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Sample records for above-threshold ionization spectra

  1. Analytic formulas for above threshold ionization or detachment plateau spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-11-01

    Closed form analytic formulas are derived in the tunneling limit for both above threshold detachment (ATD) of negative ions and above threshold ionization (ATI) of neutral atoms. These formulas provide a fully quantum justification of the well-known classical three-step scenario for strong field ionization and detachment spectra in the high energy region of the ATI or ATD plateau and also provide analytical insight into how the ATI/ATD rates may be controlled by varying the laser field parameters or by varying the atomic species.

  2. Analytic formulas for above-threshold ionization or detachment plateau spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-03-01

    Closed-form analytic formulas are derived in the tunneling limit for both above-threshold detachment (ATD) of negative ions and above-threshold ionization (ATI) of neutral atoms. These formulas are shown to give precise agreement with essentially exact single-active-electron numerical results for detached or ionized electron energies corresponding to the high-energy end of the ATD and ATI plateaus (with only a small constant shift of electron energies being required in the case of ATI). These formulas for ATI and ATD rates thus provide an analytic explanation for the well-known oscillatory patterns of ATI and ATD rates as functions of electron energy and of the parameters of the laser field. They also provide an analytic explanation for the dependence of these rates on the initial orbital angular momentum of the active electron. Most significantly, these formulas provide a fully quantum justification of the well-known classical three-step scenario for strong-field ionization and detachment spectra in the high-energy region of the ATI or ATD plateau.

  3. Above-threshold ionization and photoelectron spectra in atomic systems driven by strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Noslen; Chacón, Alexis; Ciappina, Marcelo F.; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) results from strong-field laser-matter interaction and it is one of the fundamental processes that may be used to extract electron structural and dynamical information about the atomic or molecular target. Moreover, it can also be used to characterize the laser field itself. Here we develop an analytical description of ATI, which extends the theoretical strong-field approximation (SFA), for both the direct and rescattering transition amplitudes in atoms. From a nonlocal, but separable potential, the bound-free dipole and the rescattering transition matrix elements are analytically computed. In comparison with the standard approaches to the ATI process, our analytical derivation of the rescattering matrix elements allows us to study directly how the rescattering process depends on the atomic target and laser-pulse features; we can turn on and off contributions having different physical origins or corresponding to different physical mechanisms. We compare SFA results with the full numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) within the few-cycle pulse regime. Good agreement between our SFA and TDSE model is found for the ATI spectrum. Our model captures also the strong dependence of the photoelectron spectra on the carrier envelope phase of the laser field.

  4. Above-threshold ionization of negative hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Lambropoulos, P.

    1997-10-01

    We present detailed calculations for two-and three-photon above-threshold ionization of the negative hydrogen ion. In addition to calculated values for partial wave amplitudes and phase shifts pertaining to recent experimental results [Xin Miao Zhao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1656 (1997)], we also address the question of the asymmetry of photoelectron angular distributions in ionization under elliptically polarized radiation, which has been studied experimentally in other negative ions [C. Blondel and C. Delsart, Laser Phys. 3, 3 (1993); Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 79, 156 (1993); F. Dulieu, C. Blondel, and C. Delsart, J. Phys. B 28, 3861 (1995)].

  5. Two-Source Double-Slit Interference in Angle-Resolved High-Energy Above-Threshold Ionization Spectra of Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Okunishi, M.; Itaya, R.; Shimada, K.; Pruemper, G.; Ueda, K.; Busuladzic, M.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2009-07-24

    When an electron from a diatomic molecule undergoes tunneling-rescattering ionization, a novel form of destructive interference can be realized that involves all four geometric orbits that are available to the electron when it is freed, because both ionization and rescattering may take place at the same or at different centers. We find experimentally and confirm theoretically that in orientation-averaged angle-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization spectra the corresponding destructive interference is visible for O{sub 2} but not for N{sub 2}. This effect is different from the suppression of ionization that is well known to occur for O{sub 2}.

  6. Interference in above-threshold-ionization electron distributions from molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, Jost; Lein, Manfred; Engel, Volker

    2011-05-15

    We present quantum-mechanical studies on above-threshold ionization of molecular ions in two and three dimensions. The momentum distributions show signatures of interfering emissions from the molecular centers. These structures deviate from a simple double-slit model that ignores the electron-ion interaction, but they are reproduced by an eikonal model. Such distortions of the interference pattern are partly responsible for the absence of clear interference patterns in the angle-integrated electron energy spectra.

  7. Channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-04-24

    We experimentally investigate the channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization (ATDI) of acetylene in the multiphoton regime using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse centered at 395 nm by measuring all the ejected electrons and ions in coincidence. As compared to the sequential process, diagonal lines in the electron-electron joint energy spectrum are observed for the nonsequential ATDI owing to the correlative sharing of the absorbed multiphoton energies. We demonstrate that the distinct channel-resolved sequential and nonsequential ATDI spectra can clearly reveal the photon-induced acetylene-vinylidene isomerization via proton migration on the cation or dication states. PMID:25955049

  8. Molecular rescattering signature in above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaggia, C.

    2008-10-01

    Above-threshold ionization electron spectra recorded with nonaligned molecules such as N2 , CO2 , and C3H4 exhibit the same classical kinematics features of electrons in strong laser fields as for atoms in the 1014Wcm-2 laser intensity range. The cutoff energies for direct and rescattered electrons are governed by the electron classical dynamics in the intense laser field. The main differences are found in the energy-resolved angular distributions. The molecular potential leads to a larger differential elastic cross section for forward-rescattered electrons and as a consequence to broader angular distributions for rescattered electrons with energies lower than 5Up , where Up is the ponderomotive potential.

  9. Method for calculating multiphoton above-threshold processes in atoms: Two-photon above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Manakov, N. L. Marmo, S. I.; Sviridov, S. A.

    2009-04-15

    The two-photon above-threshold ionization of atoms is calculated using numerical algorithms of the Pade approximation in the model-potential method with the Coulomb asymptotics. The total and differential cross sections of the above-threshold ionization of helium and alkali metal atoms by elliptically polarized radiation are presented. The dependence of the angular distribution of photoelectrons on the sign of the ellipticity of radiation (the elliptic dichroism phenomenon) is analyzed in the above-threshold frequency range.

  10. Classical-Quantum Correspondence for Above-Threshold Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Geng, Ji-Wei; Liu, Hong; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2014-03-01

    We measure high resolution photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) for above-threshold ionization of xenon atoms in infrared laser fields. Based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory, we develop an intuitive quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo model encoded with Feynman's path-integral approach, in which the Coulomb effect on electron trajectories and interference patterns are fully considered. We achieve a good agreement with the measured PADs of atoms for above-threshold ionization. The quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo theory sheds light on the role of ionic potential on PADs along the longitudinal and transverse direction with respect to the laser polarization, allowing us to unravel the classical coordinates (i.e., tunneling phase and initial momentum) at the tunnel exit for all of the photoelectrons of the PADs. We study the classical-quantum correspondence and build a bridge between the above-threshold ionization and the tunneling theory.

  11. Elliptical polarization favors long quantum orbits in high-order above-threshold ionization of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lai, XuanYang; Wang, ChuanLiang; Chen, YongJu; Hu, ZiLong; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, ZhiZhan; Becker, Wilhelm

    2013-01-25

    We demonstrate the significant role of long quantum orbits in strong-field atomic processes by investigating experimentally and theoretically the above-threshold ionization spectra of noble gases in intense elliptically polarized laser pulses. With increasing laser ellipticity, the yields of different energy regions of the measured electron spectrum in high-order above-threshold ionization drop at different rates. The experimental features can be reproduced by a theoretical simulation based on quantum-orbit theory, revealing that increasing ellipticity favors the contributions of the long quantum orbits in the high-order above-threshold ionization process. PMID:25166161

  12. Charge-distribution effect of imaging molecular structure by high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bingbing; Fu Panming; Guo Yingchun; Zhang Bin; Zhao Zengxiu; Yan Zongchao

    2010-10-15

    Using a triatomic molecular model, we show that the interference pattern in the high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum depends dramatically on the charge distribution of the molecular ion. Therefore the charge distribution can be considered a crucial factor for imaging a molecular geometric structure. Based on this study, a general destructive interference formula for each above-threshold ionization channel is obtained for a polyatomic molecule concerning the positions and charge values of each nuclei. Comparisons are made for the HATI spectra of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}. These results may shed light on imaging complex molecular structure by the HATI spectrum.

  13. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with attosecond bichromatic intense XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-01-01

    Angular distributions of molecular above-threshold ionization (MATI) in bichromatic attosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) linear polarization laser pulses have been theoretically investigated. Multiphoton ionization in a prealigned molecular ion H2+ produces clear MATI spectra which show a forward-backward asymmetry in angular and momentum distributions which is critically sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP) φ, the time delay Δτ between the two laser pulses, and the photoelectron kinetic energies Ee. The features of the asymmetry in MATI angular distributions are described well by multiphoton perturbative ionization models. Phase differences of continuum electron wave functions can be extracted from the CEP φ and time delay Δτ dependent ionization asymmetry ratio created by interfering multiphoton ionization pathways. At large internuclear distances MATI angular distributions exhibit more complex features due to laser-induced electron diffraction where continuum electron wavelengths are less than the internuclear distance.

  14. Above-threshold ionization of diatomic molecules by few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Hasovic, E.; Busuladzic, M.; Milosevic, D. B.; Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W. K.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Lepine, F.; Sansone, G.; Nisoli, M.; Znakovskaya, I.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-10-15

    Above-threshold ionization of diatomic molecules by infrared carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stable few-cycle laser pulses is analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The theoretical approach is based on the recently developed molecular improved strong-field approximation (ISFA), generalized to few-cycle pulses. Instead of using the first Born approximation, the rescattering matrix element in the ISFA is now calculated exactly. This modification leads to the appearance of characteristic minima in the differential cross section as a function of the scattering angle. Experimental angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} molecules are obtained using the velocity map imaging technique. A relatively good agreement of experimental and simulated angle-resolved spectra, CEP-dependent asymmetry maps, and extracted electron-molecular ion elastic scattering differential cross sections is obtained.

  15. Roles of resonances and recollisions in strong-field atomic phenomena: Above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wassaf, Joseph; Veniard, Valerie; Taieeb, Richard; Maquet, Alfred

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of a set of quantal and classical calculations designed for simulating the photoelectron spectra observed when atoms are submitted to an intense laser field. We have concentrated the discussion on the range of parameters where conspicuous enhancements are observed in the high-energy part of the above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra. Our results confirm that these enhancements result from a resonant transfer of population into the Rydberg states. Subsequent multiple returns, with elastic or inelastic recollisions of the electrons with the nucleus, when they are released in the continuum, also play an essential part. Our analysis highlights also the similarities as well as the differences observed in simulations, depending on the choice of the model potential, i.e., if it is either long range (Coulomb-like) or short range (with an exponentially decreasing tail)

  16. Above-threshold ionization of diatomic molecules by few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Hasović, E.; Busuladžić, M.; Milošević, D. B.; Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W. K.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Lépine, F.; Sansone, G.; Nisoli, M.; Znakovskaya, I.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-10-01

    Above-threshold ionization of diatomic molecules by infrared carrier-envelope phase (CEP) stable few-cycle laser pulses is analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The theoretical approach is based on the recently developed molecular improved strong-field approximation (ISFA), generalized to few-cycle pulses. Instead of using the first Born approximation, the rescattering matrix element in the ISFA is now calculated exactly. This modification leads to the appearance of characteristic minima in the differential cross section as a function of the scattering angle. Experimental angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of N2 and O2 molecules are obtained using the velocity map imaging technique. A relatively good agreement of experimental and simulated angle-resolved spectra, CEP-dependent asymmetry maps, and extracted electron-molecular ion elastic scattering differential cross sections is obtained.

  17. Analytic Model for Description of Above-Threshold Ionization by an Intense, Short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Anthony F.; Frolov, M. V.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Geng, J.-W.; Peng, L.-Y.

    2015-05-01

    We present an analytic model for above-threshold ionization (ATI) of an atom by an intense, linearly-polarized short laser pulse. Our quantum analysis provides closed-form formulas for the differential probability of ATI, with amplitudes given by a coherent sum of partial amplitudes describing ionization by neighboring optical cycles near the peak of the intensity envelope of a short laser pulse. These analytic results explain key features of short-pulse ATI spectra, such as the left-right asymmetry in the ionized electron angular distribution, the multi-plateau structures, and both large-scale and fine-scale oscillation patterns resulting from quantum interferences of electron trajectories. The ATI spectrum in the middle part of the ATI plateau is shown to be sensitive to the spatial symmetry of the initial bound state of the active electron owing to contributions from multiple-return electron trajectories. An extension of our analytic formulas to real atoms provides results that are in good agreement with results of numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for He and Ar atoms. Research supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-1208059, by RFBR Grant No. 13-02-00420, by Ministry of Ed. & Sci. of the Russian Fed. Proj. No. 1019, by NNSFC Grant Nos. 11322437, 11174016, and 11121091, and by the Dynasty Fdn. (MVF & DVK).

  18. Non-constant ponderomotive energy in above threshold ionization by intense few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Picca, Renata; Gramajo, Ana A.; Arbó, Diego G.; López, Sebastián D.; Garibotti, Carlos R.

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the contribution of the quiver kinetic energy acquired by an electron in an oscillating electric field to the energy balance in atomic ionization processes by a short laser pulse. Due to the time dependence of this additional kinetic energy, a temporal average is assumed to maintain a stationary energy conservation rule. This rule is used to predict the position of the peaks observed in the photo electron spectra (PE). For a flat top pulse envelope, the mean value of the quiver energy over the whole pulse leads to the concept of ponderomotive energy $U_{p}$. However for a short pulse with a fast changing field intensity a stationarity approximation could not be precise. We check these concepts by studying first the photoelectron (PE) spectrum within the Semiclassical Model (SCM) for a multiple steps pulses. The SCM offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the PE spectrum in the energy domain. We show that PE substructures stem from ionization at different times mapping the pulse envelope. We also present the analysis of the PE spectrum for a realistic sine-squared envelope within the Coulomb-Volkov and \\textit{ab initio} calculations solving the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. We found that the electron emission amplitudes produced at different times interfere with each other and produce a new additional pattern, that overlap the above-threshold ionization (ATI) peaks.

  19. Nonconstant ponderomotive energy in above-threshold ionization by intense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Picca, R.; Gramajo, A. A.; Garibotti, C. R.; López, S. D.; Arbó, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the contribution of the quiver kinetic energy acquired by an electron in an oscillating electric field of a short laser pulse to the energy balance in atomic ionization processes. Due to the time dependence of this additional kinetic energy, a temporal average is assumed to preserve a stationary energy conservation rule, which is used to predict the position of the energy peaks observed in the photoelectron (PE) spectra. For a plane wave and a flattop pulse, the mean value of the quiver energy over the whole pulse leads to the concept of ponderomotive energy Up. However, for a short pulse with a fast changing intensity, the stationary approximation loses its validity. We check these concepts by studying first the PE spectrum within the semiclassical model (SCM) for multiple-step pulses. The SCM offers the possibility to establish a connection between emission times and the PE spectrum in the energy domain. We show that PE substructures stem from ionization at different times mapping the pulse envelope. We also analyze the PE spectrum for a realistic sine-squared envelope within the Coulomb-Volkov and ab initio calculations solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We found that the electron emission amplitudes produced at different times interfere with each other producing, in this way, a new additional pattern that modulates the above-threshold ionization (ATI) peaks.

  20. Electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Kunitski, M; Pitzer, M; Trinter, F; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Magrakvelidze, M; Madsen, C B; Madsen, L B; Thumm, U; Dörner, R

    2013-07-12

    We report experimental observation of the energy sharing between electron and nuclei in above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of H2 by strong laser fields. The absorbed photon energy is shared between the ejected electron and nuclei in a correlated fashion, resulting in multiple diagonal lines in their joint energy spectrum governed by the energy conservation of all fragment particles. PMID:23889391

  1. Role of elastic scattering in high-order above threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhang-Jin; Ye, Jian-Mian; Xu, Yang-Bing

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the target and intensity dependence of plateau in high-order above threshold ionization (HATI) by simulating the two-dimensional (2D) momentum distributions and the energy spectra of photoelectrons in HATI of rare gas atoms through using the quantitative rescattering model. The simulated results are compared with the existing experimental measurements. It is found that the slope of the plateau in the HATI photoelectron energy spectrum highly depends on the structure of elastic scattering differential cross section (DCS) of laser-induced returning electron with its parent ion. The investigations of the long- and short-range potential effects in the DCSs reveal that the short-range potential, which reflects the structure of the target, plays an essential role in generating the HATI photoelectron spectra. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274219), the STU Scientific Research Foundation for Talents, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China.

  2. Intensity-dependent enhancements in high-order above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.; Hasovic, E.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Busuladzic, M.; Becker, W.

    2007-11-15

    The very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements of groups of peaks of high-order above-threshold-ionization spectra of rare-gas atoms are investigated using an improved version of the strong-field approximation, which realistically models the respective atom. Two types of enhancements are found and explained in terms of constructive interference of the contributions of a large number of long quantum orbits. The first type is observed for intensities slightly below channel closings. Its intensity dependence is comparatively smooth and it is generated by comparatively few (of the order of 20) orbits. The second type occurs precisely at channel closings and exhibits an extremely sharp intensity dependence. It requires constructive interference of a very large number of long orbits (several hundreds) and generates cusps in the electron spectrum at integer multiples of the laser-photon energy. An interpretation of these enhancements as a threshold phenomenon is also given. An interplay of different types of the threshold anomalies is observed. The position of both types of enhancements, in the photoelectron-energy--laser-intensity plane, shifts to the next channel closing intensity with the change of the ground-state parity. The enhancements gradually disappear with decreasing laser pulse duration. This confirms the interpretation of enhancements as a consequence of the interference of long strong-laser-field-induced quantum orbits.

  3. Resonancelike enhancement in high-order above-threshold ionization of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Okunishi, M.; Hao, X.; Ito, Y.; Chen, J.; Yang, Y.; Lucchese, R. R.; Zhang, M.; Yan, B.; Li, W. D.; Ding, D.; Ueda, K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the resonance-like enhancement (RLE) in high-order above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra of the polyatomic molecules C2H4 and C2H6 . In the spectrum-intensity maps, strong and weak RLE areas emerge alternatively for both C2H4 and C2H6 but in different sequences. Theoretical calculations using the strong-field approximation reproduce the experimental observation and analysis shows that the different characteristics of the two molecules can be attributed to interference effects of molecular orbitals with different symmetries. For C2H4 , the RLE structures are attributed to C-C centers of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) orbital. For C2H6 , in contrast, the C-C centers of the HOMO and HOMO-1 orbitals do not contribute to the RLE due to destructive interference but the hydrogen centers of the bonding HOMO-1 orbital give rise to the multiple RLE regions. In addition, clear experimental evidence of the existence of two types of the RLE and their dependence on the parity of ground state is shown. Our result, which strongly supports the channel-closing mechanism of the RLE, for the first time reveals the important role of low-lying orbitals and the differing roles of different atomic centers in the high-order ATI spectrum of molecules.

  4. Influence of multi-photon excitation on the atomic above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan-Ye; Wang, Chun-Cheng; Li, Su-Yu; Guo, Fu-Ming; Ding, Da-Jun; Wim-G, Roeterdink; Chen, Ji-Gen; Zeng, Si-Liang; Liu, Xue-Shen; Yang, Yu-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Using the time-dependent pseudo-spectral scheme, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of a hydrogen-like atom in a strong laser field in momentum space. The intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum in above-threshold ionization is obtained and further analyzed. We find that with the increase of the laser intensity, the above-threshold ionization emission spectrum exhibits periodic resonance structure. By analyzing the population of atomic bound states, we find that it is the multi-photon excitation of bound state that leads to the occurrence of this phenomenon, which is in fairly good agreement with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11274141, 11034003, 11304116, 11274001, and 11247024), and the Jilin Provincial Research Foundation for Basic Research, China (Grant No. 20140101168JC).

  5. Analytic model for the description of above-threshold ionization by an intense short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, M. V.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Geng, Ji-Wei; Peng, Liang-You; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-06-01

    We present an analytic model for the description of above-threshold ionization (ATI) of an atom by an intense, linearly polarized short laser pulse. Our treatment is based upon a description of ATI by an infinitely long train of short laser pulses whereupon we take the limit that the time interval between pulses becomes infinite. In the quasiclassical approximation, we provide detailed quantum-mechanical derivations, within the time-dependent effective range (TDER) model, of the closed-form formulas for the differential probability P (p) of ATI by an intense, short laser pulse that were presented briefly by Frolov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 213002 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.213002] and that were used to describe key features of the high-energy part of ATI spectra for H and He atoms in an intense, few-cycle laser pulse, using a phenomenological generalization of the physically transparent TDER results to the case of real atoms. Moreover, we extend these results here to the case of an electron bound initially in a p state; we also take into account multiple-return electron trajectories. The ATI amplitude in our approach is given by a coherent sum of partial amplitudes describing ionization by neighboring optical cycles near the peak of the intensity envelope of a short laser pulse. These results provide an analytical explanation of key features in short-pulse ATI spectra, such as the left-right asymmetry in the ionized electron angular distribution, the multiplateau structures, and both large-scale and fine-scale oscillation patterns resulting from quantum interferences of electron trajectories. Our results show that the shape of the ATI spectrum in the middle part of the ATI plateau is sensitive to the spatial symmetry of the initial bound state of the active electron. This sensitivity originates from the contributions of multiple-return electron trajectories. Our analytic results are shown to be in good agreement with results of numerical solutions of the

  6. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions with intense circularly polarized attosecond XUV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2012-05-01

    Photoionization of aligned and fixed nuclei three-dimensional H2+ and two-dimensional H2 by intense circularly polarized attosecond extreme ultraviolet laser pulses is investigated from numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Molecular above-threshold-ionization angular distributions are found to be rotated with respect to the two laser perpendicular polarizations or, equivalently the symmetry axes of the molecule. The angle of rotation is critically sensitive to laser wavelength λ, photoelectron energy Een, and molecular internuclear distance R. The correlated interaction of the two electrons in H2 is shown to also influence such angular distribution rotations in different electronic states.

  7. GeV Electrons Acceleration in Focused Laser Fields after Above-threshold Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2003-04-09

    Electrons produced as a result of above-threshold ionization of high-Z atoms can be accelerated by currently producible laser pulses up to GeV energies, as shown recently in Hu and Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) Article No. 245003. To describe electron acceleration by general focused laser fields, we employ an analytical model based on a Hamiltonian, fully relativistic, ponderomotive approach. Analytical expressions are derived and the applicability conditions of the ponderomotive formulation are studied both analytically and numerically. The theoretical predictions are supported by the numerical simulations.

  8. Dressed-bound-state molecular strong-field approximation: Application to above-threshold ionization of heteronuclear diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hasovic, E.; Busuladzic, M.; Becker, W.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2011-12-15

    The molecular strong-field approximation (MSFA), which includes dressing of the molecular bound state, is introduced and applied to above-threshold ionization of heteronuclear diatomic molecules. Expressions for the laser-induced molecular dipole and polarizability as functions of the laser parameters (intensity and frequency) and molecular parameters [molecular orientation, dipole, and parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)] are presented. Our previous MSFA theory, which incorporates the rescattering effects, is generalized from homonuclear to heteronuclear diatomic molecules. Angle- and energy-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization spectra of oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules, exemplified by the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule, exhibit pronounced minima, which can be related to the shape of their HOMO-electron-density distribution. For the CO molecule we have found an analytical condition for the positions of these minima. We have also shown that the effect of the dressing of the HOMO is twofold: (i) the laser-induced Stark shift decreases the ionization yield and (ii) the laser-induced time-dependent dipole and polarizability change the oscillatory structure of the spectra.

  9. Suppression of the contribution of short trajectories into above-threshold ionisation spectra by a two-colour laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Zheltukhin, A. N.; Silaev, A. A.; Knyazeva, D. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Flegel', A. V.; Frolov, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied spectra of above-threshold ionisation of atoms by a two-colour laser field with collinear linearly polarised components. We have found a sharp (gap-like) dependence of the length of the high-energy plateau in above-threshold ionisation spectra on the relative phase of the two-colour field at comparable intensities of the field components. Using the quasi-classical analysis we have shown that this effect results from the suppression of partial above-threshold ionisation amplitudes, associated with closed classical trajectories of an electron in the laser field, within a certain range of relative phase values.

  10. Phase space path-integral formulation of the above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D. B.

    2013-04-15

    Atoms and molecules submitted to a strong laser field can emit electrons of high energies in the above-threshold ionization (ATI) process. This process finds a highly intuitive and also quantitative explanation in terms of Feynman's path integral and the concept of quantum orbits [P. Salieres et al., Science 292, 902 (2001)]. However, the connection with the Feynman path-integral formalism is explained only by intuition and analogy and within the so-called strong-field approximation (SFA). Using the phase space path-integral formalism we have obtained an exact result for the momentum-space matrix element of the total time-evolution operator. Applying this result to the ATI we show that the SFA and the so-called improved SFA are, respectively, the zeroth- and the first-order terms of the expansion in powers of the laser-free effective interaction of the electron with the rest of the atom (molecule). We have also presented the second-order term of this expansion which is responsible for the ATI with double scattering of the ionized electron.

  11. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. III. High-order above-threshold ionization by an elliptically polarized field

    SciTech Connect

    Busuladzic, M.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2009-07-15

    We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of diatomic molecules having different symmetries by an elliptically polarized laser field using the modified molecular strong-field approximation. The yields of high-energy electrons contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra strongly depend on the employed ellipticity. This is more pronounced if the major axis of the polarization ellipse is parallel or perpendicular to the molecular axis and at the end of the high-energy plateau. For the O{sub 2} molecule (characterized by {pi}{sub g} symmetry) the maximum yield is observed for some value of the ellipticity {epsilon} different from zero. On the other hand, in the same circumstances, the N{sub 2} molecule ({sigma}{sub g}) behaves as an atom, i.e., the yield is maximum for {epsilon}=0. These characteristics of the photoelectron spectra remain valid in a wide region of the molecular orientations and laser peak intensities. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra are considered in detail: by changing the molecular orientation one or other type of the symmetry emerges or disappears. Presenting differential ionization spectra in the ionized electron energy-emission angle plane we have observed similar interference effects as in the HATI spectra governed by a linearly polarized field.

  12. Strong-field approximation for ionization of a diatomic molecule by a strong laser field. III. High-order above-threshold ionization by an elliptically polarized field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busuladžić, M.; Gazibegović-Busuladžić, A.; Milošević, D. B.

    2009-07-01

    We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of diatomic molecules having different symmetries by an elliptically polarized laser field using the modified molecular strong-field approximation. The yields of high-energy electrons contributing to the plateau region of the photoelectron spectra strongly depend on the employed ellipticity. This is more pronounced if the major axis of the polarization ellipse is parallel or perpendicular to the molecular axis and at the end of the high-energy plateau. For the O2 molecule (characterized by πg symmetry) the maximum yield is observed for some value of the ellipticity ɛ different from zero. On the other hand, in the same circumstances, the N2 molecule (σg) behaves as an atom, i.e., the yield is maximum for ɛ=0 . These characteristics of the photoelectron spectra remain valid in a wide region of the molecular orientations and laser peak intensities. The symmetry properties of the molecular HATI spectra are considered in detail: by changing the molecular orientation one or other type of the symmetry emerges or disappears. Presenting differential ionization spectra in the ionized electron energy-emission angle plane we have observed similar interference effects as in the HATI spectra governed by a linearly polarized field.

  13. Above-Threshold Ionization of Quasiperiodic Structures by Low-Frequency Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catoire, F.; Bachau, H.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the theoretical problem of the photoelectron cutoff change in periodical structures induced by an infrared laser field. We use a one-dimensional Kronig-Penney potential including a finite number of wells, and the analysis is fulfilled by resolving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The electron spectra, calculated for an increasing number of wells, clearly show that a plateau quickly appears as the periodic nature of the potential builds up, even at a moderate intensity (10 TW /cm2 ). Varying the intensity from 10 to 30 TW /cm2 we observe a net increase of both the yield and accessible energy range of the ionization spectrum. In order to gain insight into the dynamics of the system at these intensities, we use an analytical approach, based on exact solutions of the full Hamiltonian in a periodic potential. We show that the population transfers efficiently from lower to upper bands when the Bloch and laser frequencies become comparable. The model leads to a quantitative prediction of the intensity range where ionization enters the nonperturbative regime. Moreover, it reveals the physics underlying the increase of the photoelectron energy cutoff at moderate intensities, as observed experimentally.

  14. Above-threshold ionization near the 3p4d {sup 1}F{sup o} autoionizing state in magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, A.; Baynard, T.; Berry, R.S.; Martin, F.; Bachau, H.

    2005-05-15

    Two-photon above-threshold ionization (ATI) relative cross sections from the 3 {sup 1}P state of Mg have been measured using two-color ionization in the focus of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and have been calculated using the Green's-function method in the Feshbach formalism and an L{sup 2}-integrable close-coupling approach, with a basis of L{sup 2}-integrable B-spline functions. We report these cross sections in the region of 3d4p {sup 1}F{sup o} autoionizing state, with photon energies of 3.3-3.6 eV. This is one of the few direct comparisons between ab initio theory and experiments in ATI in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance. A good agreement between theory and experiment is found in the relative total cross sections.

  15. Controlling high-order harmonic generation and above-threshold ionization with an attosecond-pulse train

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Salieres, P.; Villain, P.; Lewenstein, M.

    2006-11-15

    We perform a detailed analysis of how high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI) can be controlled by a time-delayed attosecond-pulse train superposed to a strong, near-infrared laser field. In particular we show that the high-order harmonic and photoelectron intensities, the high-order harmonic plateau structure and cutoff energies, and the ATI angular distributions can be manipulated by changing this delay. This is a direct consequence of the fact that the attosecond pulse train can be employed as a tool for constraining the instant an electronic wave packet is ejected in the continuum. A change in such initial conditions strongly affects its subsequent motion in the laser field, and thus HHG and ATI. In our studies, we employ the strong-field approximation and explain the features observed in terms of interference effects between various electron quantum orbits. Our results are in agreement with recent experimental findings and theoretical studies employing purely numerical methods.

  16. Discerning the direct and indirect ionization processes in the photo-double-ionization of 1, 1-C2H2F2 near and above threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaire, B.; Bocharova, I.; Sturm, F. P.; Gehrken, N.; Rist, J.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th.; Berry, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Keiling, M.; Moradmand, A.; Landers, A.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Sann, H.; Kunitski, M.; Doerner, R.

    2014-05-01

    We have studied the photo-double-ionization of 1, 1-C2H2F2 near and above threshold using linearly polarized single photons (40 to 70eV). Kinematically complete experiments were achieved for the nondissociative ionization (NDI) and all ionic two body break up channels by measuring the electrons and recoil ions in coincidence with the COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) method. Using electron-ion and electron-electron energy correlation maps as well as asymmetry parameters and relative angles between the emitted electrons, we were able to trace the electronic states involved and distinguish between the direct and indirect ionization mechanisms of the NDI and the fragmentation processes. Supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences of the U.S. Department of Energy at LBNL under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Imaging the geometrical structure of the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion by high-order above-threshold ionization in an intense laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yingchun; Fu Panming; Wang Bingbing; Yan Zongchao; Gong Jiangbin

    2009-12-15

    Using a frequency-domain theory, we demonstrate that an angle-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum carries three pieces of important information: the fingerprint of the molecular wave function in the direct above-threshold-ionization amplitude, the geometrical structure of the molecule in the potential scattering between two plane waves, and the interaction between the ionized electron and the laser field, manifested in a phase factor associated with laser-assisted collisions. As a result all main interference features in the HATI spectrum can be physically explained. As an application it is pointed out that the skeleton structure of a molecule can be better imaged using lasers of higher frequencies.

  18. Measurement of intensity-dependent rates of above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.D.

    1991-04-01

    Measured rates of multiphoton ionization (MPI) from the ground state of atomic hydrogen by a linearly polarized, subpicosecond KrF laser pulse at 248 nm wavelength are compared to predictions of lowest-order perturbation theory, Floquet theory, and Keldysh-Faisal-Reiss (KFR) theory with and without Coulomb correction for peak irradiance of 3 {times} 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}. The Coulomb-corrected Keldysh model falls closest to the measured rates, the others being much higher or much lower. At 5 {times} 10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2}, the number of ATI electrons decreased by a factor of approximately 40 with each additional photon absorbed. ATI of the molecular hydrogen background and of atoms from photodissociation of the molecules were also observed. The experiment employed a crossed-beam technique at ultrahigh vacuum with an rf-discharge atomic hydrogen source and a magnetic-bottle type electron time-of-flight spectrometer to count the electrons in the different ATI channels separately. The apparatus was calibrated to allow comparison of absolute as well as relative ionization rates to the theoretical predictions. This calibration involved measuring the distribution of irradiance in a focal volume that moved randomly and changed its size from time to time. A data collection system under computer control divided the time-of-flight spectra into bins according to the energy of each laser pulse. This is the first measurement of absolute rates of ATI in atomic hydrogen, and the first measurement of absolute test of MPI in atomic hydrogen without a large factor to account for multiple modes in the laser field. As such, the results of this work are important to the development of ATI theories, which presently differ by orders of magnitude in their prediction of the ionization rates. They are also important to recent calculations of temperatures in laser-heated plasmas, many of which incorporate KFR theory.

  19. Angle-Resolved High-Order Above-Threshold Ionization of a Molecule: Sensitive Tool for Molecular Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Busuladzic, M.; Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2008-05-23

    The strong-field approximation for ionization of diatomic molecules by an intense laser field is generalized to include rescattering of the ionized electron off the various centers of its molecular parent ion. The resulting spectrum and its interference structure strongly depend on the symmetry of the ground state molecular orbital. For N{sub 2}, if the laser polarization is perpendicular to the molecular axis, we observe a distinct minimum in the emission spectrum, which survives focal averaging and allows determination of, e.g., the internuclear separation. In contrast, for O{sub 2}, rescattering is absent in the same situation.

  20. Rotations of molecular photoelectron angular distributions in above threshold ionization of H2+ by intense circularly polarized attosecond UV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2014-10-01

    We present molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in multi-photon ionization processes by circularly polarized attosecond UV laser pulses. Simulations are performed on the single electron aligned molecular ion H_2^+ by solving corresponding 3D time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Numerical results of molecular above threshold ionization (MATI) show that rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular and polarization axes depend on pulse intensities and photoelectron kinetic energies. We attribute the rotation to Γ, the difference between parallel and perpendicular ionization probabilities. It is found that in a resonant ionization process, the rotation angle is also a function of the symmetry of intermediate electronic states. The coherent population transfer between the initial and the resonant electronic states is controlled by pulse intensities. Such dependence of rotations on the pulse intensity is absent in Rydberg resonant ionizations as well as in MATI at large energy photons ℏω > Ip, where ω is angular frequency of photons and Ip is the molecular ionization potential. We describe these processes by a multi-photon perturbation theory model. Effects of molecular alignment and pulse ellipticities on rotations are investigated, confirming the essence of the ionization parameter Γ in rotations of MPADs.

  1. Simulation of the above-threshold-ionization experiment using the molecular strong-field approximation: The choice of gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Busuladzic, M.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate how various versions of the molecular strong-field approximation (MSFA) agree with the experiment by Grasbon et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 041402(R) (2001)], in which the suppression of the ionization yield in the low-energy spectrum of the O{sub 2} molecule, compared to the spectrum of its companion atom Xe, was observed. In this experiment, it was also found that the spectrum of the N{sub 2} molecule is comparable to the corresponding spectrum of its companion atom Ar. We show that the length-gauge version of the MSFA with the initial state dressed by the laser field gives the best agreement with the experimental data for both O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} molecules.

  2. Vibrationally resolved electron-nuclear energy sharing in above-threshold multiphoton dissociation of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xufei; Li, Min; Shao, Yun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Xie, Xiguo; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-07-01

    We study the photon energy sharing between the photoelectron and the nuclei in the process of above-threshold multiphoton dissociative ionization of CO molecules by measuring the joint energy spectra. The experimental observation shows that the electron-nuclear energy sharing strongly depends on the vibrational state. The experimental observation shows that both the energy deposited to the nuclei of C O+ and the emitted photoelectron decrease with increasing the vibrational level. Through studying the vibrationally resolved nuclear kinetic energy release and photoelectron energy spectra at different laser intensities, for each vibrational level of C O+ , the nuclei always tend to take the same amount of energy in every vibrational level regardless of the laser intensity, while the energy deposited to the photoelectron varies with respect to the laser intensity because of the ponderomotive shifted energy and the distinct dissociative ionization mechanisms.

  3. Electron Rescattering in Above-Threshold Photodetachment of Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D. B.; Becker, W.; Bergues, B.; Hultgren, H.; Kiyan, I. Yu.

    2010-03-12

    We present experimental and theoretical results on photodetachment of Br{sup -} and F{sup -} in a strong infrared laser field. The observed photoelectron spectra of Br{sup -} exhibit a high-energy plateau along the laser polarization direction, which is identified as being due to the rescattering effect. The shape and the extension of the plateau is found to be influenced by the depletion of negative ions during the interaction with the laser pulse. Our findings represent the first observation of electron rescattering in above-threshold photodetachment of an atomic system with a short-range potential.

  4. High-energy above-threshold detachment from negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2004-11-01

    Above-threshold detachment of electrons from negative ions by an elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed within the strong-field approximation. The low-energy part of the spectrum, that is, its structure and its apparent cutoff, strongly depends on the orbital quantum number l of the initial ground state. The high-energy part is characterized by the usual extended plateau caused by rescattering, which is essentially independent of the ground state. The potential that the returning electron experiences during rescattering is modeled by the sum of a polarization potential and a static potential. This rescattering potential does not have much effect on the shape of the plateau, but it does on its height. For H{sup -} (l=0), the yield of rescattered electrons is five orders of magnitude below the direct electrons, while for I{sup -} (l=1) the yields only differ by a factor of 40. We also analyze the dependence of the angle-resolved energy spectrum on the ellipticity of the laser field and confirm general symmetry properties. An angle-integrated elliptic dichroism parameter is introduced and analyzed.

  5. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  6. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Haselton, H. H.; Laubert, R.; Mowat, J. R.; Thoe, R. S.; Peterson, R. S.; Sellin, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The foil-excitation method has been used to study the extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized oxygen and fluorine. Several previously unreported lines in heliumlike fluorine are reported and other newly reported lines in heliumlike oxygen have been measured to higher accuracy. Included in the measurements are certain heliumlike oxygen transitions of significance in interpretation of solar-flare spectral observations. The wavelength determinations are usually in good agreement with calculated results which includes relativistic corrections, but discrepancies arise when nonrelativistic calculations are used. A comparison of the present results and those recently obtained by theta-pinch and laser-induced plasma sources is made for both heliumlike and lithiumlike ions; a few discrepancies occur, with results in most cases in better agreement with relativistically corrected calculations. Certain unidentified lines in the spectra may be attributable to radiative transitions between quartet states of lithiumlike ions.

  8. Above threshold dissociation of LiNa +: monitoring an avoided crossing with femtosecond spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnier, S.; Toniolo, A.

    2001-04-01

    Computer simulations of one- and two-color experiments in above threshold dissociation (ATD) are reported for the first heteronuclear alkali ion LiNa +. We focus on the 1 2Σ +→1 2Π→4,5 2Σ + process, with dissociation to Li ++Na(3p) or Li(3s)+Na +. The product yields are determined by the presence of an avoided crossing between the 4 and 5 2Σ + potential curves, according to the frequency and delay of the second laser pulse.

