-professional phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Baek, Eun Jin; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Chun Hee; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-09-05

    In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of a rice bran mixture extract (RBE) on Brucella (B.) abortus pathogenesis in professional (RAW 264.7) and non-professional (HeLa) phagocytes. We fermented the rice bran mixture and then extracted with 50% ethanol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify components in RBE. Our results clearly showed that RBE caused a significant reduction in the adherence of B. abortus in both cell lines. Furthermore, analysis of phagocytic signaling proteins by Western blot revealed that RBE pretreatment resulted in inhibition of phosphorylation of JNK, ERK and p38, leading to decline of internalization compared with the controls. Additionally, the intensity of F-actin observed by fluorescence microscopy and FACS was remarkably reduced in RBE-pretreated cells compared with control cells. However, the intracellular replication of B. abortus within phagocytes was not affected by RBE. Taken together, these findings suggest that the phagocytic receptor blocking and suppressive effects of RBE on the MAPK-linked phagocytic signaling pathway could negatively affect the invasion of B. abortus into phagocytes.

  19. Exploring the Molecular Basis for Binding of Inhibitors by Threonyl-tRNA Synthetase from Brucella abortus: A Virtual Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Fang; Zhao, Shengguo; Wang, Pengpeng; Li, Songli; Zhang, Yangdong; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    Targeting threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) of Brucella abortus is a promising approach to developing small-molecule drugs against bovine brucellosis. Using the BLASTp algorithm, we identified ThrRS from Escherichia coli (EThrRS, PDB ID 1QF6), which is 51% identical to ThrRS from Brucella abortus (BaThrRS) at the amino acid sequence level. EThrRS was used as the template to construct a BaThrRS homology model which was optimized using molecular dynamics simulations. To determine the residues important for substrate ATP binding, we identified the ATP-binding regions of BaThrRS, docked ATP to the protein, and identified the residues whose side chains surrounded bound ATP. We then used the binding site of ATP to virtually screen for BaThrRS inhibitors and got seven leads. We further characterized the BaThrRS-binding site of the compound with the highest predicted inhibitory activity. Our results should facilitate future experimental effects to find novel drugs for use against bovine brucellosis. PMID:27447614

  20. Comparison between Immunization Routes of Live Attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium Strains Expressing BCSP31, Omp3b, and SOD of Brucella abortus in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won K.; Moon, Ja Y.; Kim, Suk; Hur, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Live, attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine candidate expressing BCSP31, Omp3b, and SOD proteins of Brucella abortus was constructed. Thirty BALB/c mice were divided equally into three groups, Group A, were intraperitoneally (IP) inoculated with 100 μl of approximately 1.2 × 106 colony-forming units (CFUs)/ml of the Salmonella containing vector only in 100 μl as a control. And groups B and C mice were orally and IP immunized with approximately 1.2 × 109 CFU/ml of the mixture of three delivery strains in 10 μl and IP immunized with approximately 1.2 × 106 CFU/ml of the mixture in 100 μl, respectively. The serum IgG, TNF-α and IFN-γ concentrations in groups B (except Omp3b) and C were significantly higher than those in group A. Following challenge with B. abortus strain 544; challenge strain was detected <103 CFU from the spleen of all mice of group C. These results suggest that IP immunization with the mixture of the vaccine candidate can induce immune responses, and can effectively protect mice against brucellosis. PMID:27148232

  1. Immune and mitogenic responses by BALB/c, C3H/HeJ, and nude mice to Brucella abortus bacterin and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Spellman, J M; Reed, N D

    1979-05-01

    The immunogenic and mitogenic properties of Brucella abortus 1119-3 bacterin (BA) and biologically active B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (BA-LPS) were studied using normal and athymic (nude) BALB/c and C3H/HeJ mice. Although BA stimulated 2-mercaptoethanol-sensitive (2-ME-S) primary and secondary antibody responses in all mice, nude mice, in contrast to normal BALB/c and C3H/HeJ mice, did not make substantial 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant (2-ME-R) antibody responses. Similarly, all mice injected with BA-LPS made 2-ME-S primary responses, and the secondary response of thymus-bearing mice contained a substantial 2-ME-R component. Collectively, these observations suggest that although both BA and BA-LPS can stimulate thymus-independent 2-ME-S antibody synthesis, thymus-derived cells are required for optimal immune responses containing a 2-ME-R component. The antibody responses of normal BALB/c and C3H/HeJ mice to BA and BA-LPS were qualitatively and quantitatively similar. Both BA and BA-LPS were mitogenic for spleen cells from normal and nude BALB/c and C3H/HeJ mice but not for thymus cells from normal BALB/c or C3H/HeJ mice, suggesting that both preparations are B-cell mitogens.

  2. Evaluation of four DNA extraction protocols for Brucella abortus detection by PCR in tissues from experimentally infected cows with the 2308 strain.

    PubMed

    Vejarano, M P; Matrone, M; Keid, L B; Rocha, V C M; Ikuta, C Y; Rodriguez, C A R; Salgado, V R; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Telles, E O; Ferreira Neto, J S

    2013-04-01

    This study compared 4 protocols for DNA extraction from homogenates of 6 different organs of cows infected with the Brucella abortus 2308 strain. The extraction protocols compared were as follows: GT (guanidine isothiocyanate lysis), Boom (GT lysis with the carrying suspension diatomaceous earth), PK (proteinase K lysis), and Santos (lysis by boiling and freezing with liquid nitrogen). Positive and negative gold standard reference groups were generated by classical bacteriological methods. All samples were processed with the 4 DNA extraction protocols and amplified with the B4 and B5 primers. The number of positive samples in the placental cotyledons was higher than that in the other organs. The cumulated results showed that the Santos protocol was more sensitive than the Boom (p=0.003) and GT (p=0.0506) methods and was similar to the PK method (p=0.2969). All of the DNA extraction protocols resulted in false-negative results for PCR. In conclusion, despite the disadvantages of classical bacteriological methods, the best approach for direct diagnosis of B. abortus in organs of infected cows includes the isolation associated with PCR of DNA extracted from the cotyledon by the Santos or PK methods.

  3. Vaccination of adult animals with a reduced dose of Brucella abortus S19 vaccine to control brucellosis on dairy farms in endemic areas of India.

    PubMed

    Chand, Puran; Chhabra, Rajesh; Nagra, Juhi

    2015-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis is an economically important disease which seriously affects dairy farming by causing colossal losses. It can be controlled by practicing vaccination of animals with Brucella abortus S19 vaccine (S19 vaccine). In the present study, adult bovines were vaccinated on seven dairy farms with a reduced dose of S19 vaccine to control brucellosis. Serological screening of adult animals (N = 1,082) by Rose Bengal test (RBT) and ELISA prior to vaccination revealed the presence and absence of brucellosis on five and two farms, respectively. The positive animals (N = 171) were segregated and those which tested negative (N = 911) were vaccinated by conjunctival route with a booster after 4 months. The conjunctival vaccination induced weak antibody response in animals, which vanished within a period of 9 to 12 weeks. Abortion in 12 animals at various stages of pregnancy and post-vaccination was recorded, but none was attributed to S19 vaccine. However, virulent B. abortus was incriminated in six heifers, and the cause of abortion could not be established in six animals. The six aborted heifers perhaps acquired infection through in utero transmission or from the environment which remained undetected until abortion. These findings suggested that vaccination of adult animals with a reduced dose of S19 vaccine by conjunctival route did not produce adverse effects like abortion in pregnant animals and persistent vaccinal antibody titers, which are the major disadvantages of subcutaneous vaccination of adult animals.

  4. Intermediate rough Brucella abortus S19Δper mutant is DIVA enable, safe to pregnant guinea pigs and confers protection to mice.