  9. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1992-06-01

    The laser desorption and laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids are described with particular reference to their modes of fragmentation. Mass spectra of yohimbine, reserpine, quinine and quinidine are presented. Full experimental details are given.

  10. Quantum dynamics of Kerr optical frequency combs below and above threshold: Spontaneous four-wave mixing, entanglement, and squeezed states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical behavior of Kerr optical frequency combs is very well understood today from the perspective of the semiclassical approximation. These combs are obtained by pumping an ultrahigh-Q whispering-gallery mode resonator with a continuous-wave laser. The long-lifetime photons are trapped within the toruslike eigenmodes of the resonator, where they interact nonlinearly via the Kerr effect. In this article, we use quantum Langevin equations to provide a theoretical understanding of the nonclassical behavior of these combs when pumped below and above threshold. In the configuration where the system is under threshold, the pump field is the unique oscillating mode inside the resonator, and it triggers the phenomenon of spontaneous four-wave mixing, where two photons from the pump are symmetrically up- and down-converted in the Fourier domain. This phenomenon, also referred to as parametric fluorescence, can only be understood and analyzed from a fully quantum perspective as a consequence of the coupling between the field of the central (pumped) mode and the vacuum fluctuations of the various side modes. We analytically calculate the power spectra of the spontaneous emission noise, and we show that these spectra can be either single- or double-peaked depending on the value of the laser frequency, chromatic dispersion, pump power, and spectral distance between the central mode and the side mode of interest. We also calculate as well the overall spontaneous noise power per side mode and propose simplified analytical expressions for some particular cases. In the configuration where the system is pumped above threshold, we investigate the phenomena of quantum correlations and multimode squeezed states of light that can occur in the Kerr frequency combs originating from stimulated four-wave mixing. We show that for all stationary spatiotemporal patterns, the side modes that are symmetrical relative to the pumped mode in the frequency domain display quantum correlations

  11. Electrodynamic model of the field effect transistor application for THz/subTHz radiation detection: Subthreshold and above threshold operation

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrovolsky, V.

    2014-10-21

    Developed in this work is an electrodynamic model of field effect transistor (FET) application for THz/subTHz radiation detection. It is based on solution of the Maxwell equations in the gate dielectric, expression for current in the channel, which takes into account both the drift and diffusion current components, and the equation of current continuity. For the regimes under and above threshold at the strong inversion the response voltage, responsivity, wave impedance, power of ohmic loss in the gate and channel have been found, and the electrical noise equivalent power (ENEP) has been estimated. The responsivity is orders of magnitude higher and ENEP under threshold is orders of magnitude less than these values above threshold. Under the threshold, the electromagnetic field in the gate oxide is identical to field of the plane waves in free-space. At the same time, for strong inversion the charging of the gate capacitance through the resistance of channel determines the electric field in oxide.

  12. Laser-plasma spectra of highly ionized fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Nagel, D. J.; Behring, W. E.; Cowan, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Lines between 11.3 and 17.2 A of lithium-like, helium-like, and hydrogen-like fluorine have been observed in spectra of laser-produced plasmas. These lines include nine members of the Lyman series of F IX; eight members of the principal series of F VIII; and satellite lines arising from doubly excited configurations of F VII and F VIII. Similar satellite lines of the abundant solar elements have been identified in soft X-ray spectra of solar flares. A wavelength list of fluorine lines is given, and physical conditions in the plasma are discussed.

  13. Quality control for building libraries from electrospray ionization tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Neta, Pedatsur; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry coupled with liquid chromatography is a routine technique for identifying and quantifying compounds in complex mixtures. The identification step can be aided by matching acquired tandem mass spectra (MS(2)) against reference library spectra as is routine for electron ionization (EI) spectra from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, unlike the latter spectra, ESI MS(2) spectra are likely to originate from various precursor ions for a given target molecule and may be acquired at varying energies and resolutions and have characteristic noise signatures, requiring processing methods very different from EI to obtain complete and high quality reference spectra for individual analytes. This paper presents procedures developed for creating a tandem mass spectral library that addresses these factors. Library building begins by acquiring MS(2) spectra for all major MS(1) peaks in an infusion run, followed by assigning MS(2) spectra to clusters and creating a consensus spectrum for each. Intensity-based constraints for cluster membership were developed, as well as peak testing to recognize and eliminate suspect peaks and reduce noise. Consensus spectra were then examined by a human evaluator using a number of criteria, including a fraction of annotated peaks and consistency of spectra for a given ion at different energies. These methods have been developed and used to build a library from >9000 compounds, yielding 230,000 spectra. PMID:24896981

  14. New interpretations of measured antihydrogen velocities and field ionization spectra.

    PubMed

    Pohl, T; Sadeghpour, H R; Gabrielse, G

    2006-10-01

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations, showing that cold antihydrogen (H) atoms are produced when antiprotons (p) are gently heated in the side wells of a nested Penning trap. The observed H with high energies, that had seemed to indicate otherwise, are instead explained by a surprisingly effective charge-exchange mechanism. We shed light on the previously measured field-ionization spectrum, and reproduce both the characteristic low-field power law as well as the enhanced H production at higher fields. The latter feature is shown to arise from H toms too deeply bound to be described as guiding center atoms, atoms with internally chaotic motion. PMID:17155247

  15. Virtual detector methods for efficiently computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Alex; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a class of window-transform-based ``virtual detector'' methods for computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra by numerically analyzing the motion of nuclear or electronic quantum-mechanical wavepackets at the periphery of their numerical grids. While prior applications of such surface-flux methods considered semi-classical limits to derive ionization and dissociation spectra, we systematically include quantum-mechanical corrections and extensions to higher dimensions, discussing numerical convergence properties and the computational efficiency of our method in comparison with alternative schemes for obtaining momentum distributions. Using the example of atomic ionization by co- and counter-rotating circularly polarized laser pulses, we scrutinize the efficiency of common finite-difference schemes for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in virtual detection and standard Fourier-transformation methods for extracting momentum spectra. Supported by the DoE, NSF, and Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  16. New Measurements of Doubly Ionized Iron Group Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D. G.; Pickering, J. C.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. J.; Smith, Peter L.; Nave, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report new measurements of doubly ionized iron group element spectra, important in the analysis of B-type (hot) stars whose spectra they dominate. These measurements include Co III and Cr III taken with the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer and measurements of Co III taken with the normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at NIST, below 135 nm. We report new Fe III grating spectra measurements to complement our FT spectra. Work towards transition wavelengths, energy levels and branching ratios (which, combined with lifetimes, produce oscillator strengths) for these ions is underway.

  17. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  18. Effects of lowly ionized ions on silicon K-shell absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. G.; Shi, J. R.; Liang, G. Y.; Wang, F. L.; Zhong, J. Y.; Zhao, G.

    2016-05-01

    Context. In both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, K-shell absorption spectra have become powerful diagnostic tools to investigate electron density and temperature. These spectra are also widely used to verify the opacity codes in laboratory settings. Aims: We report the effects of the low ionization silicon ions, namely from Si I to Si V, which have rarely been considered in previous models, on the K-shell silicon absorption spectra. Methods: The Si K-shell atomic data were calculated with the flexible atomic code, which is a fully relativistic atomic program with configuration interaction taken into consideration. Detailed level accounting models were employed to calculate the absorption spectra. Results: We calculate the Si absorption spectra in local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with temperature and density ranges of 20-70 eV and ~1020 cm-3 to ~1022 cm-3, respectively, and show the contributions of the lowly ionized ions to the K-shell absorption spectra of silicon. We also investigate the effects of the different atomic data on the absorption spectra. We find good agreement between our results and these from OPLIB. Conclusions: We find that the contributions from these lowly ionized ions cannot be neglected at relative low temperatures. Accurate experimental measurements are needed to benchmark the theoretical calculations.

  19. Electronic structure and spectroscopy of nucleic acid bases: Ionization energies, ionization-induced structural changes, and photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Kostko, Oleg; Dolgikh, Stanislav; Landau, Arie; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2010-08-02

    We report high-level ab initio calculations and single-photon ionization mass spectrometry study of ionization of adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) and guanine (G). For thymine and adenine, only the lowest-energy tautomers were considered, whereas for cytosine and guanine we characterized five lowest-energy tautomeric forms. The first adiabatic and several vertical ionization energies were computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method for ionization potentials with single and double substitutions. Equilibrium structures of the cationic ground states were characterized by DFT with the {omega}B97X-D functional. The ionization-induced geometry changes of the bases are consistent with the shapes of the corresponding molecular orbitals. For the lowest-energy tautomers, the magnitude of the structural relaxation decreases in the following series G > C > A > T, the respective relaxation energies being 0.41, 0.32, 0.25 and 0.20 eV. The computed adiabatic ionization energies (8.13, 8.89, 8.51-8.67 and 7.75-7.87 eV for A,T,C and G, respectively) agree well with the onsets of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves (8.20 {+-} 0.05, 8.95 {+-} 0.05, 8.60 {+-} 0.05 and 7.75 {+-} 0.05 eV). Vibrational progressions for the S{sub 0}-D{sub 0} vibronic bands computed within double-harmonic approximation with Duschinsky rotations are compared with previously reported experimental photoelectron spectra.

  20. Low-Energy Peak Structure in Strong-Field Ionization by Mid-Infrared Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, C.; Dimitriou, K. I.; Arbó, D. G.; Tong, X.-M.; Kartashov, D.; Burgdörfer, J.; Gräfe, S.

    2013-03-01

    Using a quasiclassical approach, we demonstrate that the formation of the low-energy structure in above-threshold ionization spectra by intense, midinfrared laser pulses originates from a two-dimensional focusing of the strong-field dynamics in the energy-angular-momentum plane. We show that the low-energy structure is very sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field.

  1. An energy efficient sub-threshold to above-threshold level shifter using a modified Wilson current mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroof, Naeem; Sohail, Muhammad; Shin, Hyunchul

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a new energy efficient level shifter circuit is described for robust sub-threshold to above-threshold voltage conversion. The design is based on a modification of the Wilson current mirror that minimizes the static current and improves the energy efficiency. The proposed level shifter is capable of converting a 200 mV signal into a 1 V signal and operates correctly across process corners. At the design target (? 200 mV, input signal frequency = 1 MHz), the proposed level shifter exhibits a propagation delay of 20.17 ns, a static power dissipation of 11.07 nW, and the total energy per transition of 113.2 fJ. We compare our results with the design proposed by Lutkemeier and Ruckert (2010). At the design target, the energy delay product of our design is 81.53% that of the reference design and, over all the voltage range of ? from 160 mV to 1 V, the proposed circuit shows an average energy reduction of 14.71% compared to the reference design. Thorough variability analysis was performed using HSPICE Monte Carlo simulations for different values of ?, which reveals the robustness of the proposed design.

  2. Problems of theoretical interpretation of the spectra of highly ionized atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzikas, Z. B.

    1982-11-01

    The methods of theoretical and semiempirical investigation of energy spectra and electronic transitions in atoms and ions (non-relativistic approximation, taking into consideration relativistic effects as corrections in the framework of the Breit approximation as well as starting with relativistic wavefunctions) are surveyed. The problem of the identification and classification of the experimentally obtained energy spectra with the help of the optimal coupling scheme is considered. General relativistic and non-relativistic expressions for the operators of electric and magnetic multipole transitions, having unspecified values of the gauge condition of the electromagnetic field potential, are presented. The dependence of the oscillator strengths on this gauge condition is studied. Pecularities of the spectra and the structure of highly ionized atoms are discussed.

  3. Computational Prediction of Electron Ionization Mass Spectra to Assist in GC/MS Compound Identification.

    PubMed

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2016-08-01

    We describe a tool, competitive fragmentation modeling for electron ionization (CFM-EI) that, given a chemical structure (e.g., in SMILES or InChI format), computationally predicts an electron ionization mass spectrum (EI-MS) (i.e., the type of mass spectrum commonly generated by gas chromatography mass spectrometry). The predicted spectra produced by this tool can be used for putative compound identification, complementing measured spectra in reference databases by expanding the range of compounds able to be considered when availability of measured spectra is limited. The tool extends CFM-ESI, a recently developed method for computational prediction of electrospray tandem mass spectra (ESI-MS/MS), but unlike CFM-ESI, CFM-EI can handle odd-electron ions and isotopes and incorporates an artificial neural network. Tests on EI-MS data from the NIST database demonstrate that CFM-EI is able to model fragmentation likelihoods in low-resolution EI-MS data, producing predicted spectra whose dot product scores are significantly better than full enumeration "bar-code" spectra. CFM-EI also outperformed previously reported results for MetFrag, MOLGEN-MS, and Mass Frontier on one compound identification task. It also outperformed MetFrag in a range of other compound identification tasks involving a much larger data set, containing both derivatized and nonderivatized compounds. While replicate EI-MS measurements of chemical standards are still a more accurate point of comparison, CFM-EI's predictions provide a much-needed alternative when no reference standard is available for measurement. CFM-EI is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/cfm-id/ for download and http://cfmid.wishartlab.com as a web service. PMID:27381172

  4. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event and other experiments, based on liquid Ar detectors. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10-1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields, between 0.6 and 2.3 kV/cm, are determined in liquid Ar based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15-40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a computer program, to correctly determine the absorbed X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  5. Frequency-resolved photoelectron spectra of two-photon ionization of He by an attosecond pulse train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Tzallas, P.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Kovacev, M.; Kalpouzos, C.; Charalambidis, D.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    2006-06-01

    We present measured and calculated energy-resolved photoelectron spectra obtained through two-photon ionization of He induced by a superposition from the 9th to the 15th harmonic of a Ti:Sapph laser forming an attosecond (asec) pulse train. The reported measured spectra are a decisive step towards frequency-resolved two-XUV-photon ionization-based second-order autocorrelation (AC) of asec pulse trains, and thus towards a complete reconstruction of asec pulses.

  6. THE ROLE OF DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION ON NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS. II. EMITTED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    2010-12-20

    We present a grid of nonequilibrium ionization models for the X-ray spectra from supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration. The calculation follows the hydrodynamics of the blast wave as well as the time-dependent ionization of the plasma behind the shock. The ionization state is passed to a plasma emissivity code to compute the thermal X-ray emission, which is combined with the emission from nonthermal synchrotron emission to produce a self-consistent model for the thermal and nonthermal emission from cosmic-ray dominated shocks. We show how plasma diagnostics such as the G'-ratio of He-like ions, defined as the ratio of the sum of the intercombination, forbidden, and satellite lines to the resonance line, can vary with acceleration efficiency, and discuss how the thermal X-ray emission, when the time-dependent ionization is not calculated self-consistently with the hydrodynamics, can differ from the thermal X-ray emission from models which do account for the hydrodynamics. Finally, we compare the thermal X-ray emission from models which show moderate acceleration ({approx}35%) to the thermal X-ray emission from test-particle models.

  7. The effect of ionization on the infrared absorption spectra of PAHs: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, Doug J.; Miller, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The emission lines observed in many interstellar IR sources at 3.28, 6.2, 7.7, 8.7, and 11.3 microns are theorized to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These assignments are based on analyses of lab IR spectra of neutral PAHs. However, it is likely that in the interstellar medium that PAHs are ionized, i.e., are positively charged. Besides, as pointed out by Allamandola et al., although the IR emission band spectrum resembles what one might expect from a mixture of PAHs, it does not match in details such as frequency, band profile, or relative intensities predicted from the absorption spectra of any known PAH molecule. One source of more information to test the PAH theory is ab initio molecular orbital theory. It can be used to compute, from first principles, the geometries, vibrational frequencies, and vibrational intensities for model PAH compounds which are difficult to study in the lab. The Gaussian 86 computer program was used to determine the effect of ionization on the infrared absorption spectra of several small PAHs: naphthalene and anthracene. A preliminary report is presented of the results of these calculations.

  8. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  9. Effects of anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Mirza, U A; Chait, B T

    1994-09-15

    Positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of polypeptides are usually obtained from solutions that are acidified and therefore contain relatively high concentrations of anions. The present study describes an investigation of the effects of these ubiquitous anions on the positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectra of peptides and proteins. Certain anionic species in the spray solutions were observed to cause a marked decrease in the net average charge of peptide and protein ions in the mass spectra compared to the average charge measured in the absence of these anions. This charge neutralization effect was found to depend solely on the nature of the anionic species and was independent of the source of the anion (acid or salt), with the propensity for neutralization following the order: CCl3COO- > CF3COO- > CH3COO- approximately Cl-. A mechanism for the observed charge reduction effect is proposed that involves two steps. The first step occurs in solution, where an anion pairs with a positively charged basic group on the peptide. The second step occurs during the process of desolvation or in the gas phase, where the ion pair dissociates to yield the neutral acid and the peptide with reduced charge state. The different propensities for charge neutralization of the different anionic species is presumed to reflect the avidity of the anion-peptide interaction. These findings demonstrate that any attempt to correlate the distribution of charge states observed on proteins in the gas phase (by positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) with the net charge residing on the protein in solution will require that the described anion effect be taken into account. In addition, it appears that some control over the distribution of charge states on peptides and protein ions can be exercised by an appropriate choice of anion in the electrospray solution. PMID:7978296

  10. Converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms in hyperspherical partial wave theory at 6 eV above threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Das, J.N.; Paul, S.; Chakrabarti, K.

    2004-04-01

    Here we report a set of converged cross-section results for double photoionization of helium atoms obtained in the hyperspherical partial wave theory for equal energy sharing kinematics at 6 eV energy above threshold. The calculated cross section results are generally in excellent agreement with the absolute measured results of Doerner et al. [Phys. Rev. 57, 1074 (1998)].

  11. Ultraviolet and optical spectra of high-ionization Seyfert galaxies with narrow lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Peterson, Bradley M.; Korista, Kirk T.; Wagner, R. Mark; Aufdenberg, Jason P.

    1991-01-01

    Ultraviolet and optical spectra are presented for three unusual Seyfert galaxies (Mrk 1239, Mrk 42, and Mrk 493) that resemble Seyfert 1 galaxies in that they have strong high-ionization lines and strong nonstellar continua, but resemble Seyfert 2 galaxies in that the widths of their permitted lines are as narrow as the widths of their forbidden lines. The He II lambda 1640 and He II lambda 4686 lines are used to determine an upper limit to the reddening experienced by the emission lines. Published optical data show that these particular high-ionization narrow-line (HINL) Seyferts have low lambda 5007 H beta ratios and strong Fe II emission, which suggest the presence of high-density regions. The low Lalpha/H-beta ratios in these objects indicate that high-density clouds are indeed present, and, like the broad-line region clouds in Seyfert 1 galaxies, these clouds have large optical depths with partially ionized zones. Overall, the line ratios and continuum fluxes of these particular HINL Seyferts are indistinguishable from those of broad-lined Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  12. Hyperfine structure constants of singly ionized manganese obtained from analysis of Fourier Transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley-Smith, Keeley; Nave, Gillian; Imperial College London

    2016-01-01

    There is an on-going project in the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at NIST to obtain comprehensive spectral data for all of the singly ionized iron group elements and acquire more accurate energy levels, wavelengths and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants. The heavy abundance of the iron group elements and their contributions to a wide range of stellar spectra makes them of interest for astrophysical observations.Existing spectroscopic data for Mn are insufficient to model spectra obtained from HgMn stars such as HD 175640. Since manganese has an odd number of nucleons, its spectral lines generally exhibit HFS, a relativistic effect due to interaction between the magnetic moment of the nucleus and the orbiting electrons. If proper treatment of line broadening effects such as HFS is not taken, there is a poor fit of the lines in stellar spectra, leading to an overestimate of the abundance of Mn. The abnormally high abundance of manganese in HgMn stars means both weak and strong transitions are important. Weak lines may not be observed in the laboratory, but HFS constants for them can be derived from stronger transitions that combine with the two levels involved in the weak transition.Holt et al. (1999) measured HFS constants for 56 energy levels using laser spectroscopy. We have analyzed Fourier Transform spectra of a high current Mn/Ni hollow cathode lamp to obtain magnetic dipole A constants levels of Mn II. The A constants of Holt et al. (1999, MNRAS 306, 1007) for the z5P, z7P2, a5P and z5F levels were the starting point for our analysis, from which we derived A constants for 71 energy levels, including 51 previously unstudied levels. Our A constant for the a7S3 ground level differs by 5x10-4 cm-1 from that of Blackwell-Whitehead et al. (2005, ApJS 157, 402) and has a factor of 6 lower uncertainty.

  13. Non-equilibrium ionization by a periodic electron beam. I. Synthetic coronal spectra and implications for interpretation of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.; Mackovjak, Š.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Coronal heating is currently thought to proceed via the mechanism of nanoflares, small-scale and possibly recurring heating events that release magnetic energy. Aims: We investigate the effects of a periodic high-energy electron beam on the synthetic spectra of coronal Fe ions. Methods: Initially, the coronal plasma is assumed to be Maxwellian with a temperature of 1 MK. The high-energy beam, described by a κ-distribution, is then switched on every period P for the duration of P/ 2. The periods are on the order of several tens of seconds, similar to exposure times or cadences of space-borne spectrometers. Ionization, recombination, and excitation rates for the respective distributions are used to calculate the resulting non-equilibrium ionization state of Fe and the instantaneous and period-averaged synthetic spectra. Results: Under the presence of the periodic electron beam, the plasma is out of ionization equilibrium at all times. The resulting spectra averaged over one period are almost always multithermal if interpreted in terms of ionization equilibrium for either a Maxwellian or a κ-distribution. Exceptions occur, however; the EM-loci curves appear to have a nearly isothermal crossing-point for some values of κs. The instantaneous spectra show fast changes in intensities of some lines, especially those formed outside of the peak of the respective EM(T) distributions if the ionization equilibrium is assumed. Movies 1-5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Non-equilibrium ionization by a periodic electron beam. I. Synthetic coronal spectra and implications for interpretation of observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.; Mackovjak, Š.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Coronal heating is currently thought to proceed via the mechanism of nanoflares, small-scale and possibly recurring heating events that release magnetic energy. Aims: We investigate the effects of a periodic high-energy electron beam on the synthetic spectra of coronal Fe ions. Methods: Initially, the coronal plasma is assumed to be Maxwellian with a temperature of 1 MK. The high-energy beam, described by a κ-distribution, is then switched on every period P for the duration of P/ 2. The periods are on the order of several tens of seconds, similar to exposure times or cadences of space-borne spectrometers. Ionization, recombination, and excitation rates for the respective distributions are used to calculate the resulting non-equilibrium ionization state of Fe and the instantaneous and period-averaged synthetic spectra. Results: Under the presence of the periodic electron beam, the plasma is out of ionization equilibrium at all times. The resulting spectra averaged over one period are almost always multithermal if interpreted in terms of ionization equilibrium for either a Maxwellian or a κ-distribution. Exceptions occur, however; the EM-loci curves appear to have a nearly isothermal crossing-point for some values of κs. The instantaneous spectra show fast changes in intensities of some lines, especially those formed outside of the peak of the respective EM(T) distributions if the ionization equilibrium is assumed. Movies 1-5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Role of the support material on laser desorption/ionization mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Gruszecka, A; Szymanska-Chargot, M; Smolira, A; Cytawa, J; Michalak, L

    2008-04-01

    We report the results of experimental studies on the effects of sample supports in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). LDI time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra obtained for C(60) and insulin samples deposited onto standard stainless steel substrate and/or onto some non-metallic materials (glass, scotch tape, floppy disc foil, Teflon foil, photocopy film), all recorded under identical, typical experimental conditions, have been compared with regard to their intensity and quality. The LDI investigations show that compared with stainless steel, glass and floppy disc foil sample supports boost (2-3.5 times) ion yields for C(60)(+) and C(60)(-) ions, respectively. The stainless steel and scotch tape sample supports are the best for the mass resolution of positive ions and the formation of (C(60))(n)(-) (n ionization (MALDI) we did not observe significant differences in sensitivity for the support materials tested. A mechanism of ion formation in the desorption plume is suggested. PMID:18302166

  16. Mass spectra of organic and inorganic dust particles measured by an impact ionization mass analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, J. G.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Kempf, S.; Armes, S. P.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Westphal, A.

    2009-12-01

    The composition of individual cosmic dust particles can be measured in-situ using existing techniques and instrumentations. The dust particle impacting on a solid surface with hypervelocity (> 1 km/s) is vaporized and partially ionized. The generated ions are extracted and analyzed using time-of-flight methods. Laboratory calibration measurements are possible at the dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg, Germany. The accelerator is limited to using conductive dust that was limited in the past to Fe, Al or graphite samples. In the recent years, however, dust samples of organic materials and inorganic minerals of cosmic interest were developed that are suitable for application in the accelerator. This is achieved by coating micron and submicron sized dust particles by conductive polymers. Here we present the comparison of spectra measured using organic and inorganic dust samples (polystyrene, poly-[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulphide], Phyrotite). The particles were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km/s. Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 Daltons. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds.

  17. Highly Ionized Potassium Lines in Solar X-ray Spectra and the Abundance of Potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D.

    2010-02-01

    The abundance of potassium is derived from X-ray lines observed during flares by the RESIK instrument on the solar mission CORONAS-F between 3.53 Å and 3.57 Å. The lines include those emitted by He-like K and Li-like K dielectronic satellites, which have been synthesized using the CHIANTI atomic code and newly calculated atomic data. There is good agreement between observed and synthesized spectra, and the theoretical behavior of the spectra with varying temperature estimated from the ratio of the two GOES channels is correctly predicted. The observed fluxes of the He-like K resonance line per unit emission measure give log A(K) = 5.86 (on a scale log A(H) = 12), with a total range of a factor 2.9. This is higher than photospheric abundance estimates by a factor 5.5, a slightly greater enhancement than for other elements with first ionization potential (FIP) less than ~10 eV. There is, then, the possibility that enrichment of low-FIP elements in coronal plasmas depends weakly on the value of the FIP which for K is extremely low (4.34 eV). Our work also suggests that fractionation of elements to form the FIP effect occurs in the low chromosphere rather than higher up, as in some models.

  18. HIGHLY IONIZED POTASSIUM LINES IN SOLAR X-RAY SPECTRA AND THE ABUNDANCE OF POTASSIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.u

    2010-02-10

    The abundance of potassium is derived from X-ray lines observed during flares by the RESIK instrument on the solar mission CORONAS-F between 3.53 A and 3.57 A. The lines include those emitted by He-like K and Li-like K dielectronic satellites, which have been synthesized using the CHIANTI atomic code and newly calculated atomic data. There is good agreement between observed and synthesized spectra, and the theoretical behavior of the spectra with varying temperature estimated from the ratio of the two GOES channels is correctly predicted. The observed fluxes of the He-like K resonance line per unit emission measure give log A(K) = 5.86 (on a scale log A(H) = 12), with a total range of a factor 2.9. This is higher than photospheric abundance estimates by a factor 5.5, a slightly greater enhancement than for other elements with first ionization potential (FIP) less than {approx}10 eV. There is, then, the possibility that enrichment of low-FIP elements in coronal plasmas depends weakly on the value of the FIP which for K is extremely low (4.34 eV). Our work also suggests that fractionation of elements to form the FIP effect occurs in the low chromosphere rather than higher up, as in some models.

  19. The effects of ionization potential depression on the spectra emitted by hot dense aluminium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Thomas R.; Vinko, Sam M.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Richard W.; Wark, Justin S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) have demonstrated that the standard model used for simulating ionization potential depression (IPD) in a plasma (the Stewart-Pyatt (SP) model, J.C. Stewart and K.D. Pyatt Jr., Astrophysical Journal 144 (1966) 1203) considerably underestimates the degree of IPD in a solid density aluminium plasma at temperatures up to 200 eV. In contrast, good agreement with the experimental data was found by use of a modified Ecker-Kröll (mEK) model (G. Ecker and W. Kröll, Physics of Fluids 6 (1963) 62-69). We present here detailed simulations, using the FLYCHK code, of the predicted spectra from hot dense, hydrogenic and helium-like aluminium plasmas ranging in densities from 0.1 to 4 times solid density, and at temperatures up to 1000 eV. Importantly, we find that the greater IPDs predicted by the mEK model result in the loss of the n = 3 states for the hydrogenic ions for all densities above ≈0.8 times solid density, and for the helium-like ions above ≈0.65 solid density. Therefore, we posit that if the mEK model holds at these higher temperatures, the temperature of solid density highly-charged aluminium plasmas cannot be determined by using spectral features associated with the n = 3 principal quantum number, and propose a re-evaluation of previous experimental data where high densities have been inferred from the spectra, and the SP model has been used.

  20. Aliphatic hydrocarbon spectra by helium ionization mass spectrometry (HIMS) on a modified atmospheric-pressure source designed for electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihua; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-08-01

    Chemical-ionization techniques that use metastable species to ionize analytes traditionally use a flat pin or a sharp solid needle onto which the high potential needed to generate the discharge plasma is applied. We report here that direct analysis of samples containing volatile and semivolatile compounds, including saturated and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, can be achieved on any electrospray-ionization mass spectrometer by passing helium though the sample delivery metal capillary held at a high potential. In the helium plasma ionization source (HPIS) described here, the typical helium flow required (about 20-30 mL/min), was significantly lower than that needed for other helium-ionization sources. By this procedure, positive ions were generated by nominal hydride ion removal from molecules emanating from heated saturated hydrocarbons as large as tetratetracontane (C(44)H(90)), at capillary voltages ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 kV. Unsaturated hydrocarbons, on the other hand, underwent facile protonation under much lower capillary voltages (0.9 to 2.0 kV). Although saturated and monounsaturated hydrocarbons bearing the same number of carbon atoms generate ions of the same m/z ratio, a gas-phase deuterium exchange method is described to ascertain the identity of these isomeric ions originating from either protonation or hydride abstraction mechanisms. Moreover, mass spectrometric results obtained by exposing unsaturated hydrocarbons to D(2)O vapor in an HPIS-MS instrument confirmed that the proton donor for ionization of unsaturated hydrocarbons is protonated water. PMID:21953194

  1. Spectra of High-Ionization Seyfert 1 Galaxies: Implications for the Narrow-Line Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, David; Cohen, Ross D.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1996-01-01

    observational study produce line width correlations only if the width is defined by a parameter that is more sensitive to extended profile wings than is the FWHM. Our sample of six objects is in effect augmented by incorporating the larger sample (16 objects) of Veilleux into some of our discussion. This paper focuses on new interpretations of NLR emission-line spectra and line profiles that stem directly from the observations. Paper 2 focuses on modeling and complements this paper by illustrating explicitly the effects that spatial variations in electron density, ionization parameter, and column density have on model profiles. By comparing model profiles with the observed profiles presented here, as well as with those presented by Veilleux, Paper 2 yields insight into how the electron density, ionization parameter, and column density likely vary throughout the NLR.

  2. Spectra of High-Ionization Seyfert 1 Galaxies: Implications for the Narrow-Line Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, David; Cohen, Ross D.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1996-10-01

    width correlations only if the width is defined by a parameter that is more sensitive to extended profile wings than is the FWHM. Our sample of six objects is in effect augmented by incorporating the larger sample (16 objects) of Veilleux into some of our discussion. This paper focuses on new interpretations of NLR emission-line spectra and line profiles that stem directly from the observations. Paper II focuses on modeling and complements this paper by illustrating explicitly the effects that spatial variations in electron density, ionization parameter, and column density have on model profiles. By comparing model profiles with the observed profiles presented here, as well as with those presented by Veilleux, Paper II yields insight into how the electron density, ionization parameter, and column density likely vary throughout the NLR.

  3. Theory of Light Emission from Quantum Noise in Plasmonic Contacts: Above-Threshold Emission from Higher-Order Electron-Plasmon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for the description of light emission from plasmonic contacts based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. Our theory establishes a fundamental link between the finite-frequency quantum noise and ac conductance of the contact and the light emission. Calculating the quantum noise to higher orders in the electron-plasmon interaction, we identify a plasmon-induced electron-electron interaction as the source of experimentally observed above-threshold light emission from biased STM contacts. Our findings provide important insight into the effect of interactions on the light emission from atomic-scale contacts.

  4. Two-electron ionization in strong laser fields below intensity threshold: Signatures of attosecond timing in correlated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Denys I.; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2009-02-01

    We develop an analytical model of correlated two-electron ionization in strong infrared laser fields. The model includes all relevant interactions between the electrons, the laser field, and the ionic core nonperturbatively. We focus on the deeply quantum regime, where the energy of the active electron driven by the laser field is insufficient to collisionally ionize the parent ion, and the assistance of the laser field is required to create a doubly charged ion. In this regime, the electron-electron and the electron-ion interactions leave distinct footprints in the correlated two-electron spectra, recording the mutual dynamics of the escaping electrons.

  5. Single-hit spectroscopy of betatron X-ray spectra generated by laser wakefield acceleration using self and ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condamine, Florian; Schumaker, Will; Kotick, Jordan; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Fry, Alan; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Betatron X-ray created by laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are of fundamental interest in plasma physics due to their broadband X-ray spectra, compact source size and ultra short duration. In particular, the femtosecond duration of electrons bunches produced during LWFA offers the opportunity to study warm dense matter (WDM) in detail via pump/probe experiments. In this study, we used the SLAC MEC optical laser (Ti:S 800nm, 1J in 40fs) focused in a gas cell to generate betatron X-ray by using two LWFA techniques : self-injection and ionization-injection. Three different gas types (100%, 98% and 90% helium, doped with nitrogen) were investigated using a single hit detector to characterize X-ray spectra generated by the betatron source. We will compare results with self-injection and ionization-injection for different plasma conditions and several positions of the laser focal spot inside the gas cell.

  6. Interpreting the ionization sequence in star-forming galaxy emission-line spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.; Crider, Anthony; Meskhidze, Helen

    2016-05-01

    High-ionization star-forming (SF) galaxies are easily identified with strong emission-line techniques such as the BPT diagram, and form an obvious ionization sequence on such diagrams. We use a locally optimally emitting cloud model to fit emission-line ratios that constrain the excitation mechanism, spectral energy distribution, abundances and physical conditions along the star formation ionization sequence. Our analysis takes advantage of the identification of a sample of pure SF galaxies, to define the ionization sequence, via mean field independent component analysis. Previous work has suggested that the major parameter controlling the ionization level in SF galaxies is the metallicity. Here we show that the observed SF sequence could alternatively be interpreted primarily as a sequence in the distribution of the ionizing flux incident on gas spread throughout a galaxy. Metallicity variations remain necessary to model the SF sequence, however, our best models indicate that galaxies with the highest and lowest observed ionization levels (outside the range -0.37 < log [O III]/Hβ <-0.09) require the variation of an additional physical parameter other than metallicity, which we determine to be the distribution of ionizing flux in the galaxy.

  7. The Higgs portal above threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; McCullough, Matthew; Thalapillil, Arun

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson opens the door to new physics interacting via the Higgs Portal, including motivated scenarios relating to baryogenesis, dark matter, and electroweak naturalness. We systematically explore the collider signatures of singlet scalars produced via the Higgs Portal at the 14 TeV LHC and a prospective 100 TeV hadron collider. We focus on the challenging regime where the scalars are too heavy to be produced in the decays of an on-shell Higgs boson, and instead are produced primarily via an off-shell Higgs. Assuming these scalars escape the detector, promising channels include missing energy in association with vector boson fusion, monojets, and top pairs. We forecast the sensitivity of searches in these channels at √{s}=14 & 100 TeV and compare collider reach to the motivated parameter space of singlet-assisted electroweak baryogenesis, Higgs Portal dark matter, and neutral naturalness.

  8. Equal energy sharing double photoionization of the helium atom at 20 eV and 40 eV above threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. N.; Chakrabarti, K.; Paul, S.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we present triple differential cross sections for equal energy sharing kinematics for double photoionization of the helium atom at 20 and 40 eV above threshold in the framework of the hyperspherical partial wave theory. This supplements our earlier work [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 (2003) 2707] in which we were successful in showing fully, gauge independence of the results in our formalism. Also in this Letter we treat cases in which the Stokes parameter S1<1 so that partial polarization of the photon source is also taken into account. Agreement in shape with the convergent close coupling [A.S. Kheifets, 2003, private communication; H. Bräuning, et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 (1998) 5149] calculation and the experiments appears to be excellent.

  9. The generalization of Lu-Fano plot for multi-channel atomic spectra with multiple ionization thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Han, Xiao-Ying; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the detailed dynamics of electron-ion interactions is of fundamental importance in the fields of astrophysics and so on. It's important to provide the related atomic data with accuracies determined. Using our modified R-matrix code R-Eigen, we can directly calculate the short-range scattering matrices corresponding to the physical parameters associated with the multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) for both the discrete and continuous energy regions. Various physical quantities can then be derived from a straightforward application of the MQDT procedure. Through analytical continuation properties of short-range scattering matrices, we demonstrated that the precisions of scattering calculations can be determined readily in a systematical way by using the Lu-Fano plot for Kr atom with two ionization thresholds. We will show our studies of the graphical representations of the MQDT solutions of atomic spectra with multiple ionization thresholds, which is a generalization of Lu-Fano plot for the cases with two thresholds. In this way, we can determine the related scattering calculation precisions by using the spectroscopic data for general atoms with multiple ionization thresholds. We can also elucidate the intimate relations between the discrete energy levels and adjacent resonant autoionization spectra. National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274035).

  10. Soft x-ray spectra and collisional ionization equilibrium of iron ions with data upgrade of electron–ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Wei, H. G.; Zhao, G.; Zhong, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Line emissivities and ionic fraction in (non-)equilibrium are crucial for understanding the x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra. These emission originate from electron-impact excitations for a level population of highly charged ions in coronal-like plasma. Recently, a large amount of excitation data was generated within the R-matrix framework by the computational atomic physics community, especially the UK APAP network. These data take resonances in electron–ion collisions into account appropriately, which enhances the effective excitation rates and also the line emissivities in x-ray and EUV regions. For ionization equilibrium data, the earlier compilation by Mazzotta et al (1998 Astron. Astrophys. Supp. Ser. 133 403) was used extensively by the astronomical community until the update by Bryans et al (2006 Astrophys. J. Supp. Ser. 167 343), as well as the compilation of Dere (2007 Astron. Astrophys. 466 771) for electron-impact ionization rates. In past years, many experimental measurements have been performed of highly charged iron ions in heavy-ion storage ring facilities. In this work, we will investigate the line emissivities and ionization equilibrium of highly charged iron ions by using recent theoretical or experimental data of electron-impact excitations and ionizations.

  11. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  12. Relativistic model of secondary-electron energy spectra in electron-impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H. ); Manson, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    A relativistic model for differential electron-impact-ionization cross sections that allows the energy spectrum of secondary electrons to be calculated over a wide range of primary-electron energies is presented. The semiempirical method requires only experimental total ionization cross sections and optical oscillator strengths for the target species of interest, but other information, if available, can be incorporated to make the formulation still more accurate. Results for ionization of helium indicate that the lower limit on primary-electron energy for application of the model is about 100 eV. The simple analytic form of the model facilitates investigation of the regions of the secondary-electron energy spectrum where relativistic effects are important.

  13. Relative Abundances and Energy Spectra of C, N, and 0 as Measured by the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, E. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Ellison, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present results on the spectra and the relative abundances of C, N, and 0 nuclei in the cosmic radiation as measured from the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) . The ATIC detector has completed two successful balloon flights from McMurdo, Antarctica lasting a total of more than 35 days. ATIC is designed as a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation of the cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate calorimeter. It is equipped with a large area mosaic of silicon detector pixels capable of charge identification from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the middle and below a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target.

  14. Photoelectron momentum spectra for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Serge; Macek, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Full three-dimensional electron momentum distribution for multiphoton ionization of Hydrogen atoms by intense laser pulses are calculated by solving the time-dependent solutions of Schr"odinger equation on a three-dimensional lattice in a scaled coordinate representation (CSLTDSE). This approach allows one to circumvent many difficulties related to the propagation of wave function to macroscopic distances.

  15. Automatic Preocessing of Impact Ionization Mass Spectra Obtained by Cassini CDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since Cassini's arrival at Saturn in 2004, the Comic Dust Analyzer (CDA) has recorded nearly 200,000 mass spectra of dust particles. A majority of this data has been collected in Saturn's diffuse E ring where sodium salts embedded in water ice particles indicate that many particles are in fact frozen droplets from Enceladus' subsurface ocean that have been expelled from cracks in the icy crust. So far only a small fraction of the obtained spectra have been processed because the steps in processing the spectra require human manipulation. We developed an automatic processing pipeline for CDA mass spectra which will consistently analyze this data. The preprocessing steps are to de-noise the spectra, determine and remove the baseline, calculate the correct stretch parameter, and finally to identify elements and compounds in the spectra. With the E ring constantly evolving due to embedded active moons, this data will provide valuable information about the source of the E ring, the subsurface of Saturn's ice moon Enceladus, as well as about the dynamics of the ring itself.

  16. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Field: Identifying the Mechanisms behind the Correlated-Electron Momentum Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie

    Within the strong-field physics community, there has been increasing interest on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) induced by electron-electron (e-e) correlation. A large variety of novel phenomena has been revealed in experiments during the past decades. However, the theoretical understanding and interpretation of this process is still far from being complete. The most accurate simulation, i.e. the exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for two electrons in a laser field is computationally expensive. In order to overcome the difficulty, we proposed a feasible semiclassical model, in which we treat the tunneling ionization of the outmost electron quantum mechanically according to the ADK theory, sample the inner electron from microcanonical distribution and then evolve the two electrons with Newton's equations. With this model, we have successfully explained various NSDI phenomena, including the excessive DI yield, the energy spectra and angular distribution of photoelectrons. Very recently, it is adopted to reveal the physical mechanisms behind the fingerlike structure in the correlated electron momentum spectra, the unexpected correlation-anticorrelation transition close to the recollision threshold, and the anomalous NSDI of alkaline-earth-metal atoms in circularly polarized field. The obvious advantage of our model is that it gives time-resolved insights into the complex dynamics of NSDI, from the turn-on of the laser field to the final escape of the electrons, thus allowing us to disentangle and thoroughly analyze the underlying physical mechanisms.

  17. Electron-momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by an intense spatially inhomogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Pérez-Hernández, J. A.; Shaaran, T.; Roso, L.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-06-01

    We use the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (3 D-TDSE) to calculate angular electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields. An example for such inhomogeneous fields is the locally enhanced field induced by resonant plasmons, appearing at surfaces of metallic nanoparticles, nanotips, and gold bow-tie shaped nanostructures. Our studies show that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role on the above-threshold ionization process in the tunneling regime, causing significant modifications on the electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra, while its effects in the multiphoton regime appear to be negligible. Indeed, through the tunneling above-threshold ionization (ATI) process, one can obtain higher energy electrons as well as a high degree of asymmetry in the momentum space map. In this study we consider near infrared laser fields with intensities in the mid- 1014 W/cm2 range and we use a linear approximation to describe their spatial dependence. We show that in this case it is possible to drive electrons with energies in the near-keV regime. Furthermore, we study how the carrier envelope phase influences the emission of ATI photoelectrons for few-cycle pulses. Our quantum mechanical calculations are fully supported by their classical counterparts.

  18. Effect of relativity on the ionization spectra of the xenon fluorides XeFn (n=2, 4, 6).

    PubMed

    Pernpointner, Markus; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2005-06-01

    Noble gas compounds exhibit special chemical bonding situations and have been investigated by various spectroscopic and theoretical techniques. In this work we calculate the ionization spectra of the xenon fluorides (XeF2,XeF4, and XeF6) in the valence and subvalence (down to Xe 4d) areas by application of the recently developed Dirac-Hartree-Fock one-particle propagator technique. In this technique, the relativistic (four-component) and electron correlation effects are computed simultaneously. The xenon compounds show considerable spin-orbit splitting strongly influencing the photoelectron spectrum not reproducible in prior calculations. Comparison to one-component methods is made and the occurring satellite structures are interpreted. The satellite structures can be attributed either to the breakdown of the one-particle picture or to a reflection of intra-atomic and interatomic Auger decay processes within the molecule. PMID:15974733

  19. HST-COS OBSERVATIONS OF AGNs. I. ULTRAVIOLET COMPOSITE SPECTRA OF THE IONIZING CONTINUUM AND EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Stevans, Matthew; Danforth, Charles W. E-mail: matthew.stevans@colorado.edu

    2012-06-20

    The ionizing fluxes from quasars and other active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are critical for interpreting the emission-line spectra of AGNs and for photoionization and heating of the intergalactic medium. Using ultraviolet spectra from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have directly measured the rest-frame ionizing continua and emission lines for 22 AGNs. Over the redshift range 0.026 < z < 1.44, COS samples the Lyman continuum and many far-UV emission lines (Ly{alpha} {lambda}1216, C IV {lambda}1549, Si IV/O IV] {lambda}1400, N V {lambda}1240, O VI {lambda}1035). Strong EUV emission lines with 14-22 eV excitation energies (Ne VIII {lambda}{lambda}770, 780, Ne V {lambda}569, O II {lambda}834, O III {lambda}833, {lambda}702, O IV {lambda}788, 608, 554, O V {lambda}630, N III {lambda}685) suggest the presence of hot gas in the broad emission-line region. The rest-frame continuum, F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}{sub {nu}}}, shows a break at wavelengths {lambda} < 1000 A, with spectral index {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -0.68 {+-} 0.14 in the FUV (1200-2000 A) steepening to {alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.41 {+-} 0.21 in the EUV (500-1000 A). The COS EUV index is similar to that of radio-quiet AGNs in the 2002 HST/FOS survey ({alpha}{sub {nu}} = -1.57 {+-} 0.17). We see no Lyman edge ({tau}{sub HI} < 0.03) or He I {lambda}584 emission in the AGN composite. Our 22 AGNs exhibit a substantial range of FUV/EUV spectral indices and a correlation with AGN luminosity and redshift, likely due to observing below the 1000 A spectral break.

  20. The Effect of High-Lying Configurations and Ionization and Recombination Processes on Analyses of Solar and Stellar Coronal Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, Rami; Behar, Ehud; Doschek, George A.; Feldman, Uri

    2002-10-01

    This work addresses two topics important for the appropriate interpretation of astrophysical spectra. The first is the effect of high-lying levels on the atomic models and the second is the importance of ionization and recombination processes in forming line emission. In the first part of the work we study the influence of high-lying configurations on the calculated intensities of UV lines, particularly of O-like ions, observed by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer aboard the SOHO satellite. The high-lying configurations alter the line intensities through radiative cascades and configuration interaction effects. We find that cascades can significantly enhance the intensities of some lines of the considered ions by up to 65% at temperatures of the ion maximum fractional abundance. The enhancement due to cascades increases with increasing temperature and charge state. The configuration mixing effects can either enhance or reduce the line intensities. In a second study, we calculate the theoretical intensities of the soft X-ray Fe16+ lines arising from 2l-3l' transitions using a three-ion collisional-radiative model that includes the contribution of recombination and ionization processes to line formation. Dielectronic recombination is found to be particularly important. The newly calculated line intensities can explain the high values of the 2p-3s / 2p-3d intensity ratios, which are often obtained in astrophysical observations. Observed intensity ratios among the 2p-3s lines are also better reproduced.

  1. Improved Cell Typing by Charge-State Deconvolution of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Mass Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, Jon G.; Buzantu, Dan A.; Dare, Diane J.; Dragan, Yvonne P.; Chiarelli, M. Paul; Holland, Ricky D.; Beaudoin, Michael; Heinze, Thomas M.; Nayak, Rajesh; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2006-05-30

    Robust, specific, and rapid identification of toxic strains of bacteria and viruses, to guide the mitigation of their adverse health effects and optimum implementation of other response actions, remains a major analytical challenge. This need has driven the development of methods for classification of microorganisms using mass spectrometry, particularly matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS (MALDI) that allows high throughput analyses with minimum sample preparation. We describe a novel approach to cell typing based on pattern recognition of MALDI spectra, which involves charge-state deconvolution in conjunction with a new correlation analysis procedure. The method is applicable to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Charge-state deconvolution improves the quantitative reproducibility of spectra because multiply-charged ions resulting from the same biomarker attaching a different number of protons are recognized and their abundances are combined. This allows a clearer distinction of bacterial strains or of cancerous and normal liver cells. Improved class distinction provided by charge-state deconvolution was demonstrated by cluster spacing on canonical variate score charts and by correlation analyses. Deconvolution may enhance detection of early disease state or therapy progress markers in various tissues analyzed by MALDI.

  2. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 <= Gamma <= 3.4, 1 <= zeta <= 104, and 0.5 <= A(sub Fe) <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  3. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. III. A COMPLETE GRID OF IONIZED REFLECTION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; McClintock, J. E.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R. E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: thomas.dauser@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de E-mail: wiebke.eikmann@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2013-05-10

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index {Gamma} of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter {xi} at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A{sub Fe} relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 {<=} {Gamma} {<=} 3.4, 1 {<=} {xi} {<=} 10{sup 4}, and 0.5 {<=} A{sub Fe} {<=} 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/{approx}javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  4. AUTOMATED DECONVOLUTION OF COMPOSITE MASS SPECTRA OBTAINED WITH AN OPEN-AIR IONIZATIONS SOURCE BASED ON EXACT MASSES AND RELATIVE ISOTIPIC ABUNDANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemicals dispersed by accidental, deliberate, or weather-related events must be rapidly identified to assess health risks. Mass spectra from high levels of analytes obtained using rapid, open-air ionization by a Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART®) ion source often contain

  5. Numerical models for the diffuse ionized gas in galaxies. I. Synthetic spectra of thermally excited gas with turbulent magnetic reconnection as energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Lieb, S.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Lesch, H.; Hultzsch, P. J. N.; Birk, G. T.

    2012-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to verify whether turbulent magnetic reconnection can provide the additional energy input required to explain the up to now only poorly understood ionization mechanism of the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in galaxies and its observed emission line spectra. Methods: We use a detailed non-LTE radiative transfer code that does not make use of the usual restrictive gaseous nebula approximations to compute synthetic spectra for gas at low densities. Excitation of the gas is via an additional heating term in the energy balance as well as by photoionization. Numerical values for this heating term are derived from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic two-fluid plasma-neutral-gas simulations to compute energy dissipation rates for the DIG under typical conditions. Results: Our simulations show that magnetic reconnection can liberate enough energy to by itself fully or partially ionize the gas. However, synthetic spectra from purely thermally excited gas are incompatible with the observed spectra; a photoionization source must additionally be present to establish the correct (observed) ionization balance in the gas.

  6. A Test of Thick-Target Nonuniform Ionization as an Explanation for Breaks in Solar Flare Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, gordon; Dennis Brian R.; Tolbert, Anne K.; Schwartz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Solar nonthermal hard X-ray (HXR) flare spectra often cannot be fitted by a single power law, but rather require a downward break in the photon spectrum. A possible explanation for this spectral break is nonuniform ionization in the emission region. We have developed a computer code to calculate the photon spectrum from electrons with a power-law distribution injected into a thick-target in which the ionization decreases linearly from 100% to zero. We use the bremsstrahlung cross-section from Haug (1997), which closely approximates the full relativistic Bethe-Heitler cross-section, and compare photon spectra computed from this model with those obtained by Kontar, Brown and McArthur (2002), who used a step-function ionization model and the Kramers approximation to the cross-section. We find that for HXR spectra from a target with nonuniform ionization, the difference (Delta-gamma) between the power-law indexes above and below the break has an upper limit between approx.0.2 and 0.7 that depends on the power-law index delta of the injected electron distribution. A broken power-law spectrum with a. higher value of Delta-gamma cannot result from nonuniform ionization alone. The model is applied to spectra obtained around the peak times of 20 flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI from 2002 to 2004 to determine whether thick-target nonuniform ionization can explain the measured spectral breaks. A Monte Carlo method is used to determine the uncertainties of the best-fit parameters, especially on Delta-gamma. We find that 15 of the 20 flare spectra require a downward spectral break and that at least 6 of these could not be explained by nonuniform ionization alone because they had values of Delta-gamma with less than a 2.5% probability of being consistent with the computed upper limits from the model. The remaining 9 flare spectra, based on this criterion, are consistent with the nonuniform ionization model.

  7. New Measurement of Singly Ionized Selenium Spectra by High Resolution Fourier Transform and Grating Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Noman; Nave, G.; Kramida, A.; Ahmad, T.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.

    2015-05-01

    We report new measurements of singly ionised selenium, an element of the iron group detected in nearly twice as many planetary nebulae as any other trans-iron element. We use the NIST 2 m UV/Vis/IR and FT700 UV/Vis Fourier transform spectrometers over the wavelength range of 2000 Å-2.5 μm, supplemented in the lower wavelength region 300-2400 Å with grating spectra taken on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph. The analysis of Se II is being extended, covering the wide spectral region from UV to IR. From our investigation, we found serious inconsistency and incompleteness in the previously published results, where several levels were reported without any designation. The analysis is being revised and extended with the help of semiempirical quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations, starting with the 4s24p3- [4s24p2(4d +5d +5s +6s) +4s4p4] transition array. Out of fifty-two previously reported levels, we rejected thirteen and found several new level values. With the new measurements, we expect to observe transitions between 4s24p2(4d +5s) and 4s24p2(5p +4f), lying in the visible and IR region. A complete interpretation of the level system of both parities will be assisted by least squares fitted parametric calculations. In all, we have already classified about 450 observed lines involving 89 energy levels.

  8. A technique for obtaining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of poorly soluble and insoluble aromatic polyamides.

    PubMed

    Gies, Anthony P; Nonidez, William K

    2004-04-01

    Wet grinding methods for obtaining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of poorly soluble and insoluble low molecular mass oligomers (<4600 Da) of Nomex and Kevlar are described. Optimum conditions for sample preparation are given along with a detailed analysis of the spectra obtained. Two matrix materials were employed in this analysis, 1,8-dihydroxyanthrone (dithranol) and 3-aminoquinoline with potassium trifluoroacetate used as the cationizing agent. The spectra obtained in this study are sensitive to the matrix, molar mixing ratios of matrix/polymer/cationizing agent, and the sample preparation method. PMID:15053662

  9. Rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HCl via the F 1Δ2 Rydberg state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, V.

    1991-12-01

    Results of studies of rotational ion distributions in the X 2Π3/2 and X 2Π1/2 spin-orbit states of HCl+ resulting from (2+1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the S(0) branch of the F 1Δ2 Rydberg state are reported and compared with measured threshold-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy spectra reported recently [K. S. Haber, Y. Jiang, G. Bryant, H. Lefebvre-Brion, and E. R. Grant, Phys. Rev. A (in press)]. These results show comparable intensities for J+=3/2 of the X 2Π3/2 ion and J+=1/2 of the X 2Π1/2 ion. Both transitions require an angular momentum change of ΔN=-1 upon photoionization. To provide further insight into the near-threshold dynamics of this process, we also show rotationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions, alignment of the ion rotational levels, and rotational distributions for the parity components of the ion rotational levels. About 18% population is predicted to occur in the (+) parity component, which would arise from odd partial-wave contributions to the photoelectron matrix element. This behavior is similar to that in (2+1) REMPI via the S(2) branch of the F 1Δ2 state of HBr and was shown to arise from significant l mixing in the electronic continuum due to the nonspherical molecular ion potential. Rotational ion distributions resulting from (2+1) REMPI via the S(10) branch of the F 1Δ2 state are also shown.

  10. Thomson scattering and collisional ionization in the X-ray grating spectra of the recurrent nova U Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, M.; Behar, E.; Gallagher, J.; Bianchini, A.; Chiosi, E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Nelson, T.; Rauch, T.; Schaefer, B. E.; Tofflemire, B.

    2013-02-01

    We present a Chandra observation of the recurrent nova U Scorpii, done with the High Resolution camera-S (HRC-S) detector and the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) on day 18 after the observed visual maximum of 2010, and compare it with XMM-Newton observations obtained on days 23 and 35 after maximum. The total absorbed flux was in the range 2.2-2.6 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1, corresponding to unabsorbed luminosity 7-8.5 × 1036 ×(d/12 kpc)2 for N(H) = 2-2.7 × 1021 cm-2. On day 18, 70 per cent of the soft X-tray flux was in a continuum typical of a very hot white dwarf (WD) atmosphere, which accounted for about 80 per cent of the flux on days 23 and 35. In addition, all spectra display very broad emission lines, due to higher ionization stages at later times. With Chandra we observed apparent P Cygni profiles. We find that these peculiar profiles are not due to blueshifted absorption and redshifted emission in photoionized ejecta, like the optical P Cyg of novae, but they are rather a superposition of WD atmospheric absorption features reflected by the already discovered Thomson scattering corona, and emission lines due to collisional ionization in condensations in the ejecta. On days 23 and 35, the absorption components were no longer measurable, having lost the initial large blueshift that displaced them from the core of the broad emission lines. We interpret this as an indication that mass-loss ceased between day 18 and day 23. On day 35, the emission line spectrum became very complex, with several different components. Model atmospheres indicate that the WD atmospheric temperature was about 730 000 K on day 18 and reached 900 000-1000 000 K on day 35. This peak temperature is consistent with a WD mass of at least 1.3 M⊙.

  11. Statistical analysis of fragmentation patterns of electron ionization mass spectra of enolized-trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkaki, A. G.; Angelis, Y. S.; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A.; Koupparis, M.; Georgakopoulos, C.

    2009-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are included in the List of prohibited substances of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as substances abused to enhance athletic performance. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role in doping control analyses identifying AAS as their enolized-trimethylsilyl (TMS)-derivatives using the electron ionization (EI) mode. This paper explores the suitability of complementary GC-MS mass spectra and statistical analysis (principal component analysis, PCA and partial least squares-discriminant analysis, PLS-DA) to differentiate AAS as a function of their structural and conformational features expressed by their fragment ions. The results obtained showed that the application of PCA yielded a classification among the AAS molecules which became more apparent after applying PLS-DA to the dataset. The application of PLS-DA yielded a clear separation among the AAS molecules which were, thus, classified as: 1-ene-3-keto, 3-hydroxyl with saturated A-ring, 1-ene-3-hydroxyl, 4-ene-3-keto, 1,4-diene-3-keto and 3-keto with saturated A-ring anabolic steroids. The study of this paper also presents structurally diagnostic fragment ions and dissociation routes providing evidence for the presence of unknown AAS or chemically modified molecules known as designer steroids.

  12. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  13. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2016-07-21

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. PMID:27448875

  14. Magneto-Circular Dichroism Spectra of Cd1-xMnxTe-MnTe Multiple Quantum Well Prepared by Ionized-Cluster Beam Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anno, Hiroaki; Koyanagi, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kakuei

    1993-01-01

    Cd1-xMnxTe-MnTe multiple quantum wells were successfully grown on a sapphire (0001) substrate by the ionized-cluster beam deposition technique. In the magneto-circular dichroism spectra, peaks are observed at the energies where shoulders appear in the optical absorption spectra. The peaks shift toward higher energies as the Cd1-xMnxTe well width decreases. The magneto-optical effect is attributed to the Zeeman splitting of mini-band levels due to the spin exchange interaction between Mn2+ magnetic ions and electrons strongly confined in quantum wells.

  15. Spectroscopic detection of C IV λ1548 in a galaxy at z = 7.045: implications for the ionizing spectra of reionization-era galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Walth, Gregory; Charlot, Stéphane; Clément, Benjamin; Feltre, Anna; Gutkin, Julia; Richard, Johan; Mainali, Ramesh; Robertson, Brant; Siana, Brian; Tang, Mengtao; Schenker, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    We present Keck/MOSFIRE observations of UV metal emission lines in four bright (H = 23.9-25.4) gravitationally lensed z ≃ 6-8 galaxies behind the cluster Abell 1703. The spectrum of A1703-zd6, a highly magnified star-forming galaxy with a Lyα redshift of z = 7.045, reveals a confident detection of the nebular C IV λ1548 emission line (unresolved with full width at half-maximum<125 km s-1). UV metal emission lines are not detected in the three other galaxies. At z ≃ 2-3, nebular C IV emission is observed in just 1 per cent of UV-selected galaxies. The presence of strong C IV emission in one of the small sample of galaxies targeted in this paper may indicate that hard ionizing spectra are more common at z ≃ 7. The total estimated rest-frame equivalent width of the C IV doublet and C IV/Lyα flux ratio are comparable to measurements of narrow-lined AGNs. Photoionization models show that the nebular C IV line can also be reproduced by a young stellar population, with very hot metal-poor stars dominating the photon flux responsible for triply ionizing carbon. Regardless of the origin of the C IV, we show that the ionizing spectrum of A1703-zd6 is different from that of typical galaxies at z ≃ 2, producing more H ionizing photons per unit 1500 Å luminosity (log(ξion/erg- 1 Hz) = 25.68) and a larger flux density at 30-50 eV. If such extreme radiation fields are typical in UV-selected systems at z ≳ 7, it would indicate that reionization-era galaxies are more efficient ionizing agents than previously thought. Alternatively, we suggest that the small sample of Lyα emitters at z ≳ 7 may trace a rare population with intense radiation fields capable of ionizing their surrounding hydrogen distribution. Additional constraints on high-ionization emission lines in galaxies with and without Lyα detections will help clarify whether hard ionizing spectra are common in the reionization era.

  16. SC DHS InGaAsP/InP lasers (λ = 1.5-1.6 μm) with above-threshold internal quantum efficiency ηist about 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Ilya S.; Zegrya, Georgy G.; Skrynnikov, G. V.; Pikhtin, Nikita A.; Slipchenko, S. O.

    2003-06-01

    InGaAsP/InP SC DHS lasers with different waveguide design were fabricated and studied. Extremely high values of internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission ηist about 97% was demonstrated experimentally in structures with step-like waveguide design which is related to lowest leakage currents above threshold and reduced threshold carriers concentration. Theoretically was shown, that it is possible to create lasers emitting at λ = 1.5 μm, with an internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission close to 100%. ηist for structure with different waveguide design was calculated and prove to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. SC DHS InGaAsP/InP lasers (λ = 1.5-1.6 μm) with above-threshold internal quantum efficiency ηist about 100%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Ilya S.; Zegrya, Georgy G.; Skrynnikov, G. V.; Pikhtin, Nikita A.; Slipchenko, S. O.

    2002-06-01

    InGaAsP/InP SC DHS lasers with different waveguide design were fabricated and studied. Extremely high values of internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission ηist about 97% was demonstrated experimentally in structures with step-like waveguide design which is related to lowest leakage currents above threshold and reduced threshold carriers concentration. Theoretically was shown, that it is possible to create lasers emitting at λ = 1.5 μm, with an internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission close to 100%. ηist for structure with different waveguide design was calculated and prove to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Ionization yield and absorption spectra reveal superexcited Rydberg state relaxation processes in H2O and D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillion, J.-H.; Dulieu, F.; Baouche, S.; Lemaire, J.-L.; Jochims, H. W.; Leach, S.

    2003-07-01

    The absorption cross section and the ionization quantum yield of H2O have been measured using a synchrotron radiation source between 9 and 22 eV. Comparison between the two curves highlights competition between relaxation processes for Rydberg states converging to the first tilde A 2A 1 and to the second tilde B 2B 2 excited states of H2O+. Comparison with D2O absorption and ionization yields, derived from Katayama et al (1973 J. Chem. Phys. 59 4309), reveals specific energy-dependent deuteration effects on competitive predissociation and autoionization relaxation channels. Direct ionization was found to be only slightly affected by deuteration.

  19. Numerical simulation of strong-field electron spectra of Xe in the rescattering region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yaqiu

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the high-energy above-threshold ionization (HATI) plateau for Xe in a strong laser field at peak intensity of about 0.85×1014W/cm2 with wavelengths of 800, 1250, 1500, and 2000 nm. Numerical simulations are performed using a recently developed quantitative rescattering (QRS) model. According to the QRS model, the two-dimensional (2D) photoelectron momentum distribution can be treated as a product of the returning electron wave packet and the elastic differential cross section (DCS) for free electrons scattered with the parent ion. From the 2D momentum distributions, the HATI plateau can be obtained. By using different single-active electron potentials in the DCS calculations, we test the potential dependence of the high-energy plateau spectra. Good agreement between the simulated results and the experimental data confirms again the validity of the QRS model.

  20. High-energy electron-energy spectra of atoms undergoing tunneling and barrier-suppression ionization by superintense linearly polarized laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, V.P.; Sofronov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The high-energy electron-energy spectra of atoms and atomic ions undergoing direct tunneling or barrier-suppression ionization by superintense linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse are derived. The Landau-Dykhne adiabatic approximation is used. The new result is the simple analytic expression for the electron momentum spectrum along the polarization axis and along the other directions in the case of the relativistic quiver electron energies. The contribution from the direct tunneling ionization exceeds the contribution from the ionization occurring in the rescattering processes. The energy spectrum is independent of the laser frequency and of the nonrelativistic ionization potential of the atom (atomic ion) considered. The conclusions have been made that (1) the drift electron energy along the polarization axis is much greater than in other directions. (2) the energy distribution depends on the sign of the electron drift momentum along the propagation of laser radiation, and (3) the electron drift energy is the nonrelativistic quantity even when the quiver electron energy has high ultrarelativistic values.

  1. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-01

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He∗(2S1 and 2S3 ) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He∗-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN .

  2. Electron emission spectra of thermal collisions of He metastable atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces: Evidence for Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Sasaki, K.; Sogo, M.; Aoki, M.; Morikawa, Y.

    2009-10-15

    Electron emission spectra obtained by thermal collisions of He*(2{sup 1}S and 2{sup 3}S) atoms with Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces were measured to clarify the electronically excited atom-metal interactions. It has been recognized that the metastable atoms de-excite on ordinary noble- and transition-metal surfaces via resonance ionization (RI) followed by Auger neutralization (AN) without no indication of Penning ionization (PI). Our data show that this traditional criterion partially breaks down in the He*-Au(111) collision system. The local electronic states near the surface were examined by first-principles calculations using density functional theory. It reveals that the itinerant sp states are significantly spilled out toward the vacuum compared to the localized 5d states, and their asymptotic features play a crucial role in determining the branching ratio between PI and RI+AN.

  3. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  4. Theoretical basal Ca II and Mg II fluxes for late-type stars: results from acoustic wave spectra with time-dependent ionization and multilevel radiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawzy, Diaa E.

    2015-08-01

    Computations of chromospheric models and the resulting spectral line emission fluxes are presented for late-type stars exhibiting very low level of chromospheric activity, referred to as a basal flux stars or low activity stars. The computations are self-consistent, and consider the entire acoustic wave energy spectra generated in the stellar convection zones. We consider multilevel atomic models, take into account departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium and also consider the time-dependent ionization processes of hydrogen. We employ the new finding of the mixing-length parameter α = 1.8. The Ca II H+K and Mg II h+k line fluxes are computed assuming pseudo-partial redistribution. The results show the importance of time-dependent ionization in modelling the middle and high chromospheres. Models without considering time-dependent ionization overestimate the emitted Ca II fluxes by factors between 1.1 and 5.6 for F8V and M0V stars, respectively, while factors between 1.8 for G0V and 17.4 for M0V stars have been obtained for the Mg II fluxes. The theoretically computed basal fluxes in Ca II and Mg II, respectively, follow simple linear formulae depending on the effective temperature log Teff. The obtained results for Ca II fluxes show reasonable agreement with observations.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF STELLAR ROTATION. I. IMPACT ON THE IONIZING SPECTRA AND INTEGRATED PROPERTIES OF STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Emily M.; Leitherer, Claus; Ekstrom, Sylvia; Meynet, Georges; Schaerer, Daniel

    2012-05-20

    We present a sample of synthetic massive stellar populations created using the Starburst99 evolutionary synthesis code and new sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, including one set that adopts a detailed treatment of rotation. Using the outputs of the Starburst99 code, we compare the populations' integrated properties, including ionizing radiation fields, bolometric luminosities, and colors. With these comparisons we are able to probe the specific effects of rotation on the properties of a stellar population. We find that a population of rotating stars produces a much harder ionizing radiation field and a higher bolometric luminosity, changes that are primarily attributable to the effects of rotational mixing on the lifetimes, luminosities, effective temperatures, and mass-loss rates of massive stars. We consider the implications of the profound effects that rotation can have on a stellar population, and discuss the importance of refining stellar evolutionary models for future work in the study of extragalactic, and particularly high-redshift, stellar populations.

  6. The Effects of Stellar Rotation. I. Impact on the Ionizing Spectra and Integrated Properties of Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Leitherer, Claus; Ekstrom, Sylvia; Meynet, Georges; Schaerer, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    We present a sample of synthetic massive stellar populations created using the Starburst99 evolutionary synthesis code and new sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, including one set that adopts a detailed treatment of rotation. Using the outputs of the Starburst99 code, we compare the populations' integrated properties, including ionizing radiation fields, bolometric luminosities, and colors. With these comparisons we are able to probe the specific effects of rotation on the properties of a stellar population. We find that a population of rotating stars produces a much harder ionizing radiation field and a higher bolometric luminosity, changes that are primarily attributable to the effects of rotational mixing on the lifetimes, luminosities, effective temperatures, and mass-loss rates of massive stars. We consider the implications of the profound effects that rotation can have on a stellar population, and discuss the importance of refining stellar evolutionary models for future work in the study of extragalactic, and particularly high-redshift, stellar populations.

  7. Ionization injection effects in x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, K. T.; Zhao, T. Z.; Cole, J. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nees, J.; Wood, J. C.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-05-01

    Single photon counting techniques were used with an x-ray CCD camera to measure features of synchrotron-like x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with different injection techniques. Measurements were made using the Hercules laser system at the University of Michigan. With a single stage gas cell, we demonstrate that pure helium gas in our wakefield accelerator will produce spectra with higher critical energies than when helium mixed with nitrogen is used. This result was not evident when a two stage gas cell was used.

  8. The SERS spectra of alizarin and its ionized species: The contribution of the molecular resonance to the spectral enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofrumento, Cristiana; Platania, Elena; Ricci, Marilena; Mulana, Carla; Becucci, Maurizio; Castellucci, Emilio M.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum chemical calculations are today extensively used to model the SERS spectra of molecular systems as the interpretation of the experimental data is facilitated by progress in the efficiency of programs for computing derivative properties, such as normal-mode frequencies and spectral intensities. After that quantum chemical calculations furnish an invaluable aid to spectroscopists in the analysis and assignment of experimental vibrational spectra for complex poliatomics. The analysis of the vibrational properties of alizarin and its anions is presented. The experimental results obtained by Raman and SERS spectroscopy are discussed in comparison with the results of DFT calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-31g(d) level of theory. The surface selection rules for adsorbed molecule to metal nanoparticles are also applied for the explanation of the SERS experimental results. From the calculated spectra a hint to the contribution of molecular resonances to the SERS spectra can be obtained. The general spectral features of the SERS experimental data obtained with 514, 632, 785 and 1064 nm laser excitation wavelengths are satisfactorily reproduced.

  9. Ionization by few-cycle pulses: Tracing the electron orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D.B.; Paulus, G.G.; Becker, W.

    2005-06-15

    High-order above-threshold ionization by few-cycle laser pulses is analyzed in terms of quantum orbits. For a given carrier-envelope phase, the number of contributing orbits and their ionization and rescattering times determine the shape of the angle-resolved spectrum in all detail. Conversely, analysis of a given spectrum reveals the carrier-envelope phase and the various interfering pathways from which the electron could choose.

  10. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  11. High-resolution measurements of the K-alpha spectra of low-ionizationm species of iron: A new spectral signature of nonequilibrium ionization conditions in young supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.; Chen, M.; Kahn, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first systematic laboratory measurements of high-resolution K-alpha spectra of intermediate ions of iron, Fe X-XVII. These lines are not produced in collisional equilibrium plasmas because of the relevant charge states cannot exist at the high electron temperatures required for appreciable excitation of the K-alpha transitions. However, they can provide excellent spectral diagnostics for nonequilibrium ionization conditions, such the ionizing plasmas of young supernova remnants. To facilitate the line identifications, we compare our spectra with theoretical atomic calculations performed using multiconfiguration parametric potential and Dirac-Fock atomic codes. Our measurements also allow direct comparison with time-dependent ionization balance calculations for ionizing plasmas, and good agreement is found.

  12. Oil spill source identification by principal component analysis of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Corilo, Yuri E; Podgorski, David C; McKenna, Amy M; Lemkau, Karin L; Reddy, Christopher M; Marshall, Alan G; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2013-10-01

    One fundamental challenge with either acute or chronic oil spills is to identify the source, especially in highly polluted areas, near natural oil seeps, when the source contains more than one petroleum product or when extensive weathering has occurred. Here we focus on heavy fuel oil that spilled (~200,000 L) from two suspected fuel tanks that were ruptured on the motor vessel (M/V) Cosco Busan when it struck the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in November 2007. We highlight the utility of principal component analysis (PCA) of elemental composition data obtained by high resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry to correctly identify the source of environmental contamination caused by the unintended release of heavy fuel oil (HFO). Using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, we uniquely assigned thousands of elemental compositions of heteroatom-containing species in neat samples from both tanks and then applied principal component analysis. The components were based on double bond equivalents for constituents of elemental composition, CcHhN1S1. To determine if the fidelity of our source identification was affected by weathering, field samples were collected at various intervals up to two years after the spill. We are able to identify a suite of polar petroleum markers that are environmentally persistent, enabling us to confidently identify that only one tank was the source of the spilled oil: in fact, a single principal component could account for 98% of the variance. Although identification is unaffected by the presence of higher polarity, petrogenic oxidation (weathering) products, future studies may require removal of such species by anion exchange chromatography prior to mass spectral analysis due to their preferential ionization by ESI. PMID:24033143

  13. Intramolecular interactions of L-phenylalanine: Valence ionization spectra and orbital momentum distributions of its fragment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng; Falzon, Chantal

    2011-02-01

    Intramolecular interactions between fragments of L-phenylalanine, i.e., phenyl and alaninyl, have been investigated using dual space analysis (DSA) quantum mechanically. Valence space photoelectron spectra (PES), orbital energy topology and correlation diagram, as well as orbital momentum distributions (MDs) of L-phenylalanine, benzene and L-alanine are studied using density functional theory methods. While fully resolved experimental PES of L-phenylalanine is not yet available, our simulated PES reproduces major features of the experimental measurement. For benzene, the simulated orbital MDs for 1e(1g) and 1a(2u) orbitals also agree well with those measured using electron momentum spectra. Our theoretical models are then applied to reveal intramolecular interactions of the species on an orbital base, using DSA. Valence orbitals of L-phenylalanine can be essentially deduced into contributions from its fragments such as phenyl and alaninyl as well as their interactions. The fragment orbitals inherit properties of their parent species in energy and shape (ie., MDs). Phenylalanine orbitals show strong bonding in the energy range of 14-20 eV, rather than outside of this region. This study presents a competent orbital based fragments-in-molecules picture in the valence space, which supports the fragment molecular orbital picture and building block principle in valence space. The optimized structures of the molecules are represented using the recently developed interactive 3D-PDF technique. PMID:20806261

  14. Effect of Ionization on Infrared and Electronic Absorption Spectra of Methyl and Ethyl Formate in the Gas Phase and in Astrophysical H2O Ice: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganathappa, Mahadevappa; Chaudhari, Ajay

    2011-04-01

    This work reports infrared and electronic absorption spectra of trans and gauche conformers of neutral ethyl formate, trans and cis conformers of neutral methyl formate, their ions in the gas phase, and neutral ethyl and methyl formate in astrophysical H2O ice. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) method with TZVP basis set has been used to obtain ground-state geometries. An influence of ice on vibrational frequencies of neutral ethyl and methyl formate was obtained using integral equation formalism polarizable continnum model (IEFPCM). Significant shift in vibrational frequencies for neutral methyl and ethyl formate when studied in H2O ice and upon ionization is observed. Rotational and distortion constants for neutral ethyl and methyl formate from this work are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. Electronic absorption spectra of conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions are obtained using time-dependent density functional method (TDDFT). The nature of electronic transitions is also identified. We suggested lines especially good to detect these molecules in interstellar medium. Using these lines, we can identify the conformers of ethyl and methyl formate in gas phase and H2O ice in interstellar medium. This comparative study should provide useful guidelines to detect conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions in gas phase and neutral molecules in H2O ice in different astronomical environment.

  15. Multicomponent dynamics of coupled quantum subspaces and field-induced molecular ionizations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy

    2013-12-28

    To describe successive ionization steps of a many-electron atom or molecule driven by an ultrashort, intense laser pulse, we introduce a hierarchy of successive two-subspace Feshbach partitions of the N-electron Hilbert space, and solve the partitioned time-dependent Schrödinger equation by a short-time unitary algorithm. The partitioning scheme allows one to use different level of theory to treat the many-electron dynamics in different subspaces. We illustrate the procedure on a simple two-active-electron model molecular system subjected to a few-cycle extreme Ultra-Violet (XUV) pulse to study channel-resolved photoelectron spectra as a function of the pulse's central frequency and duration. We observe how the momentum and kinetic-energy distributions of photoelectrons accompanying the formation of the molecular cation in a given electronic state (channel) change as the XUV few-cycle pulse's width is varied, from a form characteristic of an impulsive ionization regime, corresponding to the limit of a delta-function pulse, to a form characteristic of multiphoton above-threshold ionization, often associated with continuous-wave infinitely long pulse. PMID:24387352

  16. Differential study on molecular suppressed ionization in intense linearly and circularly polarized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongkai; Liu, Yunquan; Liu, Xianrong; Liu, Hong; Yang, Yudong; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-12-01

    We present a differential study on above-threshold ionization of the O2 (N2) molecule as well as the companion atom Xe (Ar) (with close ionization potential) produced by linearly and circularly polarized laser fields (25 fs, 795 nm). The photoelectron angular distributions of the companion target are similar at the same laser condition. In both linearly and circularly polarized fields, we observe that the photoelectron yields of O2 are suppressed in the entire energy spectral range as compared with Xe with fully differential measurements, but not for the N2-Ar pair. This is different from the prediction of photoelectron energy spectra by the model including the interference terms [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.85.2280 85, 2280 (2000)], from which the low-energy photoelectrons of O2 were expected to be strongly suppressed in both linearly and circularly polarized laser fields. Resorting to the basic strong-field ionization picture, we believe that the lower orbital-dependent multiphoton excitation or tunneling possibility of O2 as compared with Xe is responsible for this effect. High-resolution fully differential data pose a stringent test on the current strong-field calculations on molecules.

  17. Multicomponent dynamics of coupled quantum subspaces and field-induced molecular ionizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy

    2013-12-01

    To describe successive ionization steps of a many-electron atom or molecule driven by an ultrashort, intense laser pulse, we introduce a hierarchy of successive two-subspace Feshbach partitions of the N-electron Hilbert space, and solve the partitioned time-dependent Schrödinger equation by a short-time unitary algorithm. The partitioning scheme allows one to use different level of theory to treat the many-electron dynamics in different subspaces. We illustrate the procedure on a simple two-active-electron model molecular system subjected to a few-cycle extreme Ultra-Violet (XUV) pulse to study channel-resolved photoelectron spectra as a function of the pulse's central frequency and duration. We observe how the momentum and kinetic-energy distributions of photoelectrons accompanying the formation of the molecular cation in a given electronic state (channel) change as the XUV few-cycle pulse's width is varied, from a form characteristic of an impulsive ionization regime, corresponding to the limit of a delta-function pulse, to a form characteristic of multiphoton above-threshold ionization, often associated with continuous-wave infinitely long pulse.