    PubMed

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Gogia, Neha; Goswami, Tapas K; Singh, R K; Chaudhuri, Pallab

    2015-05-21

    Brucella abortus S19 is a smooth strain used as live vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for its residual virulence and serological interference. Rough mutants defective of LPS are more attenuated but confers lower level of protection. We describe a modified B. abortus S19 strain, named as S19Δper, which exhibits intermediate rough phenotype with residual O-polysaccharide (OPS). Deletion of perosamine synthetase gene resulted in substantial attenuation of S19Δper mutant without affecting immunogenic properties. It mounted strong immune response in Swiss albino mice and conferred protection similar to S19 vaccine. Immunized mice produced higher levels of IFN-γ, IgG2a and thus has immune response inclined towards Th1 cell mediated immunity. Sera from immunized animals did not show agglutination reaction with RBPT antigen and thus could serve as DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine. S19Δper mutant displayed more susceptibility to serum complement mediated killing and sensitivity to polymyxin B. Pregnant guinea pigs injected with S19Δper mutant completed full term of pregnancy and did not cause abortion, still birth or birth of weak offspring. S19Δper mutant with intermediate rough phenotype displayed remarkable resemblance to S19 vaccine strain with improved properties of safety, immunogenicity and DIVA capability for control of bovine brucellosis.

  5. The protoxin Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis improves the protection conferred by intranasal immunization with Brucella abortus RB51 in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    González-González, Edith; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; López-Santiago, Rubén; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2015-02-25

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease affecting many people and animals worldwide. Preventing this infection requires improving vaccination strategies. The protoxin Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis is an adjuvant that, in addition to increasing the immunogenicity of different antigens, has shown to be protective in different models of parasitic infections. The objective of the present study was to test whether the intranasal co-administration of pCry1Ac with the RB51 vaccine strain of Brucella abortus confers protection against an intranasal challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 in BALB/c mice. The results showed that co-administration of pCry1Ac and RB51, increased the immunoprotection conferred by the vaccine as evidenced by the following: (1) decrease of the splenic bacterial load when challenged intranasally with the virulent strain; (2) greater in vivo cytotoxic activity in response to the transference of previously infected cells; (3) further proliferation of cytotoxic TCD8+ cells in response to stimulation with heat-inactivated bacteria; (4) increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ; and (5) significant IgG2a response. These results indicate that the use of the Cry1Ac protein as a mucosal adjuvant via the intranasal route can be a promising alternative for improving current RB51 vaccine against brucellosis.

  6. The identification of wadB, a new glycosyltransferase gene, confirms the branched structure and the role in virulence of the lipopolysaccharide core of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Yolanda; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Palacios-Chaves, Leyre; Zúñiga-Ripa, Amaia; Grilló, María-Jesús; Arce-Gorvel, Vilma; Hanniffy, Sean; Moriyón, Ignacio; Iriarte, Maite

    2014-08-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide extended zoonosis caused by Brucella spp. These gram-negative bacteria are not readily detected by innate immunity, a virulence-related property largely linked to their surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The role of the LPS lipid A and O-polysaccharide in virulence is well known. Moreover, mutation of the glycosyltransferase gene wadC of Brucella abortus, although not affecting O-polysaccharide assembly onto the lipid-A core section causes a core oligosaccharide defect that increases recognition by innate immunity. Here, we report on a second gene (wadB) encoding a LPS core glycosyltransferase not involved in the assembly of the O-polysaccharide-linked core section. As compared to wild-type B. abortus, a wadB mutant was sensitive to bactericidal peptides and non-immune serum, and was attenuated in mice and dendritic cells. These observations show that as WadC, WadB is also involved in the assembly of a branch of Brucella LPS core and support the concept that this LPS section is a virulence-related structure.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of cgs, the Brucella abortus Cyclic β(1-2) Glucan Synthetase Gene: Genetic Complementation of Rhizobium meliloti ndvB and Agrobacterium tumefaciens chvB Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iñón de Iannino, Nora; Briones, Gabriel; Tolmasky, Marcelo; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    1998-01-01

    The animal pathogen Brucella abortus contains a gene, cgs, that complemented a Rhizobium meliloti nodule development (ndvB) mutant and an Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal virulence (chvB) mutant. The complemented strains recovered the synthesis of cyclic β(1-2) glucan, motility, virulence in A. tumefaciens, and nitrogen fixation in R. meliloti; all traits were strictly associated with the presence of an active cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthetase protein in the membranes. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the presence in B. abortus of an 8.49-kb open reading frame coding for a predicted membrane protein of 2,831 amino acids (316.2 kDa) and with 51% identity to R. meliloti NdvB. Four regions of the B. abortus protein spanning amino acids 520 to 800, 1025 to 1124, 1284 to 1526, and 2400 to 2660 displayed similarities of higher than 80% with R. meliloti NdvB. Tn3-HoHo1 mutagenesis showed that the C-terminal 825 amino acids of the Brucella protein, although highly conserved in Rhizobium, are not necessary for cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthesis. Confirmation of the identity of this protein as B. abortus cyclic β(1-2) glucan synthetase was done by the construction of a B. abortus Tn3-HoHo1 insertion mutant that does not form cyclic β(1-2) glucan and lacks the 316.2-kDa membrane protein. The recovery of this mutant from the spleens of inoculated mice was decreased by 3 orders of magnitude compared with that of the parental strain; this result suggests that cyclic β(1-2) glucan may be a virulence factor in Brucella infection. PMID:9721274

  8. A diagnostic protocol to identify water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tittarelli, Manuela; Atzeni, Marcello; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Ferri, Nicola; Marchi, Enrico; Martucciello, Alessandra; De Massis, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The use of live vaccine strain RB51 for vaccination of domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) at risk of infection with Brucella abortus is permitted notwithstanding the plans for the eradication and only under strict veterinary control. The antibodies induced by RB51 vaccination are not detectable using conventional diagnostic techniques; therefore, it is necessary to have a specific diagnostic tool able to discriminate vaccinated from unvaccinated animals. The combination of a complement fixation test (CFT) with specific RB51 antigen (RB51-CFT) and a brucellin skin test has been demonstrated to be a reliable diagnostic system to identify single cattle (Bos taurus) vaccinated with RB51. So far, no data are available in the international scientific literature regarding the use of this test association in water buffalo. For this reason the suitability of this test combination has been evaluated in a water buffalo herd. One hundred twenty-seven animals farmed in a herd of Salerno province (Campania, Southern Italy), in the context of a presumptive unauthorized use of RB51 vaccine were chosen for this study. All tested animals resulted negative to Rose Bengal test (RBT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for the detection of specific antibodies against Brucella field strains. Seventy-one animals (56%) developed RB51 antigen-specific CFT (RB51-CFT) antibodies against RB51 vaccine in a first sampling, while 104 animals (82%) gave positive result to a second serum sampling conducted 11 days after the intradermal inoculation of the RB51 brucellin. One hundred and seven animals (84%) showed a positive reaction to the RB51-CFT in at least 1 sampling, while 111 animals (87%) resulted positive to the RB51 brucellin skin test. Thus, analysing the results of the 3 testing in parallel, 119 animals (94%) were positive to at least 1 of the performed tests. The results suggest that the use in parallel of the RB51 brucellin skin test with RB51-CFT may represent a reliable

  9. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Bruns, Cami K.; Belzer, Carol A.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Kroll, J. Simon; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2015-10-12

    Bacterial pathogens Neisseria meningitidis and Brucella abortus pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute N. meningitidis infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen, general pathogenicity factors and therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at N. meningitidis SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomic details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and SOD from B. abortus (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes and suggest general targets for anti-bacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors or vaccines against these harmful pathogens.

    IMPORTANCE By

  10. Serological profile of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) female calves vaccinated with standard Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine using rose bengal, 2-mercaptoethanol and complement fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Nardi, G Júnior; Ribeiro, M G; Jorge, A M; Megid, J; Silva, L M P

    2012-03-01

    The serological profiles of 21 female buffaloes vaccinated between 3 and 8 months of age using Brucella abortus strain 19 (S19) were evaluated by rose bengal (RBT), 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) and complement fixation (CFT) tests. The serum strains were collected in day zero, 15, 30, 45, 60th days and subsequently to each 30 months, until 720th day after vaccination. No animal showed reaction in day zero. In 15th day above 95% of animals revealed reaction in all tests. All the animals presented absence of reactions in CFT, RBT and 2ME tests at 270, 300 and 360 days after vaccination, respectively. Our finding highlighted early response in CFT compared than other conventional agglutination tests. None of animals presented oscillation of titers or reactions in any test after 360 day of study, which enables the use of these tests after this period without interference of antibodies from S19 vaccine origin between 3 and 8 months in buffalo heifers.