  18. Multicomponent dynamics of coupled quantum subspaces and field-induced molecular ionizations

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy

    2013-12-28

    To describe successive ionization steps of a many-electron atom or molecule driven by an ultrashort, intense laser pulse, we introduce a hierarchy of successive two-subspace Feshbach partitions of the N-electron Hilbert space, and solve the partitioned time-dependent Schrödinger equation by a short-time unitary algorithm. The partitioning scheme allows one to use different level of theory to treat the many-electron dynamics in different subspaces. We illustrate the procedure on a simple two-active-electron model molecular system subjected to a few-cycle extreme Ultra-Violet (XUV) pulse to study channel-resolved photoelectron spectra as a function of the pulse's central frequency and duration. We observe how the momentum and kinetic-energy distributions of photoelectrons accompanying the formation of the molecular cation in a given electronic state (channel) change as the XUV few-cycle pulse's width is varied, from a form characteristic of an impulsive ionization regime, corresponding to the limit of a delta-function pulse, to a form characteristic of multiphoton above-threshold ionization, often associated with continuous-wave infinitely long pulse.

  19. Communication: X-ray absorption spectra and core-ionization potentials within a core-valence separated coupled cluster framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriani, Sonia; Koch, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple scheme to compute X-ray absorption spectra (e.g., near-edge absorption fine structure) and core ionisation energies within coupled cluster linear response theory. The approach exploits the so-called core-valence separation to effectively reduce the excitation space to processes involving at least one core orbital, and it can be easily implemented within any pre-existing coupled cluster code for low energy states. We further develop a perturbation correction that incorporates the effect of the excluded part of the excitation space. The correction is shown to be highly accurate. Test results are presented for a set of molecular systems for which well converged results in full space could be generated at the coupled cluster singles and doubles level of theory only, but the scheme is straightforwardly generalizable to all members of the coupled cluster hierarchy of approximations, including CC3.

  20. First detection of ionized helium absorption lines in infrared K band spectra of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Block, David L.; Geballe, T. R.; Hanson, Margaret M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained high SNR, moderate-resolution K band spectra of two early O-type main sequence stars, HD 46150 O5 V, and HD 46223 O4 V, in the Rosette Nebula. We report the detection, for the first time, of the 2.189 micron He II line in O-type stars. Also detected is the 2.1661 micron Br-gamma line in absorption. The 2.058 micron He I line appears to be present in absorption in both stars, although its appearance at our resolution is complicated by atmospheric features. These three lines can form the basis for a spectral classification system for hot stars in the K band that may be used at infrared wavelengths to elucidate the nature of those luminous stars in otherwise obscured H II and giant H II regions.

  1. Comparison of the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of pyrrole and 2,5-dimethylpyrrole: Building toward an understanding of the electronic structure and photochemistry of porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beames, Joseph M.; Nix, Michael G. D.; Hudson, Andrew J.

    2009-11-01

    The photophysical properties of porphyrins have relevance for their use as light-activated drugs in cancer treatment and sensitizers in solid-state solar cells. However, the appearance of their UV-visible spectra is usually explained inadequately by qualitative molecular-orbital theories. We intend to gain a better insight into the intense absorption bands, and excited-state dynamics, that make porphyrins appropriate for both of these applications by gradually building toward an understanding of the macrocyclic structure, starting with studies of smaller pyrrolic subunits. We have recorded the (1+1) and (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of pyrrole and 2,5-dimethylpyrrole between 25 600 cm-1 (390 nm) and 48 500 cm-1 (206 nm). We did not observe a (1+1) REMPI signal through the optically bright B12 (ππ ∗) and A11 (ππ ∗) states in pyrrole due to ultrafast deactivation via conical intersections with the dissociative A12 (πσ ∗) and B11 (πσ ∗) states. However, we did observe (2+1) REMPI through Rydberg states with a dominant feature at 27 432 cm-1 (two-photon energy, 54 864 cm-1) assigned to a 3d←π transition. In contrast, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has a broad and structured (1+1) REMPI spectrum between 36 000 and 42 500 cm-1 as a result of vibronic transitions to the B12 (ππ ∗) state, and it does not show the 3d←π Rydberg transition via (2+1) REMPI. We have complemented the experimental studies by a theoretical treatment of the excited states of both molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and accounted for the contrasting features in the spectra. TD-DFT modeled the photochemical activity of both the optically dark π1σ∗ states (dissociative) and optically bright π1π∗ states well, predicting the barrierless deactivation of the B12 (ππ ∗) state of pyrrole and the bound minimum of the B12 (ππ ∗) state in 2,5-dimethylpyrrole. However, the quantitative agreement between vibronic

  2. In-depth analysis of Coulomb Volkov approaches to ionization and excitation by laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Guichard; H, Bachau; E, Cormier; R, Gayet; D, Rodriguez V.

    2007-10-01

    In perturbation conditions, above-threshold ionization spectra produced in the interaction of atoms with femtosecond short-wavelength laser pulses are well predicted by a theoretical approach called CV2-, which is based on Coulomb-Volkov-type states. However, when resonant intermediate states play a significant role in a multiphoton transition, the CV2- transition amplitude does not take their influence into account. In a previous paper, this influence has been introduced separately as a series of additional sequential processes interfering with the direct process. To give more credit to this procedure, called modified CV2- (MCV2-), a perturbation expansion of the standard CV2- transition amplitude is compared here to the standard time-dependent perturbation series and the strong field approximation. It is shown that the CV2- transition amplitude consists merely in a simultaneous absorption of all photons involved in the transition, thus avoiding all intermediate resonant state influence. The present analysis supports the MCV2- procedure that consists in introducing explicitly the other quantum paths, which contribute significantly to ionization, such as passing through intermediate resonances. Further, this analysis permits to show that multiphoton excitation may be addressed by a Coulomb-Volkov approach akin to MCV2-.

  3. Surface ionization of terpene hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zandberg, E.Y.; Nezdyurov, A.L.; Paleev, V.I.; Ponomarev, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    By means of a surface ionization indicator for traces of materials in the atmosphere it has been established that many natural materials containing terpenes and their derivatives are ionized on the surface of heated molybdenum oxide at atmospheric air pressure. A mass-spectrometer method has been used to explain the mechanism of ionization of individual terpene hydrocarbons and to establish its principles. The ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene, alloocimene, camphene, and also adamantane on oxidized tungsten under vacuum conditions has been investigated. The ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are ionized by surface ionization but camphene and adamantane are not ionized under vacuum conditions. The surface ionization mass spectra of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are of low line brightness in comparison with electron ionization mass spectra and differ between themselves. The temperature relations for currents of the same compositions of ions during ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are also different, which leads to the possibility of surface ionization analysis of mixtures of terpenes being ionized. The ionization coefficients of alloocimene and ..cap alpha..-pinene on oxidized tungsten under temperatures optimum for ionization and the ionization potentials of alloocimene molecules and of radicals (M-H) of both compounds have been evaluated.

  4. Atomic tunneling ionization in a photon picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujun; Esry, B. D.

    2015-05-01

    Above-threshold ionization (ATI) and high-harmonic generation (HHG) are studied by the photon-phase formalism in the tunneling regime. Different from the commonly used three-step model for understanding such strong-field phenomena, we show that each order of the ATI or HHG peaks is strongly associated with a single ``photon channel'' in the photon-phase picture. This simplicity allows an identification of pathways for each of the orders. This picture not only provides a convenient means to understand the electron dynamics in the strong field, but also gives insights that may help engineer laser pulses to manipulate the output of the ATI or HHG. We apply this method to quantify the strong-field-induced ionization threshold shift and study the carrier-envelope phase dependence of the HHG. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy

  5. Effects of Growth Medium on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption–Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectra: a Case Study of Acetic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wieme, Anneleen D.; Spitaels, Freek; Aerts, Maarten; De Bruyne, Katrien; Van Landschoot, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the growth medium used on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra generated and its consequences for species and strain level differentiation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were determined by using a set of 25 strains. The strains were grown on five different culture media that yielded a total of more than 600 mass spectra, including technical and biological replicates. The results demonstrate that the culture medium can have a profound effect on the mass spectra of AAB as observed in the presence and varying signal intensities of peak classes, in particular when culture media do not sustain optimal growth. The observed growth medium effects do not disturb species level differentiation but strongly affect the potential for strain level differentiation. The data prove that a well-constructed and robust MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification database should comprise mass spectra of multiple reference strains per species grown on different culture media to facilitate species and strain level differentiation. PMID:24362425

  6. The Role of Spin-Orbit Coupling in the Double-Ionization Photoelectron Spectra of XCN(2+) (X = Cl, Br, and I).

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumitra; Mishra, Sabyashachi

    2016-03-10

    The photoelectron spectra of XCN(2+) (X = Cl, Br, and I) were calculated employing ab initio electronic structure methods with high-level electron correlation and explicit treatment of spin-orbit coupling. Twelve scalar-relativistic excited states of the dicationic systems, calculated from state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI calculations, were used as the electronic basis to evaluate spin-orbit eigenstates. While the spin-orbit effects in ClCN(2+) are found to be negligible, the electronic spectroscopy of BrCN(2+) and ICN(2+) is significantly influenced by interstate spin-orbit coupling. Several electronic degeneracies are lifted, and many unexpected accidental degeneracies occurred due to the spin-orbit coupling. In particular, the spin-orbit interactions between X̃ (3)Σ(-)-b̃ (1)Σ(+), Ã (3)Π-c̃ (1)Π, B̃ (3)Δ-ã (1)Δ, and C̃ (3)Σ(+)-d̃ (1)Σ(-) are found to be strong in BrCN(2+) and ICN(2+). By careful analysis of the effect of spin-orbit coupling parameters and the spin-orbit eigenstate composition, an assignment of the hitherto unidentified experimental photoelectron bands of BrCN(2+) and ICN(2+) is presented. PMID:26881722

  7. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  8. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2015-10-28

    Ionization threshold energies of Al(n) (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions. PMID:26520519

  9. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-10-01

    Ionization threshold energies of Aln (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions.

  10. Nanocluster ionization energies and work function of aluminum, and their temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2015-10-28

    Ionization threshold energies of Al{sub n} (n = 32-95) nanoclusters are determined by laser ionization of free neutral metal clusters thermalized to several temperatures in the range from 65 K to 230 K. The photoion yield curves of cold clusters follow a quadratic energy dependence above threshold, in agreement with the Fowler law of surface photoemission. Accurate data collection and analysis procedures make it possible to resolve very small (few parts in a thousand) temperature-induced shifts in the ionization energies. Extrapolation of the data to the bulk limit enables a determination of the thermal shift of the polycrystalline metal work function, found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction based on the influence of thermal expansion. Small clusters display somewhat larger thermal shifts, reflecting their greater susceptibility to thermal expansion. Ionization studies of free size-resolved nanoclusters facilitate understanding of the interplay of surface, electronic, and lattice properties under contamination-free conditions.

  11. Delineation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from cystic fibrosis patients by fatty acid methyl ester profiles and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra using hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Pedrina Gonçalves; Mosel, Frank; Koehling, Hedda Luise; Mueller, Karl Dieter; Buer, Jan; Rath, Peter Michael; Steinmann, Joerg

    2014-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunist multidrug-resistant pathogen that causes a wide range of nosocomial infections. Various cystic fibrosis (CF) centres have reported an increasing prevalence of S. maltophilia colonization/infection among patients with this disease. The purpose of this study was to assess specific fingerprints of S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients (n = 71) by investigating fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) through gas chromatography (GC) and highly abundant proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and to compare them with isolates obtained from intensive care unit (ICU) patients (n = 20) and the environment (n = 11). Principal component analysis (PCA) of GC-FAME patterns did not reveal a clustering corresponding to distinct CF, ICU or environmental types. Based on the peak area index, it was observed that S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients produced significantly higher amounts of fatty acids in comparison with ICU patients and the environmental isolates. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) based on the MALDI-TOF MS peak profiles of S. maltophilia revealed the presence of five large clusters, suggesting a high phenotypic diversity. Although HCA of MALDI-TOF mass spectra did not result in distinct clusters predominantly composed of CF isolates, PCA revealed the presence of a distinct cluster composed of S. maltophilia isolates from CF patients. Our data suggest that S. maltophilia colonizing CF patients tend to modify not only their fatty acid patterns but also their protein patterns as a response to adaptation in the unfavourable environment of the CF lung. PMID:25266870

  12. Classical cutoffs for laser-induced nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, D.B.; Becker, W.

    2003-12-01

    Classical cutoffs for the momenta of electrons ejected in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization are derived for the recollision-impact-ionization scenario. Such simple cutoff laws can aid in the interpretation of the observed electron spectra.

  13. Accurate determination of absolute carrier-envelope phase dependence using photo-ionization.

    PubMed

    Sayler, A M; Arbeiter, M; Fasold, S; Adolph, D; Möller, M; Hoff, D; Rathje, T; Fetić, B; Milošević, D B; Fennel, T; Paulus, G G

    2015-07-01

    The carrier-envelope phase (CEP) dependence of few-cycle above-threshold ionization (ATI) of Xe is calibrated for use as a reference measurement for determining and controlling the absolute CEP in other interactions. This is achieved by referencing the CEP-dependent ATI measurements of Xe to measurements of atomic H, which are in turn referenced to ab initio calculations for atomic H. This allows for the accurate determination of the absolute CEP dependence of Xe ATI, which enables relatively easy determination of the offset between the relative CEP measured and/or controlled by typical devices and the absolute CEP in the interaction. PMID:26125386

  14. Steplike Intensity Threshold Behavior of Extreme Ionization in Laser-Driven Xenon Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Mueller, J. P.; Przystawik, A.; Goede, S.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Varin, C.; Ramunno, L.; Brabec, T.; Fennel, T.

    2010-07-30

    The generation of highly charged Xe{sup q+} ions up to q=24 is observed in Xe clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets and exposed to intense femtosecond laser pulses ({lambda}=800 nm). Laser intensity resolved measurements show that the high-q ion generation starts at an unexpectedly low threshold intensity of about 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Above threshold, the Xe ion charge spectrum saturates quickly and changes only weakly for higher laser intensities. Good agreement between these observations and a molecular dynamics analysis allows us to identify the mechanisms responsible for the highly charged ion production and the surprising intensity threshold behavior of the ionization process.

  15. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  16. Origin of Unexpected Low Energy Structure in Photoelectron Spectra Induced by Midinfrared Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chengpu; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2010-09-10

    Using a semiclassical model which incorporates tunneling and Coulomb field effects, the origin of the low-energy structure (LES) in the above-threshold ionization spectrum observed in recent experiments [Blaga et al., Nature Phys. 5, 335 (2009); Quan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 093001 (2009).] is identified. We show that the LES arises due to an interplay between multiple forward scattering of an ionized electron and the electron momentum disturbance by the Coulomb field immediately after the ionization. The multiple forward scattering is mainly responsible for the appearance of LES, while the initial disturbance mainly determines the position of the LES peaks. The scaling laws for the LES parameters, such as the contrast ratio and the maximal energy, versus the laser intensity and wavelength are deduced.

  17. Spin dynamics in relativistic ionization with highly charged ions in super-strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Müller, Carsten; Bauke, Heiko; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2014-03-01

    Spin dynamics and induced spin effects in above-threshold ionization of hydrogenlike highly charged ions in super-strong laser fields are investigated. Spin-resolved ionization rates in the tunnelling regime are calculated by employing two versions of a relativistic Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation (SFA). An intuitive simpleman model is developed which explains the derived scaling laws for spin flip and spin asymmetry effects. The intuitive model as well as our ab initio numerical simulations support the analytical results for the spin effects obtained in the dressed SFA where the impact of the laser field on the electron spin evolution in the bound state is taken into account. In contrast, the standard SFA is shown to fail in reproducing spin effects in ionization even at a qualitative level. The anticipated spin-effects are expected to be measurable with modern laser techniques combined with an ion storage facility.

  18. Ab initio investigation of the autoionization process Ar*(4s {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0})+Hg{yields}(Ar-Hg){sup +}+e{sup -}: Potential energy curves and autoionization widths, ionization cross sections, and electron energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Linda; Hotop, Hartmut; Meyer, Wilfried

    2005-05-08

    Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations have been performed for the Ar*(4s {sup 3}P{sub 2,0})+Hg collision complex. Feshbach projection based on orbital occupancy defines the entrance channel resonance states and provides their potential energy curves as well as resonance-continuum coupling matrix elements, which are turned into an autoionization width function by Stieltjes imaging. Coupled cluster calculations with singles, doubles, and pertubative triples [CCSD(T)] give the exit channel potential of ArHg{sup +}. The Hg{sup 20+} core is treated by a scalar-relativistic effective core potential, reparametrized to reproduce experimental excitation and ionization energies. Spin-orbit interaction is included for the Ar* open 3p shell. The nuclear motion is treated within the local complex potential approximation. Ionization occurs for 85% ({sup 3}P{sub 0}) and 98% ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) of the symmetry allowed close collisions. Calculated ionization cross sections show good agreement with experimental data. The difference potential of the collision complex is remarkably flat down to internuclear separations of 8a{sub 0} and leads to very sharp peaks in theoretical electron energy spectra for single collision energies. After accounting for the experimental energy distribution and the resolution function of the spectrometer, a very satisfying agreement with experimental electron energy spectra is found, including subtle differences due to spin-orbit coupling. Theoretical input appears indispensable for an analysis of the measured data in terms of potential energy curves and autoionization width functions.

  19. Wigner representation of ionization and scattering in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, C.; Kull, H.-J.; Fraiman, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of single-electron atoms with a strong laser field is studied in the Wigner representation. The Wigner function is a quasiprobability function in phase space that allows one to study position-momentum correlations. These correlations give a physical interpretation of the emergence of the above-threshold-ionization (ATI) energy spectrum. Conversely, the quantum-mechanical interference between electrons from neighboring photon orders can explain the spatial bunching of the electron density by the laser field. Furthermore, the Wigner function offers one a rather accurate and relatively efficient quasiclassical estimate of the bound-state population. This method is applied to laser-induced electron-ion scattering and the stationary regime of the bound-state population can be determined. The present calculations are performed for a one-dimensional Rosen-Morse potential. Extensions to general spherically symmetric atomic potentials are indicated.

  20. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  1. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  2. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  3. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  4. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  5. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  6. Photoelectron angular distributions in infrared one-photon and two-photon ionization of FEL-pumped Rydberg states of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Tachibana, T.; Nagaya, K.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Yase, S.; Yao, M.; Wada, S.; Hayashita, H.; Saito, N.; Callegari, C.; Prince, K. C.; O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Avaldi, L.; Miron, C.; Nagasono, M.; Togashi, T.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Sazhina, I. P.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Ueda, K.

    2013-10-01

    The photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) have been investigated for infrared (IR) ionization of He atoms excited to Rydberg states by extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses. The experiment was carried out with two pulses which do not overlap in time. Depending on the intensity of the IR pulses, one IR photon ionization or additionally two-photon above-threshold ionization is observed. For low IR intensity, the PAD is well described by a contribution of s and d partial waves in accordance with early experiments. At high IR intensity, the PAD for two IR photon ionization clearly shows the contribution of higher partial waves. The experimental data are compared with the results of theoretical calculations based on solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  7. Theoretical multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method study on the x-ray spectra of multiply ionized heavy atoms: The structure of the K. cap alpha. L/sup n/ lines

    SciTech Connect

    Polasik, M.

    1989-01-15

    Relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) calculations in the average-level (MCDF-AL) version with the inclusion of the transverse (Breit) interaction, self-energy, and vacuum polarization corrections have been carried out for molybdenum, palladium, lanthanum, and holmium to elucidate the structure of the K..cap alpha..L/sup n/ lines in their x-ray spectra. The examination of the effect of removing electrons from M shell on the principal K..cap alpha..(K..cap alpha..L/sup 0/) lines indicates that the most significant is the effect of removing 3p and then 3s subshells and that the effect of additional holes strongly increases with the atomic number. Detailed calculations have been performed on palladium to shed light on the structure of the K..cap alpha..L/sup n/ satellite lines of its x-ray spectrum, which is the first systematic theoretical study on the structure of these lines of a heavy atom. It has been found that in all cases the ''average'' positions of the groups of lines corresponding to the transitions of the type 1s/sup -1/2p/sup -n/..-->..2p/sup -(n+1)/ obtained in the present work are very close to the recently measured experimental positions of appropriate K..cap alpha..L/sup n/ satellite lines. On the other hand, the structure of the satellite lines has been shown to be much more complex than can be observed experimentally. The results of this work can be used to construct different theoretical K..cap alpha..L/sup n/ spectra for palladium, satisfactorily reproducing the shape of various experimental spectra generated by different inducing projectiles.

  8. NIST Databases on Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.; Martin, W. C.; Musgrove, A.; Fuhr, J. R.

    2002-11-01

    The NIST atomic and molecular spectroscopic databases now available on the World Wide Web through the NIST Physics Laboratory homepage include Atomic Spectra Database, Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms, Spectrum of Platinum Lamp for Ultraviolet Spectrograph Calibration, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Transition Probabilities, Bibliographic Database on Atomic Spectral Line Broadening, and Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) [1] offers evaluated data on energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities for atoms and atomic ions. Data are given for some 950 spectra and 70,000 energy levels. About 91,000 spectral lines are included, with transition probabilities for about half of these. Additional data resulting from our ongoing critical compilations will be included in successive new versions of ASD. We plan to include, for example, our recently published data for some 16,000 transitions covering most ions of the iron-group elements, as well as Cu, Kr, and Mo [2]. Our compilations benefit greatly from experimental and theoretical atomic-data research being carried out in the NIST Atomic Physics Division. A new compilation covering spectra of the rare gases in all stages of ionization, for example, revealed a need for improved data in the infrared. We have thus measured these needed data with our high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer [3]. An upcoming new database will give wavelengths and intensities for the stronger lines of all neutral and singly-ionized atoms, along with energy levels and transition probabilities for the persistent lines [4]. A critical compilation of the transition probabilities of Ba I and Ba II [5] has been completed and several other compilations of atomic transition probabilities are nearing completion. These include data for all spectra of Na, Mg, Al, and Si [6]. Newly compiled data for selected ions of Ne, Mg, Si and S, will form the basis for a new

  9. Double Ionization of Hydrogen Molecule by Intense Attosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Pindzola, M. S.; Robicheaux, F.

    2010-03-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations within the fixed nuclei approximation are carried out for the double ionization of H2 induced by an intense attosecond laser pulse at a photon energy of 40 eV. We consider here the two-photon absorption processes and examine the response of the ejected electrons, particularly the single- and the double-electron energy distributions, to linearly and circularly polarized pulse at laser intensities between 10^15 W/cm^2 and 10^16 W/cm^2. We find that, for both the linearly and circularly polarized pulses, sequential peaks and non-sequential wells appear in both the single- and double-electron energy distributions that are generally akin to the analogous two electrons photoemission processes in He atom driven by a linearly polarized intense attosecond pulse [1,2]. Furthermore, a clear signature of the sequential double-electron above threshold ionization process can be seen in the single- and double-electron energy distributions when a linearly polarized pulse is being used.[4pt] [1] I. F. Barna, J. Wang, and J. Burgdorfer, Phys. Rev. A. 73, 023402 (2006) [0pt] [2] T-G Lee, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux, Phys. Rev. A. 79, 053420 (2009)

  10. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  11. Improved strong-field approximation and quantum-orbit theory: Application to ionization by a bicircular laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2016-06-01

    A theory of above-threshold ionization of atoms by a strong laser field is formulated. Two versions of the strong-field approximation (SFA) are considered, the direct SFA and the improved SFA, which do not and do, respectively, take into account rescattering of the freed electron off the parent ion. The atomic bound state is included in two different ways: as an expansion in terms of Slater-type orbitals or as an asymptotic wave function. Even though we are using the single-active-electron approximation, multielectron effects are taken into account in two ways: by a proper choice of the ground state and by an adequate definition of the ionization rate. For the case of the asymptotic bound-state wave functions, using the saddle-point method, a simple expression for the T -matrix element is derived for both the direct and the improved SFA. The theory is applied to ionization by a bicircular field, which consists of two coplanar counterrotating circularly polarized components with frequencies that are integer multiples of a fundamental frequency ω . Special emphasis is on the ω -2 ω case. In this case, the threefold rotational symmetry of the field carries over to the velocity map of the liberated electrons, for both the direct and the improved SFA. The results obtained are analyzed in detail using the quantum-orbit formalism, which gives good physical insight into the above-threshold ionization process. For this purpose, a specific classification of the saddle-point solutions is introduced for both the backward-scattered and the forward-scattered electrons. The high-energy backward-scattering quantum orbits are similar to those discovered for high-order harmonic generation. The short forward-scattering quantum orbits for a bicircular field are similar to those of a linearly polarized field. The conclusion is that these orbits are universal, i.e., they do not depend much on the shape of the laser field.

  12. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  13. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  14. The investigation of time dependent flame structure by ionization probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventura, J. M. P.; Suzuki, T.; Yule, A. J.; Ralph, S.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ionization probes were used to measure mean ionization current and frequency spectra, auto-correlations and cross-correlations in jet flames with variation in the initial Reynolds numbers and equivalence ratios. Special attention was paid to the transitional region between the burner exit plane and the plane of onset of turbulence.

  15. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    portion is defined by the day/night boundary (known as the terminator).

    These two images illustrate only a small fraction of the information contained in a single LEISA scan, highlighting just one aspect of the power of infrared spectra for atmospheric studies.

  16. Excitation in the ionized diffuse interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, J.-P.; Stasińska, G.; Lequeux, J.

    1986-04-01

    Large-scale spectra have been obtained in the diffuse, ionized background of the Sagittarius-Carina arm and in the large complex of loops and filaments located in Orion and Eridanus. The intensity ratios of the emission lines of O III forbidden line, H-beta, H-alpha, N II forbidden line and S II forbidden line have been derived from these spectra, and are analyzed using models of H II regions in ionization equilibrium at very low densities, down to 0.01/cu cm. The confrontation of the observed ratios with the predictions of the models, which have been calibrated against observations of classical H II regions, shows that the S II forbidden line (6717 + 6731)/H-alpha ratio is too large to arise in a gas submitted only to a stellar flux with which it comes into ionization equilibrium, whatever the dilution of the matter. Contribution of shock excitation seems a natural explanation, as shocks are likely to occur considering the chaotic morphology of the studied regions. Some alternative explanations are also suggested. However, this medium is principally ionized by radiation, and it is shown that the forbidden line O III/H-beta ratios are well accounted for by the known population of O stars within the expected uncertainties, while ionization by white dwarfs or by B stars suggested by previous authors are excluded. The mean effective temperature for ionizing stars (less than 35,000 K) is lower than that of stars exciting classical H II regions.

  17. The ionization rate inversion of H? induced by the single and double UV photon(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Pei-Lun; He, Feng

    2013-11-01

    The ionization of H? in the strong UV laser pulse is studied by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. In analogy to Young's double-slit interference, the ionized electron originating from two nuclei will constructively, or destructively interfere, depending on the UV frequencies. The fluctuation of the ionization rate as a function of the laser frequency is observed. The destructive interference suppresses the single-photon ionization rate, so that the double-photon ionization rate can be larger than the single-photon ionization rate. When such an ionization-rate inversion happens, the electron momentum spectra splits into several peaks.

  18. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  19. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  20. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  1. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  2. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  3. Intensity oscillations in the carbon 1s ionization cross sections of 2-butyne

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Thomas X.; Zahl, Maria G.; Borve, Knut J.; Saethre, Leif J.; Decleva, Piero; Ponzi, Aurora; Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Thomas, T. Darrah

    2013-06-21

    Carbon 1s photoelectron spectra for 2-butyne (CH{sub 3}C{identical_to}CCH{sub 3}) measured in the photon energy range from threshold to 150 eV above threshold show oscillations in the intensity ratio C2,3/C1,4. Similar oscillations have been seen in chloroethanes, where the effect has been attributed to EXAFS-type scattering from the substituent chlorine atoms. In 2-butyne, however, there is no high-Z atom to provide a scattering center and, hence, oscillations of the magnitude observed are surprising. The results have been analyzed in terms of two different theoretical models: a density-functional model with B-spline atom-centered functions to represent the continuum electrons and a multiple-scattering model using muffin-tin potentials to represent the scattering centers. Both methods give a reasonable description of the energy dependence of the intensity ratios.

  4. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  5. Towards universal ambient ionization: direct elemental analysis of solid substrates using microwave plasma ionization.

    PubMed

    Evans-Nguyen, K M; Gerling, J; Brown, H; Miranda, M; Windom, A; Speer, J

    2016-06-21

    A microwave plasma was used for direct ambient ionization mass spectrometry of solid substrates, rapidly yielding atomic spectra without sample digestion or pre-treatment. Further, molecular spectra for the organic components of the substrate were obtained simultaneously, in an ambient ionization format. Initial characterization of the microwave plasma coupling to an ion trap mass spectrometer was carried out using solution standards and a microwave plasma torch (MPT) configuration. The configuration of the microwave plasma was then optimized for ambient ionization. The atomic and organic composition for samples applicable to nuclear and conventional forensic screening, including explosive/radionuclide mixtures and inorganic/organic gunshot residue component mixtures were successfully determined. The technologies employed are readily fieldable; the feasibility of a multimode ion source that could be coupled with a portable ion trap mass spectrometer for rapid, on-site, elemental, isotopic, and molecular screening of samples is demonstrated. PMID:26979768

  6. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  7. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-07-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) techniques. Rapid analyses of gas, liquid, and solid samples are possible with the adoption of various sample-introduction methods. This review sorts different ambient ionization techniques into two main subcategories, primarily on the basis of the ionization processes, that are further differentiated in terms of the approach used for sampling.

  8. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  9. Modeling of Ionization Physics with the PIC Code OSIRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Tsung, F.; Lee, S.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; O'Connell, C.; Dodd, E.; Decker, F.J.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Hemker, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Ren, C.; Raimondi, P.; Wang, S.; Walz, D.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    When considering intense particle or laser beams propagating in dense plasma or gas, ionization plays an important role. Impact ionization and tunnel ionization may create new plasma electrons, altering the physics of wakefield accelerators, causing blue shifts in laser spectra, creating and modifying instabilities, etc. Here we describe the addition of an impact ionization package into the 3-D, object-oriented, fully parallel PIC code OSIRIS. We apply the simulation tool to simulate the parameters of the upcoming E164 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We find that impact ionization is dominated by the plasma electrons moving in the wake rather than the 30 GeV drive beam electrons. Impact ionization leads to a significant number of trapped electrons accelerated from rest in the wake.

  10. Atmospheric pressure ionization and gas phase ion mobility studies of isomeric dihalogenated benzenes using different ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) featuring different ionization techniques was used to analyze isomeric ortho-, meta- and para-dihalogenated benzenes in order to assess how structural features affect ion formation and drift behavior. The structure of the product ions formed was investigated by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and IMS-MS coupling. Photoionization provided [M]+ ions for chlorinated and fluorinated compounds while bromine was cleaved from isomers of dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene. This ionization technique does not permit the different isomers to be distinguished. Comparable ions and additional clustered ions were obtained using 63Ni ionization. Depending on the chemical constitution, different clustered ions were observed in ion mobility spectra for the separate isomers of dichlorobenzene and dibromobenzene. Corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of dihalogenated compounds. Only clustered product ions were obtained. Corona discharge ionization enables the classification of different structural isomers of dichlorobenzene, dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene.

  11. Rocket measurements of mesospheric ionization irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, R. B.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The Langmuir probe technique for measurement of electron concentration in the mesosphere is capable of excellent altitude resolution, of order 1 m. Measurements from nine daytime rocket flights carrying an electron density fine structure experiment frequently show small scale ionization structures in the altitude region 70 to 90 km. The irregularities are believed to be the result of turbulent advection of ions and electrons. The fine structure experiment flown by the University of Illinois is described and methods of analyzing the collected data is presented. Theories of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are reviewed. Power spectra of the measured irregularities are calculated and compared to spectra predicted by turbulence theories.

  12. Ionized interstellar froth in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Gallagher, John S., III

    1990-01-01

    The warm interstellar medium of galaxies is a complicated place. It is often full of holes, neutral and ionized loops and shells, and diffuse ionized gas. Deep H alpha images of Magellanic-type irregular galaxies also reveal complex spatial structures consisting of loops and filaments in the interstellar gas outside of the boundaries of traditional HII regions. Researchers refer to these ionized structures as froth. Such structures could mark paths over which newly produced heavy elements are dispersed in irregular galaxies, and they could be the signatures of a feedback process related to star formation. In order to investigate the physical nature of the froth, researchers obtained narrow-band images and high and low dispersion spectra from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and deep blue-passband plates from the Canada-France-Hawaii Observatory (CFHO).

  13. Massive cluster impact ionization of saccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Dookeran, N.N.; Todd, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the utility of ionizing saccharides by massive cluster impact (MCI), a form of secondary ionization wherein the primary ions are high molecular weight clusters. For a number of compounds and classes, MCI yields copious secondary ions without prior derivitization or the need to find a suitable matrix. In fact, MCI can be used for in situ ionization of some analytes directly from biologic tissue. For the simple sugars and disaccharides that were studied, the authors found that persistent ( e.g. > 2 h) positive and negative secondary ion emission could almost always be detected from pure samples. The authors characterized the secondary anions from a variety of saccharides by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and found the behavior of the MS/MS spectra to be consistent, sensible, diagnostic and invariant with the dose suffered by the sample.

  14. Energy spectra and LET spectra of protons behind shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Sari; Barak, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    With the advent of devices sensitive to SEU due to direct ionization by protons, it became important to know the flux and energies of protons behind aluminum shielding or within satellites. We present new analytically derived expressions for the energy distribution of incident protons, after passing the shielding, and of secondary protons emitted within the shielding. The results are compared with those of the MULASSIS code. In some cases, like a satellite in a GCR orbit, the contribution of the secondary protons to SEU might be the dominant one. Proton energy-distributions behind shielding are proportional, at low energy values, to inverse proton-LET in aluminum. Their calculated LET-spectra in silicon can be used for evaluating SEU-rate in space. The analytic expressions presented here can be useful in calculating the influence of shielding on other incident ions and secondary ions.

  15. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  16. Multiple ionization of atomic targets by proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.; DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1982-10-01

    We have combined experimental measurements of multiply charged ion production, doubly differential electron emission cross sections and Auger electron spectra produced in fast proton noble-gas collisions with theoretical inner and outer shell ionization cross sections in an effort to provide a consistent description of the ionization process. A detailed analysis is provided for 1-4 MeV proton ionization of krypton. Our measured relative yields of Kr/sup +2/ and Kr/sup +3/ ions are in approximate agreement with photoionization results of Krause and Carlson. If we assume nearly half of the 3d vacancies created in Kr are filled through multiple (3 dNNN) Auger transitions, the M-subshell ionization cross sections that we derive from our Auger electron spectra are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The absolute yields of Kr/sup +2/ and Kr/sup +3/ are, however, a factor of 2 smaller than the calculated values.

  17. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  18. Degradation spectra of electrons in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. P.; Son, E. E.

    2015-11-01

    Theory and numerical simulations of degradation spectra of electrons in gases are presented. Theory is based on the power spectra of degradation charged particles as the spectra with fluxes in energy space. Numerical calculations of the electron energy distribution function have been performed for ionospheric gas mixtures constituted of molecules N2, O2 and atom O under influence of high energy electron source with detailed elementary electron collision processes with molecules and atoms being taken into consideration. The energy expenses of electrons into ionization, dissociation and excitation of various levels have been obtained so that to determine the rates of electron collision processes. The dependence of the electron energy expenses into various inelastic electronic processes upon the energy of primary electron source has been revealed. The results are presented for the rates of numerous elementary processes of electron interaction with basic ionospheric components to be suitably determined.

  19. Ultraviolet spectra and chromospheres of R stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Johnson, H. R.; Obrien, G. T.; Baumert, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Long-wavelength IUE spectra of 13 normal R stars and two hydrogen-deficient R0 supergiants were obtained. Early R stars are noted to have line spectra and levels of flux in the ultraviolet characteristic of G5-K2 III stars, whereas late R stars were observed to have colors and line spectra similar to late K and M stars, but with greatly enhanced strength of low-lying multiplets of neutral metals. Hydrogen-deficient carbon stars show readily apparent differences from the normal early R stars, reflecting their luminosity and somewhat higher temperatures. The lines of neutral metals in these stars are weakened, while those of ionized metals are strengthened.

  20. Ionization and scintillation of nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Matis, H. S.; Miller, T.; Nakajima, Y.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Shuman, D.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Castel, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Dias, T. H. V. T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gil, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jinete, M. A.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Moiseenko, A.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Natal da Luz, H.; Navarro, G.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Palma, R.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Tomás, A.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R. C.; White, J.; Yahlali, N.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization and scintillation produced by nuclear recoils in gaseous xenon at approximately 14 bar have been simultaneously observed in an electroluminescent time projection chamber. Neutrons from radioisotope α-Be neutron sources were used to induce xenon nuclear recoils, and the observed recoil spectra were compared to a detailed Monte Carlo employing estimated ionization and scintillation yields for nuclear recoils. The ability to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils using the ratio of ionization to primary scintillation is demonstrated. These results encourage further investigation on the use of xenon in the gas phase as a detector medium in dark matter direct detection experiments.

  1. INFRARED SPECTRA OF ISOLATED PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Knorke, Harald; Langer, Judith; Dopfer, Otto; Oomens, Jos

    2009-11-20

    Gas-phase infrared (IR) spectra of larger protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, H{sup +}PAH, have been recorded for the first time. The ions are generated by electrospray ionization and spectroscopically assayed by IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer using a free electron laser. IRMPD spectra of protonated anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene are presented and compared to calculated IR spectra. Comparison of the laboratory IR spectra to an astronomical spectrum of the unidentified IR emission (UIR) bands obtained in a highly ionized region of the interstellar medium provides for the first time compelling spectroscopic support for the recent hypothesis that H{sup +}PAHs contribute as carriers of the UIR bands.

  2. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  3. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  4. High-order harmonic cutoff extension of the O{sub 2} molecule due to ionization suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Bing; Tong Xiaomin; Zhao Zengxiu; Chang Zenghu; Lin, C.D.

    2002-12-01

    High-order harmonic generation has been observed experimentally from O{sub 2} molecules at the saturation ionization intensity. The harmonic cutoff extends far beyond the cutoff of Xe despite both have nearly equal ionization potentials. In contrast, the harmonic spectra for N{sub 2} and Ar, which have almost the same ionization potentials, are essentially close to each other. We show the extension of harmonic cutoff in O{sub 2} is a consequence of ionization suppression. Using a simple modified tunneling ionization model for molecules, we predict both the harmonic cutoff extension and the ionization suppression semiquantitatively.

  5. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  6. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  8. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  9. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  10. Two-color multiphoton ionization of diazabicyclooctane in a supersonic free jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masaaki; Ebata, Takayuki; Mikami, Naohiko; Ito, Mitsuo

    1983-11-01

    Two-color multiphoton ionization (MPI) spectroscopy has been applied for diazabicyclooctane (DABCO) in a supersonic free jet. The MPI spectra due to transitions from the various vibronic levels of the S 1 (3s Rydberg) state which were excited by the first laser revealed the high Rydberg states above the adiabatic ionization potential. The ionization process and the vibrational potential of the ion are discussed.