  11. Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Are Necessary for the Recruitment of CD8+ T Cells in the Liver in a Pregnant Mouse Model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Oca, Roberto Montes; Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Sánchez, Joaquín; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80+ cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8+ T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response. PMID:10679002

  12. Protective immunity elicited by a divalent DNA vaccine encoding both the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can.

  13. Oral vaccination with microencapsuled strain 19 vaccine confers enhanced protection against Brucella abortus strain 2308 challenge in red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-10-01

    Bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), USA, are infected with Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, and they serve as a wildlife reservoir for the disease. Bovine brucellosis recently has been transmitted from infected elk to cattle in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho and has resulted in their loss of brucellosis-free status. An efficacious Brucella vaccine with a delivery system suitable for wildlife would be a valuable tool in a disease prevention and control program. We evaluated Strain 19 (S19) in a sustained release vehicle consisting of alginate microspheres containing live vaccine. In a challenge study using red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) as a model for elk, alginate, a naturally occurring polymer combined with a protein of Fasciola hepatica vitelline protein B was used to microencapsulate S19. Red deer were orally or subcutaneously immunized with 1.5 x 10(10) colony-forming units (CFUs) using microencapsulated S19. Humoral and cellular profiles were analyzed bimonthly throughout the study. The vaccinated red deer and nonvaccinated controls were challenged 1 yr postimmunization conjunctivally with 1 x 10(9) CFUs of B. abortus strain 2308. Red deer vaccinated with oral microencapsulated S19 had a statistically significant lower bacterial tissue load compared with controls. These data indicate for the first time that protection against Brucella-challenge can be achieved by combining a commonly used vaccine with a novel oral delivery system such as alginate-vitelline protein B microencapsulation. This system is a potential improvement for efficacious Brucella-vaccine delivery to wildlife in the GYA.

  14. Structure-based mutational studies of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase reveal the reason for the loss of cysteine synthase complex formation in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Dharavath, Sudhaker; Raj, Isha; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2017-03-23

    Cysteine biosynthesis takes place via a two-step pathway in bacteria, fungi, plants and protozoan parasites, but not in humans, and hence, the machinery of cysteine biosynthesis is an opportune target for therapeutics. The decameric cysteine synthase complex (CSC) is formed when the C-terminal tail of serine acetyltransferase (SAT) binds in the active site of O-acetylserine sulfydrylase (OASS), playing a role in the regulation of this pathway. Here, we show that OASS from Brucella abortus (BaOASS) does not interact with its cognate SAT C-terminal tail. Crystal structures of native BaOASS showed that residues Gln96 and Tyr125 occupy the active-site pocket and interfere with the entry of the SAT C-terminal tail. The BaOASS (Q96A-Y125A) mutant showed relatively strong binding (Kd = 32.4 μM) to BaSAT C-terminal peptides in comparison with native BaOASS. The mutant structure looks similar except that the active-site pocket has enough space to bind the SAT C-terminal end. Surface plasmon resonance results showed a relatively strong (7.3 μM Kd) interaction between BaSAT and the BaOASS (Q96A-Y125A), but no interaction with native BaOASS. Taken together, our observations suggest that the CSC does not form in B. abortus. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Antigenic, Immunologic and Genetic Characterization of Rough Strains B.abortus RB51, B.melitensis B115 and B.melitensis B18

    PubMed Central

    Adone, Rosanna; Muscillo, Michele; La Rosa, Giuseppina; Francia, Massimiliano; Tarantino, Michela

    2011-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered the major virulent factor in Brucella spp. Several genes have been identified involved in the synthesis of the three LPS components: lipid A, core and O-PS. Usually, Brucella strains devoid of O-PS (rough mutants) are less virulent than the wild type and do not induce undesirable interfering antibodies. Such of them proved to be protective against brucellosis in mice. Because of these favorable features, rough strains have been considered potential brucellosis vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the antigenic, immunologic and genetic characteristics of rough strains B.abortus RB51, B.melitensis B115 and B.melitensis B18. RB51 derived from B.abortus 2308 virulent strain and B115 is a natural rough strain in which the O-PS is present in the cytoplasm. B18 is a rough rifampin-resistan mutant isolated in our laboratory. The surface antigenicity of RB51, B115 and B18 was evaluated by testing their ability to bind antibodies induced by rough or smooth Brucella strains. The antibody response induced by each strain was evaluated in rabbits. Twenty-one genes, involved in the LPS-synthesis, were sequenced and compared with the B.melitensis 16M strain. The results indicated that RB51, B115 and B18 have differences in antigenicity, immunologic and genetic properties. Particularly, in B115 a nonsense mutation was detected in wzm gene, which could explain the intracellular localization of O-PS in this strain. Complementation studies to evaluate the precise role of each mutation in affecting Brucella morphology and its virulence, could provide useful information for the assessment of new, attenuated vaccines for brucellosis. PMID:22065984

  16. The Dutch Brucella abortus monitoring programme for cattle: the impact of false-positive serological reactions and comparison of serological tests.

    PubMed

    Emmerzaal, A; de Wit, J J; Dijkstra, Th; Bakker, D; van Zijderveld, F G

    2002-02-01

    The Dutch national Brucella abortus eradication programme for cattle started in 1959. Sporadic cases occurred yearly until 1995; the last infected herd was culled in 1996. In August 1999 the Netherlands was declared officially free of bovine brucellosis by the European Union. Before 1999, the programme to monitor the official Brucella-free status of bovine herds was primarily based on periodical testing of dairy herds with the milk ring test (MRT) and serological testing of all animals older than 1 year of age from non-dairy herds, using the micro-agglutination test (MAT) as screening test. In addition, serum samples of cattle that aborted were tested with the MAT. The high number of false positive reactions in both tests and the serum agglutination test (SAT) and complement fixation test (CFT) used for confirmation seemed to result in unnecessary blockade of herds, subsequent testing and slaughter of animals. For this reason, a validation study was performed in which three indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), the CFT and the SAT were compared using a panel of sera from brucellosis-free cattle, sera from experimentally infected cattle, and sera from cattle experimentally infected with bacteria which are known to induce cross-reactive antibodies (Pasteurella, Salmonella, Yersinia, and Escherichia). Moreover, four ELISAs and the MRT were compared using a panel of 1000 bulk milk samples from Brucella-free herds and 12 milk samples from Brucella abortus- infected cattle. It is concluded that the ELISA obtained from ID-Lelystad is the most suitable test to monitor the brucelosis free status of herds because it gives rise to fewer false-positive reactions than the SAT.

  17. Vaccination with recombinant flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN induce protection against Brucella abortus 544 infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianbo; Xu, Jie; Xie, Yongfei; Qiu, Yefeng; Fu, Simei; Yuan, Xitong; Ke, Yuehua; Yu, Shuang; Du, Xinying; Cui, Mingquan; Chen, Yanfen; Wang, Tongkun; Wang, Zhoujia; Yu, Yaqing; Huang, Kehe; Huang, Liuyu; Peng, Guangneng; Chen, Zeliang; Wang, Yufei

    2012-12-28

    Brucella has been considered as a non-motile, facultative intracellular pathogenic bacterium. However, the genome sequences of different Brucella species reveal the presence of the flagellar genes needed for the construction of a functional flagellum. Due to its roles in the interaction between pathogen and host, we hypothesized that some of the flagellar proteins might induce protective immune responses and these proteins will be good subunit vaccine candidates. This study was conducted to screening of protective antigens among these flagellar proteins. Firstly, according to the putative functional roles, a total of 30 flagellar genes of Brucella abortus were selected for in vitro expression. 15 of these flagellar genes were successfully expressed as his-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli ER2566. Then, these proteins were purified and used to analyze their T cell immunity induction activity by an in vitro gamma interferon (IFN-γ) assay. Five of the flagellar proteins could stimulate significantly higher levels of IFN-γ secretion in splenocytes from S19 immunized mice, indicating their T cell induction activity. Finally, immunogenicity and protection activity of these 5 flagellar proteins were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Results showed that immunization with FlgJ (BAB1_0260) or FliN (BAB2_0122) plus adjuvant could provide protection against B. abortus 544 infection. Furthermore, mice immunized with FlgJ and FliN developed a vigorous immunoglobulin G response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with immunizing proteins induced the secretion of IFN-γ. Altogether, these data suggest that flagellar proteins FlgJ and FliN are protective antigens that could produce humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice and candidates for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis.

  18. Identification of an IS711 Element Interrupting the wboA Gene of Brucella abortus Vaccine Strain RB51 and a PCR Assay To Distinguish Strain RB51 from Other Brucella Species and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Vemulapalli, Ramesh; McQuiston, John R.; Schurig, Gerhardt G.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Halling, Shirley M.; Boyle, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 is a natural stable attenuated rough mutant derived from the virulent strain 2308. The genetic mutations that are responsible for the roughness and the attenuation of strain RB51 have not been identified until now. Also, except for an assay based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, no other simple method to differentiate strain RB51 from its parent strain 2308 is available. In the present study, we demonstrate that the wboA gene encoding a glycosyltransferase, an enzyme essential for the synthesis of O antigen, is disrupted by an IS711 element in B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Exploiting this feature, we developed a PCR assay that distinguishes strain RB51 from all other Brucella species and strains tested. PMID:10473532

  19. A prospective study of sheep and goat abortion using real-time polymerase chain reaction and cut point estimation shows Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydophila abortus infection concurrently with other major pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Murray J; McDowall, Rebeccah; DeLay, Josepha; Stalker, Margaret; McEwen, Beverly; van Dreumel, Tony; Spinato, Maria; Binnington, Brian; Slavic, Durda; Carman, Susy; Cai, Hugh Y

    2013-05-01

    From 2009 to 2011, 163 sheep and 96 goat abortion submissions were received at the Animal Health Laboratory, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, for gross and histologic examination, as well as real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for Chlamydophila abortus and/or Coxiella burnetii. Additional testing included immunohistochemistry for Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydophila spp., routine bacterial culture and selective culture for Campylobacter spp., examination of modified acid-fast-stained placenta smears, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing for Chlamydophila spp., and virus isolation. The final diagnosis made for each case by individual pathologists, based on gross and histologic lesions, as well as ancillary testing, was used as a standard to determine the significance of C. abortus and C. burnetii infection. Coxiella burnetii was identified by real-time PCR in 113 of 163 (69.0%) and 72 of 96 (75%) sheep and goat abortion submissions, respectively, but was considered to be significant in causing abortion in only 11 of 113 (10%) sheep and 15 out of 72 (21%) goat submissions that tested positive. Chlamydophila abortus was identified by real-time PCR in 42 of 162 (26%) and 54 of 92 (59%) sheep and goat submissions, respectively, but was considered the cause of the abortion in 16 of 42 (38%) sheep and 34 of 54 (63%) goat submissions that tested positive. Optimal sensitivity and specificity cut points for the real-time PCR copy number for C. abortus and C. burnetii were determined using the final pathology diagnosis as the reference test.

  20. Novel influenza virus vectors expressing Brucella L7/L12 or Omp16 proteins in cattle induced a strong T-cell immune response, as well as high protectiveness against B. abortus infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Yespembetov, Bolat; Zinina, Nadezhda; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Kozhamkulov, Yerken; Inkarbekov, Dulat; Gotskina, Tatyana; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents the results of a study of the immunogenicity and protectiveness of new candidate vector vaccine against Brucella abortus - a bivalent vaccine formulation consisting of a mixture of recombinant influenza A subtype H5N1 or H1N1 (viral constructs vaccine formulation) viruses expressing Brucella ribosomal protein L7/L12 and Omp16, in cattle. To increase the effectiveness of the candidate vaccine, adjuvants such as Montanide Gel01 or chitosan were included in its composition. Immunization of cattle (heifers aged 1-1.5 years, 5 animals per group) with the viral constructs vaccine formulation only, or its combination with adjuvants Montanide Gel01 or chitosan, was conducted via the conjunctival method using cross prime (influenza virus subtype H5N1) and booster (influenza virus subtype H1N1) vaccination schedules at an interval of 28 days. Vaccine candidates were evaluated in comparison with the positive (B. abortus S19) and negative (PBS) controls. The viral constructs vaccine formulations, particularly in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant promoted formation of IgG antibodies (with a predominance of antibodies of isotype IgG2a) against Brucella L7/L12 and Omp16 proteins in ELISA. Moreover, these vaccines in cattle induced a strong antigen-specific T-cell immune response, as indicated by a high number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, as well as the concentration of IFN-γ, and most importantly provided a high level of protectiveness comparable to the commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine and superior to the B. abortus S19 vaccine in combination with Montanide Gel01 adjuvant. Based on these findings, we recommended the bivalent vaccine formulation containing the adjuvant Montanide Gel01 for practical use in cattle.

  1. Herd-level prevalence and associated risk factors for Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Chlamydia abortus and bovine viral diarrhoea virus in commercial dairy and beef cattle in eastern, northern and northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wu-Wen; Meng, Qing-Feng; Cong, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Chun-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Although the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Chlamydia abortus and bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in cattle have been reported in some areas in China, most of them were conducted with small number of cattle samples and very limited districts and neglected the assessment of herd management factors associated with herd-level prevalence of these pathogen infections. Thus, from September 2013 to December 2014, a large-scale seroprevalence study was conducted to determine the animal-level and herd-level seroprevalence and identify herd-level risk factors associated with these pathogen infections in 4487 cattle from 134 herds in five provinces (Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning, Shandong, Hebei) and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. At animal level, the true prevalence of antibodies against T. gondii, N. caninum, C. abortus and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) was 10.48, 17.14, 11.92 and 50.10%, respectively. At herd level, the true prevalence of antibodies against T. gondii, N. caninum, C. abortus and BVDV was 27.16, 29.10, 37.31 and 40.30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis of these characteristics showed that source of water and presence of felids were significantly associated with T. gondii infection in the studied cattle herds. Source of water was significantly associated with N. caninum infection in the studied cattle herds. While herd size and management system were significantly associated with BVDV infection in the studied cattle herds, this is the first report of herd-level prevalence and associated risk factors of T. gondii, N. caninum, C. abortus and BVDV infection in cattle in China.

  2. The bhuQ gene encodes a heme oxygenase that contributes to the ability of Brucella abortus 2308 to use heme as an iron source and is regulated by Irr.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Jenifer F; Martinson, David A; Menscher, Evan A; Roop, R Martin

    2012-08-01

    The Brucella BhuQ protein is a homolog of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum heme oxygenases HmuD and HmuQ. To determine if this protein plays a role in the ability of Brucella abortus 2308 to use heme as an iron source, an isogenic bhuQ mutant was constructed and its phenotype evaluated. Although the Brucella abortus bhuQ mutant DCO1 did not exhibit a defect in its capacity to use heme as an iron source or evidence of increased heme toxicity in vitro, this mutant produced increased levels of siderophore in response to iron deprivation compared to 2308. Introduction of a bhuQ mutation into the B. abortus dhbC mutant BHB2 (which cannot produce siderophores) resulted in a severe growth defect in the dhbC bhuQ double mutant JFO1 during cultivation under iron-restricted conditions, which could be rescued by the addition of FeCl(3), but not heme, to the growth medium. The bhuQ gene is cotranscribed with the gene encoding the iron-responsive regulator RirA, and both of these genes are repressed by the other major iron-responsive regulator in the alphaproteobacteria, Irr. The results of these studies suggest that B. abortus 2308 has at least one other heme oxygenase that works in concert with BhuQ to allow this strain to efficiently use heme as an iron source. The genetic organization of the rirA-bhuQ operon also provides the basis for the proposition that BhuQ may perform a previously unrecognized function by allowing the transcriptional regulator RirA to recognize heme as an iron source.