  11. Resonance ionization mass spectrometric study of the promethium/samarium isobaric pair

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Samarium daughters are problematic in isotope ratio measurements of promethium because they are isobaric. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was utilized to circumvent this problem. An ionization selectivity factor of at least 1000:1 has been measured for promethium over samarium at 584.6 nm. Resonance ionization spectra have been recorded for both elements over the 528-560 and 580-614 nm wavelength ranges.

  12. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  13. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and their reliability are often highly suspect. We have utilized state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He to Zn. We have also utilized state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998), we have calculated improved collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. (1998) for all elements from H to Ni, and with the fractional abundances derived from the modern DR and RR calculations of Gu (2003a,b, 2004) for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni.

  14. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  15. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF SIZE RESOLVED LIQUID MICRODROPLETS. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectra of single micrometer-size glycerol droplets containing organic and inorganic analytes were obtained by on-line laser desorption ionization. Aerosol droplets entered the mass spectrometer through an inlet where they were detected by light scattering of a continuous la...

  16. Electron ionization and dissociation of aliphatic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Shchukin, P.; Kočíšek, J.; Matejčík, Š.

    2012-09-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of electron ionization and dissociative ionization to the gas phase amino acids valine, leucine, and isoleucine. A crossed electron/molecular beams technique equipped with quadrupole mass analyzer has been applied to measure mass spectra and ion efficiency curves for formation of particular ions. From experimental data the ionization energies of the molecules and the appearance energies of the fragment ions were determined. Ab initio calculations (Density Functional Theory and G3MP2 methods) were performed in order to calculate the fragmentation paths and interpret the experimental data. The experimental ionization energies of parent molecules [P]+ 8.91 ± 0.05, 8.85 ± 0.05, and 8.79 ± 0.05 eV and G3MP2 ionization energies (adiabatic) of 8.89, 8.88, and 8.81 eV were determined for valine, leucine, and isoleucine, respectively, as well as the experimental and theoretical threshold energies for dissociative ionization channels. The comparison of experimental data with calculations resulted in identification of the ions as well as the neutral fragments formed in the dissociative reactions. Around 15 mass/charge ratio fragments were identified from the mass spectra by comparison of experimental appearance energies with calculated reaction enthalpies for particular dissociative reactions.

  17. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  18. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  19. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  20. Angular Correlation of Electrons Emitted by Double Auger Decay of K-Shell Ionized Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew Philip

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated in detail the 4-body continuum state produced when core-ionized neon undergoes Double-Auger (DA) decay, using COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS ). We conducted the experiment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source (LBNL-ALS) beamline 11.0.2. The synchrotron operated in 2-bunch mode and outputted an elliptically polarized, pulsed photon beam (hn=872.9eV), sufficient to K-shell ionize neon just above threshold. Our analysis supports research showing that Auger electrons tend to share energy asymmetrically. We qualitatively compared this result to Photo-Double Ionization (PDI) of helium. Further, we confirm research that shows how Auger electrons that share energy symmetrically can be modeled by the elastic-like knock-out process plus Post-Collision Interaction ( PCI) effects. New observations include the angular correlation between the photo-electron and each respective Auger electron, for specific ranges of energy sharing. We identify a broad feature in the asymmetric case that shows a level of interaction between electrons that until recently, has disagreed with theory. Additionally, we consider the angular correlation between the photo-electron and the momentum sum of the Auger electrons. We observe that the angular correlation between this sum and the photo-electron in the highly asymmetric case is nearly identical to the correlation between just the fast-Auger and the photo-electron - as expected. In the case of symmetric energy sharing, the sum momentum vector appears to be isotropic, particularly for small angles of interaction. Finally, we acknowledge two novel methods of calibration. The first, uses well known line-energies to calibrate the spectrometer. These lines correspond to the decay channels of core-excited neon, Ne(1 s-13p). The second, describes a method to statistically weight list-mode data in order to calibrate it to well known physical features (e.g., isotropic distributions).

  1. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. P.; Harkins, D. A.; Compton, R. N.; Ding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1-4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1-3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (``neutral ladder'' or the ``ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**. The excitation of highly excited UF6** is proposed to be facilitated by the well known ``giant resonance,'' whose energy level lies in the range of 12-14 eV above that of ground state UF6. The highly excited molecule then primarily dissociates, via multiple channels, into Un+, UF+x, fluorine atoms, and ``slow'' electrons, although dissociation

  2. Ionization of vitamin C in gas phase: Theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the gas phase ionization energies and photoelectron spectra of four important conformers of vitamin C were calculated. Symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction methodology employing the single and double excitation operators (SAC-CI SD-R) along with D95++(d,p) basis set were used for the calculations. Thermochemistry calculations were also performed on all possible conformers of vitamin C to find the relative stability of conformers in the gas phase. The calculated ionization bands of each conformer were assigned by calculating the contribution of natural bonding orbital (NBO) in the calculated canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization. SAC-CI calculations showed that the first ionization band of vitamin C is related to the π electrons of CC bond of the ring of molecule although, there is the lone electron pairs of oxygen atoms and π electrons of CO bond in the molecule. PMID:27092998

  3. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  4. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  6. THERMOSPRAY IONIZATION WITH REPELLER-INDUCED COLLISIONALLY ACTIVATED DISSOCIATION OF DYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermospray ionization with repeller-induced collisionally activated dissociation (repeller-CAD) has been used to acquire mass spectra of a series of dyes. hese were obtained by applying a voltage of 400 V on the wire repeller. he mass spectra contained arge number of fragment io...

  7. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  8. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  9. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography. PMID:23812882

  10. Analysis of solvent dyes in refined petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Solvent dyes are used to color refined petroleum products to enable differentiation between gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. Analysis for these dyes in the hydrocarbon product is difficult due to their very low concentrations in such a complex matrix. Flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode was used to optimize ionization of ten typical solvent dyes. Samples of hydrocarbon product were analyzed under similar conditions. Positive electrospray ionization produced very complex spectra, which were not suitably specific for targeting only the dyes. Negative electrospray ionization produced simple spectra because aliphatic and aromatic moieties were not ionized. This enabled screening for a target dye in samples of hydrocarbon product from a spill.

  11. Two-Photon Ionization of Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechanski, James Poremba

    has not only involved the acquisition of definitive atomic spectra data sets, but has also established a facility for resonant ionization spectroscopy at The American University.

  12. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  13. Influence of Multiple Ionization on Charge State Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-08-01

    The spectrum emitted by a plasma depends on the charge state distribution (CSD) of the gas. For collisionally ionized plasmas, the CSD is is determined by the corresponding rates for electron-impact ionization and recombination. In astrophysics, such plasmas are formed in stars, supernova remnants, galaxies, and galaxy clusters. Current CSD calculations generally do not account for electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI), a process in which multiple electrons are ejected by a single electron-ion collision. We have estimated the EIMI cross sections for all charge states of iron using a combination of the available experimental data and semi-empirical formulae. We then modeled the CSD and observed the influence of EIMI compared to only including single ionization. One case of interest for astrophysics is nanoflare heating, which is a leading theory to explain the heating of the solar corona. In order to determine whether this theory can indeed explain coronal heating, spectroscopic measurements are being compared to model nanoflare spectra. Such models have attempted to predict the spectra of impulsively heated plasmas in which the CSD is time dependent. These nonequilbirium ionization calculations have so far ignored EIMI, but our findings suggest that EIMI can have a significant effect on the CSD of a nanoflare-heated plasma, changing the ion abundances by up to about 50%.

  14. Multiple ionization of atomic targets by proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Toburen, L.H.; DuBois, R.D.; Manson S.T.

    1983-04-01

    The authors have combined experimental measurements of multiply charged ion production, doubly differential electron emission cross sections and Auger electron spectra produced in fast-proton noble-gas collisions with theoretical inner and outer shell ionization cross sections in an effort to provide a unified description of the ionization process. A detailed analysis is provided for 1-4 MeV proton ionization of krypton. Measured relative yields of Kr/sup +2/ and Kr/sup +3/ ions are in approximate agreement with the photoionization results of Krause and Carlson. If it is assumed that nearly half of the 3d vacancies created in Kr are filled through multiple (3dNNN) Auger transitions, the M-subshell ionization cross sections that are derived from Auger electron spectra are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The measured absolute yields of Kr/sup +2/ and Kr/sup +3/ are, however, a factor of 2 smaller than those derived from the decay of inner shell vacancies. This discrepancy leads the authors to believe that multiple ionization in the intial interaction is a significant contribution to the observed yields.

  15. Probe of the electron correlation in sequential double ionization of helium by two-color attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Zhang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei-Chao; Zhang, Gong-Qiu; Gong, Qihuang

    2012-12-01

    We theoretically study the sequential double ionization of He by two-color attosecond pulses. We show that, for short time delays between the two pulses, the ionization spectra cannot be explained by an independent model based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. By varying the time delay, one can probe the role of the electron correlation played in the double ionization, which is mostly obvious by examining the differential double-ionization yield. In the present scheme, we also identify a kind of “catch-up” interaction between the two ionized electrons.

  16. Ultrahigh vacuum measuring ionization gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    The ionization gage described consists of separate ionization and collector regions connected at an exit area with a modulator electrode. In addition to the standard modulation function, the modulator in this location yields a suprising increase in collector current, apparently due to improved focussing and extraction of ions from the ionization region.

  17. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P. . UEO Enrichment Technical Operations Div.)

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  18. Femtosecond growth dynamics of an underdense ionization front measured by spectral blueshifting

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.; Siders, C.W.; Downer, M.C.

    1993-06-01

    A comprehensive report of time-resolved spectral blue shifts of 100-femtosecond laser pulses caused by ionization of atmospheric density N{sub 2} and noble gases subjected to high (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} - 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) light intensities is presented. Included are data for two experiments: (1) self-shifting of the ionizing laser pulses for varying peak intensities, pressures (1-5 atm.), and gas species; and (2) time-resolved blueshifts of a weak copropagating probe pulse for the same range of ionization conditions. The self-shift data reveal a universal, reproducible pattern in the shape of the blueshifted spectra: as laser intensity, gas pressure, or atomic number increase, the self-blueshifted spectra develop from a near replica of the incident pulse spectrum into a complex structure consisting of two spectral peaks. The time-resolved data reveal different temporal dependence for each of these two features. A quantitative model for a simplified cylindrical focal geometry is presented which explains the presence of the two spectral features in terms of two distinct ionization mechanisms: collisionless tunneling ionization, which dominates early in the ionizing pulse profile, and electron impact ionization, which dominates during the intense maximum of the ionizing pulse. Transient resonant enhancements may also contribute to ionization near the peak of the pulse.

  19. Femtosecond growth dynamics of an underdense ionization front measured by spectral blueshifting

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.M.; Siders, C.W.; Downer, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive report of time-resolved spectral blue shifts of 100-femtosecond laser pulses caused by ionization of atmospheric density N[sub 2] and noble gases subjected to high (10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] - 10[sup 16] W/cm[sup 2]) light intensities is presented. Included are data for two experiments: (1) self-shifting of the ionizing laser pulses for varying peak intensities, pressures (1-5 atm.), and gas species; and (2) time-resolved blueshifts of a weak copropagating probe pulse for the same range of ionization conditions. The self-shift data reveal a universal, reproducible pattern in the shape of the blueshifted spectra: as laser intensity, gas pressure, or atomic number increase, the self-blueshifted spectra develop from a near replica of the incident pulse spectrum into a complex structure consisting of two spectral peaks. The time-resolved data reveal different temporal dependence for each of these two features. A quantitative model for a simplified cylindrical focal geometry is presented which explains the presence of the two spectral features in terms of two distinct ionization mechanisms: collisionless tunneling ionization, which dominates early in the ionizing pulse profile, and electron impact ionization, which dominates during the intense maximum of the ionizing pulse. Transient resonant enhancements may also contribute to ionization near the peak of the pulse.

  20. Femtosecond growth dynamics of an underdense ionization front measured by spectral blueshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, W. M.; Siders, C. W.; Downer, M. C.

    A comprehensive report of time-resolved spectral blue shifts of 100-femtosecond laser pulses caused by ionization of atmospheric density N(sub 2) and noble gases subjected to high (10(sup 14) W/cm(sup 2) - 10(sup 16) W/cm(sup 2)) light intensities is presented. Included are data for two experiments: (1) self-shifting of the ionizing laser pulses for varying peak intensities, pressures (1-5 atm.), and gas species; and (2) time-resolved blueshifts of a weak copropagating probe pulse for the same range of ionization conditions. The self-shift data reveal a universal, reproducible pattern in the shape of the blueshifted spectra: as laser intensity, gas pressure, or atomic number increase, the self-blueshifted spectra develop from a near replica of the incident pulse spectrum into a complex structure consisting of two spectral peaks. The time-resolved data reveal different temporal dependence for each of these two features. A quantitative model for a simplified cylindrical focal geometry is presented which explains the presence of the two spectral features in terms of two distinct ionization mechanisms: collisionless tunneling ionization, which dominates early in the ionizing pulse profile, and electron impact ionization, which dominates during the intense maximum of the ionizing pulse. Transient resonant enhancements may also contribute to ionization near the peak of the pulse.

  1. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the ionizing radiation dosimetry aboard LDEF provide a unique opportunity for assessing the accuracy of current space radiation models and in identifying needed improvements for future mission applications. Details are given of the LDEF data available for radiation model evaluations. The status is given of model comparisons with LDEF data, along with future directions of planned modeling efforts and data comparison assessments. The methodology is outlined which is related to modeling being used to help insure that the LDEF ionizing radiation results can be used to address ionizing radiation issues for future missions. In general, the LDEF radiation modeling has emphasized quick-look predictions using simplified methods to make comparisons with absorbed dose measurements and induced radioactivity measurements of emissions. Modeling and LDEF data comparisons related to linear energy transfer spectra are of importance for several reasons which are outlined. The planned modeling and LDEF data comparisons for LET spectra is discussed, including components of the LET spectra due to different environment sources, contribution from different production mechanisms, and spectra in plastic detectors vs silicon.

  2. Ionization of the glycerin molecule by the electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2014-10-01

    The paper describes experimental method for and presents the results of studying positive ion yields produced due to direct and dissociative electron-impact ionization of the glycerin molecule. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at different temperatures. The energy dependences of the ionization efficiency cross sections of the glycerin molecule ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of fragment ion formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  3. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  4. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  5. A combined electron-ion spectrometer for studying complete kinematics of molecular dissociation upon shell selective ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-07-15

    A combined electron-ion spectrometer has been built to study dissociation kinematics of molecular ions upon various electronic decay processes ensuing from ionization of neutral molecules. The apparatus can be used with various ionization agents. Ion time-of-flight (ToF) spectra arising from various electronic decay processes are acquired by triggering the ToF measurement in coincidence with energy analyzed electrons. The design and the performance of the spectrometer in a photoionization experiment is presented in detail. Electron spectra and ion time of flight spectra resulting from valence and 2p{sub 1/2} ionization of Argon and those from valence ionization of CO are presented to demonstrate the capability of the instrument. The fragment ion spectra show remarkable differences (both kinematic and cross sectional) dependent on the energy of the ejected electron, corresponding to various electron loss and decay mechanisms in dissociative photoionization of molecules.

  6. Ionization Processes in the Atmosphere of Titan (Research Note). III. Ionization by High-Z Nuclei Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C.; Lilensten, J.; Desorgher, L.; Fluckiger, E.; Velinov, P.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed the importance of particle precipitation in the atmosphere of Titan thanks to in-situ measurements. These ionizing particles (electrons, protons, and cosmic rays) have a strong impact on the chemistry, hence must be modeled. Aims. We revisit our computation of ionization in the atmosphere of Titan by cosmic rays. The high-energy high-mass ions are taken into account to improve the precision of the calculation of the ion production profile. Methods. The Badhwahr and O Neill model for cosmic ray spectrum was adapted for the Titan model. We used the TransTitan model coupled with the Planetocosmics model to compute the ion production by cosmic rays. We compared the results with the NAIRAS/HZETRN ionization model used for the first time for a body that differs from the Earth. Results. The cosmic ray ionization is computed for five groups of cosmic rays, depending on their charge and mass: protons, alpha, Z = 8 (oxygen), Z = 14 (silicon), and Z = 26 (iron) nucleus. Protons and alpha particles ionize mainly at 65 km altitude, while the higher mass nucleons ionize at higher altitudes. Nevertheless, the ionization at higher altitude is insufficient to obscure the impact of Saturn s magnetosphere protons at a 500 km altitude. The ionization rate at the peak (altitude: 65 km, for all the different conditions) lies between 30 and 40/cu cm/s. Conclusions. These new computations show for the first time the importance of high Z cosmic rays on the ionization of the Titan atmosphere. The updated full ionization profile shape does not differ significantly from that found in our previous calculations (Paper I: Gronoff et al. 2009, 506, 955) but undergoes a strong increase in intensity below an altitude of 400 km, especially between 200 and 400 km altitude where alpha and heavier particles (in the cosmic ray spectrum) are responsible for 40% of the ionization. The comparison of several models of ionization and cosmic ray spectra (in

  7. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  8. Ionization photophysics and spectroscopy of cyanoacetylene.

    PubMed

    Leach, Sydney; Garcia, Gustavo A; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Bénilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Gaie-Levrel, François; Champion, Norbert; Schwell, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Photoionization of cyanoacetylene was studied using synchrotron radiation over the non-dissociative ionization excitation range 11-15.6 eV, with photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. The absolute ionization cross-section and spectroscopic aspects of the parent ion were recorded. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyanoacetylene was measured as 11.573 ± 0.010 eV. A detailed analysis of photoelectron spectra of HC3N involves new aspects and new assignments of the vibrational components to excitation of the A(2)Σ(+) and B(2)Π states of the cation. Some of the structured autoionization features observed in the 11.94 to 15.5 eV region of the total ion yield (TIY) spectrum were assigned to two Rydberg series converging to the B(2)Π state of HC3N(+). A number of the measured TIY features are suggested to be vibrational components of Rydberg series converging to the C(2)Σ(+) state of HC3N(+) at ≈17.6 eV and others to valence shell transitions of cyanoacetylene in the 11.6-15 eV region. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the cation electronic state geometries, vibrational frequencies and energies, as well as of the C-H dissociation potential energy profiles of the ground and electronic excited states of the ion, are compared with experimental observations. Ionization quantum yields are evaluated and discussed and the problem of adequate calibration of photoionization cross-sections is raised. PMID:24811639

  9. Ionization photophysics and spectroscopy of cyanoacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Sydney; Champion, Norbert; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Fray, Nicolas; Gaie-Levrel, François; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Schwell, Martin

    2014-05-07

    Photoionization of cyanoacetylene was studied using synchrotron radiation over the non-dissociative ionization excitation range 11–15.6 eV, with photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. The absolute ionization cross-section and spectroscopic aspects of the parent ion were recorded. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyanoacetylene was measured as 11.573 ± 0.010 eV. A detailed analysis of photoelectron spectra of HC{sub 3}N involves new aspects and new assignments of the vibrational components to excitation of the A{sup 2}Σ{sup +} and B{sup 2}Π states of the cation. Some of the structured autoionization features observed in the 11.94 to 15.5 eV region of the total ion yield (TIY) spectrum were assigned to two Rydberg series converging to the B{sup 2}Π state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +}. A number of the measured TIY features are suggested to be vibrational components of Rydberg series converging to the C{sup 2}Σ{sup +} state of HC{sub 3}N{sup +} at ≈17.6 eV and others to valence shell transitions of cyanoacetylene in the 11.6–15 eV region. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the cation electronic state geometries, vibrational frequencies and energies, as well as of the C–H dissociation potential energy profiles of the ground and electronic excited states of the ion, are compared with experimental observations. Ionization quantum yields are evaluated and discussed and the problem of adequate calibration of photoionization cross-sections is raised.

  10. Electron-Impact Ionization Measurements Important for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, M. E.

    2004-05-01

    Electron impact ionization (EII) is the dominant ionization mechanism in the solar chromosphere, transition region, and corona. Analyzing spectra from this region of the sun requires accurate ionization balance calculations for plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium as well as plasmas under conditions of non-equilibrium ionization. Here we report on a series of laboratory measurements of EII that are now underway at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility for selected ions in the heliumlike, berylliumlike, and oxygenlike isoelectronic sequences. We have found significant errors and uncertainties in the EII data for these isoelectronic sequences, primarily due to uncertainty in the fraction of metastable ions encountered in prior measurements. By determining the metastable ion fractions independent of the ionization experiments, our measurements will provide new EII data for both ground-state and metastable ions with uncertainties of 15% or less. This material is based upon work supported by NASA under Award No. NNH04AA151 issued through the Sun-Earth Connection Division's Solar & Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  11. Vibrational overtone spectroscopy of H/sub 2/O (4. gamma. /sub OH/) using energy-selective electron impact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.C.; Penn, S.M.; Carlson, K.J.; Crim, F.F.

    1988-03-24

    The authors describe a new method for obtaining vibrational overtone spectra of polyatomic molecules in supersonic expansions that uses low-energy electrons to ionize the vibrationally excited molecules. Measuring the excitation spectrum of water in the region of the third overtone of the OH stretching vibration (4..sigma../sub OH/) demonstrates the technique. The ionization process is probably not direct but may occur by electron impact excitation to vibrationally and electronically excited states from which the neutral molecule is subsequently ionizes

  12. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    A calculational program utilizing data from radiation dosimetry measurements aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite to reduce the uncertainties in current models defining the ionizing radiation environment is in progress. Most of the effort to date has been on using LDEF radiation dose measurements to evaluate models defining the geomagnetically trapped radiation, which has provided results applicable to radiation design assessments being performed for Space Station Freedom. Plans for future data comparisons, model evaluations, and assessments using additional LDEF data sets (LET spectra, induced radioactivity, and particle spectra) are discussed.

  13. A simple way to model nebulae with distributed ionizing stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, L.; Morisset, C.

    2008-04-01

    Aims: This work is a follow-up of a recent article by Ercolano et al. that shows that, in some cases, the spatial dispersion of the ionizing stars in a given nebula may significantly affect its emission spectrum. The authors found that the dispersion of the ionizing stars is accompanied by a decrease in the ionization parameter, which at least partly explains the variations in the nebular spectrum. However, they did not research how other effects associated to the dispersion of the stars may contribute to those variations. Furthermore, they made use of a unique and simplified set of stellar populations. The scope of the present article is to assess whether the variation in the ionization parameter is the dominant effect in the dependence of the nebular spectrum on the distribution of its ionizing stars. We examined this possibility for various regimes of metallicity and age. We also investigated a way to model the distribution of the ionizing sources so as to bypass expensive calculations. Methods: We wrote a code able to generate random stellar populations and to compute the emission spectra of their associated nebulae through the widespread photoionization code cloudy. This code can process two kinds of spatial distributions of the stars: one where all the stars are concentrated at one point, and one where their separation is such that their Strömgren spheres do not overlap. Results: We found that, in most regimes of stellar population ages and gas metallicities, the dependence of the ionization parameter on the distribution of the stars is the dominant factor in the variation of the main nebular diagnostics with this distribution. We derived a method to mimic those effects with a single calculation that makes use of the common assumptions of a central source and a spherical nebula, in the case of constant density objects. This represents a computation time saving by a factor of at least several dozen in the case of H ii regions ionized by massive clusters.

  14. Background fitting for electron energy-loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, J.; Lehman, G.L.; Sklad, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microanalysis using electron energy loss spectroscopy is now well established. In order to assess true edge profiles and obtain integrated intensities of the inner shell ionization edges of interest, it is first necessary to subtract the background. Usually a simple inverse power law is used, but for some spectra this form does not fit well. An alternative form which results in superior fits is described.

  15. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    PubMed

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution. PMID:20545181

  16. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  17. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  18. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  19. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  20. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  1. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  2. Multispectral processing without spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out, for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 1553 (1994) we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 33 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 3003 (1994). We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. 2003 Optical Society of America

  3. Multispectral processing without spectra.

    PubMed

    Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out,for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1553 (1994)] we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 3 x 3 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model [G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 3003 (1994)]. We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. PMID:12868625

  4. KINEMATICS IN PARTIALLY IONIZED MOLECULAR CLOUDS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TRANSITION TO COHERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Caselli, Paola; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: caselli@mpe.mpg.de

    2015-01-10

    A previous paper by Bailey and Basu shows analysis of density and mass-to-flux ratio maps for simulations with either an ionization profile which takes into account photoionization (step-like profile) or a cosmic ray only ionization profile. We extend this study to analyze the effect of these ionization profiles on velocity structures, kinematics, and synthetic spectra. Clump regions are found to occur at the convergence of two flows with a low velocity region and velocity direction transition occurring at the junction. Models with evident substructure show that core formation occurs on the periphery of these velocity valleys. Analysis of synthetic spectra reveals the presence of large non-thermal components within low-density gas, especially for models with the step-like ionization profile. All cores show small, sub-thermal relative motions compared to background gas. Large deviations within this analysis are due to the line of sight intersecting low- and high-density regions across the velocity switch transition. Positive deviations correspond to a foreground core moving away from the observer while negative deviations correspond to a background core moving toward the observer. Comparison of velocities resulting from different ionization profiles suggest that high ionization fractions yield supersonic velocities, up to two times the sound speed, while regions with low ionization fractions tend to be subsonic or mildly supersonic. This suggests that the transition to coherence within cores could be a transition between high and low ionization fractions within the gas.

  5. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  6. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  7. How big, and how long-lasting, will an extreme burst above threshold be ? Lessons from self-organised criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, N. W.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2011-12-01

    The idea that there might not be a typical scale for energy release in some space physics systems is a relatively new one [see e.g. mini-review of early work in Freeman and Watkins, Science, 2002; & Aschwanden, Self Organized Criticality (SOC) in Astrophysics, Springer, 2011]. In part it resulted from the widespread approximate fractality seen elsewhere in nature. SOC was introduced by Bak et al [PRL, 1987] as a physical explanation of such widespread space-time fractality. SOC inspired the introduction into magnetospheric physics of "burst" diagnostics by Takalo [1993] & Consolini [1996]. These quantified events in a time series by "size" (integrated area above a fixed threshold) and "duration", and revealed a long tailed population of events across a broad range of sizes, subsequently also seen in solar wind drivers like Akasofu's epsilon function [Freeman et al, PRE & GRL, 2000]. Spatiotemporal bursts have an interest beyond SOC, however. Estimating the probability of a burst of a given size and duration bears directly on the problem of correlated extreme events, or "bunched black swans" [e.g. Watkins et al, EGU, 2011 presentation at the URL below]. With a view both to space physics and this wider context we here consider an interesting development of the burst idea made by Uritsky et al [GRL, 2001]. These authors adapted the spatiotemporal spreading exponent [e.g. Marro & Dickman, Nonequilibrium phase transitions in lattice models, 1999], calculating a superposed epoch average of surviving activity in bursts after their first excursion above a threshold. In a 1D time series, the 1-minute AL auroral index (averaged over 5 minutes), they found scaling behaviour up to ~ 2 hours. We investigate the relationships between exponents found by this method and other, more widely known exponents governing a fractal (or multifractal) time series such as the self-similarity exponent H and long-range dependence exponent d. We conclude by discussing the applications of these techniques to problems such as the forecasting the probability of a single short-lived large burst versus that of a long correlated sequence of more moderate exceedences above a threshold.

  8. Ionization Thresholds of Small Carbon Clusters: Tunable VUVExperiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Ahmed,Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer III, Henry F.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2007-07-31

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in amolecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuumultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUVradiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source(ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra atvarious ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances ofthe neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species isC3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra arerecorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionizationthresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transferbracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for differentcluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clustersfor n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) levelwith cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations areapplied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic andvertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measuredionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomericstructures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. Themeasurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because ofunquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidencefor the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 speciesand the presence of cyclic C10.

  9. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Neustetter, M; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E; Limão-Vieira, P; Denifl, S

    2016-08-01

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO)6 clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W2(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W2C(CO)n (+) (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves. PMID:27497555

  10. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustetter, M.; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Denifl, S.

    2016-08-01

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO)6) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO)6 clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W2(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W2C(CO)n+ (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves.

  11. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  12. Ionizing Photon Production and Escape in Extreme Starbursts: the Case of the Green Peas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, Sally

    2015-08-01

    With similarities to high-redshift galaxies and potential Lyman continuum (LyC) escape, the low-redshift "Green Pea" (GP) galaxies represent an important test of ionizing photon production and feedback in young massive clusters. Using optical spectra and HST ACS emission-line imaging, we evaluate the ionizing sources, optical depths, and spatial variation of ionization in these unusual starbursts. The GPs’ spectra imply young starburst ages and possible low LyC optical depths. However, CLOUDY photoionization and Starburst99 models have difficulty reproducing all of the observed line ratios and suggest a need for additional hard ionizing sources. New ACS observations of four GPs highlight the extreme, compact nature of these bursts and reveal regions of low optical depth that are the likely sites of LyC escape.

  13. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  14. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  15. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  16. A combined desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S; Miller, Scott A; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H](+) or [M + metal](+) ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies. PMID:21472555

  17. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    from the quasimolecule or from the separated ion. Low energy electron spectra of the ionized electrons were measured to see if Auger electron peaks could be resolved.

  18. Warm Absorbers in the ROSAT Spectra of Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    We present two ROSAT PSPC observations of the radio-loud, lobe-dominated quasar 3C 351, which shows an 'ionized absorber' in its X-ray spectrum. The factor 1.7 change in flux in the approx. 2 years between the observations allows a test of of models for this ionized absorber. The absorption feature at approx. 0.7 keV (quasar frame) is present in both spectra but with a lower optical depth when the source intensity - and hence the ionizing flux at the absorber - is higher, in accordance with a simple, single-zone, equilibrium photoionization model. Detailed modeling confirms this agreement quantitatively. The maximum response time of 2 years allows us to limit the gas density: n(sub e) greater than 2 x 10(exp 4)cm(exp -3); and the distance of the ionized gas from the central source R less than 19 pc. This produces a strong test for a photoionized absorber in 3C 351: a factor 2 flux change in approx. 1 week in this source must show non-equilibrium effects in the ionized absorber.

  19. Einstein spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the initial stage of the CfA survey of quasar energy distributions are reviewed. Einstein imaging proportional counter spectra of 33 quasars have been studied by fitting a single power law slope and absorption by an equivalent column density of neutral hydrogen. Comparison with the higher energy HEAO-A2 data leads to a two-component model for the X-ray spectrum. The X-ray column density is systematically lower than the 21-cm measured Galactic column density along the same line of sight.

  20. An Ionization-Dependent Baldwin Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espey, B. R.; Lanzetta, K. M.; Turnshek, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    We will present results concerning the Baldwin Effect in AGN. The data used come from an optimally extracted set of IUE spectra (Lanzetta, Turnshek and Sandoval 1993, ApJS, 84, 109) and published ground-based data. The improvement in the signal-to-noise of the optimally extracted IUE data relative to previously available results enables us to study lines as far shortward in the spectrum as OVI 1034 Angstroms. Our data support the results of previous studies of the Baldwin Effect and, in addition, suggest that the strength of the effect is related to the ionization potential of the relevant ion. The OVI line shows the strongest Baldwin Effect of any previously examined emission line and the Balmer lines the weakest. The consequences of this result for AGN models are examined.

  1. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Kim, K. C.; Seo, E. S.; Sina, R.; Wang, J. Z.; Wu, J.; Case, G.; Ellison, S. B.; Gould, R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) experiment is designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = 1 to 28 cosmic rays over the energy range of approximately 10 GeV - 100 TeV. ATIC is comprised of an eight-layer, 18 radiation length deep Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter, downstream of a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target and an approximately 1 sq m finely segmented silicon charge detector. Interleaved with the graphite layers are three scintillator strip hodoscopes for pre-triggering and tracking. ATIC flew for the first time on a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) launched from McMurdo, Antarctica in January 2001. During its 16-day flight ATIC collected more than 30 million science events, along with housekeeping, calibration, and rate data. This presentation will describe the ATIC data processing, including calibration and efficiency corrections, and show results from analysis of this dataset. The next launch is planned for December 2002.

  2. Ionization of glycerin molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    The methods and results of studying the yield of positive ions produced due to direct and dissociative electron impact ionization of the glycerin molecule are described. The experiment is carried out using two independent setups, namely, a setup with a monopole mass spectrometer employing the method of crossing electron and molecular beams and a setup with a hypocycloidal electron spectrometer with the gas-filled cell. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at various temperatures. The energy dependences of the effective cross sections of the glycerin molecular ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are obtained and analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of the glycerin molecule fragment ions formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  3. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  4. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  5. Mechanisms of Strong-Field Double Ionization of Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xufei; Li, Min; Ye, Difa; Xin, Guoguo; Fu, Libin; Xie, Xiguo; Deng, Yongkai; Wu, Chengyin; Liu, Jie; Gong, Qihuang; Liu, Yunquan

    2014-09-01

    We perform a fully differential measurement on strong-field double ionization of Xe by 25 fs, 790 nm laser pulses in intensity region (0.4-3)×1014 W/cm2. We observe that the two-dimensional correlation momentum spectra along the laser polarization direction show a nonstructured distribution for double ionization of Xe when decreasing the laser intensity from 3×1014 to 4×1013 W /cm2. The electron correlation behavior is remarkably different with the low-Z rare gases, i.e., He, Ne, and Ar. We find that the electron energy cutoffs increase from 2.9Up to 7.8Up when decreasing the laser intensities from the sequential double ionization to the nonsequential double ionization regime. The experimental observation indicates that multiple rescatterings play an important role for the generation of high energy photoelectrons. We have further studied the shielding effect on the strong-field double ionization of high-Z atoms.

  6. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  7. Model calculations of the radiation dose and LET spectra on LDEF and comparisons with flight data.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T W; Colborn, B L; Benton, E V

    1996-11-01

    Ionizing radiation environment models, a 3-D spacecraft mass model, and radiation transport codes have been used to predict the radiation dose and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra measured at various locations on the LDEF satellite. The predictions are compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of the trapped proton and electron doses and with LET spectra measured by plastic nuclear track detectors. The predicted vs observed comparisons indicate some of the uncertainties of present ionizing radiation environment models for low Earth-orbit missions. PMID:11540506

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  9. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  10. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  11. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  12. Measurements of Electron-Impact Ionization Relevant for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    For many cosmic plasmas, such as are formed in supernova remnants, stellar coronae, the interstellar medium (ISM), the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies, and elliptical galaxies, electron impact ionization (EII) is the dominant ionization mechanism. Spectroscopic data produced by an array of past, present, and future satellite spectroscopic observatories are being used to address many fundamental questions in astrophysics. Analyzing the collected spectra from electron-ionized plasmas, however, requires accurate ionization balance calculations for plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) as well as plasmas under conditions of non-equilibrium ionization (NEI). Therefore accurate EII data are needed for ions found in these astrophysical environments. Here we report on recent laboratory measurements of EII at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility for selected ions in the berylliumlike isoelectronic sequence. These results are compared with state-of-the-art non-perturbative calculations for these ions. This systematic investigation of EII will continue with measurements on heliumlike and oxygenlike ions. For these isoelectronic sequences there appear to be significant errors and uncertainties in the EII data, primarily due to uncertainty in the fraction of metastable ions encountered in prior measurements. By determining the metastable ion fractions independent of the ionization experiments, our measurements will provide new EII data with uncertainties of 15% or less. This material is based upon work supported by NASA under Award Nos. NNH04AA151 and NNH04AA72I and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  13. Electron-impact ionization measurements for use in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    Spectroscopic data produced by an array of past, present, and future satellite and space observatories are being used to address many fundamental questions in astrophysics. Analyzing the collected spectra from electron-ionized plasmas, however, requires accurate ionization balance calculations for plasmas in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) as well as plasmas under conditions of non-equilibrium ionization (NEI). Therefore accurate electron-impact ionization (EII) data are needed for ions found in many cosmic plasmas where EII is the dominant ionization mechanism, such as supernova remnants, stellar coronae, the interstellar medium (ISM), the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies, and elliptical galaxies. Here we report on a program of laboratory measurements of EII for ions in the berylliumlike isoelectronic sequence at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility. These results are compared with state-of-the-art non-perturbative calculations. Our studies also focus on measurements of EII for heliumlike and oxygenlike ions. For these three isoelectronic sequences there appear to be significant errors and uncertainties in the EII data used in astrophysics, primarily due to uncertainty in the fraction of metastable ions encountered in prior measurements. By determining the metastable ion fractions independently of the ionization experiments, our measurements will provide new EII data with total uncertainties of 15% or less. This material is based upon work supported by NASA under Award Nos. NNH04AA151 and NNH04AA72I and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  14. Degradation of cyanobacterial biosignatures by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Ruban, Alexander V; Wright, Gary; Griffiths, Andrew D; Muller, Jan-Peter; Ward, John M

    2011-12-01

    Primitive photosynthetic microorganisms, either dormant or dead, may remain today on the martian surface, akin to terrestrial cyanobacteria surviving endolithically in martian analog sites on Earth such as the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama Desert. Potential markers of martian photoautotrophs include the red edge of chlorophyll reflectance spectra or fluorescence emission from systems of light-harvesting pigments. Such biosignatures, however, would be modified and degraded by long-term exposure to ionizing radiation from the unshielded cosmic ray flux onto the martian surface. In this initial study into this issue, three analytical techniques--absorbance, reflectance, and fluorescence spectroscopy--were employed to determine the progression of the radiolytic destruction of cyanobacteria. The pattern of signal loss for chlorophyll reflection and fluorescence from several biomolecules is characterized and quantified after increasing exposures to ionizing gamma radiation. This allows estimation of the degradation rates of cyanobacterial biosignatures on the martian surface and the identification of promising detectable fluorescent break-down products. PMID:22149884

  15. IONIZED OUTFLOWS FROM COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan; Kewley, Lisa E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Massive outflows are known to exist, in the form of extended emission-line regions (EELRs), around about one-third of powerful FR II radio sources. We investigate the origin of these EELRs by studying the emission-line regions around compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies that are younger (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} yr old) versions of the FR II radio galaxies. We have searched for and analyzed the emission-line regions around 11 CSS sources by taking integral field spectra using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North. We fit the [O III] {lambda}5007 line and present the velocity maps for each detected emission-line region. We find, in most cases, that the emission-line regions have multi-component velocity structures with different velocity dispersions and/or flux distributions for each component. The velocity gradients of the emission-line gas are mostly well aligned with the radio axis, suggesting a direct causal link between the outflowing gas and the radio jets. The complex velocity structure may be a result of different driving mechanisms related to the onset of the radio jets. We also present the results from the line-ratio diagnostics we used to analyze the ionization mechanism of the extended gas, which supports the scenario where the emission-line regions are ionized by a combination of active galactic nucleus radiation and shock excitation.

  16. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  17. Measurements of LET spectra and comparison to models.

    PubMed

    Wiegel, B; Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Frank, A

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of LET spectra for near earth orbits with various inclinations and altitudes. A comparison with calculated LET spectra shows that the contribution from direct ionizing galactic cosmic rays is well described by the models. An additional contribution to the spectra originates from stopping protons and from nuclear interactions of particles with material. In the case of an interaction a large amount of energy is deposited in a small volume by target recoils or target fragments. These events will be called short range (SR) events. For a low inclination orbit radiation belt protons are the main source of these events while galactic protons become more important when increasing the inclination to near polar orbits. We show that the contribution of SR events for orbits with low altitude (324 km) and 57 degrees inclination is comparable to that for an orbit with 28 degrees inclination at a high altitude (510 km). PMID:11537028

  18. Separation of Recollision Mechanisms in Nonsequential Strong Field Double Ionization of Ar: The Role of Excitation Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Feuerstein, B.; Moshammer, R.; Fischer, D.; Dorn, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Deipenwisch, J.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Hoehr, C.; Neumayer, P.; Ullrich, J.

    2001-07-23

    Vector momentum distributions of two electrons created in double ionization of Ar by 25fs, 0.25 PW/cm{sup 2} laser pulses at 795nm have been measured using a ''reaction microscope.'' At this intensity, where nonsequential ionization dominates, distinct correlation patterns are observed in the two-electron momentum distributions. A kinematical analysis of these spectra within the classical ''recollision model'' revealed an (e,2e) -like process and excitation with subsequent tunneling of the second electron as two different ionization mechanisms. This allows a qualitative separation of the two mechanisms demonstrating that excitation-tunneling is the dominant contribution to the total double ionization yield.

  19. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions.

    PubMed

    Maclot, S; Delaunay, R; Piekarski, D G; Domaracka, A; Huber, B A; Adoui, L; Martín, F; Alcamí, M; Avaldi, L; Bolognesi, P; Díaz-Tendero, S; Rousseau, P

    2016-08-12

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization. PMID:27563959

  20. Determination of Energy-Transfer Distributions in Ionizing Ion-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Piekarski, D. G.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.; Adoui, L.; Martín, F.; Alcamí, M.; Avaldi, L.; Bolognesi, P.; Díaz-Tendero, S.; Rousseau, P.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization and fragmentation of the nucleoside thymidine in the gas phase has been investigated by combining ion collision with state-selected photoionization experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. The comparison between the mass spectra measured in both types of experiments allows us to accurately determine the distribution of the energy deposited in the ionized molecule as a result of the collision. The relation of two experimental techniques and theory shows a strong correlation between the excited states of the ionized molecule with the computed dissociation pathways, as well as with charge localization or delocalization.

  1. Single-photon multiple ionization forming double vacancies in the 2p subshell of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linusson, P.; Fritzsche, S.; Eland, J. H. D.; Mucke, M.; Feifel, R.

    2013-04-01

    Single-photon ionization leading to two vacancies in the 2p subshell of argon is investigated experimentally using the photoelectron time-of-flight magnetic bottle coincidence technique. Three peaks corresponding to the 3P, 1D, and 1S states of the dication are found in the ionization energy range 535 to 562 eV. Multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock calculations were performed to estimate the single-photon double-ionization cross sections. Reasonable agreement between the measured and simulated spectra is found if single and double excitations are taken into account in the wave-function expansion.

  2. Nonmonotonic increase in laser-driven THz emissions through multiple ionization events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, A.; González de Alaiza Martínez, P.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2015-04-01

    Highly charged states created through multiple ionization of gases are shown to enhance terahertz (THz) generation by intense, single- or two-color femtosecond laser pulses. A one-dimensional, nonpropagating fluid model reveals the main conversion processes up to 1017W cm-2 laser intensities, namely, ionization-induced photocurrents and plasma current oscillations. For increasing intensities, we demonstrate a cyclic growth in the THz signal associated with the different binding energies of argon and helium. This behavior is confirmed by direct particle-in-cell and unidirectional pulse propagation simulations. Changes in the forward and backward THz spectra owing to multiple ionization are discussed.

  3. IEHI: Ionization Equilibrium for Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2015-07-01

    IEHI, written in Fortran, outputs a simple "coronal" ionization equilibrium (i.e., collisional ionization and auto-ionization balanced by radiative and dielectronic recombination) for a plasma at a given electron temperature.

  4. Cluster analysis on mass spectra of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, C.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Mensah, A.; Mentel, T.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosols (BSOA) are of high importance in the atmosphere. The formation of SOA from the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of selected trees was investigated in the JPAC (Jülich Plant Aerosol Chamber) facility. The VOC (mainly monoterpenes) were transferred into a reaction chamber where vapors were photo-chemically oxidized and formed BSOA. The aerosol was characterized by aerosol mass spectrometry (Aerodyne Quadrupol-AMS). Inside the AMS, flash-vaporization of the aerosol particles and electron impact ionization of the evaporated molecules cause a high fragmentation of the organic compounds. Here, we present a classification of the aerosol mass spectra via cluster analysis. Average mass spectra are produced by combination of related single mass spectra to so-called clusters. The mass spectra were similar due to the similarity of the precursor substances. However, we can show that there are differences in the BSOA mass spectra of different tree species. Furthermore we can distinguish the influence of the precursor chemistry and chemical aging. BSOA formed from plants exposed to stress can be distinguished from BSOA formed under non stressed conditions. Significance and limitations of the clustering method for very similar mass spectra will be demonstrated and discussed.

  5. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  6. AGNs with composite spectra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, P.; Goncalves, A. C.; Veron-Cetty, M.-P.

    1997-03-01

    The use of the Baldwin et al. (1981PASP...93....5B) or Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987ApJS...63..295V) diagnostic diagrams allows the unambiguous classification of the nuclear emission line regions of most galaxies into one of three categories: nuclear HII regions or starbursts, Seyfert 2 galaxies and Liners. However, a small fraction of them have a "transition" spectrum. We present spectral observations of 15 "transition" objects at high-dispersion (66Å/mm) around the Hα, [NII]λλ6548,6584 and/or Hβ, [OIII]λλ4959,5007 emission lines. We show that most of these spectra are composite, due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of a Seyfert nucleus and a HII region. Seyfert 2s and Liners seem to occupy relatively small and distinct volumes in the three-dimensional space λ5007/Hβ, λ6584/Hα, λ6300/Hα.

  7. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  8. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  9. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  10. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  11. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  12. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  13. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  14. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  15. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  16. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  17. Spectra of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    Non-LTE modeling is essential for interpreting the spectra of O stars and their decendents, and much progress has been made. The major uncertainty associated with analyzing photospheric spectra of O stars arises from issues related to microturbulence and macroturbulence. Many supergiants, for example, have microturbulent velocities that approach the sound speed, while macroturbulent velocities are often several times the sound speed. The cause of this turbulence is unknown, but may be related to pulsation, an underlying convection zone associated with the Fe opacity bump, or feedback from the stellar wind. Determining accurate abundances in O stars is hampered by the lack of lines belonging to low-z elements. Many species only have a few observable lines, and some of these are subject to complex non-LTE effects. A characteristic of massive stars is the existence of a stellar wind which is driven by radiation pressure. Radiation driving is inherently unstable, and this leads to winds with an inhomogeneous structure. Major issues that are still unresolved include: How are winds driven through the sonic point? What is the nature of the inhomogeneities, and how do the properties of these inhomogeneities change with density and velocity? How important is spatial porosity, and porosity in velocity space? What is the structure of the shocks, and in what stars do the shocks fail to cool? With Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars the major uncertainty arises because the classic spectroscopic radius (i.e., the location where τ = 2/3) often refers to a location in the wind — not necessarily the stellar radius associated with stellar evolution models. Derived radii are typically several times those predicted by stellar evolution calculations, although for strong-lined W-R stars it is possible to construct models that are consistent with evolution calculations. The driving of the winds in these stars is strongly coupled to the closeness of the stars to the Eddington limit and to their

  18. Measuring Ionization at Extreme Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Dominik; Doeppner, Tilo; Kritcher, Andrea; Bachmann, Benjamin; Fletcher, Luke; Falcone, Roger; Gericke, Dirk; Glenzer, Siegfried; Masters, Nathan; Nora, Ryan; Boehm, Kurt; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Yi, Austin; Kline, John; Redmer, Ronald; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is crucial in order to properly model compressibility and heat capacity of ICF ablator materials for efficient implosions producing energy gain. Here, we present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules on the National Ignition Facility. Recording scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees, first experiments show strong sensitivity to k-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray Thomson scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3, giving the possibility to investigate effects of continuum lowering and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before stagnation of the implosion.

  19. Double ionization of atomic cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Linusson, P.; Fritzsche, S.; Eland, J. H. D.; Hedin, L.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2011-02-15

    We have recorded the double photoionization spectrum of atomic Cd at four different photon energies in the range 40-200 eV. The main channel is single ionization and subsequent decay of excited Cd{sup +} states, some involving Coster-Kronig processes, whereas direct double ionization is found to be weak. The decay of the excited Cd{sup +} states shows a strong selectivity, related to the configuration of the final state. Double ionization leading to the Cd{sup 2+} ground state is investigated in some detail and is found to proceed mainly through ionization and decay of 4d correlation satellites. The most prominent autoionization peaks have been identified with the aid of quantum-mechanical calculations.

  20. Salts Are Mostly NOT Ionized.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the misconception that salts are completely ionizing in solution, the presence of this error in textbooks, probable origins of the error, covalent bonding and ion pairs, and how to tell students the truth. (MKR)

  1. Calculation of multiphoton ionization processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Poe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    We propose an accurate and efficient procedure in the calculation of multiphoton ionization processes. In addition to the calculational advantage, this procedure also enables us to study the relative contributions of the resonant and nonresonant intermediate states.

  2. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  3. Dissociative ionization of sodium molecules via repulsive Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong

    In this thesis, an investigation of two color resonance multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and fragmentation processes in Na2 has been performed in combination with Linear Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry technique. The ionization and dissociative ionizations channels in the energy range up to 2500cm -1 above the dissociative ionization threshold into Na(3s)+Na ++e have been studied. After a mild supersonic expansion from the beam source, neutral sodium dimers in the ground state have been produced. Two tunable, pulsed lasers excite Na2 molecules via the intermediate A1S+u state to a single ro-vibrational level of the second intermediate 21pig state. Following absorption of a third photon, the total energy is above the dissociation limit into Na(3s) + Na+ + e. Typically, a small portion of atomic ions is produced under our experimental conditions. By varying the total available energy below and through the doubly excited states correlating with the Na(3p)+Na(4s) atom pair, there is no evidence that the doubly excited states positioned in the ionic continuum get involved. By calculation of the expected transition probabilities for all possible channels which can decay directly and indirectly into atomic ions, I find that direct dissociative ionization via 12S+u is impossible. The transition probabilities for dissociative ionization via the repulsive Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers n from 5˜12 converging toward the 12S+u state are three to four orders of magnitude larger than those for direct ionization into the continuum of the X2S+g ground state. These repulsive Rydberg states are much more likely to play a role in the photo-ionization through the intermediate 21Pg state. A semi-classical model which was originally developed for negative ion dissociative attachment (O'MAL'67) describes how dissociative ionization occurs along the repulsive Rydberg states. Its prediction concerning the ratio of atomic to molecular ion production as a function of initial

  4. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  5. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  6. Laser ionization mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardez, Luis J., III; Siekhaus, W. J.

    1989-10-01

    Laser Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (LIMS) is a simple technique with several advantages and disadvantages over standard mass spectroscopy techniques. The LIMS technique uses a laser to vaporize a small portion of a sample. The vapor from the sample consists of a mixture of charged and neutral atoms or fragments. Using electrostatic grids, the ions (positive or negative) are given a known amount of kinetic energy and sent down a time-of-flight tube. The time it takes the ions to travel down the flight tube is recorded. Knowing the ions' energy, the length of the flight tube, and the time it takes the ions to travel that distance, the masses of the ions can be calculated. The instrument used is a LIMA 3 made by Cambridge Mass Spectrometry. It has a Quanta Ray DCR-11 Nd:YAG laser, which was frequency-quadrupled to 266 nm. The laser spot size is typically between 2 and 5 microns in diameter and the pulse width is between 5 and 10 nanoseconds. The energy of the laser is continually variable between 0.1 and 3.0 millijoules. The detector is a 17-stage venetian-blind multiplier made by Thorn EMI. The analysis is carried out under vacuum, usually between 10(exp -8) and 10(exp -9) Torr. The LIMA 3 has several useful features such as: a He-Ne pilot laser used to target the Nd:YAG laser; a microscope (which is used to view the sample through the laser optics); and a precision sample stage for accurate sample alignment.

  7. Laser ionization mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardez, L.J. III; Siekhaus, W.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Laser Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (LIMS) is a simple technique with several advantages and disadvantages over standard mass spectroscopy techniques. The LIMS technique uses a laser to vaporize a small portion of a sample. The vapor from the sample consists of a mixture of charged and neutral atoms or fragments. Using electrostatic grids, the ions (positive or negative) are given a known amount of kinetic energy and sent down a time-of-flight tube. The time it takes the ions to travel down the flight tube is recorded. Knowing the ions' energy, the length of the flight tube, and the time it takes the ions to travel that distance, the masses of the ions can be calculated. The instrument we use is a LIMA 3 made by Cambridge Mass Spectrometry. It has a Quanta Ray DCR-11 Nd:YAG laser, which we frequency-quadruple to 266 nm. The laser spot size is typically between 2 and 5 microns in diameter and the pulse width is between 5 and 10 nanoseconds. The energy of the laser is continually variable between 0.1 and 3.0 millijoules. The detector is a 17-stage venetian-blind multiplier made by Thorn EMI. The analysis is carried out under vacuum, usually between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}9} Torr. The LIMA 3 has several useful features such as: a He-Ne pilot laser used to target the Nd:YAG laser; a microscope (which is used to view the sample through the laser optics); and a precision sample stage for accurate sample alignment. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

  9. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  10. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  11. Late time optical spectra from the Ni/sup 56/ model for Type I Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-04-01

    A numerical model has been created that produces self-consistent optical spectra, temperatures, and ionization states for a homologously expanding spherical shell which at t = 0 is assumed to consist of pure Nickel 56, and is further assumed to have density independent of radius within the shell. A brief summary is given of the model, followed by some results from the calculations. (GHT)

  12. HUMIDITY EFFECTS ON THE MASS SPECTRA OF SINGLE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry has developed into a widely used method for chemical characterization of individual aerosol particles. In the present study, the spectra of laboratory-generated particles were obtained as a function of relative humidity to elu...

  13. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of drugs in the thermal and hyperthermal energy range -- a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Shai; Amirav, Aviv; Fujü, Toshihiro

    1995-12-01

    Thermal and hyperthermal surface ionization (SI) mass spectra of nicotine, caffeine and lidocaine were obtained using a rhenium oxide surface. Thermal surface ionization was studied on an oxidized surface positioned inside an electron impact ion source, while hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) was obtained upon seeding the compounds into a hydrogen or helium supersonic molecular beam that scattered from the rhenium oxide surface. Both HSI and SI provide rich, informative and complementary mass spectral information. The results indicate that SI follows thermal dissociation processes on the surface prior to the desorption of the ion, while in HSI no thermal equilibrium is established and the ionization process is impulsive, followed by mostly unimolecular ion dissociation. HSI mass spectra are similar to electron impact mass spectra in the fragment ion masses, but the observed relative intensities are different. HSI is a softer ionization method compared to SI, and enables the degree of ion fragmentation to be tuned so that it can be minimized to a low level at low molecular kinetic energy. In SI, limited control over the degree of fragmentation is possible through the surface temperature. The analytical mass spectrometric applications of SI and HSI are briefly mentioned.

  14. Impact of electron ionization on the generation of high-order harmonics from molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Brener, S.; Moiseyev, N.; Ivanov, M. V.

    2003-08-01

    When the laser frequency is tuned to be equal to the molecular electronic excitation, high-order harmonics are generated due to the electronic dipole transitions between the corresponding two potential-energy surfaces (PES). A natural, often taken, choice is the PES of the field-free molecular system. In this special choice the ionization phenomenon is not considered. Only the effect of the dissociation is considered. The method we developed enables one to remain within the framework of the 2-PES approximation and yet to include also the ionization effect in the calculations of molecular high-order harmonic generation spectra. In this approach the coupling between the electronic and nuclear motions is taken into consideration by using coupled complex adiabatic PES. As an illustrative numerical example, we calculated the high harmonic generation (HHG) spectra of H{sub 2}{sup +} in a 730-nm laser with the intensity of 8.77x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}. The inclusion of the ionization in our approach not only enables the electrons to tunnel through the effective static potential barrier, but also apply an asymmetric force which accelerates the electron before ionization takes place. Therefore, indirectly the inclusion of the ionization by the laser field may lead eventually to an enhanced HHG spectra in comparison with the calculated one when the ''natural'' choice of the field-free 2PES is taken.

  15. Influence of Dust Loading on Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  16. Influence of dust loading on atmospheric ionizing radiation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the radiation environment at the surface of Mars is the primary goal of the Radiation Assessment Detector on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover. One of the conditions that Curiosity will likely encounter is a dust storm. The objective of this paper is to compute the cosmic ray ionization in different conditions, including dust storms, as these various conditions are likely to be encountered by Curiosity at some point. In the present work, the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety model, recently modified for Mars, was used along with the Badhwar & O'Neill 2010 galactic cosmic ray model. In addition to galactic cosmic rays, five different solar energetic particle event spectra were considered. For all input radiation environments, radiation dose throughout the atmosphere and at the surface was investigated as a function of atmospheric dust loading. It is demonstrated that for galactic cosmic rays, the ionization depends strongly on the atmosphere profile. Moreover, it is shown that solar energetic particle events strongly increase the ionization throughout the atmosphere, including ground level, and can account for the radio blackout conditions observed by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft. These results demonstrate that the cosmic rays' influence on the Martian surface chemistry is strongly dependent on solar and atmospheric conditions that should be taken into account for future studies.

  17. Influence of Multiple Ionization on Studies of Nanoflare Heated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum emitted by a plasma depends on the charge state distribution (CSD) of the gas. This, in turn, is determined by the corresponding rates for electron-impact ionization and recombination. Current CSD calculations for solar physics do not account for electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI), a process in which multiple electrons are ejected by a single electron-ion collision. We have estimated the EIMI cross sections for all charge states of iron using a combination of the available experimental data and semi-empirical formulae. We then modeled the CSD and observed the influence of EIMI compared to only including single ionization. One case of interest for solar physics is nanoflare heating. Recent work has attempted to predict the spectra of impulsively heated plasmas in order to identify diagnostics arising from non-equilibrium ionization that can constrain the nanoflare properties, but these calculations have ignored EIMI. Our findings suggest that EIMI can have a significant effect on the CSD of a nanoflare-heated plasma, changing the ion abundances by up to about 50%.

  18. Zero Volt Paper Spray Ionization and Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wleklinski, Michael; Li, Yafeng; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, T; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-01

    The analytical performance and a suggested mechanism for zero volt paper spray using chromatography paper are presented. A spray is generated by the action of the pneumatic force of the mass spectrometer (MS) vacuum at the inlet. Positive and negative ion signals are observed, and comparisons are made with standard kV paper spray (PS) ionization and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI). While the range of analytes to which zero volt PS is applicable is very similar to kV PS and nESI, differences in the mass spectra of mixtures are interpreted in terms of the more significant effects of analyte surface activity in the gentler zero volt experiment than in the other methods due to the significantly lower charge. The signal intensity of zero volt PS is also lower than in the other methods. A Monte Carlo simulation based on statistical fluctuation of positive and negative ions in solution has been implemented to explain the production of ions from initially uncharged droplets. Uncharged droplets first break up due to aerodynamics forces until they are in the 2-4 μm size range and then undergo Coulombic fission. A model involving statistical charge fluctuations in both phases predicts detection limits similar to those observed experimentally and explains the effects of binary mixture components on relative ionization efficiencies. The proposed mechanism may also play a role in ionization by other voltage-free methods. PMID:26024306

  19. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100°C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. PMID:26838374

  20. HIIexplorer: Detect and extract integrated spectra of HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, S. F.

    2016-03-01

    HIIexplorer detects and extracts the integrated spectra of HII regions from IFS datacubes. The procedure assumes H ii regions are peaky/isolated structures with a strong ionized gas emission, clearly above the continuum emission and the average ionized gas emission across the galaxy and that H ii regions have a typical physical size of about a hundred or a few hundreds of parsecs, which corresponds to a typical projected size at the distance of the galaxies of a few arcsec for galaxies at z~0.016. All input parameters can be derived from either a visual inspection and/or a statistical analysis of the Hα emission line map. The algorithm produces a segmentation FITS file describing the pixels associated to each H ii region.

  1. Far-ultraviolet absorption spectra of quasars: How to find missing hot gas and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verner, D. A.; Tytler, David; Barthel, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    We show that some high-redshift QSO absorption systems that reveal only the H I Lyman series lines at wavelengths visible from the ground maybe a new class of ultra-high-ionization metal line systems, with metal lines in the far-UV region which is now being explored with satellites. At high temperatures or in intense radiation fields metal systems will not show the usual C IV absorption, and O VI will become the most prominent metal absorber. At still higher ionization, O IV also becomes weak and the strongest metal lines are from Ne VIII, Mg X and Si XII, which have doublets in the rangs 500-800 A. Hence very high ionization metal systems will not show metal lines in existing spectra. Recent X-ray observations show that galaxy halos contain hot gas, so we predict that far-UV spectra of QSOs will also show this gas.

  2. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  3. REGIOSPECIFIC ANALYSIS OF DIRICINOLEOYL-ACYL-GLYCEROL IN CASTOR OIL USING ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HPLC fractions of castor oil were used to identify the regiospecific location of non-hydroxyl fatty acids on glycerol backbone in diricinoleoyl-acyl-glycerols using electrospray ionization MS3 of lithium adducts. The regiospecific ions in MS3 spectra were from the loss of 'a,B'-unsaturated fatty aci...

  4. Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl and eta5-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl studied by symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation and collision-energy resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2010-02-28

    Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)(5) and eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2) have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES), and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations. Theory provided reliable assignments for the complex ionization spectra of these molecules, which have metal-carbonyl bonds. Theoretical ionization energies agreed well with experimental observations and the calculated wave functions could explain the relative intensities of PIES spectra. The collision-energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) was obtained by 2D-PIES. To interpret these CEDPICS, the interaction potentials between the molecules and a Li atom were examined in several coordinates by calculations. The relation between the slope of the CEDPICS and the electronic structure of the ionized states, such as molecular symmetry and the spatial distribution of ionizing orbitals, was analyzed. In Fe(CO)(5), an attractive interaction was obtained for the equatorial CO, while the interaction for the axial CO direction was repulsive. For Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), the interaction potential in the direction of both Co-C-O and Co-Cp ring was attractive. These anisotropic interactions and ionizing orbital distributions consistently explain the relative slopes of the CEDPICS. PMID:20192297

  5. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  6. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  7. Amonia gas: an improved reagent for chemical ionization mass spectrometry of bile acid methyl ester acetates

    SciTech Connect

    DeMark, B.R.; Klein, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The ammonia chemical ionization mass spectra of 28 methyl ester acetate derivatives of bile acids and related compounds have been determined by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Advantages of ammonia ionization over the previously studied isobutane ionization include a 130 to 270% enhancement in the sensitivity of base peak monitoring, and direct determination of molecular weight from the base peak (M + NH/sub 4//sup +/) in the mass spectrum of any of the derivatives. Minor ions in the ammonia spectra also allow selective detection of 3-keto compounds and can indicate unsaturation or double bond conjugation in the molecule. The significance of these studies for the detection and quantitation of bile acids is discussed. 2 tables.

  8. Speciation of arsenic oxides using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allen, T M; Bezabeh, D Z; Smith, C H; McCauley, E M; Jones, A D; Chang, D P; Kennedy, I M; Kelly, P B

    1996-11-15

    Positive and negative ion mass spectra of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) and arsenic pentaoxide (As2O5) have been obtained by single-step laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Pulsed UV radiation at 266 nm was used for the simultaneous desorption and ionization of the solid sample. High-mass cluster ions that are unique to the oxidation state of each oxide sample appear in the negative ion mass spectra. The As2O3 produces As3O5-, while the As2O5 yields As3O8-. The formation of unique negative cluster ions presents the capability for arsenic oxidation state speciation by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The ability of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to examine the relative amounts of each arsenic oxide present in a series of mixtures is discussed. Application of our speciation technique to a model incinerator sample is demonstrated. PMID:8916457

  9. The detection of energetic materials with a laser ionization ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alistair; Deas, Robert M.; Kosmidis, Constantinos; Ledingham, Kenneth W. D.; Marshall, Archibald; Singhal, Ravi P.

    1995-04-01

    Laser induced multiphoton ionization (MPI) has been used to produce positive and negative ions at atmospheric pressure in an ion mobility spectrometer. This paper deals particularly with the application of this technique to the ultra-trace detection of a number of energetic materials such as RDX and PETN. In conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), a radioactive 63Ni β-foil is used as the ionization source. The laser IMS spectra will be compared with the 63Ni spectra and it will be shown that the analyte ions produced by laser ionization have a wavelength dependent fingerprint which provides an additional degree of selectivity. It is felt that this new approach to IMS will develop considerably the scope and applicability of this powerful technique.

  10. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient analysis of solids.

    PubMed

    Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zon; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Chi-Yang; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Beech, Iwona; Sunner, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A new method of electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry, which combines laser desorption with post-ionization by electrospray, was applied to rapid analysis of solid materials under ambient conditions. Analytes were desorbed from solid metallic and insulating substrata using a pulsed nitrogen laser. Post-ionization produced high-quality mass spectra characteristic of electrospray, including protein multiple charging. For the first time, mass spectra of intact proteins were obtained using laser desorption without adding a matrix. Bovine cytochrome c and an illicit drug containing methaqualone were chosen in this study to demonstrate the applicability of ELDI to the analysis of proteins and synthetic organic compounds. PMID:16299699

  11. Generalized eikonal approximation for strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cajiao Vélez, F.; Krajewska, K.; Kamiński, J. Z.

    2015-05-01

    We develop the eikonal perturbation theory to describe the strong-field ionization by finite laser pulses. This approach in the first order with respect to the binding potential (the so-called generalized eikonal approximation) avoids a singularity at the potential center. Thus, in contrast to the ordinary eikonal approximation, it allows one to treat rescattering phenomena in terms of quantum trajectories. We demonstrate how the first Born approximation and its domain of validity follow from eikonal perturbation theory. Using this approach, we study the coherent interference patterns in photoelectron energy spectra and their modifications induced by the interaction of photoelectrons with the atomic potential. Along with these first results, we discuss the prospects of using the generalized eikonal approximation to study strong-field ionization from multicentered atomic systems and to study other strong-field phenomena.

  12. Low-energy electron-impact ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Schow, E.; Hazlett, K.; Childers, J. G.; Medina, C.; Vitug, G.; Khakoo, M. A.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2005-12-15

    Normalized doubly differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of helium at low energies are presented. The data are taken at the incident electron energies of 26.3, 28.3, 30.3, 32.5, 34.3, 36.5, and 40.7 eV and for scattering angles of 10 deg. -130 deg. The measurements involve the use of the moveable target method developed at California State University Fullerton to accurately determine the continuum background in the energy-loss spectra. Normalization of experimental data is made on a relative scale to well-established experimental differential cross sections for excitation of the n=2 manifold of helium and then on an absolute scale to the well-established total ionization cross sections of Shah et al. [J. Phys. B 21, 2751 (1988)]. Comparisons are made with available experimental data and the results of the convergent close-coupling theory.

  13. Theoretical studies of photoexcitation and ionization in H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diercksen, G. H. F.; Kraemer, W. P.; Rescigno, T. N.; Bender, C. F.; Mckoy, B. V.; Langhoff, S. R.; Langhoff, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies using Franck-Condon and static-exchange approximations are reported for the complete dipole excitation and ionization spectrum in H2O, where (1) large Cartesian Gaussian basis sets are used to represent the required discrete and continuum electronic eigenfunctions at the ground state equilibrium geometry, and (2) previously devised moment-theory techniques are employed in constructing the continuum oscillator-strength densities from the calculated spectra. Comparisons are made of the calculated excitation and ionization profiles with recent experimental photoabsorption studies and corresponding spectral assignments, electron impact-excitation cross sections, and dipole and synchrotron-radiation studies of partial-channel photoionization cross sections. The calculated partial-channel cross sections are found to be atomic-like, and dominated by 2p-kd components. It is suggested that the latter transition couples with the underlying 1b(1)-kb(1) channel, accounting for a prominent feature in recent synchrotron-radiation measurements.

  14. Supercontinuum in ionization by relativistically intense and short laser pulses: Ionization without interference and its time analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, K.; Kamiński, J. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization by relativistically intense laser pulses of finite duration is considered in the framework of strong-field quantum electrodynamics. We show that the resulting ionization spectra change their behavior from the interference-dominated oscillatory pattern to the interference-free smooth supercontinuum, the latter being the main focus of this paper. More specifically, when studying the energy distributions of photoelectrons ionized by circularly polarized and short pulses, we observe the appearance of broad structures lacking the interference patterns. These supercontinua extend over hundreds of driving photon energies, thus corresponding to high-order nonlinear processes. Their positions on the electron energy scale can be controlled by changing the pulse duration. The corresponding polar-angle distributions show asymmetries which are attributed to the radiation pressure experienced by photoelectrons. Moreover, our time analysis shows that the electrons comprising the supercontinuum can form pulses of short duration. While we present the fully numerical results, their interpretation is based on the saddle-point approximation for the ionization probability amplitude.

  15. An Atlas of Far-ultraviolet Spectra of the Zeta Aurigae Binary 31 Cygni with Line Identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen Bauer, Wendy; Bennett, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    The ζ Aurigae system 31 Cygni (K4 Ib + B4 V) was observed by the FUSE satellite during total eclipse and at three phases during chromospheric eclipse. We present the coadded, calibrated spectra and atlases with line identifications. During total eclipse, emission from high ionization states (e.g., Fe III and Cr III) shows asymmetric profiles redshifted from the systemic velocity, while emission from lower ionization states (e.g., Fe II and O I) appears more symmetric and is centered closer to the systemic velocity. Absorption from neutral and singly ionized elements is detected during chromospheric eclipse. Late in chromospheric eclipse, absorption from the K star wind is detected at a terminal velocity of ~80 km s-1. These atlases will be useful for interpreting the far-UV spectra of other ζ Aur systems, as the observed FUSE spectra of 32 Cyg, KQ Pup, and VV Cep during chromospheric eclipse resemble that of 31 Cyg.

  16. AN ATLAS OF FAR-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF THE ZETA AURIGAE BINARY 31 CYGNI WITH LINE IDENTIFICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Wendy Hagen; Bennett, Philip D.

    2014-04-01

    The ζ Aurigae system 31 Cygni (K4 Ib + B4 V) was observed by the FUSE satellite during total eclipse and at three phases during chromospheric eclipse. We present the coadded, calibrated spectra and atlases with line identifications. During total eclipse, emission from high ionization states (e.g., Fe III and Cr III) shows asymmetric profiles redshifted from the systemic velocity, while emission from lower ionization states (e.g., Fe II and O I) appears more symmetric and is centered closer to the systemic velocity. Absorption from neutral and singly ionized elements is detected during chromospheric eclipse. Late in chromospheric eclipse, absorption from the K star wind is detected at a terminal velocity of ∼80 km s{sup –1}. These atlases will be useful for interpreting the far-UV spectra of other ζ Aur systems, as the observed FUSE spectra of 32 Cyg, KQ Pup, and VV Cep during chromospheric eclipse resemble that of 31 Cyg.

  17. Strong-field ionization of H{sub 2} from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths: Photoelectron energy and angular identifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbois, Timo; Helm, Hanspeter

    2011-11-15

    Strong-field ionization of molecular hydrogen is studied at wavelengths ranging from 300 to 800 nm using pulses of 100-fs duration. We find that over this wide wavelength range, from nominally 4-photon to 11-photon ionization, resonance features dominate the ionization probability at intensities below 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Photoelectron momentum maps recorded by an imaging spectrometer are analyzed to identify the wavelength-dependent ionization pathways in single ionization of molecular hydrogen. A number of models, some empirical, which are appropriate for a quantitative interpretation of the spectra and the ionization yield are introduced. A near-absolute comparison of measured ionization yields at 398 nm is made with the predictions based on a numerical solution [Y. V. Vanne and A. Saenz, Phys. Rev. A 79, 023421 (2009)] of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for two correlated electrons.

  18. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, M.; Audet, T. L.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo González, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  19. Ionization/dissociation processes in some alkyl iodides induced by strong picosecond laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siozos, P.; Kaziannis, S.; Kosmidis, C.; Lyras, A.

    2005-05-01

    The interaction of 1-, 2-iodopropane, 1-, 2-iodobutane and 1-iodopentane with strong (2 × 1015 W cm-2) picosecond laser fields at 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm is studied by means of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The experimental findings are compared with those reported, for the same molecules, from fs experiments at similar laser intensities. The pertaining molecular ionization mechanism (multiphoton and/or field ionization) is found to depend on the laser wavelength, while the recorded multiply charged atomic ions are generated via field ionization processes in all cases. The identification of these ionization mechanisms has been based on the dependence of the signal intensity and the peak profiles on laser polarization. The recorded mass spectra are analyzed vis-à-vis those reported for methyl iodide. The observed similarities and differences are discussed in detail.

  20. Spectroscopic investigations of tungsten EUV spectra for fusion plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementson, Joel; Lennartsson, Thomas; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Safronova, Ulyana; Brage, Tomas; Grumer, Jon

    2011-10-01

    The Livermore WOLFRAM spectroscopy project consists of experimental and theoretical investigations of tungsten ions of relevance to the diagnostics of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A recent effort has focused on the complex extreme ultraviolet spectra of few-times ionized tungsten atoms that are expected to be abundant in ITER divertor plasmas. The tungsten ions were produced and excited in the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap by scanning the electron-beam energy between 30 and 300 eV. The emission was studied using a broad-band grazing-incidence spectrometer covering 150 - 300 Å and a high-resolution spectrometer covering the 180 - 220 Å region. Experimental spectra are presented together with analysis based on calculations using the FAC, GRASP, Cowan, HULLAC, and RMBPT codes. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA-27344.

  1. Energy spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Dietrich; Swordy, Simon P.; Meyer, Peter; L'Heureux, Jacques; Grunsfeld, John M.

    1991-06-01

    New results are described on the energy spectra and relative abundances of primary cosmic ray nuclei from carbon to iron. The measurement was performed on the Spacelab-2 mission of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1985, and extends to energies beyond 1 TeV per amu. The data indicate that the cosmic ray flux arriving near earth becomes enriched with heavier nuclei, most notably iron, as energy increases. Extrapolating to the source, with a simple leaky box model of galactic propagation with rigidity-dependent containment time, relative abundances of the elements are obtained that are quite similar to those reported at lower energy. In particular, the depletion of elements with high first ionization potential relative to the local galactic abundances, seems to persist in the cosmic ray source well up to TeV energies. A single power-law energy spectrum about E exp -2.1 provides a good description of the observed spectra of most elemental species.

  2. Microwave ionization of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, T.F.

    1996-12-31

    An atom can be ionized by a static field if the field depresses the potential below the binding energy W, leading to the requirement E = W{sup 2}/4 in atomic units. The atomic units of field and energy are 5.14 {times} 10{sup 9} V/cm and 27.2 eV. The ionization field is often expressed in terms of the principal quantum number n of the state in question as E = 1/16n{sup 4}. In a microwave field with frequency far less than the separation {Delta}W = 1/n{sup 3} between adjacent n states, atoms other than H ionize at the much lower microwave field amplitude of E = 1/3n{sup 5}. This field corresponds to the Inglis-Teller limit, where it is impossible to resolve spectrally adjacent n states due to Stark broadening in a plasma. In H ionization occurs as it does in a static field. The difference exists because the finite sized ionic core of a non hydrogenic atom breaks one of the symmetries found in H. In non hydrogenic atoms the microwave field drives a series of transitions through successively higher n states culminating in ionization. These transitions can be understood in terms of a Landau-Zener picture based on the variation of the energies of the atoms produced by the time varying field or as the resonant multiphoton absorption of the microwave photons. In either case, the atoms make transitions through real intermediate states en route to ionization. With short, four cycle, microwave pulses complete ionization does not occur with fields of E = 1/3n{sup 5}, and population is left in intermediate states. The transition from ionization at fields near E = 1/3n{sup 5} to fields of E = 1/16n{sup 4} occurs when the frequency becomes low enough that the energies of the states vary adiabatically in the temporally varying field.

  3. Characteristics of low-temperature plasma ionization for ambient mass spectrometry compared to electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2012-12-18

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) is an attractive method for direct analysis with applications in homeland security, forensics, and human health. For example, low-temperature plasma probe (LTP) ionization was successfully used to detect, e.g., explosives, drugs, and pesticides directly on the target. Despite the fact that the field is gaining significant attention, few attempts have been made to classify ambient ionization techniques based on their ionization characteristics and performance compared to conventional ionization sources used in mass spectrometry. In the present study, relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) for a large group of compound families were determined with LTP-Orbitrap-MS and compared to those obtained with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). RIEs were normalized against one reference compound used across all methods to ensure comparability of the results. Typically, LTP analyte ionization through protonation/deprotonation (e.g., 4-acetamidophenol) was observed; in some cases (e.g., acenaphthene) radicals were formed. Amines, amides, and aldehydes were ionized successfully with LTP. A benefit of LTP over conventional methods is the possibility to successfully ionize PAHs and imides. Here, the studied model compounds could be detected by neither APCI nor ESI. LTP is a relatively soft ionization method because little fragmentation of model compounds was observed. It is considered to be an attractive method for the ionization of low molecular weight compounds over a relatively wide polarity range. PMID:23134531

  4. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  5. Multiphoton ionization-fragmentation patterns of tertiary amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, D. H.; Bernstein, R. B.; Lichtin, D. A.

    1981-09-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI)-fragmentation patterns are reported for a series of normal and caged tertiary amines. Ionization is enhanced by two-photon resonance with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of trimethylamine, triethylamine, and the caged amines quinuclidine and triethylenediamine. Over the wavelength region λ = 400-530 nm, N(CH3)3 ionizes to the parent ion (P) and fragments only by the loss of a H atom to yield the P-H daughter ion; N(C2H5)3 ionizes to its parent ion and fragments by the loss of a methyl to form the P-CH3 ion. The branching ratio of daughter to parent ions is found to be essentially independent of laser intensity but strongly dependent on laser wavelength. The caged amines quinuclidine [N(C2H4)3CH, or ABCO] and triethylenediamine [N(C2H4)3N, or DABCO] fragment extensively over this λ range in a manner dependent on both laser wavelength and intensity. The extent of daughter ion formation in N(CH3)3 and N(C2H5)3 can be understood by consideration of the wavelength regions in which the total available energy from the initial three- or four-photon ionization event exceeds the appearance potential of the given daughter ion. For the caged amines direct observation of this mechanism is masked by fragmentation due to sequential absorption of photons (during the ˜5 ns pulse duration) by the parent and/or daughter ions. The present results show that even for molecules with broad, unstructured UV absorption and MPI spectra such as N(CH3)3 and N(C2H5)3, considerable information on photon-molecule and photon-ion interactions can still be gained by the MPI mass spectrometry technique.

  6. L x rays emitted from multiply ionized holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Horvat, V.; Watson, R.L.; Blackadar, J.M.; Perumal, A.N.; Peng, Yong

    2005-06-15

    Spectra of L x rays emitted from Ho targets bombarded by 10 keV electrons and 6 MeV/amu C, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions were measured in high resolution using a curved crystal spectrometer. The spectra were analyzed in order to examine the systematic evolution of the L x-ray satellite structure as a function of projectile atomic number. Scaling rules are established for the apparent average M-shell spectator vacancy fraction and apparent average double to single L-vacancy population ratio at the time of L x-ray emission. The results are compared to those obtained for K-shell ionizing collisions and with predictions of the geometrical model.