  3. Immunogenicity and Protective Response Induced by Recombinant Plasmids Based on the BAB1_0267 and BAB1_0270 Open Reading Frames of Brucella abortus 2308 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Leonardo A.; Alvarez, Francisco I.; Fernández, Pablo A.; Flores, Manuel R.; Molina, Raúl E.; Coloma, Roberto F.; Oñate, Angel A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenicity induced by recombinant plasmids based on the BAB1_0267 and BAB1_0270 open reading frames (ORFs) of Brucella abortus 2308 was evaluated. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that the BAB1_0267 and BAB1_0270 ORFs encode a protein with a SH3 domain and a Zn-dependent metalloproteinase, respectively. Both ORFs have important effects on intracellular survival and replication of B. abortus 2308, mediated via professional and non-professional phagocytic cells. Our results show that immunization with the recombinant plasmid based on the BAB1_0267 ORF significantly increases the production of IgG1, levels of IFN-γ and the lymphoproliferative response of splenocytes. However, BAB1_0267 did not provide significant levels of protection. The plasmid based on the BAB1_0270 significantly increased IgG2a production, levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and the lymphoproliferative response of splenocytes. These results demonstrate that immunization with the BAB1_0270 derived recombinant plasmid induce a Th1-type immune response, correlated with a heightened resistance to B. abortus 2308 infection in mice. It is concluded that the Th1-type immune response against bacterial Zn-dependent metalloproteinase induces a protective response in mice, and that pV270 recombinant plasmid is an effective candidate microbicide against brucellosis. PMID:27747197

  4. Protective effect of a DNA vaccine containing an open reading frame with homology to an ABC-type transporter present in the genomic island 3 of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Retamal-Díaz, Angello; Acuña, Francisca; Riquelme, Pablo; Rivera, Alejandra; Sáez, Darwin; Oñate, Angel

    2013-08-12

    The immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine containing an open reading frame (ORF) of genomic island 3 (GI-3), specific for Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, has been examined. Intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA carrying the open reading frame with homology to an ABC-type transporter (pV278a) into BALB/c mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. Mice injected with pV278a had a dominant immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) response. This DNA vaccine elicited a T-cell-proliferative response and induced significant levels of interferon gamma (INF-γ) upon restimulation with recombinant 278a protein. Upon stimulation with an appropriate recombinant protein or crude Brucella protein, the vaccine did not induce IL-4, suggesting a typical T-helper (TH1) response. Furthermore, the vaccine induced protection in BALB/c mice when challenged with the virulent strain Brucella abortus 2308. Taken together, these data suggest that DNA vaccination offers an improved delivery of the homologous of an ABC-type transporter antigen, and provides the first evidence of a protective effect of this antigen in the construction of vaccines against B. abortus.

  5. Mechanism of Asp24 Upregulation in Brucella abortus Rough Mutant with a Disrupted O-Antigen Export System and Effect of Asp24 in Bacterial Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. PMID:24752516

  6. Mechanism of Asp24 upregulation in Brucella abortus rough mutant with a disrupted O-antigen export system and effect of Asp24 in bacterial intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-07-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Immunization of BALB/c mice with Brucella abortus 2308ΔwbkA confers protection against wild-type infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-qiang; Gui, Dan; Sun, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Jun-bo; Zhang, Wen-zhi; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. Vaccination is a major measure for prevention of brucellosis, but it is currently not possible to distinguish vaccinated animals from those that have been naturally infected. Therefore, in this study, we constructed the Brucella (B.) abortus 2380 wbkA mutant (2308ΔwbkA) and evaluated its virulence. The survival of 2308ΔwbkA was attenuated in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) and BALB/c mice, and it induced high protective immunity in mice. The wbkA mutant elicited an anti-Brucella-specific immunoglobulin G response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon. Antibodies to 2308ΔwbkA could be detected in sera from mice, implying the potential for use of this protein as a diagnostic antigen. The WbkA antigen would allow serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. These results suggest that 2308ΔwbkA is a potential attenuated vaccine against 16M. This vaccine will be further evaluated in sheep. PMID:26040616

  8. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding ribosomal protein L9 of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shikha; Afley, Prachiti; Dohre, Sudhir K; Saxena, Nandita; Kumar, Subodh

    2014-07-31

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease. No Brucella vaccine is available for use in humans and existing animal vaccines have limitations. We have previously described the ribosomal protein L9 to have the vaccine potential. In this study, L9 based DNA vaccine (pVaxL9) was generated and evaluated in mouse model. Intramuscular immunisation of pVaxL9 was able to elicit the anti-L9 IgG antibody response of both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes when compared with PBS and pVax immunised control animals. Heightened antibody response was observed in mice groups immunised with pVaxL9 priming and recombinant L9 boosting (PB) and where pDNA immunisation was carried out by in vivo electroporation (EP). The vaccine groups proliferated splenocytes and released Th1 type cytokines e.g. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2. Further, flow cytometric analysis revealed that IFN-γ was released by both by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells particularly in PB and EP groups when compared with mice immunised with empty control vector. The L9 based pDNA vaccine was able to confer significant protection in mice against challenge with virulent B. abortus with PB and EP groups offering better protection. Taken together, it can be concluded that L9 based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and confer protection in mouse model.

  9. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  10. A serological study on Brucella abortus, caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus and Leptospira in dairy goats in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lilenbaum, Walter; de Souza, Guilherme Nunes; Ristow, Paula; Moreira, Madelayne Cortez; Fráguas, Suzana; Cardoso, Verônica da Silva; Oelemann, Walter Martin Roland

    2007-03-01

    In spite of the large number of goats found in several developing tropical countries, milk production remains unsatisfactory. The occurrence of infectious diseases, such as leptospirosis, brucellosis and caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) may in part be responsible for sub-optimal production. In this study, 1000 serum samples were tested for leptospirosis, 953 for brucellosis and 562 for CAE. All tested flocks presented at least one seroreactive animal for leptospirosis and for CAE. Reactivity to leptospirosis was 11.1%, and serovar hardjo was the most frequently found. Anti-B. abortus agglutinins were found in 0.5% of the samples presented and 14.1% were seroreactive to CAE. Leptospirosis was considered to represent the major infectious problem in the studied goat flocks. The occurrence of infectious diseases in the tested flocks may represent an important factor contributing to the decreased productivity of the animals. These findings may be similar to those observed in other developing countries and require further study to define the relationship between seropositivity and reduced production.

  11. Nocodazole treatment interrupted Brucella abortus invasion in RAW 264.7 cells, and successfully attenuated splenic proliferation with enhanced inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Min, Wongi; Lee, Hu Jang; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2017-02-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most important and widespread zoonosis worldwide responsible for serious economic losses and considerable public health burden. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effect of a microtubule-inhibitor, nocodazole, on B. abortus infection in murine macrophages and in a mouse model. Nocodazole activated macrophages and directly inhibited the growth of Brucella in a dose-dependent manner. Nocodazole increased adhesion but reduced invasion and intracellular growth of Brucella in macrophages although it did not affect co-localization of Brucella with LAMP-1. In addition, nocodazole negatively affected actin polymerization, and weakly activated ERK and p38α but significantly activated JNK in non-infected cells. After subsequent infection, nocodazole weakly inhibited activation of ERK and p38α. For the in vivo tests, nocodazole -treated mice displayed elevated levels of IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-10 while Brucella-infected nocodazole -treated mice showed high levels of TNF, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-10 and IL-6 as compared to controls. Furthermore, nocodazole treatment reduced inflammation and Brucella proliferation in the spleens of mice. These findings highlight the potential use of nocodazole for the control of brucellosis although further investigations are encouraged to validate its therapeutic use in animal hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mass vaccination as a complementary tool in the control of a severe outbreak of bovine brucellosis due to Brucella abortus in Extremadura, Spain.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Cristina; Sáez, José Luis; Alvarez, Julio; Cortés, María; Pereira, Gema; Reyes, Aurelia; Rubio, Félix; Martín, Javier; García, Nerea; Domínguez, Lucas; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, María; Hermoso-de-Mendoza, Javier

    2010-11-01

    We report the evolution of an outbreak of bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the region of Extremadura (Spain) involving more than 1000 herds and nearly 40,000 animals. S19 vaccination of young cattle combined with a test and slaughter strategy did not result in a rapid decrease in herd prevalence and animal incidence; these parameters showed a constant decreasing trend only when a combination of restriction of cattle movements, increased test frequency, S19 vaccination and mass RB51 vaccination (with yearly revaccinations) were applied to all susceptible populations. These measures were applied for 5 years; abortions following RB51 vaccination of pregnant cows were limited to the first inoculation and the involvement of the vaccine strain could only be demonstrated in 78 out of 897 abortions. Our results demonstrate the usefulness - and lack of significant side effects - of RB51 mass vaccination as a complementary tool to control bovine brucellosis outbreaks in areas where the disease cannot be contained using more conservative approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) clearance is associated with the early recruitment of neutrophils and CD8(+)T cells in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Del Río, L; Buendía, A J; Sánchez, J; Garcés, B; Caro, M R; Gallego, M C; Bernabé, A; Cuello, F; Salinas, J

    2000-01-01

    The immune mechanisms in response to Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection were studied in C57BL/6 and CBA mice. The infection was monitored and the following aspects of the immune response were evaluated: the nature of the leucocyte infiltrate in the liver, the percentages of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), macrophages and lymphocytes in the spleen, and the concentrations of cytokines in serum. In addition, the serum concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2a were determined. Both mouse strains showed a Th1-like immune response, with high concentrations of IFN-gamma and minimal levels of IL-4; however, C57 mice differed from CBA mice in showing milder clinical signs and earlier resolution of infection. The greater ability of C57 mice than CBA mice to eliminate chlamydophilae was related to the establishment of an earlier innate immunity, based on a more pronounced PMN response, and on a greater presence of CD8(+)T cells.

  14. Update: potential exposures to attenuated vaccine strain Brucella abortus RB51 during a laboratory proficiency test--United States and Canada, 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-01-18

    In November 2007, New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) officials notified CDC of potential exposures to attenuated vaccine strain Brucella abortus RB51 (RB51) in multiple clinical laboratories that participated in a Laboratory Preparedness Survey (LPS) proficiency test. NYSDOH conducted a survey of participating laboratories and identified 17 laboratories that reported handling the RB51 sample in a manner placing lab workers at potential risk for exposure. Subsequently, CDC recommended that public health officials conduct a review of biosafety practices at all LPS-participating laboratories to identify any additional RB51 exposures. This report summarizes the results of investigations in 36 states, two cities, one county, and the District of Columbia. As of January 14, 2008, follow-up by public health officials with LPS-participating laboratories throughout the United States identified a total of 916 laboratory workers in 254 laboratories with potential RB51 exposure. The results highlight the need for routine adherence to recommended biosafety practices when working with infectious organisms, particularly during widespread infectious-disease events, including bioterrorism attacks.

  15. The two-component systems PrrBA and NtrYX co-ordinately regulate the adaptation of Brucella abortus to an oxygen-limited environment.

    PubMed

    Carrica, Mariela Del Carmen; Fernandez, Ignacio; Sieira, Rodrigo; Paris, Gastón; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of the zoonotic disease brucellosis, which is endemic in many parts of the world. The success of Brucella as pathogen relies in its ability to adapt to the harsh environmental conditions found in mammalian hosts. One of its main adaptations is the induction of the expression of different genes involved in respiration at low oxygen tension. In this report we describe a regulatory network involved in this adaptation. We show that Brucella abortus PrrBA is a functional two-component signal transduction system that responds to the redox status and acts as a global regulator controlling the expression of the regulatory proteins NtrY, FnrN and NnrA, which are involved in the adaptation to survive at low oxygen tension. We also show that the two-component systems PrrBA and NtrYX co-ordinately regulate the expression of denitrification and high-affinity cytochrome oxidase genes. Strikingly, a double mutant strain in the prrB and ntrY genes is severely impaired in growth and virulence, while the ntrY and prrB single mutant strains are similar to wild-type B. abortus. The proposed regulatory network may contribute to understand the mechanisms used by Brucella for a successful adaptation to its replicative niche inside mammalian cells.

  16. A new cis-encoded sRNA, BsrH, regulating the expression of hemH gene in Brucella abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaowei; Dong, Hao; Wu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    A total of 129 sRNA candidates were identified in Brucella abortus 2308 in our previous work, and one candidate with potential to regulate expression of hemH gene was further analyzed in this study. We found that the novel sRNA can inhibit the expression of hemH and called it BsrH (Brucella sRNA regulating HemH). The expression level of BsrH was tested in four different stress conditions. A significant upregulation was detected during the growth in acidic and Brucella minimal media, as well as in the presence of hydroxyl peroxide, while iron deficiency caused the opposite effect. As expected, BsrH strongly affected the survival ratio of the Brucella cells under iron-limitation conditions, though overexpression of BsrH did not affect Brucella virulence. Thus, we conclude that BsrH plays a regulatory role in bacterial heme biosynthesis and can be considered as the first Brucella sRNA involved in stress responses.

  17. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and occurrence of a 16.5-kilodalton outer membrane protein of Brucella abortus with similarity to pal lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, A; Weynants, V; Denoel, P; Lichtfouse, B; De Bolle, X; Saman, E; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant lambda gt11 phages were selected by screening a genomic library of Brucella abortus DNA with monoclonal antibodies specific for a 16.5-kDa Brucella outer membrane protein (Omp16). The corresponding gene, named pal, was subcloned on a 0.7-kb AluI fragment. Immunoblotting confirmed the expression of a recombinant Omp16 in the transformants. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 168 codons. The deduced amino acid sequence agrees with an internal peptide sequence of native Omp16 and contains a potential lipoprotein signal peptide cleavage site, giving rise to a predicted mature protein of 144 amino acids. The predicted sequence of Omp16 also shows a remarkable degree of similarity to the sequences of three peptidoglycan-associated bacterial lipoproteins. In immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody specific for Omp16, we demonstrated that Omp16 was expressed in the 34 Brucella strains tested, representing all six species and known biovars. Images PMID:8063379

  18. The Immunization of Guinea-pigs and Mice with a Whole-Culture Extract of a Smooth and a Rough Strain of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Keppie, J.; Witt, K.; Smith, H.

    1972-01-01

    A purified killed Br. abortus vaccine developed for use in man from the smooth strain 544 and previously tested in mice (Keppie, Witt and Smith, 1971) has now been shown to immunize guinea-pigs without the addition of adjuvant. A similar vaccine prepared from the rough strain 45/20 also immunized guinea-pigs but to a slightly lesser degree. The activity of both vaccines in the guinea-pig was markedly enhanced by the use of water-in-oil emulsions. A commercially available killed vaccine, “Duphavac”, prepared from strain 45/20 for use in cattle, was slightly more active in guinea-pigs than the emulsified whole-culture extract of “544” possibly because its oily adjuvant was different. In mice, all the “45/20” vaccines were only feebly protective even when given with oily adjuvant, in sharp contrast to the “544” vaccines which were highly active in this animal, with or without adjuvant. As expected, the “45/20” vaccines were much less agglutinogenic than the “544” vaccines but both produced a similar degree of delayed hypersensitivity in guinea-pigs. It is suggested that the whole-extract vaccine from strain 544 is suitable for a trial in man. PMID:4628447

  19. Immunization of BALB/c mice with Brucella abortus 2308ΔwbkA confers protection against wild-type infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-qiang; Gui, Dan; Sun, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Jun-bo; Zhang, Wen-zhi; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Fei; Chen, Chuang-fu

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. Vaccination is a major measure for prevention of brucellosis, but it is currently not possible to distinguish vaccinated animals from those that have been naturally infected. Therefore, in this study, we constructed the Brucella (B.) abortus 2380 wbkA mutant (2308ΔwbkA) and evaluated its virulence. The survival of 2308ΔwbkA was attenuated in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) and BALB/c mice, and it induced high protective immunity in mice. The wbkA mutant elicited an anti-Brucella-specific immunoglobulin G response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon. Antibodies to 2308ΔwbkA could be detected in sera from mice, implying the potential for use of this protein as a diagnostic antigen. The WbkA antigen would allow serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. These results suggest that 2308ΔwbkA is a potential attenuated vaccine against 16M. This vaccine will be further evaluated in sheep.

  20. Validation of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibody against Brucella abortus in cattle sera using an automated ELISA workstation.

    PubMed

    Paweska, J T; Potts, A D; Harris, H J; Smith, S J; Viljoen, G J; Dungu, B; Brett, O L; Bubb, M; Prozesky, L

    2002-03-01

    An automated indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) for the serological diagnosis of bovine brucellosis was developed and validated in-house. A total of 4,803 cattle sera from South Africa (n = 3,643), Canada (n = 652), Germany (n = 240), France (n = 73) and the USA (n = 195) was used. The South African panel of sera represented 834 sera known to be positive by the Rose Bengal test (RBT), serum agglutination test (SAT) and complement fixation test (CFT), 2709 sera that were negative by CFT, and 100 sera from animals vaccinated with a standard dose of Brucella abortus strain 19. Overseas sera were obtained from reference non-vaccinated brucella-free cattle (n = 834), naturally infected (n = 72), experimentally infected (n = 71), and vaccinated animals (n = 83). Also 100 sera collected from cattle in Canada and known to be positive by competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) were used. The intermediate ranges ("borderline" range for the interpretation of test results) were derived from two-graph receiver operating characteristics analysis. The lowest values of the misclassification cost-term analysis obtained from testing overseas panels, covered lower I-ELISA cut-off PP values (0.02-3.0) than those from local panels (1.5-5.0). The relatively low cut-off PP values selected for I-ELISA were due to the fact that the positive control used represents a very strong standard compared to other reference positive sera. The greater overlap found between negative and positive cattle sera from South Africa than that between reference overseas panels was probably due to the different criteria used in classifying these panels as negative (sera from true non-diseased/non-infected animals) or positive (sera from true diseased/infected animals). The diagnostic sensitivity of the I-ELISA (at the optimum cut-off value) was 100% and of the CFT 83.3%. The diagnostic specificity of I-ELISA was 99.8% and of the CFT 100%. Estimate of Youden's index was higher for the I-ELISA (0.998) than

  1. The lipopolysaccharide of Brucella abortus BvrS/BvrR mutants contains lipid A modifications and has higher affinity for bactericidal cationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Manterola, Lorea; Moriyón, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Weiss, David S; Koch, Michel H J; Howe, Jörg; Brandenburg, Klaus; López-Goñi, Ignacio

    2005-08-01

    The two-component BvrS/BvrR system is essential for Brucella abortus virulence. It was shown previously that its dysfunction abrogates expression of some major outer membrane proteins and increases bactericidal peptide sensitivity. Here, we report that BvrS/BvrR mutants have increased surface hydrophobicity and susceptibility to killing by nonimmune serum. The bvrS and bvrR mutant lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) bound more polymyxin B, chimeras constructed with bvrS mutant cells and parental LPS showed augmented polymyxin B resistance, and, conversely, parental cells and bvrS mutant LPS chimeras were more sensitive and displayed polymyxin B-characteristic outer membrane lesions, implicating LPS as being responsible for the phenotype of the BvrS/BvrR mutants. No qualitative or quantitative changes were detected in other envelope and outer membrane components examined: periplasmic beta(1-2) glucans, native hapten polysaccharide, and phospholipids. The LPS of the mutants was similar to parental LPS in O-polysaccharide polymerization and fine structure but showed both increased underacylated lipid A species and higher acyl-chain fluidity that correlated with polymyxin B binding. These lipid A changes did not alter LPS cytokine induction, showing that in contrast to other gram-negative pathogens, recognition by innate immune receptors is not decreased by these changes in LPS structure. Transcription of Brucella genes required for incorporating long acyl chains into lipid A (acpXL and lpxXL) or implicated in lipid A acylation control (bacA) was not affected. We propose that in Brucella the outer membrane homeostasis depends on the functioning of BvrS/BvrR. Accordingly, disruption of BvrS/BvrR damages the outer membrane, thus contributing to the severe attenuation manifested by bvrS and bvrR mutants.

  2. BvrR/BvrS-controlled outer membrane proteins Omp3a and Omp3b are not essential for Brucella abortus virulence.

    PubMed

    Manterola, Lorea; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Moriyón, Ignacio; Grilló, María-Jesús; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo

    2007-10-01

    The Brucella abortus two-component regulatory system BvrR/BvrS controls the expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) Omp3a (Omp25) and Omp3b (Omp22). Disruption of bvrS or bvrR generates avirulent mutants with altered cell permeability, higher sensitivity to microbicidal peptides, and complement. Consequently, the role of Omp3a and Omp3b in virulence was examined. Similar to bvrS or bvrR mutants, omp3a and omp3b mutants displayed increased attachment to cells, indicating surface alterations. However, they showed unaltered permeability; normal expression of Omp10, Omp16, Omp19, Omp2b, and Omp1; native hapten polysaccharide; and lipopolysaccharide and were resistant to complement and polymyxin B at ranges similar to those of the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Likewise, omp3a and omp3b mutants were able to replicate in murine macrophages and in HeLa cells, were resistant to the killing action of human neutrophils, and persisted in mice, like the WT strain. Murine macrophages infected with the omp3a mutant generated slightly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha than the WT, whereas the bvrS mutant induced lower levels of this cytokine. Since the absence of Omp3a or Omp3b does not result in attenuation, it can be concluded that BvrR/BvrS influences additional Brucella properties involved in virulence. Our results are discussed in the light of previous works suggesting that disruption of omp3a generates attenuated Brucella strains, and we speculate on the role of group 3 Omps.

  3. BvrR/BvrS-Controlled Outer Membrane Proteins Omp3a and Omp3b Are Not Essential for Brucella abortus Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, Lorea; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Moriyón, Ignacio; Grilló, María-Jesús; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    The Brucella abortus two-component regulatory system BvrR/BvrS controls the expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) Omp3a (Omp25) and Omp3b (Omp22). Disruption of bvrS or bvrR generates avirulent mutants with altered cell permeability, higher sensitivity to microbicidal peptides, and complement. Consequently, the role of Omp3a and Omp3b in virulence was examined. Similar to bvrS or bvrR mutants, omp3a and omp3b mutants displayed increased attachment to cells, indicating surface alterations. However, they showed unaltered permeability; normal expression of Omp10, Omp16, Omp19, Omp2b, and Omp1; native hapten polysaccharide; and lipopolysaccharide and were resistant to complement and polymyxin B at ranges similar to those of the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Likewise, omp3a and omp3b mutants were able to replicate in murine macrophages and in HeLa cells, were resistant to the killing action of human neutrophils, and persisted in mice, like the WT strain. Murine macrophages infected with the omp3a mutant generated slightly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha than the WT, whereas the bvrS mutant induced lower levels of this cytokine. Since the absence of Omp3a or Omp3b does not result in attenuation, it can be concluded that BvrR/BvrS influences additional Brucella properties involved in virulence. Our results are discussed in the light of previous works suggesting that disruption of omp3a generates attenuated Brucella strains, and we speculate on the role of group 3 Omps. PMID:17664262

  4. Immunological assay after vaccination of goats with Brucella melitensis Rev. I and Brucella abortus 45/20 vaccines at Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Taher, S A; Ewais, M A

    1997-01-01

    The living smooth Brucella melitensis Rev. I vaccine given in the normal dose (7x10(8) organism) to goats 3 to 5 months of age stimulated a marked increase in agglutinin titer. Fractionation of pools of serum by gel filtration by anion exchange chromatography, using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE -) cellulose showed that both IgM and IgG agglutinins were present from 12 to 47 days after goats were vaccinated. Only mercaptoethanol (ME)-sensitive agglutinins were detected in most goats 4 months after vaccination, but 2 of 30 goats retained ME-resistant agglutinins for the 13 1/2 - month observation period. Fractionation of serums from goats representative of these 2 types of serologic response indicated that most goats had only IgM agglutinins, whereas the 2 given goats had activity in the IgG fraction. Adult goats given Brucella abortus 42/20 adjuvant vaccine and revaccinated 5 months later developed low agglutination titers to smooth antigen, and all became test positive to the antiglobulin test. Fractionation of serum of pools taken 1 week and 8 months after revaccination indicated that antibody activity was restricted to the IgG fraction. Sera from 5 vaccinated and nonvaccinated goats which were positive by bacteriological culture examination at necropsy 31 to 47 days after goats were given conjunctival inoculation of virulent B. melitensis had antibody activity in both IgG and IgM fractions. Test positive reaction to the ME, complement-fixation (CF), and antiglobulin (AG) test were restricted to the IgG-containing fractions of serum, whereas reactions to the agglutination (STT) and the card tests appeared with either or both fractions. The effect of these findings on the choice of tests for the differentiation of vaccination response is discussed.