  7. Rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma by direct ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ho-Yi; Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Chan, Chi-On; Mok, Daniel Kam-Wah; Xin, Gui-Zhong; Li, Ping; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2016-09-28

    In this study, direct ionization mass spectrometry (DI-MS) for rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma (known as Tianma in Chinese), a popular herbal medicine, has been developed. This method is rapid, simple and allows direct generation of characteristic mass spectra from the raw herbal medicines with the application of some solvents and a high voltage. The acquired DI-MS spectra showed that gastrodin, parishin B/parishin C and parishin, the major active components of Gastrodiae rhizoma, could be found only in genuine Gastrodiae rhizoma samples, but not in counterfeit samples, thus allowing rapid authentication of Gastrodiae rhizoma. Moreover, wild and cultivated Gastrodiae rhizoma could be classified and Gastrodiae rhizoma from different geographical locations could be differentiated based on their different intensity ratios of characteristic ions or principal component analysis (PCA). This method is simple, rapid, reproducible, and can be extended to analyze other herbal medicines. PMID:27619090

  8. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  9. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  10. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisin, J. R.

    Some of the problems related to chemical protection against ionizing radiation are discussed with emphasis on : definition, classification, degree of protection, mechanisms of action and toxicity. Results on the biological response modifyers (BRMs) and on the combination of nontoxic (i.e. low) doses of sulphydryl radioprotectors and BRMs are presented.

  11. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  12. Application of a quadrupole mass filter to laser ionization mass spectrometry: synchronization between the laser pulse and the mass scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuya, M.; Ohoka, Y.; Katoh, H.; Sakanashi, H.

    1998-01-01

    A quadrupole-based laser ionization mass spectrometry system was developed by combining a commercial quadrupole mass filter with a laser microprobe instrument, which employs a pulse generator that synchronizes the laser pulse with the quadrupole mass scan to detect the pulsed ion signals generated by laser induced ionization. Mass spectra were measured for several solid samples of pure metals (Al,Cu), metal alloys (Inconel 601, brass), and ceramics (BN). Reproducible spectra, with relative standard deviations of the ion signals less than 1%, were obtained with this system. Moreover, isotope abundance ratios were measured and compared with the natural abundance ratios.

  13. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  14. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-à-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  15. Field ionization process of Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Li; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The field ionization process of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states, converging to the first ionization limit, 4f76s 9S4, is systematically investigated. The spectra of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states are populated with three-step laser excitation, and detected by electric field ionization (EFI) method. Two different kinds of the EFI pulses are applied after laser excitation to observe the possible impacts on the EFI process. The exact EFI ionization thresholds for the 4f76snp Rydberg states can be determined by observing the corresponding EFI spectra. In particular, some structures above the EFI threshold are found in the EFI spectra, which may be interpreted as the effect from black body radiation (BBR). Finally, the scaling law of the EFI threshold for the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states with the effective quantum number is built. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11004151 and 11174218).

  16. Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of hydrogen sulfide by metastable helium and neon atoms.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Candori, Pietro; Bettoni, Marta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2014-08-21

    The dynamics of the Penning ionization of hydrogen sulfide molecules by collision with helium and metastable neon atoms, occurring in the thermal energy range, has been studied by analyzing the energy spectra of the emitted electrons obtained in our laboratory in a crossed beam experiment. These spectra are compared with the photoelectron spectra measured by using He(I) and Ne(I) photons under the same experimental conditions. In this way we obtained the negative energy shifts for the formation of H2S(+) ions in the first three accessible electronic states by He*(2(3,1)S1,0) and Ne*((3)P2,0) Penning ionization collisions: the 2b1 (X̃(2)B1) fundamental one, the first 5a1 (Ã(2)A1), and the second 2b2 (B̃(2)B2) excited states, respectively. The recorded energy shifts indicate that in the case of He* and Ne*-H2S the autoionization dynamics depends on the features of the collision complex and is mainly driven by an effective global attraction that comes from a balance among several non covalent intermolecular interaction components. This suggests that the Penning ionization should take place, in a specific range of intermolecular distances, as we have already observed in the case of Penning ionization of water molecules [Brunetti, B. G.; Candori, P.; Falcinelli, S.; Pirani, F.; Vecchiocattivi, F. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 139, 164305-1-164305-8]. PMID:24796487

  17. NIST Critical Compilations and Online Databases for Atomic Spectra*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saloman, E. B.; Reader, J.; Wiese, W. L.

    2003-05-01

    The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center continues to provide critically compiled data for atomic energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, and line widths. In addition to journal papers and books, most of the data are available online at http://physics.nist.gov/data. Our online databases on Atomic Spectra, Transition Probabilities Bibliography, Line Broadening Bibliography, and related databases currently receive over 100,000 requests per month. A new database on spectroscopy data for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory is now available. Our database Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data (lines and levels of all neutral and singly ionized atoms) and an Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra Bibliographic Database will be released soon. A major compilation of transition probabilities for Fe I and II is nearing completion. A unified volume on energy levels and lines of noble gases in all stages of ionization is in progress. Supported in part by the Office of Fusion Energy of the U. S. Department of Energy and by the U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed noncontact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect material ablated by a 355 nm UV laser in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appears to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the `softness' of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. In this work, a series of benzylpyridinium salts were employed as thermometer ions to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation/liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. These data, along with results from the analysis the biological molecules bradykinin and angiotensin III indicated that the ions or their fragments formed directly by UV laser ablation that survive the liquid capture/electrospray ionization process were likely to be an extremely small component of the total ion signal observed. Instead, the preponderate neutral molecules, clusters, and particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream, then electrosprayed, were the principal source of the ion signal observed. Thus, the electrospray ionization process used controls the overall `softness' of this technique.

  19. Intense laser ionization of transiently aligned CO

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, D.; Jones, R.R.

    2005-08-15

    We have measured the ionization rate for CO molecules exposed to intense 30 fsec 780 nm laser pulses as a function of the angle between the molecular and laser polarization axes. Nonionizing, 70 fsec laser pulses are used to coherently prepare the molecules, preferentially aligning them for the strong-field ionization experiments. We find a 2:1 ionization-rate ratio for molecules aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ionizing field.

  20. Five-photon double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.; Colgan, J.

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent close-coupling method is used to calculate the five-photon double ionization of He. It is found that the generalized cross section used in the past for two-photon double ionization of He cannot be extended to five-photon double ionization of He. Therefore only five-photon double ionization probabilities that depend on specific radiation field pulses can be calculated.

  1. Auger spectrum of a water molecule after single and double core ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Inhester, L.; Burmeister, C. F.; Groenhof, G.; Grubmueller, H.

    2012-04-14

    The high intensity of free electron lasers opens up the possibility to perform single-shot molecule scattering experiments. However, even for small molecules, radiation damage induced by absorption of high intense x-ray radiation is not yet fully understood. One of the striking effects which occurs under intense x-ray illumination is the creation of double core ionized molecules in considerable quantity. To provide insight into this process, we have studied the dynamics of water molecules in single and double core ionized states by means of electronic transition rate calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the MD trajectories, photoionization and Auger transition rates were computed based on electronic continuum wavefunctions obtained by explicit integration of the coupled radial Schroedinger equations. These rates served to solve the master equations for the populations of the relevant electronic states. To account for the nuclear dynamics during the core hole lifetime, the calculated electron emission spectra for different molecular geometries were incoherently accumulated according to the obtained time-dependent populations, thus neglecting possible interference effects between different decay pathways. We find that, in contrast to the single core ionized water molecule, the nuclear dynamics for the double core ionized water molecule during the core hole lifetime leaves a clear fingerprint in the resulting electron emission spectra. The lifetime of the double core ionized water was found to be significantly shorter than half of the single core hole lifetime.

  2. The composite load spectra project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H.; Kurth, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic methods and generic load models capable of simulating the load spectra that are induced in space propulsion system components are being developed. Four engine component types (the transfer ducts, the turbine blades, the liquid oxygen posts and the turbopump oxidizer discharge duct) were selected as representative hardware examples. The composite load spectra that simulate the probabilistic loads for these components are typically used as the input loads for a probabilistic structural analysis. The knowledge-based system approach used for the composite load spectra project provides an ideal environment for incremental development. The intelligent database paradigm employed in developing the expert system provides a smooth coupling between the numerical processing and the symbolic (information) processing. Large volumes of engine load information and engineering data are stored in database format and managed by a database management system. Numerical procedures for probabilistic load simulation and database management functions are controlled by rule modules. Rules were hard-wired as decision trees into rule modules to perform process control tasks. There are modules to retrieve load information and models. There are modules to select loads and models to carry out quick load calculations or make an input file for full duty-cycle time dependent load simulation. The composite load spectra load expert system implemented today is capable of performing intelligent rocket engine load spectra simulation. Further development of the expert system will provide tutorial capability for users to learn from it.

  3. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  4. [C II] and [N II] from dense ionized regions in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The interstellar medium (ISM) consists of highly ionized and neutral atomic, as well as molecular, components. Knowledge of their distribution is important for tracing the structure and lifecycle of the ISM. Aims: To determine the properties of the highly ionized gas and neutral weakly ionized gas in the Galaxy traced by the fine-structure lines of ionized nitrogen, [N ii], and ionized carbon, [C ii]. Methods: We utilize observations of the [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine-structure lines taken with the high spectral resolution Heterodyne Instrument in the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory along ten lines of sight towards the inner Galaxy to analyze the ionized ISM. The [N ii] emission can be used to estimate the contribution of the highly ionized gas to the [C ii] emission and separate the contributions from highly ionized and weakly ionized neutral gas. Results: We find that [N ii] has strong emission in distinct spectral features along all lines of sight associated with strong [C ii] emission. The [N ii] arises from moderate density extended H ii regions or ionized boundary layers of clouds. Comparison of the [N ii] and [C ii] spectra in 31 separate kinematic features shows that many of the [C ii] spectra are affected by absorption from low excitation gas associated with molecular clouds, sometimes strongly so. The apparent fraction of the [C ii] associated with the [N ii] gas is unrealistically large in many cases, most likely due to the reduction of [C ii] by absorption. In a few cases the foreground absorption can be modeled to determine the true source intensity. In these sources we find that the foreground absorbing gas layer has C+ column densities of order 1018 cm-2. Conclusions: [C ii] emission arising from strong sources of [N ii] emission is frequently absorbed by low excitation foreground gas complicating the interpretation of the properties of the ionized and neutral gas components that give rise to [C ii] emission.

  5. Lyman-alpha emission from the Lyman-alpha forest. [in high red shift quasar spectra due to molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.; Weymann, Ray J.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that high-dispersion long-slit spectra or very narrow-band etalon images of 'blank' sky could reveal patches of Ly-alpha line emission from the population of clouds whose absorption produces the 'Ly-alpha forest' in QSO spectra. A nonobservation can put limits on the ionizing background at high redshift which are better than those obtainable by direct measurements of background light.

  6. Mobility of Proteins in Porous Substrates under Electrospray Ionization Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Proteins are important substances in living organisms and characterization of proteins is an indispensible part for protein study. Analysis of proteins using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with porous substrates was investigated in this study. The results revealed that the ionization process had two stages. At the first stage, mobility and resulting spectra of proteins were similar to those obtained with conventional capillary-based ESI-MS. At the second stage, hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions between proteins and the tip surfaces played an important role in mobility and detectability of protein ions, which were size and shape dependent, and a linear relationship could be found between the peak area of selected ion chromatogram and the cross section of protein ions. Preparative separation of proteins could be achieved by collecting the proteins remained on the porous substrates. These results led us to propose that electrospray ionization from porous substrates offer a potential approach for analysis of proteins and investigation of protein structures and conformations. PMID:27149434

  7. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF{sub 6} have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental ({lambda}=1064 nm) and its harmonics ({lambda}=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF{sub x}{sup +} fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U{sup n+} ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U{sup 2+}) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U{sup +}). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U{sup n+} (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U{sup 2+} ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF{sub x}{sup +} fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule.

  8. Semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Lein, M.; Madsen, L. B.; Räsänen, E.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.; Arbó, D. G.; Tőkési, K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization that accounts for path interferences of tunnel-ionized electrons in the ionic potential beyond perturbation theory. Within the framework of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo representation of the phase-space dynamics, the model employs the semiclassical approximation to the phase of the full quantum propagator in the exit channel. By comparison with the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for strong-field ionization of hydrogen, we show that for suitable choices of the momentum distribution after the first tunneling step, the model yields good quantitative agreement with the full quantum simulation. The two-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions, the energy spectra, and the angular distributions are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding quantum results. Specifically, the model quantitatively reproduces the fanlike interference patterns in the low-energy part of the two-dimensional momentum distributions, as well as the modulations in the photoelectron angular distributions.

  9. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  10. Radiation pressure confinement - III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-12-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe0+ to Fe25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN/d log ξ|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 ≲ ξ ≲ 104 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN/d log ξ| ≈ N1ξa) yield N1 = 3 × 1021 cm- 2 ± 0.4 dex and a = 0-0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed N1 and a? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN/d log ξ| = 8 × 1021 ξ0.03 cm-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of N1 and a depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.

  11. Analysis of photometric spectra of 17 meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The initial phase of the photometry which involved 17 meteor spectra consisting of eight Geminid spectra, six Orionid spectra and three Eta Aquarid spectra is discussed. Among these 17 spectra it is found that the Geminid spectra are of the best quality and are used for the identification of the atomic lines and molecular bands that normally appear on video tape spectra. The data from the Geminid records are used for developing calibration techniques in photometry. The Orionid and Eta Aquarid spectra are chosen for early analysis because of the current interest in all physical and chemical data relating to Comet Halley.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Permanent Magnet Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Gamage, Chaminda M.; Misharin, Alexander S.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.; Tolmachev, Dmitry A.; Tarasova, Irina A.; Kharybin, Oleg N.; Novoselov, Konstantin P.; Gorshkov, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    A new Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer based on a permanent magnet with an atmospheric pressure ionization source was designed and constructed. A mass resolving power (full-width-at-half-maximum) of up to 80,000 in the electron ionization mode and 25,000 in the electrospray mode was obtained. Also, a mass measurement accuracy at low-ppm level has been demonstrated for peptide mixtures in a mass range of up to 1,200 m/z in the isotopically resolved mass spectra. PMID:17587594

  13. [Identification of high-lying odd energy levels of uranium by resonant ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Du, H; Shi, G; Huang, M; Jin, C

    2000-06-01

    Single-colour and two-colour multiphoton resonant ionization spectra of uranium atom were studied extensively with a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser atomic beam apparatus time-of-flight mass spectrometer in our laboratory. The energy locations of high-lying odd-parity levels in the region 33,003-34,264 cm-1, measured by a two-colour three-step ionization technique, were reported here. The angular momentum quantum number J was uniquely assigned for these levels by using angular momentum selection rules. PMID:12958925

  14. Theoretical Calculation for the Ionization of Molecules by Short Strong Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, L.; Borbely, S.

    2011-10-03

    We have developed several calculation methods for the ionization of atoms and molecules by strong and ultrashort laser pulses, based on the numerical solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) in the momentum space. We have performed calculations within the strong field approximation (Volkov) and using iterative and direct methods for solving the TDSE. The investigated molecules are H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}O. In case of the ionization of diatomic molecules the interference effects in the ejected electron spectra due to the coherent addition of the waves associated to the electrons ejected from the vicinity of different nuclei were also analysed.

  15. An evaluation of ionizing radiation emitted by high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, C.D. ); Bolch, W.E. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Sciences)

    1992-02-01

    Ionizing radiation emitted by electron-beam driven high power microwave (HPM) generators were measured in the near and far-field using lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Simplified photon energy spectra were determined by measuring radiation transmission, at electron beam energies of 300 to 650 keV, through various thicknesses of steel and lead attenuators. These data were used to calculate the effective energy of the x-rays produced by interactions between the electrons and the walls or other structures of the HPM generators. Operators were polled to determine locations of burn marks or other visible damage to locate potential ionizing radiation source regions. 27 refs.

  16. Multiphoton ionization/dissociation of cyclopentanone at the lower Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine; Tzallas, Paraskevas

    1998-12-01

    The 2-photon excitation of the 3p and 3d Rydberg states in jet-cooled cyclopentanone has been investigated by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in a time of flight mass spectrometer. The three 3px,y,z components are clearly resolved while the case for the 3di excitations is obscure due to the S1 one-photon resonance. The ns laser induced mass spectra are characteristic of hard ionization while the fs laser induced mass spectrum is very similar to the Electron Impact one.

  17. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  18. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  19. Electron impact ionization of 5- and 6-chlorouracil: appearance energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denifl, S.; Ptasinska, S.; Gstir, B.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2004-03-01

    Electron impact ionization of the gas phase modified DNA/RNA bases 5- and 6-ClU was studied using a crossed electron/neutral beams technique in combination with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. 5- and 6-ClU belong to the class of halouracils which are used in radiation therapy to increase the effect of ionizing radiation to tumours, when they are incorporated into cancer tissue. Besides determining the mass spectra for both molecules at the electron energy of 70 eV, the ionization efficiency curves for each parent ion and the most abundant fragment ions were measured near the threshold and the corresponding appearance energies (AEs) were derived using an iterative, non-linear least square fitting procedure using the Marquart-Levenberg algorithm based on the Wannier threshold law. The most abundant cations observed in mass spectra have a threshold value of AE ((C3H2ClNO)+/5-ClU)=11.12+/-0.03 eV and AE ((C3H2NO)+/6-ClU)=12.06+/-0.03 eV. The present AE value for the parent ion of 5-ClU AE((5-ClU)+/5-ClU)=9.38+/-0.05 eV is in fair agreement with previous calculations at the B3LYP level of theory. The AE((6-ClU)+/6-ClU)=9.71+/-0.05 eV is 0.33 eV higher than that for 5-ClU.

  20. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  1. Identification of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene by resonant two-photon ionization and mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanqi; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Takahashi, Kaito; Shivatare, Vidya; Zhang, Bing; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2015-03-28

    We report the vibronic and cation spectra of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene, recorded by using the two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques. The excitation energies of the S{sub 1}← S{sub 0} electronic transition are found to be 32 767, 32 907, 33 222, and 33 281 cm{sup −1}, and the corresponding adiabatic ionization energies are 65 391, 64 977, 65 114, and 64 525 cm{sup −1} for these isomeric species. Most of the observed active vibrations in the electronically excited S{sub 1} and cationic ground D{sub 0} states involve in-plane ring deformation and substituent-sensitive bending motions. It is found that the relative orientation of the methoxyl with respect to the vinyl group does not influence the vibrational frequencies of the ring-substituent bending modes. The two dimensional potential energy surface calculations support our experimental finding that the isomerization is restricted in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states.

  2. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  3. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  4. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  5. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  6. Nanotip Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel C; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    A method called nanotip ambient ionization mass spectrometry (NAIMS) is described, which applies high voltage between a tungsten nanotip and a metal plate to generate a plasma in which ionized analytes on the surface of the metal plate are directed to the inlet and analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The dependence of signal intensity is investigated as a function of the tip-to-plate distance, the tip size, the voltage applied at the tip, and the current. These parameters are separately optimized to achieve sensitivity or high spatial resolution. A partially observable Markov decision process is used to achieve a stabilized plasma as well as high ionization efficiency. As a proof of concept, the NAIMS technique has been applied to phenanthrene and caffeine samples for which the limits of detection were determined to be 0.14 fmol for phenanthrene and 4 amol for caffeine and to a printed caffeine pattern for which a spatial resolution of 8 ± 2 μm, and the best resolution of 5 μm, was demonstrated. The limitations of NAIMS are also discussed. PMID:27087600

  7. S1 excitation and zero kinetic energy spectra of partly deuterated 1:1 phenol-water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopfer, Otto; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    1994-11-01

    Two-photon, two-color resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of the S1 state of isotopic 1:1 hydrogen-bonded phenol-water clusters have been recorded. Up to three deuterium atoms are introduced in the phenolic OH group and/or the water molecule. The intermolecular vibrational structure found is in reasonable agreement with previously reported one-color REMPI spectra, however, a partly different interpretation of the spectra is presented here. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE) spectra have been obtained via different intermediate S1 levels of the various isotopic complexes. The analysis of both the REMPI and the ZEKE spectra supports the new assignment of several vibrational bands observed in the REMPI spectra of the deuterated complexes where one or two hydrogen atoms are substituted by deuterium. For these deuterated complexes, the reassignment given here is based on the assumption that two different nonequivalent isomeric configurations are responsible for the structure observed in the REMPI spectra. This result is in clear contrast to the previously given interpretation where the spectra were analyzed in terms of only one isomer and the occurrence of Fermi resonances. Furthermore, accurate ionization energies are determined for all possible isomers of the various isotopic complexes and propensity rules for these values as a function of site-specific deuteration have been found. In addition, the analysis of the intermolecular vibrational structure of the complex cations confirmed the assignment of the intermolecular stretch vibration.

  8. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  9. Relativistic ionization fronts in gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Nuno; Dias, J. M.; Gallacher, J. G.; Issac, R. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Lopes, N. C.; Silva, L. O.; Mendonça, J. T.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    A high-power ultra-short laser pulse propagating through a gas jet, ionizes the gas by tunnelling ionization, creating a relativistic plasma-gas interface. The relativistic ionization front that is created can be used to frequency up-shift electromagnetic radiation either in co-propagation or in counter-propagation configurations. In the counter-propagation configuration, ionization fronts can act as relativistic mirrors for terahertz radiation, leading to relativistic double Doppler frequency up-shift to the visible range. In this work, we identified and explored, the parameters that optimize the key features of relativistic ionization fronts for terahertz radiation reflection. The relativistic ionization front generated by a high power laser (TOPS) propagating in a supersonic gas jet generated by a Laval nozzle has been fully characterized. We have also performed detailed two-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations with Osiris 2.0 to analyze the generation and propagation of the ionization fronts.

  10. Direct protein detection from biological media through electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zong; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Jen-Yih; Jeng, Jingyueh; Shiea, Jentaie

    2006-05-01

    We report here using a novel technology-electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization (ELDI)/mass spectrometry-for the rapid and sensitive detection of the major proteins that exist in dried biological fluids (e.g., blood, tears, saliva, serum), bacterial cultures, and tissues (e.g., porcine liver and heart) under ambient conditions. This technique required essentially no sample pretreatment. The proteins in the samples were desorbed using a pulsed nitrogen laser without the assistance of an organic matrix. The desorbed protein molecules were then post-ionized through their fusion into the charged solvent droplets produced from the electrospray of an acidic methanol solution; electrospray ionization (ESI) proceeded from the newly formed droplets to generate the ESI-like protein ions. This new ionization approach combines some of the features of electrospray ionization with those of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), that is, sampling of a solid surface with spatial resolution, generating ESI-like mass spectra of the desorbed proteins, and operating under ambient conditions. PMID:16674100

  11. The Diagnostic Potential of Transition Region Lines Undergoing Transient Ionization in Dynamic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Giunta, A.; Singh, A.; Madjarska, M. S.; Summers, H.; Kellett, B. J.; O'Mullane, M.

    2012-09-01

    We discuss the diagnostic potential of high cadence UV spectral data when transient ionization is considered. For this we use high cadence UV spectra taken during the impulsive phase of a solar flare (observed with instruments on-board the Solar Maximum Mission) which showed excellent correspondence with hard X-ray pulses. The ionization fraction of the transition region ion O v and, in particular, the contribution function for the O v 1371 Å line are computed within the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, which is a collection of fundamental and derived atomic data and codes to manipulate them. Due to transient ionization, the O v 1371 Å line is enhanced in the first fraction of a second with the peak in the line contribution function occurring initially at a higher electron temperature than in ionization equilibrium. The rise time and enhancement factor depend mostly on the electron density. The fractional increase in the O v 1371 Å emissivity due to transient ionization can reach a factor of two-four and can explain the fast response in the line flux of transition regions ions during the impulsive phase of flares solely as a result of transient ionization. This technique can be used to diagnose the electron temperature and density of solar flares observed with the forthcoming Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph.

  12. Ionization Energy Measurements and Spectroscopy of HfO and HfO^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, J. M.; Bondybey, V. E.; Heaven, M. C.

    2009-06-01

    Rotationally resolved spectra of the HfO^+ cation have been recorded using the pulsed field ionization zero electron kinetic energy (PFI-ZEKE) technique. The F(0^+)← X^1Σ_g band system in HfO was resonantly excited to provide vibrational and rotational state selectivity in the two photon ionization process. Using the PFI-ZEKE technique a value of 7.91687(10) eV was determined for the ionization energy (IE) of HfO, 0.37 eV higher than the values reported previously using electron impact ionization measurements. Underestimation of the IE in the previous studies is attributed to ionization of thermally excited states. A progression in the HfO^+ stretching vibration up to ν^+ = 4 was observed in the PFI-ZEKE spectrum, allowing for determination of the ground electronic state vibrational frequency of ν_e = 1017.7(10) cm^{-1} and anharmonicity of ω_ex_e = 3.2(2) cm^{-1}. The rotational constant of HfO^+ was determined to be 0.403(5) cm^{-1}. Benchmark theoretical ab initio calculations were carried out in order to explore the effects of electron correlation on the predicted molecular properties. Survey scans utilizing laser induced fluorescence and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization detection revealed many previously unassigned bands in the region of the F-X and G-X bands of HfO, which we attribute to nominally forbidden singlet - triplet transitions of HfO.

  13. Ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis: radiation studies in Neurospora predictive for results in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; DeMarini, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was the first mutagen discovered and was used to develop the first mutagenicity assay. In the ensuing 70+ years, ionizing radiation became a fundamental tool in understanding mutagenesis and is still a subject of intensive research. Frederick de Serres et al. developed and used the Neurospora crassa ad-3 system initially to explore the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. Using this system, de Serres et al. demonstrated the dependence of the frequency and spectra of mutations induced by ionizing radiation on the dose, dose rate, radiation quality, repair capabilities of the cells, and the target gene employed. This work in Neurospora predicted the subsequent observations of the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Modeled originally on the mouse specific-locus system developed by William L. Russell, the N. crassa ad-3 system developed by de Serres has itself served as a model for interpreting the results in subsequent systems in mammalian cells. This review describes the primary findings on the nature of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in the N. crassa ad-3 system and the parallel observations made years later in mammalian cells.

  14. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  15. Cloud Processing of CCN Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud processing often makes bimodal aerosol spectra from which size at minimal concentration infers cloud effective supersaturation (Seff) (Hoppel et al. 1986). Particle hygroscopicity (κ) converts this Hoppel minimum to critical S, Sc. Only lower Sc particles that produce cloud droplets are physically (coalescence) or chemically (gas-to-particle conversion) processed, which increases soluble content so that upon evaporation, these CCN have even lower Sc whereas the unactivated CCN do not change size or Sc. This results in the size gap at Seff. DRI CCN spectrometers have revealed bimodality in 6 projects for which Seff can be obtained without κ. However in 2 projects, MASE and ICE-T, simultaneous DMA measurements also provided κ by transposing DMA sizes to Sc; the κ that makes the DMA spectra agree with simultaneous CCN spectra (Fig). There was DMA-CCN agreement for 227 MASE and 50 ICE-T measurements. Since unlike Fig. a mean κ of the processed modes was greater than mean κ of the unprocessed modes, chemical processing was indicated; since most κ were lower than ammonium sulfate κ (0.61) chemical processing should move processed κ closer to 0.61. Chemical processing was also indicated in MASE by greater sulfate and nitrate concentrations for bimodal spectra and greater sulfur dioxide and ozone concentrations for monomodal spectra. MASE above cloud measurements showed higher κ and less bimodality than below cloud measurements, this is consistent with the higher above cloud NCCN, that κ is lower in pollution and for these less cloud interacted samples. Interspersed bimodal and monomodal CCN spectra under the ubiquitous MASE stratus suggested less than well-mixed boundary layers. Somewhat surprisingly there was more bimodality for the cumulus ICE-T clouds than the MASE stratus. ICE-T indicated more physical than chemical cloud processing. Cloud-processing of CCN spectra is as important as CCN sources; it alters Seff, cloud droplet concentrations, mean

  16. Femtosecond Laser Ionization of Organic Amines with Very Low Ionization Potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Obayashi, Takashi; Tanaka, Michinori; Murakami, Masanao; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2006-03-01

    The interaction between high intensity femtosecond laser and molecules is one of the most attractive areas in laser chemistry and ionization is the most fundamental subject. Theoretical consideration successfully reproduced the ionization behavior of rare gases. However, the understanding of ionization mechanisms of large molecules is difficult more than those of rare gases due to their complexity. Generally speaking, molecules are harder to ionize than rare gases even if they have the same ionization potential. The suppressed ionization phenomena are one of the important features of molecular ionization. Hankin et al. examined 23 organic molecules with ionization potentials between 8.25 and 11.52 eV. We have examined ionization and/ or fragmentation of many organic molecules, including aromatic compounds, halogenated compounds, methane derivatives etc. at various wavelengths below 10^16 Wcm-2. In order to investigate the nature of molecular ionization, it is interesting to examine a variety of molecule in a wide range of ionization potential. In this study, we examined several organic amines because we can explore the uninvestigated ionization potential range down to 5.95 eV. In addition to the significant suppression of the ionization rates, stepwise ionization behavior, which was not observed in rare gases, was observed.

  17. Reproducibility of SELDI Spectra Across Time and Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Lixia; Clarke, Charlotte H.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Roth, Jack; Mao, Li; Czerniak, Bogdan; Baggerly, Keith A.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Fung, Eric T.; Bast, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    This is an open access article. Unrestricted non-commercial use is permitted provided the original work is properly cited. The reproducibility of mass spectrometry (MS) data collected using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (SELDI-TOF) has been questioned. This investigation was designed to test the reproducibility of SELDI data collected over time by multiple users and instruments. Five laboratories prepared arrays once every week for six weeks. Spectra were collected on separate instruments in the individual laboratories. Additionally, all of the arrays produced each week were rescanned on a single instrument in one laboratory. Lab-to-lab and array-to-array variability in alignment parameters were larger than the variability attributable to running samples during different weeks. The coefficient of variance (CV) in spectrum intensity ranged from 25% at baseline, to 80% in the matrix noise region, to about 50% during the exponential drop from the maximum matrix noise. Before normalization, the median CV of the peak heights was 72% and reduced to about 20% after normalization. Additionally, for the spectra from a common instrument, the CV ranged from 5% at baseline, to 50% in the matrix noise region, to 20% during the drop from the maximum matrix noise. Normalization reduced the variability in peak heights to about 18%. With proper processing methods, SELDI instruments produce spectra containing large numbers of reproducibly located peaks, with consistent heights. PMID:21552492

  18. Microplume model of spatial-yield spectra. [applying to electron gas degradation in molecular nitrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. E. S.; Singhal, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic representation for the spatial (radial and longitudinal) yield spectra is developed in terms of a model containing three simple 'microplumes'. The model is applied to electron energy degradation in molecular nitrogen gas for 0.1 to 5 keV incident electrons. From the nature of the cross section input to this model it is expected that the scaled spatial yield spectra for other gases will be quite similar. The model indicates that each excitation, ionization, etc. plume should have its individual spatial and energy dependence. Extensions and aeronomical and radiological applications of the model are discussed.

  19. Determination of the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Horton, J L

    1990-01-01

    A simple technique to determine the neutron and photon spectra of a clinical fast neutron beam is described. This technique involves making narrow beam attenuation measurements with a pair of ionization chambers and an iterative fitting program to analyze the data. A method is also described for determining the first-guess neutron spectrum for input into the iterative program. The results of the analysis yield spectra suitable for use in dose calculation algorithms and dosimetry protocols. Presented here is the first-known published photon spectrum from a clinical machine. PMID:2120558

  20. Electronic and vibrational spectra of matrix isolated anthracene radical cations - Experimental and theoretical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin; Talbi, Dahbia; Parisel, Olivier; Ellinger, Yves

    1993-01-01

    The IR vibrational and visible/UV electronic absorption spectra of the anthracene cation, An(+), were studied experimentally, in argon matrices at 12 K, as well as theoretically, using ab initio calculations for the vibrational modes and enhanced semiempirical methods with configuration interaction for the electronic spectra. It was found that both approaches predicted well the observed photoelectron spectrum. The theoretical IR intensities showed some remarkable differences between neutral and ionized species (for example, the CH in-plane bending modes and CC in-plane stretching vibrations were predicted to increase by several orders of magnitude upon ionization). Likewise, estimated experimental IR intensities showed a significant increase in the cation band intensities over the neutrals. The implication of these findings for the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations are responsible for the unidentified IR emission bands from interstellar space is discussed.

  1. First-principles calculation of principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra for warm dense KCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-06-01

    Principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra of warm dense KCl are calculated using the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method. Evolution of electronic structures as well as the influence of the approximate description of ionization on pressure (caused by the underestimation of the energy gap between conduction bands and valence bands) in the first-principles method are illustrated by the calculation. It is shown that approximate description of ionization in FPMD has small influence on Hugoniot pressure due to mutual compensation of electronic kinetic pressure and virial pressure. The calculation of X-ray absorption spectra shows that the band gap of KCl persists after the pressure ionization of the 3p electrons of Cl and K taking place at lower energy, which provides a detailed understanding to the evolution of electronic structures of warm dense matter.

  2. First-principles calculation of principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra for warm dense KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-06-15

    Principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra of warm dense KCl are calculated using the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method. Evolution of electronic structures as well as the influence of the approximate description of ionization on pressure (caused by the underestimation of the energy gap between conduction bands and valence bands) in the first-principles method are illustrated by the calculation. It is shown that approximate description of ionization in FPMD has small influence on Hugoniot pressure due to mutual compensation of electronic kinetic pressure and virial pressure. The calculation of X-ray absorption spectra shows that the band gap of KCl persists after the pressure ionization of the 3p electrons of Cl and K taking place at lower energy, which provides a detailed understanding to the evolution of electronic structures of warm dense matter.

  3. Zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of ammonia by nonresonant two-photon ionization from the neutral ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Georg; Habenicht, Wieland; Mueller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    1993-06-01

    Results are presented of nonresonant two-photon zero kinetic energy spectroscopy of ammonia, with resolution down to 0.4/cm. The spectra provide new rotational and vibrational data on the nu(2) vibrational progression of NH3(+). The adiabatic (field corrected) ionization energy is confirmed at 82,159 +/- 1 per cm.

  4. Nitrogen optical emission during nanosecond laser ablation of metals: prompt electrons or photo-ionization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Dilecce, G.; Tolias, P.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on the interaction of metal targets with a Nd:YAG laser beam ( = 1,064 nm, intensity -) are carried out in a finite Nitrogen pressure environment. The observed spectra are unambiguous evidence of the existence of an ionization and excitation source, arriving at the observation volume prior to the plume. Such a source can be either prompt electrons or VUV radiation. The analysis reveals that the prompt electron interpretation requires energies in excess of 1 keV, incompatible with any acceleration mechanisms relevant for such laser intensities. On the other hand, VUV radiation is sufficiently strong to explain the observed spectra.

  5. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  6. Exploring the high-mass components of humic acid by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chilom, Gabriela; Chilom, Ovidiu; Rice, James A

    2008-05-01

    Leonardite and Elliot soil humic acids have been analyzed by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) in the m/z 4000-200,000 range. Positive ion mass spectra for each humic acid obtained under optimum conditions showed a broad high-mass distribution between m/z 20,000 and 80,000. The dependence of the mass distribution on instrumental parameters and solution conditions was used to investigate the nature of the high-mass peaks from humic acid spectra. Our data suggests that macromolecular ions and humic acid aggregates have the same probability of occurrence while cluster ion formation has a low probability of occurrence. PMID:18421699

  7. Near-infrared emission-line spectra of the Orion Nebula, NGC 4151, and other Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Osterbrock, D.E.; Shaw, R.A.; Veilleux, S. )

    1990-04-01

    Near-IR CCD moderate-resolution spectra in the 7000-11,000 wavelength range were obtained for NGC 1976 and NGC 4151 in three overlapping segments. The strongest three lines in both objects are forbidden S III 9531, He I 10830, and forbidden S III 9069. Also, lower resolution spectra of 14 additional Seyfert galaxies were obtained. In all but two of these spectra, the strongest line is forbidden S III 9531. The line strengths among these galaxies are compared to trace ionization behavior. 59 refs.

  8. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ionizing Radiation and Its Risks

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Marvin

    1982-01-01

    Penetrating ionizing radiation fairly uniformly puts all exposed molecules and cells at approximately equal risk for deleterious consequences. Thus, the original deposition of radiation energy (that is, the dose) is unaltered by metabolic characteristics of cells and tissue, unlike the situation for chemical agents. Intensely ionizing radiations, such as neutrons and alpha particles, are up to ten times more damaging than sparsely ionizing sources such as x-rays or gamma rays for equivalent doses. Furthermore, repair in cells and tissues can ameliorate the consequences of radiation doses delivered at lower rates by up to a factor of ten compared with comparable doses acutely delivered, especially for somatic (carcinogenic) and genetic effects from x- and gamma-irradiation exposure. Studies on irradiated laboratory animals or on people following occupational, medical or accidental exposures point to an average lifetime fatal cancer risk of about 1 × 10-4 per rem of dose (100 per 106 person-rem). Leukemia and lung, breast and thyroid cancer seem more likely than other types of cancer to be produced by radiation. Radiation exposures from natural sources (cosmic rays and terrestrial radioactivity) of about 0.1 rem per year yield a lifetime cancer risk about 0.1 percent of the normally occurring 20 percent risk of cancer death. An increase of about 1 percent per rem in fatal cancer risk, or 200 rem to double the “background” risk rate, is compared with an estimate of about 100 rem to double the genetic risk. Newer data suggest that the risks for low-level radiation are lower than risks estimated from data from high exposures and that the present 5 rem per year limit for workers is adequate. PMID:6761969

  10. Site-specific Auger electron spectra of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules studied by magnetic bottle electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, Hiroshi; Shigemasa, Eiji; Hikosaka, Yasumasa; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Ito, Kenji; Lablanquie, Pascal; Penet, Francis; Andric, Lidija; Selles, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    We performed multielectron coincidence measurements for inner-shell photoionizations of ethyl trifluoroacelate molecules (C4H5F3O2) using a magnetic bottle electron spectrometer. From a two dimensional coincidence map between a photoelectron and Auger electron for C 1s ionizations, we extracted site-specific Auger electron spectra for each carbon site and corresponding binding energy of doubly charged states.

  11. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  12. The Tevatron Ionization Profile Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bowie, K.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    In designing an ionization profile monitor system for the Tevatron some novel approaches were taken, in particular for the readout electronics. This was motivated by the desire to resolve the individual bunches in both beams simultaneously. For this purpose, custom made electronics originally developed for Particle Physics experiments was used to provide a fast charge integration with very low noise. The various parts of the read-out electronics have been borrowed or adapted from the KTev, CMS, MINOS and BTev experiments. The detector itself also had to be modified to provide clean signals with sufficient bandwidth. The system design will be described along with the initial results.

  13. Optical Detection of Tunneling Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoef, Aart J.; Mitrofanov, Alexander V.; Kartashov, Daniil V.; Baltuska, Andrius

    2010-04-23

    We have experimentally detected optical harmonics that are generated due to a tunneling-ionization-induced modulation of the electron density. The optical signature of electron tunneling can be isolated from concomitant optical responses by using a noncollinear pump-probe setup. Whereas previously demonstrated tools for attosecond metrology of gases, plasmas, and surfaces rely on direct detection of charged particles, detection of the background-free time-resolved optical signal, which uniquely originates from electron tunneling, offers an interesting alternative that is especially suited for systems in which free electrons cannot be directly measured.