  5. Improved performance of Brucella melitensis native hapten over Brucella abortus OPS tracer on goat antibody detection by the fluorescence polarization assay.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Pfeiffer, C; Díaz-Aparicio, E; Rodríguez-Padilla, C; Morales-Loredo, A; Alvarez-Ojeda, G; Gomez-Flores, R

    2008-06-15

    The current method for goat brucellosis diagnosis is based on the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) using the screening card test (CT), with antigen at 8% (CT8) or 3% (CT3) of cell concentrations, and the confirmatory complement fixation test (CFT). However, these tests do not differentiate antibodies induced by vaccination from those derived from field infections by Brucella species or other bacterial agents; in places like Mexico, where the prevalence of brucellosis and the vaccination rates are high, there is a considerable percentage of false positive reactions that causes significant unnecessary slaughter of animals. Furthermore, results of the fluorescence polarization assay (FPA) using the Brucella abortus O-polysaccharide (OPS) tracer in goats are poorer than those with cattle. The present study was undertaken to investigate a tracer prepared from the native hapten (NH) of the Rev. 1 strain of Brucella melitensis to improve FPA performance on goat brucellosis diagnosis. Evaluation of 48 positive samples and 96 negative samples showed that the NH tracer was more accurate (p<0.01) than the OPS tracer (97.2% vs. 93.8% accuracy, respectively). On the diagnostic performance evaluation, the NH tracer performed better (87.5% accuracy, 79.5% sensitivity, 84.3% specificity, and 163.8 performance index) than the OPS tracer (83.5%, 75.9%, 81.0%, and 156.9, respectively) using 1009 positive and 2039 negative Mexican field goat sera samples selected by test series approved by the OIE (card test 3% and CFT). We demonstrated a new application for the NH lipopolysaccharide on detecting antibodies against Brucella using the FPA, which may yield faster results (minutes vs. 24-72h) than the immunodiagnosis assays frequently used in bovine brucellosis. In addition, NH tracer produces similar or better performance results than the conventional OPS tracer, using the FPA in goat sera samples.

  6. First evaluation of an influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine in sheep and goats: Assessment of safety, immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Tabynov, Kaissar; Yespembetov, Bolat; Matikhan, Nurali; Ryskeldinova, Sholpan; Zinina, Nadezhda; Kydyrbayev, Zhailaubay; Assanzhanova, Nurika; Tabynov, Kairat; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Mukhitdinova, Gulnara; Sansyzbay, Abylai

    2016-12-25

    Previously we developed and evaluated a candidate influenza viral vector based Brucella abortus vaccine (Flu-BA) administered with a potent adjuvant Montanide Gel01 in cattle, which was found safe and highly effective. This study was aimed to establish a proof-of-concept of the efficacy of Flu-BA vaccine formulation in sheep and goats. We vaccinated sheep and goats with Flu-BA vaccine and as a positive control vaccinated a group of animals with a commercial B. melitensis Rev.1 vaccine. Clinically, both Flu-BA and Rev.1 vaccines were found safe. Serological analysis showed the animals received Flu-BA vaccine did not induce antibody response against Brucella Omp16 and L7/L12 proteins during the period of our study (56days post-initial vaccination, PIV). But observed significant antigen-specific T cell response indicated by increased lymphocyte stimulation index and enhanced secretion of IFN-γ at day 56 PIV in Flu-BA group. The Flu-BA vaccinated animals completely protected 57.1% of sheep and 42.9% of goats against B. melitensis 16M challenge. The severity of brucellosis in terms of infection index and colonization of Brucella in tissues was significantly lower in the Flu-BA group compared to negative control animals group. Nevertheless, positive control commercial Rev.1 vaccine provided strong antigen-specific T cell immunity and protection against B. melitensis 16M infection. We conclude that the Flu-BA vaccine induces a significant antigen-specific T-cell response and provides complete protection in approximately 50% of sheep and goats against B. melitensis 16M infection. Further investigations are needed to improve the efficacy of Flu-BA and explore its practical application in small ruminants.

  7. Investigating the use of protein saver cards for storage and subsequent detection of bovine anti-Brucella abortus smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies and gamma interferon.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Lucy; Commander, Nicola J; Erdenlig, Sevil; McGiven, John A; Stack, Judy

    2013-11-01

    Brucella abortus, a smooth strain of the genus Brucella, is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis. To support the ongoing development of diagnostic tests for bovine brucellosis, the use of Protein Saver cards (Whatman) for bovine blood serum and plasma sample collection has been evaluated. These cards offer significant logistical and safety alternatives to transporting and storing liquid samples and may aid in diagnostic programs and validation studies. To evaluate the utility of these cards, 204 bovine blood serum samples from Brucella-infected and noninfected animals were stored on and eluted from the Protein Saver cards. Anti-Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (sLPS) antibody titers for the serum eluates were compared to those of the unprocessed original serum samples by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed a highly significant correlation between titers from the serum eluates and the unprocessed sera. Therefore, under these circumstances, serum eluates and unprocessed serum samples may be used interchangeably. Blood plasma from 113 mitogen-stimulated whole-blood samples was added to and eluted from the Protein Saver cards. The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) titers in the plasma eluates were compared to those of the unprocessed plasma samples obtained by IFN-γ ELISA. The results showed a significant correlation between the plasma eluates and the unprocessed plasma samples. To derive a signal in the plasma eluate, it was necessary to develop a novel and highly sensitive ELISA for the detection of IFN-γ. The serum samples stored on cards at room temperature over a 10-day period showed little variation in antibody titers. However, the plasma eluates showed a progressive loss of IFN-γ recovery over 10 days when stored at room temperature.

  8. Investigating the Use of Protein Saver Cards for Storage and Subsequent Detection of Bovine Anti-Brucella abortus Smooth Lipopolysaccharide Antibodies and Gamma Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Commander, Nicola J.; Erdenlig, Sevil; McGiven, John A.; Stack, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus, a smooth strain of the genus Brucella, is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis. To support the ongoing development of diagnostic tests for bovine brucellosis, the use of Protein Saver cards (Whatman) for bovine blood serum and plasma sample collection has been evaluated. These cards offer significant logistical and safety alternatives to transporting and storing liquid samples and may aid in diagnostic programs and validation studies. To evaluate the utility of these cards, 204 bovine blood serum samples from Brucella-infected and noninfected animals were stored on and eluted from the Protein Saver cards. Anti-Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (sLPS) antibody titers for the serum eluates were compared to those of the unprocessed original serum samples by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed a highly significant correlation between titers from the serum eluates and the unprocessed sera. Therefore, under these circumstances, serum eluates and unprocessed serum samples may be used interchangeably. Blood plasma from 113 mitogen-stimulated whole-blood samples was added to and eluted from the Protein Saver cards. The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) titers in the plasma eluates were compared to those of the unprocessed plasma samples obtained by IFN-γ ELISA. The results showed a significant correlation between the plasma eluates and the unprocessed plasma samples. To derive a signal in the plasma eluate, it was necessary to develop a novel and highly sensitive ELISA for the detection of IFN-γ. The serum samples stored on cards at room temperature over a 10-day period showed little variation in antibody titers. However, the plasma eluates showed a progressive loss of IFN-γ recovery over 10 days when stored at room temperature. PMID:23986318

  9. Brucella abortus surveillance of cattle in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and a case for active disease surveillance as a training tool.

    PubMed

    Tukana, Andrew; Hedlefs, Robert; Gummow, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    There have been no surveys of the cattle population for brucellosis in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) for more than 15 years. This study used disease surveillance as a capacity building training tool and to examine some of the constrain