  14. Origin of double-line structure in nonsequential double ionization by few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Zhong, Mingmin; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-07-01

    We investigate nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of molecules by few-cycle laser pulses at the laser intensity of 1.2-1.5 × 1014 W/cm2 using the classical ensemble model. The same double-line structure as the lower intensity (1.0 × 1014 W/cm2) is also observed in the correlated electron momentum spectra for 1.2-1.4 × 1014 W/cm2. However, in contrast to the lower intensity where NSDI proceeds only through the recollision-induced double excitation with subsequent ionization (RDESI) mechanism, here, the recollision-induced excitation with subsequent ionization (RESI) mechanism has a more significant contribution to NSDI. This indicates that RDESI is not necessary for the formation of the double-line structure and RESI can give rise to the same type of structure independently. Furthermore, we explore the ultrafast dynamics underlying the formation of the double-line structure in RESI.

  15. Highly ionized physical vapor deposition plasma source working at very low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, V.; Herrendorf, A.-P.; Drache, S.; Hippler, R.; Cada, M.; Hubicka, Z.; Tichy, M.

    2012-04-02

    Highly ionized discharge for physical vapor deposition at very low pressure is presented in the paper. The discharge is generated by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) which assists with ignition of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge. The magnetron gun (with Ti target) was built into the single-turn coil RF electrode of the ECWR facility. ECWR assistance provides pre-ionization effect which allows significant reduction of pressure during HiPIMS operation down to p = 0.05 Pa; this is nearly more than an order of magnitude lower than at typical pressure ranges of HiPIMS discharges. We can confirm that nearly all sputtered particles are ionized (only Ti{sup +} and Ti{sup ++} peaks are observed in the mass scan spectra). This corresponds well with high plasma density n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, measured during the HiPIMS pulse.

  16. Highly ionized physical vapor deposition plasma source working at very low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranak, V.; Herrendorf, A.-P.; Drache, S.; Cada, M.; Hubicka, Z.; Tichy, M.; Hippler, R.

    2012-04-01

    Highly ionized discharge for physical vapor deposition at very low pressure is presented in the paper. The discharge is generated by electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) which assists with ignition of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge. The magnetron gun (with Ti target) was built into the single-turn coil RF electrode of the ECWR facility. ECWR assistance provides pre-ionization effect which allows significant reduction of pressure during HiPIMS operation down to p = 0.05 Pa; this is nearly more than an order of magnitude lower than at typical pressure ranges of HiPIMS discharges. We can confirm that nearly all sputtered particles are ionized (only Ti+ and Ti++ peaks are observed in the mass scan spectra). This corresponds well with high plasma density ne ˜ 1018 m-3, measured during the HiPIMS pulse.

  17. Cosmic ray studies with a gas Cherenkov counter in association with an ionization spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Arens, J. F.; Siohan, F.; Yodh, G. B.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a balloon-borne gas Cherenkov counter (threshold 16.5 GeV/nucleon) and an ionization spectrometer are presented. The gas Cherenkov counter provides an absolute energy distribution for the response of the calorimeter for 5 or = Z 26 nuclei of cosmic rays. The contribution of scintillation to the gas Cherenkov pulse height was obtained by independently selecting particles below the gas Cherenkov threshold using the ionization spectrometer. Energy spectra were derived by minimizing the chi squared between Monte Carlo simulted data and flight data. Best fit power laws, dN/dE = AE-gamma, were determined for C, N, O, Ne, Mg, and Si. The power laws, all consistent with E (-2.7) are not good fits to the data. A better fit is obtained using the spectrum derived from the spectrometer. The data from the ionization calorimeter and the gas Cherenkov are thus completely self-consistent.

  18. Ionization-site effects on the photofragmentation of chloro- and bromoacetic acid molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levola, Helena; Itälä, Eero; Schlesier, Kim; Kooser, Kuno; Laine, Sanna; Laksman, Joakim; Ha, Dang Trinh; Rachlew, Elisabeth; Tarkanovskaja, Marta; Tanzer, Katrin; Kukk, Edwin

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation of gas-phase chloro- and bromoacetic acid samples, particularly its dependency on the atomic site of the initial core ionization, was studied in photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence (PEPIPICO) measurements. The fragmentation was investigated after ionizing carbon 1 s and bromine 3 d or chlorine 2 p core orbitals. It was observed that the samples had many similar fragmentation pathways and that their relative weights depended strongly on the initial ionization site. Additional Auger PEPIPICO measurements revealed a clear dependence of fragment pair intensities on the kinetic energy of the emitted Auger electrons. The modeled and measured Auger electron spectra indicated that the average internal energy of the molecule was larger following the carbon 1 s core-hole decay than after the decay of the halogen core hole. This difference in the internal energies was found to be the source of the site-dependent photofragmentation behavior.

  19. Impact of Dielectronic Recombination on Ionization Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Z-pinch Stainless Steel Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Clark, R. W.; Whitney, K. G.

    2009-01-21

    The implosion dynamics of an array of stainless steel (SS) wires on the Z and/or ZR accelerator produces an abundance of radiation from the K- and L-shell ionization stages. As the plasma assembles on axis, a number of time resolved snapshots provide temperature and density profiles and size of the emitting region. The non-LTE populations will be obtained by using detailed atomic models that include all important excitation, ionization, and recombination processes. In particular, we will investigate the effects of dielectronic recombination (DR) which is the most important recombination process for moderate to high Z plasma such as iron at moderate densities. We will analyze the ionization dynamics and generate K- and L-shell spectra using the temperature and density conditions generated in the Z and/or ZR accelerator describing the implosion with a 1-D non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics model.

  20. Evaluating the Utility of an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Analyzing Organic Peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameer, A.; Hastie, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are known to affect the earth's radiation budget through its ability to scatter and absorb radiation. Consequently, the mechanisms and factors that influence SOA composition and formation are poorly understood. However, recent modeling studies coupled with smog chamber experiments suggest that organic peroxides (organic hydroperoxides and peroxyhemiacetals) might be a major component of SOA composition under low NOx conditions. This study utilized an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer (APCI-MS) in the positive mode to detect organic peroxides. Mass spectra of organic peroxides analyzed in this study show excessive fragmentation during ionization with protonated water clusters. It was believed that intact ions were not found due to decomposition in the ion source. Future work will explore new reagents for ionization to reduce fragmentation during analysis.

  1. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, A; Esirkepov, T; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-20

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (approximately 10/30 fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses. PMID:20366045

  2. THE ORIGIN AND OPTICAL DEPTH OF IONIZING RADIATION IN THE 'GREEN PEA' GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Although Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation from star-forming galaxies likely drove the reionization of the universe, observations of star-forming galaxies at low redshift generally indicate low LyC escape fractions. However, the extreme [O III]/[O II] ratios of the z = 0.1-0.3 Green Pea galaxies may be due to high escape fractions of ionizing radiation. To analyze the LyC optical depths and ionizing sources of these rare, compact starbursts, we compare nebular photoionization and stellar population models with observed emission lines in the Peas' Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. We focus on the six most extreme Green Peas, the galaxies with the highest [O III]/[O II] ratios and the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation. The Balmer line equivalent widths and He I {lambda}3819 emission in the extreme Peas support young ages of 3-5 Myr, and He II {lambda}4686 emission in five extreme Peas signals the presence of hard ionizing sources. Ionization by active galactic nuclei or high-mass X-ray binaries is inconsistent with the Peas' line ratios and ages. Although stacked spectra reveal no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features, we tentatively detect WR features in the SDSS spectra of three extreme Peas. Based on the Peas' ages and line ratios, we find that WR stars, chemically homogeneous O stars, or shocks could produce the observed He II emission. If hot stars are responsible, then the Peas' optical depths are ambiguous. However, accounting for emission from shocks lowers the inferred optical depth and suggests that the Peas may be optically thin. The Peas' ages likely optimize the escape of LyC radiation; they are old enough for supernovae and stellar winds to reshape the interstellar medium, but young enough to possess large numbers of UV-luminous O or WR stars.

  3. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  4. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  5. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15–30 labels simultaneously.

  6. Vibrational spectra of fluorohafnate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, Bernard; Drexhage, Martin G.; Banerjee, Pranab K.; Goltman, John; Mitra, Shashanka S.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.

    1981-02-01

    We report the first detailed measurements of fundamental vibrational spectra in fluorohafnate glass. The Raman spectrum is dominated by a single relatively broad peak in the vicinity of 570-590 cm -1 attributed to Hf-F stretching modes, while the infrared spectrum displays two prominent broad peaks. The location of the high frequency peaks is shown to be consistent with the observed position of the infrared absorption edge.

  7. An Ionizing Ultraviolet Background Dominated by Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehnelt, Martin G.; Madau, Piero; Kudritzki, Rolf; Haardt, Francesco

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the implications of a stellar-dominated UV background at high redshifts for the star formation history of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and the thermal and ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM). The composite spectrum of 29 LBGs evaluated by Steidel et al. at =3.4 can be well fitted by a stellar population with ongoing star formation, a Salpeter initial mass function, modest or negligible dust reddening, and no intrinsic H I photoelectric absorption. Fading starbursts in which star formation has ceased for 107 yr or more cannot reproduce the observed flux shortward of 1 ryd. The small H I optical depth in LBGs suggests that the neutral gas from which stars form is most likely contained in compact clouds of neutral gas with small covering factor. The escape fraction of H-ionizing photons must be close to 100% for the observed sample of LBGs. The spectrum of ionizing photons produced by a stellar population with ongoing star formation is similar to that of QSOs between 1 and 3 ryd but becomes softer between 3 and 4 ryd and drops sharply shortward of 4 ryd. A galaxy-dominated UV background appears inconsistent with the observed He II/H I opacity ratio at z=2.4 but might be able to explain the Si IV/C IV abundances measured at z>3 in QSO absorption spectra. A scenario may be emerging where star-forming galaxies reionize intergalactic hydrogen at z>6 and dominate the 1 ryd metagalactic flux at z>3, with quasi-stellar sources taking over at lower redshifts. If the large amplitude of the H-ionizing flux estimated by Steidel et al. is correct, hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation in the IGM within the cold dark matter paradigm require a baryon density (to explain the observed opacity of the Lyα forest in QSO absorption spectra) that is similar to or larger than that favored by recent cosmic microwave background experiments and is inconsistent with standard nucleosynthesis values.

  8. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Glish, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above.

  9. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1992-01-01

    The Helmholtz-free-energy model for nonideal mixtures of hydrogen atoms and molecules by Saumon and Chabrier (1991) is extended to describe dissociation and ionization in similar mixtures in chemical equilibrium. A free-energy model is given that describes partial ionization in the pressure and temperature ionization region. The plasma-phase transition predicted by the model is described for hydrogen mixtures including such components as H2, H, H(+), and e(-). The plasma-phase transition has a critical point at Tc = 15,300 K and Pc = 0.614 Mbar, and thermodynamic instability is noted in the pressure-ionization regime. The pressure dissociation and ionization of fluid hydrogen are described well with the model yielding information on the nature of the plasma-phase transition. The model is shown to be valuable for studying dissociation and ionization in astrophysical objects and in high-pressure studies where pressure and temperature effects are significant.

  10. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  11. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  12. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I.; Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T.; Hasuo, M.; Koike, F.; Nakamura, N.; Sasaki, A.; Wang, E. H.

    2013-07-11

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  13. Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Neutral and Ionized PAHs: Implications for Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Tan, X.; Biennier, L.; Cami, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the gas-phase spectroscopy of neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the W-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laborat'ory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature ($\\sim lOO$-K). The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs are measured using the high sensitivity methods of cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) and multiplex integrated cavity output spectroscopy (MICOS). These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, cold large carbon molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for ionized PAH are found to be intrinsically broad ($\\geq$20 cm$^{-l}$) while the bands associated with the neutral precursors are narrower (of the order of 2 - 10 cm$^{-l}$). The laboratory data are discussed and compared with recent astronomical spectra of large and narrow DIBs and with the spectra of circumstellar environments of selected carbon stars (see contribution of Cami et al.) and the implications for the interstellar PAH population are derived. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles are formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma. This finding holds great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar grains.

  14. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  15. Hard X-Ray Emission and the Ionizing Source in LINERs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terashima, Y.; Ho, L. C.; Ptak, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray luminosities of 21 LINERs (low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions) and 17 low-luminosity Seyferts obtained with ASCA and discuss the ionizing source in LINERs. Most LINERs with broad H-alpha emission in their optical spectra (LINER 1s) have a compact hard X-ray source and their 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities (LX) are proportional to their H alpha luminosities (L-H-alpha). This correlation strongly supports the hypothesis that the dominant ionizing source in LINER 1s is photoionization by hard photons from low-luminosity AGNs. Although some LINERs without broad H-alpha emission (LINER 2s) have X-ray properties similar to LINER 1s, the X-ray luminosities of many LINER 2s in our sample are lower than LINER 1s at a given H-alpha luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities in these objects are insufficient to power their H-alpha luminosities, suggesting that their primary ionizing source is something other than an AGN, or that an AGN, if present, is obscured even at energies above 2 keV. LINER 2s having small LX/LH-alpha occupy a localized region with small [OI]/H-alpha on the excitation diagram. Such LINER spectra can be reproduced by photoionization by very hot stars.

  16. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  17. Electron impact ionization of glycolaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinska, Sylwia; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Märk, Tilmann D.

    2005-05-01

    Positive ion formation upon electron impact ionization of the monomeric and dimeric form of glycolaldehyde is studied with high electron energy resolution. In the effusive neutral beam of evaporated monomeric glycolaldehyde some ions with a mass larger than the monomer indicate the presence of weakly bound neutral dimers. The yield of all ions that originate from the electron impact ionization of these neutral dimers exhibit a strong temperature dependence that can be interpreted as being due to the formation of dimers via three body collisions and thermal decomposition of the dimeric form back into monomers at higher temperatures. Ion efficiency curves are measured and analyzed for the 10 most abundant product cations of monomeric glycolaldehyde. The appearance energies of the parent ion signals of the monomer and dimer of glycolaldehyde (10.2 and 9.51 eV, respectively) are lower than the appearance energy of the parent cation of the more complex sugar deoxyribose that was recently determined to be 10.51 eV.

  18. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  19. Lyman-α Spectra from Multiphase Outflows, and their Connection to Shell Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, M.; Dijkstra, M.

    2016-07-01

    We perform Lyman-α (Lyα) Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations on a suite of 2500 models of multiphase, outflowing media, which are characterized by 14 parameters. We focus on the Lyα spectra emerging from these media and investigate which properties are dominant in shaping the emerging Lyα profile. Multiphase models give rise to a wide variety of emerging spectra, including single-, double-, and triple-peaked spectra. We find that the dominant parameters in shaping the spectra include (i) the cloud covering factor, f c , which is in agreement with earlier studies, and (ii) the temperature and number density of residual H i in the hot ionized medium. We attempt to reproduce spectra emerging from multiphase models with “shell models” which are commonly used to fit observed Lyα spectra, and investigate the connection between shell-model parameters and the physical parameters of the clumpy media. In shell models, the neutral hydrogen content of the shell is one of the key parameters controlling Lyα radiative transfer. Because Lyα spectra emerging from multiphase media depend much less on the neutral hydrogen content of the clumps, the shell-model parameters such as H i column density (but also shell velocity and dust content) are generally not well matched to the associated physical parameters of the clumpy media.

  20. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion.

  1. Tunneling Ionization Time Resolved by Backpropagation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2016-07-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular, the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. PMID:27447504

  2. Two-step single-ionization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeyen, R. W. van; Doering, J. P.; Watanabe, N.; Cooper, J. W.; Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.

    2006-03-15

    In a recent publication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 233202 (2004)] two different electron impact double ionization (e,3e) mechanisms were identified and the way in which two-electron momentum distributions for atoms and molecules could be obtained by triple coincidence (e,3e) measurements was discussed. The apparatus used detected the two ejected electrons both in and out of the scattering plane at an angle of 45 deg. to the momentum transfer direction in triple coincidence with the scattered electron. Ejected electrons detected out of the scattering plane were shown to be a result of two-step double ionization processes. With the same apparatus we have made double coincidence (e,2e) measurements of electron impact single ionization cross sections for ionization of magnesium 3s (valence) and 2p and 2s (inner) shell electrons at incident energies from 400 to 3000 eV in order to obtain more information about two-step ionization. The experimental results were compared with distorted-wave and plane-wave Born approximations carried out to second order. For the experimental conditions, two-step ionization processes involving one ionizing collision and a second elastic collision with the atomic core are the dominant contribution to the measured cross sections. Calculations are in moderate agreement with the data. The angular distributions of the ionized electrons in these two-step ionizations reflect the initial momentum distributions of the target electrons, a result that is analogous with the earlier (e,3e) measurements.

  3. On the ionization potential of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Gardner, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ionization potential of O2 was measured by the technique of high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy taking into account the influence of rotational structure on the shape of the vibrational bands. A value of 12.071 + or - .001 eV (1027.1 + or - 0.1 A) was found for the ionization potential. A lowering of the ionization potential caused by a branch-head when delta N = -2 gave an appearance potential for ionization of 12.068 + or - .001 eV (1027.4 + or - 0.1 A).

  4. Development of dielectric-barrier-discharge ionization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng'an; Tang, Fei; Chen, Jin; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-03-01

    Dielectric-barrier-discharge ionization is an ambient-ionization technique. Since its first description in 2007, it has attracted much attention in such fields as biological analysis, food safety, mass-spectrometry imaging, forensic identification, and reaction monitoring for its advantages, e.g., low energy consumption, solvent-free method, and easy miniaturization. In this review a brief introduction to dielectric barrier discharge is provided, and then a detailed introduction to the dielectric-barrier-discharge-ionization technique is given, including instrumentation, applications, and mechanistic studies. Based on the summary of reported work, possible future uses of this type of ionization source are discussed at the end. PMID:25510973

  5. Tunneling ionization time-resolved by backpropagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Hongcheng; Saalmann, Ulf; Rost, Jan M.; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme Team

    2016-05-01

    We determine the ionization time in tunneling ionization by an elliptically polarized light pulse relative to its maximum. This is achieved by a full quantum propagation of the electron wave function forward in time, followed by a classical backpropagation to identify tunneling parameters, in particular the fraction of electrons that has tunneled out. We find, that the ionization time is close to zero for single active electrons in helium and in hydrogen if the fraction of tunneled electrons is large. We expect our analysis to be essential to quantify ionization times for correlated electron motion. This work was supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  6. Multiple ionization of xenon by proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T.; DuBois, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of multiple ionization of xenon for 0.2- to 2.0-MeV proton impact was made. Absolute cross sections for producing xenon ions with charges from +1 to +3 were measured, and calculations of subshell cross sections were performed. Experiment and theory are consistent and indicate that multiple ionization of xenon by fast protons occurs via inner-shell ionization. This is in contrast to the lighter noble gases where direct multiple outer shell ionization can be predominant.

  7. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  8. Optogalvanic single-color multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of uranium in a hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, S.; Babin, F.; Gagne, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Single color multiphoton ionization spectra of atoms can be obtained using the fast pulsed ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}9} s) optogalvanic signal generated by photoionization in the dark space of a hollow cathode discharge. Such spectra have been measured for uranium in the spectral range of rhodamine 6G with a high laser bandwidth excitation (0.3 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the process of ascribing an ionization scheme to each line through the known levels of uranium, many possibilities appear. In order to help the authors select the correct scheme, they perturbed the atomic level population distribution by optical pumping of the 16900.37 cm{sup {minus}1} level ({sup 7}M{sub 7}). The spectrum obtained this way show many new strong lines. They try to explain these lines by a three photon resonant or quasi-resonant scheme, using known levels of uranium, or by a two photon scheme from the 16900.37 cm{sup {minus}1} level. In both perturbed and unperturbed spectra, many ionization schemes are still possible for each line. For this reason the authors have performed higher resolution scans of selected lines (in particular 5915.4{angstrom}) in order to confirm the existence of more than one scheme for many lines.

  9. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  10. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  11. Ionized gas at the edge of the central molecular zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.; Velusamy, T.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wiesemeyer, H.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The edge of the central molecular zone (CMZ) is the location where massive dense molecular clouds with large internal velocity dispersions transition to the surrounding more quiescent and lower CO emissivity region of the Galaxy. Little is known about the ionized gas surrounding the molecular clouds and in the transition region. Aims: We determine the properties of the ionized gas at the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E using observations of N+ and C+. Methods: We observed a small portion of the edge of the CMZ near Sgr E with spectrally resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine structure lines at six positions with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA and in [C ii] using Herschel HIFI on-the-fly strip maps. We use the [N ii] spectra along with a radiative transfer model to calculate the electron density of the gas and the [C ii] maps to illuminate the morphology of the ionized gas and model the column density of CO-dark H2. Results: We detect two [C ii] and [N ii] velocity components, one along the line of sight to a CO molecular cloud at - 207 km s-1 associated with Sgr E and the other at -174 km s-1 outside the edge of another CO cloud. From the [N ii] emission we find that the average electron density is in the range of ~5 to 21 cm-3 for these features. This electron density is much higher than that of the disk's warm ionized medium, but is consistent with densities determined for bright diffuse H ii nebula. The column density of the CO-dark H2 layer in the -207 km s-1 cloud is ~1-2 × 1021 cm-2 in agreement with theoretical models. The CMZ extends further out in Galactic radius by ~7 to 14 pc in ionized gas than it does in molecular gas traced by CO. Conclusions: The edge of the CMZ likely contains dense hot ionized gas surrounding the neutral molecular material. The high fractional abundance of N+ and high electron density require an intense EUV field with a photon flux of order 106 to 107 photons cm-2 s-1, and/or efficient proton charge exchange with

  12. Experimental and simulated argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, M.; Fournier, K. B.; Carraro, L.; Coffey, I.; Giroud, C.; Lawson, K.; Monier-Garbet, P.; O'Mullane, M.; Ongena, J.; Puiatti, M. E.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental argon spectra in the 2.3-3.4 nm region from the Jet tokamak on a single null divertor configuration have been simulated. The spectra include lines from five ionization states, namely from Ar15+ Li-like to Ar11+ N-like ions. Collisional-radiative models have been constructed for these five Ar ions, considering electron collisional excitation and radiative decay as the populating processes of the excited states. These models give photon emission coefficients for the emitted lines at electron density and temperature values corresponding to the experimental situations. Impurity modelling is performed using a one-dimensional (1D) impurity transport code, calculating the steady-state radial distribution of the Ar ions. The Ar line brightnesses are evaluated in a post-processing subroutine and simulated spectra are obtained. The parts of the spectra corresponding to a single-ionization state do not depend on the experimental conditions and show good agreement except for the amplitude of the simulated 2s-3p Ar XVI line and the shape of the simulated 2.50 nm feature (composed of Ar XVI and Ar XV lines). On the other hand, the superposition of these spectra depends on the experimental conditions, as a consequence of the fact that the ion charge distribution depends not only on the radial profiles of the electron density and temperature, but also of the impurity transport coefficients. Simulations of the Ar spectra (including transport) give confidence in the atomic physics calculations; moreover, they allow the determination of the transport coefficients in the plasma region emitting the considered ionization states, i.e. at the interior of the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS). For a correct simulation of the amplitudes of the spectral features it is necessary to include a transport barrier inside the LCMS. As far as the atomic physics is concerned, we report improved wavelengths for Ar XV transitions and we benchmark photon emission coefficients for XUV

  13. Photoelectron spectra of some important biological molecules: symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Ghandehari, Maryam

    2013-05-23

    In this work, the valence vertical ionization energies (up to 5) of some important biologically active molecules including 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitroanisole, nicotinic acid, nicotinic acid methyl ester, nicotinamide, N,N-diethylnicotinamide, barbituric acid, uric acid, cytosine, β-carotene, and menadione were calculated in the gas phase and compared with the experimental data reported in the literature. The symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) general-R method was used to calculate the ionization energies. The intensity of each ionization band was evaluated using the monopole approximation. Comparison of the calculated photoelectron spectrum of each molecule with its corresponding experimental spectra allowed for assigning the photoelectron bands by natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations even though some of the associated bands were significantly overlapped for some molecules. Among the considered molecules, there was no agreement between the experimental and calculated photoelectron spectrum of β-carotene. The reason for this disagreement was theoretically investigated and attributed to the degradation and decomposition of β-carotene. The calculated first ionization energies of the considered molecules were correlated with their Hückel k-index to obtain Coulomb (α) and resonance (β) integrals of the Hückel molecular orbital theory for the biomolecules considered in this study. A linear correlation was found between the first ionization energy and the Hückel k-index. PMID:23659524

  14. IONIZED NITROGEN AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Neri, R.; Cox, P.; Bertoldi, F.; Carilli, C.; Kneib, J. P.; Lestrade, J. F.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Richard, J.; Riechers, D.; Thanjavur, K.; Weiss, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present secure [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} detections in two millimeter-bright, strongly lensed objects at high redshift, APM 08279+5255 (z = 3.911) and MM 18423+5938 (z = 3.930), using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Due to its ionization energy [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} is a good tracer of the ionized gas phase in the interstellar medium. The measured fluxes are S([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (4.8 {+-} 0.8) Jy km s{sup -1} and (7.4 {+-} 0.5) Jy km s{sup -1}, respectively, yielding line luminosities of L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for APM 08279+5255 and L([N II]{sub 205{mu}m}) = (2.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} {mu}{sup -1} L{sub Sun} for MM 18423+5938. Our high-resolution map of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m} and 1 mm continuum emission in MM 18423+5938 clearly resolves an Einstein ring in this source and reveals a velocity gradient in the dynamics of the ionized gas. A comparison of these maps with high-resolution EVLA CO observations enables us to perform the first spatially resolved study of the dust continuum-to-molecular gas surface brightness ({Sigma}{sub FIR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup N}{sub CO}, which can be interpreted as the star formation law) in a high-redshift object. We find a steep relation (N = 1.4 {+-} 0.2), consistent with a starbursting environment. We measure a [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR luminosity ratio in APM 08279+5255 and MM 18423+5938 of 9.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and 5.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, respectively. This is in agreement with the decrease of the [N II]{sub 205{mu}m}/FIR ratio at high FIR luminosities observed in local galaxies.

  15. Secondary electron spectra: a semiempirical model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Wilson, W.E.; Manson, S.T.

    1985-05-01

    A model based on evaluation of coefficients in Bethe's asymptotic expansion of the first Born approximation has been developed to extend the data base of differential ionization cross sections needed in track structure calculations. The coefficient of the lowest-order term in this expansion is related to the photoionization cross section of the target, but optical data alone are generally not sufficient to determine differential cross sections for ionization by charged particles. We have used proton-impact, differential ionization data to evaluate the coefficient of the next higher-order term in the expansion. Since these coefficients are independent of the projectile, the experimentally derived coefficients can be used to predict differential cross sections for ionization of the target by bare ions and electrons that are sufficiently energetic to make the Bethe theory valid. This paper compares model calculations with recent experimental data on ionization of water vapor by high-energy electrons and protons. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  16. DUO: Spectra of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Stolyarov, Andrey V.

    2016-05-01

    Duo computes rotational, rovibrational and rovibronic spectra of diatomic molecules. The software, written in Fortran 2003, solves the Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei for the simple case of uncoupled, isolated electronic states and also for the general case of an arbitrary number and type of couplings between electronic states. Possible couplings include spin–orbit, angular momenta, spin-rotational and spin–spin. Introducing the relevant couplings using so-called Born–Oppenheimer breakdown curves can correct non-adiabatic effects.

  17. Satellite spectra of heliumlike nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsuan, H.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; von Goeler, S. Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; Sesnic, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Karim, K.R.

    1987-02-01

    Spectra of heliumlike nickel, NiXXVII, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the heliumlike resonance line, the intercombination and forbidden lines, and all the associated satellites due to transitions 1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2l'nl'' with N greater than or equal to 2. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can thus be determined very accurately. The observed spectral data are in good agreement with results from the present Hartree-Fock-Slater atomic model calculations and predictions from the Z-expansion method.

  18. Identified hadron spectra from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Gábor I.; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyslouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-08-01

    Transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons and protons, as well as antiparticle to particle ratios near mid-rapidity from d+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 200\\,{\\rm GeV} have been measured by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The transverse momentum range of particle identification was extended to beyond 3 GeV/c using the TOF detector and a new trigger system. The pseudorapidity dependence of the nuclear modification factor for charged hadrons in d+Au collisions is presented.

  19. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  20. Planetary spectra for anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Some of the effects on planetary spectra that would be produced by departures from isotropic scattering are examined. The phase function is the simplest departure to handle analytically and the only phase function, other than the isotropic one, that can be incorporated into a Chandrasekhar first approximation. This approach has the advantage of illustrating trends resulting from anisotropies while retaining the simplicity that yields physical insight. An algebraic solution to the two sets of anisotropic H functions is developed in the appendix. It is readily adaptable to progammable desk calculators and gives emergent intensities accurate to 0.3 percent, which is sufficient even for spectroscopic analysis.

  1. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  2. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  3. Characterization of glycosphingolipids by direct inlet chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Murata, T; Oshima, M; Maezawa, M; Miyatake, T

    1980-09-01

    Permethylated derivatives of cerebrosides and ceramide di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta-hexosides were analyzed by the direct inlet ammonia chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometry. In the CI mass spectra, the fragment ions produced by the loss of methanol from the protonated molecular ion were observed in all of the glycosphingolipids. Other fragment ions due to the cleavage of glycosidic moiety were major ones under the CI conditions. These ions provide information on the molecular species of glycosphingolipids and the sugar sequence of their oligosaccharides. Glycosphingolipids with hydroxy fatty acids could also be differentiated from those with nonhydroxy fatty acids by comparing the intensities of characteristic fragment ions. The CI method should be particularly useful in structural studies of glycosphingolipids from natural sources. PMID:7441059

  4. The ionizing radiation environment of LDEF prerecovery predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John W., Jr.; Derrickson, James H.; Parnell, T. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was exposed to several sources of ionizing radiation while in orbit. The principal ones were trapped belt protons and electrons, galactic cosmic rays, and albedo particles (protons and neutrons) from the atmosphere. Large solar flares in 1989 may have caused a small contribution. Prior to the recovery of the spacecraft, a number of calculations and estimates were made to predict the radiation exposure of the spacecraft and experiments. These were made to assess whether measurable radiation effects might exist, and to plan the analysis of the large number of radiation measurements available on the LDEF. Calculations and estimates of total dose, particle fluences, linear energy transfer spectra, and induced radioactivity were made. The principal sources of radiation is described, and the preflight predictions are summarized.

  5. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment: expected performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk; Adams, James H.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Dudnik, Alexey V.; Fazely, Ali R.; Garcia, L.; Grigorov, Naum L.; Guzik, T. Gregory; Inderhees, Susan E.; Isbert, Joachim; Jung, H. C.; Khein, L.; Kim, Sun-Kee; Kroeger, Richard A.; McDonald, Frank B.; Panasyuk, Mikhail I.; Park, Choong-Soo; Schmidt, Wolfgang K.; Dion-Schwartz, C.; Senchishin, V. G.; Wang, J. Z.; Wefel, John P.; Zatsepin, Viktor I.; Zinn, S. Y.

    1996-10-01

    An advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC) will be used to investigate the charge composition and energy spectra of ultrahigh energy primary cosmic rays in a series of long- duration balloon flights. While obtaining new high priority scientific results, this balloon payload can also serve as a proof of concept for a BGO calorimeter-based instrument on the International Space Station. The ATIC technical details are presented in a companion paper at this conference. Here we discuss the expected performance of the instrument based on a GEANT code developed for simulating nuclear- electromagnetic cascades initiated by protons. For simulations of helium and heavy nuclei, a nucleus-nucleus interaction event generator LUCIAE was linked to the GEANT based program. Using these models, the design of the ATIC detector system has been optimized by simulating the instrument response to particles of different charges over the energy range to be covered. Results of these simulations are presented and discussed.

  6. 4-Component relativistic calculations of L3 ionization and excitations for the isoelectronic species UO2(2+), OUN(+) and UN2.

    PubMed

    South, Christopher; Shee, Avijit; Mukherjee, Debashis; Wilson, Angela K; Saue, Trond

    2016-08-01

    We present a 4-component relativistic study of uranium 2p3/2 ionization and excitation in the isoelectronic series UO2(2+), OUN(+) and UN2. We calculate ionization energies by ΔSCF at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and Kohn-Sham (KS) level of theory. At the ΔHF level we observe a perfectly linear chemical shift of ionization energies with respect to uranium atomic charges obtained from projection analysis. We have also developed a non-canonical 2nd-order Møller-Plesset code for wave function based correlation studies. We observe the well-known failure of Koopmans' theorem for core ionization due to the dominance of orbital relaxation over electron correlation effects. More unexpectedly, we find that the correlation contribution has the same sign as the relaxation contribution and show that this is due to a strong coupling of relaxation and correlation. We simulate uranium L3 XANES spectra, dominated by 2p3/2 → U6d transitions, by restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the complex polarization propagator (CPP) approach and demonstrate that they give identical spectra when the same Lorentz broadening is chosen. We also simulate XANES spectra by the Hartree-Fock based static exchange (STEX) method and show how STEX excitation energies can be reproduced by time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We furthermore show that Koopmans' theorem provide a correct approximation of ionization energies in the linear response regime and use this observation to align REW-TDDFT and CPP spectra with STEX ones. We point out that the STEX method affords the most detailed assignment of spectra since it employs virtual orbitals optimized for the selected core ionization. The calculated XANES spectra reflect the loss of bound virtual orbitals as the molecular charge is reduced along the isoelectronic series. PMID:26878601

  7. Ghost peaks observed after AP-MALDI experiment may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization

    PubMed Central

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Understanding the mechanisms of MALDI promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample has been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laserless matrix-assisted ionization. METHODS An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser was turned off and MALDI sample was removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly- and doubly-charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. RESULTS The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. CONCLUSIONS The observations were partially consistent with a model of

  8. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  9. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  10. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  11. Device for detecting ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Anatychuk, L.I.; Kharitonov, J.P.; Kusniruk, V.F.; Meir, V.A.; Melnik, A.P.; Ponomarev, V.S.; Skakodub, V.A.; Sokolov, A.D.; Subbotin, V.G.; Zhukovsky, A.N.

    1980-10-28

    The present invention relates to ionizing radiation sensors, and , more particularly, to semiconductor spectrometers with thermoelectric cooling, and can most advantageously be used in mineral raw material exploration and evaluation under field conditions. The spectrometer comprises a vacuum chamber with an entrance window for passing the radiation therethrough. The vacuum chamber accommodates a thermoelectric cooler formed by a set of peltier elements. A heat conducting plate is mounted on the cold side of the thermoelectric cooler, and its hot side is provided with a radiator. Mounted on the heat conducting plate are sets of peltier elements, integral with the thermoelectric cooler and independent of one another. The peltier elements of these sets are stacked so as to develop the minimum temperature conditions on one set carrying a semiconductor detector and to provide the maximum refrigeration capacity conditions on the other set provided with the field-effect transistor mounted thereon.

  12. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  13. Spectral Evidence for Ionization in Air-Filled Glow Discharge Tubes: Application to Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. A.; Williams, E. R.; Golka, R. K.; Williams, D. R.

    2001-12-01

    The question of ionization in sprites and the evidence for VLF backscatter from sprites has motivated a quantitative spectral analysis of the various (classical) regions of the glow discharge tube under DC excitation and at air densities appropriate for sprites in the mesosphere. A PR-650 colorimeter (Photo Research, Inc.) has enabled calibrated irradiance measurements for localized zones along the axis of the discharge tube--in the dominantly blue negative glow, in the Faraday dark space and in the red/pink positive column. Consistent with historical nomenclature, nitrogen first and second positive emission is dominant in the positive column (associated with neutral N2), and nitrogen first negative emission, with a prominent peak at 4278 A, is dominant in the blue negative glow (associated with ionized N2+). Whereas nitrogen first and second positive emission are also detected in the negative glow, no spectral evidence for ionization (no 4279, no 3914, no Meinel) is found in the red/pink positive column. This negative result is attributed not to an absence of ionization in the positive column, but rather to a sparse population of N2+ relative to neutral nitrogen in this region, and to the prominent emission in the blue part of the spectrum due to nitrogen second positive. A similar interpretation may be appropriate for the time-integrated spectra from the red body of sprites, also lacking direct evidence for ionization.

  14. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Ionization Effect during Major Gles Due to Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishev, Alexander; Velinov, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Several major ground level enhancements (GLEs) occurred during previous solar cycle 23. During the solar cycle 23, sixteen GLE events were observed with intensities ranging ~ 3 - 269% at the sea level. The first event occurred on 6 November 1997 (GLE 55) and the last event occurred on 13 December 2006 (GLE 70). Here we focus on major GLEs, namely on their ionization effect due to cosmic rays of galactic and solar origin and provide a comparative analysis. The solar energetic particles protons of MeV and greater energies cause an excess of ionization in the atmosphere. The ionization effect in the Earth atmosphere is obtained for various latitudes and altitudes in the atmosphere using solar proton energy spectra derived from ground based measurements with neutron monitors. The ion production is obtained using a numerical model for cosmic ray induced ionization, based on Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cascade ion the atmosphere of the Earth. Her we consider the GLE 70 on December of 13, 2006, which is among is among the strongest recorded events during solar cycle 23, even it occurred at quit solar activity conditions. We compare the ionization effect this event with Bastille day event (GLE 59). A quantitative comparison with the sequence of Halloween events (GLE 65-67) and the major event of 20 January 2005 (GLE 69) is carried out. We briefly discussed the results.

  16. Model CRAC:EPII for atmospheric ionization due to precipitating electrons: Yield function and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-02-01

    A new model of the family of CRAC models, CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization), is presented. The model calculates atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons and uses the formalism of ionization yield functions. The CRAC:EPII model is based on a full Monte Carlo simulation of electron propagation and interaction with the air molecules. It explicitly considers various physical processes, namely, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of bremsstrahlung high-energy photons, photoionization, annihilation of positrons, and multiple scattering. The simulations were performed using GEANT 4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS with NRLMSISE 00 atmospheric model. The CRAC:EPII model is applicable to the entire atmosphere. The results from the simulations are given as look-up table representing the ionization yield function. The table allows one to compute ionization due to precipitating electrons for a given altitude and location considering a given electron spectrum. Application of the model for computation of ion production during electron precipitation events using spectra from balloon-borne measurements is presented.

  17. Weakly ionized cerium plasma radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Germer, Rudolf; Koorikawa, Yoshitake; Murakami, Kazunori; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Obata, Fumiko; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Sigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-02-01

    In the plasma flash x-ray generator, high-voltage main condenser of about 200 nF is charged up to 55 kV by a power supply, and electric charges in the condenser are discharged to an x-ray tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The flash x-rays are then produced. The x-ray tube is of a demountable triode that is connected to a turbo molecular pump with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. As electron flows from the cathode electrode are roughly converged to a rod cerium target of 3.0 mm in diameter by electric field in the x-ray tube, the weakly ionized linear plasma, which consists of cerium ions and electrons, forms by target evaporating. At a charging voltage of 55 kV, the maximum tube voltage was almost equal to the charging voltage of the main condenser, and the peak current was about 20 kA. When the charging voltage was increased, weakly ionized cerium plasma formed, and the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities increased. The x-ray pulse widths were about 500 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of about 40 μC/kg at 1.0 m from x-ray source with a charging voltage of 55 kV. In the angiography, we employed a film-less computed radiography (CR) system and iodine-based microspheres. Because K-series characteristic x-rays are absorbed easily by the microspheres, high-contrast angiography has been performed.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection Against Radiation (10 CFR part 20), relating to protection against occupational radiation exposure... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources...

  19. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Protection Against Radiation (10 CFR part 20), relating to protection against occupational radiation exposure... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources...